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TMP Tompkins Financial

Filed: 9 Aug 21, 12:29pm

United States
Securities and Exchange Commission
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
 
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2021
 
OR
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 
 
For the transition period from _____ to ______
 
Commission File Number 1-12709

 
 tmp-20210630_g1.jpg 

Tompkins Financial Corporation
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
New York 16-1482357
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization) (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
P.O. Box 460, Ithaca, NY
(Address of principal executive offices)
14851
(Zip Code)
 
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (888) 503-5753
Former name, former address, and former fiscal year, if changed since last report: NA
Indicate the number of shares of the Registrant’s Common Stock outstanding as of the latest practicable date:
Title of each classTrading Symbol(s)Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, $0.10 par valueTMPNYSE American, LLC
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes   No .
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes   No .
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company”, and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
Large Accelerated FilerAccelerated Filer
Non-Accelerated FilerSmaller Reporting Company
Emerging Growth Company
  
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.) Yes No .

Indicate the number of shares of the Registrant's Common Stock outstanding as of the latest practicable date: 14,736,858 shares as of August 3, 2021.




TOMPKINS FINANCIAL CORPORATION
 
FORM 10-Q
 
INDEX





Item 1. Financial Statements

TOMPKINS FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CONDITION
(In thousands, except share and per share data)As ofAs of
ASSETS06/30/202112/31/2020
 (unaudited)(audited)
Cash and noninterest bearing balances due from banks$20,302 $21,245 
Interest bearing balances due from banks270,712 367,217 
Cash and Cash Equivalents291,014 388,462 
Available-for-sale debt securities, at fair value (amortized cost of $2,009,317 at June 30, 2021 and $1,599,894 at December 31, 2020)2,014,089 1,627,193 
Held-to-maturity securities, at amortized cost (fair value of $154,299 at June 30, 2021 and $0 December 31, 2020)151,848 
Equity securities, at fair value (amortized cost $916 at June 30, 2021 and $929 at December 31, 2020)916 929 
Total loans and leases, net of unearned income and deferred costs and fees5,175,129 5,260,327 
Less: Allowance for credit losses47,505 51,669 
Net Loans and Leases5,127,624 5,208,658 
Federal Home Loan Bank and other stock15,991 16,382 
Bank premises and equipment, net86,596 88,709 
Corporate owned life insurance85,726 84,736 
Goodwill92,447 92,447 
Other intangible assets, net4,274 4,905 
Accrued interest and other assets117,683 109,750 
Total Assets$7,988,208 $7,622,171 
LIABILITIES
Deposits:
Interest bearing:
  Checking, savings and money market4,016,052 3,761,933 
  Time710,170 746,234 
Noninterest bearing2,110,778 1,929,585 
Total Deposits6,837,000 6,437,752 
Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase52,134 65,845 
Other borrowings245,000 265,000 
Trust preferred debentures8,799 13,220 
Other liabilities117,022 122,665 
Total Liabilities$7,259,955 $6,904,482 
EQUITY
Tompkins Financial Corporation shareholders' equity:
Common Stock - par value $0.10 per share: Authorized 25,000,000 shares; Issued: 14,865,783 at June 30, 2021; and 14,964,389 at December 31, 20201,487 1,496 
Additional paid-in capital327,881 333,976 
Retained earnings450,773 418,413 
Accumulated other comprehensive loss(47,882)(32,074)
Treasury stock, at cost – 120,848 shares at June 30, 2021, and 124,849 shares at December 31, 2020(5,480)(5,534)
Total Tompkins Financial Corporation Shareholders’ Equity726,779 716,277 
Noncontrolling interests1,474 1,412 
Total Equity$728,253 $717,689 
Total Liabilities and Equity$7,988,208 $7,622,171 
 
See notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.
1


TOMPKINS FINANCIAL CORPORATION
 CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME 
Three Months EndedSix Months Ended
(In thousands, except per share data) (Unaudited)06/30/202106/30/202006/30/202106/30/2020
INTEREST AND DIVIDEND INCOME
Loans$53,653 $56,133 $107,860 $111,747 
Due from banks45 130 
Available-for-sale debt securities5,626 6,922 10,876 14,066 
Held-to-maturity securities312 312 
Federal Home Loan Bank and other stock199 389 412 824 
Total Interest and Dividend Income59,835 63,445 119,590 126,644 
INTEREST EXPENSE
Time certificates of deposits of $250,000 or more567 860 1,206 1,703 
Other deposits2,235 3,917 4,747 10,272 
Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase15 21 31 57 
Trust preferred debentures821 253 996 542 
Other borrowings1,351 2,028 2,727 4,735 
Total Interest Expense4,989 7,079 9,707 17,309 
Net Interest Income54,846 56,366 109,883 109,335 
Less: (Credit) provision for credit loss expense(3,071)877 (4,901)17,636 
Net Interest Income After Provision for Credit Loss Expense57,917 55,489 114,784 91,699 
NONINTEREST INCOME
Insurance commissions and fees8,054 7,255 17,220 15,300 
Investment services income4,717 3,920 9,390 8,122 
Service charges on deposit accounts1,471 1,248 2,941 3,231 
Card services income2,951 2,283 5,334 4,466 
Other income1,665 2,466 3,639 4,570 
Net gain on securities transactions317 448 
Total Noninterest Income18,858 17,177 38,841 36,137 
NONINTEREST EXPENSE
Salaries and wages23,992 23,037 46,652 45,531 
Other employee benefits6,626 5,886 12,110 11,570 
Net occupancy expense of premises3,561 3,040 7,023 6,368 
Furniture and fixture expense2,204 1,888 4,154 3,873 
Amortization of intangible assets329 375 659 749 
Other operating expense10,730 11,437 21,355 22,847 
Total Noninterest Expenses47,442 45,663 91,953 90,938 
Income Before Income Tax Expense29,333 27,003 61,672 36,898 
Income Tax Expense6,471 5,540 13,151 7,449 
Net Income Attributable to Noncontrolling Interests and Tompkins Financial Corporation22,862 21,463 48,521 29,449 
Less: Net Income Attributable to Noncontrolling Interests31 32 64 69 
Net Income Attributable to Tompkins Financial Corporation$22,831 $21,431 $48,457 $29,380 
Basic Earnings Per Share$1.55 $1.44 $3.28 $1.97 
Diluted Earnings Per Share$1.54 $1.44 $3.26 $1.97 
 
See notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.

2


TOMPKINS FINANCIAL CORPORATION
 CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME 
Three Months Ended
(In thousands) (Unaudited)06/30/202106/30/2020
Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests and Tompkins Financial Corporation$22,862 $21,463 
Other comprehensive (loss) income, net of tax:
Available-for-sale debt securities:
Change in net unrealized gain/(loss) during the period8,489 (257)
Reclassification adjustment for net realized gain on sale of available-for-sale debt securities included in net income0 
Employee benefit plans:
Amortization of net retirement plan actuarial loss537 439 
Amortization of net retirement plan prior service cost42 41 
Other comprehensive income9,068 223 
Subtotal comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interests and Tompkins Financial Corporation31,930 21,686 
Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests(31)(32)
Total comprehensive income attributable to Tompkins Financial Corporation$31,899 $21,654 

Six Months Ended
(In thousands) (Unaudited)06/30/202106/30/2020
Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests and Tompkins Financial Corporation$48,521 $29,449 
Other comprehensive income, net of tax:
Available-for-sale debt securities:
Change in net unrealized gain/loss during the period(16,757)21,866 
Reclassification adjustment for net realized gain on sale of available-for-sale debt securities included in net income(249)(324)
Employee benefit plans:
Amortization of net retirement plan actuarial loss1,114 893 
Amortization of net retirement plan prior service cost84 81 
Other comprehensive (loss) income(15,808)22,516 
Subtotal comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interests and Tompkins Financial Corporation32,713 51,965 
Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests(64)(69)
Total comprehensive income attributable to Tompkins Financial Corporation$32,649 $51,896 

See notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.

3


TOMPKINS FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
Six Months Ended
(In thousands) (Unaudited)06/30/202106/30/2020
OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income attributable to Tompkins Financial Corporation$48,457 $29,380 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
(Credit) provision for credit loss expense(4,901)17,636 
Depreciation and amortization of premises, equipment, and software5,102 5,105 
Amortization of intangible assets659 749 
Earnings from corporate owned life insurance(1,111)(1,058)
Net amortization on securities6,869 4,207 
Amortization/accretion related to purchase accounting147 (551)
Net gain on securities transactions(317)(448)
Net gain on sale of loans originated for sale(582)(867)
Proceeds from sale of loans originated for sale17,379 16,759 
Loans originated for sale(15,231)(18,517)
Net loss (gain) on sale of bank premises and equipment11 (3)
Net excess tax benefit from stock based compensation251 118 
Stock-based compensation expense2,434 2,294 
Decrease (increase) in accrued interest receivable4,450 (16,318)
Decrease in accrued interest payable(316)(491)
Other, net(12,808)5,090 
Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities50,493 43,085 
INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Proceeds from maturities, calls and principal paydowns of available-for-sale debt securities257,771 278,795 
Proceeds from sales of available-for-sale debt securities38,924 42,584 
Proceeds from maturities, calls and principal paydowns of held-to-maturity securities
Purchases of available-for-sale debt securities(712,688)(333,189)
Purchases of held-to-maturity securities(151,817)
Net decrease (increase) in loans85,006 (505,102)
Proceeds from sale/redemptions of Federal Home Loan Bank stock3,557 39,669 
Purchases of Federal Home Loan Bank and other stock(3,166)(25,018)
Proceeds from sale of bank premises and equipment63 
Purchases of bank premises, equipment and software(1,955)(1,859)
Redemption of corporate owned life insurance169 446 
Other, net124 323 
Net Cash Used in Investing Activities(484,012)(503,347)
FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Net increase in demand, money market, and savings deposits435,312 1,140,448 
Net (decrease) increase in time deposits(35,799)24,501 
Net decrease in Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase(13,711)(9,457)
Increase in other borrowings74,583 
Repayment of other borrowings(20,000)(407,683)
Redemption of trust preferred debentures(5,150)
Cash dividends(16,097)(15,539)
Repurchase of common stock(7,983)(5,620)
Shares issued for dividend reinvestment plan681 
Net shares issued related to restricted stock awards(292)
Net proceeds from exercise of stock options(503)(216)
Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities336,071 801,406 
Net (Decrease) Increase in Cash and Cash Equivalents(97,448)341,144 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period388,462 137,982 
Total Cash and Cash Equivalents at End of Period$291,014 $479,126 
 
See notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.
4


TOMPKINS FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
 
Six Months Ended
(In thousands) (Unaudited)06/30/202106/30/2020
Supplemental Information:
Cash paid during the year for  - Interest$10,288 $18,148 
Cash paid during the year for  - Taxes19,341 1,610 
Transfer of loans to other real estate owned0 192 
Initial recognition of operating lease right-of-use assets0
Initial recognition of operating lease liabilities0
Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new lease liabilities21 554 
 
See notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements.
 
5


TOMPKINS FINANCIAL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
(Unaudited)
(In thousands except share and per share data) (Unaudited)Common
Stock
Additional Paid-in CapitalRetained
Earnings
Accumulated Other Comprehensive (Loss) IncomeTreasury
Stock
Non-
controlling Interests
Total
Balances at April 1, 2020$1,494 $333,662 $372,344 $(21,271)$(5,076)$1,444 $682,597 
Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests and Tompkins Financial Corporation21,431 32 21,463 
Other comprehensive income223 223 
Total Comprehensive Income21,686 
Cash dividends ($0.52 per share)(7,750)(7,750)
Net exercise of stock options (177 shares)(7)(7)
Shares issued for dividend reinvestment plan (12,029 shares)1680 681 
Stock-based compensation expense1,114 1,114 
Directors deferred compensation plan (1,152 shares)111 (111)
Restricted stock activity (5,695 shares)(292)(292)
Balances at June 30, 2020$1,495 $335,268 $386,025 $(21,048)$(5,187)$1,476 $698,029 
Balances at April 1, 2021$1,494 $333,247 $435,990 $(56,950)$(5,288)$1,443 $709,936 
Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests and Tompkins Financial Corporation22,831 31 22,862 
Other comprehensive loss9,068 9,068 
Total Comprehensive Income31,930 
Cash dividends ($0.54 per share)(8,048)(8,048)
Net exercise of stock options (5,377 shares)(352)(351)
Common stock repurchased and returned to unissued status (80,004 shares)(8)(6,467)(6,475)
Shares issued for dividend reinvestment plan (32 shares)
Stock-based compensation expense1,259 1,259 
Directors deferred compensation plan (2,394 shares)192 (192)
Restricted stock activity ((2,317) shares)
Balances at June 30, 2021$1,487 $327,881 $450,773 $(47,882)$(5,480)$1,474 $728,253 
6


(In thousands except share and per share data)(Unaudited)Common
Stock
Additional Paid-in CapitalRetained
Earnings
Accumulated Other Comprehensive (Loss) IncomeTreasury
Stock
Non-
controlling Interests
Total
Balances at January 1, 2020$1,501 $338,507 $370,477 $(43,564)$(5,279)$1,412 $663,054 
Impact of adoption of ASU 2016-131,707 1,707 
Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests and Tompkins Financial Corporation29,380 69 29,449 
Other comprehensive income22,516 22,516 
Total Comprehensive Income51,965 
Cash dividends ($1.04 per share)(15,539)(15,539)
Net exercise of stock options (3,188 shares)(216)(216)
Common stock repurchased and returned to unissued status (71,288 shares)(7)(5,613)(5,620)
Shares issued for dividend reinvestment plan (12,029 shares)680 681 
Stock-based compensation expense2,294 2,294 
Directors deferred compensation plan (4,864 shares)(92)92 
Restricted stock activity (8,060 shares)(292)(292)
Partial repurchase of noncontrolling interest(5)(5)
Balances at June 30, 2020$1,495 $335,268 $386,025 $(21,048)$(5,187)$1,476 $698,029 
Balances at January 1, 2021$1,496 $333,976 $418,413 $(32,074)$(5,534)$1,412 $717,689 
Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests and Tompkins Financial Corporation48,457 64 48,521 
Other comprehensive loss(15,808)(15,808)
Total Comprehensive Income32,713 
Cash dividends ($0.54 per share)(16,097)(16,097)
Net exercise of stock options (8,110 shares)(504)(503)
Common stock repurchased and returned to unissued status (101,535 shares)(10)(7,973)(7,983)
Shares issued for dividend reinvestment plan (32 shares)
Stock-based compensation expense2,434 2,434 
Directors deferred compensation plan ((4,001) shares)(54)54 
Restricted stock activity ((5,213) shares)
Partial repurchase of noncontrolling interest(2)(2)
Balances at June 30, 2021$1,487 $327,881 $450,773 $(47,882)$(5,480)$1,474 $728,253 
 
See notes to unaudited consolidated financial statements
7


NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

1. Business
 
Tompkins Financial Corporation (“Tompkins” or the “Company”) is headquartered in Ithaca, New York and is registered as a Financial Holding Company with the Federal Reserve Board under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended. The Company is a locally oriented, community-based financial services organization that offers a full array of products and services, including commercial and consumer banking, leasing, trust and investment management, financial planning and wealth management, and insurance services. At June 30, 2021, the Company had 4 wholly-owned banking subsidiaries: Tompkins Trust Company (the “Trust Company”), The Bank of Castile (DBA Tompkins Bank of Castile), Mahopac Bank (DBA Tompkins Mahopac Bank), and VIST Bank (DBA Tompkins VIST Bank). The Company’s banks have announced plans for a rebranding effort, pursuant to which the Company’s 4 wholly-owned banking subsidiaries will be combined into one bank, with The Bank of Castile, Mahopac Bank, and VIST Bank merging with and into Tompkins Trust Company. The combined bank will conduct business under the “Tompkins” brand name, with a legal name of “Tompkins Community Bank.” The Company filed applications with applicable regulators on July 12, 2021, with the re-branding and combination anticipated to take effect later in 2021, subject to regulatory approval. The Company also has a wholly-owned insurance agency subsidiary, Tompkins Insurance Agencies, Inc. (“Tompkins Insurance”). The Trust Company provides a full array of trust and investment services under the Tompkins Financial Advisors brand, including investment management, trust and estate, financial and tax planning as well as life, disability and long-term care insurance services. The Company’s principal offices are located at 118 E. Seneca Street, Ithaca, New York, 14850, and its telephone number is (888) 503-5753. The Company’s common stock is traded on the NYSE American under the symbol “TMP.”

As a registered financial holding company, the Company is regulated under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (“BHC Act”), as amended and is subject to examination and comprehensive regulation by the Federal Reserve Board (“FRB”). The Company is also subject to the jurisdiction of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) and is subject to disclosure and regulatory requirements under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. The Company is subject to the rules of the NYSE American for listed companies.

The Company’s banking subsidiaries are subject to examination and comprehensive regulation by various regulatory authorities, including the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”), the New York State Department of Financial Services (“NYSDFS”), and the Pennsylvania Department of Banking and Securities (“PDBS”). Each of these agencies issues regulations and requires the filing of reports describing the activities and financial condition of the entities under its jurisdiction. Likewise, such agencies conduct examinations on a recurring basis to evaluate the safety and soundness of the institutions, and to test compliance with various regulatory requirements, including: consumer protection, privacy, fair lending, the Community Reinvestment Act, the Bank Secrecy Act, sales of non-deposit investments, electronic data processing, and trust department activities.

The trust division of Tompkins Trust Company is subject to examination and comprehensive regulation by the FDIC and NYSDFS.

The Company’s insurance subsidiary is subject to examination and regulation by the NYSDFS and the Pennsylvania Insurance Department.
 
2. Basis of Presentation
 
The unaudited consolidated financial statements included in this quarterly report do not include all of the information and footnotes required by U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles ("GAAP") for a full year presentation and certain disclosures have been condensed or omitted in accordance with rules and regulations of the SEC. In the application of certain accounting policies, management is required to make assumptions regarding the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain. These estimates and assumptions affect the reported amounts of certain assets, liabilities, revenues, and expenses in the unaudited consolidated financial statements. Different amounts could be reported under different conditions, or if different assumptions were used in the application of these accounting policies. The accounting policies that management considers critical in this respect are the determination of the allowance for credit losses and the review of its securities portfolio for other than temporary impairment.
 
In management’s opinion, the unaudited consolidated financial statements reflect all adjustments of a normal recurring nature. The results of operations for the interim periods are not necessarily indicative of the results of operations to be expected for the full year ended December 31, 2021. The unaudited consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the
8


audited consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.

Cash and cash equivalents in the consolidated statements of cash flow include cash and noninterest bearing balances due from banks, interest-bearing balances due from banks, and money market funds. Management regularly evaluates the credit risk associated with the counterparties to these transactions and believes that the Company is not exposed to any significant credit risk on cash and cash equivalents.
 
The Company has evaluated subsequent events for potential recognition and/or disclosures. On August 7, 2021, the Company redeemed all of the trust preferred of Leesport Capital Trust II, with a par value of $10.0 million. The redemption resulted in a non-cash charge to interest income of $1.2 million, reflecting the acceleration of a purchase accounting discount.
 
The consolidated financial information included herein combines the results of operations, the assets, liabilities, and shareholders’ equity of the Company and its subsidiaries. Amounts in the prior periods’ unaudited consolidated financial statements are reclassified when necessary to conform to the current periods’ presentation. All significant intercompany balances and transactions are eliminated in consolidation.

3. Securities

Available-for-Sale Debt Securities
The following table summarizes available-for-sale debt securities held by the Company at June 30, 2021:
Available-for-Sale Debt Securities
June 30, 2021Amortized
Cost
Gross
Unrealized
Gains
Gross
Unrealized
Losses
Fair Value
(In thousands)
U.S. Treasuries$129,228 $138 $275 $129,091 
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities824,157 7,534 7,973 823,718 
Obligations of U.S. states and political subdivisions111,269 2,599 79 113,789 
Mortgage-backed securities – residential, issued by
   U.S. Government agencies113,357 1,782 717 114,422 
   U.S. Government sponsored entities828,806 9,879 8,029 830,656 
U.S. corporate debt securities2,500 87 2,413 
Total available-for-sale debt securities$2,009,317 $21,932 $17,160 $2,014,089 
 
The following table summarizes available-for-sale debt securities held by the Company at December 31, 2020:
Available-for-Sale Debt Securities
December 31, 2020Amortized
Cost
Gross
Unrealized
Gains
Gross
Unrealized
Losses
Fair Value
(In thousands)
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities$599,652 $9,820 $1,992 $607,480 
Obligations of U.S. states and political subdivisions126,642 3,144 40 129,746 
Mortgage-backed securities – residential, issued by
   U.S. Government agencies179,538 3,216 646 182,108 
   U.S. Government sponsored entities691,562 14,593 675 705,480 
U.S. corporate debt securities2,500 121 2,379 
Total available-for-sale debt securities$1,599,894 $30,773 $3,474 $1,627,193 






9



Held-to-Maturity Debt Securities
The following table summarizes held-to-maturity debt securities held by the Company at June 30, 2021:

Held-to-Maturity Securities
June 30, 2021Amortized
Cost
Gross
Unrealized
Gains
Gross
Unrealized
Losses
Fair Value
(In thousands)
U.S. Treasuries$50,856 $603 $$51,459 
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities100,992 1,848 102,840 
Total held-to-maturity debt securities$151,848 $2,451 $0 $154,299 

There were 0 held-to-maturity debt securities at December 31, 2020.

Management measures expected credit losses on held-to-maturity debt securities on a collective basis by major security type with each type sharing similar risk characteristics and considers historical credit loss information that is adjusted for current conditions and reasonable and supportable forecasts. Management has made the accounting policy election to exclude accrued interest receivable on held-to-maturity debt securities from the estimate of credit losses. As of June 30, 2021, the held-to-maturity portfolio consisted of U.S. Treasury securities and securities issued by U.S. government-sponsored enterprises, including The Federal National Mortgage Agency and the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding Corporation. U.S. Treasury securities are backed by the full faith and credit of and/or guaranteed by the U.S. government, and it is expected that the securities will not be settled at prices less than the amortized cost bases of the securities. Securities issued by U.S. government agencies or U.S. government-sponsored enterprises carry the explicit and/or implicit guarantee of the U.S. government, are widely recognized as “risk-free,” and have a long history of zero credit loss. As such, the Company did not record an allowance for credit losses for these securities as of June 30, 2021.

The available-for-sale portfolio also includes callable securities that may be called by the issuer prior to maturity. The Company may from time to time sell debt securities from its available-for-sale portfolio. Realized gains on sale of available-for-sale debt securities were $0 and $330,000 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and $0 and $178,000 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020. Realized losses on available-for-sale debt securities were $0 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and $0 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020. Proceeds from the sale of available-for-sale debt securities were $2.2 million and $38.9 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, and $0 and $42.6 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020. Sales of available-for-sale investment securities were the result of general investment portfolio and interest rate risk management. The Company's investment portfolio includes callable securities that may be called prior to maturity. Realized gains on called available-for-sale debt securities were $0 and $251,000 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020. The Company also recognized net losses of $0 and $12,000 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, on equity securities, reflecting the change in fair value.

The following table summarizes available-for-sale debt securities that had unrealized losses at June 30, 2021.
Less than 12 Months12 Months or LongerTotal
(In thousands)Fair ValueUnrealized LossesFair ValueUnrealized LossesFair ValueUnrealized Losses
U.S. Treasuries$69,198 $275 $$$69,198 $275 
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities517,624 7,973 517,624 7,973 
Obligations of U.S. states and political subdivisions9,216 79 9,216 79 
Mortgage-backed securities – residential, issued by
U.S. Government agencies33,681 373 3,533 344 37,214 717 
U.S. Government sponsored entities404,870 7,701 6,596 328 411,466 8,029 
U.S. corporate debt securities2,413 87 2,413 87 
Total available-for-sale debt securities$1,034,589 $16,401 $12,542 $759 $1,047,131 $17,160 
10


The following table summarizes available-for-sale debt securities that had unrealized losses at December 31, 2020.
Less than 12 Months12 Months or LongerTotal
(In thousands)Fair ValueUnrealized LossesFair ValueUnrealized LossesFair ValueUnrealized Losses
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities$310,711 $1,992 $$$310,711 $1,992 
Obligations of U.S. states and political subdivisions8,868 40 8,868 40 
Mortgage-backed securities – residential, issued by
   U.S. Government agencies10,560 396 1,819 250 12,379 646 
U.S. Government sponsored entities87,643 586 5,068 89 92,711 675 
U.S. corporate debt securities2,379 121 2,379 121 
Total available-for-sale debt securities$417,782 $3,014 $9,266 $460 $427,048 $3,474 

There were 0 unrealized losses on held-to-maturity debt securities at June 30, 2021 and there were 0 held-to-maturity debt securities at December 31, 2020.

The Company evaluates available-for-sale debt securities for expected credit losses (“ECL”) in unrealized loss positions at each measurement date to determine whether the decline in the fair value below the amortized cost basis (impairment) is due to credit-related factors or noncredit-related factors.

Factors that may be indicative of ECL include, but are not limited to, the following:

Extent to which the fair value is less than the amortized cost basis.
Adverse conditions specifically related to the security, an industry, or geographic area (changes in technology,
business practice).
Payment structure of the debt security with respect to underlying issuer or obligor.
Failure of the issuer to make scheduled payment of principal and/or interest.
Changes to the rating of a security or issuer by a nationally recognized statistical rating organization.
Changes in tax or regulatory guidelines that impact a security or underlying issuer.

For available for sale debt securities in an unrealized loss position, the Company evaluates the securities to determine whether the decline in the fair value below the amortized cost basis (technical impairment) is the result of changes in interest rates or reflects a fundamental change in the credit worthiness of the underlying issuer. Any impairment that is not credit related is recognized in other comprehensive income, net of applicable taxes. Credit-related impairment is recognized as an allowance for credit losses (“ACL”) on the Statement of Condition, limited to the amount by which the amortized cost basis exceeds the fair value, with a corresponding adjustment to earnings. Both the ACL and the adjustment to net income may be reversed if conditions change.

The gross unrealized losses reported for residential mortgage-backed securities relate to investment securities issued by U.S. government sponsored entities such as Federal National Mortgage Association, Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, and
U.S. government agencies such as Government National Mortgage Association. The total gross unrealized losses, shown in the tables above, were primarily attributable to changes in interest rates and levels of market liquidity, relative to when the investment securities were purchased, and not due to the credit-related quality of the investment securities. In addition, the Company maintains the ability and intent to hold these positions until the recovery of unrealized losses and does not believe that the Company would be required to sell any securities currently in an unrealized loss position.

The amortized cost and estimated fair value of debt securities by contractual maturity are shown in the following table. Expected maturities may differ from contractual maturities because issuers may have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without call or prepayment penalties. Mortgage-backed securities are shown separately since they are not due at a single maturity date.
11


June 30, 2021
(In thousands)Amortized CostFair Value
Available-for-sale debt securities:
Due in one year or less$58,024 $58,673 
Due after one year through five years498,147 502,123 
Due after five years through ten years448,441 445,387 
Due after ten years62,542 62,828 
Total1,067,154 1,069,011 
Mortgage-backed securities942,163 945,078 
Total available-for-sale debt securities$2,009,317 $2,014,089 

December 31, 2020
(In thousands)Amortized CostFair Value
Available-for-sale debt securities:
Due in one year or less$54,484 $55,008 
Due after one year through five years379,044 388,132 
Due after five years through ten years228,572 229,107 
Due after ten years66,694 67,358 
Total728,794 739,605 
Mortgage-backed securities871,100 887,588 
Total available-for-sale debt securities$1,599,894 $1,627,193 

June 30, 2021
(In thousands)Amortized CostFair Value
Held-to-maturity debt securities:
Due after five years through ten years151,848 154,299 
Total held-to-maturity debt securities$151,848 $154,299 

There were 0 held-to-maturity debt securities at December 31, 2020.

The Company also holds non-marketable Federal Home Loan Bank New York (“FHLBNY”) stock, non-marketable Federal Home Loan Bank Pittsburgh (“FHLBPITT”) stock and non-marketable Atlantic Community Bankers Bank ("ACBB") stock, all of which are required to be held for regulatory purposes and for borrowing availability. The required investment in FHLB stock is tied to the Company’s borrowing levels with the FHLB. Holdings of FHLBNY stock, FHLBPITT stock, and ACBB stock totaled $11.3 million, $4.6 million and $95,000, respectively, at June 30, 2021. These securities are carried at par, which is also cost. The FHLBNY and FHLBPITT continue to pay dividends and repurchase stock. Quarterly, we evaluate our investment in the FHLB for impairment. We evaluate recent and long-term operating performance, liquidity, funding and capital positions, stock repurchase history, dividend history and impact of legislative and regulatory changes. Based on our most recent evaluation, as of June 30, 2021, we determined that no impairment write-downs were required.

12


4. Loans and Leases
Loans and leases at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were as follows:
(In thousands)06/30/202112/31/2020
Commercial and industrial
Agriculture$79,351 $94,489 
Commercial and industrial other755,885 792,987 
PPP loans*258,964 291,252 
Subtotal commercial and industrial1,094,200 1,178,728 
Commercial real estate
Construction158,654 163,016 
Agriculture201,863 201,866 
Commercial real estate other2,213,798 2,204,310 
Subtotal commercial real estate2,574,315 2,569,192 
Residential real estate
Home equity187,581 200,827 
Mortgages1,246,450 1,235,160 
Subtotal residential real estate1,434,031 1,435,987 
Consumer and other
Indirect6,497 8,401 
Consumer and other64,371 61,399 
Subtotal consumer and other70,868 69,800 
Leases14,728 14,203 
Total loans and leases5,188,142 5,267,910 
Less: unearned income and deferred costs and fees(13,013)(7,583)
Total loans and leases, net of unearned income and deferred costs and fees$5,175,129 $5,260,327 
*Paycheck Protection Program ("PPP")

The Company has adopted comprehensive lending policies, underwriting standards and loan review procedures. Management reviews these policies and procedures on a regular basis. The Company discussed its lending policies and underwriting guidelines for its various lending portfolios in Note 3 – “Loans and Leases” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020. There have been no significant changes in these policies and guidelines since the date of that report. As such, these policies are reflective of new originations as well as those balances held at December 31, 2020. The Company’s Board of Directors approves the lending policies at least annually. The Company recognizes that exceptions to policy guidelines may occasionally occur and has established procedures for approving exceptions to these policy guidelines. Management has also implemented reporting systems to monitor loan origination, loan quality, concentrations of credit, loan delinquencies and nonperforming loans and potential problem loans.
 
Loans are considered past due if the required principal and interest payments have not been received as of the date such payments are due. Generally loans are placed on nonaccrual status if principal or interest payments become 90 days or more past due and/or management deems the collectability of the principal and/or interest to be in question as well as when required by regulatory agencies. When interest accrual is discontinued, all unpaid accrued interest is reversed. Payments received on loans on nonaccrual are generally applied to reduce the principal balance of the loan. Loans are generally returned to accrual status when all the principal and interest amounts due are brought current, the borrower has established a payment history, and future payments are reasonably assured. When management determines that the collection of principal in full is not probable, management will charge-off a partial amount or full amount of the loan balance. Management considers specific facts and circumstances relative to each individual credit in making such a determination. For residential and consumer loans, management uses specific regulatory guidance and thresholds for determining charge-offs.
 

13


The below table is an age analysis of past due loans, segregated by class of loans, as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020.
 
June 30, 2021
(In thousands)30-59 Days60-89 Days90 Days or MoreTotal Past DueCurrent LoansTotal Loans
Loans and Leases
Commercial and industrial
Agriculture$$$$$79,351 $79,351
Commercial and industrial other567 618 1,185 754,700 755,885 
PPP loans258,964 258,964 
Subtotal commercial and industrial567 618 1,185 1,093,015 1,094,200 
Commercial real estate
Construction334 334 158,320 158,654
Agriculture136 136 201,727 201,863
Commercial real estate other5,296 5,296 2,208,502 2,213,798
Subtotal commercial real estate470 5,296 5,766 2,568,549 2,574,315 
Residential real estate
Home equity1,031 1,034 186,547 187,581
Mortgages33 389 4,474 4,896 1,241,554 1,246,450
Subtotal residential real estate36 389 5,505 5,930 1,428,101 1,434,031 
Consumer and other
Indirect106 42 130 278 6,219 6,497
Consumer and other78 97 179 64,192 64,371
Subtotal consumer and other184 46 227 457 70,411 70,868 
Leases14,728 14,728 
Total loans and leases1,257 435 11,646 13,338 5,174,804 5,188,142 
Less: unearned income and deferred costs and fees(13,013)(13,013)
Total loans and leases, net of unearned income and deferred costs and fees$1,257 $435 $11,646 $13,338 $5,161,791 $5,175,129 
14


December 31, 2020
(In thousands)30-59 Days60-89 Days90 Days or MoreTotal Past DueCurrent LoansTotal Loans
Loans and Leases
Commercial and industrial
Agriculture$$18 $$18 $94,471 $94,489 
Commercial and industrial other44 1,516 1,567 791,420 792,987 
PPP loans291,252 291,252 
Subtotal commercial and industrial44 25 1,516 1,585 1,177,143 1,178,728 
Commercial real estate
Construction163,016 163,016 
Agriculture263 263 201,603 201,866 
Commercial real estate other7,125 7,125 2,197,185 2,204,310 
Subtotal commercial real estate263 7,125 7,388 2,561,804 2,569,192 
Residential real estate
Home equity713 224 1,126 2,063 198,764 200,827 
Mortgages521 879 4,210 5,610 1,229,550 1,235,160 
Subtotal residential real estate1,234 1,103 5,336 7,673 1,428,314 1,435,987 
Consumer and other
Indirect175 35 91 301 8,100 8,401 
Consumer and other115 18 232 365 61,034 61,399 
Subtotal consumer and other290 53 323 666 69,134 69,800 
Leases14,203 14,203 
Total loans and leases1,831 1,181 14,300 17,312 5,250,598 5,267,910 
Less: unearned income and deferred costs and fees(7,583)(7,583)
Total loans and leases, net of unearned income and deferred costs and fees$1,831 $1,181 $14,300 $17,312 $5,243,015 $5,260,327 

























15


The following table presents the amortized cost basis of loans on nonaccrual status and the amortized cost basis of loans on nonaccrual status for which there was no related allowance for credit losses as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

June 30, 2021
(In thousands)Nonaccrual Loans and Leases with no Allowance for Credit LossesNonaccrual Loans and LeasesLoans and Leases Past Due Over 89 Days and Accruing
Loans and Leases
Commercial and industrial
Commercial and industrial other$171 $708 $
Subtotal commercial and industrial171 708 
Commercial real estate
Agriculture1,041 1,154 
Commercial real estate other24,907 34,247 
Subtotal commercial real estate25,948 35,401 
Residential real estate
Home equity707 2,534 
Mortgages1,030 9,022 
Subtotal residential real estate1,737 11,556 
Consumer and other
Indirect226 
Consumer and other128 
Subtotal consumer and other354 
Leases
Total loans and leases$27,859 $48,019 $0 

16


December 31, 2020
(In thousands)Nonaccrual Loans and Leases with no Allowance for Credit LossesNonaccrual Loans and LeasesLoans and Leases Past Due Over 89 Days and Accruing
Loans and Leases
Commercial and industrial
Commercial and industrial other$803 $1,775 $
Subtotal commercial and industrial803 1,775 
Commercial real estate
Agriculture118 
Commercial real estate other23,080 23,509 
Subtotal commercial real estate23,080 23,627 
Residential real estate
Home equity767 2,965 
Mortgages1,365 10,180 
Subtotal residential real estate2,132 13,145 
Consumer and other
Indirect169 
Consumer and other260 
Subtotal consumer and other429 
Leases
Total loans and leases$26,018 $38,976 $0 

The Company recognized $0 of interest income on nonaccrual loans during the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020.

5. Allowance for Credit Losses
 
Management reviews the appropriateness of the allowance for credit losses (“allowance” or "ACL") on a regular basis. Management considers the accounting policy relating to the allowance to be a critical accounting policy, given the inherent uncertainty in evaluating the levels of the allowance required to cover credit losses in the portfolio and the material effect that assumptions could have on the Company’s results of operations. The Company has developed a methodology to measure the amount of estimated credit loss exposure inherent in the loan portfolio to assure that an appropriate allowance is maintained. The Company’s methodology is based upon guidance provided in SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 119, Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments ("CECL"), and Financial Instruments - Credit Losses and ASC Topic 326, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (ASU 2016-3).

The Company uses a discounted cash flow ("DCF") method to estimate expected credit losses for all loan segments excluding the leasing segment. For each of these loan segments, the Company generates cash flow projections at the instrument level wherein payment expectations are adjusted for estimated prepayment speed, curtailments, recovery lag probability of default, and loss given default. The modeling of expected prepayment speeds, curtailment rates, and time to recovery are based on internal historical data.

The Company uses regression analysis of historical internal and peer data to determine suitable loss drivers to utilize when modeling lifetime probability of default and loss given default. This analysis also determines how expected probability of default and loss given default will react to forecasted levels of the loss drivers. For all loans utilizing the DCF method, management utilizes forecasts of national unemployment and a one year percentage change in national gross domestic product as loss drivers in the model.

17


For all DCF models, management has determined that four quarters represents a reasonable and supportable forecast period and reverts back to a historical loss rate over eight quarters on a straight-line basis. Management leverages economic projections from a reputable and independent third party to inform its loss driver forecasts over the four-quarter forecast period. Other internal and external indicators of economic forecasts are also considered by management when developing the forecast metrics.

The combination of adjustments for credit expectations and timing expectations produces an expected cash flow stream at the instrument level. Instrument effective yield is calculated, net of the impacts of prepayment assumptions, and the instrument expected cash flows are then discounted at that effective yield to produce a net present value of expected cash flows ("NPV"). An ACL is established for the difference between the NPV and amortized cost basis.

Since the methodology is based upon historical experience and trends, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts, as well as management’s judgment, factors may arise that result in different estimates. While management’s evaluation of the allowance as of June 30, 2021, considers the allowance to be appropriate, under certain conditions or assumptions, the Company would need to increase or decrease the allowance. In addition, various federal and State regulatory agencies, as part of their examination process, review the Company's allowance and may require the Company to recognize additions to the allowance based on their judgements and information available to them at the time of their examinations.

Loan Commitments and Allowance for Credit Losses on Off-Balance Sheet Credit Exposures

Financial instruments include off-balance sheet credit instruments, such as commitments to make loans, and commercial letters of credit. The Company's exposure to credit loss in the event of nonperformance by the other party to the financial instrument for off-balance sheet loan commitments is represented by the contractual amount of those instruments. Such financial instruments are recorded when they are funded. The Company records an allowance for credit losses on off-balance sheet credit exposures, unless the commitments to extend credit are unconditionally cancelable, through a charge to credit loss expense for off-balance sheet credit exposures included in provision expense in the Company's consolidated statements of income.

The following table details activity in the allowance for credit losses on loans for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020. The Company adopted ASU 2016-13 on January 1, 2020 using the modified retrospective approach. The transition adjustment included a decrease in the allowance of $2.5 million. Allocation of a portion of the allowance to one category of loans does not preclude its availability to absorb losses in other categories.

Three Months Ended June 30, 2021
(In thousands)Commercial
& Industrial
Commercial
Real Estate
Residential
Real Estate
Consumer
and Other
Finance
Leases
Total
Allowance for credit losses:
Beginning balance$7,750 $30,467 $9,470 $1,583 $69 $49,339 
Charge-offs(2)(48)(60)(110)
Recoveries826 125 39 994 
Provision (credit) for credit loss expense(639)(2,092)(13)28 (2)(2,718)
Ending Balance$7,113 $29,201 $9,534 $1,590 $67 $47,505 

Three Months Ended June 30, 2020
(In thousands)Commercial
& Industrial
Commercial
Real Estate
Residential
Real Estate
Consumer
and Other
Finance
Leases
Total
Allowance for credit losses:
Beginning balance$11,665 $22,446 $16,330 $1,883 $80 $52,404 
Charge-offs(15)(1)(127)(143)
Recoveries21 12 84 52 169 
Provision (credit) for credit loss expense(573)1,843 (1,401)(212)(5)(348)
Ending Balance$11,113 $24,286 $15,012 $1,596 $75 $52,082 

18


Six Months Ended June 30, 2021
(In thousands)Commercial
& Industrial
Commercial
Real Estate
Residential
Real Estate
Consumer
and Other
Finance
Leases
Total
Allowance for credit losses:
Beginning balances$9,239 $30,546 $10,257 $1,562 $65 $51,669 
Charge-offs(118)(46)(152)(316)
Recoveries101 1,039 158 82 1,380 
Provision (credit) for credit loss expense(2,109)(2,384)(835)98 (5,228)
Ending Balance$7,113 $29,201 $9,534 $1,590 $67 $47,505 

Six Months Ended June 30, 2020
(In thousands)Commercial
& Industrial
Commercial
Real Estate
Residential
Real Estate
Consumer
and Other
Finance
Leases
Total
Allowance for credit losses:
Beginning balance, prior to adoption of ASC 326$10,541 $21,608 $6,381 $1,362 $$39,892 
Impact of adopting ASC 326(2,008)(5,917)4,459 850 82 (2,534)
Charge-offs(1)(1,305)(3)(264)(1,573)
Recoveries37 30 163 121 351 
Provision (credit) for credit loss expense2,544 9,870 4,012 (473)(7)15,946 
Ending Balance$11,113 $24,286 $15,012 $1,596 $75 $52,082 

The following table presents the amortized cost basis of collateral dependent loans, which are individually evaluated to determine expected credit losses, and the related allowance for credit losses allocated to these loans:

(In thousands)Real EstateBusiness AssetsOtherTotalACL Allocation
June 30, 2021
Commercial and Industrial$46 $501 $478 $1,025 $155 
Commercial Real Estate35,167 35,167 1,666 
Commercial Real Estate - Agriculture1,559 1,559 
Total$35,213 $501 $478 $36,192 $1,821 

(In thousands)Real EstateBusiness AssetsOtherTotalACL Allocation
December 31, 2020
Commercial and Industrial$103 $582 $110 $795 $122 
Commercial Real Estate24,277 1,418 25,695 186 
Total$24,380 $2,000 $110 $26,490 $308 

Loans are considered modified in a troubled debt restructuring ("TDR") when, due to a borrower’s financial difficulties, the Company makes concessions to the borrower that it would not otherwise consider. These modifications may include, among others, an extension for the term of the loan, and granting a period when interest-only payments can be made with the principal payments made over the remaining term of the loan or at maturity.
 
19


There were no new TDRs in the second quarter of 2021 or 2020, and no new TDRs for the six months ended June 30, 2021. The following tables present information on loans modified in a TDR during the six months ended June 30, 2020. Post-modification amounts are presented as of June 30, 2020.

Six Months Ended
June 30, 2020
Defaulted TDRs2
(In thousands)Number of
Loans
Pre-
Modification
Outstanding
Recorded
Investment
Post-Modification Outstanding Recorded InvestmentNumber of
Loans
Post-
Modification
Outstanding
Recorded
Investment
Commercial real estate
  Commercial real estate other1
$$$37 
Residential real estate
  Home equity1
121 121 87 
Total2 $121 $121 2 $124 
1 Represents the following concessions:  extension of term and reduction of rate.
2 TDRs that defaulted during the six months ended June 30, 2020 that were restructured in the prior twelve months.







































20


The following table presents credit quality indicators by total loans on an amortized cost basis by origination year as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

June 30, 2021
(In thousands)20212020201920182017PriorRevolving Loans Amortized Cost BasisRevolving Loans Converted to TermTotal Loans
Commercial & Industrial - Other:
Pass$61,749 $69,200 $62,167 $48,666 $46,939 $308,161 $147,361 $3,414 $747,657 
Special Mention28 860 328 309 552 1,367 799 4,243 
Substandard15 385 300 801 231 695 1,558 3,985 
Total Commercial & Industrial - Other$61,792 $70,445 $62,795 $49,776 $47,722 $310,223 $149,718 $3,414 $755,885 
Commercial and Industrial - PPP:
Pass$205,576 $53,388 $$$$$$$258,964 
Special Mention
Substandard
Total Commercial and Industrial - PPP$205,576 $53,388 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $258,964 
Commercial and Industrial - Agriculture:
Pass$2,993 $9,004 $6,581 $9,802 $6,724 $4,347 $35,006 $268 $74,725 
Special Mention25 21 225 271 
Substandard93 24 118 2,337 1,783 4,355 
Total Commercial and Industrial - Agriculture$2,993 $9,097 $6,605 $9,827 $6,863 $6,684 $37,014 $268 $79,351 
Commercial Real Estate
Pass$145,134 $269,940 $258,852 $206,663 $228,178 $858,179 $73,474 $22,560 $2,062,980 
Special Mention1,777 11,336 3,868 4,578 78,555 362 100,476 
Substandard4,933 18,535 6,171 20,521 182 50,342 
Total Commercial Real Estate$145,134 $271,717 $275,121 $229,066 $238,927 $957,255 $74,018 $22,560 $2,213,798 
Commercial Real Estate - Agriculture:
Pass$11,618 $20,794 $32,737 $43,163 $24,080 $57,892 $3,970 $2,586 $196,840 
Special Mention1,930 49 1,983 
Substandard40 2,365 635 3,040 
Total Commercial Real Estate - Agriculture$11,618 $22,724 $32,737 $43,203 $24,080 $60,261 $4,654 $2,586 $201,863 
Commercial Real Estate - Construction
Pass$5,069 $13,480 $18,804 $7,745 $1,739 $9,308 $92,062 $9,020 $157,227 
Special Mention340 774 1,114 
Substandard313 313 
Total Commercial Real Estate - Construction$5,069 $13,480 $18,804 $7,745 $1,739 $9,961 $92,836 $9,020 $158,654 
21


December 31, 2020
(In thousands)20202019201820172016PriorRevolving Loans Amortized Cost BasisRevolving Loans Converted to TermTotal Loans
Commercial & Industrial - Other:
Internal risk grade:
Pass$91,597 $72,639 $56,191 $60,714 $33,402 $301,027 $149,969 $16,301 $781,840 
Special Mention1,064 367 344 912 2,045 228 1,331 6,291 
Substandard412 305 933 485 292 783 1,646 4,856 
Total Commercial & Industrial - Other$93,073 $73,311 $57,468 $62,111 $35,739 $302,038 $152,946 $16,301 $792,987 
Commercial and Industrial - Agriculture:
Pass$11,536 $8,005 $11,162 $6,531 $3,539 $2,599 $41,936 $1,340 $86,648 
Special Mention002872900208002837
Substandard9983020202308231205004
Total Commercial and Industrial - Agriculture$11,635 $8,088 $11,190 $7,462 $3,539 $4,907 $46,328 $1,340 $94,489 
Commercial and Industrial - PPP:
Pass$291,252 $$$$$$$$291,252 
Special Mention
Substandard
Total Commercial and Industrial - PPP$291,252 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $291,252 
Commercial Real Estate
Pass$278,747 $246,331 $232,651 $237,487 $290,106 $664,027 $33,117 $64,903 $2,047,369 
Special Mention35 13,016 5,612 4,654 34,310 46,074 203 103,904 
Substandard4,933 18,395 6,172 5,625 17,610 302 53,037 
Total Commercial Real Estate$278,782 $264,280 $256,658 $248,313 $330,041 $727,711 $33,622 $64,903 $2,204,310 
Commercial Real Estate - Agriculture:
Pass$22,440 $35,081 $44,519 $22,356 $17,081 $44,559 $919 $5,602 $192,557 
Special Mention1,960 575 1,366 1,053 49 5,009 
Substandard1,777 713 1,527 283 4,300 
Total Commercial Real Estate - Agriculture$24,400 $35,081 $45,094 $25,499 $18,847 $46,092 $1,251 $5,602 $201,866 
Commercial Real Estate - Construction
Pass$14,465 $20,705 $7,999 $2,478 $1,879 $6,682 $85,513 $21,051 $160,772 
Special Mention467 1,453 1,920 
Substandard324 324 
Total Commercial Real Estate - Construction$14,465 $20,705 $7,999 $2,478 $1,879 $7,473 $86,966 $21,051 $163,016 



22


The following table presents credit quality indicators by total loans on an amortized cost basis by origination year as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, continued.

June 30, 2021
(In thousands)20212020201920182017PriorRevolving Loans Amortized Cost BasisRevolving Loans Converted to TermTotal Loans
Residential - Home Equity
Performing$689 $1,287 $3,221 $1,858 $1,822 $1,278 $170,670 $4,222 $185,047 
Nonperforming17 633 1,884 2,534 
Total Residential - Home Equity$689 $1,287 $3,238 $1,858 $1,822 $1,911 $172,554 $4,222 $187,581 
Residential - Mortgages
Performing$148,238 $295,017 $175,802 $109,328 $138,882 $359,124 $10,456 $581 $1,237,428 
Nonperforming257 699 8,035 31 9,022 
Total Residential - Mortgages$148,238 $295,017 $175,802 $109,585 $139,581 $367,159 $10,487 $581 $1,246,450 
Consumer - Direct
Performing$12,624 $12,508 $10,628 $6,625 $5,524 $11,115 $5,219 $$64,243 
Nonperforming42 68 12 $128 
Total Consumer - Direct$12,624 $12,513 $10,670 $6,693 $5,536 $11,115 $5,220 $0 $64,371 
Consumer - Indirect
Performing$1,075 $1,134 $874 $2,424 $622 $142 $$$6,271 
Nonperforming131 63 30 226 
Total Consumer Indirect$1,075 $1,134 $1,005 $2,487 $624 $172 $0 $0 $6,497 

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December 31, 2020
(In thousands)20202019201820172016PriorRevolving Loans Amortized Cost BasisRevolving Loans Converted to TermTotal Loans
Residential - Home Equity
Performing$1,440 $2,764 $1,052 $2,120 $722 $1,106 $188,614 $44 $197,862 
Nonperforming18 194 506 2,247 2,965 
Total Residential - Home Equity$1,440 $2,782 $1,052 $2,120 $916 $1,612 $190,861 $44 $200,827 
Residential - Mortgages
Performing$305,476 $193,543 $123,205 $155,699 $178,149 $255,556 $11,735 $1,617 $1,224,980 
Nonperforming258 455 706 1,404 7,305 52 10,180 
Total Residential - Mortgages$305,476 $193,801 $123,660 $156,405 $179,553 $262,861 $11,787 $1,617 $1,235,160 
Consumer - Direct
Performing$14,840 $11,127 $8,011 $6,632 $2,854 $10,840 $6,835 $$61,139 
Nonperforming74 167 12 260 
Total Consumer - Direct$14,845 $11,201 $8,178 $6,644 $2,854 $10,842 $6,835 $0 $61,399 
Consumer - Indirect
Performing$1,424 $1,878 $3,327 $1,128 $382 $93 $$$8,232 
Nonperforming67 44 36 15 169 
Total Consumer Indirect$1,424 $1,945 $3,371 $1,135 $418 $108 $0 $0 $8,401 

6. Earnings Per Share
 
Earnings per share in the table below, for the three and six month periods ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 are calculated under the two-class method as required by ASC Topic 260, Earnings Per Share. ASC 260 provides that unvested share-based payment awards that contain nonforfeitable rights to dividends are participating securities and shall be included in the computation of earnings per share pursuant to the two-class method. The Company has issued restricted stock awards that contain such rights and are therefore considered participating securities. Basic earnings per common share are calculated by dividing net income allocable to common stock by the weighted average number of common shares, excluding participating securities, during the period. Diluted earnings per common share include the dilutive effect of participating securities.
 
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Three Months Ended
(In thousands, except share and per share data)6/30/20216/30/2020
Basic
Net income available to common shareholders$22,831 $21,431 
Less: income attributable to unvested stock-based compensation awards(164)(251)
Net earnings allocated to common shareholders22,667 21,180 
Weighted average shares outstanding, including unvested stock-based compensation awards14,886,687 14,910,300 
Less: average unvested stock-based compensation awards(231,913)(228,344)
Weighted average shares outstanding - Basic14,654,774 14,681,956 
Diluted
Net earnings allocated to common shareholders22,667 21,180 
Weighted average shares outstanding - Basic14,654,774 14,681,956 
Plus:  incremental shares from assumed conversion of stock-based compensation awards82,961 32,892 
Weighted average shares outstanding - Diluted14,737,735 14,714,848 
Basic EPS$1.55 $1.44 
Diluted EPS$1.54 $1.44 

Stock-based compensation awards representing 477 and 10,449 of common shares during the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively, were not included in the computations of diluted earnings per common share because the effect on those periods would have been anti-dilutive.

Six Months Ended
(In thousands, except share and per share data)6/30/20216/30/2020
Basic
Net income available to common shareholders$48,457 $29,380 
Less: income attributable to unvested stock-based compensation awards(350)(350)
Net earnings allocated to common shareholders48,107 29,030 
Weighted average shares outstanding, including unvested stock-based compensation awards14,899,524 14,934,028 
Less: unvested stock-based compensation awards(234,003)(233,576)
Weighted average shares outstanding - Basic14,665,521 14,700,452 
Diluted
Net earnings allocated to common shareholders48,107 29,030 
Weighted average shares outstanding - Basic14,665,521 14,700,452 
Plus: incremental shares from assumed conversion of stock-based compensation awards82,055 44,107 
Weighted average shares outstanding - Diluted14,747,576 14,744,559 
Basic EPS$3.28 $1.97 
Diluted EPS$3.26 $1.97 
Stock-based compensation awards representing approximately 8,187 and 10,090 of common shares during the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively were not included in the computations of diluted earnings per common share because the effect on those periods would have been anti-dilutive.
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7. Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)

The following tables present reclassifications out of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) for the three and six month periods ended June 30, 2021 and 2020.
Three Months Ended June 30, 2021
(In thousands)Before-Tax
Amount
Tax (Expense)
Benefit
Net of Tax
Available-for-sale debt securities:
Change in net unrealized gain/loss during the period$11,244 $(2,755)$8,489 
Reclassification adjustment for net realized gain on sale of available-for-sale debt securities included in net income
Net unrealized gains/losses11,244 (2,755)8,489 
Employee benefit plans:
Amortization of net retirement plan actuarial gain712 (175)537 
Amortization of net retirement plan prior service cost55 (13)42 
Employee benefit plans767 (188)579 
Other comprehensive (loss) income$12,011 $(2,943)$9,068 
 
Three Months Ended June 30, 2020
(In thousands)Before-Tax
Amount
Tax (Expense)
Benefit
Net of Tax
Available-for-sale debt securities:
Change in net unrealized gain/loss during the period$(339)$82 $(257)
Reclassification adjustment for net realized gain on sale of available-for-sale debt securities included in net income
Net unrealized gains/losses(339)82 (257)
Employee benefit plans:
Amortization of net retirement plan actuarial gain581 (142)439 
Amortization of net retirement plan prior service cost54 (13)41 
Employee benefit plans635 (155)480 
Other comprehensive income$296 $(73)$223 

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Six Months Ended June 30, 2021
(In thousands)Before-Tax
Amount
Tax (Expense)
Benefit
Net of Tax
Available-for-sale debt securities:
Change in net unrealized gain/loss during the period$(22,197)$5,440 $(16,757)
Reclassification adjustment for net realized gain on sale of available-for-sale debt securities included in net income(330)81 (249)
Net unrealized gains/losses(22,527)5,521 (17,006)
Employee benefit plans:
Amortization of net retirement plan actuarial loss1,476 (362)1,114 
Amortization of net retirement plan prior service cost111 (27)84 
Employee benefit plans1,587 (389)1,198 
Other comprehensive income$(20,940)$5,132 $(15,808)

Six Months Ended June 30, 2020
(In thousands)Before-Tax
Amount
Tax (Expense)
Benefit
Net of Tax
Available-for-sale debt securities:
Change in net unrealized gain/loss during the period$28,963 $(7,097)$21,866 
Reclassification adjustment for net realized gain on sale of available-for-sale debt securities included in net income(429)105 (324)
Net unrealized gains/losses28,534 (6,992)21,542 
Employee benefit plans:
Amortization of net retirement plan actuarial loss1,183 (290)893 
Amortization of net retirement plan prior service cost107 (26)81 
Employee benefit plans1,290 (316)974 
Other comprehensive income$29,824 $(7,308)$22,516 

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The following table presents the activity in our accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) for the periods indicated:
 
(In thousands)Available-for-
Sale Debt Securities
Employee
Benefit Plans
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
(Loss) Income
Balance at March 31, 2021$(4,886)$(52,064)$(56,950)
Other comprehensive (loss) income before reclassifications8,489 8,489 
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income579 579 
Net current-period other comprehensive (loss) income8,489 579 9,068 
Balance at June 30, 2021$3,603 $(51,485)$(47,882)
Balance at January 1, 2021$20,609 $(52,683)$(32,074)
Other comprehensive (loss) income before reclassifications(16,757)(16,757)
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income(249)1,198 949 
Net current-period other comprehensive income(17,006)1,198 (15,808)
Balance at June 30, 2021$3,603 $(51,485)$(47,882)

(In thousands)Available-for-
Sale Debit Securities
Employee
Benefit Plans
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
(Loss) Income
Balance at March 31, 2020$25,838 $(47,109)$(21,271)
Other comprehensive income (loss) before reclassifications(257)(257)
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income480 480 
Net current-period other comprehensive income(257)480 223 
Balance at June 30, 2020$25,581 $(46,629)$(21,048)
Balance at January 1, 2020$4,039 $(47,603)$(43,564)
Other comprehensive income (loss) before reclassifications21,866 21,866 
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income(324)974 650 
Net current-period other comprehensive income21,542 974 22,516 
Balance at June 30, 2020$25,581 $(46,629)$(21,048)















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The following tables present the amounts reclassified out of each component of accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020.

Three Months Ended June 30, 2021
Details about Accumulated other Comprehensive Income (Loss) Components (In thousands)
Amount
Reclassified from
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
(Loss) Income
1
Affected Line Item in the
Statement Where Net Income is
Presented
Available-for-sale debt securities:
Unrealized gains and losses on available-for-sale debt securities$Net gain on securities transactions
Tax expense
Net of tax
Employee benefit plans:
Amortization of the following 2
Net retirement plan actuarial loss(711)Other operating expense
Net retirement plan prior service cost(56)Other operating expense
(767)Total before tax
188 Tax benefit
$(579)Net of tax
 
Three Months Ended June 30, 2020
Details about Accumulated other Comprehensive Income (Loss) Components (In thousands)
Amount
Reclassified from
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
(Loss) Income
1
Affected Line Item in the
Statement Where Net Income is
Presented
Available-for-sale debt securities:
Unrealized gains and losses on available-for-sale debt securities$Net gain on securities transactions
Tax expense
Net of tax
Employee benefit plans:
Amortization of the following2
Net retirement plan actuarial loss(581)Other operating expense
Net retirement plan prior service cost(54)Other operating expense
(635)Total before tax
155 Tax benefit
$(480)Net of tax
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Six Months Ended June 30, 2021
Details about Accumulated other Comprehensive Income (Loss) Components (In thousands)
Amount
Reclassified from
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
(Loss) Income
1
Affected Line Item in the
Statement Where Net Income is
Presented
Available-for-sale debt securities:
Unrealized gains and losses on available-for-sale debt securities$330 Net gain on securities transactions
(81)Tax expense
249 Net of tax
Employee benefit plans:
Amortization of the following2
Net retirement plan actuarial loss(1,475)Other operating expense
Net retirement plan prior service cost(111)Other operating expense
(1,586)Total before tax
388 Tax benefit
$(1,198)Net of tax

Six Months Ended June 30, 2020
Details about Accumulated other Comprehensive Income (Loss) Components (In thousands)
Amount
Reclassified from
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
(Loss) Income
1
Affected Line Item in the
Statement Where Net Income is
Presented
Available-for-sale debt securities:
Unrealized gains and losses on available-for-sale debt securities$429 Net gain on securities transactions
(105)Tax expense
324 Net of tax
Employee benefit plans:
Amortization of the following2
Net retirement plan actuarial loss(1,183)Other operating expense
Net retirement plan prior service cost(107)Other operating expense
(1,290)Total before tax
316 Tax benefit
$(974)Net of tax
1 Amounts in parentheses indicated debits in income statement.
2 The accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income components are included in the computation of net periodic benefit cost (See Note 8 - “Employee Benefit Plan”).
 

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8. Employee Benefit Plans
 
The following tables set forth the amount of the net periodic benefit cost recognized by the Company for the Company’s pension plan, post-retirement plan (Life and Health), and supplemental employee retirement plans (“SERP”) including the following components: service cost, interest cost, expected return on plan assets for the period, amortization of the unrecognized transitional obligation or transition asset, and the amounts of recognized gains and losses, prior service cost recognized, and gain or loss recognized due to settlement or curtailment.

Components of Net Periodic Benefit Cost
Pension Benefits
Three Months Ended
Life and Health
Three Months Ended
SERP Benefits
Three Months Ended
(In thousands)6/30/20216/30/20206/30/20216/30/20206/30/20216/30/2020
Service cost$0 $$42 $45 $55 $61 
Interest cost327 545 36 59 147 217 
Expected return on plan assets(1,411)(1,352)0 0 
Amortization of net retirement plan actuarial loss397 355 82 52 233 175 
Amortization of net retirement plan prior service (credit) cost0 (2)(15)(15)70 71 
Net periodic benefit (income) cost$(687)$(454)$145 $141 $505 $524 

Pension Benefits
Six Months Ended
Life and Health
Six Months Ended
SERP Benefits
Six Months Ended
(In thousands)6/30/20216/30/20206/30/20216/30/20206/30/20216/30/2020
Service cost$0 $$93 $86 $115 $107 
Interest cost814 1,185 90 122 346 457 
Expected return on plan assets(2,826)(2,708)0 0 
Amortization of net retirement plan actuarial loss780 705 156 77 540 400 
Amortization of net retirement plan prior service cost (credit)0 (5)(30)(30)141 143 
Net periodic benefit (income) cost$(1,232)$(823)$309 $255 $1,142 $1,107 

The service component of net periodic benefit cost for the Company's benefit plans is recorded as a part of salaries and wages in the consolidated statements of income. All other components are recorded as part of other operating expenses in the consolidated statements of income.
 
The Company realized approximately $1.2 million and $974,000, net of tax, as amortization of amounts previously recognized in accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income, for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively.
 
The Company is not required to contribute to the pension plan, but it may make voluntary contributions. The Company did 0t contribute to the pension plan in the first six months of 2021 and 2020.

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9. Other Income and Operating Expense
 
Other income and operating expense totals are presented in the table below. Components of these totals exceeding 1% of the aggregate of total noninterest income and total noninterest expenses for any of the periods presented below are stated separately.
 
Three Months EndedSix Months Ended
(In thousands)6/30/20216/30/20206/30/20216/30/2020
Noninterest Income
Other service charges$710 $583 $1,379 $1,388 
Earnings from corporate owned life insurance570 735 1,111 1,058 
Net gains on the sales of loans originated for sale153 691 582 867 
Other income232 457 567 1,257 
Total other income$1,665 $2,466 $3,639 $4,570 
Noninterest Expenses
Marketing expense$1,132 $936 $1,627 $1,876 
Professional fees1,533 1,421 3,427 3,256 
Legal fees221 315 441 537 
Technology expense2,977 2,968 5,905 5,831 
Cardholder expense875 740 1,662 1,569 
Other expenses3,992 5,057 8,293 9,778 
Total other operating expense$10,730 $11,437 $21,355 $22,847 
 
10. Revenue Recognition

As stated in Note 1 - "Summary of Significant Accounting Policies," in the 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K, the Company adopted ASU No. 2014-09 “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” (ASC 606) and all subsequent ASUs that modified ASC 606, on January 1, 2018. ASC 606 does not apply to revenue associated with financial instruments, including revenue from loans and securities. In addition, certain noninterest income streams such as fees associated with mortgage servicing rights, financial guarantees, derivatives, and certain credit card fees are also not in scope of ASC 606. ASC 606 is applicable to noninterest revenue streams such as trust and asset management income, deposit related fees, interchange fees, merchant income, and annuity and insurance commissions. However, the recognition of these revenue streams did not change significantly upon adoption of ASC 606.

Insurance Commissions and Fees
Insurance commissions and fees from insurance product sales are typically earned upon the effective date of bound coverage, as no significant performance obligation remains after coverage is bound. Commission revenue on policies billed in installments is now accrued based upon the completion of the performance obligation creating a current asset for the unbilled revenue until such time as an invoice is generated, typically not to exceed twelve months. The impact of these changes was not significant, but it will result in slight variances from quarter to quarter. Contingent commissions are estimated based upon management’s expectations for the year with an appropriate constraint applied and accrued relative to the recognition of the corresponding core commissions.

Trust & Asset Management
Trust and asset management income is primarily comprised of fees earned from the management and administration of trusts and other customer assets. The Company’s performance obligation is generally satisfied over time and the resulting fees are recognized monthly, based upon the month-end market value of the assets under management and the applicable fee rate. Payment is generally received a few days after month end through a direct charge to customers’ accounts. The Company does not earn performance-based incentives. Optional services such as real estate sales and tax return preparation services are also available to existing trust and asset management customers. The Company’s performance obligation for these transactional-based services is generally satisfied, and related revenue recognized, at a point in time (i.e., as incurred). Payment is received shortly after services are rendered.


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Mutual Fund & Investment Income
Mutual fund and investment income consists of other recurring revenue streams such as commissions from sales of mutual funds and other investments, investment advisory fees from the Company’s Strategic Asset Management Services (SAM) wealth management product. Commissions from the sale of mutual funds and other investments are recognized on trade date, which is when the Company has satisfied its performance obligation. The Company also receives periodic service fees (i.e., trailers) from mutual fund companies typically based on a percentage of net asset value, recorded over time, usually monthly or quarterly, as net asset value is determined. Investment advisor fees from the wealth management product is earned over time and based on an annual percentage rate of the net asset value. The investment advisor fees are charged to the customer’s account in advance on the first month of the quarter, and the revenue is recognized over the following three-month period. The Company does engage a third party, LPL Financial, LLC (LPL), to satisfy part of this performance obligation, and therefore this income is reported net of any corresponding expenses paid to LPL.

Service Charges on Deposit Accounts
Service charges on deposit accounts consist of account analysis fees (i.e., net fees earned on analyzed business and public checking accounts), monthly service fees, check orders, and other deposit account related fees. The Company’s performance obligation for account analysis fees and monthly service fees is generally satisfied, and the related revenue recognized, over the period in which the service is provided. Check orders and other deposit account related fees are largely transactional based, and therefore, the Company’s performance obligation is satisfied and related revenue recognized, at a point in time. Payment for service charges on deposit accounts is primarily received immediately or in the following month through a direct charge to customers’ accounts.

Card Services Income
Fees, exchange, and other service charges are primarily comprised of debit and credit card income, ATM fees, merchant services income, and other service charges. Debit and credit card income is primarily comprised of interchange fees earned whenever the Company’s debit and credit cards are processed through card payment networks such as MasterCard. ATM fees are primarily generated when a Company cardholder uses a non-Company ATM or a non-Company cardholder uses a Company ATM. Merchant services income mainly represents fees charged to merchants to process their debit and credit card transactions, in addition to account management fees. The Company’s performance obligation for fees and exchange are largely satisfied, and related revenue recognized, when the services are rendered or upon completion. Payment is typically received immediately or in the following month.

Other
Other service charges include revenue from processing wire and ACH transfers, lock box service and safe deposit box rental. Payment on these revenue streams is received primarily through a direct charge to the customer’s account, immediately or in the following month, and therefore, the Company’s performance obligation is satisfied, and related revenue recognized, at a point in time.

33


The following tables present noninterest income, segregated by revenue streams in-scope and out-of-scope of ASC 606, for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020.
Three Months Ended
(In thousands)06/30/202106/30/2020
Noninterest Income
In-scope of Topic 606:
Commissions and Fees$7,488 $7,024 
Installment Billing(52)(49)
Refund of Commissions31 (226)
Contract Liabilities/Deferred Revenue(237)(204)
Contingent Commissions824 710 
Subtotal Insurance Revenues8,054 7,255 
Trust and Asset Management3,334 2,790 
Mutual Fund & Investment Income1,383 1,130 
Subtotal Investment Service Income4,717 3,920 
Service Charges on Deposit Accounts1,471 1,248 
Card Services Income2,951 2,283 
Other297 238 
Noninterest Income (in-scope of ASC 606)17,490 14,944 
Noninterest Income (out-of-scope of ASC 606)1,368 2,233 
Total Noninterest Income$18,858 $17,177 

Six Months Ended
(In thousands)06/30/202106/30/2020
Noninterest Income
In-scope of Topic 606:
Commissions and Fees$15,171 $14,409 
Installment Billing(17)(79)
Refund of Commissions11 (353)
Contract Liabilities/Deferred Revenue(237)(208)
Contingent Commissions2,292 1,531 
Subtotal Insurance Revenues17,220 15,300 
Trust and Asset Management6,700 5,728 
Mutual Fund & Investment Income2,690 2,394 
Subtotal Investment Service Income9,390 8,122 
Service Charges on Deposit Accounts2,941 3,231 
Card Services Income5,334 4,466 
Other598 552 
Noninterest Income (in-scope of ASC 606)35,483 31,671 
Noninterest Income (out-of-scope of ASC 606)3,358 4,466 
Total Noninterest Income$38,841 $36,137 

Contract Balances
A contract asset balance occurs when an entity performs a service for a customer before the customer pays consideration or before payment is due, which would result in contract receivables or assets, respectively. A contract liability balance is an entity’s obligation to transfer a service to a customer for which the entity has already received payment or for which payment is due from the customer. The Company’s noninterest revenue streams, excluding some insurance commissions and fees, are largely based on transactional activity, or standard month-end revenue accruals such as asset management fees based on month-end market values. Receivables primarily consist of amounts due for insurance and wealth management services performed for
34


which the Company's performance obligations have been fully satisfied. Receivables for the insurance and wealth management services amounted to $5.7 million and $2.1 million, respectively, at June 30, 2021, compared to $5.2 million and $2.2 million, respectively, at December 31, 2020. Additionally, the Company had contract assets related to contingent income of $1.1 million and $2.5 million, respectively, at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, and contract liabilities of $3.2 million and $2.0 million, respectively at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

Contract Acquisition Costs
The Company is required to capitalize, and subsequently amortize into expense, certain incremental costs of obtaining a contract with a customer if these costs are expected to be recovered. The incremental costs of obtaining a contract are those costs that an entity incurs to obtain a contract with a customer that it would not have incurred if the contract had not been obtained (for example, sales commission). The Company utilizes the practical expedient which allows entities to immediately expense contract acquisition costs when the asset that would have resulted from capitalizing these costs would have been amortized in one year or less.

11. Financial Guarantees
 
The Company currently does not issue any guarantees that would require liability recognition or disclosure, other than standby letters of credit. The Company extends standby letters of credit to its customers in the normal course of business. The standby letters of credit are generally short-term. As of June 30, 2021, the Company’s maximum potential obligation under standby letters of credit was $33.0 million compared to $31.4 million at December 31, 2020. Management uses the same credit policies to extend standby letters of credit that it uses for on-balance sheet lending decisions and may require collateral to support standby letters of credit based upon its evaluation of the counterparty. Management does not anticipate any significant losses as a result of these transactions, and has determined that the fair value of standby letters of credit is not significant.
 
12. Segment and Related Information
 
The Company manages its operations through 3 reportable business segments in accordance with the standards set forth in FASB ASC 280, “Segment Reporting”: (i) banking (“Banking”), (ii) insurance (“Tompkins Insurance”) and (iii) wealth management (“Tompkins Financial Advisors”). The Company’s insurance services and wealth management services, other than trust services, are managed separately from the Banking segment.
 
Banking
The Banking segment is primarily comprised of the Company’s 4 banking subsidiaries: Tompkins Trust Company, a commercial bank with 13 banking offices located in Ithaca, NY and surrounding communities; The Bank of Castile (DBA Tompkins Bank of Castile), a commercial bank with 16 banking offices located in the Genesee Valley region of New York State as well as Monroe County; Mahopac Bank (DBA Tompkins Mahopac Bank), a commercial bank with 14 full-service banking offices located in the counties north of New York City; and VIST Bank (DBA Tompkins VIST Bank), a banking organization with 20 banking offices headquartered and operating in the areas surrounding southeastern Pennsylvania. As described above in greater detail in Note 1 - "Business", the Company's subsidiary banks have announced plans for a rebranding effort, subject to regulatory approval, pursuant to which the Company's four wholly-owned banking subsidiaries will be combined into one bank which will conduct business under the "Tompkins" brand name, with a legal name of "Tompkins Community Bank."
 
Insurance
The Company provides property and casualty insurance services and employee benefits consulting through Tompkins Insurance Agencies, Inc., a 100% wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, headquartered in Batavia, New York. Tompkins Insurance is an independent insurance agency, representing many major insurance carriers and provides employee benefit consulting to employers in Western and Central New York and Southeastern Pennsylvania, assisting them with their medical, group life insurance and group disability insurance. Tompkins Insurance has 5 stand-alone offices in Western New York.
 
Wealth Management
The Wealth Management segment is generally organized under the Tompkins Financial Advisors brand. Tompkins Trust Company, under the Tompkins Financial Advisors brand offers a comprehensive suite of financial services to customers, including trust and estate services, investment management and financial and insurance planning for individuals, corporate executives, small business owners and high net worth individuals. Tompkins Financial Advisors has offices in each of the Company’s 4 subsidiary banks. 

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Summarized financial information concerning the Company’s reportable segments and the reconciliation to the Company’s consolidated results is shown in the following table. Investment in subsidiaries is netted out of the presentations below. The “Intercompany” column identifies the intercompany activities of revenues, expenses and other assets between the banking, insurance and wealth management services segments. The Company accounts for intercompany fees and services at an estimated fair value according to regulatory requirements for the services provided. Intercompany items relate primarily to the use of human resources, information systems, accounting and marketing services provided by any of the banks and the holding company. All other accounting policies are the same as those described in the summary of significant accounting policies in the 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
As of and for the three months ended June 30, 2021
(In thousands)BankingInsuranceWealth ManagementIntercompanyConsolidated
Interest income$59,843 $$$(8)$59,835 
Interest expense4,997 (8)4,989 
Net interest income54,846 54,846 
(Credit) provision for credit loss expense(3,071)(3,071)
Noninterest income6,447 8,163 4,808 (560)18,858 
Noninterest expense37,879 6,760 3,363 (560)47,442 
Income before income tax expense26,485 1,403 1,445 29,333 
Income tax expense5,729 401 341 6,471 
Net Income attributable to noncontrolling interests and Tompkins Financial Corporation20,756 1,002 1,104 22,862 
Less:  Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests31 31 
Net Income attributable to Tompkins Financial Corporation$20,725 $1,002 $1,104 $$22,831 
Depreciation and amortization$2,527 $55 $14 $$2,596 
Assets7,987,751 46,590 30,435 (76,568)7,988,208 
Goodwill64,370 19,866 8,211 92,447 
Other intangibles, net1,994 2,201 79 4,274 
Net loans and leases5,127,624 5,127,624 
Deposits6,851,924 (14,924)6,837,000 
Total Equity667,007 33,101 28,145 728,253 
36


As of and for the three months ended June 30, 2020
(In thousands)BankingInsuranceWealth
Management
IntercompanyConsolidated
Interest income$63,445 $$$(1)$63,445 
Interest expense7,080 (1)7,079 
Net interest income56,365 56,366 
Provision for credit loss expense877 877 
Noninterest income6,248 7,360 4,095 (526)17,177 
Noninterest expense36,484 6,358 3,347 (526)45,663 
Income before income tax expense25,252 1,003 748 27,003 
Income tax expense5,113 260 167 5,540 
Net Income attributable to noncontrolling interests and Tompkins Financial Corporation20,139 743 581 21,463 
Less:  Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests32 32 
Net Income attributable to Tompkins Financial  Corporation$20,107 $743 $581 $$21,431 
Depreciation and amortization$2,484 $57 $10 $$2,551 
Assets7,528,501 42,215 25,474 (14,134)7,582,056 
Goodwill64,585 19,866 7,996 92,447 
Other intangibles, net2,758 2,623 119 5,500 
Net loans and leases5,372,203 5,372,203 
Deposits6,391,034 (13,513)6,377,521 
Total Equity643,139 31,567 23,323 698,029 

As of and for the six months ended June 30, 2021
(In thousands)BankingInsuranceWealth
Management
IntercompanyConsolidated
Interest income$119,597 $$$(9)$119,590 
Interest expense9,716 (9)9,707 
Net interest income109,881 109,883 
(Credit) provision for credit loss expense(4,901)(4,901)
Noninterest income12,759 17,581 9,591 (1,090)38,841 
Noninterest expense73,206 13,197 6,640 (1,090)91,953 
Income before income tax expense54,335 4,386 2,951 61,672 
Income tax expense11,243 1,203 705 13,151 
Net Income attributable to noncontrolling interests and Tompkins Financial Corporation43,092 3,183 2,246 48,521 
Less:  Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests64 64 
Net Income attributable to Tompkins Financial Corporation$43,028 $3,183 $2,246 $$48,457 
Depreciation and amortization$4,965 $110 $27 $$5,102 

37


As of and for the six months ended June 30, 2020
(In thousands)BankingInsuranceWealth
Management
IntercompanyConsolidated
Interest income$126,644 $$$(2)$126,644 
Interest expense17,311 (2)17,309 
Net interest income109,333 $109,335 
Provision for credit loss expense17,636 17,636 
Noninterest income13,241 15,510 8,469 (1,083)36,137 
Noninterest expense72,709 12,920 6,392 (1,083)90,938 
Income before income tax expense32,229 2,592 2,077 $36,898 
Income tax expense6,269 691 489 7,449 
Net Income attributable to noncontrolling interests and Tompkins Financial Corporation25,960 1,901 1,588 $29,449 
Less:  Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests69 69 
Net Income attributable to Tompkins Financial Corporation$25,891 $1,901 $1,588 $$29,380 
Depreciation and amortization$4,969 $116 $20 $$5,105 

13. Fair Value Measurements

FASB ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value in generally accepted accounting principles and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. ASC 820 also establishes a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3 measurements). Transfers between levels, when determined to be appropriate, are recognized at the end of each reporting period.
 
The three levels of the fair value hierarchy under ASC 820 are:
 
Level 1 – Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets that are accessible at the measurement date for identical, unrestricted assets or liabilities; 

Level 2 – Quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active, or inputs that are observable, either directly or indirectly, for substantially the full term of the asset or liability;
 
Level 3 – Prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both significant to the fair value measurement and unobservable (i.e., supported by little or no market activity).
 
38


The following table summarizes financial assets and financial liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, segregated by the level of valuation inputs within the fair value hierarchy used to measure fair value.
 
Recurring Fair Value Measurements
June 30, 2021
(In thousands)Total(Level 1)(Level 2)(Level 3)
Available-for-sale debt securities
U.S. Treasuries$129,091 $$129,091 $
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities823,718 $823,718 $
Obligations of U.S. states and political subdivisions113,789 113,789 
Mortgage-backed securities – residential, issued by:
U.S. Government agencies114,422 114,422 
U.S. Government sponsored entities830,656 830,656 
U.S. corporate debt securities2,413 2,413 
Total Available-for-sale debt securities$2,014,089 $0 $2,014,089 $0 
Equity securities, at fair value$916 $0 $0 $916 
 
Recurring Fair Value Measurements
December 31, 2020
(In thousands)Total(Level 1)(Level 2)(Level 3)
Available-for-sale debt securities
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities$607,480 $$607,480 $
Obligations of U.S. states and political subdivisions129,746 129,746 
Mortgage-backed securities – residential, issued by:
U.S. Government agencies182,108 182,108 
U.S. Government sponsored entities705,480 705,480 
U.S. corporate debt securities2,379 2,379 
Total Available-for-sale debt securities$1,627,193 $0 $1,627,193 $0 
Equity securities, at fair value$929 $0 $0 $929 
 
Securities: Fair values for U.S. Treasury securities are based on quoted market prices. Fair values for obligations of U.S. government sponsored entities, mortgage-backed securities-residential, obligations of U.S. states and political subdivisions, and U.S. corporate debt securities are based on quoted market prices, where available, as provided by third party pricing vendors. If quoted market prices were not available, fair values are based on quoted market prices of comparable instruments in active markets and/or based upon a matrix pricing methodology, which uses comprehensive interest rate tables to determine market price, movement and yield relationships. These securities are reviewed periodically to determine if there are any events or changes in circumstances that would adversely affect their value.

The change in the fair value of equity securities valued using significant unobservable inputs (level 3), for the periods ended June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, was immaterial.
 
There were no transfers between Levels 1, 2 and 3 for the six months ended June 30, 2021.
 
The Company determines fair value for its available-for-sale debt securities using an independent bond pricing service for identical assets or very similar securities. The Company determines fair value for its equity securities based on the underlying equity fund’s pricing and valuation procedures which consider recent sales price, market quotations from a pricing service, or market quotes from an independent broker-dealer. The Company has reviewed the pricing sources, including methodologies used, and finds them to be fairly stated.

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Certain assets are measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis. For the Company, these include loans held for sale, individually evaluated loans, and other real estate owned (“OREO”). For the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, certain individually evaluated loans were remeasured and reported at fair value through a specific valuation allowance and/or partial charge-offs for credit losses based upon the fair value of the underlying collateral. Collateral values are estimated using Level 2 inputs based upon observable market data. In addition to collateral dependent evaluated loans, certain other real estate owned were remeasured and reported at fair value based upon the fair value of the underlying collateral. The fair values of other real estate owned are estimated using Level 2 inputs based on observable market data or Level 3 inputs based on customized discounting criteria. In general, the fair values of other real estate owned are based upon appraisals, with discounts made to reflect estimated costs to sell the real estate. Upon initial recognition, fair value write-downs are taken through a charge-off to the allowance for credit losses. Subsequent fair value write-downs on other real estate owned are reported in other noninterest expense.
 
Three months ended June 30, 2021
(In thousands)Fair value measurements at reporting
date using:
Gain (losses)
from fair
value changes
Assets:As of 06/30/2021Quoted prices in
active markets for
identical assets
(Level 1)
Significant other
observable inputs
(Level 2)
Significant
unobservable inputs
(Level 3)
Three months ended 06/30/2021
Individually evaluated$8,922 $$8,922 $$
Other real estate owned

Three months ended June 30, 2020
(In thousands)Fair value measurements at reporting
date using:
Gain (losses)
from fair
value changes
Assets:As of 06/30/2020Quoted prices in
active markets for
identical assets
(Level 1)
Significant other
observable inputs
(Level 2)
Significant
unobservable inputs
(Level 3)
Three months ended 06/30/2020
Individually evaluated$2,560 $$2,560 $$(15)
Other real estate owned23 

Six months ended June 30, 2021
(In thousands)Fair value measurements at reporting
date using:
Gain (losses)
from fair
value changes
Assets:As of 06/30/2021Quoted prices in
active markets for
identical assets
(Level 1)
Significant other
observable inputs
(Level 2)
Significant
unobservable inputs
(Level 3)
Six months ended 06/30/2021
Individually evaluated$31,619 $$31,619 $$
Other real estate owned

40


Six months ended June 30, 2020
(In thousands)Fair value measurements at reporting
date using:
Gain (losses)
from fair
value changes
Assets:As of 06/30/2020Quoted prices in
active markets for
identical assets
(Level 1)
Significant other
observable inputs
(Level 2)
Significant
unobservable inputs
(Level 3)
Six months ended 06/30/2020
Individually evaluated$10,130 $$10,130 $$(1,305)
Other real estate owned274 274 23 

The following table presents the carrying amounts and estimated fair values of the Company’s financial instruments at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020. The carrying amounts shown in the table are included in the Consolidated Statements of Condition under the indicated captions.
 
The fair value estimates, methods and assumptions set forth below for the Company's financial instruments, including those financial instruments carried at cost, are made solely to comply with disclosures required by U.S. GAAP and should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes included in this Report.

For loans where the Company has determined that foreclosure of the collateral is probable, or where the borrower is experiencing financial difficulty and the Company expects repayment of the loan to be provided substantially through the operation or sale of the collateral, the ACL is measured based on the difference between the fair value of the collateral and the amortized cost basis of the loan as of the measurement date. For real estate loans, fair value of the loan’s collateral is determined by third party appraisals, which are then adjusted for the estimated selling and closing costs related to liquidation of the collateral. For this asset class, the actual valuation methods (income, sales comparable, or cost) vary based on the status of the project or property. For example, land is generally based on the sales comparable method while construction is based on the income and/or sales comparable methods. The unobservable inputs may vary depending on the individual assets with no one of the three methods being the predominant approach. The Company reviews the third party appraisal for appropriateness and adjusts the value downward to consider selling and closing costs, which typically range from 5% to 8% of the appraised value. For non-real estate loans, fair value of the loan’s collateral may be determined using an appraisal, net book value per the borrower’s financial statements, or aging reports, adjusted or discounted based on management’s historical knowledge, changes in market conditions from the time of the valuation, and management’s expertise and knowledge of the client and client’s business. 
Estimated Fair Value of Financial Instruments
June 30, 2021
(In thousands)Carrying
Amount
Fair Value(Level 1)(Level 2)(Level 3)
Financial Assets:
Cash and cash equivalents$291,014 $291,014 $291,014 $$
Securities - held-to-maturity151,848 154,299 154,299 
FHLB and other stock15,991 15,991 15,991 
Accrued interest receivable27,575 27,575 27,575 
Loans/leases, net1
5,127,624 5,111,354 31,619 5,079,735 
Financial Liabilities:
Time deposits$710,170 $715,382 $$715,382 $
Other deposits6,126,830 6,126,830 6,126,830 
Fed funds purchased and securities sold
under agreements to repurchase52,134 52,134 52,134 
Other borrowings245,000 251,406 251,406 
Trust preferred debentures8,799 12,832 12,832 
Accrued interest payable1,411 1,411 1,411 
 
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Estimated Fair Value of Financial Instruments
December 31, 2020
(In thousands)Carrying
Amount
Fair Value(Level 1)(Level 2)(Level 3)
Financial Assets:
Cash and cash equivalents$388,462 $388,462 $388,462 $$
FHLB and other stock16,382 16,382 16,382 
Accrued interest receivable32,025 32,025 32,025 
Loans/leases, net1
5,208,658 5,226,301 22,171 5,204,130 
Financial Liabilities:
Time deposits$746,234 $753,045 $$753,045 $
Other deposits5,691,518 5,691,518 5,691,518 
Fed funds purchased and securities
sold under agreements to repurchase65,845 65,845 65,845 
Other borrowings265,000 274,238 274,238 
Trust preferred debentures13,220 18,483 18,483 
Accrued interest payable1,727 1,727 1,727 
1 Lease receivables, although excluded from the scope of ASC Topic 825, are included in the estimated fair value amounts at their carrying value.
 
The following methods and assumptions were used in estimating fair value disclosures for financial instruments:
 
Cash and Cash Equivalents: The carrying amounts reported in the Consolidated Statements of Condition for cash, noninterest-bearing deposits, money market funds, and Federal funds sold approximate the fair value of those assets.

FHLB Stock: The carrying amount of FHLB stock approximates fair value. If the stock is redeemed, the Company will receive an amount equal to the par value of the stock. For miscellaneous equity securities, carrying value is cost.
 
Loans and Leases: Fair value for loans are calculated using an exit price notion. The Company's valuation methodology takes into account factors such as estimated cash flows, including contractual cash flow and assumptions for prepayments; liquidity risk; and credit risk. The fair values of residential loans were estimated using discounted cash flow analyses, based upon available market benchmarks for rates and prepayment assumptions. The fair values of commercial and consumer loans were estimated using discounted cash flow analyses, based upon interest rates currently offered for loans and leases with similar terms and credit quality. The fair values of loans held for sale were determined based upon contractual prices for loans with similar characteristics.
 
Accrued Interest Receivable and Accrued Interest Payable: The carrying amount of these short term instruments approximate fair value.
 
Deposits: The fair values disclosed for noninterest bearing accounts and accounts with no stated maturities are equal to the amount payable on demand at the reporting date. The fair value of time deposits is based upon discounted cash flow analyses using rates offered for FHLB advances, which is the Company’s primary alternative source of funds.
 
Trust Preferred Debentures: The fair value of the trust preferred debentures has been estimated using a discounted cash flow analysis which uses a discount factor of a market spread over current interest rates for similar instruments.
 
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Item 2.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

BUSINESS
 
Corporate Overview and Strategic Initiatives
Tompkins Financial Corporation (“Tompkins” or the “Company”) is headquartered in Ithaca, New York and is registered as a Financial Holding Company with the Federal Reserve Board under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended. The Company is a locally oriented, community-based financial services organization that offers a full array of products and services, including commercial and consumer banking, leasing, trust and investment management, financial planning and wealth management, and insurance services. At June 30, 2021, the Company had four wholly-owned banking subsidiaries: Tompkins Trust Company (the “Trust Company”), The Bank of Castile (DBA Tompkins Bank of Castile), Mahopac Bank (DBA Tompkins Mahopac Bank), and VIST Bank (DBA Tompkins VIST Bank). The Company’s banks have announced plans for a rebranding effort, pursuant to which the Company’s four wholly-owned banking subsidiaries will be combined into one bank, with The Bank of Castile, Mahopac Bank, and VIST Bank merging with and into Tompkins Trust Company. The combined bank will conduct business under the “Tompkins” brand name, with a legal name of “Tompkins Community Bank.” The Company filed applications with applicable regulators on July 12, 2021, with the re-branding and combination anticipated to take effect later in 2021, subject to regulatory approval. The Company also has a wholly-owned insurance agency subsidiary, Tompkins Insurance Agencies, Inc. (“Tompkins Insurance”). The trust division of the Trust Company provides a full array of investment services, including investment management, trust and estate, financial and tax planning as well as life, disability and long-term care insurance services. The Company’s principal offices are located at 118 E. Seneca Street, P.O. Box 460, Ithaca, NY, 14850, and its telephone number is (888) 503-5753. The Company’s common stock is traded on the NYSE American under the Symbol “TMP.”

The Tompkins strategy centers around our core values and a commitment to delivering long-term value to our clients, communities, and shareholders. A key strategic initiative for the Company is a focus on responsible and sustainable growth, including initiatives to grow organically through our current businesses, as well as through possible acquisitions of financial institutions, branches, and financial services businesses. As such, the Company has acquired, and from time to time considers acquiring, banks, thrift institutions, branch offices of banks or thrift institutions, or other businesses that would complement the Company’s business or its geographic reach. The Company generally targets merger or acquisition partners that are culturally similar and have experienced management and possess either significant market presence or have potential for improved profitability through financial management, economies of scale and expanded services.

Business Segments
Banking services consist primarily of attracting deposits from the areas served by the Company’s four banking subsidiaries’ 63 banking offices (43 offices in New York and 20 offices in Pennsylvania) and using those deposits to originate a variety of commercial loans, consumer loans, real estate loans (including commercial loans collateralized by real estate), and leases. The Company’s lending function is managed within the guidelines of a comprehensive Board-approved lending policy. Reporting systems are in place to provide management with ongoing information related to loan production, loan quality, concentrations of credit, loan delinquencies, and nonperforming and potential problem loans. Banking services also include a full suite of products such as debit cards, credit cards, remote deposit, electronic banking, mobile banking, cash management, and safe deposit services.
 
Wealth management services consist of investment management, trust and estate, financial and tax planning as well as life, disability and long-term care insurance services. Wealth management services are provided by the Trust Company under the trade name Tompkins Financial Advisors. Tompkins Financial Advisors has office locations, and services are available to customers, at the Company’s four subsidiary banks.
 
Insurance services include property and casualty insurance, employee benefit consulting, and life, long-term care and disability insurance. Tompkins Insurance is headquartered in Batavia, New York. Over the years, Tompkins Insurance has acquired smaller insurance agencies in the market areas serviced by the Company’s banking subsidiaries and successfully consolidated them into Tompkins Insurance. Tompkins Insurance offers services to customers of the Company’s banking subsidiaries by sharing offices with The Bank of Castile, Trust Company, and VIST Bank. In addition to these shared offices, Tompkins Insurance has five stand-alone offices in Western New York, and one stand-alone office in Tompkins County, New York.
 
The Company’s principal expenses are interest on deposits, interest on borrowings, and operating and general administrative expenses, as well as provisions for credit losses. Funding sources, other than deposits, include borrowings, securities sold under agreements to repurchase, and cash flow from lending and investing activities.
 
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Competition
Competition for commercial banking and other financial services is strong in the Company’s market areas. In one or more aspects of its business, the Company’s subsidiaries compete with other commercial banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, finance companies, Internet-based financial services companies, mutual funds, insurance companies, brokerage and investment banking companies, and other financial intermediaries. Some of these competitors have substantially greater resources and lending capabilities and may offer services that the Company does not currently provide. In addition, many of the Company’s non-bank competitors are not subject to the same extensive Federal regulations that govern financial holding companies and Federally-insured banks.
 
Competition among financial institutions is based upon interest rates offered on deposit accounts, interest rates charged on loans and other credit and service charges, the quality and scope of the services rendered, the convenience of facilities and services, and, in the case of loans to commercial borrowers, relative lending limits. Management believes that a community-based financial organization is better positioned to establish personalized financial relationships with both commercial customers and individual households. The Company’s community commitment and involvement in its primary market areas, as well as its commitment to quality and personalized financial services, are factors that contribute to the Company’s competitiveness. Management believes that each of the Company’s subsidiary banks can compete successfully in its primary market areas by making prudent lending decisions quickly and more efficiently than its competitors, without compromising asset quality or profitability. In addition, the Company focuses on providing unparalleled customer service, which includes offering a strong suite of products and services, including products that are accessible to our customers through digital means. Although management feels that this business model has caused the Company to grow its customer base in recent years and allows it to compete effectively in the markets it serves, we cannot assure you that such factors will result in future success.
Regulation
Banking, insurance services and wealth management are highly regulated. As a financial holding company with four community banks, a registered investment adviser, and an insurance agency subsidiary, the Company and its subsidiaries are subject to examination and regulation by the Federal Reserve Board (“FRB”), Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”), the New York State Department of Financial Services, Pennsylvania Department of Banking and Securities, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, and the Pennsylvania Insurance Department.

OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION
 
The following discussion is intended to provide an understanding of the consolidated financial condition and results of operations of the Company for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021. It should be read in conjunction with the Company’s Audited Consolidated Financial Statements and the notes thereto included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020, and the Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements and notes thereto included in Part I of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.
 
In this Report, there are comparisons of the Company’s performance to that of a peer group, which is comprised of the group of 146 domestic bank holding companies with $3 billion to $10 billion in total assets as defined in the Federal Reserve’s “Bank Holding Company Performance Report” for March 31, 2021 (the most recent report available). Although the peer group data is presented based upon financial information that is one fiscal quarter behind the financial information included in this report, the Company believes that it is relevant to include certain peer group information for comparison to current quarter numbers.

Forward-Looking Statements
This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. The statements contained in this Report that are not statements of historical fact may include forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Forward-looking statements may be identified by use of such words as "may", "will", "estimate", "intend", "continue", "believe", "expect", "plan", or "anticipate", and other similar words. Examples of forward-looking statements may include statements regarding the asset quality of the Company's loan portfolios; the level of the Company's allowance for credit losses; whether, when and how borrowers will repay deferred amounts and resume scheduled payments; the sufficiency of liquidity sources; the Company's exposure to changes in interest rates, and to new, changed, or extended government/regulatory expectations; the impact of changes in accounting standards; and trends, plans, prospects, growth and strategies. Forward-looking statements are made based on management’s expectations and beliefs concerning future events impacting the Company and are subject to certain uncertainties and factors relating to the Company’s operations and economic environment, all of which are difficult to predict and many of which are beyond the control of the Company, that could cause actual results of the Company to differ materially from those expressed and/or implied by forward-looking statements. The following factors, in addition to those listed as Risk Factors in Item 1A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020, are among those that could cause actual results to differ
44


materially from the forward-looking statements: changes in general economic, market and regulatory conditions; the severity and duration of the COVID-19 pandemic and the impact of the pandemic (including the government’s response to the pandemic) on economic and financial markets, potential regulatory actions, and modifications to our operations, products, and services relating thereto; disruptions in our and our customers’ operations and loss of revenue due to pandemics, epidemics, widespread health emergencies, government-imposed travel/business restrictions, or outbreaks of infectious diseases such as the COVID-19, and the associated adverse impact on our financial position, liquidity, and our customers’ abilities or willingness to repay their obligations to us or willingness to obtain financial services products from the Company; a decision to amend or modify the terms under which our customers are obligated to repay amounts owed to us; the development of an interest rate environment that may adversely affect the Company’s interest rate spread, other income or cash flow anticipated from the Company’s operations, investment and/or lending activities; changes in laws and regulations affecting banks, bank holding companies and/or financial holding companies, such as the Dodd-Frank Act and Basel III and the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act; legislative and regulatory changes in response to COVID-19 with which we and our subsidiaries must comply, including the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the "CARES Act") and the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder, and federal, state and local government mandates; technological developments and changes; the ability to continue to introduce competitive new products and services on a timely, cost-effective basis; governmental and public policy changes, including environmental regulation; reliance on large customers; uncertainties arising from national and global events, including the potential impact of widespread protests, civil unrest, and political uncertainty on the economy and the financial services industry; and financial resources in the amounts, at the times and on the terms required to support the Company’s future businesses.

Critical Accounting Policies
The accounting and reporting policies followed by the Company conform, in all material respects, to U.S. generally accepted accounting principles ("GAAP") and to general practices within the financial services industry. In the course of normal business activity, management must select and apply many accounting policies and methodologies and make estimates and assumptions that lead to the financial results presented in the Company’s consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. There are uncertainties inherent in making these estimates and assumptions, which could materially affect the Company’s results of operations and financial position.

Management considers accounting estimates to be critical to reported financial results if (i) the accounting estimates require management to make assumptions about matters that are highly uncertain, and (ii) different estimates that management reasonably could have used for the accounting estimate in the current period, or changes in the accounting estimate that are reasonably likely to occur from period to period, could have a material impact on the Company’s financial statements. Management considers the accounting policies relating to the allowance for credit losses (“allowance”, or “ACL”), and the review of the securities portfolio for other-than-temporary impairment to be critical accounting policies because of the uncertainty and subjectivity involved in these policies and the material effect that estimates related to these areas can have on the Company’s results of operations. On January 1, 2020, the Company adopted ASU 2016-13, "Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (ASC Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments," which resulted in changes to the Company's existing critical accounting policy that existed at December 31, 2019.

For information on the Company's significant accounting policies and to gain a greater understanding of how the Company’s financial performance is reported, refer to Note 1 – “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020. Refer to "Recently Issued Accounting Standards" in Management's Discussion and Analysis in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for a discussion of recent accounting updates.

COVID-19 Pandemic and Recent Events

The COVID-19 global pandemic continued to present health and economic challenges on an unprecedented scale during the second quarter of 2021. During the second quarter, the Company continued to focus on the health and well-being of its workforce, meeting its clients' needs, and supporting its communities. The Company has designated a Pandemic Planning Committee, which includes key individuals across the Company as well as members of Senior Management, to oversee the Company’s response to COVID-19, and has implemented a number of risk mitigation measures designed to protect our employees and customers while maintaining services for our customers and community. These measures included restrictions on business travel, establishment of a remote work environment for most non-customer facing employees, and social distancing restrictions for those employees working at our offices and branch locations. In July 2020, we began initiating the reopening of our offices and reinstatement of branch services, and the return of our workforce, but as of June 30, 2021, approximately 85% of our noncustomer facing employees continued to work remotely. As New York State has eased COVID-19 restrictions, we have lifted our own restrictions including opening our facilities to employees and customers, lifting travel restrictions, and
45


discontinuing other guidelines put in place as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, on-site employees who have not been vaccinated are required to wear masks and follow distancing requirements consistent with CDC guidelines.

Tompkins continues to offer, on a limited basis, assistance to its customers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic by implementing a payment deferral program to assist both consumer and business borrowers that may be experiencing financial hardship due to COVID-19. Our standard program allowed for the deferral of loan payments for up to 90 days; in certain cases we extended additional deferrals or other accommodations. As part of this program, the Company deferred approximately 3,843 loans totaling $1.6 billion. As of June 30, 2021, 3,709 loans totaling approximately $1.4 billion had moved out of the deferral status; of those loans 0.9% were more than 30 days past due. As of June 30, 2021, total loans that continued in a deferral status amounted to approximately $129.4 million, representing 2.5% of total loans. We expect that loans in the deferral program will continue to accrue interest during the deferral period unless otherwise classified as nonperforming. The provisions of the CARES Act and the interagency guidance issued by Federal banking regulators provided clarification related to modifications and deferral programs to assist borrowers who are negatively impacted by the COVID-19 national emergency. The guidance and clarifications detail certain provisions whereby banks are permitted to make deferrals and modifications to the terms of a loan which would not require the loan to be reported as a troubled debt restructuring ("TDR"). In accordance with the CARES Act and the interagency guidance, the Company elected to adopt the provisions to not report qualified loan modifications as TDRs. The relief related to TDRs under the CARES Act was extended by the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021. Under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, relief under the CARES Act will continue until the earlier of (i) 60 days after the date the COVID-19 national emergency comes to an end or (ii) January 1, 2022.

Management continues to monitor credit conditions carefully at the individual borrower level, as well as by industry segment, in order to be responsive to changing credit conditions. It is difficult to assess whether a customer that continues to experience COVID-19 related financial hardship will be able to perform under the original terms of the loan once the deferral period ends. Any such inability to perform may result in increases in past due and nonperforming loans. The table below list certain larger industry concentrations within our loan portfolio and the percentage of each segment that are currently in a deferral status.

Deferral Credit Concentrations
(in thousands)June 30, 2021
DescriptionPortfolio Balance ($)Concentration*Deferral Balance ($)Percent of Loans Currently in Deferral Status
Lessors of Residential Buildings and Dwellings$545,615 17.10 %$125 0.02 %
Hotels and Motels199,016 6.20 %56,812 28.55 %
Dairy Cattle and Milk Production183,790 5.80 %%
Health Care and Social Assistance154,288 4.80 %%
Lessors of Other Real Estate Property113,890 3.60 %6,885 6.05 %
$1,196,598 $63,821 
*Concentration is defined as outstanding loan balances as a percentage of total commercial and commercial real estate loans.

The Company is also participating in the U.S. Small Business Administration (“SBA”) Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”). This program provides borrower guarantees for lenders, and envisions a certain amount of loan forgiveness for loan recipients who properly utilize funds, all in accordance with the rules and regulations established by the SBA for the PPP. The Company began accepting applications for PPP loans on April 3, 2020, and had funded 2,998 loans totaling about $465.6 million when the initial program ended. On January 19, 2021, the Company began accepting both first draw and second draw applications for the reopening of the PPP program and as of July 19, 2021, the Company had funded an additional 2,481 applications totaling $261.2 million.

Out of the total $695.2 million of PPP loans that the Company had funded through July 19, 2021, approximately $471.4 million had been forgiven by the SBA under the terms of the program.

As of June 30, 2021, the Company's nonperforming assets represented 0.67% of total assets, up from 0.60% at December 31, 2020. Despite relatively stable trends in nonperforming assets and other delinquency, some customers have experienced continued cash flow stress related to the pandemic, resulting in an increase in loans rated Special Mention, which totaled $108.3 million at June 30, 2021, up from $44.7 million at June 30, 2020. The downgrades to Special Mention were mainly in the retail, hospitality, and agriculture industries. At June 30, 2021, loans rated Substandard declined to $45.4 million from $48.0 million at June 30, 2020. As mentioned above, the Company is working with its customers who are dealing with hardships caused by
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the pandemic, and as part of those efforts, the Company implemented a loan payment deferral program in March 2020 and participates in the PPP. As of June 30, 2021, the Company had not experienced any significant impact to our liquidity or funding capabilities as a result of COVID-19. The Company’s participation as a lender in the PPP has been a use of liquidity; however, the Federal Reserve Bank has provided a lending facility that may be used by banks to obtain funding specifically for PPP loans. PPP loans would be pledged as collateral on a bank's borrowings under the Federal Reserve Bank's designated PPP lending facility. As of June 30, 2021, the Company has not accessed this Federal Reserve Bank PPP lending facility.

RESULTS OF OPERATION
 
Performance Summary
Net income for the second quarter of 2021 was $22.8 million or $1.54 diluted earnings per share, compared to $21.4 million or $1.44 diluted earnings per share for the same period in 2020. Net income for the first six months of 2021 was $48.5 million or $3.26 diluted earnings per share compared to $29.4 million or $1.97 diluted earnings per share for the first six months of 2020. Net income for the quarter and year-to-date periods ending June 30, 2021, increased by 6.5% and 64.9%, respectively. The increase in net income for the quarter ended June 30, 2021, when compared to the second quarter of 2020 was primarily a result of a $3.1 million credit to provision for credit loss expense and increases in all fee income categories, partially offset by a decrease in net interest income and an increase in noninterest expense.

Return on average assets (“ROA”) for the quarter ended June 30, 2021 was 1.15%, compared to 1.16% for the quarter ended June 30, 2020. Return on average shareholders’ equity (“ROE”) for the second quarter of 2021 was 12.70%, compared to 12.48% for the same period in 2020. For the year-to-date period ended June 30, 2021, ROA and ROE totaled 1.24% and 13.55%, respectively, compared to 0.84% and 8.63%, for the same period in 2020.

Segment Reporting
The Company operates in the following three business segments, banking, insurance, and wealth management. Insurance is comprised of property and casualty insurance services and employee benefit consulting operated under the Tompkins Insurance Agencies, Inc. subsidiary. Wealth management activities include the results of the Company’s trust, financial planning, and wealth management services, organized under the Tompkins Financial Advisors brand. All other activities are considered banking.
 
Banking Segment
The banking segment reported net income of $20.7 million for the second quarter of 2021, an increase of $618,000 or 3.1% from net income of $20.1 million for the same period in 2020. For the six months ended June 30, 2021, the banking segment reported net income of $43.0 million, an increase of $17.1 million or 66.2% from the same period in 2020.
 
Net interest income of $54.8 million for the second quarter of 2021 was down $1.5 million or 2.7% over the same period in 2020, mainly due to lower net deferred loan fees in 2021. For the six months ended June 30, 2021, net interest income of $109.9 million was up $548,000 or 0.5% compared to the first six months of 2020. The increase in net interest income for the six month period was mainly a result of a decrease in interest expense driven by lower market interest rates and growth in average noninterest bearing deposits. Net interest income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 included net deferred loan fees associated with PPP loans of $1.9 million and $4.7 million, respectively, compared to net deferred loan fees of $2.3 million for both the three and six months ended June 30, 2020.

The provision for credit losses was a credit of $3.1 million for the three months ended June 30, 2021, which was down $3.9 million compared to the same period in 2020. For the six month period ended June 30, 2021, the provision for credit losses was a credit of $4.9 million compared to provision expense of $17.6 million for the same period in 2020. The first quarter of 2020 included a provision expense of $16.8 million related to the impact of the economic conditions due to COVID-19 on economic forecasts and other model assumptions relied upon by management in determining the allowance, and reflects the calculation of the allowance for credit losses in accordance with ASU 2016-13. For additional information, see the section titled "The Allowance for Credit Losses" below.

Noninterest income of $6.4 million for the three months ended June 30, 2021 was up $199,000 or 3.2% compared to the same period in 2020, mainly due to increases in fee income categories which in total were up $3.8 million . For the six months ended June 30, 2021, noninterest income of $12.8 million was down $482,000 or 3.6% compared to the six months ended June 30, 2020. The decrease was mainly due to lower gains on sales of residential mortgage loans in 2021.

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Noninterest expense of $37.9 million and $73.2 million for the three and six months, respectively, ended June 30, 2021, was up $1.4 million or 3.8% and $497,000 or 0.7%, respectively, from the same periods in 2020. The increases were mainly attributed to increases in salary and wages and employee benefits reflecting normal annual merit increases, and increase in health insurance expense over the comparable periods in the prior year.
 
Insurance Segment
The insurance segment reported net income of $1.0 million for the three months ended June 30, 2021, which was up $259,000 or 34.9% compared to the second quarter of 2020. Total revenue was up $803,000 or 10.9% for the second quarter of 2021 compared to the same quarter in the prior year. The increase in insurance commissions and fees in the second quarter of 2021 over the same period in 2020; was mainly in property and casualty commissions and contingency income.

For the six months ended June 30, 2021, net income was up $1.3 million or 67.4% compared to the same period in the prior year. Total revenue was up $2.1 million or 13.4% compared to the same period in the prior year. The increase in revenues and net income for the six months ended June 30, 2021 compared to the prior year is mainly due to growth in overall commission revenue of $762,000 or 5.25% and contingency income, which was up $760,000 or 49.6%. In addition, revenue for the prior year was reduced by an increase in reserves for cancellations and policy changes as a result of economic uncertainties related to COVID-19.

Noninterest expenses for the three months ended June 30, 2021 were up $402,000 or 6.3% compared to the three months ended June 30, 2020. Year-to-date noninterest expenses were up $277,000 or 2.2% compared to the six months ended June 30, 2020. The increases in noninterest expenses for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 were mainly the result of increases in new business commissions tied to the increase in commission revenue, related payroll taxes and employee benefits. The increase for the second quarter of 2021 was also attributable to increased health insurance premiums. Certain expenses continue to be below average as a result of pandemic-related travel and business restrictions.

Wealth Management Segment
The wealth management segment reported net income of $1.1 million for the three months ended June 30, 2021, which was up $523,000 or 90.0% compared to the second quarter of 2020. Revenue for the second quarter of 2021 was up $713,000 or 17.4% compared to the second quarter of 2020. The increase for both the three and six month periods in 2021 was mainly due to an increase in advisory fee income resulting from the growth in assets under management. Total expense for the second quarter of 2021 was in line with the second quarter of 2020. For the six months ended June 30, 2021, net income of $2.2 million was up $658,000 or 41.4% compared to the prior year, mainly due to an increase in advisory fee income over the same period prior year. Noninterest expense for the six months ended June 30, 2021, was up 3.9% over the same period in 2020, driven mainly by increases in salary and wages.

Net Interest Income
The following tables show average interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities, and the corresponding yield or cost associated with each for the three and six month periods ended June 30, 2021 and 2020.

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Average Consolidated Statements of Condition and Net Interest Analysis (Unaudited)
Quarter EndedQuarter Ended
June 30, 2021June 30, 2020
AverageAverage
BalanceAverageBalanceAverage
(Dollar amounts in thousands)(QTD)InterestYield/Rate(QTD)InterestYield/Rate
ASSETS
Interest-earning assets
Interest-bearing balances due from banks$216,679 $45 0.08 %$4,541 $0.09 %
Securities (1)
U.S. Government securities1,987,541 5,338 1.08 %1,199,999 6,298 2.11 %
State and municipal (2)114,221 727 2.55 %109,621 743 2.73 %
Other securities (2)3,418 23 2.70 %3,433 32 3.75 %
Total securities2,105,180 6,088 1.16 %1,313,053 7,073 2.17 %
FHLBNY and FRB stock17,285 199 4.62 %21,691 389 7.21 %
Total loans and leases, net of unearned income (2)(3)5,270,648 53,909 4.10 %5,276,794 56,441 4.30 %
Total interest-earning assets7,609,792 60,241 3.18 %6,616,079 63,904 3.89 %
Other assets340,154 797,866 
Total assets$7,949,946 $7,413,945 
LIABILITIES & EQUITY
Deposits
Interest-bearing deposits
Interest bearing checking, savings, & money market3,966,472 943 0.10 %3,660,190 1,935 0.21 %
Time deposits726,258 1,859 1.03 %704,460 2,842 1.62 %
Total interest-bearing deposits4,692,730 2,802 0.24 %4,364,650 4,777 0.44 %
Federal funds purchased & securities sold under agreements to repurchase52,099 15 0.11 %52,464 21 0.16 %
Other borrowings272,993 1,351 1.98 %391,547 2,028 2.08 %
Trust preferred debentures12,978 821 25.39 %17,092 253 5.95 %
Total interest-bearing liabilities5,030,800 4,989 0.40 %4,825,753 7,079 0.59 %
Noninterest bearing deposits2,082,149 1,788,108 
Accrued expenses and other liabilities115,661 109,609 
Total liabilities7,228,610 6,723,470 
Tompkins Financial Corporation Shareholders’ equity719,880 689,018 
Noncontrolling interest1,456 1,457 
Total equity721,336 690,475 
Total liabilities and equity$7,949,946 $7,413,945 
Interest rate spread2.78 %3.30 %
Net interest income/margin on earning assets55,252 2.91 %56,825 3.45 %
Tax Equivalent Adjustment(406)(459)
Net interest income per consolidated financial statements$54,846 $56,366 


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Average Consolidated Statements of Condition and Net Interest Analysis (Unaudited)
Year to Date Period EndedYear to Date Period Ended
June 30, 2021June 30, 2020
AverageAverage
BalanceAverageBalanceAverage
(Dollar amounts in thousands)(YTD)InterestYield/Rate(YTD)InterestYield/Rate
ASSETS
Interest-earning assets
Interest-bearing balances due from banks$312,130 $130 0.08 %$3,033 $0.46 %
Securities (1)
U.S. Government securities1,812,315 9,950 1.11 %1,197,376 12,874 2.16 %
State and municipal (2)117,571 1,502 2.58 %103,550 1,409 2.74 %
Other securities (2)3,422 46 2.72 %3,428 68 3.99 %
Total securities1,933,308 11,498 1.20 %1,304,354 14,351 2.21 %
FHLBNY and FRB stock16,836 412 4.93 %24,124 824 6.87 %
Total loans and leases, net of unearned income (2)(3)5,280,914 108,365 4.14 %5,095,414 112,348 4.43 %
Total interest-earning assets7,543,188 120,405 3.22 %6,426,925 127,530 3.99 %
Other assets345,461 616,521 
Total assets$7,888,649 $7,043,446 
LIABILITIES & EQUITY
Deposits
Interest-bearing deposits
Interest bearing checking, savings, & money market3,957,936 2,036 0.10 %3,436,366 6,301 0.37 %
Time deposits737,729 3,917 1.07 %692,354 5,674 1.65 %
Total interest-bearing deposits4,695,665 5,953 0.26 %4,128,720 11,975 0.58 %
Federal funds purchased & securities sold under agreements to repurchase55,821 31 0.11 %57,996 57 0.20 %
Other borrowings269,019 2,727 2.04 %444,988 4,735 2.14 %
Trust preferred debentures13,105 996 15.33 %17,071 542 6.38 %
Total interest-bearing liabilities5,033,610 9,707 0.39 %4,648,775 17,309 0.75 %
Noninterest bearing deposits2,016,262 1,598,884 
Accrued expenses and other liabilities117,749 111,141 
Total liabilities7,167,621 6,358,800 
Tompkins Financial Corporation Shareholders’ equity719,586 683,206 
Noncontrolling interest1,442 1,440 
Total equity721,028 684,646 
Total liabilities and equity$7,888,649 $7,043,446 
Interest rate spread2.83 %3.24 %
Net interest income/margin on earning assets110,698 2.96 %110,221 3.45 %
Tax Equivalent Adjustment(815)(886)
Net interest income per consolidated financial statements$109,883 $109,335 
1 Average balances and yields on available-for-sale debt securities are based on historical amortized cost
2 Interest income includes the tax effects of taxable-equivalent adjustments using an effective income tax rate of 21% in 2021 and 2020 to increase tax exempt interest income to taxable-equivalent basis.
3 Nonaccrual loans are included in the average asset totals presented above. Payments received on nonaccrual loans have been recognized as disclosed in Note 1 of the Company’s consolidated financial statements included in Part 1 of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020.

Net Interest Income 
Net interest income is the Company’s largest source of revenue, representing 74.4% and 73.9%, respectively, of total revenues for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, compared to 76.6% and 75.2% for the same periods in 2020. Net interest income is dependent on the volume and composition of interest earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities and the level of market interest rates. The above table shows average interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities, and the corresponding yield or cost associated with each.
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Taxable-equivalent net interest income for the three months ended June 30, 2021, decreased $1.6 million or 2.8% from the same period in the prior year. The decrease resulted mainly from the decrease in average asset yields exceeding the decrease in average funding costs. Taxable-equivalent net interest income for the six month period ended June 30, 2021 was in line with the six month period ended June 30, 2020. Net interest income in the first six months of 2021 benefited from the growth in average earning assets, which were up 12.0% over the same six month period in 2020. The growth in average earning assets was partially offset by the decrease in average asset yields resulting from lower market interest rates over the trailing twelve month period as well as a greater percentage of earning assets being comprised of lower yielding securities and interest bearing balances due from banks, when compared to the same period in 2020.

Net interest margin for the three months ended June 30, 2021 was 2.91% compared to 3.45% in 2020. Net interest margin for the six months ended June 30, 2021 was 2.96% compared to 3.45% for the same period in 2020. The decrease in net interest margin for three and six months ended June 30, 2021 compared to the same periods in 2020 was mainly due the effect of declining market interest rates on earning asset yields and a shift in composition of average earning assets, with a greater mix of lower yielding average earning assets, mainly securities and interest bearing balances, partially offset by lower funding costs.
 
Taxable-equivalent interest income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, was $60.2 million and $120.4 million, respectively, down 5.7% and 5.6%, respectively, compared to the same periods in 2020. The year-over-year decrease in taxable-equivalent interest income was mainly a result of lower average asset yields, partially offset by growth in average earning assets. Average asset yields for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 were down 71 and 77 basis points, respectively, compared to the same periods in 2020, mainly driven by the decrease in market interest rates as well as the growth in lower yielding securities and interest bearing balances. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, average earning assets were up $993.7 million or 15.0% and $1.1 billion or 17.4%, respectively, over the same periods in 2020, with the majority of growth in securities and interest bearing balances due from banks. Average loan balances for the three months ended June 30, 2021, were in line with the three months ended June 30, 2020, and for the six months ended June 30, 2021 were up $185.5 million or 17.4% over the six months ended June 30, 2020, while the average yield on loans decreased 20 and 29 basis points, respectively, for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, compared to the same periods in 2020. As a result of its participation in the SBA's PPP, in the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company recorded net deferred loan fees of $1.9 million and $4.7 million, respectively, compared to $3.2 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020. These net deferred loan fees are included in interest income. Average securities balances for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, were up $792,000 or 60.3% and $629,000 or 48.2%, respectively, and the average yield on securities was down 101 basis points and down 29 basis points, respectively, compared to the same periods in 2020. Average interest bearing balances for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, were up $212.1 million and $309.1 million, respectively, over the same periods in 2020.
 
Interest expense for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, decreased by $2.1 million or 29.5% and $7.6 million or 43.9%, respectively, compared to the same periods in 2020, driven mainly by decreases in rates paid on deposits and borrowings as a result of lower market interest rates, partially offset by growth in average balances over prior year. Interest expense for the second quarter of 2021 included an accelerated noncash purchase accounting discount of $650,000 related to the redemption of $5.2 million in trust preferred securities. Growth in average deposit balances also resulted in a decrease in higher cost other borrowings. The average cost of interest-bearing deposits during the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 was 0.24% and 0.26%, respectively, down 20 basis points and 32 basis points, compared to the same periods in 2020. Average interest-bearing deposits for the second quarter of 2021 were up $328.1 million or 7.5% compared to the same period in 2020, while year-to-date average interest-bearing deposits were up $566.9 million or 13.7% compared to the same period in 2020. Average noninterest bearing deposits were up $294.0 million or 16.4% for the three months ended June 30, 2021 when compared to the second quarter of 2020, and for the six months ended June 30, 2021 were up $417.4 million or 26.1% with the same period in 2020. Average deposit balances continued to benefit from the inflows of government stimulus-related deposit funding, including PPP loans originated by Tompkins, the majority of which were deposited into Tompkins checking accounts. Average other borrowings for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 were down $118.6 million or 30.3% and $176.0 million or 39.5%, respectively, compared to the same periods in 2020, mainly due to decreases in overnight borrowings with the FHLB as a result of deposit growth.

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Provision for Credit Losses 
The provision for credit losses represents management’s estimate of the amount necessary to maintain the allowance for credit losses ("ACL") at an appropriate level. Provision for credit losses in the second quarter of 2021 was a credit of $3.1 million, compared to a provision expense of $877,000 for the second quarter of 2020. Provision for credit losses for the six months ended June 30, 2021 was a credit of $4.9 million, compared to an expense of $17.6 million for the same period in 2020. The provision for credit losses for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 included a $353,000 reversal of credit losses and a provision expense of $1.2 million related to off-balance sheet credit exposures compared to provision expense of $1.2 million and $1.7 million, respectively, for the same periods in 2020. The changes compared to prior year were mainly due to adjustments made in the Company's ACL model to reflect improvements in the economic forecasts relied on by management for unemployment and GDP. The section captioned “Financial Condition – The Allowance for Credit Losses” below has further details on the allowance for credit losses and asset quality metrics.
 
Noninterest Income 
Noninterest income was $18.9 million for the second quarter of 2021, which was up 9.8% compared to the second quarter of 2020, and $38.8 million for the first six months of 2021, up 7.5% from the same period prior year. Noninterest income represented 25.6% of total revenue for the second quarter of 2021 and 26.1% for the six months ended June 30, 2021, compared to 23.4% and 24.8%, respectively, for the same periods in 2020.
 
Insurance commissions and fees, the largest component of noninterest income, were a $8.1 million for the second quarter of 2021, an increase of 11.0% from the same period prior year. The increase in insurance commissions and fees in the second quarter of 2021 over the same period in 2020, was mainly in property and casualty commissions and contingency income. For the first six months of 2021, insurance commissions and fees were up $1.9 million or 12.5% compared to the same period in 2020. The increase in revenues for the six month period ended June 30, 2021 compared to the prior year is mainly due to growth in overall commission revenue and contingency income. In addition, revenues for the prior year were reduced by an increase in reserves for cancellations and policy changes as a result of economic uncertainties related to the COVID-19 pandemic.
 
Investment services income of $4.7 million in the second quarter of 2021 was up $797,000 or 20.3% compared to the second quarter of 2020. For the first six months of 2021, investment services income was up $1.3 million or 15.6% compared to the same period in 2020. The increase for both the three and six month periods in 2021 was mainly due to an increase in advisory fee income resulting from the growth in assets under management. Investment services income includes trust services, financial planning, wealth management services, and brokerage related services. The fair value of assets managed by, or in custody of, Tompkins was $5.0 billion at June 30, 2021, which included $1.5 billion of Company-owned securities where Tompkins Trust Company is custodian.
 
Card services income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, was up $668,000 or 29.3% and $868,000 or 19.4%, respectively, compared to the same periods in 2020. Debit card income, the largest component of card services income, was up $532,000 or 31.5% compared to the same quarter in the prior year, and up $772,000 or 24.3% from the first six months of 2020. Contributing to the increase from the prior year was an increase in transaction volumes. During the first six months of 2020, transaction volumes were down due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but during the second quarter of 2021 transaction volumes returned to normal levels.

Other income of $1.7 million in the second quarter of 2021 was down $801,000 or 32.5% compared to the same period in 2020. For the first six months of 2021, other income of $3.6 million was down $931,000 or 20.4% compared to the same period in 2020. The decrease from prior year for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, was mainly due to the gains on sales of residential mortgage loans in the second quarter of 2020 of $691,000 and $867,000 respectively, compared to $153,000 and $582,000 for the same periods in 2021. Higher volume of loans sold and higher premiums paid on loans sold in 2020 were the main drivers for the year-over-year change.

Noninterest Expense 
Noninterest expense of $47.4 million for the second quarter of 2021 and $92.0 million for the first six months of 2021, was up 3.9% and 1.1%, respectively, compared to the same periods in 2020.
 
Expenses associated with compensation and benefits comprise the largest component of noninterest expense, representing 64.5% and 63.9% of total noninterest expense for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021. Salaries and wages expense for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 increased by $956,000 or 4.1% and $1.1 million or 2.5%, respectively, compared to the same periods in 2020. The increases were mainly due to normal merit adjustments. Employee benefits for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, increased by $740,000 or 12.6% and $540,000 or 4.7%, respectively, over the same periods in 2020, mainly as a result of higher health care expense.
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Other expense categories, not related to compensation and benefits, for the three months ended June 30, 2021 were in line with expenses for the three months ended June 30, 2020, and for the six months ended June 30, 2021 were $646,000 or 1.9% below the same period in 2020. Other expenses for the second quarter of 2021 included a $410,000 net occupancy expense of premises related to the termination of a lease. Marketing expenses for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 were up $196,000 or 21.0% and down $250,000 or 13.3%, respectively, compared to the same periods in 2020. FDIC expense for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 were up $150,000 or 30.4% and $401,000 or 40.6%, respectively, when compared to the same periods in 2020, mainly a result of asset growth. Other expense in the second quarter of 2020 also included a loss of $675,000 related to the pending sale of real estate.

Income Tax Expense 
The provision for income taxes was $6.5 million for an effective rate of 22.1% for the second quarter of 2021, compared to tax expense of $5.5 million and an effective rate of 20.5% for the same quarter in 2020. For the first six months of 2021, the provision for income taxes was $13.2 million for an effective rate of 21.3% compared to tax expense of $7.4 million and an effective rate of 20.2% for the same period in 2020. The effective rates differ from the U.S. statutory rate primarily due to the effect of tax-exempt income from loans, securities and life insurance assets, and the income tax effects associated with stock based compensation.


FINANCIAL CONDITION
 
Total assets were $8.0 billion at June 30, 2021, up $366.0 million or 4.8% from December 31, 2020. The increase in total assets over year-end 2020 was mainly due to an increase in securities balances, which increased $538.7 million or 33.1% compared to December 31, 2020. Total loan balances were $5.2 billion at June 30, 2021, down $85.2 million or 1.6% compared to the $5.3 billion reported at year-end 2020. Total cash and cash equivalents were down $97.4 million or 25.1% compared to December 31, 2020. The increase in securities from year-end 2020 was largely due to the investment of excess liquidity into the securities portfolio. Total deposits at June 30, 2021 were up $399.2 million or 6.2% from December 31, 2020. Other borrowings at June 30, 2021 decreased $20.0 million or 7.5% from December 31, 2020, as deposit growth was used to reduce borrowings.

Securities
As of June 30, 2021, the Company’s securities portfolio was $2.2 billion or 27.1% of total assets, compared to $1.6 billion or 21.4% of total assets at year end 2020. The following table details the composition of the securities portfolio.

Available-for-Sale Debt Securities
June 30, 2021December 31, 2020
(In thousands)Amortized CostFair ValueAmortized CostFair Value
U.S. Treasuries$129,228 $129,091 $$
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities824,157 823,718 599,652 $607,480 
Obligations of U.S. states and political subdivisions111,269 113,789 126,642 129,746 
Mortgage-backed securities - residential, issued by
U.S. Government agencies113,357 114,422 179,538 182,108 
U.S. Government sponsored entities828,806 830,656 691,562 705,480 
U.S. corporate debt securities2,500 2,413 2,500 2,379 
Total available-for-sale debt securities$2,009,317 $2,014,089 $1,599,894 $1,627,193 
 
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Held-to-Maturity Debt Securities
June 30, 2021December 31, 2020
(In thousands)Amortized CostFair ValueAmortized CostFair Value
U.S. Treasuries$50,856 $51,459 $$
Obligations of U.S. Government sponsored entities100,992 102,840 
Obligations of U.S. states and political subdivisions
Total held-to-maturity debt securities$151,848 $154,299 $$

As of June 30, 2021, the available-for-sale debt securities portfolio had net unrealized gains of $4.7 million compared to net unrealized gains of $27.3 million at December 31, 2020. The decrease in unrealized gains related to the available-for-sale debt securities portfolio, which reflects the amount that the fair value exceeds amortized cost, was due primarily to decreases in market interest rates during the first six months of 2021. Management’s policy is to purchase investment grade securities that on average have relatively short duration, which helps mitigate interest rate risk and provides sources of liquidity without significant risk to capital.
 
The Company evaluates available-for-sale debt securities in an unrealized loss position to determine whether the decline in the fair value below the amortized cost basis (impairment) is the result of changes in interest rates or reflects a fundamental change in the credit worthiness of the underlying issuer. Any impairment that is not credit related is recognized in other comprehensive income, net of applicable taxes. Credit-related impairment is recognized as an allowance for credit losses (“ACL”) on the balance sheet, limited to the amount by which the amortized cost basis exceeds the fair value, with a corresponding adjustment to earnings. Both the ACL and the adjustment to net income may be reversed if conditions change.

The Company determined that at June 30, 2021, all impaired available-for-sale debt securities were primarily attributable to changes in interest rates and levels of market liquidity, relative to when the investment securities were purchased, and not due to the credit worthiness of the underlying issuers. In addition, the Company maintains the ability and intent to hold these positions until the recovery of unrealized losses and does not believe that the Company would be required to sell any securities currently in an unrealized loss position. Therefore, the Company carried no ACL at June 30, 2021 and there was no credit loss expense recognized by the Company with respect to the securities portfolio during the three and six months ended June 30, 2021.


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Loans and Leases
Loans and leases as of the end of the second quarter and prior year-end period were as follows:
(In thousands)06/30/202112/31/2020
Commercial and industrial
Agriculture$79,351 $94,489 
Commercial and industrial other755,885 792,987 
PPP loans258,964 291,252 
Subtotal commercial and industrial1,094,200 1,178,728 
Commercial real estate
Construction158,654 163,016 
Agriculture201,863 201,866 
Commercial real estate other2,213,798 2,204,310 
Subtotal commercial real estate2,574,315 2,569,192 
Residential real estate
Home equity187,581 200,827 
Mortgages1,246,450 1,235,160 
Subtotal residential real estate1,434,031 1,435,987 
Consumer and other
Indirect6,497 8,401 
Consumer and other64,371 61,399 
Subtotal consumer and other70,868 69,800 
Leases14,728 14,203 
Total loans and leases5,188,142 5,267,910 
Less: unearned income and deferred costs and fees(13,013)(7,583)
Total loans and leases, net of unearned income and deferred costs and fees$5,175,129 $5,260,327 
 
Total loans and leases of $5.2 billion at June 30, 2021 were down $85.2 million or 1.6% from December 31, 2020, mainly in the commercial portfolio and partly due to a net decline in PPP loans. As of June 30, 2021, total loans and leases represented 64.8% of total assets compared to 69.0% of total assets at December 31, 2020. The decrease in total loans as a percentage of total assets reflects a decrease in the pace of loan growth, and growth in the securities portfolio since December 31, 2020.

Residential real estate loans, including home equity loans, were $1.4 billion at June 30, 2021, down $2.0 million or 0.1% compared to December 31, 2020, and comprised 27.7% of total loans and leases at June 30, 2021. Changes in residential loan balances reflect the Company’s decision to retain these loans or sell them in the secondary market due to interest rate considerations. The Company’s Asset/Liability Committee meets regularly and establishes standards for selling and retaining residential real estate mortgage originations.
 
The Company may sell residential real estate loans in the secondary market based on interest rate considerations. These residential real estate loans are generally sold to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“FHLMC”) or State of New York Mortgage Agency (“SONYMA”) without recourse in accordance with standard secondary market loan sale agreements. These residential real estate loans also are subject to customary representations and warranties made by the Company, including representations and warranties related to gross incompetence and fraud. The Company has not had to repurchase any loans as a result of these representations and warranties.
 
During the first six months of 2021 and 2020, the Company sold residential loans totaling $16.8 million and $15.9 million, respectively, recognizing gains of $582,000 and $867,000, respectively. These residential real estate loans were sold without recourse in accordance with standard secondary market loan sale agreements. When residential mortgage loans are sold, the Company typically retains all servicing rights, which provides the Company with a source of fee income. Mortgage servicing rights totaled $1.0 million at June 30, 2021 and $981,000 at December 31, 2020. 

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Commercial real estate loans and commercial and industrial loans totaled $2.6 billion and $1.1 billion, respectively, and represented 49.7% and 21.1%, respectively of total loans as of June 30, 2021. The commercial real estate portfolio was up $5.1 million or 0.2% over year-end 2020, while commercial and industrial loans were down $84.5 million or 7.2%. The decrease in commercial and industrial loans over year-end included a net decline of $32.3 million of PPP loans that had been forgiven by the SBA under the terms of the program. As of June 30, 2021, agriculturally-related loans totaled $281.2 million or 5.4% of total loans and leases, compared to $296.4 million or 5.6% of total loans and leases at December 31, 2020. Agriculturally-related loans include loans to dairy farms and crop farms. Agriculturally-related loans are primarily made based on identified cash flows of the borrower with consideration given to underlying collateral, personal guarantees, and government related guarantees. Agriculturally-related loans are generally secured by the assets or property being financed (commercial real estate) or other business assets such as accounts receivable, livestock, equipment or commodities/crops (commercial).

The Company has adopted comprehensive lending policies, underwriting standards and loan review procedures. Management reviews these policies and procedures on a regular basis. The Company discussed its lending policies and underwriting guidelines for its various lending portfolios in Note 3 – “Loans and Leases” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020. There have been no significant changes in these policies and guidelines since the date of that report. Therefore, both new originations as well as those balances held at December 31, 2020, reflect these policies and guidelines. The Company’s Board of Directors approves the lending policies at least annually. The Company recognizes that exceptions to policy guidelines may occasionally occur and has established procedures for approving exceptions to these policy guidelines. Management has also implemented reporting systems to monitor loan originations, loan quality, concentrations of credit, loan delinquencies and nonperforming loans and potential problem loans. 

The Company's loan and lease customers are located primarily in the New York and Pennsylvania communities served by its four subsidiary banks. Although operating in numerous communities in New York State and Pennsylvania, the Company is still dependent on the general economic conditions of these states and the local economic conditions of the communities within those states in which the Company does business. The suspension of business activities in our market area related to the COVID-19 pandemic has led to a significant increase in unemployment rates as compared to pre-pandemic levels and has had a negative effect on our customers. Although New York and Pennsylvania unemployment rates have improved since their peak in the second quarter of 2020, there continues to be a great deal of uncertainty regarding how long those conditions will continue to exist and whether increased restrictions will cause a further increase in unemployment rates or other worsening of economic conditions. As a result, the economic consequences of the pandemic on our market area generally and on the Company in particular continue to be difficult to quantify.

The Allowance for Credit Losses
 
The below tables represents the allowance for credit losses as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020. The tables provide, as of the dates indicated, an allocation of the allowance for credit losses for inherent loan losses by type. The allocation is neither indicative of the specific amounts or the loan categories in which future charge-offs may occur, nor is it an indicator of future loss trends. The allocation of the allowance for credit losses to each category does not restrict the use of the allowance to absorb losses in any category.
 
(In thousands)6/30/202112/31/2020
Allowance for credit losses
Commercial and industrial$7,113 $9,239 
Commercial real estate29,201 30,546 
Residential real estate9,534 10,257 
Consumer and other1,590 1,562 
Finance leases67 65 
Total$47,505 $51,669 
 
As of June 30, 2021, the total allowance for credit losses was $47.5 million, down $4.2 million or 8.1% compared to December 31, 2020. The ACL as a percentage of total loans measured 0.92% at June 30, 2021, compared to 0.98% at December 31, 2020.

The decrease in the ACL from year-end 2020 reflects lower estimated reserves driven primarily by improvements in forecasts for unemployment and the gross domestic product used in the model relied upon by management. The decrease in the ACL resulting from the improved forecast during the second quarter of 2021, was partially offset by increases in reserves for specific loans within the hospitality and certain other industries that have an elevated level of risk due to the adverse economic impact of
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the COVID-19 pandemic. Although we have seen improved occupancy rates in the hospitality industry in recent months, we continue to closely monitor this industry. Further, although we continue to see a decrease in amount of loans in the deferral program; compared to the first quarter of 2021, as loans returned to repayment status and the delinquency rate for customers who returned to repayment status remained low as of June 30, 2021, at 0.87%, we continue to have qualitative reserves related to loans that remain in the Company's payment deferral program implemented in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The qualitative reserves were added to all portfolio segments, with the majority in commercial real estate, followed by commercial and residential real estate. The Company had net recoveries of $1.1 million in the first six months of 2021, compared to net charge-offs of $1.2 million for the same period in 2020.

The ratio of ACL to total loans is also impacted by the inclusion of PPP loans in our loan portfolio. Since PPP loans are guaranteed by the SBA, there are no reserves allocated to these loans. Excluding PPP loans from total loans results in an ACL to total loan ratio of 0.97% at June 30, 2021, down from 1.04% at December 31, 2020.

Asset quality measures at June 30, 2021 were generally in line with December 31, 2020. Loans internally-classified Special Mention or Substandard were down $18.6 million or 9.8% compared to December 31, 2020. Nonperforming loans and leases were up $8.0 million or 17.5% from year end 2020 and represented 1.04% of total loans at June 30, 2021 compared to 0.87% at December 31, 2020. The decrease in Special Mention or Substandard loans and the increase in nonperforming loans and leases compared to prior year-end was mainly related to one commercial real estate relationship totaling $9.1 million, which was previously reported as Substandard. The allowance for credit losses covered 88.31% of nonperforming loans and leases as of June 30, 2021, compared to 112.87% at December 31, 2020.

Analysis of the Allowance for Credit Losses
(In thousands)6/30/20216/30/2020
Average loans outstanding during period$5,280,914 $5,095,414 
Allowance at beginning of year, prior to adoption of ASU 2016-1351,669 39,892 
Impact of adopting ASU 2016-130 (2,534)
Balance of allowance at beginning of year51,669 43,410 
LOANS CHARGED-OFF:
Commercial and industrial118 
Commercial real estate0 1,305 
Residential real estate46 
Consumer and other152 264 
Finance leases0 
Total loans charged-off$316 $1,573 
RECOVERIES OF LOANS PREVIOUSLY CHARGED-OFF:
Commercial and industrial101 37 
Commercial real estate1,039 30 
Residential real estate158 163 
Consumer and other82 121 
Finance Leases0 
Total loans recovered$1,380 $351 
Net loans (recovered) charged-off(1,064)1,222 
Provision (credit) for credit losses related to loans(5,228)15,946 
Balance of allowance at end of period$47,505 $52,082 
Allowance for credit losses as a percentage of total loans and leases0.92 %0.96 %
Annualized net (recoveries) charge-offs on loans to average total loans and leases during the period(0.01)%0.05 %

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Analysis of Off-Balance Sheet Reserves
(In thousands)6/30/20216/30/2020
Liabilities for off-balance sheet credit exposures at beginning of period$1,920 $477 
Impact of Adopting ASU 2016-130 381 
Provision for credit losses related to off-balance sheet credit exposures327 1,690 
Liabilities for off-balance sheet credit exposures at end of period$2,247 $2,548 

Net loan and lease recoveries for the six months ended June 30, 2021 were $1.1 million compared to net charge-offs of $1.2 million for the same period in 2020. The first quarter of 2020 included a write-down on one credit in the commercial real estate portfolio for $1.2 million. Annualized net recoveries as a percentage of average loans and leases were (0.01)% at June 30, 2021, compared to annualized net charge-offs of 0.05% at June 30, 2020.

The provision for credit losses was a credit of $3.1 million for the three months ended June 30, 2021, compared to an expense of $877,000 for the same period in 2020. For the six month period ended June 30, 2021, the provision for credit losses was a credit of $4.9 million compared to provision expense of $17.6 million. The provision for credit losses for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 included a $353,000 reversal of credit losses and a provision expense of $1.2 million related to off-balance sheet credit exposures compared to provision expense of $1.2 million and $1.7 million, respectively, for the same periods in 2020.

The provision expense for credit losses is based upon the Company's quarterly evaluation of the appropriateness of the allowance for credit losses. The larger than normal provision expense of $17.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020 was mainly a result of the economic forecasts and other model assumptions impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The provision credit of $3.1 million for the first six months of June 30, 2021 reflects lower estimated reserves driven by improvements in forecasts for unemployment and the gross domestic product used in our model, partially offset by increases in qualitative reserves for loans within the hospitality and certain other industries that may have an elevated level of risk due to the adverse economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as loans that remain in the Company's payment deferral program implemented in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Analysis of Past Due and Nonperforming Loans  
(In thousands)6/30/202112/31/20206/30/2020
Loans 90 days past due and accruing
Total loans 90 days past due and accruing$0 $$
Nonaccrual loans
Commercial and industrial$708 $1,775 $2,014 
Commercial real estate35,401 23,627 9,217 
Residential real estate11,556 13,145 11,555 
Consumer and other354 429 397 
Total nonaccrual loans$48,019 $38,976 $23,183 
Troubled debt restructurings not included above5,776 6,803 6,988 
Total nonperforming loans and leases$53,795 $45,779 $30,171 
Other real estate owned88 88 274 
Total nonperforming assets$53,883 $45,867 $30,445 
Allowance as a percentage of nonperforming loans and leases88.31 %112.87 %172.62 %
Total nonperforming loans and leases as percentage of total loans and leases1.04 %0.87 %0.56 %
Total nonperforming assets as percentage of total assets0.67 %0.60 %0.40 %

Nonperforming assets include nonaccrual loans, TDRs, and foreclosed real estate/other real estate owned. Total nonperforming assets of $53.9 million at June 30, 2021 were up $8.0 million or 17.5% compared to December 31, 2020, and up $23.4 million or 77.0% compared to June 30, 2020. The increase in nonperforming assets from June 30, 2020, was mainly in the commercial real estate portfolio, as a result of unfavorable economic conditions related to the COVID-19 pandemic. In the second quarter of 2021, one commercial real estate relationship in the hospitality industry totaling $9.1 million was moved into nonaccrual. The loan had previously been reported as a performing Substandard loan. Nonperforming assets represented 0.67% of total assets at June 30, 2021, up from 0.60% at December 31, 2020, and 0.40% at June 30, 2020. The Company’s ratio of nonperforming assets to total assets is in line with our peer group’s most recent ratio of 0.61% at March 31, 2021.

Loans are considered modified in a TDR when, due to a borrower’s financial difficulties, the Company makes a concession(s) to the borrower that it would not otherwise consider and the borrower could not obtain elsewhere. These modifications may include, among others, an extension of the term of the loan, and granting a period when interest-only payments can be made, with the principal payments made over the remaining term of the loan or at maturity. TDRs are included in the above table within the following categories: “loans 90 days past due and accruing”, “nonaccrual loans”, or “troubled debt restructurings not included above”. Loans in the latter category include loans that meet the definition of a TDR but are performing in accordance with the modified terms and therefore classified as accruing loans. At June 30, 2021, the Company had $7.3 million in TDRs, and of that total $1.5 million was reported as nonaccrual and $5.8 million was considered performing and included in the table above. The provisions of the CARES Act guidance issued by Federal banking regulators provided guidance and clarification related to modifications and deferral programs to assist borrowers who are negatively impacted by the COVID-19 national emergency. The guidance and clarifications detail certain provisions whereby banks are permitted to make deferrals and modifications to the terms of a loan which would not require the loan to be reported as a TDR. In accordance with the CARES Act and the interagency guidance, the Company elected to adopt the provisions to not report qualified loan modifications as TDRs.

In general, the Company places a loan on nonaccrual status if principal or interest payments become 90 days or more past due and/or management deems the collectability of the principal and/or interest to be in question, as well as when required by applicable regulations. Although in nonaccrual status, the Company may continue to receive payments on these loans. These payments are generally recorded as a reduction to principal, and interest income is recorded only after principal recovery is reasonably assured. 

The ratio of the allowance to nonperforming loans and leases (loans past due 90 days and accruing, nonaccrual loans and restructured troubled debt) was 88.31% at June 30, 2021, compared to 112.87% at December 31, 2020, and 172.62% at June 30, 2020. The Company’s nonperforming loans and leases are mostly made up of individually evaluated loans with limited exposure or loans that require limited specific reserves due to the level of collateral available with respect to these loans and/or previous charge-offs.
 
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The Company, through its internal loan review function, identified 22 commercial relationships from the loan portfolio totaling $25.0 million at June 30, 2021, that were potential problem loans. At December 31, 2020, the Company had identified 35 relationships totaling $40.8 million that were potential problem loans. Of the 22 relationships at June 30, 2021, that were Substandard, there were 8 relationships that equaled or exceeded $1.0 million, which in aggregate totaled $21.8 million, the largest of which was $11.8 million. The Company continues to monitor these potential problem relationships; however, management cannot predict the extent to which continued weak economic conditions or other factors may further impact borrowers. These loans remain in a performing status due to a variety of factors, including payment history, the value of collateral supporting the credits, and personal or government guarantees. These factors, when considered in the aggregate, give management reason to believe that the current risk exposure on these loans does not warrant accounting for these loans as nonperforming. However, these loans do exhibit certain risk factors, which have the potential to cause them to become nonperforming. Accordingly, management's attention is focused on these credits, which are reviewed on at least a quarterly basis.

Capital
Total equity was $728.3 million at June 30, 2021, an increase of $10.6 million or 1.5% from December 31, 2020. The increase reflects growth in retained earnings; partially offset by an increase in accumulated other comprehensive losses and a decline in additional paid-in capital.
 
Additional paid-in capital decreased by $6.1 million, from $334.0 million at December 31, 2020, to $327.9 million at June 30, 2021. The decrease was primarily attributable to an $8.0 million aggregate purchase price related to the Company's repurchase and retirement of 101,535 shares of its common stock during the first six months of 2021 pursuant to its publicly announced stock repurchase plan, $504,000 related to the exercise of stock options and $54,000 related to director deferred compensation. This was partially offset by $2.4 million attributed to stock-based compensation.

Retained earnings increased by $32.4 million or 7.7% from $418.4 million at December 31, 2020, to $450.8 million at June 30, 2021, mainly reflecting net income of $48.5 million for the year-to-date period, less dividends paid of $16.1 million.

Accumulated other comprehensive loss increased from a net loss of $32.1 million at December 31, 2020, to a net loss of $47.9 million at June 30, 2021, reflecting a $17.0 million decrease in unrealized gains on available-for-sale debt securities mainly due to changes in market rates and a $1.2 million decrease related to post-retirement benefit plans.

Cash dividends paid in the first six months of 2021 totaled approximately $16.1 million or $1.08 per common share, representing 33.2% of year to date 2021 earnings through June 30, 2021, compared to cash dividends of $15.5 million or $1.04 per common share paid in the first six months of 2020. Cash dividends per share during the first six months of 2021 were up 3.8% over the same period in 2020.
 
The Company and its subsidiary banks are subject to various regulatory capital requirements administered by Federal bank regulatory agencies. Failure to meet minimum capital requirements can initiate certain mandatory and possibly additional discretionary actions by regulators that, if undertaken, could have a direct material adverse effect on the Company’s business, results of operation and financial condition. Under capital adequacy guidelines and the regulatory framework for prompt corrective action (PCA), banks must meet specific guidelines that involve quantitative measures of assets, liabilities, and certain off-balance-sheet items as calculated under regulatory accounting practices. Capital amounts and classifications of the Company and its subsidiary banks are also subject to qualitative judgments by regulators concerning components, risk weightings, and other factors. Quantitative measures established by regulation to ensure capital adequacy require the maintenance of minimum amounts and ratios of common equity Tier 1 capital, Total capital and Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets, and of Tier 1 capital to average assets. Management believes that the Company and its subsidiary banks meet all capital adequacy requirements to which they are subject.

In addition to setting higher minimum capital ratios, the Basel III Capital Rules introduced a capital conservation buffer, which must be added to each of the minimum capital ratios and is designed to absorb losses during periods of economic stress. The capital conservation buffer was phased-in over a three year period that began on January 1, 2016, and was fully phased-in on January 1, 2019 at 2.5%.







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The following table provides a summary of the Company’s capital ratios as of June 30, 2021: 
Regulatory Capital Analysis
June 30, 2021ActualMinimum Capital Required - Basel III Fully Phased-InWell Capitalized Requirement
(dollar amounts in thousands)AmountRatioAmountRatioAmountRatio
Total Capital (to risk weighted assets)$739,527 14.62 %$531,012 10.50 %$505,726 10.00 %
Tier 1 Capital (to risk weighted assets)$688,952 13.62 %$429,867 8.50 %$404,581 8.00 %
Tier 1 Common Equity (to risk weighted assets)$680,153 13.45 %$354,008 7.00 %$328,722 6.50 %
Tier 1 Capital (to average assets)$688,952 8.79 %$313,555 4.00 %$391,943 5.00 %
 
As of June 30, 2021, the Company’s capital ratios exceeded the minimum required capital ratios plus the fully phased-in capital conservation buffer, and the minimum required capital ratios for well capitalized institutions. The capital levels required to be considered well capitalized, presented in the above table, are based upon prompt corrective action regulations, as amended to reflect the changes under Basel III Capital Rules.

Total capital as a percent of risk weighted assets increased to 14.6% at June 30, 2021, compared with 14.4% as of December 31, 2020. Tier 1 capital as a percent of risk weighted assets increased from 13.3% at the end of 2020 to 13.6% as of June 30, 2021. Tier 1 capital as a percent of average assets was 8.8% at June 30, 2021, unchanged from December 31, 2020. Common equity Tier 1 capital was 13.5% at the end of the second quarter of 2021, up from 13.3% at the end of 2020.

As of June 30, 2021, the capital ratios for the Company’s subsidiary banks also exceeded the minimum required capital ratios for well capitalized institutions, plus the fully phased-in capital conservation buffer.

In the first quarter of 2020, U.S. Federal regulatory authorities issued an interim final rule that provides banking organizations that adopt CECL during the 2020 calendar year with the option to delay for two years the estimated impact of CECL on regulatory capital relative to regulatory capital determined under the prior incurred loss methodology, followed by a three-year transition period to phase out the aggregate amount of the capital benefit provided during the initial two-year delay (i.e., a five-year transition in total). In connection with our adoption of CECL on January 1, 2020, we elected to utilize the five-year CECL transition.
 
Deposits and Other Liabilities
Total deposits of $6.8 billion at June 30, 2021 were up $399.2 million or 6.2% from December 31, 2020. The increase from year-end 2020 was primarily in checking, money market and savings balances, which collectively were up $254.1 million or 6.8%. The majority of the increase was in money market deposit balances and reflects growth in municipal, non-personal and personal deposits, partially offset by the repayment of $200 million of brokered deposits that matured during the quarter. Noninterest bearing deposits were up $181.2 million or 9.4% and time deposits declined $36.1 million or 4.8%, respectively from year-end 2020. Deposit balances have benefited from PPP loan originations and government stimulus payments. The majority of the Company's PPP loan originations were deposited in Tompkins checking accounts.

The most significant source of funding for the Company is core deposits. The Company defines core deposits as total deposits less time deposits of $250,000 or more, brokered deposits, municipal money market deposits, and reciprocal deposit relationships with municipalities. Core deposits grew by $570.3 million or 11.1% from year-end 2020, to $5.7 billion at June 30, 2021. Core deposits represented 83.7% of total deposits at June 30, 2021, compared to 80.1% of total deposits at December 31, 2020.
 
The Company uses both retail and wholesale repurchase agreements. Retail repurchase agreements are arrangements with local customers of the Company, in which the Company agrees to sell securities to the customer with an agreement to repurchase those securities at a specified later date. Retail repurchase agreements totaled $52.1 million at June 30, 2021, and $65.8 million at December 31, 2020. Management generally views retail repurchase agreements as an alternative to large time deposits.
 
The Company’s other borrowings totaled $245.0 million at June 30, 2021, down $20.0 million or 7.5% from $265.0 million at December 31, 2020. The decrease in borrowings was due to the seasonal growth in public deposits and core deposit growth from year-end. Borrowings at June 30, 2021 included $245.0 million of FHLB term advances. Borrowings at year-end 2020 included $265.0 million of FHLB term advances. Of the $245.0 million in FHLB term advances at June 30, 2021, $175.0 million was due in over one year.

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Liquidity
As of June 30, 2021, the Company had not experienced any significant impact to our liquidity or funding capabilities as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Company is participating as a lender in the PPP under the CARES Act. The Federal Reserve Bank has provided a lending facility that may be used by banks to obtain funding specifically for PPP loans. PPP loans would be pledged as collateral on any of the Bank's borrowings under the Federal Reserve Bank's PPP lending facility. The Company has a long-standing liquidity plan in place that is designed to ensure that appropriate liquidity resources are available to fund the balance sheet, and as of June 30, 2021 had not accessed the Federal Reserve's PPP lending facility. Additionally, given the uncertainties related to the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on liquidity, the Company has confirmed the availability of funds at the FHLB of NY and FHLB of Pittsburgh, completed actions required to activate participation in the Federal Reserve Bank PPP lending facility, and confirmed availability of Federal Fund lines with correspondent bank partners.

The objective of liquidity management is to ensure the availability of adequate funding sources to satisfy the demand for credit, deposit withdrawals, and business investment opportunities. The Company’s large, stable core deposit base and strong capital position are the foundation for the Company’s liquidity position. The Company uses a variety of resources to meet its liquidity needs, which include deposits, cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments, cash flow from lending and investing activities, repurchase agreements, and borrowings. The Company’s Asset/Liability Management Committee monitors asset and liability positions of the Company’s subsidiary banks individually and on a combined basis. The Committee reviews periodic reports on liquidity and interest rate sensitivity positions. Comparisons with industry and peer groups are also monitored. The Company’s strong reputation in the communities it serves, along with its strong financial condition, provides access to numerous sources of liquidity as described below. Management believes these diverse liquidity sources provide sufficient means to meet all demands on the Company’s liquidity that are reasonably likely to occur.
 
Core deposits, discussed above under “Deposits and Other Liabilities”, are a primary and low cost funding source obtained primarily through the Company’s branch network. In addition to core deposits, the Company uses non-core funding sources to support asset growth. These non-core funding sources include time deposits of $250,000 or more, brokered time deposits, municipal money market deposits, reciprocal deposits, bank borrowings, securities sold under agreements to repurchase and overnight and term advances from the FHLB. Rates and terms are the primary determinants of the mix of these funding sources. Non-core funding sources of $1.4 billion at June 30, 2021 decreased $204.8 million or 12.7% as compared to year-end 2020. The decrease was driven mainly by the repayment of $200.0 million of brokered time deposits that matured during the quarter. Non-core funding sources, as a percentage of total liabilities, were 19.4% at June 30, 2021, compared to 23.4% at December 31, 2020. 
 
Non-core funding sources may require securities to be pledged against the underlying liability. Securities held at fair value were $1.4 billion at June 30, 2021 and $1.2 billion at December 31, 2020, and were either pledged or sold under agreements to repurchase. Pledged securities represented 62.5% of total securities at June 30, 2021, compared to 75.3% of total securities at December 31, 2020.
 
Cash and cash equivalents totaled $291.0 million as of June 30, 2021 which decreased from $388.5 million at December 31, 2020. The decrease in cash from year-end was mainly due to the purchase of higher-yielding securities, which totaled $568.0 million at June 30, 2021. Short-term investments, consisting of securities due in one year or less, increased from $55.0 million at December 31, 2020, to $58.7 million on June 30, 2021.
 
Cash flow from the loan and investment portfolios provides a significant source of liquidity. These assets may have stated maturities in excess of one year, but have monthly principal reductions. Total mortgage-backed securities, at fair value, were $945.1 million at June 30, 2021 compared with $887.6 million at December 31, 2020. Outstanding principal balances of residential mortgage loans, consumer loans, and leases totaled approximately $1.5 billion at June 30, 2021, flat compared with year-end 2020. Aggregate amortization from monthly payments on these assets provides significant additional cash flow to the Company.

The Company's liquidity is enhanced by ready access to national and regional wholesale funding sources including Federal funds purchased, repurchase agreements, brokered certificates of deposit, and FHLB advances. Through its subsidiary banks, the Company has borrowing relationships with the FHLB and correspondent banks, which provide secured and unsecured borrowing capacity. At June 30, 2021, the unused borrowing capacity on established lines with the FHLB was $2.2 billion.

As members of the FHLB, the Company’s subsidiary banks can use certain unencumbered mortgage-related assets and securities to secure additional borrowings from the FHLB. At June 30, 2021, total unencumbered residential mortgage loans and securities were $1.6 billion. Additional assets may also qualify as collateral for FHLB advances upon approval of the FHLB.
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Newly Adopted Accounting Standards

ASU No 2019-12, "Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes.” ASU 2019-12 removes certain exceptions to the general principles in Topic 740 in Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. ASU 2019-12 became effective for the Company on January 1, 2021, and did not have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

Accounting Standards Pending Adoption

ASU No. 2020-04, "Reference Rate Reform (Topic 848): Facilitation of the Effects of Reference Rate Reform on Financial Reporting." The amendments in this update provide optional guidance for a limited period of time to ease the potential burden in accounting for (or recognizing the effects of) reference rate reform on financial reporting. It provides optional expedients and exceptions for applying generally accepted accounting principles to contracts, hedging relationships, and other transactions affected by reference rate reform if certain criteria are met. The amendments in this update are effective for all entities as of March 12, 2020 through December 31, 2022. Tompkins is currently evaluating the potential impact of ASU 2020-04 on our consolidated financial statements.

The Company reviewed new accounting standards as issued. Management has not identified any other new standards that it believes will have a significant impact on the Company’s financial statements.

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure About Market Risk
 
Interest rate risk is the primary market risk category associated with the Company’s operations. Interest rate risk refers to the volatility of earnings caused by changes in interest rates. The Company manages interest rate risk using income simulation to measure interest rate risk inherent in its on-balance sheet and off-balance sheet financial instruments at a given point in time. The simulation models are used to estimate the potential effect of interest rate shifts on net interest income for future periods. Each quarter, the Company’s Asset/Liability Management Committee reviews the simulation results to determine whether the exposure of net interest income to changes in interest rates remains within levels approved by the Company’s Board of Directors. The Committee also considers strategies to manage this exposure and incorporates these strategies into the investment and funding decisions of the Company. The Company does not currently use derivatives, such as interest rate swaps, to manage its interest rate risk exposure, but may consider such instruments in the future.

The Company’s Board of Directors has set a policy that interest rate risk exposure will remain within a range whereby net interest income will not decline by more than 10% in one year as a result of a 100 basis point parallel change in rates. Based upon the simulation analysis performed as of May 31, 2021, a 200 basis point parallel upward change in interest rates over a one-year time frame would result in a one-year decrease in net interest income from the base case of approximately 3.8%, while a 100 basis point parallel decline in interest rates over a one-year period would result in a decrease in one-year net interest income from the base case of 1.9%. The simulation assumes no balance sheet growth and no management action to address balance sheet mismatches.

The decrease in net interest income in the rising rate scenario is a result of the balance sheet showing a more liability sensitive position over a one year time horizon. As such, in the short-term net interest income is expected to trend slightly below the base assumption, as upward adjustments to rate sensitive deposits and short-term funding outpace increases to asset yields which are concentrated in intermediate to longer-term products. As intermediate and longer-term assets continue to reprice/adjust into higher rate environment and funding costs stabilize, net interest income is expected to trend upwards.

The down 100 basis point scenario decreases net interest income slightly in the first year as a result of the Company's assets repricing downward to a greater degree than the rates on the Company's interest bearing liabilities, mainly deposits and overnight borrowings. Rates on savings and money market accounts have moved down and are at or near historically low levels allowing little interest expense relief in the first year of a declining rate scenario. In addition, the model assumes that prepayments accelerate in the down interest rate environment resulting in additional pressure on asset yields as proceeds are reinvested at lower rates.

The most recent simulation of a base case scenario, which assumes interest rates remain unchanged from the date of the simulation, reflects a net interest margin that is declining slightly over the next 12 to 18 months.

Although the simulation model is useful in identifying potential exposure to interest rate movements, actual results may differ from those modeled as the repricing, maturity, and prepayment characteristics of financial instruments may change to a different degree than modeled. In addition, the model does not reflect actions that management may employ to manage the
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Company’s interest rate risk exposure. The Company’s current liquidity profile, capital position, and growth prospects, offer a level of flexibility for management to take actions that could offset some of the negative effects of unfavorable movements in interest rates. Management believes the current exposure to changes in interest rates is not significant in relation to the earnings and capital strength of the Company.
 
In addition to the simulation analysis, management uses an interest rate gap measure. The table below is a Condensed Static Gap Report, which illustrates the anticipated repricing intervals of assets and liabilities as of June 30, 2021. The Company’s one-year net interest rate gap was a negative $229.7 million or 2.88% of total assets at June 30, 2021, compared with a positive $58.9 million or 0.77% of total assets at December 31, 2020. A negative gap position exists when the amount of interest-bearing liabilities maturing or repricing exceeds the amount of interest-earning assets maturing or repricing within a particular time period. This analysis suggests that the Company’s net interest income is more vulnerable to an increasing rate environment than it is to a prolonged declining interest rate environment. An interest rate gap measure could be significantly affected by external factors such as a rise or decline in interest rates, loan or securities prepayments, and deposit withdrawals.

Condensed Static Gap - June 30, 2021  Repricing Interval 
(In thousands)Total0-3 months3-6 months6-12 monthsCumulative 12 months
Interest-earning assets1
$7,472,149 $1,283,204 $460,133 $862,077 $2,605,414 
Interest-bearing liabilities7,142,934 2,301,103 205,116 328,878 2,835,097 
Net gap position$(1,017,899)$255,017 $533,199 $(229,683)
Net gap position as a percentage of total assets(12.74)%3.19 %6.67 %(2.88)%
 1 Balances of available securities are shown at amortized cost 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures
 
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
The Company’s management, with the participation of the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended) as of June 30, 2021.

Based upon that evaluation, the Company's Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that, as of the end of the period covered by this Report on Form 10-Q, the Company's disclosure controls and procedures were effective.

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
There were no changes in the Company's internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the quarter ended June 30, 2021, that materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company's internal control over financial reporting.

PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

Item 1. Legal Proceedings 
The Company is subject to various claims and legal actions that arise in the ordinary course of conducting business. As of June 30, 2021, management, after consultation with legal counsel, does not anticipate that the aggregate ultimate liability arising out of litigation pending or threatened against the Company or its subsidiaries will be material to the Company's consolidated financial position. On at least a quarterly basis, the Company assesses its liabilities and contingencies in connection with such legal proceedings. Although the Company does not believe that the outcome of pending litigation will be material to the Company's consolidated financial position, it cannot rule out the possibility that such outcomes will be material to the consolidated results of operations for a particular reporting period in the future.
 
Item 1A. Risk Factors
 
There have been no material changes in the risk factors previously disclosed under Item 1A. of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020.
 
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Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
 
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
 
Total Number of Shares PurchasedAverage Price Paid Per ShareTotal Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or ProgramsMaximum Number of Shares that May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plans or Programs
(a)(b)(c)(d)
April 1, 2021 through April 30, 20213,796 $78.83 2,536 248,243 
May 1, 2021 through May 31, 202125,845 81.31 25,297 222,946 
June 1, 2021 through June 30, 202152,171 80.92 52,171 170,775 
Total81,812 $80.95 80,004 170,775 

Included in the table above are 1,260 shares purchased in April 2021, at an average cost of $80.83, and 548 shares purchased in May 2021, at an average cost of $83.25, by the trustee of the rabbi trust established by the Company under the Company’s Stock Retainer Plan For Eligible Directors of Tompkins Financial Corporation and Participating Subsidiaries, which were part of the director deferred compensation under that plan.

On January 30, 2020, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized a share repurchase plan (the “2020 Repurchase Plan”) for the repurchase of up to 400,000 shares of the Company’s common stock over the 24 months following adoption of the plan. Shares may be repurchased from time to time under the 2020 Repurchase Plan in open market transactions at prevailing market prices, in privately negotiated transactions, or by other means in accordance with federal securities laws, and the repurchase program may be suspended, modified or terminated by the Board of Directors at any time for any reason. Under the 2020 Repurchase Plan, the Company had repurchased 229,225 shares through June 30, 2021, at an average cost of $75.06.

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities
 
None
 
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities
 
None 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
 
Not applicable
 
Item 5. Other Information
 
None        
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Item 6.     Exhibits
 
EXHIBIT INDEX
 
Exhibit NumberDescription
31.1
31.2
32.1
32.2
101 INS**The instance document does not appear in the interactive data file because its XBRL tags are embedded within the inline XBRL document
101 SCH**Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101 CAL**Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101 DEF**Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101 LAB**Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101 PRE**Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document
104Cover Page Interactive Data File - the cover page interactive data file does not appear in the interactive date file because its XBRL tags are embedded with the inline XBRL document.
** Attached as Exhibit 101 to this report are the following formatted in Inline XBRL (eXtensible Business Reporting Language): (i) Consolidated Statements of Condition as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020; (ii) Consolidated Statements of Income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020; (iii) Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020; (iv) Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020; (v) Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders' Equity for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020; and (vi Notes to Unaudited Consolidated Financial Statements.

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SIGNATURES
 
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
 
Date: August 09, 2021
 
TOMPKINS FINANCIAL CORPORATION
 
By:/s/ Stephen S. Romaine 
 Stephen S. Romaine 
 President and Chief Executive Officer 
 (Principal Executive Officer) 
 
By:/s/ Francis M. Fetsko 
 Francis M. Fetsko 
 Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, and Chief Operating Officer
 (Principal Financial Officer) 
(Principal Accounting Officer) 
 

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