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EMAN EMagin

Filed: 12 Nov 21, 4:15pm

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

Form 10-Q

þ QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2021

Or

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 For the transition period from   to

Commission file number 001-15751 

Picture 1

eMAGIN CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware

56-1764501

(State or other jurisdiction of

(I.R.S. Employer

incorporation or organization)

Identification No.)

 

700 South Drive, Suite 201, Hopewell Junction, NY 12533

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

(845) 838-7900

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class

Trading Symbol(s)

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $.001 Par Value Per Share

EMAN

NYSE American

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes þ     No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes þ     No ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer  ¨

 

Smaller Reporting Company  þ

Accelerated filer           ¨

 

Emerging growth company    ¨

Non-accelerated Filer    þ

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act)    Yes ¨     No þ

As of October 31, 2021, there were 72,679,686 common shares at $0.001 par value per share of the registrant outstanding.

Table of Contents

STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, or Report, contains forward-looking statements that are based on our management’s belief and assumptions and on information currently available to our management. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in these forward-looking statements are reasonable, these statements relate to future events or our future financial performance, and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements.

In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential,” “continue” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. You should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements because they involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, which are, in some cases, beyond our control and which could materially affect our results. Factors that may cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations include, among other things, those listed in the section entitled “Risk Factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020. If one or more of these risks or uncertainties occur, or if our underlying assumptions prove to be incorrect, actual events or results may vary significantly from those implied or projected by the forward-looking statements. No forward-looking statement is a guarantee of future performance. You should read this Report and the documents that we reference in this Report and have filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, as exhibits to this Report, completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from any future results expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements.

In particular, forward-looking statements in this Report include statements about:

our ability to generate sufficient cash flows and obtain the additional financing we need in order to continue as a going concern;

our ability to generate additional revenue or secure additional financing when required, in order to continue our current operations;

our ability to manufacture our products on a timely basis and at a competitive cost;

our ability to successfully remediate manufacturing issues that have resulted in production delays and successfully integrate new equipment on our manufacturing line;

our ability to achieve our yield improvement initiatives;

our ability to meet our obligations as they become due over the next twelve months;

our needs for additional financing, as well as our ability to obtain such additional financing on reasonable terms and the interest rate and expense we incur on any debt financing;

the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our business;

our anticipated cash needs and our estimates regarding our capital requirements;

our ability to repay our indebtedness pursuant to the asset based lending, or ABL, facility;

changes in demand by original equipment manufacturer, or OEM, customers for advanced microdisplays, limited availability of products provided by suppliers and foundries, high costs of raw materials, pricing pressure brought by the marketplace or governmental customers and other factors that impact the commercial, military and consumer markets in which we operate;

our ability to maintain our relationships with customers and vendors;

our ability to protect our intellectual property;

our ability to successfully develop and market our products to customers;

our ability to generate customer demand for our products in our target markets;

the development of our target markets and market opportunities, including the consumer market;

technological developments in our target markets and the development of alternate, competing technologies in them;

the rate of acceptance of augmented reality/virtual reality, or AR/VR, systems and products in the consumer and commercial marketplace;

our potential exposure to product liability claims;

our ability to meet customers’ delivery schedules;

market pricing for our products and for competing products;

the impact of the majority holder of our Series B convertible stock, being able to prevent us from entering into significant corporate transactions, including certain capital raising transactions;

increasing competition;

our ability to comply with the terms of government awards;

provisions in certain of our organizational documents, commercial agreements, government awards, and our military contracts that may prevent or delay an acquisition of, partnership with, or investment in us and our ability to develop original equipment manufacturer and mass production partnerships; and

our ability to maintain our operations as a result of potential employee, customer and supplier disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic or any resurgences and quarantine restrictions.

The forward-looking statements in this Report represent our views as of the date of this Report. We anticipate that subsequent events and developments may cause our views to change. However, while we may elect to update these forward-looking statements at some point in the future, we have no current intention of doing so except to the extent required by applicable law. Therefore, these forward-looking statements do not represent our views as of any date other than the date of this Report.

In this Report, references to “eMagin Corporation,” “eMagin,”, “we,” “us,” and “our company” refer to eMagin Corporation and our wholly owned subsidiary, Virtual Vision, Inc. References to “Consumer Night Vision Business” refers to our former consumer night vision products business, which we exited in 2018.

eMagin® is a registered trademark of eMagin Corporation. dPdTM is an unregistered trademark of eMagin. All other trademarks used in this Annual Report are the property of their respective owners.


ITEM 1.  Financial Statements 

eMAGIN CORPORATION 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS 

(In thousands, except share data)

(unaudited) 

September 30,

December 31,

2021

2020

ASSETS

Current assets:

Cash and cash equivalents

$

7,337

$

8,315 

Restricted cash

1,272

2,111 

Accounts receivable, net

4,345

5,314 

Account receivable-due from government awards

204

1,013 

Unbilled accounts receivable

1,173

253 

Inventories

7,917

8,379 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

723

943 

Total current assets

22,971

26,328 

Property, plant and equipment, net

29,344

21,132 

Operating lease right - of - use assets

5

50 

Intangibles and other assets

39

126 

Total assets

$

52,359

$

47,636 

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

Current liabilities:

Accounts payable

$

988

$

1,206 

Accrued compensation

2,005

1,628 

Paycheck Protection Program loan - current

982 

Revolving credit facility, net

1,992

1,875 

Common stock warrant liability

4,446

4,622 

Other accrued expenses

476

1,693 

Deferred revenue

65

425 

Operating lease liability - current

5

51 

Finance lease liability - current

1,138

1,027 

Other current liabilities

747

757 

Total current liabilities

11,862

14,266 

Other liability - long term

28

56 

Paycheck Protection Program loan - long term

982 

Deferred Income - government awards - long term

12,072

4,309 

Finance lease liability - long term

11,641

11,783 

Total liabilities

35,603

31,396 

Shareholders’ equity:

Preferred stock, $0.001 par value: authorized 10,000,000 shares:

Series B Convertible Preferred stock, (liquidation preference of $5,659) stated value $1,000 per share, $0.001 par value: 10,000 shares designated and 5,659 issued and outstanding as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

Common stock, $0.001 par value: authorized 200,000,000 shares, issued 72,697,697 shares, outstanding 72,535,631 shares as of September 30, 2021 and issued 68,890,819 shares, outstanding 68,728,753 shares as of December 31, 2020.

72

69 

Additional paid-in capital

275,592

268,729 

Accumulated deficit

(258,408)

(252,058)

Treasury stock, 162,066 shares as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

(500)

(500)

Total shareholders’ equity

16,756

16,240 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

$

52,359

$

47,636 

See notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements. 

eMAGIN CORPORATION 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS 

(In thousands, except share and per share data) 

(unaudited) 

Three Months Ended

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

September 30,

2021

2020

2021

2020

Revenues:

Product

$

5,313

$

6,978

$

17,160

$

18,872

Contract

469

333

1,674

2,870

Total revenues, net

5,782

7,311

18,834

21,742

Cost of revenues:

Product

4,962

5,385

15,135

15,153

Contract

261

234

861

1,487

Total cost of revenues

5,223

5,619

15,996

16,640

Gross profit

559

1,692

2,838

5,102

Operating expenses:

Research and development

1,669

1,734

5,299

4,313

Selling, general and administrative

2,203

1,824

5,717

5,334

Total operating expenses

3,872

3,558

11,016

9,647

Loss from operations

(3,313)

(1,866)

(8,178)

(4,545)

Other (expense) income:

Change in fair value of common stock warrant liability

4,742

(1,803)

176

(3,304)

Interest expense, net

(210)

(10)

(625)

(45)

Gain on forgiveness of debt

1,963

Other income, net

87

148

314

163

Total other income (expense)

4,619

(1,665)

1,828

(3,186)

Income (loss) before provision for income taxes

1,306

(3,531)

(6,350)

(7,731)

Income taxes

Net income (loss)

$

1,306

$

(3,531)

$

(6,350)

$

(7,731)

Less net income allocated to participating securities

268

Net income (loss) allocated to common shares 

$

1,038

$

(3,531)

$

(6,350)

$

(7,731)

Income (loss) per share, basic

$

0.01

$

(0.06)

$

(0.09)

$

(0.14)

Loss per share, diluted

$

(0.05)

$

(0.06)

$

(0.09)

$

(0.14)

Weighted average number of shares outstanding:

Basic

72,527,479

57,735,846

71,675,336

54,450,815

Diluted

73,861,952

57,735,846

73,416,993

54,450,815

See notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

eMAGIN CORPORATION 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDER’S EQUITY

(In thousands, except share data) 

(unaudited)

Preferred Shares

Preferred Stock

Common Shares

Common Stock

Additional Paid-in Capital

Accumulated Deficit

Treasury Stock

Total Shareholders’ Equity

Balance, December 31, 2020

5,659 

$

68,890,819 

$

69 

$

268,729 

$

(252,058)

$

(500)

$

16,240 

Exercise of options

227,792 

364 

364 

Stock based compensation

13 

13 

Exercise of common stock warrants

3,019,247 

5,059 

5,062 

Net loss

(7,378)

(7,378)

Balance, March 31, 2021

5,659 

$

72,137,858 

$

72 

$

274,165 

$

(259,436)

$

(500)

$

14,301 

Exercise of options

203,459 

381 

381 

Stock based compensation

37 

37 

Exercise of common stock warrants

324,413 

590 

590 

Net loss

(278)

(278)

Balance, June 30, 2021

5,659 

$

72,665,730 

$

72 

$

275,173 

$

(259,714)

$

(500)

$

15,031 

Exercise of options

15,300 

Stock based compensation

16,667 

419 

419 

Net income

1,306 

1,306 

Balance, September 30, 2021

5,659 

$

72,697,697 

$

72 

$

275,592 

$

(258,408)

$

(500)

$

16,756 

Preferred Shares

Preferred Stock

Common Shares

Common Stock

Additional Paid-in Capital

Accumulated Deficit

Treasury Stock

Total Shareholders’ Equity

Balance, December 31, 2019

5,659 

$

50,250,378 

$

50 

$

258,767 

$

(240,610)

$

(500)

$

17,707 

Stock based compensation

43 

43 

Public offering of common shares, net of offering costs

3,730,540 

1,548 

1,552 

Net loss

(1,369)

(1,369)

Balance, March 31, 2020

5,659 

$

53,980,918 

$

54 

$

260,358 

$

(241,979)

$

(500)

$

17,933 

Stock based compensation

44 

44 

Public offering of common shares, net of offering costs

3,408,913 

1,756 

1,759 

Exercise of common stock warrants

4,017,500 

36 

40 

Net loss

(2,831)

(2,831)

Balance, June 30, 2020

5,659 

$

61,407,331 

$

61 

$

262,194 

$

(244,810)

$

(500)

$

16,945 

Stock based compensation

60 

60 

Public offering of common shares, net of offering costs

6,135,991 

6,466 

6,473 

Exercise of common stock warrants

118,346 

Net loss

(3,531)

(3,531)

Balance, September 30, 2020

5,659 

$

67,661,668 

$

68 

$

268,720 

$

(248,341)

$

(500)

$

19,947 

See notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

eMAGIN CORPORATION 

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS 

(In thousands) 

(unaudited)

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

2021

2020

Cash flows from operating activities:

Net loss

$

(6,350)

$

(7,731)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

Depreciation and amortization

2,110

1,487

Change in fair value of common stock warrant liability

(176)

3,304

Gain on forgiveness of debt

(1,963)

Stock-based compensation

469

147

Amortization of operating lease right-of-use assets

45

563

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

Accounts receivable

1,778

788

Unbilled accounts receivable

(920)

124

Inventories

462

699

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

220

(666)

Deferred revenues

(360)

116

Operating lease liabilities

(46)

(588)

Accounts payable, accrued expenses, and other current liabilities

(1,964)

63

Net cash used in operating activities

(6,695)

(1,694)

Cash flows from investing activities:

Purchase of equipment

(729)

(946)

Purchase of equipment, government grant

(9,393)

(582)

Net cash used in investing activities

(10,122)

(1,528)

Cash flows from financing activities:

Repayments under revolving line of credit, net

117

(2,401)

Proceeds from public offering, net

9,784

Proceeds from Paycheck Protection Program loan

1,963

Change in finance lease liabilities

(225)

Proceeds from government grant

8,711

2,404

Proceeds from warrant exercise

5,652

40

Proceeds from exercise of stock options

745

Net cash provided by financing activities

15,000

11,790

Net (decrease) increase in cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash

(1,817)

8,568

Cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash, beginning of period

10,426

3,515

Cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash, end of period

$

8,609

$

12,083

Cash, cash equivalents, end of period

7,337

10,283

Restricted cash, end of period

1,272

1,800

Supplementary Cash Flow Information

Cash paid for interest

$

625

$

52

Cash paid for income taxes

$

$

Non-cash activities:

Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for finance lease liabilities

$

194

$

 

See notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

eMAGIN CORPORATION 

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

 

 

Note 1 – Description of the Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The Business 

eMagin Corporation, or the Company, designs, develops, manufactures and markets Active Matrix organic light emitting diode, or OLED, -on-silicon microdisplays used in military and commercial AR/VR devices and other near-eye imaging products which utilize OLED microdisplays. The Company’s products are sold mainly in North America, Asia, and Europe.

Basis of Presentation 

In the opinion of management, the accompanying unaudited interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements of eMagin Corporation and its subsidiary reflect all adjustments, including normal recurring accruals, necessary for a fair presentation. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. Certain information and footnote disclosure normally included in annual financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, or GAAP, have been condensed or omitted pursuant to instructions, rules and regulations prescribed by the SEC. These unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements, and related disclosures, should be read in conjunction with the audited Consolidated Financial Statements contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020. The results of operations for the periods ended September 30, 2021 are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year. The Consolidated Financial Statements as of December 31, 2020 are derived from audited financial statements included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.

Use of estimates

In accordance with GAAP, management utilizes certain estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. On an on-going basis, management evaluates its estimates and judgments related to, among others, allowance for doubtful accounts, warranty reserves, inventory reserves, stock-based compensation expense, liability classified warrants, percentage of completion of contracts, deferred tax asset valuation allowances, litigation and other loss contingencies. Management bases its estimates and judgments on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results could differ from those estimates. 

Intangible Assets – Patents

Acquired patents are recorded at purchase price as of the date acquired and amortized over the expected useful life which is generally the remaining life of the patent.

The total intangible amortization expense was approximately $2 thousand and $6 thousand for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020 respectively.

Product warranty

The Company generally offers a one year product replacement warranty. The standard policy is to repair or replace the defective products. The Company accrues for estimated returns of defective products at the time revenue is recognized based on historical activity as well as for specific known product issues. The determination of these accruals requires the Company to make estimates of the frequency and extent of warranty activity and estimate future costs to replace the products under warranty. If the actual warranty activity and/or repair and replacement costs differ significantly from these estimates, adjustments to cost of revenue may be required in future periods.


The following table provides a summary of the activity related to the Company's warranty liability included in other current liabilities, (in thousands):

Three Months Ended

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

September 30,

2021

2020

2021

2020

Beginning balance

$

705

$

351

$

615

$

300

Warranty accruals and adjustments

(73)

142

27

201

Warranty claims

(2)

(4)

(12)

(12)

Ending balance

$

630

$

489

$

630

$

489

Inventories

Inventories are stated on a standard cost basis adjusted to approximate the lower of cost (as determined by the first-in, first-out method) or net realizable value. Cost includes materials, labor, and manufacturing overhead related to the production of OLED displays. The standard cost for our products is subject to fluctuation from quarter to quarter, depending primarily on the number of displays produced, fluctuations in manufacturing overhead, labor hours incurred, and the yields experienced in the manufacturing process. Under the principles of full absorption costing, these costs are allocated to each unit of production in work in process and finished goods inventory based on actual use of the production facilities. However, in applying this principle, the requirements of Accounting Standards Codification, or ASC, 330-10-30-4, “Inventory” require that a company determine the range of normal capacity, or production expected to be achieved over a number of periods or seasons, and limits the amount of fixed production overheads allocated to inventory in periods of abnormally low production.

Beginning in 2014, the Company defined normal capacity in terms of the number of displays produced per quarter. The amount of displays produced in any given period, is determined in part by the relative sizes of displays produced, and the resultant number of die that can be drawn on the surface of the silicon wafers used in our manufacturing process. Before production yield considerations, the maximum potential die per wafer amounts range from 42 for our larger newer displays through 177 for our more established displays. In 2015 and in periods subsequent, the Company produced fewer displays than a baseline level established during 2014, and accordingly limited the amount of fixed overheads allocated to inventory.

During the first quarter of 2021, in recognition of a shift in product demand toward larger, more complex displays yielding fewer die per wafer, the Company concluded that measuring output by the number of displays produced per quarter was no longer an accurate measure of productive capacity. The Company determined that measuring output based on the number of wafers produced per quarter was a more appropriate measure of production volume. The Company reviewed the number of wafers produced through the nine months ended September 30, 2021, and the prior two calendar years, and determined the nine months ended September 30, 2021 level was within the range of normal capacity. The Company also believes that fully allocating overhead to work in process and finished goods inventories, results in more accurate inventory valuation and computation of costs of goods sold, in addition to providing better information to management in making pricing decisions.

In accordance with this change in estimate for allocating overhead adopted in the first quarter of 2021, overhead is fully allocated to products, resulting in an increase in standard costs and inventory values. The impact of this change for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 was an increase of approximately $0.7 million in the carrying value of the Company’s work in process and finished goods inventory as of September 30, 2021, and a corresponding decrease in product costs of goods sold. This decreased the Company’s net loss by $0.7 million and the Company’s loss per share by $0.01 as compared to results that would have been obtained using the former method of estimation.

During the three months ended September 30, 2021, there was no impact to the Company’s inventory, cost of goods sold, or earnings per share as compared to results that would have been obtained using the former method of estimation.

Earnings per Common Share

Basic earnings per share is computed using the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period, and excludes any dilutive effects of common stock equivalent shares such as stock options, warrants, restricted stock units and convertible preferred stock. Diluted earnings per share is computed using the weighted average number of common shares outstanding and potentially dilutive common stock equivalent shares outstanding during the period. Common stock equivalent shares are excluded from the computation if their effect is anti-dilutive. 

The Company’s Series B Convertible Preferred stock, or Preferred Stock – Series B, is considered a participating security as the preferred stock participates in dividends with the common stock, which requires the use of the two-class method when computing basic earnings per share. Diluted earnings per share must be calculated under both the treasury stock and two-class method, and the calculation that results in the most dilutive earnings per share amount for the common stock is reported. The Preferred Stock – Series B is not required to absorb any net loss. Although the Company paid a one-time special dividend in 2012, the Company does not expect to pay dividends on its common or preferred stock in the near future. In accordance with the Preferred Stock – Series B agreements, the conversion price was adjusted to $0.3033 per share in December 2019, and the resultant, if converted common shares are reflected in the table of anti-dilutive common stock equivalents below.

The following table sets forth the computation of basic and diluted earnings per share (in thousands, except per share and share data) for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020:

Three Months Ended

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

September 30,

2021

2020

2021

2020

Net income (loss)

$

1,306

$

(3,531)

$

(6,350)

$

(7,731)

Income allocated to participating securities

268

Income (loss) allocated to common shares

$

1,038

$

(3,531)

$

(6,350)

$

(7,731)

Change in fair value of warrant liability

$

(4,742)

$

$

(176)

$

Income (loss) allocated to common shares
  - Diluted

$

(3,704)

$

(3,531)

$

(6,526)

$

(7,731)

Weighted average common shares outstanding
  - Basic

72,527,479

57,735,846

71,675,336

54,450,815

Dilutive effect of liability classified warrants

1,334,473

1,741,657

Weighted average common shares outstanding
  - Diluted (1)(2)

73,861,952

57,735,846

73,416,993

54,450,815

Net income (loss) per share:

Basic

$

0.01

$

(0.06)

$

(0.09)

$

(0.14)

Diluted

$

(0.05)

$

(0.06)

$

(0.09)

$

(0.14)

(1)For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, weighted average shares used for calculating diluted earnings per share includes the effect of liability classified warrants as they have a dilutive effect on earnings per share.

(2)For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, weighted average shares used for calculating basic and diluted earnings per share are the same as the inclusion of liability classified warrants, would be anti-dilutive to the earnings per share calculation.

In calculating net income (loss) per share amounts, shares underlying the potentially dilutive common stock equivalents were excluded from the calculation of diluted net income (loss) per common share because their effect was anti-dilutive.

The following table sets forth the potentially dilutive common stock equivalents for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020 that were not included in diluted earnings per share, or EPS, as their effect would be anti-dilutive:

Three Months Ended

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

September 30,

2021

2020

2021

2020

Restricted Stock Units

402,099

50,000

402,099

50,000

Options

3,973,758

4,872,834

3,973,758

4,872,834

Warrants

4,780,447

15,055,773

4,780,447

15,055,773

Convertible preferred stock

18,726,009

18,726,009

18,726,009

18,726,009

Total potentially dilutive common stock equivalents

27,882,313

38,704,616

27,882,313

38,704,616

The above table reflects a revision in the potentially dilutive common stock equivalents that were not included in diluted EPS associated with the Company’s Preferred Stock- Series B for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, compared to what was previously reported. The Company increased such potentially dilutive common stock equivalents from 7,545,333 to 18,726,009 as a result of previously excluding certain common stock equivalents that would be issued as a result of the Company conducting an equity offering priced below the Preferred Stock- Series B’s conversion price. This correction had no impact on the Company’s financial statements or EPS.

Government Funding

The Company accounts for awards received from the U.S. Government for procurement of capital equipment after reviewing the terms of the underlying award contract, and in accordance with contract and equipment purchase milestones and accounting principles for grant accounting. For awards in which the Company will hold title to the underlying equipment, the Company initially records amounts invoiced to the U.S. Government for equipment progress payments on the accompanying Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as Deferred Income – Government Awards – long term and Accounts Receivable – due from Government Awards. The Company records such progress payments made to capital equipment vendors in Property, plant and equipment. Amounts recorded in Deferred Income – Government Awards – long term are recognized as Other Income on the accompanying Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations on a systematic basis as depreciation and other expenses are incurred over the useful life of the capital equipment.

Restricted Cash

The Company accounts for cash received pursuant to U.S. Government funding, that is legally restricted for procurement of capital equipment, as Restricted Cash on the accompanying Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. Restricted Cash amounts are received from the U.S. Government in advance of progress payments required for various program related capital equipment purchases and are disbursed by the Company to related equipment vendors.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Cash, cash equivalents, accounts receivable, short-term investments and accounts payable are stated at cost, which approximates fair value, due to the short-term nature of these instruments. The asset based lending facility, or the ABL Facility, is also stated at cost, which approximates fair value because the interest rate is based on a market based rate plus a margin. The PPP loan is presented on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet at cost, which equals fair market value due to the loan’s short–term maturity.

The Company has categorized its assets and liabilities that are valued at fair value on a recurring basis into a three-level fair value hierarchy in accordance with GAAP. Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices in active markets for identical assets and liabilities (Level 1) and lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3).

 

Assets and liabilities recorded in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets at fair value are categorized based on a hierarchy of inputs as follows:

 

Level 1 – Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets of identical assets or liabilities.

Level 2 – Quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets or inputs that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly through market corroboration, for substantially the full term of the financial instrument.

Level 3 – Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

The common stock warrant liability is currently the only financial asset or liability recorded at fair value on a recurring basis and is considered a Level 3 liability. The fair value of the common stock warrant liability is included in current liabilities on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets, as the warrants are currently exercisable.

The following table shows the reconciliation of the Level 3 warrant liability measured and recorded at fair value on a recurring basis, using significant unobservable inputs (in thousands):

Estimated Fair Value

Balance as of January 1, 2021

$

4,622

Fair value of warrants issuance during period

-

Change in fair value of warrant liability, net

(176)

Balance as of September 30, 2021

$

4,446

The fair value of the liability for common stock purchase warrants at issuance and at September 30, 2021 was estimated using the Black Scholes option pricing model based on the market value of the underlying common stock at the measurement date. Inputs to the model at September 30, 2021 included remaining contractual terms of the warrants ranging from 0.67 to 1.33 years, at risk-free interest rates of 0.47% to 0.86% with 0 expected dividends, and expected volatility of the price of the underlying common stock of 91.23% to 96.08%.

Concentrations

The Company purchases principally all of its silicon wafers, which are a key ingredient in its OLED production process, from 2 suppliers located in Taiwan and Korea.

For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, 1 customer of 25.2% and 18.5% accounted for over 10% of net revenues, respectively. As of September 30, 2021, the Company had accounts receivable from that 1 customer that accounted for 32.6% of all accounts receivable. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, there were 2 customers of 22.2% and 15.8%, respectively and 3 customers of 17.2%, 12.3% and 12.2%, respectively, who accounted for over 10% of the Company’s net revenues.

Liquidity and Going Concern

The accompanying Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which assumes that the Company will continue to operate as a going concern and which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. For the nine months ended September 30, 2021, the Company incurred a net loss of $6.4 million and used cash in operating activities of $6.7 million. As of September 30, 2021, the Company had $7.3 million of cash, $2.0 million of outstanding indebtedness under its ABL facility and borrowing availability of $1.9 million under its ABL Facility.

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly increased economic and demand uncertainty across the globe. It is possible that the current outbreak and continued spread of COVID-19, and any resurgence related to the Delta variant, or other vaccine resistant strains will cause the economic slowdown to continue, and it is possible that it could cause a global recession. Although vaccines are becoming more widely available, there is a significant degree of uncertainty and lack of visibility as to the extent and duration of the COVID-19 pandemic and related slowdowns or economic trends. If either were prolonged, demand for the Company’s products and the Company’s ability to obtain components and other materials or services on a timely basis could result in manufacturing delays, increased costs, and ultimately, in reduced or delayed sales or lost orders which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations. Although many jurisdictions are now open with social distancing measures implemented to curtail the spread of COVID-19, we cannot predict the length of time that it will take for our supply chains to be restored and any meaningful economic recovery to take place. We also cannot predict whether the Delta variant or other vaccine resistant strains will lead to additional surges in new cases of COVID-19, or the severity of such surges if/when they occur, such that governmental authorities decide to reimpose quarantines, lockdowns or travel restrictions, which could further materially and adversely affect the Company’s results and financial condition. It is also not possible to predict with certainty the impact executive orders providing for mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations will have on our workforce. Our implementation of these requirements may result in attrition, including attrition of critically skilled labor, and difficulty securing future labor needs, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

Due to continuing losses, the COVID-19 pandemic, and uncertainty regarding the Company’s need or ability to borrow under its ABL Facility, the Company may not be able to meet its financial obligations as they become due without obtaining additional financing or sources of capital at acceptable terms to the Company. Therefore, in accordance with applicable accounting guidance, and based on the Company’s current financial condition and availability of funds, there is substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern through twelve months from the date these financial statements were issued.

The Company has taken actions to increase revenues and to reduce expenses and is considering financing alternatives. The Company’s plans with regard to these matters include the following actions: 1) focus production and engineering resources on improving manufacturing yields and increasing production volumes, 2) continuing a Work Status Reduction program that began in October 2019 wherein senior management work status was reduced by approximately 20%, 3) continue to utilize government grants for purchase of capital equipment and funding manufacturing personnel, 4) reduce discretionary and other expenses, 5) seek to enter new markets, and 6) considering additional financing and/or strategic alternatives.

The Company is reassessing its business plans and forecasts over the next two years. Based on its known cash needs as of October 31, 2021, the Company has developed plans to extend its liquidity to support its working capital requirements through the fourth quarter of 2022. However, there can be no assurance the Company’s plans will be achieved, or that the Company will be able to continue to borrow under its ABL Facility, mitigate the impacts of COVID-19, secure additional financing, and/or pursue strategic alternatives on terms acceptable to the Company, or at all.

Recently adopted accounting pronouncements

The Company's accounting policies are the same as those described in Note 1 to the Company's Consolidated Financial Statements in its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.

Recently issued accounting pronouncements

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-13, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326) and subsequently issued amendments. The guidance affects the Company's accounts receivable, and it requires the measurement of expected credit losses to be based on relevant information from past events, including historical experiences, current conditions and reasonable and supportable forecasts that affect collectability. This new guidance is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2022. Based on the composition of the Company's receivables, current market conditions and historical credit loss activity, the Company is currently evaluating the impact of this ASU on the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

In August 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-06, Debt - Debt with Conversion and Other Options (Subtopic 470-20) and Derivatives and Hedging - Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity (Subtopic 815-40) Accounting for Convertible Instruments and Contracts in an Entity's Own Equity. This guidance changes how entities account for convertible instruments and contracts in an entity's own equity and simplifies the accounting for convertible instruments by removing certain separation models for convertible instruments. This guidance also modifies the guidance on diluted earnings per share calculations. This new guidance is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2023. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this ASU on the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

Note 2 – Revenue Recognition

All of the Company’s revenues are earned from contracts with customers and are classified as either Product or Contract revenues. Contract revenues include R&D activities performed pursuant to written agreements and purchase orders, as well as arrangements that are implied by customary practices or law.

Product revenue is generated primarily from contracts to produce, ship and deliver OLED microdisplays. The Company’s performance obligations are satisfied, control of our products is transferred, and revenue is recognized at a single point in time when control transfers to our customer for product shipped. The Company’s customary terms are FOB our factory and control is deemed to transfer upon shipment. The Company has elected to treat shipping and other transportation costs charged to customers as fulfillment activities and are recorded in both revenue and cost of sales at the time control is transferred to the customer. As customers are invoiced at the time control transfers and the right to consideration is unconditional at that time, the Company does not maintain contract asset balances for product revenue. Additionally, the Company does not maintain contract liability balances for product revenues, as performance obligations are satisfied prior to customer payment for product. The Company generally offers a one year product warranty, for replacement of product only, and does not allow returns. The Company offers industry standard payment terms that typically require payment from our customers from 30 to 60 days after title transfers.

The Company also recognizes revenues under the over time method from certain research and development, or R&D, activities (contract revenues) under both firm fixed-price contracts and cost-type contracts. Progress and revenues from research and development activities relating to firm fixed-price contracts and cost-type contracts are generally recognized on an input method of accounting as costs are incurred. Under the input method, revenue is recognized based on efforts expended to date (e.g., the costs of resources consumed or labor hours worked, or machine hours used) relative to total efforts intended to be expended. Contract costs include all direct material, labor and subcontractor costs and an allocation of allowable indirect costs as defined by each contract, as periodically adjusted to reflect revised agreed upon rates. These rates are subject to audit by the other party. Any changes in estimate related to contract accounting are accounted for prospectively over the remaining life of the contract. Under the over time method, billings may not correlate directly to the revenue recognized. Based upon the terms of the specific contract, billings may be in excess of the revenue recognized, in which case the amounts are included in deferred revenues as a liability on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. Likewise, revenue recognized may exceed customer billings in which case the amounts are reported as unbilled receivables. Unbilled revenues are expected to be billed and collected within one year.

Costs to Obtain and Fulfill a Contract

The incidental costs related to obtaining product sales contracts are non-recoverable from customer and, accordingly, are expenses as incurred. The Company capitalizes costs incurred to fulfil its R&D contracts that i) relate directly to a contract or anticipated contract, ii) are expected to satisfy the Company’s performance obligation under the contract, and iii) are expected to be recovered through revenue generated under the contract. Contact fulfillment costs are expensed to cost of revenue as the related performance obligations are satisfied.

Disaggregation of Revenue

The Company sells products directly to military contractors and OEM’s who use the Company’s displays in a diverse range of applications encompassing the military and commercial, including medical and industrial, market sectors. Revenues are classified as either military, commercial, consumer or multiple based on management’s knowledge of the customer’s products and markets served by displays or the R&D contract work. Revenues classified as multiple are for sales to customers that incorporate the Company’s displays in products that could be used for either military or commercial applications. R&D activities are performed for both military customers and U.S. Government defense related agencies and consumer companies. Product and contract revenues are disclosed on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Additional disaggregated revenue information for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020 were as follows (in thousands):

Three Months Ended

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

September 30,

2021

2020

2021

2020

North and South America

$

3,727

$

4,246

$

10,677

$

11,963

Europe, Middle East, and Africa

1,957

2,408

6,578

7,330

Asia Pacific

98

657

1,579

2,449

Total

$

5,782

$

7,311

$

18,834

$

21,742

Three Months Ended

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

September 30,

2021

2020

2021

2020

Military

$

3,733

$

5,836

$

11,492

$

16,363

Commercial, including industrial and medical

440

491

2,240

1,213

Consumer

448

1,598

2,023

Multiple

1,161

984

3,504

2,143

Total

$

5,782

$

7,311

$

18,834

$

21,742

Accounts Receivable from Customers

Accounts receivable, net of allowances, were $4.3 million and $5.3 million as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

Contract Assets and Liabilities

Unbilled Accounts Receivables (Contract Assets) - Pursuant to the over time revenue recognition model, revenue may be recognized prior to the customer being invoiced. An unbilled accounts receivable is recorded to reflect revenue that is recognized when the cost based input method is applied and such revenue exceeds the amount invoiced to the customer. Unbilled receivables are disclosed on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Customer Advances and Deposits (Contract Liabilities) - The Company recognizes a contract liability when it has billed and received consideration from the customer pursuant to the terms of a contract but has not yet recognized the related revenue. These billings in excess of revenue are classified as deferred revenue on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Total contract assets and liabilities consisted of the following amounts (in thousands):

September 30,

December 31,

2021

2020

Unbilled Receivables (contract assets)

$

1,173

$

253

Deferred Revenue (contract liabilities)

$

65

$

425

For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 the Company recognized $21 thousand and $360 thousand of revenue related to its contract liabilities that existed at December 31, 2020. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020 the Company recognized $0 thousand and $33 thousand of revenue related to its contract liabilities that existed at December 31, 2019.

Remaining Performance Obligations

The Company has elected the practical expedient, which allows disclosure of remaining performance obligations only for contracts with an original duration of greater than one year. Such remaining performance obligations primarily relate to engineering and design services. As of September 30, 2021, the aggregate amount of the transaction price allocated to remaining performance obligations was $2 million. The Company expects to recognize revenue on all of its remaining performance obligations over the next 12 months.

 

Note 3 – Accounts Receivable

The majority of the Company’s commercial accounts receivable are due from OEM’s. Credit is extended based on an evaluation of a customer’s financial condition and, generally, collateral is not required.

Accounts receivable consisted of the following (in thousands):

September 30,

December 31,

2021

2020

Accounts receivable

$

4,484

$

5,453

Less allowance for doubtful accounts

(139)

(139)

Accounts receivable, net

$

4,345

$

5,314

Note 4 – Inventories, net

The components of inventories are as follows (in thousands):

September 30,

December 31,

2021

2020

Raw materials 

$

3,574

$

3,995

Work in process

1,861

1,263

Finished goods 

2,984

3,918

Total inventories

8,419

9,176

Less inventory reserve

(502)

(797)

Total inventories, net

$

7,917

$

8,379

 

As described in Note 1, during the period ended March 31, 2021, the Company changed its method of estimating the allocation of overhead.

Note 5 – Line of Credit / Loan Payable

Revolving Credit Facility

September 30,

December 31,

(in thousands)

2021

2020

Revolving credit facility

$

1,992

$

1,875

On December 21, 2016, the Company entered into the ABL Facility with a lender that provides for up to a maximum amount of $5 million based on a borrowing base equivalent to 85% of eligible accounts receivable plus the lesser of $2 million or 50% of eligible inventory. The interest on the ABL Facility is equal to the Prime Rate plus 3% but may not be less than 6.5% with a minimum monthly interest payment of $2 thousand. The Company is also obligated to pay the lender a monthly administrative fee of $1 thousand and an annual facility fee equal to 1% of the maximum amount borrowable under the facility.

The ABL Facility will automatically renew on December 31, 2021 for a one year term unless written notice to terminate the agreement is provided by either party. 

The ABL Facility is secured by a lien on all receivables, property and the proceeds thereof, credit insurance policies and other insurance relating to the collateral, books, records and other general intangibles, inventory and equipment, proceeds of the collateral and accounts, instruments, chattel paper, and documents. Collections received on accounts receivable are directly used to pay down the outstanding borrowings on the credit facility.

The ABL Facility contains customary representations and warranties, affirmative and negative covenants and events of default. The Company is required to maintain a minimum tangible net worth of $13 million and a minimum working capital balance of $4 million at all times. As of September 30, 2021, the Company had $2.0 million in borrowings outstanding under the ABL Facility, had unused borrowing availability of $1.9 million under the ABL Facility and was in compliance with all financial debt covenants under the ABL Facility.

Promissory Note under the Paycheck Protection Program

On June 8, 2020, the Company received a loan under the U.S. Small Business Administration’s, or SBA, Paycheck Protection Program, or PPP, from KeyBank National Association related to the COVID-19 pandemic in the amount of $1.9 million. Under the PPP loan, the loan has a fixed interest rate of 1% per annum, a maturity date two years from the date of the funding of the loan, and deferral of payments for six months. During 2020, the Company used the proceeds to pay qualified payroll costs, in accordance with PPP and Section 1106 of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or the CARES Act, requirements. The Company applied for forgiveness of the entire loan in the fourth quarter of 2020. In April 2021, the Company received a forgiveness notice from the SBA and received a related acknowledgement letter from its lender stating that they received payment in full from the SBA effective March 31, 2021. This amount was recorded in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations as gain on forgiveness of debt in the first quarter of 2021.

Note 6 – Stock Compensation 

The Company uses the fair value method of accounting for share-based compensation arrangements. The fair value of stock options is estimated at the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option valuation model. Stock-based compensation expense is reduced for estimated forfeitures and is amortized over the vesting period using the straight-line method.

The fair value of Restricted Stock Units, or RSU’s is established by the market price of the Company’s common stock at the date of grant and for time based grants, is amortized over the vesting period using the straight line method. Performance-based RSUs are typically granted such that they vest upon the achievement of EBITDA targets, during a specified performance period, subject to the satisfaction of certain time-based service criteria. Compensation expense from these awards is equal to the fair market value of the Company’s ordinary shares on the date of grant and is recognized over the remaining service period based on the probable outcome of achievement of the financial metrics used in the specific grant’s performance criteria. Management’s estimate of the number of shares expected to vest is based on the anticipated achievement of the specified non-market performance criteria, which are assessed at each reporting period.

The following table summarizes the allocation of non-cash stock-based compensation to our expense categories for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020 (in thousands): 

Three Months Ended

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

September 30,

2021

2020

2021

2020

Cost of revenues

$

33

$

2

$

36

$

14

Research and development

62

7

74

42

Selling, general and administrative

324

51

359

91

Total stock compensation expense

$

419

$

60

$

469

$

147

The following table summarizes the Company’s stock-based compensation expense by each award type:

Three Months Ended

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

September 30,

2021

2020

2021

2020

Stock options

$

284

$

60

$

309

$

147

Restricted Share Units

135

160

Total stock compensation expense

$

419

$

60

$

469

$

147

At September 30, 2021, total unrecognized compensation costs related to stock options and RSUs was approximately $176 thousand and $1.2 million, respectively, net of estimated forfeitures. Total unrecognized compensation cost for stock options and RSUs will be adjusted for future changes in estimated forfeitures and is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of approximately 0.8 years and approximately 2.7 years, respectively.

Stock Option Summary

The following key assumptions were used in the Black-Scholes option pricing model to determine the fair value of stock options granted:

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

2021

2020

Dividend yield

0

%

0

%

Risk free interest rates

0.89-0.95

%

0.3

 %

Expected volatility

75.9 to 79.0

%

46.1

 %

Expected term (in years)

5.0 to 5.5

5

The Company does not expect to pay dividends in the near future. Therefore, the Company used an expected dividend yield of 0%. The risk-free interest rate used in the Black-Scholes option pricing model is based on applicable yield available at the date of the option grant on U.S. Treasury securities with an equivalent term. Expected volatility is based on the weighted average historical volatility of the Company’s common stock for the equivalent term. The expected term of the options represents the period that the Company’s stock-based awards are expected to be outstanding and was determined based on historical experience and vesting schedules of similar awards.

A summary of the Company’s stock option activity for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 presented in the following table (unaudited):

Number of
Shares

Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price

Weighted
Average
Remaining
Contractual
Life (In Years)

Aggregate
Intrinsic
Value

Outstanding at December 31, 2020

4,797,834

$

2.36

Options granted

230,000

3.24

Options exercised

(514,707)

1.92

Options forfeited

Options cancelled or expired

(539,369)

4.41

Outstanding at September 30, 2021

3,973,758

$

1.95

3.33

$

2,656,904

Vested or expected to vest at September 30, 2021 (1)

3,971,894

$

1.95

3.33

$

2,656,516

Exercisable at September 30, 2021

3,847,757

$

1.92

3.15

$

2,629,494

(1)The expected to vest options are the result of applying the pre-vesting forfeiture rate assumptions to total unvested options.

The aggregate intrinsic value in the table above represents the difference between the exercise price of the underlying options and the quoted price of the Company’s common stock. The aggregate intrinsic value of options exercised was $0.03 million and $1.01 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021. The Company issues new shares of common stock upon exercise of stock options.

 

Restricted Stock Units (“RSU”) Summary

The following table summarized the activity in respect of RSUs issued under the Company for the nine months ended September 30, 2021:

Weighted Average Grant Date

Number of Awards

Fair Value Per Share

Service

Performance

Service

Performance

based

based

based

based

RSU's outstanding, beginning of period

50,000

$

0.84

$

Granted

417,591

103,048

3.55

3.60

Vested and settled

(16,667)

0.84

Forfeited

(48,825)

1.72

RSU's outstanding, end of period

402,099

103,048

3.55

3.60

Note 7 – Income Taxes

The Company’s effective tax rate is calculated quarterly based upon current assumptions relating to the full year’s estimated operating results and various tax-related items. The Company’s effective tax rate was 0% for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020. The difference between the effective tax rate of 0% and the U.S. federal statutory rate of 21% for three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020 was primarily due to recognizing a full valuation allowance on deferred tax assets.

The Company determined that, based on all available evidence, both positive and negative, including the Company’s latest forecasts and cumulative losses in recent years, it was more likely than not that none of its deferred tax assets would be realized and therefore it continued to record a full valuation allowance as of September 30, 2021.

The Company’s net operating loss carry-forward amounts expire through 2037 and are subject to certain limitations that may occur due to a change in the ownership provisions under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code and similar state provisions. Pursuant to provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the net operating losses originating in years subsequent to 2017 can be carried forward indefinitely.

Due to the Company’s operating loss carry-forwards, all tax years remain open to examination to the extent of the operating loss carry-forward by the major taxing jurisdictions to which the Company is subject. In the event that the Company is assessed interest or penalties at some point in the future, it will be classified in the financial statements as tax expense.

On March 27, 2020, the President of the United States signed the CARES Act. The CARES Act provides several provisions that effect businesses from an income tax perspective. Due to the history of the tax losses, most of the CARES Act provisions have no current benefit to the Company. The Company can, however, benefit from one provision, which allows for the immediate refund of the Alternative Minimum Tax Credit, or AMT Credit, previously recognized as deferred tax asset. The Company has filed an amendment to claim the AMT Credit and is anticipating a refund of $212 thousand. This tax receivable was recorded during 2017, and is reflected in Prepaid Expenses and Other Current Assets on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Note 8  Commitments and Contingencies 

Equipment Purchase Commitments 

The Company has committed to equipment purchases of approximately $987 thousand at September 30, 2021.

In addition, through September 30, 2021, the Company has committed to equipment to be purchased under government awards of $16.5 million.

Litigation

From time to time, the Company may become subject to various legal proceedings that are incidental to the ordinary conduct of our business. In March 2019, the Company received a demand letter seeking payment of $0.9 million of outstanding invoices relating to purchased inventory from Suga Electronics Limited, or Suga, a contract manufacturer located in China, which manufactured product sold by our consumer night vision business. The Company has responded to the demand letter, and requested that Suga provide substantiation of purchased inventory. On August 1, 2019, the Company was notified by Suga that they intend to pursue arbitration.

During September and October 2019, the Company held preliminary discussions with Suga to attempt to reach a settlement, however in November 2019 a formal request for arbitration was received, which Suga filed with the International Chamber of Commerce or ICC. The Company retained local counsel in Hong Kong to represent it before the ICC and in December 2019 filed an answer to Suga’s request for arbitration including a counterclaim seeking repayment of amounts previously paid to Suga. An arbitrator was appointed and arbitral proceedings for the consideration of the claims and counterclaims, and settlement discussions continued through May 2021. The parties were permitted to settle at any point during the arbitration proceedings and the parties reached a tentative settlement in April 2021. On May 12, 2021 the parties executed settlement agreements and mutual releases from all claims in exchange for a payment of $0.6 million to Suga from the Company.

As disclosed in the financial statements in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company made a decision to exit the consumer night vision business and accrued approximately $1.0 million related to invoices received for inventory purchased by Suga in anticipation of future production. As a result of the May 12, 2021 settlement of the arbitration with Suga the Company removed the $1.0 million accrual from its balance sheet, wrote off $0.3 million in prepayments and recorded a gain of $0.1 million in Other Income/Expense during the second quarter of 2021.

Note 9  Warrants

The Company accounts for common stock warrants pursuant to applicable accounting guidance contained in ASC 815, "Derivatives and Hedging - Contracts in Entity's Own Equity" and makes a determination as to their treatment as either equity instruments or a warrant liability based on an analysis of the underlying warrant agreements.

The following table sets forth the Company’s outstanding common stock warrants as of September 30, 2021:

Issued

Outstanding

Exercise Price

Expiration

2016 Warrant Issuance

2,947,949

1,680,447

2.60

Feb 2022

2017 Warrant Issuance (1)

100,000

100,000

2.25

Mar 2022

2017 Warrant Issuance (2)

1,650,000

1,650,000

2.45

Nov 2022

2018 Warrant Issuance (2)

4,004,324

2,909,369

1.55

Jul 2023

2019 Warrant Issuance (3)

6,000,000

3,000,000

0.78

Oct 2024

9,339,816

(1)Issued in conjunction with an unsecured line of credit.

(2)Warrants are subject to liability accounting.

(3)Private Placement unregistered warrants exercisable six months following issuance.

Equity classified warrants

The 2016 and 2019 warrants share similar terms, and the exercise price of the Warrant Shares are subject to adjustment in the event of any stock dividends and splits, reverse stock splits, stock dividends, recapitalizations, reorganizations or similar transactions. The Warrants will be exercisable on a “cashless” basis in certain circumstances, including in the event a registration statement is not in effect at time of exercise. The warrant agreements contain a clause specifying that in the event there is no effective registration in effect for the underlying warrant shares to be issued at time of exercise, in no circumstance will the Company be required to net cash settle the warrants.

Based on the Company’s analysis of the terms and conditions of the warrants, the Company has concluded that they meet the conditions outlined in applicable accounting guidance to be classified as equity instruments. As a result, the Company has accounted for the exercise price paid by investors for purchase of the pre-funded warrants as additional paid in capital on the accompanying Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Liability classified warrants

The 2017 and 2018 warrants have alternative settlement provisions that, at the option of the holder, provide for physical settlement or if, at the time of settlement there is no effective registration statement, a cashless exercise as defined in the warrant agreement.

Based on analysis of the underlying warrant agreement and applicable accounting guidance, the Company concluded that these registered warrants require the issuance of registered securities upon exercise and do not sufficiently preclude an implied right to net cash settlement. Accordingly, these warrants were classified in the accompanying Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as a current liability upon issuance and will be revalued at each subsequent balance sheet date.

The fair value of the liability for common stock purchase warrants is estimated using the Black Scholes option pricing model based on the market value of the underlying common stock at the measurement date, the contractual term of the warrant, risk-free interest rates,

expected dividends and expected volatility of the price of the underlying common stock.

Based on the Black Sholes method the fair value of the Company’s warrants are as follows (in thousands):

September 30,

December 31,

2021

2020

2018 January and February Issuance

Fair Value

$

3,407

$

3,577

2017 May Issuance

Fair Value

1,039

1,045

$

4,446

$

4,622

Three Months Ended

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

September 30,

2021

2020

2021

2020

Change in Fair Value of common stock warrant liability (1)

$

4,742

$

(1,803)

$

176

(3,304)

(1)The combined changes in fair value are reflected as income (loss) from change in the fair market value of common stock warrant liability.

 

During the quarter ended September 30, 2021, there were 0 warrant exercises. During the nine months ended September 30, 2021, the Company received $5.7 million in payment of the exercise price for warrants to purchase 3,343,660 shares of common stock.

Note 10  Leases

The Company leases office and manufacturing facilities in Hopewell Junction, New York under a non-cancelable operating lease agreement. The lease for these facilities, as amended, was to expire in May 2024 and did not contain a renewal option. The lease agreement did not contain any residual value guarantees, or material restrictive covenants. In November 2020, we entered into the 12th amendment, which will expand the current footprint to approximately 63,000 square feet in 2021 and includes 2 five year options to extend. Under ASU 842, the Company reassessed the lease from operating to a finance lease for the 12th amendment.

The Company also leases an office facility for its design group in Santa Clara, California. During the fourth quarter of 2019, the Company signed a two year extension of this lease that expired in October 2021. The lease agreement did not contain any residual value guarantees, material restrictive covenants or a renewal option. This lease was classified as an operating lease. In October 2021, the Company signed an additional two-year extension of the lease for the Santa Clara design group facility, and is evaluating the accounting treatment. On May 2, 2019, the Company entered into a three year finance lease commitment for phone equipment.

The Company's leases generally do not provide an implicit rate, and therefore the Company uses its incremental borrowing rate as the discount rate when measuring lease liabilities. The Company estimates its incremental borrowing rate based on a yield curve analysis, utilizing the interest rate derived from the fair value analysis of the Company’s credit facility and adjusting it for factors that appropriately reflect the profile of secured borrowing over the expected term of the lease.

The components of lease expense were as follows (in thousands):

Three Months Ended

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

September 30,

2021

2020

2021

2020

Finance Lease Cost:

Amortization of right-of-use assets

$

157

$

4

$

469

$

12

Interest on lease liabilities

198

1

594

3

Operating lease cost

15

262

46

786

Short-term lease cost

17

31

Total Lease Cost

$

370

$

284

$

1,109

$

832

Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities:

Operating cash flows from operating leases

$

15

$

266

$

46

$

797

Financing cash flows from finance leases

$

271

$

5

$

815

$

15

Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new finance lease liabilities

$

86

$

-

$

194

$

-

Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new operating lease liabilities

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

September 30, 2021

December 31, 2020

Finance lease right-of-use assets

$

12,402

$

12,677

Operating lease right-of-use assets

$

5

$

50

Finance lease liability, current

$

1,138

$

1,027

Finance lease liability, non-current

$

11,641

$

11,783

Operating lease liabilities, current

$

5

$

51

Operating lease liabilities, non-current

$

-

$

-

Weighted average remaining lease terms - finance leases

20.67 years

20.67 years

Weighted average remaining lease terms - operating leases

0.08 years

0.84 years

Weighted average discount rate - finance leases

6.42%

6.43%

Weighted average discount rate - operating leases

7.75%

7.75%

Future annual minimum lease payments and finance lease commitments as of September 30, 2021 were as follows (in thousands):

Operating Leases

Finance Leases

2021

$

5

$

270

2022

-

1,163

2023

-

1,229

2024

-

1,229

2025

-

1,229

Thereafter

-

22,624

Total undiscounted future minimum lease payments

5

27,744

Less imputed interest

-

(14,965)

Lease liability

$

5

$

12,779

(1)Total future lease payments exclude approximately $4.9 million of lease payments related to the Expansion Space portion of the NY Lease that was signed but has not yet commenced as of September 30, 2021

Note 11 – Shareholders’ Equity

Equity Raises

On June 10, 2020, the Company filed a prospectus supplement to update and amend the aggregate amount of shares it could sell pursuant to its At Market Offering Agreement, dated November 22, 2019, as amended from time to time, between the Company and H.C. Wainwright & Co., LLC. This amendment allowed for additional shares to be sold up to an additional dollar amount of $7.29 million.

During 2020, the Company raised $9.8 million, net of offering expenses, through the sale of shares under the At The Market facility, or the ATM Facility, which represented the remaining amount available under the facility. The Company used and intends to use the net proceeds from sales made under the ATM Facility for working capital and other general corporate purposes.

Note 12 – Government Funding

On July 28, 2020, the Company announced that it had been awarded a $33.6 million contract over the next 33 months from the U.S. Department of Defense, or the DoD, to sustain and enhance U.S. domestic capability for high resolution, high brightness OLED microdisplays that will be based on the Company’s proprietary direct patterning technology dPd. This investment is in addition to the $5.5 million award announced on June 11, 2020, under the U.S. Department of Defense Industrial Base Analysis, or IBAS, Program for OLED Supply Chain Assurance and will be used to increase capacity and sustain operations at the Company’s Hopewell Junction, New

York, headquarters. These funds will be used to procure key equipment and tooling, and reimburse the Company for certain labor and material costs, which the Company believes will improve all aspects of its OLED microdisplay production, including increased throughput and capacity.

Pursuant to the preliminary Technology Investment Agreement the U.S. government provided when the award was announced, the Company expects that the U.S. government will own the related equipment purchases until the end of the 33 month contract period, at which point the Company can apply to take title. The Company began making payments to related equipment vendors during the fourth quarter of 2020. For accounting purposes, the Company considers that it is probable that title will pass to the Company and accordingly will treat this award in a similar fashion as the IBAS award.

The Company recognizes the government awards as deferred income – government awards as program milestones are invoiced, and will recognize other income as depreciation and other expenditures are incurred over the useful life of the capital equipment. As of September 30, 2021, the Company has received $12.2 million in total, for initial deposits required by capital equipment vendors. Amounts received, pending payment of deposits to vendors as of September 30, 2021, of $1.3 million are reflected in restricted cash on the accompanying Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. Amounts due from the U.S. DoD pursuant to invoices for capital equipment are presented on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as accounts receivable – due from government awards. The total amount invoiced on these programs of $12.2 million is reflected less depreciation in deferred revenue government awards – long term, and other current liabilities. Additional amounts remaining under the awards will be recorded in a similar fashion and will coincide with the progress payments required under the various capital equipment purchase terms. For the nine months ended September 30, 2021, the Company recognized deferred income related to certain overhead expenses, not capitalized, of $174 thousand.

The terms of various government agreements provide among other items that the Company must achieve certain yield targets, give priority to military orders and continue to maintain the productive capacity of equipment purchased for up to five years past the completion of the programs.

ITEM 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and notes thereto. Our fiscal year ends December 31. This Report contains certain forward-looking statements including, among others, anticipated trends in our financial condition and results of operations and our business strategy. These forward-looking statements are based largely on our current expectations and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties. Please see "Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Information" and Part II, Item 1A, "Risk Factors" of this Report. Actual results could differ materially from these forward-looking statements. Important factors to consider in evaluating such forward-looking statements include changes in external factors or in our internal budgeting process which might impact trends in our results of operations, unanticipated working capital or other cash requirements, changes in our business strategy or an inability to execute our strategy due to unanticipated changes in the industries in which we operate, and various competitive market factors that may prevent us from competing successfully in the marketplace. Forward-looking statements do not represent our views as of any date other than the date of this Report.

Business

We design, develop, manufacture and market organic light emitting diode, or OLED, miniature displays, which we refer to as OLED-on-silicon microdisplays, virtual imaging products that utilize OLED microdisplays, and related products. We also perform research in the OLED field. Our virtual imaging products integrate OLED technology with silicon chips to produce high-resolution microdisplays which, when viewed through a magnifying headset, create virtual images that appear comparable in size to that of a computer monitor or a large‑screen television. Our products enable our original equipment manufacturer, or OEM, customers in the military and commercial markets to develop and market improved or new electronic products.

We believe that our OLED microdisplays offer a number of significant advantages over comparable liquid crystal microdisplays, including higher contrast, greater power efficiency, less weight, more compact size, and negligible image smearing. Using our active matrix OLED technology, many computer and electronic system functions can be built directly into the OLED microdisplays silicon backplane, resulting in compact, high resolution and power efficient systems. Already proven in military and commercial systems, our product portfolio of OLED microdisplays deliver high‑resolution, virtual images that perform effectively even in extreme temperatures and high‑vibration conditions.

We have been deemed to be an essential business in the State of New York and have continued to produce and ship products during the COVID-19 pandemic. We have implemented employee health and safety measures as required by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, guidelines, and monitor, Federal, State and local governmental regulations to respond to the latest health and safety guidelines. As of the date of this Report, we have experienced disruptions in supply, had several employees test positive for the COVID-19 pandemic and had to close our facilities for cleaning purposes. There is no assurance that our operations will not be disrupted in the future by additional impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Delta variant, or other resurgences of the virus, on either our internal operations or those of our suppliers or customers, including the possible impact of disruptions in the supply of silicon wafers or other raw materials that could harm our ability to meet demand for our products in a timely manner, or within budget.

Operating expenses for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, including R&D expenses, increased approximately $0.3 million and $1.4 million, respectively, as compared to September 30, 2020. The majority of the increase during the three months ended September 30, 2021 was due to the impact of increased share prices on the fair value of non-cash stock compensation. The increase during the nine months ended September 30, 2021 was due to investments in SG&A expenses for company-funded work related to our high-brightness dPd product and XLE process development, along with resources expended on improving manufacturing processes.

We are continually making improvements in production processes; however, the majority of our equipment is older and malfunctions in single point of failure equipment has the potential to delay our production until repairs can be made. We experienced equipment issues in 2019, experienced some equipment issues during 2020 and 2021, and also had delays in getting vendor support personnel due to COVID-19 travel restrictions. Equipment to be purchased during fiscal 2021 and 2022 under our government awards programs is expected to reduce our single point of failure risk and improve manufacturing yields and throughput. As part of our ongoing efforts to improve our throughput, yield, and quality practices, we are working with an industrial engineering firm to develop an operations excellence strategy and to obtain the AS9100 quality certification. Our backlog at September 30, 2021 was $13.2 million compared to backlog of $9.4 million at September 30, 2020.

We believe that our U.S.-based design and manufacturing, combined with in-house advanced backplane design, and our dPd technology give us a competitive advantage. Our direct patterning equipment is operational. We have fabricated full color displays using the newly upgraded and installed dPd tool during 2021 including our 4kX4k and WUXGA displays. In July 2021, using our dPd technology we created full color WUXGA displays with a brightness of over 10,000 cd/m2. We continue our development work for our Tier One Consumer customer and are targeting similar levels of brightness on proof-of-concept displays using our full color dPd

process.

We received a validation of our products and technology during fiscal 2020 from the U.S. government. In 2020, we received two U.S. Department of Defense, or DoD, awards totaling $39.1 million. We believe we are the only commercial U.S. manufacturer of OLED microdisplays and our displays are used in many U.S. Military programs.

Consumer, medical, and military customers are increasingly turning to us because of our technological leadership in display brightness and resolution. This leadership in brightness is further demonstrated by our proprietary dPd capability. Unlike traditional OLEDs that produce colors by using a white source with filters that eliminate about 80% of the emitted light, with dPd we make full color displays by directly depositing each of the primary color materials on respective sub-pixels, without the use of filters. This advanced technology gives us an increase in brightness of over 10X versus the competition. In July 2021, we achieved full color brightness levels of over 10,000 cd/m2 and expect to achieve a brightness level of over 28,000 cd/m2 ready for mass production of full color displays by 2023. We achieved the highest monochrome brightness levels in the market years ago and are continuing our leadership with color displays. Display brightness is critical for AR/VR devices because of optics inefficiency and the need to eliminate motion artifacts. This is especially important for heads up displays used in bright, daylight environments. Our high resolution and low pixel pitch are also important to eliminate the “screen door” effect that comes with expanding lower resolution displays over wide fields of view.

Liquidity and Going Concern

The accompanying Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared on the going concern basis, which assumes we will continue to operate as a going concern and which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. However, due to continuing losses, uncertainty regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, our financial position, and uncertainty regarding our ability to borrow under the ABL Facility, we may not be able to meet our financial obligations as they become due without additional financing or sources of capital.

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly increased economic and demand uncertainty across the globe. It is possible that the current outbreak and continued spread of COVID-19, and any resurgence related to the Delta variant, or other vaccine resistant strains will cause the economic slowdown to continue, and it is possible that it could cause a global recession. Although vaccines are becoming more widely available, there is a significant degree of uncertainty and lack of visibility as to the extent and duration of the COVID-19 pandemic and related slowdowns or economic trends. If either were prolonged, demand for the Company’s products and the Company’s ability to obtain components and other materials or services on a timely basis could result in manufacturing delays, increased costs, and ultimately, in reduced or delayed sales or lost orders which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations. Although many jurisdictions are now open with social distancing measures implemented to curtail the spread of COVID-19, we cannot predict the length of time that it will take for our supply chains to be restored and any meaningful economic recovery to take place. We also cannot predict whether the Delta variant or other vaccine resistant strains will lead to additional surges in new cases of COVID-19, or the severity of such surges if/when they occur, such that governmental authorities decide to reimpose quarantines, lockdowns or travel restrictions, which could further materially and adversely affect the Company’s results and financial condition. It is also not possible to predict with certainty the impact executive orders providing for mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations will have on our workforce. Our implementation of these requirements may result in attrition, including attrition of critically skilled labor, and difficulty securing future labor needs, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

Our common stock is listed on the NYSE American, and we are subject to its continued listing requirements, including maintaining certain share prices and a minimum amount of shareholder’s equity. If we are unable to comply with the NYSE American continued listing requirements, including its trading price requirements, our common stock may be suspended from trading on and/or delisted from the NYSE American.

Critical Accounting Policies

Please refer to the information provided under the heading "Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates" included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020, filed with the SEC on March 19, 2021, for a discussion of our critical accounting policies. There were no material changes to such policies in the nine months ended September 30, 2021, with the exception of the change in estimate of inventory costing described below.

Inventory - Inventories are stated on a standard cost basis adjusted to approximate the lower of cost (as determined by the first-in, first-out method) or net realizable value. Cost includes materials, labor, and manufacturing overhead related to the production of OLED displays. The standard cost for our products is subject to fluctuation from quarter to quarter, depending primarily on the number of displays produced, fluctuations in manufacturing overhead, labor hours incurred, and the yields experienced in the

manufacturing process. Under the principles of full absorption costing, these costs are allocated to each unit of production in work in process and finished goods inventory based on actual use of the production facilities. However, in applying this principle, the requirements of Accounting Standards Codification, or ASC, 330-10-30-4, “Inventory” require that a company determine the range of normal capacity, or production expected to be achieved over a number of periods or seasons, and limits the amount of fixed production overheads allocated to inventory in periods of abnormally low production.

Beginning in 2014, we defined normal capacity in terms of the number of displays produced per quarter. The amount of displays produced in any given period, is determined in part by the relative sizes of displays produced, and the resultant number of die that can be drawn on the surface of the silicon wafers used in our manufacturing process. Before production yield considerations, the maximum potential die per wafer amounts range from 42 for our larger newer displays through 177 for our more established displays. In 2015 and in periods subsequent, we produced fewer displays than a baseline level established during 2014, and accordingly limited the amount of fixed overheads allocated to inventory.

During the first quarter of 2021, in recognition of a shift in product demand toward larger, more complex displays yielding fewer die per wafer, we concluded that measuring output by the number of displays produced per quarter was no longer an accurate measure of productive capacity. Management determined that measuring output based on the number of wafers produced per quarter was a more appropriate measure of production volume. We reviewed the number of wafers produced through the nine months ended September 30, 2021, and the prior two calendar years, and determined the nine months ended September 30, 2021 level was within the range of normal capacity. We believe that fully allocating the overhead to work in process and finished goods inventories, results in more accurate inventory valuation and computation of costs of goods sold, in addition to providing better information to management in making pricing decisions.

Under this change in estimate for allocating overhead adopted in the first quarter of 2021, overhead is fully allocated to products, resulting in an increase in standard costs and inventory values. The impact of this change for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 was an increase of approximately $0.7 million in the carrying value of our work in process and finished goods inventory as of September 30, 2021, and a corresponding decrease in product costs of goods sold. This decreased our net loss by $0.7 million and our loss per share by $0.01 as compared to results that would have been obtained using the former method of estimation.

During the three months ended September 30, 2021, there was no impact to the Company’s inventory, cost of goods sold or earnings per share as compared to results that would have been obtained using the former method of estimation.

Results of Operations 

 

Comparative results of operations for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020 (in thousands):

Revenues 

Three Months Ended

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

September 30,

2021

2020

Change

2021

2020

Change

Product

$

5,313

$

6,978

$

(1,665)

$

17,160

$

18,872

$

(1,712)

Contract

469

$

333

136

1,674

2,870

(1,196)

Total revenue, net

$

5,782

$

7,311

$

(1,529)

$

18,834

$

21,742

$

(2,908)

Total revenue for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 were $5.8 million and $18.8 million, respectively, as compared to revenues of $7.3 million and $21.7 million, respectively for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020.

Product revenue is comprised primarily of sales of displays as well as sales of other hardware. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 product revenue decreased by $1.7 million and $1.7 million, respectively, primarily due to unexpected down time experienced with manufacturing equipment and resulting capacity constraints which delayed $1.3 million of display shipments into the fourth quarter.

Contract revenue primarily reflected development associated with a proof of concept display for our Tier One Consumer Company. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 contract revenue increased by $0.1 million and decreased by $1.2 million, respectively, as compared to the prior periods, reflecting the timing of phases and milestones of this contract. We are continuing to work on our proof of concept for this customer and expect ongoing contract revenue under this program.

Cost of Revenues

Three Months Ended

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

September 30,

2021

2020

Change

2021

2020

Change

Product

$

4,962

$

5,385

$

(423)

$

15,135

$

15,153

$

(18)

Contract

261

234

27

861

$

1,487

(626)

Total cost of revenues

$

5,223

$

5,619

$

(396)

$

15,996

$

16,640

$

(644)

Total cost of revenues is comprised of costs of product and contract revenues. Cost of product revenue includes materials, labor and manufacturing overhead, warranty costs and depreciation related to our products. Total cost of revenues for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 decreased by $0.4 million and $0.6 million, respectively, from the comparable prior year period, primarily due to the impact of decreased product and contract revenues. As discussed in Critical Accounting Policies above, during the first quarter of 2021 we changed our method of allocating overhead to inventory. The impact of this change for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, was an increase of approximately $0.7 million in the carrying value of our work in process and finished goods inventory as of September 30, 2021, and a corresponding decrease in product costs of goods sold. This decreased our net loss by $0.7 million and our loss per share by $0.01 as compared to results that would have been obtained using the former method of estimation.

During the three months ended September 30, 2021, there were no impacts to the Company’s inventory, costs of goods sold or earnings per share, as compared to results that would have been obtained using the former method of estimation.

Product costs of goods sold for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 were negatively impacted by a decrease in displays produced in the third quarter due to equipment issues, which resulted in increased cost of sales, due to a decrease in the capitalization of period costs into inventory.

The following table outlines product and contract total gross profit and related gross margins for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020(dollars in thousands): 

  

Three Months Ended

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

September 30,

  

2021

2020

2021

2020

Product revenues gross profit

  

$

351

$

1,593

$

2,025

$

3,719

Product revenues gross margin

  

7

%

23

12

%

20

Contract revenues gross profit

  

$

208

  

$

99

$

813

  

$

1,383

Contract revenues gross margin

  

44

%

30

49

%

48

Total gross profit

  

$

559

  

$

1,692

$

2,838

  

$

5,102

Total gross margin

  

10

%

23

15

%

23

Total gross profit is a function of revenues less cost of revenues. Gross profit for the three months ended September 30, 2021 of $0.6 million decreased $1.1 million, from the comparable prior year period reflecting decreased product revenues and the impact of a more favorable sales mix in the prior year’s period. Gross profit for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, of $2.8 million decreased $2.3 million as compared to the prior year period primarily due to decreased product and contract revenue and decreases on product revenue gross profits. Total gross margin was 10% and 15 % for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 compared to 23% and 23% for the comparable 2020 periods, respectively.

The product gross profit of $0.4 million and $2.0 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, respectively, decreased from the comparable prior year due to decreased shipments of displays in the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 combined with the impact of lower manufacturing volumes and decreases in period costs capitalized into inventory due to equipment issues that occurred during the second and third quarters of 2021.

Contract gross margin is dependent upon the mix of internal versus external third-party costs and materials, with the external third-party costs and materials causing a lower gross margin and reducing the contract gross profit. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, contract revenue gross profit was $0.2 million and $0.8 million compared to $0.1 million and $1.4 million, respectively, for the prior year period. The changes in contract gross profit for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 versus the comparable prior year periods primarily reflects the changes in contract revenues.

Operating Expenses

Three Months Ended

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

September 30,

2021

2020

Change

2021

2020

Change

Research and development expense

$

1,669

$

1,734

$

(65)

$

5,299

$

4,313

$

986

Percentage of net revenue

29

%

24

%

28

%

20

%

Selling, general and administrative expense

$

2,203

$

1,824

$

379

$

5,717

$

5,334

$

383

Percentage of net revenue

38

%

25

%

30

%

25

%

Total operating expenses

$

3,872

$

3,558

$

314

$

11,016

$

9,647

$

1,369

Percentage of net revenue

67

%

49

%

58

%

44

%

Research and Development

R&D expenses are Company funded and are primarily compromised of salaries and related benefits, development materials and other costs specifically allocated to the development of new technologies, microdisplay products, OLED technologies and production processes. R&D related costs associated with fulfilling contracts are categorized as contract cost of revenues. R&D expenses were $1.7 million and $5.3 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021. R&D costs in the third quarter were comparable to the prior year period. The increase in R&D costs for the first nine months of 2021 reflects materials and other overhead costs related to development and qualification of our higher brightness XLE and dPd displays and a decrease in costs allocated to contracts reflecting lower contract revenues in the 2021 periods.

Selling, General and Administrative

SG&A expenses consist primarily of personnel expenses, professional services fees, as well as other marketing, general corporate and administrative expenses. The increase in SG&A expenses for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, of $2.2 million and $5.7 million, respectively, primarily reflects changes in non-cash stock compensation of $0.4 million and $0.3 million, respectively, due to the impact of increased share prices during the 2021 periods on fair value calculations.

Other Income (Expense)

Other income (expense), net consists of changes in the fair value of warrant liability as well as interest income earned on cash balances. Income related to the change in fair value of warrant liability was $4.7 million for the three months ended September 30, 2021 and $0.2 million, for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, respectively. This non-cash income or expense is associated with changes in the liability related to registered warrants issued in May 2017 and January 2018. We are required to revalue warrants classified on our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as a liability at the end of each reporting period and reflect a gain or loss from the change in fair value in the period in which the change occurred. We calculate the fair value of the warrants outstanding using the Black-Scholes model. Other income for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 also includes a $0.1 million gain upon settlement of an arbitration proceeding with a contract manufacturer and $0.1 million in reimbursement of labor overhead charges under government grant programs.

Gain on forgiveness of debt

Gain on forgiveness of debt of $2.0 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, reflects indebtedness payable to the Small Business Administration that was forgiven during the three months ended March 31, 2021, pursuant to the terms of the Paycheck Protection Program and the CARES Act.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

As of September 30, 2021, we had $7.3 million in cash and cash equivalents, working capital of $11.1 million and borrowings outstanding and borrowing availability under the ABL Facility of $2.0 million and $1.9 million, respectively. The Company had $8.3 million in cash, working capital of $12.1 million and borrowings outstanding and borrowing availability under the ABL Facility of $1.9 million and $2.1 million, respectively, at December 31, 2020.

On June 8, 2020, we received a loan under the U.S. Small Business Administration’s, or SBA, Paycheck Protection Program, or PPP, from KeyBank National Association related to the COVID-19 pandemic for $1.9 million. The terms of the PPP loan, included a fixed interest rate of 1% per annum, a maturity date two years from the date of the funding of the loan, and deferral of payments for six

months. During 2020, we used the proceeds to pay qualified payroll costs, in accordance with PPP and Section 1106 of the CARES Act

requirements. We applied for forgiveness of the entire loan in the fourth quarter. In April, 2021 the Company received a forgiveness notice from the SBA and received a related acknowledgement letter from its lender stating that they received payment in full from the SBA effective March 31, 2021. We recorded this amount in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations as gain on forgiveness of debt in the first quarter of 2021.

On July 28, 2020, we announced that we have been awarded a $33.6 million contract over the next 33 months from the DoD to sustain and enhance U.S. domestic capability for high resolution, high brightness OLED microdisplays that will be based on our proprietary direct dPd technology. This investment is in addition to the $5.5 million award announced on June 11, 2020, under the IBAS Program for OLED Supply Chain Assurance and will be used to increase capacity and sustain operations at our Hopewell Junction, New York headquarters. In August 2020, these funds began to be released to us and will continue to be released over the life of the programs in accordance with the down payment and progress payment schedules of the various capital equipment vendors.

For the nine months ended September 30, 2021 cash used in operating activities, were $6.7 million, which was attributable to a net loss of $6.4 million and changes in operating assets and liabilities of $(0.8) million and non-cash income and expenses of $0.5 million. Cash used in operating activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 was $1.7 million.

For the nine months ended September 30, 2021 cash used in investing activities was $10.1 million related to equipment purchases primarily to improve manufacturing yields and production capacity and to advance our dPd technology including grant proceeds for capital expenditures of $9.4 million.

As of September 30, 2021, we had outstanding commitments to purchase approximately $987 thousand in capital expenditures, and expect to make additional capital expenditures during 2021 to improve our manufacturing and R&D capabilities. These commitments exclude $16.5 million expected to be purchased and funded by the DoD, as described above. Cash used in investing activities during nine months ended September 30, 2020 was $1.5 million for equipment purchases.

For the nine months ended September 30, 2021, cash provided by financing activities was $15.0 million, including $6.4 million in proceeds from the exercise of warrants and employee stock options, and proceeds from government grants of $8.7 million offset by net repayments of $0.1 million under our ABL Facility. Net cash provided by financing activities during the nine months ended September 30, 2020 was $11.8 million.

Going concern

The accompanying Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which assumes that we will continue to operate as a going concern and which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business.

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly increased economic and demand uncertainty across the globe. It is possible that the current outbreak and continued spread of COVID-19, and any resurgence related to the Delta variant, or other vaccine resistant strains will cause the economic slowdown to continue, and it is possible that it could cause a global recession. Although vaccines are becoming more widely available, there is a significant degree of uncertainty and lack of visibility as to the extent and duration of the COVID-19 pandemic and related slowdowns or economic trends. If either were prolonged, demand for the Company’s products and the Company’s ability to obtain components and other materials or services on a timely basis could result in manufacturing delays, increased costs, and ultimately, in reduced or delayed sales or lost orders which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations. Although many jurisdictions are now open with social distancing measures implemented to curtail the spread of COVID-19, we cannot predict the length of time that it will take for our supply chains to be restored and any meaningful economic recovery to take place. We also cannot predict whether the Delta variant or other vaccine resistant strains will lead to additional surges in new cases of COVID-19, or the severity of such surges if/when they occur, such that governmental authorities decide to reimpose quarantines, lockdowns or travel restrictions, which could further materially and adversely affect the Company’s results and financial condition. It is also not possible to predict with certainty the impact executive orders providing for mandatory COVID-19 vaccinations will have on our workforce. Our implementation of these requirements may result in attrition, including attrition of critically skilled labor, and difficulty securing future labor needs, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

Due to continuing losses, the COVID-19 pandemic, uncertainty regarding our need or ability to borrow under our ABL Facility, we may not be able to meet our financial obligations as they become due without additional financing or sources of capital. Therefore, in accordance with applicable accounting guidance, and based on our current financial condition and availability of funds, there is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern through twelve months from the date these financial statements were issued.

We have taken actions to increase revenues and to reduce expenses and is considering financing alternatives. Our plans with regard to these matters include the following actions:

focus production and engineering resources on improving manufacturing yields and increasing production volumes;

continue the Work Status Reduction program that began in October 2019 wherein senior management work status was reduced by approximately 20%;

continue to utilize government grants for purchase of capital equipment and funding manufacturing personnel;

reduce discretionary and other expenses;

seek to enter new markets; and

consider additional financing and/or strategic alternatives.

We are reassessing our business plan and forecasts over the next two years. Based on our known cash needs as of October 31, 2021, and the anticipated availability of our ABL facility, we have developed plans to extend our liquidity to support our working capital requirements through the fourth quarter of 2022. However, there can be no assurance our plans will be achieved, or that we will be able to continue to borrow under its ABL Facility, mitigate the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, secure additional financing, and/or pursue strategic alternatives on terms acceptable to us, or at all.

In addition, even if we successfully generate additional funds through the sale of additional equity securities, borrowings or alternative financing, there can be no assurances that the revenue or capital infusion will be sufficient to enable us to develop our business to a level where it will be profitable or generate positive cash flow. If we raise additional funds through the issuance of equity or convertible debt securities, the percentage ownership of our stockholders could be significantly diluted, and these newly issued securities may have rights, preferences or privileges senior to those of existing stockholders. If we incur additional debt, a substantial portion of its operating cash flow may be dedicated to the payment of principal and interest on such indebtedness, thus limiting funds available for our operational business activities. The terms of any debt securities issued could also impose significant restrictions on our operations. In addition, broad market and industry factors may seriously harm the market price of our common stock, regardless of its operating performance, and may adversely impact its ability to raise additional funds.

Equity Raises

On November 22, 2019, we entered into an ATM offering agreement, or the ATM Agreement, with H.C. Wainwright & Co., LLC, or Wainwright, relating to sales of shares of our common stock. On June 10, 2020, we filed a prospectus supplement to update and amend the aggregate amount of shares we could sell pursuant to the ATM Agreement.

During 2020, we raised $9.8 million, net of offering expenses, through the sale of shares under the ATM Agreement which represented the remaining amount available under the facility. We used and intend to use the net proceeds from sales made under the ATM Agreement for working capital and other general corporate purposes.

ABL Facility

On December 21, 2016, we entered into an asset based revolving credit facility with a lender that provides for up to a maximum amount of $5 million based on a borrowing base equivalent of 85% of eligible accounts receivable plus the lesser of $2 million or 50% of eligible inventory. The interest on the ABL Facility is equal to the Prime Rate plus 3% but may not be less than 6.5% with a minimum monthly interest payment of $2,000. We are obligated to pay the lender a monthly administrative fee of $1,000 and an annual facility fee equal to 1% of the maximum amount borrowable under the facility. The ABL Facility will automatically renew on December 31, 2021 for a one-year term unless written notice to terminate the Financing Agreement is provided by either party.

The ABL Facility renewed on December 31, 2020 and will automatically renew on December 31, 2021 for a one-year term unless written notice to terminate the Financing Agreement is provided by either party.

 

The ABL Facility is secured by a lien on all receivables, property and the proceeds thereof, credit insurance policies and other insurance relating to the collateral, books, records and other general intangibles, inventory and equipment, proceeds of the collateral and accounts, instruments, chattel paper, and documents. The ABL Facility contains customary representations and warranties, affirmative and negative covenants and events of default, including a provision that we maintain a minimum tangible net worth of $13 million and a minimum working capital balance of $4 million. As of September 30, 2021, we had $2.0 million in borrowings, had unused borrowing availability of $1.9 million and were in compliance with all financial debt covenants.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements 

We have no off balance sheet arrangements that are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, revenues, results of operations, liquidity or capital expenditures. 

ITEM 3.   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 

Not applicable.

ITEM 4.   Controls and Procedures 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures 

 

Our management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as defined in Rule 13a-15 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, as of the end of the period covered by this Report.

Our disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of our disclosure control system are met. Because of inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues, if any, within a company have been detected. Based on our evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that, as of the end of the period covered by this Report, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective.

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

During the quarter ended September 30, 2021, there were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting. Despite the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, due to our classification as an essential business in the State of New York, our finance and administrative workforce worked onsite during the quarter ended September 30, 2021. Although the workforce occasionally works form home on isolated days, these changes to the working environment did not have a material effect on our internal controls over financial reporting during the most recent quarter. We are continually monitoring and assessing the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our internal controls to minimize the impact on their design and operating effectiveness.


ITEM 1.   Legal Proceedings

From time to time, we may become subject to various legal proceedings that are incidental to the ordinary conduct of our business. Although the results of litigation and claims cannot be predicted with certainty, as of September 30, 2021, we are not presently subject to any pending or threatened litigation that we believe, if determined adversely to us, would individually or in the aggregate be reasonably expected to have a material adverse effect on our business. Regardless of the outcome, litigation can have an adverse impact on us because of defense and settlement costs, diversion of management resources and other factors.

ITEM 1A.   Risk Factors

 

We operate in a rapidly changing environment that involves a number of risks that could materially affect our business, financial condition or future results, some of which are beyond our control. In addition to the other information set forth in this Report, you should carefully consider the factors discussed in Part I, “Item 1A. Risk Factors” in our 2020 Form 10-K. In addition, refer to our discussion in the Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, and other sections of this report, which address effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and possible impacts on our ability to continue as a going concern. The COVID-19 pandemic can also exacerbate other risks discussed in the “Risk Factors” sections of our 2020 Form 10-K and this Report, which could in turn have a material adverse effect on us. The “Risk Factors” section in our 2020 Form 10-K otherwise remains current in all material respects. The risks discussed in the “Risk Factors” section in our 2020 Form 10-K do not identify all risks that we face—our operations could also be affected by factors that are not presently known to us or that we currently consider to be immaterial to our operations. Due to risks and uncertainties, known and unknown, our past financial results may not be a reliable indicator of future performance and historical trends should not be used to anticipate results or trends in future periods.

Risks related to Manufacturing and our Supply Chain

Semiconductor industry supply chain shortages and increased demand may reduce the availability of raw materials we need for production and have led to longer lead times and increased material costs. If we are unable to purchase sufficient quantities of raw materials at acceptable prices, we may be unable to meet demand for our products in a timely manner or within budget.

Should our semiconductor industry suppliers be unable to provide us with the raw materials in the amounts we require for production, due to either capacity constraints, ongoing supply chain disruptions, or natural disasters, our ability to manufacture microdisplays would be adversely affected. Our inability to obtain components and other materials or services on a timely basis could result in manufacturing delays, increased costs, and ultimately, in reduced or delayed sales or lost orders which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

A September 2021 U.S. presidential executive order concerning mandatory COVID-19 vaccination of U.S.-based employees of companies that work on or in support of federal contracts could have a material adverse impact on our business and results of operations.

On September 9, 2021, U.S. President Biden issued an executive order requiring all employers with U.S. Government contracts to ensure that their U.S.-based employees, contractors, and subcontractors, that work on or in support of U.S. Government contracts, are fully vaccinated by January 4, 2022. The executive order includes on-site, and remote U.S.-based employees, contractors and subcontractors and it only permits limited exceptions for medical and religious reasons. The executive order will require all our U.S.-based employees, contractors, and subcontractors to be vaccinated against COVID-19, unless a religious or medical exemption applies.

It is currently not possible to predict with certainty the impact the executive order will have on our workforce. As a U.S. business that supports several key military programs and U.S Government contractors, we are requiring all of our U.S. based employees, contractors, and subcontractors that service or support our U.S. Government contracts to be fully vaccinated by January 4, 2022. Our implementation of these requirements may result in attrition, including attrition of critically skilled labor, and difficulty securing future labor needs, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

Risks related to our Common Stock

The majority holder of our Series B convertible stock, has prevented, and may in the future prevent, us from entering into significant corporate transactions that our management and Board have otherwise approved, including certain capital raising transactions.

The exercise of rights by the majority holder of the Series B convertible preferred stock has impaired, and may in the future impair, our ability to enter into significant corporate transactions, including certain capital raising transactions. For example, the securities purchase agreement pursuant to which we sold the Series B convertible preferred stock provides that so long as there are holders of at

least 577 outstanding shares of series B convertible preferred stock and until such date that (i) all shares of our Series B convertible stock become eligible for resale under Rule 144 without volume restrictions or (ii) a registration statement registering the sale of such shares becomes effective, unless we obtain the prior written consent of the majority holders, we may not issue or sell any securities in a capital raising transaction, unless such securities are not and will not be registered under the Securities Act until on or after the effective date of a registration statement registering the sale of the Series B convertible stock. The majority holder of our series B convertible preferred stock, has previously withheld consent to certain capital raises that were proposed by our management and approved by our Board, most recently in September 2021. As a result, we were unable to proceed with the proposed offerings and raise capital at the times, at the prices and in the amounts, that our management and our Board deemed most beneficial to the Company. There can be no assurances that the majority holder of our Series B convertible preferred stock, will not withhold its consent for any future capital raise we propose.

ITEM 2.   Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

None.

ITEM 3.   Defaults Upon Senior Securities 

None. 

ITEM 4.   Mine Safety Disclosures 

Not applicable. 

ITEM 5.   Other Information

None.

ITEM 6. Exhibits 

3.1

Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation (incorporated by reference to an appendix to the Registrant's Definitive Proxy Statement filed on September 21, 2006).

3.2

Certificate of Amendment of Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation (incorporated by reference to an appendix to the Registrant's Definitive Proxy Statement filed on October 26, 2010).

3.3

By laws of the Company (incorporated by reference to exhibit 99.3 to the Registrant's Definitive Proxy Statement filed on June 14, 2001).

3.4

Amended and Restated By-Laws of the Company (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.4 to the Registrant's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2021 filed on May 13, 2021).

4.1

Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 of the Registrant’s report on Form 8-K filed on December 23, 2008).

4.2

Form of Letter Agreement (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Registrant's report on Form 8-K filed on August 24, 2016).

4.3

Form of common Stock Purchase Warrant (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Registrant’s report on Form 8-K filed on December 18, 2015).

4.4

Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant issued to the Warrant Holders in the Transaction (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 to the Registrant's report on Form 8-K filed on August 24, 2016).

4.5

Common Stock Purchase Warrant issued on March 24, 2017 to the holder of an unsecured line of credit (incorporated by reference to exhibit 4.5 to the Registrant's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2017 filed on November 9, 2017).

4.6

Form of Common Stock Purchase Warrant issued to the Warrant Holders in conjunction with an issuance of common shares on May 19, 2017 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Registrant's report on Form 8-K filed on May 24, 2017).

4.8

Description of Registrants Securities (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.8 to the Registrant's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020 filed on March 19, 2021).

31.1

Certification by Principal Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. (1)

31.2

Certification by Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. (1)

32.1

Certification by Principal Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. (2)

32.2

Certification by Principal Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. (2)

101.INS

XBRL Instance Document (1)

101.SCH

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document (1)

101.CAL

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document (1)

101.DEF

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document (1)

101.LAB

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document (1)

101.PRE

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document (1)

104.

Cover Page Interactive Data File (formatted as inline XBRL and contained in Exhibit 101) (1)

(1)  Filed herewith.

(2)  Furnished herewith.

SIGNATURES 

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized

Date: November 12, 2021

eMAGIN CORPORATION

By:

/s/ Andrew G. Sculley

Andrew G. Sculley

Chief Executive Officer

Principal Executive Officer

 

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