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KDCE Kid Castle Educational

Filed: 14 Jan 22, 5:18pm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

 

QUARTERLY REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2021

 

TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE EXCHANGE ACT

 

For the transition period from ___________ to _____________

 

Commission File Number 333-39629

 

KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware 59-2549529
(State or other jurisdiction (I.R.S. Employer
of incorporation or organization) Identification No.)
   
370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance California 90501
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

310-895-1839

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class: Trading Symbol(s) Name of each exchange on which registered:
Common Stock KDCE 

EXPERT MARKET

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or, an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company”, and “emerging growth company”, in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer ☐ Accelerated filer ☐
Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company
(Do not check if smaller reporting company) Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐ No

 

Nine months ended September, 2021, there were 22,324,706 shares of the registrant’s common stock, $0.00001 par value per share, issued and outstanding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I. – FINANCIAL INFORMATION 
  
Item 1. Financial Statements1
  
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations32
  
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk41
  
Item 4. Controls and Procedures41
  
PART II. – OTHER INFORMATION 
  
Item 1. Legal Proceedings43
  
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds44
  
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities44
  
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures44
  
Item 5. Other Information45
  
Item 6. Exhibits45
  
Signatures46

 

 

 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets nine months ended September , 2021 (unaudited) and December 31, 2020 (audited)2
  
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020 (unaudited)3
  
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders’ Deficit for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 (unaudited)4
  
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020 (unaudited)5
  
Notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited)6

 

1

 

 

KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

  September 30, 2021  December 31, 2020 
  (unaudited)  (audited) 
ASSETS        
Current Assets:        
Cash and cash equivalents $218,707  $1,630 
Investments - trading securities  37,100   91,282 
Total Current Assets  255,807   92,912 
         
Property and equipment, net $-  $7,745 
Investments - real estate  -   664,111 
Lingstar Electric Vehicles Invt  27,271     
Entrepreneurship Development  2,974,133   - 
Crypto Currency Mining Rigs  19,200   - 
Total assets  3,276,411   764,767 
         
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)        
Current Liabilities:        
Accrued expenses  -   4,542 
Accrued interest  1,600   2,812 
Marginal loan payable  0   115 
Line of credit - related party, current portion  10,000   63,632 
Total Current Liabilities $11,600  $71,102 
         
Long-Term Liabilities:        
Notes payable - net of current portion $903,248  $150,000 
Related party liabilities - net of current portion  1,382,374   540,524 
Total Long-Term Liabilities  2,285,622   690,524 
Total Liabilities $2,297,222  $761,626 
         
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)        
Preferred stock, $.000001 par value, 1,000,000 shares authorized, 100,000 issued and outstanding as at and September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 respectively $10  $10 
Common Stock, $0.001 par value, 1,000,000,000 shares authorized, 22,324,706 and 922,324,706 issued and outstanding as at and September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 respectively  223   9,223 
Additional paid in capital  7,638,427   7,873,783 
Accumulated deficit  (6,659,471)  (7,879,875)
Minority Interest  117,503   377 
Total Stockholders’ Equity $979,189  $3,141 
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity  3,276,411   764,767 

 

The accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

 

2

 

 

KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(Unaudited)

 

  2021  2020  2021  2020 
  For the three months ended September 30,  For the nine months ended September 30, 
  2021  2020  2021  2020 
Revenue:            
Entrepreneurship Development $146,000      $146,000     
Sales of investments under trading securities  1,852,489  $19,035   5,194,298  $99,877 
Sales of investment under property      -   700,385   1,205,000 
Total Revenue  1,998,489   19,035   6,040,683   1,304,877 
                 
Cost of goods sold:                
Entrepreneurship Development  34,100       34,100     
Licensing Fees  165,361       1,382,374     
Cost of sales - trading securities  859,392   -   2,719,477   - 
Cost of sales - property          722,341   1,179,827 
Total cost of goods sold $1,058,853   -  $4,858,293  $1,179,827 
Gross profit $939,635  $19,035  $1,182,390  $125,050 
                 
Operating expenses:                
General and administrative  60,233   9,528   98,349   47,224 
Professional fees  40,561   11,221   135,261   66,059 
Advertising and promotions  85   1,598   1,774   16,325 
Interest expense  2,095   -   463   - 
Total operating expenses  102,973   22,347   235,847   129,608 
Income (loss) from operations $836,662  $(3,312) $946,544  $(4,559)
                 
Other Income                
Dividends  0  $152  $62  $173 
Unrealized gain (loss) $(756,928)  (39,515)  71   (128,233)
Net Income  79,734   (42,676)  946,676   (132,618)
                 
Earnings (loss) per Share: Basic and Diluted $0.0036  $(0.000) $0.0424  $(0.000)
                 
Weighted Average Common Shares Outstanding: Basic and Diluted  22,324,706   922,324,706   22,324,706   922,324,706 

 

The accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

 

3

 

 

KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION

STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

 

           Additional       
  Common  Preferred     Paid-In  Accumulated    
  Shares  Shares  Amount  Capital  Deficit  Total 
                   
Balance at December 31, 2008  25,000,000   0  $8,592,138  $259,341  $(7,638,660) $1,212,819 
Reverse Split in 2009  (22,675,294)  -   (8,590,445)  7,386,026   (12,708)  (1,217,127)
Common stock issued to settle debt and employee compensation  -   -   -             
Common stock issued to settle debt and employee compensation, shares  -   -                 
Preferred stock conversion                        
Preferred stock conversion, shares                        
Preferred shares issued                        
Preferred shares issued, shares                        
Acquisition of business                        
Share cancellation                        
Share cancellation, shares                        
Disposition of business                        
Net (income) loss  -   -                 
Balance at December 31, 2018  2,324,706   0  $1,683  $7,645,367  $(7,651,368) $(4,308)
Common stock issued to settle debt and employee compensation  20,000,000       200           200 
Preferred stock conversion  900,000,000       9,000           9,000 
Preferred shares issued      100,000   10           10 
Acquisition of business          (1,670)  180,746       181,049 
Net (income) loss                  (149,682)  (149,682)
Balance, December 31, 2019  922,324,706   100,000  $9,233  $7,826,113  $(7,801,051) $36,269 
Preferred shares issued      900,000               - 
Acquisition of business              47,670   2,181   49,851 
Net (income) loss          0       (82,979)  (82,979)
Balance, December 31, 2020  922,324,706   1,000,000  $9,233  $7,873,783  $(7,879,875) $3,141 
Share cancellation  (900,000,000)      (9,000)  9,000       - 
Disposition of business              (244,355)  273,727   29,372 
Net Income          0       946,676   946,676 
Balance, September 30, 2021  22,324,706   1,000,000  $233  $7,638,428  $(6,659,471) $979,189 

 

The accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

 

4

 

 


KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION

STATEMENTS OF CASHFLOWS

(Unaudited)

 

  2021  2020 
  For the six months ended Sept 30, 
  2021  2020 
Cash Flows from Operating Activities:        
Net Income (Loss) $946,677  $(132,618)
Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash used in operating activities:        
net cash used in operating activities:        
Inventory Asset: Trading Securities  54,110   22,435 
Depreciation  -   4,301 
Other Accrued Liabilities  (2,257)  1,522 
Net Cash Flows Used in Operating Activities  998,530   (104,360)
         
Cash flows from investing activities:        
Entrepreneurship Development  (2,974,133)  41,579 
Payment for real estate investment  664,111   482,750 
Crypto Currency Mining Rigs  (19,200)    
Lingstar Electric Vehicles Invt  (27,271)    
Net Cash Flows from Investing Activities  (2,356,493)  524,328 
         
Cash flows from financing activities:        
Proceeds from issuance of marginal loan payable  -   1,208 
Proceeds from issuance of line of credit - long term      150,000 
Payment on line of credit - long term - related party      (726,192)
Proceeds from issuance of stock      25,697 
Long term liabilities - related party  1,382,374     
Line of credit - short term - related party  192,667   122,431 
New Cash Flows from Financing Activities  1,575,041   (426,856)
         
Net Change in Cash: $217,078  $(6,888)
Beginning cash:  1,630   12,229 
Ending Cash: $218,707  $5,341 
         
Supplemental Disclosures of Cash Flow Information:        
Cash paid for interest $62  $11,549 
Cash paid for tax $0  $0 
         
Supplemental Disclosures of Non-Cash Financing        
Shares issued to settle accounts payable $0     
Shares issued to settle accruals - related parties $0     

 

The accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

 

5

 

 

KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 1. NATURE OF OPERATIONS

 

Nature of Business

 

The Company and Nature of Business

 

Kid Castle Educational Corporation, a Delaware corporation, (“Kid Castle,” “the Company,” “We,” “KDCE,” “Us” or “Our’), through its operating subsidiary, GiveMePower Corporation, operates and manages a portfolio of real estate and financial services assets and operations to empower black persons in the United States through financial tools and resources. The Corporation is primarily focused on: (1) creating and empowering local black businesses in urban America; and (2) creating real estate properties and businesses in opportunity zones and other distressed neighborhood across America.

 

Kid Castle was the result of a share exchange transaction, commonly referred to as a reverse merger, pursuant to which shareholders of an offshore operating company take control of a U.S. company that has no operations (commonly referred to as a shell company), and the offshore operating company becomes a subsidiary of the U.S. company. In KDCE case, the offshore company was Higoal Developments Ltd., which was the parent company of Kid Castle Internet Technologies Limited and Kid Castle Education Software Development Co. Limited, KDCE’s operating companies that run our English language instruction business. The U.S. or shell company, at the time of the share exchange, was King Ball International Technology Corporation.

 

Kid Castle used to be a Florida corporation until the company voluntarily dissolved its Florida registration with intention to simultaneously incorporate in Delaware and convert into a Delaware corporation. Although the company immediately finalized its registration effort to convert into a Delaware Corporation, the company’s registered agent who was supposed to submit the registration package to the Delaware Secretary of State for certification, failed to make a timely submission. Later in January 2019, when the company realized that the Delaware incorporation/registration package/process was never submitted to the Delaware Secretary of State nor completed in any other way or form, the Company went ahead and resubmitted the required registration package and was then formally re-incorporated in Delaware and convert into a Delaware corporation. Thus, the company was formally incorporated in Delaware and converted into a Delaware Corporation in January 2019.

 

The re-incorporation in Delaware, which occurred in January 2019, has placed at risk, voidable and unenforceable, all and any liabilities that may have accrued, including any material agreements the Company may have executed during the period between March 22, 2011 and January 2019. To the best of our knowledge, no such liabilities that were accrued and no material agreement were entered into by the company during the period between March 22, 2011 and January 2019. In addition, there could be penalties or legal liabilities that may have accrued as a result of conducting business from 2011 to 2019 without properly registering with any State. To the best of our knowledge, as at September 7, 2020, no such penalties or liabilities has accrued to the company accrued as a result of conducting business from 2011 to 2019 without properly registering with any State. However, there is no guarantee that such penalties or liabilities would not accrue or arise in the future.

 

6

 

 

On October 21, 2019, pursuant to a stock purchase agreement dated October 2, 2019, Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc., a California corporation, purchased one (1) million shares of its preferred shares (one preferred share is convertible 1,000 share of common stocks) of the Company, representing 97.82% of our total issued and outstanding voting shares of common stock and preferred stock. Simultaneously with the purchase, the officers and directors of the Company resigned and Frank I Igwealor became Chairman and CEO, Secretary, Treasurer, and Director of the Company. Following the share sales to Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc., the purchaser converted 900,000 of the preferred shares for 900,000,000 shares of the Company’s current outstanding shares of common stock.

 

Following the consummation of the October 21, 2019 transactions, the Company decided to restart filing important information immediately. The Company used the Form 10-12(g) to register its common stock with the SEC.

 

On September 15, 2020, Kid Castle Educational Corporation (the “Company”) entered into a stock purchase agreement with certain corporation related to our President and CEO with respect to the private placement of 900,000 shares of its preferred stock at a purchase price of $3 in cash and a transfer of 100% interest in, and control of Community Economic Development Capital, LLC (a California Limited Liability Company). The shares were issued to the investors without registration under the Securities Act of 1933 based upon exemptions from registration provided under Section 4(2) of the Act and Regulation D promulgated thereunder. The issuances did not involve any public offering; no general solicitation or general advertising was used in connection with the offering. Community Economic Development Capital, is a specialty real estate holding company for specialized assets including, affordable housing, opportunity zones properties, medical real estate investments, related commercial facilities, industrial and commercial real estate, and other real estate related services.

 

Similarly, on September 16, 2020, as part of its purchase of unregistered securities from certain corporation related to our President and CEO, the Company, received $3.00 in cash and 1,000,000 shares of its preferred stock, and in exchange transferred 100% interest in, and control of Community Economic Development Capital, LLC (“CED Capital”), a California Limited Liability Company, and 97% of the issued and outstanding shares of Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), to GiveMePower Corporation, a Nevada corporation. This transaction gave the Company 88% of the voting control of GiveMePower.

 

On April 21, 2021, the Company sold Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc. (“CBDX”), a California corporation, to Premier Information Management, Inc. for $1 in cash. As further consideration pursuant to the stated sales, CBDX returned Kid Castle Educational Inc., the parent Company of GMPW, the 100,000 shares of KDCE preferred stock and 900,000,000 shares of KDCE common stock that CBDX bought in October of 2019. Pursuant to the April 21, 2021 transaction, CBDX ceased from being a subsidiary of GMPW, effective April 1, 2021.

 

7

 

 

As at the time of these transactions, all four businesses involved in the transactions were controlled by Mr. Frank I Igwealor. Because both the buyer and seller in the above acquisitions were under the control of the same person, the transaction was classified as “common control transaction and therefore fall under “Transactions Between Entities Under Common Control” subsections of ASC 805-50. Under ASC 805-50, “assets transferred to the entity are generally not stepped up to fair value. Instead, they are recorded at the ultimate parent’s historical cost basis. Whether the transaction should be retrospectively or prospectively applied is dependent on the nature of the common control transaction. Transfer of net assets or a business are reflected retrospectively, whereas transfers of assets are prospective.” “The financial statements of the receiving entity should report results of operations for the period in which the transfer occurs as though the transfer of net assets or exchange of equity interests had occurred at the beginning of the period. Results of operations for that period will thus comprise those of the previously separate entities combined from the beginning of the period to the date the transfer is completed and those of the combined operations from that date to the end of the period.”

 

The consolidated financial statements of the Company therefore include GiveMePower Corporation and its wholly owned subsidiaries of Alpharidge Capital LLC. (“Alpharidge”), Community Economic Development Capital, LLC. (“CED Capital”), and subsidiaries, in which GiveMePower has a controlling voting interest and entities consolidated under the variable interest entities (“VIE”) provisions of ASC 810, “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”), after elimination of intercompany transactions and accounts.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its subsidiaries, in which the Company has a controlling voting interest and entities consolidated under the variable interest entities (“VIE”) provisions of ASC 810, “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”). Inter-company balances and transactions have been eliminated upon consolidation.

 

ASC 810 requires that the investor with the controlling financial interest should consolidate the investee/affiliate. ASC 810-10 requires that an equity interest investor consolidates a VIE when it retains an investment in the entity, is considered a variable interest investor in the entity, and is the primary beneficiary of the entity. An investor in a VIE is a “variable interest beneficiary” when, per an arrangement’s governing documents, the investor will absorb a portion of the VIE’s expected losses or will receive a portion of the entity’s “residual returns.” The variable interest beneficiary retaining a controlling financial interest in the VIE is designated as its “primary beneficiary” and must consolidate the VIE. A variable interest beneficiary retains a “controlling financial interest” in a VIE when that beneficiary retains the power to direct the activities of the VIE that have the greatest influence over the VIE’s economic performance and retains an obligation to absorb the VIE’s significant losses or the right to receive benefits from the VIE that could potentially be significant to the VIE. Based on the ASC 810 test above, Kid Castle Educational Corporation is the primary beneficiary of GiveMePower Corporation (the “VIE”) because Kid Castle retained a controlling financial interest in the VIE and has the power to direct the activities of the VIE, having the greatest influence over the VIE’s economic performance and retains an obligation to absorb the VIE’s significant losses and the right to determine and receive benefits from the VIE.

 

8

 

 

Because GiveMePower Corporation is 87% controlled by Kid Castle Educational Corporation, the consolidation rule requires the Revenue, Assets and Liabilities recognized and disclosed on the financial statements of GiveMePower Corporation are also recognized and disclosed on the financial statements of Kid Castle Educational Corporation pursuant to ASC 810.

 

NOTE 2. GOING CONCERN

 

Our financial statements are prepared using accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America applicable to a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and the liquidation of liabilities in the normal course of business. While this would make it our third profitable quarter in a row, we still operate limited ongoing business operations that generate income. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, we reported net income of $79,734 and $946,676 respectively, and an accumulated deficit of $6,659,471 as of September 30, 2021. These conditions raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. The financial statements do not include any adjustments to reflect the possible future effects on the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that may result from the outcome of these uncertainties. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon our ability to (a) continue to run our current businesses profitably, (b) raise additional debt, or (c) equity funding to meet our ongoing operating expenses and ultimately in merging with another entity with experienced management and profitable operations. No assurances can be given that we will be successful in achieving these objectives.

 

NOTE 3. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The summary of significant accounting policies is presented to assist in the understanding of the financial statements. These policies conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and have been consistently applied. The Company has elected a calendar year of December 31 year-end.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The Consolidated Financial Statements include the accounts of Kid Castle Educational Corporation and all of our controlled subsidiary companies. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated. Investments in business entities in which we do not have control, but we have the ability to exercise significant influence over operating and financial policies (generally 20% to 50% ownership) are accounted for using the equity method of accounting. Operating results of acquired businesses are included in the Consolidated Statements of Income from the date of acquisition. We consolidate variable interest entities if we have operational and financial control, and are deemed to be the >50.1% beneficiary of the profit and loss of the entity. Operating results for variable interest entities in which we are determined to be the primary beneficiary are included in the Consolidated Statements of Income from the date such determination is made. For convenience and ease of reference, we refer to the financial statement caption “Income before Income Taxes and Equity Income” as “pre-tax income” throughout the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

9

 

 

COVID-19 Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties

 

COVID-19 Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties —We are subject to the risks arising from COVID-19’s impacts on the residential real estate industry. Our management believes that these impacts, which include but are not limited to the following, could have a significant negative effect on our future financial position, results of operations, and cash flows: (i) prohibitions or limitations on in-person activities associated with residential real estate transactions; (ii) lack of consumer desire for in-person interactions and physical home tours; and (iii) deteriorating economic conditions, such as increased unemployment rates, recessionary conditions, lower yields on individuals’ investment portfolios, and more stringent mortgage financing conditions. In addition, we have considered the impacts and uncertainties of COVID-19 in our use of estimates in preparation of our consolidated financial statements. These estimates include, but are not limited to, likelihood of achieving performance conditions under performance-based equity awards, net realizable value of inventory, and the fair value of reporting units and goodwill for impairment.

 

In April 2020, following the government lockdown order, we asked all employees to begin to work from their homes and we also reduced the number of hours available to each of our employees by approximately by approximately 75%. These actions taken in response to the economic impact of COVID-19 on our business resulted in a reduction of productivity for the period ended September 30, 2021. All cost related to these actions are included in general and administrative expenses, as these costs were determined to be direct and incremental.

 

Use of Estimates and Assumptions

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

We maintain cash balances in a non-interest-bearing account that currently does not exceed federally insured limits. For the purpose of the statements of cash flows, all highly liquid investments with a maturity of three months or less are considered to be cash equivalents. As of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, we did maintain $218,707 and $1,630 balance of cash equivalents respectively.

 

10

 

 

Financial Instruments

 

The estimated fair values for financial instruments were determined at discrete points in time based on relevant market information. These estimates involved uncertainties and could not be determined with precision. The carrying amount of the our accounts payable and accruals, our accruals- related parties and loans – related parties approximate their fair values because of the short-term maturities of these instruments.

 

Fair Value Measurements:

 

ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures (“ASC 820”), provides a comprehensive framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosures which are required about fair value measurements. Specifically, ASC 820 sets forth a definition of fair value and establishes a hierarchy prioritizing the inputs to valuation techniques, giving the highest priority to quoted prices in active markets for identical assets and liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable value inputs. ASC 820 defines the hierarchy as follows:

 

Level 1 – Quoted prices are available in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the reported date. The types of assets and liabilities included in Level 1 are highly liquid and actively traded instruments with quoted prices, such as equities listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

 

Level 2 – Pricing inputs are other than quoted prices in active markets but are either directly or indirectly observable as of the reported date. The types of assets and liabilities in Level 2 are typically either comparable to actively traded securities or contracts or priced with models using highly observable inputs.

 

Level 3 – Significant inputs to pricing that are unobservable as of the reporting date. The types of assets and liabilities included in Level 3 are those with inputs requiring significant management judgment or estimation, such as complex and subjective models and forecasts used to determine the fair value of financial transmission rights.

 

Our financial instruments consist of accounts payable and accruals and our accruals- related parties. The carrying amount of the out accounts payable and accruals, accruals- related parties and loans – related parties approximates their fair values because of the short-term maturities of these instruments.

 

The Company’s financial instruments consisted of cash, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, and line of credit. The estimated fair value of cash, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, due to or from affiliated companies, and notes payable approximates its carrying amount due to the short maturity of these instruments.

 

Financial Instruments

 

In the normal course of business, the Investment Funds may trade various financial instruments and enter into certain investment activities, which may give rise to off-balance-sheet risks, with the objective of capital appreciation or as economic hedges against other securities or the market as a whole. The Investment Funds’ investments may include futures, options, swaps and securities sold, not yet purchased. These financial instruments represent future commitments to purchase or sell other financial instruments or to exchange an amount of cash based on the change in an underlying instrument at specific terms at specified future dates. Risks arise with these financial instruments from potential counterparty non-performance and from changes in the market values of underlying instruments.

 

11

 

 

Credit concentrations may arise from investment activities and may be impacted by changes in economic, industry or political factors. The Investment Funds routinely execute transactions with counterparties in the financial services industry, resulting in credit concentration with respect to the financial services industry. In the ordinary course of business, the Investment Funds may also be subject to a concentration of credit risk to a particular counterparty. The Investment Funds seek to mitigate these risks by actively monitoring exposures, collateral requirements and the creditworthiness of its counterparties.

 

The Investment Funds have entered into various types of swap contracts with other counterparties. These agreements provide that they are entitled to receive or are obligated to pay in cash an amount equal to the increase or decrease, respectively, in the value of the underlying shares, debt and other instruments that are the subject of the contracts, during the period from inception of the applicable agreement to its expiration. In addition, pursuant to the terms of such agreements, they are entitled to receive or obligated to pay other amounts, including interest, dividends and other distributions made in respect of the underlying shares, debt and other instruments during the specified time frame. They are also required to pay to the counterparty a floating interest rate equal to the product of the notional amount multiplied by an agreed-upon rate, and they receive interest on any cash collateral that they post to the counterparty at the federal funds or LIBOR rate in effect for such period.

 

The Investment Funds may trade futures contracts. A futures contract is a firm commitment to buy or sell a specified quantity of a standardized amount of a deliverable grade commodity, security, currency or cash at a specified price and specified future date unless the contract is closed before the delivery date. Payments (or variation margin) are made or received by the Investment Funds each day, depending on the daily fluctuations in the value of the contract, and the whole value change is recorded as an unrealized gain or loss by the Investment Funds. When the contract is closed, the Investment Funds record a realized gain or loss equal to the difference between the value of the contract at the time it was opened and the value at the time it was closed.

 

The Investment Funds may utilize forward contracts to seek to protect their assets denominated in foreign currencies and precious metals holdings from losses due to fluctuations in foreign exchange rates and spot rates. The Investment Funds’ exposure to credit risk associated with non-performance of such forward contracts is limited to the unrealized gains or losses inherent in such contracts, which are recognized in other assets and accrued expenses and other liabilities in our consolidated balance sheets.

 

The Investment Funds may also enter into foreign currency contracts for purposes other than hedging denominated securities. When entering into a foreign currency forward contract, the Investment Funds agree to receive or deliver a fixed quantity of foreign currency for an agreed-upon price on an agreed-upon future date unless the contract is closed before such date. The Investment Funds record unrealized gains or losses on the contracts as measured by the difference between the forward foreign exchange rates at the dates of entry into such contracts and the forward rates at the reporting date.

 

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Furthermore, the Investment Funds may also purchase and write option contracts. As a writer of option contracts, the Investment Funds receive a premium at the outset and then bear the market risk of unfavorable changes in the price of the underlying financial instrument. As a result of writing option contracts, the Investment Funds are obligated to purchase or sell, at the holder’s option, the underlying financial instrument. Accordingly, these transactions result in off-balance-sheet risk, as the Investment Funds’ satisfaction of the obligations may exceed the amount recognized in our consolidated balance sheets.

 

Certain terms of the Investment Funds’ contracts with derivative counterparties, which are standard and customary to such contracts, contain certain triggering events that would give the counterparties the right to terminate the derivative instruments. In such events, the counterparties to the derivative instruments could request immediate payment on derivative instruments in net liability positions.

 

Derivatives

 

From time to time, our subsidiaries enter into derivative contracts, including purchased and written option contracts, swap contracts, futures contracts and forward contracts. U.S. GAAP requires recognition of all derivatives as either assets or liabilities in the balance sheet at their fair value. The accounting for changes in fair value depends on the intended use of the derivative and its resulting designation. For those derivative instruments that are designated and qualify as hedging instruments, a company must designate the hedging instrument, based upon the exposure being hedged, as a fair value hedge, cash flow hedge or a hedge of a net investment in a foreign operation. Gains and losses related to a hedge are either recognized in income immediately to offset the gain or loss on the hedged item or are deferred and reported as a component of accumulated other comprehensive loss and subsequently recognized in earnings when the hedged item affects earnings. The change in fair value of the ineffective portion of a financial instrument, determined using the hypothetical derivative method, is recognized in earnings immediately. The gain or loss related to financial instruments that are not designated as hedges are recognized immediately in earnings. Cash flows related to hedging activities are included in the operating section of the consolidated statements of cash flows. For further information regarding our derivative contracts, see Note 6, “Financial Instruments.”

 

Marginal Loan Payable

 

The Company entered into a marginal loan agreement as part of its new trading account process in 2019 with the Company’s brokerage for the purchase of securities and to fund the underfunded balance. The marginal loan payable bears interest at 0% per annum and interest and unpaid principal balance is payable on the maturity date. The balance of this account nine months ended September, 2021 is $0.

 

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Investment – Trading Securities

 

All investment securities are classified as trading securities and are carried at fair value in accordance with ASC 320 Investments — Debt and Equity Securities. Investment transactions are recorded on a trade date basis. Realized gains or losses on sales of investments are based on the first-in, first-out or the specific identification method. Realized and unrealized gains or losses on investments are recorded in the statements of operations as realized and unrealized gains or losses as net revenue. All investment securities are held and transacted by the Company’s broker firm. The Company did not hold more than 4.8% of equity of the shares of any public companies as investments nine months ended September 30, 2021

 

All investments that are listed on a securities exchange are valued at their last sales price on the primary securities exchange on which such securities are traded on such date. Securities that are not listed on any exchange but are traded over-the-counter are valued at the mean between the last “bid” and “ask” price for such security on such date. The Company does not have any investment securities for which market quotes are not readily available.

 

The Company’s trading securities are held by a third-party brokerage firm, and composed of publicly traded companies with readily available fair value which are quoted prices in active markets.

 

Related Party Transactions:

 

A related party is generally defined as (i) any person that holds 10% or more of our common stock or membership interests including such person’s immediate families, (ii) our management, (iii) someone that directly or indirectly controls, is controlled by or is under common control with us, or (iv) anyone who can significantly influence our financial and operating decisions. A transaction is considered to be a related party transaction when there is a transfer of resources or obligations between related parties. As at September 30, 2021, the Company has a loan balance of $903,248 from company that is controlled by the Company’s majority stockholder. Additionally, during the period under review, the Company paid rent $1,793 to a company that is controlled by the Company’s majority stockholder. See NOTE 7 for more details of our related party transactions.

 

Other accrued liabilities entail licensing fees owned to Poverty Solutions, Inc., a control entity. The related party is a California nonprofit corporation that specialized in developing and deploying programs that help low-income persons and families to divest poverty, through affordable housing, real estate development, financial capability training, venture capital initiatives, private equity operations, and algorithmic trading models designs. The transaction is arm-length and 20/80 distribution is standard practice in the hedge-fund and private-equity industry.

 

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Revenue, Assets and Liabilities of Consolidated Subsidiary and Financial Statement Relationship

 

GiveMePower Corporation is 87% owned and controlled by Kid Castle Educational Corporation. Kid Castle Educational Corporation is 55% owned and controlled by Video River Networks, Inc. Because of the consolidated subsidiary relationship between these three companies, the singular Revenue, Assets and Liabilities recognized and disclosed on the financial statements of GiveMePower Corporation are also recognized and disclosed on the financial statements of Kid Castle Educational Corporation and Video River Networks, Inc. pursuant to ASC 810.

 

Leases:

 

Prior to January 1, 2019, the Company accounted for leases under Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 840, Accounting for Leases. Effective from January 1, 2019, the Company adopted the guidance of ASC 842, Leases, which requires an entity to recognize a right-of-use asset and a lease liability for virtually all leases. On February 25, 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), to increase transparency and comparability among organizations by recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet and disclosing key information about leasing transactions. ASC 842 requires that lessees recognize right of use assets and lease liabilities calculated based on the present value of lease payments for all lease agreements with terms that are greater than twelve months. It requires for leases longer than one year, a lessee to recognize in the statement of financial condition a right·of·use asset, representing the right to use the underlying asset for the lease term, and a lease liability, representing the liability to make lease payments. ASC 842 distinguishes leases as either a finance lease or an operating lease that affects how the leases are measured and presented in the statement of operations and statement of cash flows. ASC 842 supersedes nearly all existing lease accounting guidance under GAAP issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) including ASC Topic 840, Leases. The accounting update also requires that for finance leases, a lessee recognize interest expense on the lease liability, separately from the amortization of the right-of-use asset in the statements of earnings, while for operating leases, such amounts should be recognized as a combined expense. In addition, this accounting update requires expanded disclosures about the nature and terms of lease agreements.

 

The Company does not have operating and financing leases nine months ended September , 2021. The adoption of ASC 842 did not materially impact our results of operations, cash flows, or presentation thereof. The Company has reviewed the new standard and does not expect it to have a material impact to the statement of financial condition or its net capital.

 

Income Taxes:

 

Under the asset and liability method prescribed within ASC 740, Income Taxes, the Company recognizes deferred tax assets and liabilities for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between financial statement carrying amounts of assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be realized or settled. The effect of a change in tax rates on deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. The realizability of deferred tax assets is assessed throughout the year and a valuation allowance is recorded if necessary, to reduce net deferred tax assets to the amount more likely than not to be realized. Certain prior period deferred tax disclosures were reclassified to conform with current period presentation.

 

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ASC 740 provides that a tax benefit from an uncertain tax position may be recognized when it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained upon examination, including resolutions of any related appeals or litigation processes, based on the technical merits of the position. ASC 740 also provides guidance on measurement, derecognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure, and transition.

 

The Company’s practice is to recognize interest accrued related to unrecognized tax benefits in interest expense and penalties in selling and administrative expense. Nine months ended September , 2021, the Company had no accrued interest or penalties on unrecognized tax benefits.

 

The provision for income taxes is computed using the asset and liability method, under which deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities, and for operating losses and tax credit carry-forwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using the currently enacted tax rates that apply to taxable income in effect for the years in which those tax assets are expected to be realized or settled. We record a valuation allowance to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that is believed more likely than not to be realized.

 

Uncertain Tax Positions:

 

We evaluate tax positions in a two-step process. We first determine whether it is more likely than not that a tax position will be sustained upon examination, based on the technical merits of the position. If a tax position meets the more-likely-than-not recognition threshold it is then measured to determine the amount of benefit to recognize in the financial statements. The tax position is measured as the largest amount of benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement. We classify gross interest and penalties and unrecognized tax benefits that are not expected to result in payment or receipt of cash within one year as long term liabilities in the financial statements.

 

Revenue Recognition:

 

The Company recognizes revenue in accordance with the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, which requires that five basic steps be followed to recognize revenue: (1) a legally enforceable contract that meets criteria standards as to composition and substance is identified; (2) performance obligations relating to provision of goods or services to the customer are identified; (3) the transaction price, with consideration given to any variable, noncash, or other relevant consideration, is determined; (4) the transaction price is allocated to the performance obligations; and (5) revenue is recognized when control of goods or services is transferred to the customer with consideration given, whether that control happens over time or not. Determination of criteria (3) and (4) are based on our management’s judgments regarding the fixed nature of the selling prices of the products and services delivered and the collectability of those amounts. The adoption of ASC 606 did not result in a change to the accounting for any of the in-scope revenue streams; as such, no cumulative effect adjustment was recorded.

 

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The Company generates revenue primarily from: (1) the sale of homes/properties, (2) commissions and fees charged on each real estate services transaction closed by our lead agents or partner agents, and (3) sales of trading securities using its broker firm, less original purchase cost. Net trading revenues primarily consist of revenues from trading securities earned upon completion of trade, net of any trading fees. A trading is completed when earned and recognized at a point in time, on a trade-date basis, as the Company executes trades. The Company records trading revenue on a net basis, trading sales less original purchase cost. Net realized gains and losses from securities transactions are determined for federal income tax and financial reporting purposes on the first-in, first-out method and represent proceeds on disposition of investments less the cost basis of investments. Sale of real estate properties are recognized at the sales price/amount and the total cost (including cost of rehabilitations) associated with the property acquisition and rehabilitation are classified in Cost of Goods Sold (COGS).

 

During three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, the Company did recognized revenue of $1,998,489 and 6,040,683 from operations, and $0 and $62 in dividend income respectively.

 

Professional Fees:

 

We expense professional fees when incurred. During the period ended September 30, 2021, the Company did recognize professional fees of $135,261 compared to $66,059 spent for similar period of last fiscal year.

 

Real Estate

 

Revenue Recognition: Revenue from real estate sales and related costs are recognized at the time of closing primarily by specific identification. We shall account for our leases as follows: (i) for operating leases, revenue is recognized on a straight line basis over the lease term and (ii) for financing leases (x) minimum lease payments to be received plus the estimated value of the property at the end of the lease are considered the gross investment in the lease and (y) unearned income, representing the difference between gross investment and actual cost of the leased property, is amortized to income over the lease term so as to produce a constant periodic rate of return on the net investment in the lease. We have no real estate sales in the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021

 

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Alpharidge’s Entrepreneurship Development Initiative (EDI)

 

EDI Program Summary

 

Alpharidge’s Entrepreneurship Development Initiative comprises of entrepreneurship and financial capability training that facilitates economic development, train former-servicemen/veterans to become entrepreneurs, transform and empower at-risk youths, improved economic outcomes for participants, help low-income families to create jobs for friends and family members, train young low-income persons to become self-sufficiency and achieve economic independence through financial capability training. Enrolment eligibility is determined at the start. We recruit aspiring entrepreneurs, focusing specifically on young-persons from low-income backgrounds. Although all Low-income Persons are eligible to participate, we prioritize veterans in our program enrolment because most of them have been well-trained in the areas of discipline, punctuality, perseverance, hard-working and patience. Many of the veterans that we have served had faced barriers to employment such as lack of civilian work skills and experience, length of time out of the labor force, current and/or past histories of physical or emotional disability, homelessness, and/or lack of resources for engaging in job skills training for today’s job market. Alpharidge work with local business incubators are in place to provide support infrastructure to growing firms in California, Arizona, Nevada, Georgia and Maryland. Additional states would be added in the future as EDI grows.

 

In April of 2021, Alpharidge launched its Entrepreneurship Development Initiative which entails: (1) Portfolio – acquiring OTC trading shells with stop signs and cleaning them up to become Pink Current, then merging them with emerging businesses controlled by Alpharidge-trained entrepreneurs; and (2) Custodianship – use the custodianship process in Nevada and Delaware to acquire custodianship of abandoned OTC-trading shells, clean them up to become Pink Current, then merging them with emerging businesses controlled by Alpharidge-trained entrepreneurs.

 

To launch its Entrepreneurship Development Initiative, Alpharidge Capital, LLC drew $0.9 million from its $1.5 million LOC with LA Community Capital. On April 22, 2021, Alpharidge retained a Nevada based Attorney to petition for custodianship of Mondial Ventures, Inc. Alpharidge later lost the attempt and expensed all related cost as Professional fees – legal. On May 5, 2021, Alpharidge purchase from the open market, Labwire, Inc., (LBWR) and Waypoint Biomedical, Inc., both of which it has brought Pink Current. As at the date of this reports, Alpharidge’ Entrepreneurship Development Initiative Portfolio has bought also purchase Nano Mobile Healthcare, Inc. to make it 3 shells. The Custodianship has petitioned for MNVN, HMLA, TONR, ECMH, ABWN, FPMI, NTGL, CGUD, ICOA, SRBT, USWF, NWTT, USBC, WRMA, WWRL, HERF, NRCD, TGMR, ITRX, AFFN, UTDE, AOBI, SRCX, ADCV, DVFI, APWL, CIVX, NHLG, ILIM, CCWF, TMXN, MNDP, JPEX, SVLT, MTEI, CAMG, CDBT, ERGO, NOUV, ICNM, PRDL, OCLG, ILST and FCGD, altogether 44 petitions filed within 8 weeks. Of the 44, Alpharidge lost, walked-away, or withdrew from 9 petitions.” Cost related to the successful petitions were capitalized on the Company’s balance sheet as “Entrepreneurship Development” and those related to failed petitions were expensed in the period incurred as “Professional Fees - legal.”

 

EDI Long-Term Goals

 

Alpharidge Capital LLC anticipates its Entrepreneurship Development to be an ongoing business. It expects to generate income and expense cost related to this line of business.

 

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Accounting and Reporting for EDI

 

Costs are accumulated by shells as follows: (1) legal cost to petition court for custodianship of an abandoned shell; (2) State taxes and fees to revive or reinstate company into good standing; (3) payment to Transfer agents to clear outstanding balance; and (4) fees paid to consultants, SEC and OTC Market group for systems access and compliance reporting. The total expenses attracted by each custodianship or portfolio investments are itemized to the named shell/investment for better cost-recovery analysis. Total accumulated fees are expensed at the time each shell is sold. As of September 30, 2021, Alpharidge has sold two such shells and expensed the total accumulated costs related to each shell sold. As of September 30, 2021, EDI stood at $2.945 million comprising of the following:

 SCHEDULE OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEVELOPMENT CAPITAL

Name Descriptions Amount 
EDI Capital Statutory Equity at cost $1,435,295 
Compliance filings Cash paid to Consultants $63,000 
Legal fees Cash paid for court filings $229,175 
NV Secretary of States Cash paid to NV to reinstate $793,300 
OTCIQ Access Fees Cash paid to OTCM $57,000 
Buyouts and Settlements Cash paid to previous management $238,541 
Transfer Agents Cash paid to Transfer Agents $157,822 

 

Entrepreneurship development capital: The initial equity investment required by the State Statute to be eligible to seek custodianship of each target, and other additional equity investments is accounted for at cost and booked into an assets account classified as “Entrepreneurship Development Capital.” Each of these shells is available to be sold within 12 months.

 

As at the date of this report, Alpharidge Capital has successfully cleaned 21 of the 35 shells; paid all the most of the State’s minimum tax and fees for reinstatement and revival; cleared most of the outstanding balances with the respective shell’s Transfer Agents; brought the 21 into compliance with the minimum reporting requirements using the alternative reporting systems available through the OTC Market Groups systems. The remaining 14 are waiting for access to the Edgar filing systems to start making necessary report available to meet the requirements. Of those 21, Alpharidge Capital has executed definite agreements to sell two of the shells for profit. In addition, except for minor disagreements of a unique merger clause that is of particular interest to Alpharidge, agreements for the sale of additional three shells are almost complete. Alpharidge is also incompliance with the Nevada court custodianship process reporting requirements.

 

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As of September 30, 2021, total value of Investment – Entrepreneurship Development was $2,974,133, comprising of $0.3 million in capitalized legal fees, $1.4 million statutory equity stake and additional investments, $0.7 million in State charter reinstatement fees paid, and $0.5 million in other costs.

 

Concentrations of Credit Risk

 

The Company’s financial instruments that are exposed to concentrations of credit risk primarily consist of its cash and cash equivalents. The Company places its cash and cash equivalents with financial institutions of high credit worthiness. The Company maintains cash balances at financial institutions within the United States which are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) up to limits of approximately $250,000. The Company has not experienced any losses with regard to its bank accounts and believes it is not exposed to any risk of loss on its cash bank accounts. It is possible that at times, the company’s cash and cash equivalents with a particular financial institution may exceed any applicable government insurance limits. In such situation, the Company’s management would assess the financial strength and credit worthiness of any parties to which it extends funds, and as such, it believes that any associated credit risk exposures would be addressed and mitigated.

 

Stock Based Compensation:

 

The cost of equity instruments issued to non-employees in return in accordance with ASC 505-50 “Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees” for goods and services is measured by the fair value of the goods or services received or the measurement date fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is the more readily determinable. Measurement date for non-employees is the earlier of performance commitment date or the completion of services. The cost of employee services received in exchange for equity instruments is based on the grant date fair value of the equity instruments issued in accordance with ASC 718 “Compensation - Stock Compensation.”

 

NOTE 4. COMMITMENTS & CONTINGENCIES

 

Legal Proceedings

 

We were not subject to any legal proceedings nine months ended September 30, 2021 and to the best of our knowledge, no legal proceedings are pending or threatened.

 

The Company’s principal executive office is located at 370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance, CA 90501. The space is a shared office space, which at the current time is suitable for the conduct of our business. The Company has no real property and do not presently owned any interests in real estate. As at September 30, 2021, the Company has spent about $1,793 on rent which was paid to Poverty Solutions to sublet office space for the company operations.

 

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From time to time, the Company may be involved in certain legal actions and claims arising in the normal course of business. Management is of the opinion that such matters will be resolved without material effect on the Company’s financial condition or results of operations.

 

Contractual Obligations

 

We were not subject to any contractual obligations as at September 30, 2021.

 

NOTE 5. NET TRADING REVENUE

 

The Company recognizes revenue in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. The Company’s net revenue primarily consists of revenues from sales of trading securities using its broker firm, less original purchase cost. Net trading revenues primarily consist of revenues from trading securities earned upon completion of trade, net of any trading fees. A trading is completed when earned and recognized at a point in time, on a trade-date basis, as the Company executes trades. The Company records trading revenue on a net basis, trading sales less original purchase cost.

 

Net trading revenue consisted of the following:

 SCHEDULE OF NET TRADING REVENUE

January 1, 2021 to September 30, 2021 Total 
Revenue from sales of securities $5,194,298 
Cost of securities  (2,719,477)
Platform License Fees  (1,382,374)
Net income from trading securities $1,092,447 

 

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NOTE 6. SALES – INVESTMENT PROPERTY

 

Real Estate

 

Sales and other disposition of properties from Real Estate Investments holdings:

 

Dispositions

 SCHEDULE OF REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS SALES

  30-Sep-21  31-Dec-20 
Description        
Sales - Investment property $700,385  $1,205,000 
Cost:        
Closing costs      (11,522)
Commissions Paid  (35,019)  (60,645)
Developer Fees      (95,750)
Escrow & Title  (3,617)  (6,714)
Investment property sold  (674,846)  (917,825)
Mortgage Payoff      (51,879)
Property Taxes  (1,386)  (20,064)
Recording Charges  (4,213)  (7,048)
Seller Credit      (8,380)
Miscellaneous Debits/Credits  (3,261)  (8,380)
Total costs  (722,341)  (1,179,827)
         
Gain on real estate investment sales $(21,956) $25,173 

 

NOTE 7. LINE OF CREDIT / LOANS - RELATED PARTIES

 

The Company considers its founders, managing directors, employees, significant shareholders, and the portfolio Companies to be affiliates. In addition, companies controlled by any of the above named is also classified as affiliates.

 

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Line of credit from related party consisted of the following:

 SCHEDULE OF LINE OF CREDIT FROM RELATED PARTY

  September 30, 2021  December 31, 2020 
September 2019 (line of credit) - Line of credit with maturity date of September 14, 2022 with 0% interest per annum with unpaid principal balance and accrued interest payable on the maturity date. $0  $63,632 
May 20, 2020 (line of credit) Line of credit with maturity date of May 4, 2025 with 0% interest per annum with unpaid principal balance and accrued interest payable on the maturity date.  903,248   540,524 
Total Line of credit - related party  903,248   604,156 
Less: current portion      (63,632)
Total Long-term Line of credit - related party $903,248  $540,524 

 

Goldstein Franklin, Inc. - $190,000 line of credit

 

On February 28, 2020, the Company amended its line of credit agreement to increase it to the amount of $190,000 with maturity date of September 14, 2022. The line of credit bears interest at 0% per annum and interest and unpaid principal balance is payable on the maturity date. Nine months ended September , 2021, the Company had $0 balance due on this LOC.

 

Los Angeles Community Capital - $1,500,000 line of credit

 

On May 5, 2020, the Company amended its line of credit agreement to increase it to the amount of $1,500,000 with maturity date of May 4, 2025. The line of credit bears interest at 0% per annum and interest and unpaid principal balance is payable on the maturity date.

 

The Company does not own any property. It currently shares a leased office with two other organizations that are affiliated to its principal shareholder at 370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance, California 90501. Its principal shareholder and seasonal staff use this location. The approximate cost of the shared office space varies between $650 and $850 per month. The Company intends to start recording rent expense of $7,800 for the year that would end December 31, 2020.

 

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Affiliate Receivables and Payables

 

The Company considers its officers, managing directors, employees, significant shareholders and the Portfolio Companies to be affiliates. In addition, companies controlled by any of the above named is also classified as affiliates. As at September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Company’s controlling firm and significant stockholder advanced $903,248 and $604,156 respectively, to the Company for working capital. These advances are non-interest bearing and payable on demand. Details of Due from Affiliates and Due to Affiliates were comprised of the following:

 SCHEDULE OF DUE FROM AFFILIATES AND DUE TO AFFILIATES

  September 30, 2021  December 31, 2020 
Due from Affiliates        
         
Due from Affiliates $  $0 
Due to Affiliates        
Due to Goldstein Franklin who have been lending operating capital to the company $0  $63,632 
Due to Poverty Solutions who holds 11.7% of the Company’s outstanding common stock  1,382,374   0 
Due to Los Angeles Community Capital – advance used to acquire Investment Real Estate and Entrepreneurship Development  903,248   540,524 
         
Total $6,895,680  $604,156 
Due to Affiliates $6,895,680  $604,156 

 

Affiliate Receivables and Payables - Other Accrued Liabilities

 

Other accrued liabilities entail licensing fees owned to Poverty Solutions, Inc., a control entity that owns 11.70% of the outstanding shares of Company’s common stock. The related party is a California nonprofit corporation that specialized in developing and deploying programs that help low-income persons and families to divest poverty, through affordable housing, real estate development, financial capability training, venture capital initiatives, private equity operations, and algorithmic trading models designs. The transaction is arm-length and 20/80 distribution is standard practice in the hedge-fund and private-equity industry.

 

NOTE 8. EARNINGS (LOSS) PER SHARE

 

Net Loss per Share Calculation:

 

Basic net loss per common share (“EPS”) is computed by dividing loss available to common stockholders by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Dilutive earnings per share include the effect of any potentially dilutive debt or equity under the treasury stock method, if including such instruments is dilutive, assuming all dilutive potential common shares were issued. Dilutive loss per share excludes all potential common shares if their effect is anti-dilutive. The Company’s diluted earnings (loss) per share is the same as the basic earnings/loss per share for the period January 1, 2021 to September 30, 2021, as there are no potential shares outstanding that would have a dilutive effect.

 

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 SCHEDULE OF EARNINGS (LOSS) PER SHARE

January 1, 2021 to September 30, 2021 Amount 
Net income $946,676 
Dividends  62 
Stock option  - 
Adjusted net income attribution to stockholders $946,676 
     
Weighted-average shares of common stock outstanding    
Basic and Diluted  22,324,706 
Net changes in fair value at end of the period    
Basic and Diluted $0.0424 

 

NOTE 9. INCOME TAXES

 

Deferred income taxes reflect the net tax effects of temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts used for income tax purposes. A full valuation allowance is established against all net deferred tax assets nine months ended September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 based on estimates of recoverability. While the Company has optimistic plans for its business strategy, it determined that such a valuation allowance was necessary given the current and expected near term losses and the uncertainty with respect to its ability to generate sufficient profits from its business model.

 

We did not provide any current or deferred US federal income tax provision or benefit for any of the periods presented in these financial statements because we have accumulated substantial operating losses over the years. When it is more likely than not, that a tax asset cannot be realized through future income, we must record an allowance against any future potential future tax benefit. We have provided a full valuation allowance against the net deferred tax asset, consisting of net operating loss carry forwards, because management has determined that it is more likely than not that we will not earn income sufficient to realize the deferred tax assets during the carry forward periods.

 

The Company has not taken a tax position that, if challenged, would have a material effect on the financial statements for the periods ended September 30, 2021 or December 31, 2020 as defined under ASC 740, “Accounting for Income Taxes.” We did not recognize any adjustment to the liability for uncertain tax position and therefore did not record any adjustment to the beginning balance of the accumulated deficit on the balance sheet.

 

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A reconciliation of the differences between the effective and statutory income tax rates for the period ended September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020:

 SCHEDULE OF EFFECTIVE INCOME TAX RATE RECONCILIATION

  Percent  30-Sep-21  31-Dec-20 
          
Federal statutory rates  34.0% $(2,264,220) $(2,678,271)
State income taxes  5.0%  (332,974)  (393,863)
Permanent differences  -0.5%  33,297   39,005 
Valuation allowance against net deferred tax assets  -38.5%  2,597,194   3,032,748 
Effective rate  0% $-  $- 

 

At September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the significant components of the deferred tax assets are summarized below:

 SCHEDULE OF DEFERRED TAX ASSETS

  30-Sep-21  31-Dec-20 
Deferred income tax asset        
Net operation loss carryforward  6,659,471   (7,879,875)
Total deferred income tax asset  2,597,194   3,073,151 
Less: valuation allowance  (2,597,194)  (3,073,151)
Total deferred income tax asset $-  $- 

 

The Company has recorded nine months ended September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, a valuation allowance of $2,597,194 and $3,073,151 respectively, as it believes that it is more likely than not that the deferred tax assets will not be realized in future years. Management has based its assessment on the Company’s lack of profitable operating history.

 

The Company conducts an analysis of its tax positions and has concluded that it has 0 uncertain tax positions nine months ended September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

 

The Company has net operating loss carry-forwards of approximately $6,659,471. Such amounts are subject to IRS code section 382 limitations and expire in 2033.

 

NOTE 10. RECENTLY ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

 

ASU 2019-12 — In December 2019, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASU 2019- 12, Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes. The amendments in ASU 2019-12 simplify the accounting for income taxes by removing certain exceptions to the general principles in Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 740, Income Taxes. The amendments also improve consistent application of and simplify GAAP for other areas of Topic 740 by clarifying and amending existing guidance. ASU 2019-12 will be effective for the Company’s fiscal year beginning October 1, 2021, with early adoption permitted. The transition requirements are dependent upon each amendment within this update and will be applied either prospectively or retrospectively. The Company does not expect this ASU to have a material impact on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

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ASU 2016-13 — In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments, which amends FASB ASC Topic 326, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses. In addition, in May 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-05, Targeted Transition Relief, which updates FASB ASU 2016-13. These ASU’s require financial assets measured at amortized cost to be presented at the net amount to be collected and broadens the information, including forecasted information incorporating more timely information, that an entity must consider in developing its expected credit loss estimate for assets measured. These ASU’s are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early application is permitted for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018. Most of our financial assets are excluded from the requirements of this standard as they are measured at fair value or are subject to other accounting standards. In addition, certain of our other financial assets are short-term in nature and therefore are not likely to be subject to significant credit losses beyond what is already recorded under current accounting standards. As a result, we currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Disclosure Framework-Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurements, which amends FASB ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements. This ASU eliminates, modifies and adds various disclosure requirements for fair value measurements. This ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Certain disclosures are required to be applied using a retrospective approach and others using a prospective approach. Early adoption is permitted. The various disclosure requirements being eliminated, modified or added are not significant to us. As a result, we currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15, Customer’s Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That is a Service Contract, which amends FASB ASC Subtopic 350-40, Intangibles-Goodwill and Other-Internal-Use Software. This ASU adds certain disclosure requirements related to implementation costs incurred for internal-use software and cloud computing arrangements. The amendment aligns the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred in a hosting arrangement that is a service contract with the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred to develop or obtain internal-use software (and hosting arrangements that include an internal-use software license). This ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The amendments in this ASU should be applied either using a retrospective or prospective approach. Early adoption is permitted. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2014, the FASB issued ASU 2014-15 on “Presentation of Financial Statements Going Concern (Subtopic 205-40) – Disclosure of Uncertainties about an Entity’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern”. Currently, there is no guidance in U.S. GAAP about management’s responsibility to evaluate whether there is substantial doubt about an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern or to provide related footnote disclosures. The amendments in this update provide such guidance. In doing so, the amendments are intended to reduce diversity in the timing and content of footnote disclosures. The amendments require management to assess an entity’s ability to continue as a going concern by incorporating and expanding upon certain principles that are currently in U.S. auditing standards. Specifically, the amendments (1) provide a definition of the term substantial doubt, (2) require an evaluation every reporting period including interim periods, (3) provide principles for considering the mitigating effect of management’s plans, (4) require certain disclosures when substantial doubt is alleviated as a result of consideration of management’s plans, (5) require an express statement and other disclosures when substantial doubt is not alleviated, and (6) require an assessment for a period of one year after the date that the financial statements are issued (or available to be issued). The amendments in this update are effective for public and nonpublic entities for annual periods ending after December 15, 2016. Early adoption is permitted. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

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In January 2013, the FASB issued ASU No. 2013-01, “Balance Sheet (Topic 210): Clarifying the Scope of Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities.” This ASU clarifies that the scope of ASU No. 2011-11, “Balance Sheet (Topic 210): Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities.” applies only to derivatives, repurchase agreements and reverse purchase agreements, and securities borrowing and securities lending transactions that are either offset in accordance with specific criteria contained in FASB Accounting Standards Codification or subject to a master netting arrangement or similar agreement. The amendments in this ASU are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning on or after January 1, 2013. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In February 2013, the FASB issued ASU No. 2013-02, “Comprehensive Income (Topic 220): Reporting of Amounts Reclassified Out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income.” The ASU adds new disclosure requirements for items reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income by component and their corresponding effect on net income. The ASU is effective for public entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2013. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In February 2013, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, issued ASU No. 2013-04, “Liabilities (Topic 405): Obligations Resulting from Joint and Several Liability Arrangements for which the Total Amount of the Obligation Is Fixed at the Reporting Date.” This ASU addresses the recognition, measurement, and disclosure of certain obligations resulting from joint and several arrangements including debt arrangements, other contractual obligations, and settled litigation and judicial rulings. The ASU is effective for public entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2013. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In March 2013, the FASB issued ASU No. 2013-05, “Foreign Currency Matters (Topic 830): Parent’s Accounting for the Cumulative Translation Adjustment upon Derecognition of Certain Subsidiaries or Groups of Assets within a Foreign Entity or of an Investment in a Foreign Entity.” This ASU addresses the accounting for the cumulative translation adjustment when a parent either sells a part or all of its investment in a foreign entity or no longer holds a controlling financial interest in a subsidiary or group of assets that is a nonprofit activity or a business within a foreign entity. The guidance outlines the events when cumulative translation adjustments should be released into net income and is intended by FASB to eliminate some disparity in current accounting practice. This ASU is effective prospectively for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2013. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

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In March 2013, the FASB issued ASU 2013-07, “Presentation of Financial Statements (Topic 205): Liquidation Basis of Accounting.” The amendments require an entity to prepare its financial statements using the liquidation basis of accounting when liquidation is imminent. Liquidation is imminent when the likelihood is remote that the entity will return from liquidation and either (a) a plan for liquidation is approved by the person or persons with the authority to make such a plan effective and the likelihood is remote that the execution of the plan will be blocked by other parties or (b) a plan for liquidation is being imposed by other forces (for example, involuntary bankruptcy). If a plan for liquidation was specified in the entity’s governing documents from the entity’s inception (for example, limited-life entities), the entity should apply the liquidation basis of accounting only if the approved plan for liquidation differs from the plan for liquidation that was specified at the entity’s inception. The amendments require financial statements prepared using the liquidation basis of accounting to present relevant information about an entity’s expected resources in liquidation by measuring and presenting assets at the amount of the expected cash proceeds from liquidation. The entity should include in its presentation of assets any items it had not previously recognized under U.S. GAAP but that it expects to either sell in liquidation or use in settling liabilities (for example, trademarks). The amendments are effective for entities that determine liquidation is imminent during annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2013, and interim reporting periods therein. We currently do not anticipate this standard to have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

We have reviewed all the recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting pronouncements. Management does not believe that any recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting standards could have a material effect on the accompanying financial statements. As new accounting pronouncements are issued, we will adopt those that are applicable under the circumstances.

 

NOTE 11. INVESTMENT SECURITIES (TRADING)

 

Investment

 

Investments and securities purchased, not yet sold consist of equities, bonds, bank debt and other corporate obligations, all of which are reported at fair value in our consolidated balance sheets. These investments are considered trading securities. In addition, our Investment segment has certain derivative transactions which are discussed below in “Financial Instruments.”

 

Investment Securities (Trading): The Company applied the fair value accounting treatment for trading securities per ASC 320, with unrealized gains and losses recorded in net income each period. Debt securities classified as trading should be measured at fair value in the currency in which the debt securities are denominated and remeasured into the investor’s functional currency using the spot exchange rate at the balance sheet date.

 

Trading securities are treated using the fair value method, whereby the value of the securities on the company’s balance sheet is equivalent to their current market value. These securities will be recorded in the current assets section under the Investment Securities account and will be offset in the shareholder’s equity section under the unrealized proceeds from sale of short-term investments” account. The Short Term Investments account amount represents the current market value of the securities, and the “Unrealized Proceeds From Sale of Short Term Investments” account represents the cash proceeds that the company would receive if it were to sell the investments at the end of the specified accounting period.

 

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NOTE 12. REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS

 

Current Holdings of Real Estate Investments:

 

Nine months ended September 30, 2021, the Company has no available-for-sale real estate properties.

 

NOTE 13. MARGINAL LOAN PAYABLE

 

The Company’s subsidiary, Alpharidge Capital LLC. entered into a marginal loan agreement as part of its new trading account process in 2019 with a brokerage firm for the purchase of securities and to fund the underfunded balance. The balance of this account as at September 30, 2021 is $0.

 

NOTE 14. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

The managing member, CEO and director of the Company is involved in other business activities and may, in the future, become involved in other business opportunities. If a specific business opportunity becomes available, he may face a conflict in selecting between the Company and his other business interests. The Company is formulating a policy for the resolution of such conflicts.

 

The Company had the following related party transactions:

 

 
Line of Credit – On September 15, 2019, the Company entered into a line of credit agreement in the amount of $41,200 with Goldstein Franklin, Inc. which is owned and operated by Frank I. Igwealor, Chief Executive Officer of the Company. The maturity date of the line of credit is February 15, 2020. The line of credit agreement was amended to the amount of $190,000 and maturity date of September 14, 2022. The line of credit bears interest at 0% per annum and interest and unpaid principal balance is payable on the maturity date. Nine months ended September , 2021, the Company had repaid the entire balance on the LOC
   
 Line of credit - On May 5, 2020, the Company entered into a line of credit agreement in the amount of $1,500,000 with Los Angeles Community Capital, which is owned and operated by Frank I. Igwealor, Chief Executive Officer of the Company. The maturity date of the line of credit is May 4, 2025. The line of credit bears interest at 0% per annum and interest and unpaid principal balance is payable on the maturity date. The Company has drawn $903,248 from the line of credit nine months ended September 30, 2021.

 

The company’s principal shareholder has advanced the Company most of the money it uses to fund working capital expenses. This advance is unsecured and does not carry an interest rate or repayment terms. Nine months ended September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Company has $903,248 and $540,524, respectively, in long-term loans obligation from related parties.

 

The Company does not own any property. It currently shares a leased office with two other organizations that are affiliated to its principal shareholder at 370 Amapola Ave., Suite 200A, Torrance, California 90501. Its principal shareholder and seasonal staff use this location. The approximate cost of the shared office space varies between $650 and $850 per month

 

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NOTE 16. SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

Preferred Stock

 

Nine months ended September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 we were authorized to issue 1,000,000 shares of preferred stock with a par value of $0.00001.

 

The Company has 100,000 shares of preferred stock were issued and outstanding as at September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 respectively.

 

Common Stock

 

The Company is authorized to issue 1,000,000,000 shares of common stock with a par value of $0.00001 as at September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 respectively.

 

Period ended September 30, 2021

 

The Company has issued 22,324,706 and 922,324,706 shares of our common stock to more than 54 shareholders as at September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 respectively.

 

Warrants

 

NaN warrants were issued or outstanding as at September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 respectively.

 

Stock Options

 

The Company has never adopted a stock option plan and has never issued any stock options.

 

NOTE 17. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

Pursuant to ASC 855-10, the Company evaluated subsequent events after September 30, 2021 through December 08, 2021, the date these financial statements were issued and has determined there have been no subsequent events for which disclosure is required. The Company did not have any material recognizable subsequent events that required disclosure in these financial statements.

 

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ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (this “Quarterly Report”) contains forward-looking statements. The Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) encourages companies to disclose forward-looking information so that investors can better understand a company’s future prospects and make informed investment decisions. This Quarterly Report and other written and oral statements that we make from time to time contain such forward-looking statements that set out anticipated results based on management’s plans and assumptions regarding future events or performance. We have tried, wherever possible, to identify such statements by using words such as “anticipate,”“estimate,”“expect,”“project,”“intend,”“plan,”“believe,”“will” and similar expressions in connection with any discussion of future operating or financial performance. In particular, these include statements relating to future actions, future performance or results of current and anticipated sales efforts, expenses, the outcome of contingencies, such as legal proceedings, and financial results.

 

We caution that the factors described herein, and other factors could cause our actual results of operations and financial condition to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements we make and that investors should not place undue reliance on any such forward-looking statements. Further, any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which such statement is made, and we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which such statement is made or to reflect the occurrence of anticipated or unanticipated events or circumstances. New factors emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict all of such factors. Further, we cannot assess the impact of each such factor on our results of operations or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements.

 

General

 

The following discussion highlights Kid Castle results of operations and the principal factors that have affected our financial condition as well as our liquidity and capital resources for the periods described and provides information that management believes is relevant for an assessment and understanding of the statements of financial condition and results of operations presented herein. The following discussion and analysis are based on our audited Financial Report, which we have prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles. You should read this discussion and analysis together with such financial statements and the related notes thereto.

 

Kid Castle Educational Corporation through its operating subsidiary, GiveMePower Corporation, operates and manages a portfolio of real estate and financial services assets and operations to empower black persons in the United States through financial tools and resources. The Corporation is primarily focused on: (1) creating and empowering local black businesses in urban America; and (2) creating real estate properties and businesses in opportunity zones and other distressed neighborhood across America.

 

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Basis of Presentation

 

The consolidated financial statements of the Company therefore include GiveMePower Corporation and its wholly owned subsidiaries of Alpharidge Capital LLC. (“Alpharidge”), Community Economic Development Capital, LLC. (“CED Capital”), and subsidiaries, in which GiveMePower has a controlling voting interest and entities consolidated under the variable interest entities (“VIE”) provisions of ASC 810, “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”), after elimination of intercompany transactions and accounts.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its subsidiaries, in which the Company has a controlling voting interest and entities consolidated under the variable interest entities (“VIE”) provisions of ASC 810, “Consolidation” (“ASC 810”). Inter-company balances and transactions have been eliminated upon consolidation.

 

ASC 810 requires that the investor with the controlling financial interest should consolidate the investee/affiliate. ASC 810-10 requires that an equity interest investor consolidates a VIE when it retains an investment in the entity, is considered a variable interest investor in the entity, and is the primary beneficiary of the entity. An investor in a VIE is a “variable interest beneficiary” when, per an arrangement’s governing documents, the investor will absorb a portion of the VIE’s expected losses or will receive a portion of the entity’s “residual returns.” The variable interest beneficiary retaining a controlling financial interest in the VIE is designated as its “primary beneficiary” and must consolidate the VIE. A variable interest beneficiary retains a “controlling financial interest” in a VIE when that beneficiary retains the power to direct the activities of the VIE that have the greatest influence over the VIE’s economic performance and retains an obligation to absorb the VIE’s significant losses or the right to receive benefits from the VIE that could potentially be significant to the VIE. Based on the ASC 810 test above, Kid Castle Educational Corporation is the primary beneficiary of GiveMePower Corporation (the “VIE”) because Kid Castle retained a controlling financial interest in the VIE and has the power to direct the activities of the VIE, having the greatest influence over the VIE’s economic performance and retains an obligation to absorb the VIE’s significant losses and the right to determine and receive benefits from the VIE.

 

Because GiveMePower Corporation is 87% controlled by Kid Castle Educational Corporation, the consolidation rule requires the Revenue, Assets and Liabilities recognized and disclosed on the financial statements of GiveMePower Corporation are also recognized and disclosed on the financial statements of Kid Castle Educational Corporation pursuant to ASC 810.

 

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Overview

 

The Company and Nature of Business

 

Kid Castle Educational Corporation, a Delaware corporation, (“Kid Castle,” “the Company,” “We,” “KDCE,” “Us” or “Our’) operates and manages a portfolio of real estate and financial services assets and operations to empower black persons in the United States.

 

Kid Castle was the result of a share exchange transaction, commonly referred to as a reverse merger, pursuant to which shareholders of an offshore operating company take control of a U.S. company that has no operations (commonly referred to as a shell company), and the offshore operating company becomes a subsidiary of the U.S. company. In KDCE case, the offshore company was Higoal Developments Ltd., which was the parent company of Kid Castle Internet Technologies Limited and Kid Castle Education Software Development Co. Limited, KDCE’s operating companies that run our English language instruction business. The U.S. or shell company, at the time of the share exchange, was King Ball International Technology Corporation.

 

Kid Castle used to be a Florida corporation until the company voluntarily dissolved its Florida registration with intention to simultaneously incorporate in Delaware and convert into a Delaware corporation. Although the company immediately finalized its registration effort to convert into a Delaware Corporation, the company’s registered agent who was supposed to submit the registration package to the Delaware Secretary of State for certification, failed to make a timely submission. Later in January 2019, when the company realized that the Delaware incorporation/registration package/process was never submitted to the Delaware Secretary of State nor completed in any other way or form, the Company went ahead and resubmitted the required registration package and was then formally re-incorporated in Delaware and convert into a Delaware corporation. Thus, the company was formally incorporated in Delaware and converted into a Delaware Corporation in January 2019.

 

The re-incorporation in Delaware, which occurred in January 2019, has placed at risk, voidable and unenforceable, all and any liabilities that may have accrued, including any material agreements the Company may have executed during the period between March 22, 2011 and January 2019. To the best of our knowledge, no such liabilities that were accrued and no material agreement were entered into by the company during the period between March 22, 2011 and January 2019. In addition, there could be penalties or legal liabilities that may have accrued as a result of conducting business from 2011 to 2019 without properly registering with any State. To the best of our knowledge, as at September 7, 2020, no such penalties or liabilities has accrued to the company accrued as a result of conducting business from 2011 to 2019 without properly registering with any State. However, there is no guarantee that such penalties or liabilities would not accrue or arise in the future.

 

On October 21, 2019, pursuant to a stock purchase agreement dated October 2, 2019, Cannabinoid Biosciences, Inc., a California corporation, purchased one (1) million shares of its preferred shares (one preferred share is convertible 1,000 share of common stocks) of the Company, representing 97.82% of our total issued and outstanding voting shares of common stock and preferred stock. Simultaneously with the purchase, the officers and directors of the Company resigned and Frank I Igwealor, Chairman and CEO, Secretary, Treasurer, and Director.

 

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Following the consummation of the October 21, 2019 transactions, the Company decided to restart filing important information immediately. The Company used the Form 10-12(g) to register its common stock with the SEC.

 

Most Recent Addition to Our Business and Organization

 

Crypto Currency Mining Operation

 

During the period between March 3 to March 16 2021, the Company tried unsuccessfully, to acquire Bitcentro/Buzzmehome’s CryptoCurrency mining operations in Canada for $500,000 in cash. The deal fell through because of misunderstanding between parties as to the timing and duration of due diligence period.

 

After the failed acquisition attempt, the Company contracted with Brady Fernandes, a Los Angeles resident who claimed expertise in the crypto mining industry. The Company contracted with Brady for $9,200 to commence the project of helping the company to build out its own in-house cryptocurrency mining farm. Brady has commenced building our first rig and has also ordered the necessary equipment to add rigs to our crypto currency mining farm. On April 28, 2021, the Company paid additional $10,000 to Mr. Fernandez for ordering additional equipment for building out it crypto currency mining farm.

 

We have dedicated a line-item, “Crypto Currency Mining Rigs,” on our balance to track all our investments in the Crypto Currency Mining Operation. We plan to build out a fully operating farm in California, using solar energy to mitigate the high cost of energy in California.

 

Current Business and Organization - Alpharidge

 

The Company, through its three wholly owned subsidiaries, Alpharidge Capital, LLC (“Alpharidge”), Malcom Wingate Cush Franklin LLC (“MWCF”), and Opportunity Zone Capital LLC (“OZC”), seeks to empower black persons in the United States through financial tools and resources as follows:

 

 Alpharidge and OZC Real estate operations – Real estate operations would consist primarily of rental real estate, affordable housing projects, opportunity zones, other property development and associated HOA activities. OZC development operations would be primarily through a real estate investment, management and development subsidiary that focuses primarily on the construction and sale of single-family and multi-family homes, lots in subdivisions and planned communities, and raw land for residential development; and

 

 MWCF financial empowerment – MWCF would utilize operate the tools of financial education/training, mergers and acquisitions, private equity and business lending to invest and empower young black entrepreneurs, seeding their viable business plans and ideas and creating jobs in their communities. MWCF is primarily focused on: (1) creating and empowering local black businesses in urban America; and (2) creating real estate in opportunity zones and other distressed neighbourhood across America.

 

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 Cash Management, Opportunistic and Event-Driven Investments: The Company keeps no more than 10% of its total assets in liquid cash or investments portfolio, which is actively managed by its directors and officers and invest primarily in equity investments on a long and short basis. The Company’s cash management policy which requires that the Company actively invests its excess cash into stocks, bonds and other securities is intended to provide the company greater levels of liquidity and current income. The Company uses proprietary trading models to capitalize on real-time market anomalies and generate ongoing income in the forms similar to hedge funds. Where necessary, the Company uses seeded entities to pursue real-time market transactions in publicly traded securities including but not limited to stocks, bonds, options, futures, forex, warrants, and other instruments.

 

Alpharidge’s Entrepreneurship Development Initiative

 

In April of 2021, Alpharidge launched its Entrepreneurship Development Initiative which entails: (1) Portfolio – acquiring OTC trading shells with stop signs and cleaning them up to become Pink Current, then merging them with emerging businesses controlled by Alpharidge-trained entrepreneurs; and (2) Custodianship – use the custodianship process in Nevada and Delaware to acquire custodianship of abandoned OTC-trading shells, clean them up to become Pink Current, then merging them with emerging businesses controlled by Alpharidge-trained entrepreneurs.

 

On April 22, 2021, Alpharidge retained a Nevada based Attorney to petition for custodianship of Mondial Ventures, Inc. Alpharidge later lost the attempt and expensed all related cost as Professional fees – legal. On May 5, 2021, Alpharidge purchase from the open market, Labwire, Inc., (LBWR) and Waypoint Biomedical, Inc., both of which it has brought Pink Current. As at the date of this reports, Alpharidge’ Entrepreneurship Development Initiative Portfolio has bought also purchase Nano Mobile Healthcare, Inc. to make it 3 shells. The Custodianship has petitioned for MNVN, HMLA, TONR, ECMH, ABWN, FPMI, NTGL, CGUD, ICOA, SRBT, USWF, NWTT, USBC, WRMA, WWRL, HERF, NRCD, TGMR, ITRX, AFFN, UTDE, AOBI, SRCX, ADCV, DVFI, APWL, CIVX, NHLG, ILIM, CCWF, TMXN, MNDP, JPEX, SVLT, MTEI, CAMG, CDBT, ERGO, NOUV, ICNM, PRDL, OCLG, ILST and FCGD, altogether 44 petitions filed within 8 weeks. Of the 44, Alpharidge lost, walked-away, or withdrew from 9 petitions.” Cost related to the successful petitions were capitalized on the Company’s balance sheet as “Entrepreneurship Development” and those related to failed petitions were expensed in the period incurred as “Professional Fees - legal.”

 

Alpharidge Capital LLC anticipates its Entrepreneurship Development to be an ongoing business. It expects to generate income and expense cost related to this line of business.

 

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Current Business and Organization - CED Capital

 

Community Economic Development Capital, LLC. (“CED Capital”), a California limited liability company, is a specialty real estate holding company for specialized assets including, affordable housing, opportunity zones properties, industrial and commercial real estate, and other real estate related services. CED Capital principal business objective is to maximize returns through a combination of (1) generating good profit while making substantial social impact, (2) sustainable long-term growth in cash flows from increased rents, and (3) potential long-term appreciation in the value of its properties from capital gains upon future sale. The Company is engaged primarily in the ownership, operation, management, acquisition, development and redevelopment of predominantly multifamily housing and specialized industrial properties in the United States. Additionally, its specialized industrial property strategy is to acquire and own a portfolio of specialized industrial properties, including multifamily properties. This strategy includes the following components:

 

 [  ]Owning Specialized Real Estate Properties and Assets for Income. The Company intends to acquire multifamily housings, economic development real estates and multifamily properties. The Company expects to hold acquired properties for investment and to generate stable and increasing rental income from leasing these properties to licensed growers.

 

 [  ]Owning Specialized Real Estate Properties and Assets for Appreciation. The Company intends to lease its acquired properties under long-term, triple-net leases. However, from time to time, the Company may elect to sell one or more properties if the Company believes it to be in the best interests of its stockholders. Accordingly, the Company will seek to acquire properties that it believes also have potential for long-term appreciation in value.

 

 [  ]Affordable Housing. Its motto is: “acquiring distressed/troubled properties, securing generous government subsidies, empowering low-income families, and generating above-market returns to investors.”
   
 [  ]Preserving Financial Flexibility on the Company’s Balance Sheet. The Company intends to focus on maintaining a conservative capital structure, in order to provide us flexibility in financing its growth initiatives.

 

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Competition

 

Our business is highly competitive. We are in direct competition with more established private equity firms, private investors and management companies. Many management companies offer similar products and services for business rollups and consolidations. We may be at a substantial disadvantage to our competitors who have more capital than we do to carry out acquisition, operations and restructuring efforts. These competitors may have competitive advantages, such as greater name recognition, larger capital-base, marketing, research and acquisition resources, access to larger customer bases and channel partners, a longer operating history and lower labor and development costs, which may enable them to respond more quickly to new or emerging opportunities and changes in customer requirements or devote greater resources to the development, acquisition and promotion.

 

Increased competition could result in us failing to attract significant capital or maintaining them. If we are unable to compete successfully against current and future competitors, our business and financial condition may be harmed.

 

We hope to maintain our competitive advantage by keeping abreast of market dynamism that is face by our industry, and by utilizing the experience, knowledge, and expertise of our management team. Moreover, we believe that we distinguish ourselves in the ways our model envisaged transformation of businesses.

 

Government Regulation

 

Our activities currently are subject to no particular regulation by governmental agencies other than that routinely imposed on corporate businesses. However, we may be subject to the rules governing acquisition and disposition of businesses, real estates and personal properties in each of the state where we have our operations. We may also be subject to various state laws designed to protect buyers and sellers of businesses. We cannot predict the impact of future regulations on either us or our business model.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We currently have no patents, trademarks or other registered intellectual property. We do not consider the grant of patents, trademarks or other registered intellectual property essential to the success of our business.

 

Employees

 

We do not have a W-2 employee at the present. Frank Ikechukwu Igwealor, our President, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, is our only full-time staff Nine months ended September , 2021, pending when we could formalize an employment contract for him. In addition to Mr. Igwealor, we have three part-time unpaid staff who helps with bookkeeping and administrative chores. Most of our part-time staff, officers, and directors will devote their time as needed to our business and are expect to devote at least 15 hours per week to our business operations. We plan on formalizing employment contract for those staff currently helping us without pay. Furthermore, in the immediate future, we intend to use independent contractors and consultants to assist in many aspects of our business on an as needed basis pending financial resources being available. We may use independent contractors and consultants once we receive sufficient funding to hire additional employees. Even then, we will principally rely on independent contractors for substantially all of our technical and marketing needs.

 

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The Company has no written employment contract or agreement with any person. Currently, we are not actively seeking additional employees or engaging any consultants through a formal written agreement or contract. Services are provided on an as-needed basis to date. This may change in the event that we are able to secure financing through equity or loans to the Company. As our company grows, we expect to hire more full-time employees.

 

Results of Operations

 

Three and Nine months ended September 30, 2021, as Compared to Three and Nine months Ended September 30, 2021, 2020

 

Revenues — The Company recorded $1,998,489 and $6,040,683 in revenue for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 as compared to $29,250 and $1,466,400 for the same period of September 30, 2020.

 

Operating Expenses — Total operating expenses for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, was $102,973 and $235,847 as compared to $23,820 and $129,673 in the same period of September 30, 2020, due to increased operating activities during the period ended September 30, 2021.

 

Net Income — Net income for three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 was $79,734 and $946,676 as compared to Net Loss of $42,672 and Net Loss of $132,618 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020. Net income includes unrealized gain of $(756,928) and $71for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021.

 

OCI - Unrealized Gain or Other Comprehensive Income for three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, was $(756,928) and $71 as compared to Unrealized Loss of $39,359 and $107,187 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020. The Unrealized Gain of $(756,928) and $71 were a result of mark-to-market/fair value adjustment to Custodianship as well as Trading Securities for the period.

 

Financial Condition, Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of September 30, 2021, the Company had a working capital of $244,208 consisting of $218,707 in cash, $37,100 in Trading Securities, minus $11,600 in short-term liabilities.

 

For the nine months period ended September 30, 2021, the Company generated cash of $998,530 on operating activities, used cash of $2,356,493 on investing activities, and generated cash of $1,575,041 from financing activities, resulting in an increase in total cash of $217,078 and a cash balance of $218,707 for the period. For the nine months period ended September 30, 2020, the Company used cash of $20,320 in operating activities, used cash of $321,498 on investing activities and generated cash of $341,335 from financing activities, resulting in a decrease in cash of $483 and a cash balance of $17 at the end of that period due to discontinuation of business line.

 

As of September 30, 2021, total Notes Payable to related parties decreased by $84,100 from the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020.

 

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As of September 30, 2021, total stockholders’ equity increased to $979,189 from $3,141 as of December 31, 2020. The increase in stockholders’ equity was largely due to the 35 shells acquired by the Company through the State of Nevada custodianship process. As at September 30, 2021, Alpharidge has paid a total of $711,600 as reinstatement and revival fees to the State of Nevada to reinstate and revive the 35 shells.

 

As of September 30, 2021, the Company had a cash balance of $218,707 (i.e. cash is used to fund operations). The Company does believe our current cash balances will be sufficient to allow us to fund our operating plan for the next twelve months. However, our ability to continue as a going concern is still dependent on us obtaining adequate capital to fund operation or maintaining consecutive quarterly profitability. If we are unable to obtain adequate capital, or maintaining consecutive quarterly profitability, we could be forced to cease operations or substantially curtail its drug development activities. These conditions could raise substantial doubt as to our ability to continue as a going concern. The accompanying financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts and classification of liabilities should we be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Our principal sources of liquidity are: (1) Crypto Currency Mining, (2) Real Estate Operations, (4) Sales of Custodianship Shells, (4) Trading Securities, and (5) Electric Vehicles and battery Technology activities. In the past, we have been generating cash from loans to us by our major shareholder. In order to be able to achieve our strategic goals, we need to further expand our business and implement our business plan. To continue to develop our business plan and generate sales, significant capital has been and will continue to be required. Management intends to fund future operations through private or public equity and/or debt offerings. We continue to engage in preliminary discussions with potential investors and broker-dealers, but no terms have been agreed upon. There can be no assurances, however, that additional funding will be available on terms acceptable to us, or at all. Any equity financing may be dilutive to existing shareholders. We do not currently have any contractual restrictions on our ability to incur debt and, accordingly we could incur significant amounts of indebtedness to finance operations. Any such indebtedness could contain covenants which would restrict our operations.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

There are no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that is material to investors.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) requires estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities in the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. The SEC has defined a company’s critical accounting policies as the ones that are most important to the portrayal of the company’s financial condition and results of operations, and which require the company to make its most difficult and subjective judgments, often as a result of the need to make estimates of matters that are inherently uncertain.

 

Based on this definition, we have identified the critical accounting policies and judgments addressed which are described in Note 2 to our condensed consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report. Although we believe that our estimates, assumptions and judgments are reasonable, they are based upon information presently available. Actual results may differ significantly from these estimates under different assumptions, judgments or conditions.

 

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

 

Not required for smaller reporting companies.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

As required by Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), Rule 13a-15(b), we have carried out an evaluation (the “Evaluation”), under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Interim Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our management, and the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures Nine months ended September , 2021. Based upon an evaluation of the effectiveness of disclosure controls and procedures, our Chief Executive Officer and Interim Chief Financial Officer has concluded that as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report, our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) or 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act) were not effective because of the material weaknesses described below, in order to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified by the rules and forms of the SEC and is accumulated and communicated to management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Interim Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure (see below for further discussion).We had neither the resources, nor the personnel, to provide an adequate control environment.

 

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Due to our limited resources, the following material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting continued to exist at September 30, 2021:

 

 we do not have written documentation of our internal control policies and procedures. Written documentation of key internal controls over financial reporting is a requirement of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”);
   
 we do not have sufficient segregation of duties within accounting functions, which is a basic internal control. Due to our limited size and early stage nature of operations, segregation of all conflicting duties may not always be possible and may not be economically feasible; however, to the extent possible, the initiation of transactions, the custody of assets and the recording of transactions should be performed by separate individuals;
   
 we do not have an independent audit committee of our Board of Directors;
   
 insufficient monitoring and review controls over the financial reporting closing process, including the lack of individuals with current knowledge of GAAP that led to the restatement of our previously issued financial statements; and
   
 we continue to outsource the functions of controller on an interim basis to assist us in implementing the necessary financial controls over the financial reporting and the utilization of internal management and staff to effectuate these controls.

 

We believe that these material weaknesses primarily related, in part, to our lack of sufficient staff with appropriate training in GAAP and SEC rules and regulations with respect to financial reporting functions, and the lack of robust accounting systems, as well as the lack of sufficient resources to hire such staff and implement these accounting systems.

 

If and when our financial resources allow, we plan to take a number of actions to correct these material weaknesses including, but not limited to, establishing an audit committee of our Board of Directors comprised of three independent directors, hiring a full-time Chief Financial Officer, adding experienced accounting and financial personnel and retaining third-party consultants to review our internal controls and recommend improvements.

 

It should be noted that any system of controls, however well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable and not absolute assurance that the objectives of the system are met. In addition, the design of any control system is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of certain events. Because of these and other inherent limitations of control systems, there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions, regardless of how remote.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There were no material changes in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a- 15(f) under the Exchange Act) that occurred Nine months ended September , 2021, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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CEO and CFO Certifications

 

Exhibits 31.1 and 31.2 to this Quarterly Report are the Certifications of the Chief Executive Officer and the Interim Chief Financial Officer, respectively. These Certifications are required in accordance with Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (the “Section 302 Certifications”). This Item 4 of this Quarterly Report, which you are currently reading, is the information concerning the Evaluation referred to above and in the Section 302 Certifications and this information should be read in conjunction with the Section 302 Certifications for a more complete understanding of the topics presented.

 

PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. Legal Proceedings

 

There are no legal proceedings that have occurred within the past ten years concerning our directors or officers which involved a criminal conviction, a criminal proceeding, an administrative or civil proceeding limiting one’s participation in the securities or banking industries, or a finding of securities or commodities law violations.

 

From time to time we may be involved in litigation relating to claims arising out of the operation of our business in the normal course of business. Other than as described below, as of the date of this Registration Statement we are not aware of potential dispute or pending litigation and are not currently involved in a litigation proceeding or governmental actions the outcome of which in management’s opinion would be material to our financial condition or results of operations. An adverse result in these or other matters may have, individually or in the aggregate, a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or operating results.

 

As of April 28, the date of this report, there was no material proceeding to which any of our directors, officers, affiliates or stockholders is a party adverse to us. During the past ten years, no present director, executive officer or person nominated to become a director or an executive officer of us:

 

(1) had a petition under the federal bankruptcy laws or any state insolvency law filed by or against, or a receiver, fiscal agent or similar officer appointed by a court for the business or property of such person, or any partnership in which he was a general partner at or within two years before the time of such filing, or any corporation or business association of which he was an executive officer at or within ten years before the time of such filing;

 

(2) was convicted in a criminal proceeding or subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offenses);

 

(3) was subject to any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction, permanently or temporarily enjoining him from or otherwise limiting his involvement in any of the following activities:

 

i. acting as a futures commission merchant, introducing broker, commodity trading advisor commodity pool operator, floor broker, leverage transaction merchant, any other person regulated by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, or an associated person of any of the foregoing, or as an investment adviser, underwriter, broker or dealer in securities, or as an affiliated person, director or employee of any investment company, bank, savings and loan association or insurance company, or engaging in or continuing any conduct or practice in connection with such activity;

 

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ii. engaging in any type of business practice; or

 

iii. engaging in any activity in connection with the purchase or sale of any security or commodity or in connection with any violation of federal or state securities laws or federal commodities laws; or

 

(4) was the subject of any order, judgment or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of an federal or state authority barring, suspending or otherwise limiting for more than 60 days the right of such person to engage in any activity described in paragraph (3) (i), above, or to be associated with persons engaged in any such activity; or

 

(5) was found by a court of competent jurisdiction (in a civil action), the Securities and Exchange Commission or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and for which the judgment has not been reversed, suspended or vacated.

 

ITEM 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2021, the Company issued 0 shares of its common stock.

 

Use of Proceeds of Registered Securities

 

Not applicable.

 

Purchases of Equity Securities by Us and Affiliated Purchasers

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2021, the Company has not purchased any equity securities nor have any officers or directors of the Company.

 

ITEM 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities

 

The Company is not aware of any defaults upon its senior securities.

 

ITEM 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

 

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ITEM 5. Other Information.

 

None.

 

ITEM 6. Exhibits

 

Exhibit  
Number Description
   
31.1* Certification of Principal Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.
   
31.2* Certification of Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.
   
32.1** Certification of Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
   
101.INS* Inline XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH* Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL* Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF* Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB* Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE* Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document
104 Cover Page Interactive Data File (embedded within the Inline XBRL document)

 

*Filed herewith.
**Furnished herewith.

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

 KID CASTLE EDUCATIONAL CORPORATION
  
Date: January 14, 2022By:/s/ Frank I Igwealor
  Frank I Igwealor
  President, Chief Executive Officer and Interim Chief Financial Officer (Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and Principal Accounting Officer)

 

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