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MADL Man Ahl Diversified I

Filed: 30 Mar 21, 5:30pm

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Fiscal Year Ended: December 31, 2020

or

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(D) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File Number: 000-53043

Man-AHL Diversified I L.P.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware 06-1496634

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

c/o Man Investments (USA) Corp.

452 5th Avenue

27th Floor

New York, NY

 10018
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (212) 649-6600

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Trading
Symbol(s)

 

Name of each exchange
on which registered

none none none

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

Units of Limited Partnership Interest

(Title of Class)

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):    

 

Large accelerated filer   Accelerated Filer 
Non-accelerated filer   Smaller reporting company   
   Emerging growth company 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes      No  

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter.

Not applicable.

Documents Incorporated by Reference

The report of the independent registered public accounting firm and the financial statements of the Registrant for the year ended December 31, 2020 are included herewith as Exhibit 13.1 and are incorporated by reference into Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.


PART I

Item 1.    Business

(a)    General development of business

Man-AHL Diversified I L.P., a Delaware limited partnership (the “Partnership”), was organized in September 1997 under the Delaware Revised Uniform Limited Partnership Act and commenced trading operations on April 3, 1998, for the purpose of engaging in the speculative trading of physical commodities, futures and forward contracts and related instruments. The Partnership was formerly named AHL Diversified (USA) L.P., but was renamed in February 2002. The Partnership is a “feeder” fund in a “master-feeder” structure, whereby the Partnership invests substantially all of its assets in Man AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P. (the “Trading Company”). AHL Partners LLP (the “Trading Advisor”), a United Kingdom limited liability partnership, is the Partnership’s and the Trading Company’s trading advisor. The Trading Advisor also serves as the Partnership’s commodity pool operator. Man Investments (USA) Corp. (the “General Partner”), a Delaware corporation, is the Partnership’s general partner. The Trading Advisor is an affiliate of the General Partner. Man Investments Limited, a United Kingdom private limited company, that is part of Man Group plc (“Man Group”), is the managing member of the Trading Advisor, and Man Investments Holdings Inc., a Delaware corporation that is part of Man Group, is the sole shareholder of the General Partner.

On January 28, 2008, the Partnership filed a registration statement under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, (the “Exchange Act”). The registration statement, which was subsequently amended, became effective on or about March 28, 2008. The Partnership offers two classes of units of limited partnership interest in the Partnership (“Units”): Class A Units are generally offered; Class B Units are offered to employee benefit plans, IRAs and other retirement plans and accounts. The two Classes of Units are identical to each other except that Class B Units may be purchased, transferred, held and redeemed in a minimum amount of $10,000. On April 1, 2009, the Partnership added two new series of Units: Class A Series 2 Units (“Class A-2”) and Class B Series 2 Units (“Class B-2”). Except as described in section (c) below, Class A-2 and Class B-2 units are identical to Class A and B units, respectfully.

Although the Partnership uses the term “class” to distinguish between certain interests in the Partnership, the Partnership does not believe that the differences between such interests are sufficient to make them separate “classes” under Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act, as all of the interests in the Partnership, regardless of “class,” are of substantially similar character and the holders of which enjoy substantially similar rights and privileges. The holders of interests in the Partnership (regardless of “class”) share pro rata in the Partnership’s profits and losses, enjoying no preferences over one another during the life of the Partnership or upon dissolution and otherwise have identical rights under the Partnership’s Limited Partnership Agreement, as amended or supplemented from time to time (the “Limited Partnership Agreement”). The only differences among the “classes” relate to fees and minimum investment.

The General Partner became the general partner of the Partnership as of April 1, 2005 when Man-AHL (USA) Corp., the Partnership’s original general partner and trading advisor (“Man-AHL”), appointed it as such. In addition to the appointment of the General Partner, Man-AHL appointed Man-AHL (USA) Limited to serve as the trading advisor to the Partnership commencing as of April 1, 2005. Following the appointments of the General Partner as a general partner and Man-AHL (USA) Limited as the trading advisor, Man-AHL resigned as a general partner and trading advisor of the Partnership. The General Partner agreed to continue the Partnership without interruption or change. On June 1, 2014, the General Partner appointed the Trading Advisor as trading advisor of the Partnership, and Man-AHL (USA) Limited resigned as trading advisor. The Trading Advisor implements the same trading program and employs substantively the same personnel as did Man-AHL (USA) Limited. The General Partner controls and manages the business of the Partnership, but has otherwise delegated its investment management authority and commodity pool operator responsibilities with respect to the Partnership to the Trading Advisor. Purchasers of Units, as the Partnership’s “Limited Partners,” have no right to participate in management or control of the Partnership. The offices of the Partnership, where its books and records are kept, are located at the office of the General Partner: 452 5th Ave., 27th Floor, New York, NY, 10018; telephone (212) 649-6600.

(c)    Narrative description of business

The Partnership engages in speculative trading of physical commodities, futures contracts, spot and forward contracts, swaps and options and other related instruments, directly and indirectly through an investment in the Trading Company, pursuant to the trading strategies employed by the Trading Advisor. The Partnership invests substantially all of its assets in the Trading Company.

The investment objective of the AHL Diversified Program is to deliver capital growth for commensurate levels of volatility over the medium term, independent of the movement of the stock and bond markets, through the speculative trading, directly and

 

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indirectly, of futures, options and forward contracts, swaps and other financial derivatives both on and off exchange. The AHL Diversified Program trades globally in several market sectors, including without limitation, currencies, bonds, energies, stock indices, interest rates, credit, metals, agriculturals and volatility. In the future, the AHL Diversified Program may, to a limited extent, invest in stocks.

The AHL Diversified Program employs a systematic, statistically based investment strategy that is designed to identify and capitalize on trends and other inefficiencies in markets around the world. Trading signals are generated and executed via a finely tuned trading and implementation infrastructure. This process is quantitative, meaning that investment decisions are entirely driven by mathematical models based on quantitative analysis of historical relationships. It is underpinned by rigorous risk control, ongoing research, diversification and the constant quest for efficiency. Trading takes place around-the-clock and real-time price information is used to respond to price moves across a diverse range of global markets.

As well as emphasizing sector and market diversification, the AHL Diversified Program has been constructed to achieve diversification by combining various investment strategies. The AHL Diversified Program invests in a diversified portfolio of instruments which may include futures, options and forward contracts, swaps and other financial derivatives both on and off exchange. The AHL Diversified Program trades approximately 250 markets and these markets may be accessed directly or indirectly and include, without limitation, stock indices, bonds, currencies, short-term interest rates, energies, credits, metals, agriculturals and volatility.

Another important aspect of diversification is the fact that the models generate signals across different timeframes, ranging from intra-day to several months. In line with the principle of diversification, the approach to portfolio construction and asset allocation is premised on the importance of deploying investment capital across the full range of sectors and markets. Particular attention is paid to correlation of markets and sectors, expected returns, trading costs and market liquidity. Portfolios are regularly reviewed and, when necessary, adjusted to reflect changes in these factors. The Trading Advisor also has a systematic process for adjusting market risk exposure in real time to reflect changes in the volatility of individual markets.

As the success of the AHL Diversified Program is largely dependent on its systems, the Trading Advisor is committed to investing in leading computer technology. The Trading Advisor (inclusive of affiliates) also maintains a disaster recovery site where a back-up trading system runs permanently and in parallel with the main system.

The AHL Diversified Program uses margin and considerable leverage to reach model allocations.

The AHL Diversified Program is supported by a dedicated team of investment specialists that continually seek to extend the range and versatility of the original investment techniques. As such, the Trading Advisor may increase the number and diversity of markets, strategies and instruments traded directly or indirectly by the AHL Diversified Program.

The Trading Advisor is paid a monthly management fee, payable in arrears, in an amount equal to 0.1667% of the month-end Net Asset Value of the Partnership (as defined in the Limited Partnership Agreement) whether or not the Partnership is profitable (approximately 2% annually). The General Partner is paid a monthly general partner administrative fee in an amount equal to 0.0833% of the month-end Net Asset Value of the Partnership whether or not the Partnership is profitable (approximately 1% annually) in respect to Class A-1 and Class B-1 units. The Trading Advisor may pay a portion of its management fee to the General Partner, and the General Partner may share a portion of its administrative fee with the Placement Agent (as defined below).

The Partnership will pay the Trading Advisor an incentive fee equal to 20% of the Net New Appreciation (as defined in the Limited Partnership Agreement), if any, achieved by the Partnership as of the end of such calendar month. Net New Appreciation achieved during a calendar month means the excess, if any, of (a) the Net Asset Value of the Partnership as of the end of a calendar month (without reduction for any incentive fees accrued or paid to the Trading Advisor for the calendar month or for any redemptions or distributions effected during or as of the end of such calendar month and without increase for any additional capital contributions effected during or as of the end of such calendar month) over (b) the Net Asset Value of the Partnership as of the end of the most recent prior calendar month for which an incentive fee was accrued or paid to the Trading Advisor, with clause (b) reduced by the amount of the incentive fee accrued or paid for such prior calendar month and also reduced by any redemptions or distributions, and increased by any contributions, effected as of or subsequent to the end of such prior calendar month through the first day of the calendar month referred to in clause (a), above.

Man Investments Inc., an affiliate of the General Partner and Trading Advisor, is the lead placement agent for the Partnership (the “Placement Agent”). In connection with various services provided by the Placement Agent to the Partnership related to the offer and sale of interests in the Partnership and the ongoing servicing of its investors, the Partnership will pay the Placement Agent a servicing fee equal to, in respect to Class A Units and Class B Units, 0.0833% of the month-end Net Asset Value of such Units (approximately 1% annually), and in respect of Class A-2 Units and Class B-2 Units, 0.0625% of the month-end Net Asset Value of such Units (approximately 0.75% annually), whether or not the Partnership is profitable as of the end of each

 

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month. The Placement Agent may pass all or a portion of the servicing fee on to certain other selling and services agents. In addition, Units purchased through such selling and services agents may be subject to the payment of an additional upfront selling commission of up to 3% of the purchase price of the Units.

The Partnership’s organizational and initial offering fees and expenses were paid by the Partnership and have been completely amortized. The Partnership pays all of its expenses incurred in the ordinary course of its business. The Partnership also pays its extraordinary expenses, if any.

The Trading Company utilizes a number of brokers in the performance of its trading activities. Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC, J.P. Morgan Securities LLC and Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated serve as the Trading Company’s futures brokers; the Royal Bank of Scotland, HSBC Bank PLC and Deutsche Bank AG, London Branch serve as the Trading Company’s foreign exchange prime brokers; J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC and Credit Suisse Securities (USA) LLC act as the clearing members for centrally cleared credit default swap index transactions engaged in by the Trading Company; and the Trading Company conducts certain over-the-counter (“OTC”) interest rate swap trading through J.P. Morgan Chase Bank N.A. and Deutsche Bank AG, London Branch (collectively, the “Brokers”). The Partnership is charged brokerage commissions at institutional rates, inclusive of all applicable National Futures Association (the “NFA”), exchange, clearing and other transaction fees. In connection with trading spot and forward contracts in the interbank foreign currency markets, the Partnership pays clearing fees of between $3.25 and $4.00 per transaction as well as dealer profits, which cannot be quantified, embedded in dealer quotes.

The Partnership invests substantially all of its assets in the Trading Company. Most of the Trading Company’s assets will be held in cash or United States (“U.S.”) government securities in accounts in the name of the Trading Company at the Brokers or a bank, which currently is The Bank of New York Mellon, and in order to conduct futures trading activities, will be transferred, as necessary, into segregated accounts at the Brokers. Approximately 10% to 40% of the Trading Company’s assets will be committed as margin for derivative positions. The Brokers may receive compensating balance treatment and excess interest income on the Partnership’s assets, through the Trading Company, held at the Brokers in the form of cash.

The Trading Company engages in trading on non-U.S. exchanges and markets. In connection with trading on non-U.S. exchanges and markets, the brokers may either maintain Trading Company assets in accordance with the requirements of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (the “CFTC”) Rule 30.7 or may redeposit Trading Company assets with non-U.S. banks and brokers which may not be subject to regulatory schemes comparable to those applicable to the Brokers.

Regulation

Under the Commodity Exchange Act, as amended (the “CEA”), commodity exchanges and trading in futures and swaps (as defined in the CEA) are subject to regulation by the CFTC. The NFA, a “registered futures association” under the CEA, is the only non-exchange self-regulatory organization for futures industry professionals. The CFTC has delegated to the NFA responsibility for the registration of “commodity trading advisors,” “commodity pool operators,” “futures commission merchants,” “swap dealers,” “introducing brokers” and their respective associated persons and “floor brokers” and “floor traders.” The CEA requires commodity pool operators and commodity trading advisors, such as the General Partner and Trading Advisor, respectively, and commodity brokers, swap dealers, or futures commission merchants to be registered and to comply with various reporting and record keeping requirements. The CFTC may suspend a commodity pool operator’s or trading advisor’s registration if it finds that its trading practices tend to disrupt orderly market conditions or in certain other situations. In the event that the registration of the Trading Advisor as a commodity pool operator or commodity trading advisor were terminated or suspended, the Trading Advisor would be unable to fulfill its obligations as the Partnership’s commodity pool operator or implement the AHL Diversified Program on behalf of the Partnership. Should the Trading Advisor’s registrations be suspended, termination of the Partnership might result.

In addition to such registration requirements, the CFTC and certain commodity exchanges have established limits on the maximum net long or net short position which any person may hold or control in particular commodities. Most exchanges also limit the changes in futures contract prices that may occur during a single trading day.

The CFTC has proposed a separate position limits rule for 28 so-called “exempt” (i.e. metals and energy) and agricultural futures and options contracts and their economically equivalent swap contracts. As of January 31, 2020, these proposed separate position limits have not been adopted, and it is unclear whether the Trading Advisor will be required to modify its trading on behalf of its clients, including the Trading Company, with respect to certain futures contracts which may have an adverse effect on the Partnership.

Item 1A.    Risk Factors.

Risk of Loss. Investing in the Partnership is speculative and involves substantial risks. You should not invest unless you can afford to lose your entire investment.

 

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General. The transactions in which the Trading Advisor generally will engage on behalf of the Partnership involve significant risks. Growing competition may limit the Trading Advisor’s ability to take advantage of trading opportunities in rapidly changing markets. No assurance can be given that investors will realize a profit on their investment. Moreover, investors may lose all or some of their investment. Because of the nature of the trading activities, the results of the Partnership’s operations may fluctuate from month to month and from period to period. Accordingly, investors should understand that the results of a particular period will not necessarily be indicative of results in future periods.

Markets Are Volatile and Difficult to Predict. Trading in futures is a speculative activity. Futures prices may be highly volatile. Market prices are difficult to predict and are influenced by many factors, including: changes in interest rates; governmental, agricultural, trade, fiscal, monetary and exchange control programs and policies; weather and climate conditions; changing supply and demand relationships; national and international political and economic events; and the changing philosophies and emotions of market participants. In addition, governments intervene in particular markets from time to time, both directly and by regulation, often with the intent to influence prices. The effects of government intervention may be particularly significant in the financial instrument and currency markets, and may cause such markets to move rapidly.

Trading Is Highly Leveraged. The low margin deposits normally required in futures trading permit an extremely high degree of leverage. A relatively small movement in the price of a futures contract may result in immediate and substantial loss or gain to a trader holding a position in such contract. For example, if at the time of purchase 10% of the price of a futures contract is deposited as margin, a 10% decrease in the price of the futures contract would, if the contract were then closed out, result in a total loss of the margin deposit before any deduction for brokerage commissions. Consequently, like other leveraged investments, a futures trade may result in losses in excess of the amount invested. Forward contracts involve similar leverage and also may require deposits of margin as collateral. Swaps and OTC derivative instruments are also highly leveraged transactions.

Markets May Be Illiquid. At times, it may not be possible for the Trading Advisor to obtain execution of a buy or sell order at the desired price or to liquidate an open position, either due to market conditions on exchanges or due to the operation of “daily price fluctuation limits” or “circuit breakers.” For example, most U.S. commodity exchanges limit fluctuations in most futures contract prices during a single day by regulations referred to as “daily price fluctuation limits” or “daily limits.” During a single trading day, no trades may be executed at prices beyond the daily limit. Futures contract prices occasionally have moved to the daily limit for several consecutive days with little or no trading.

Even when futures prices have not moved to the daily limit, the Trading Advisor might not be able to obtain execution of trades at favorable prices if little trading in the contracts which the Trading Advisor wishes to trade is taking place. Also, an exchange or governmental authority may suspend or restrict trading on an exchange (or in particular futures traded on an exchange) or order the immediate settlement of a particular instrument.

Options trading may be restricted in the event that trading in the underlying instrument becomes restricted. Options trading also may be illiquid at times regardless of the condition of the market in the underlying instrument. In either event, it will be difficult for the Trading Advisor to realize gains or limit losses on option positions by offsetting them or to change positions in the market.

Trading in OTC derivative instruments is conducted with individual counterparties rather than on organized exchanges. There have been periods during which forward and swap contract dealers have refused to quote prices for forward and swap contracts or have quoted prices with an unusually wide spread between the bid and asked price.

Speculative Position Limits May Restrict Futures Trading. Speculative position limits prescribe the maximum net long or short futures contract and options positions which any person or group may hold or control in particular futures contracts. All futures contracts and options on futures contracts traded on commodity exchanges located in the United States, with the exception of contracts on certain major non-U.S. currencies, are subject to speculative position limits established either by the CFTC or the relevant exchange.

All trading accounts owned or managed by the Trading Advisor and its principals will be combined for the purposes of speculative position limits. Such limits could adversely affect the profitability of the Trading Company and, consequently, of the Partnership. For example, the Trading Advisor could be required to liquidate futures positions at an unfavorable time in order to comply with such limits. However, the Trading Advisor does not believe that existing speculative position limits will materially adversely affect its ability to manage the Trading Company’s account.

Cash Flow. Futures contract gains and losses are marked-to-market daily for purposes of determining margin requirements. Option positions generally are not, although short option positions will require additional margin if the market moves against the position. Due to these differences in margin treatment between futures and options, there may be periods in which positions on both sides must be closed down prematurely due to short-term cash flow needs. If this were to occur during an adverse move in a spread or straddle relationship, a substantial loss could occur.

 

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Decisions Based on Trends and Technical Analysis. The trading decisions of the Trading Advisor will be based in part on trading strategies which utilize mathematical analyses of technical factors relating to past market performance. The buy and sell signals generated by a technical, trend-following trading strategy are based upon a study of actual daily, weekly and monthly price fluctuations, volume variations and changes in open interest in the markets. The profitability of any technical, trend-following trading strategy depends upon the occurrence in the future of significant, sustained price moves in some of the markets traded. The Trading Company and, consequently, the Partnership may incur substantial trading losses:

 

 

during periods when markets are dominated by fundamental factors that are not reflected in the technical data analyzed by the program;

 

 

during prolonged periods without sustained moves in one or more of the markets traded; or

 

 

during “whip-saw” markets, in which potential price trends start to develop but reverse before actual trends are realized.

In the past there have been prolonged periods without sustained price moves in various markets. Presumably, such periods will recur. A series of volatile reverses in price trends may generate repeated entry and exit signals in trend-following systems, resulting in unprofitable transactions and increased brokerage commission expenses. Technical, trend-following trading systems are used by many other traders. At times, the use of such systems may:

 

 

result in traders attempting to initiate or liquidate substantial positions in a market at or about the same time;

 

 

alter historical trading patterns;

 

 

obscure developing price trends; or

 

 

affect the execution of trades.

Model and Data Risk. The Trading Advisor relies heavily on proprietary mathematical quantitative models (each a “Model” and collectively, “Models”) and data developed both by the Trading Advisor and those supplied by third parties (collectively, “Data”) rather than granting trade-by-trade discretion to the Trading Advisor’s investment professionals. In combination, Models and Data are used to construct investment decisions, to value both current and potential investments (including, without limitation, for trading purposes, and for the purposes of determining the Net Asset Value of the Partnership), to provide risk management insights and to assist in hedging the Partnership’s positions and investments. Models and Data are known to have errors, omissions, imperfections and malfunctions (collectively, “System Events”).

The Trading Advisor seeks to reduce the incidence and impact of System Events, to the extent feasible, through a combination of internal testing, simulation, real-time monitoring and the use of independent safeguards in the overall portfolio management process, often in the software code itself. Despite such testing, monitoring and independent safeguards, System Events will result in, among other things, the execution of unanticipated trades, the failure to execute anticipated trades, delays in the execution of anticipated trades, the failure to properly allocate trades, the failure to properly gather and organize available data, the failure to take certain hedging or risk reducing actions and/or the taking of actions which increase certain risk(s)—all of which may have materially adverse effects on the Partnership. System Events in third-party provided Data is generally entirely outside of the control of the Trading Advisor.

The research and modeling processes engaged in by the Trading Advisor on behalf of its managed funds is extremely complex and involves the use of financial, economic, econometric and statistical theories, research and modeling; the results of this investment approach must then be translated into computer code. Although the Trading Advisor seeks to hire individuals skilled in each of these functions and to provide appropriate levels of oversight and employ other mitigating measures and processes, the complexity of the individual tasks, the difficulty of integrating such tasks, and the limited ability to perform “real world” testing of the end product, even with simulations and similar methodologies, raise the chances that Model code may contain one or more coding errors, thus potentially resulting in a System Event and further, one or more of such coding errors could adversely affect the Partnership’s investment performance.

The investment strategies of the Trading Advisor are highly reliant on the gathering, cleaning, culling and performing of analysis of large amounts of Data. Accordingly, Models rely heavily on appropriate Data inputs. However, it is impossible and impracticable to factor all relevant, available Data into forecasts, investment decisions and other parameters of the Models. The Trading Advisor will use its discretion to determine what Data to gather with respect to each investment strategy and what subset of that Data the Models take into account to produce forecasts which may have an impact on ultimate investment decisions. In addition, due to the automated nature of Data gathering, the volume and depth of Data available, the complexity and often manual nature of Data cleaning, and the fact that the substantial majority of Data comes from third-party sources, it is

 

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inevitable that not all desired and/or relevant Data will be available to, or processed by, the Trading Advisor at all times. Irrespective of the merit, value and/or strength of a particular Model, it will not perform as designed if incorrect Data is fed into it which may lead to a System Event potentially subjecting the Partnership to a loss. Further, even if Data is input correctly, “model prices” anticipated by the Data through the Models may differ substantially from market prices, especially for financial instruments with complex characteristics, such as derivatives, in which the Partnership may invest.

Where incorrect or incomplete Data is available, the Trading Advisor may, and often will, continue to generate forecasts and make investment decisions based on the Data available to it. Additionally, the Trading Advisor may determine that certain available Data, while potentially useful in generating forecasts and/or making investment decisions, is not cost effective to gather due to, among other factors, the technology costs or third-party vendor costs and, in such cases, the Trading Advisor will not utilize such Data. The Trading Advisor has full discretion to select the Data it utilizes. The Trading Advisor may elect to use or may refrain from using any specific Data or type of Data in generating forecasts or making trading decisions with respect to the Models. The Data utilized in generating forecasts or making trading decisions underlying the Models may not be (i) the most accurate data available or (ii) free of errors. The Data set used in connection with the Models is limited. The foregoing risks associated with gathering, cleaning, culling and analysis of large amounts of Data are an inherent part of investing with a quantitative, process-driven, systematic adviser such as the Trading Advisor.

When Models and Data prove to be incorrect, misleading or incomplete, any decisions made in reliance thereon expose the Partnership to potential losses and such losses may be compounded over time. For example, by relying on Models and Data, the Trading Advisor may be induced to buy certain investments at prices that are too high, to sell certain other investments at prices that are too low, or to miss favorable opportunities altogether. Similarly, any hedging based on faulty Models and Data may prove to be unsuccessful and when determining the Net Asset Value of the Partnership, any valuations of the Partnership’s investments that are based on valuation Models may prove to be incorrect. In addition, Models may incorrectly forecast future behavior, leading to potential losses on a cash flow and/or a mark-to-market basis. Furthermore, in unforeseen or certain low-probability scenarios (often involving a market event or disruption of some kind), Models may produce unexpected results which may or may not be System Events.

Errors in Models and Data are often extremely difficult to detect, and, in the case of Models, the difficulty of detecting System Events may be exacerbated by the lack of design documents or specifications. Regardless of how difficult their detection appears in retrospect, some System Events may go undetected for long periods of time and some may never be detected. Finally, the Trading Advisor will detect certain System Events that it chooses, in its sole discretion, not to address or fix, and the third party software will lead to System Events known to the Trading Advisor that it chooses, in its sole discretion, not to address or fix. The degradation or impact caused by these System Events can compound over time. The Trading Advisor generally will not perform a materiality analysis on the potential impact of a System Event. The Trading Advisor believes that the testing and monitoring performed on Models will enable the Trading Advisor to identify and address those System Events that a prudent person managing a quantitative, systematic and computerized investment program would identify and address by correcting the underlying issue(s) giving rise to the System Events, however there is no guarantee of the success of such processes. Investors should assume that System Events and their ensuing risks and impact are an inherent part of investing with a process-driven, systematic investment manager such as the Trading Advisor.

Accordingly, the Trading Advisor does not expect to disclose discovered System Events to its investors. The Partnership will bear the risks associated with the reliance on Models and Data including bearing all losses related to System Events other than in relation to losses arising from the Trading Advisor’s willful misconduct, negligence or breach of fiduciary obligations.

Trade Systems and Execution of Orders. The Trading Advisor relies extensively on computer programs, systems, technology, Data and Models to implement its execution strategies and algorithms. The Trading Advisor’s investment strategies, trading strategies and algorithms depend on its ability to establish and maintain an overall market position in a combination of financial instruments selected by the Trading Advisor. There is a risk that the Trading Advisor’s proprietary algorithmic trading systems may not be able to adequately react to a market event without serious disruption. Further, trading strategies and algorithms may malfunction causing severe losses. While the Trading Advisor has employed tools to allow for human intervention to respond to significant system malfunctions, it cannot be guaranteed that losses will not occur in such circumstances as unforeseen market events and disruptions and execution system issues.

Orders may not be executed in a timely and efficient manner due to various circumstances, including, without limitation, trading volume surges or systems failures attributable to the Trading Advisor, the Trading Advisor’s counterparties, brokers, dealers, agents or other service providers. In such event, the Trading Advisor might only be able to acquire or dispose of some, but not all, of the components of such position, or if the overall position were to need adjustment, the Trading Advisor might not be able to make such adjustment. As a result, the Partnership would not be able to achieve the market position selected by the Trading Advisor, which may result in a loss.

Trade Error Risk. The complex execution modalities operated by the Trading Advisor and the speed and volume of trading invariably result in occasional trades being executed which, with the benefit of hindsight, were not required or intended by the

 

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execution strategy or occasional trades not being executed when they should have been. To the extent a trade error is caused by counterparty, such as a broker, the Trading Advisor generally, to the extent reasonable and practical, attempts to recover any loss associated with such trade error from such counterparty. To the extent a trade error is caused by the Trading Advisor, a formalized process is in place for the documentation and resolution of such trade errors. Given the volume, diversity and complexity of transactions executed by the Trading Advisor on behalf of the Partnership, investors should assume that trade errors will occur on occasion. If such trade errors result in gains to the Partnership, such gains will generally be retained by the Partnership. However, if a trade error result in losses, they will be borne by the Trading Advisor in accordance with its internal policies unless otherwise determined by the General Partner.

Trading in OTC Markets Will Expose the Partnership to Risks Not Applicable to Trading on Organized Exchanges. The Partnership, through the Trading Company, may engage in OTC derivative transactions, such as: currency forward contracts traded in the interbank market; options on currency forward contracts; and swap transactions.

In general, there is much less governmental regulation and supervision of transactions in the OTC markets than of transactions entered into on organized exchanges. Most of the protections afforded to participants on U.S. and certain non-U.S. exchanges, such as daily price fluctuation limits and the performance guarantee of an exchange clearinghouse, will not be available in connection with OTC transactions. Consequently, the Partnership will be exposed to greater risk of loss through default than if it confined its trading to organized exchanges.

A portion of the Partnership’s assets may be traded in forward contracts. Such forward contracts are generally not traded on exchanges and are executed directly through forward contract dealers. However, certain forward currency exchange contracts are regulated as swaps by the CFTC and have begun being voluntarily traded on swap execution facilities. Some of these contracts may be required to be centrally cleared by a regulated U.S. clearinghouse, and may be required to be traded on a regulated exchange in the future. There is no limitation on the daily price moves of forward contracts, and a dealer is not required to continue to make markets in such contracts. There have been periods during which forward contract dealers have refused to quote prices for forward contracts or have quoted prices with an unusually wide spread between the bid and asked price. Arrangements to trade forward contracts may therefore experience liquidity problems. The Partnership therefore will be subject to the risk of credit failure or the inability of or refusal of a forward contract dealer to perform with respect to its forward contracts.

When trading currency forward contracts, the Trading Company may hedge the foreign currencies in order to limit the Trading Company’s exposure to fluctuations in exchange rates. However, there is no guarantee that such hedging will be successful.

Enhanced Regulation of the OTC Derivatives Markets. The European Market Infrastructure Regulation (“EMIR”) seeks comprehensively to regulate the OTC derivatives market in Europe including, in particular, imposing mandatory central clearing, trade reporting and, for non-centrally cleared trades, risk management obligations on counterparties. Similarly, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Reform Act”), enacted in July 2010, includes provisions that substantially increase the regulation of the OTC derivatives markets. The Reform Act requires that a substantial portion of OTC derivatives must be executed in regulated markets and be submitted for clearing to regulated clearinghouses, subject to margin requirements. OTC derivative dealers also are required to post margin to the clearinghouses through which they clear their customers’ trades instead of using such margin in their operations as was widely permitted before the Reform Act. Taken together, these regulatory developments have increased and will continue to increase the OTC derivative dealers’ costs, and these increased costs are generally passed through to other market participants in the form of higher upfront and mark-to-market margin, less favorable trade pricing, and the imposition of new or increased fees including clearing account maintenance fees.

The CFTC also requires certain derivatives transactions that were previously executed on a bilateral basis in the OTC markets to be executed through a regulated futures or swap exchange or execution facility. Similarly, under EMIR, European regulators may require a substantial proportion of such derivatives transactions to be bought on exchange and/or centrally cleared. The SEC is also expected to impose similar requirements on certain security-based derivatives in the near future, though it is not yet clear when these parallel SEC requirements will go into effect. Such requirements may make it more difficult and costly for investment funds, including the Partnership and/or the Trading Company, to enter into highly tailored or customized transactions. They may also render certain strategies in which the Partnership might otherwise engage impossible or so costly that they will no longer be economical to implement. The overall impact of EMIR and the Reform Act on the Partnership remains uncertain and it is unclear how the OTC derivatives markets will adapt to these new regulatory regimes.

Exchanges for Physicals/Swaps/Risk. While not a regular practice for the Trading Company, it may in rare instances engage in transactions known as exchanges for physicals (“EFP”), exchanges for swaps (“EFS”), or exchanges for risk/OTC derivatives (“EFR”). An EFP/EFS/EFR is a purchase or sale of a spot commodity/swap/derivative, as applicable, in conjunction with an offsetting sale or purchase of a corresponding futures contract involving the same or equivalent underlying commodity or instrument, without making an open and competitive trade for the futures contract on the exchange. EFPs, EFSs and EFRs

 

7


are a permitted exception to the general requirement of the CEA that all futures contracts must be competitively executed on an exchange. They are permitted pursuant to the rules of the relevant exchanges, which vary from exchange to exchange. If the EFP, EFS or EFR does not comply with specific exchange requirements, particularly regarding possessing documentation evidencing possession of the underlying commodity or instrument, then the CFTC or the exchange may deem the transaction to be an illegal off-exchange futures contract. In addition, every EFP, EFS or EFR involves the transfer of an underlying commodity or entry into a swap or derivative on a bilateral basis, as applicable, with a counterparty in exchange for a related cleared futures contract. There is, therefore, counterparty credit risk if the counterparty or its clearing member on the futures leg fails to perform. Unlike other futures contracts that are deemed cleared by the clearinghouse upon trade matching or at the end of the business day, futures contracts arising out of EFPs, EFSs or EFRs may, under various clearinghouse rules, not be deemed accepted by the clearinghouse until the next business day.

Options on Futures Contracts May Be More Volatile Than Futures Contracts. The Trading Advisor may trade options on futures contracts. Options are speculative in nature and are highly leveraged. The purchaser of an option risks losing the entire purchase price of the option. The seller (writer) of an option risks losing the difference between the premium received for the option and the price of the underlying futures contract that the writer must purchase upon exercise of the option. Additionally, the seller and writer of the options lose any commissions and fees associated with such transactions. This could subject the writer to unlimited risk in the event of an increase in the price of the contract to be purchased or delivered. Successful trading of options on futures contracts requires a trader to accurately determine near-term market volatility because it often has an immediate impact on the price of outstanding options. Accurate determination of near-term volatility is more important to successful options trading than it is to long-term futures contract trading strategies because such volatility generally does not have as significant an effect on the prices of futures contracts.

Trading on Non-U.S. Exchanges and Markets Will Expose the Partnership to Risks Not Applicable to Trading on U.S. Exchanges and Markets. The Partnership, through the Trading Company, may engage in trading on non-U.S. exchanges and markets. The Partnership will be subject to the risk of fluctuations in the currency exchange rate between the local currency and the U.S. dollar and to the possibility of exchange controls. Trading on such exchanges and markets generally involves other risks not applicable to trading on U.S. exchanges and markets.

For example, such exchanges and markets:

 

 

may not provide the same assurances of the integrity (financial and otherwise) of the marketplace and its participants as do U.S. exchanges and markets;

 

 

may exercise less regulatory oversight and supervision over transactions and participants in transactions;

 

 

may not afford all participants an equal opportunity to execute trades;

 

 

may be subject to a variety of political influences and the possibility of direct governmental intervention;

 

 

may have different clearance and settlement procedures for transactions than U.S. exchanges and markets. There have been times when settlement procedures have been unable to keep pace with the volume of transactions on certain exchanges and markets, making it difficult to conduct trades; and

 

 

may be “principals’ markets” in which performance is the responsibility only of the member with whom the trader has dealt (the counterparty) rather than the responsibility of an exchange or clearing association. Each transaction on such an exchange or market may subject the Partnership to the risk of the counterparty’s credit failure or inability or refusal to perform its obligations.

Institutional Risks. Institutions, such as the banks and brokers, will have custody of the assets of the Partnership. These firms may encounter financial difficulties that impair the operating capabilities or the capital position of the Partnership, the Trading Company or the General Partner.

Counterparty Risk. The Partnership will be subject to the risk of the inability of counterparties to perform with respect to transactions, particularly uncleared swap and currency forward transactions, whether due to insolvency, bankruptcy or other causes, which could subject the Partnership to substantial losses. In an effort to mitigate such risks, the General Partner and Trading Advisor will attempt to limit transactions to counterparties, which are established, well-capitalized and creditworthy.

Affiliated Parties — Conflicts of Interest. Under the terms of the Limited Partnership Agreement, the General Partner has the authority to engage trading advisors to make trading decisions for the Partnership. Since the Trading Advisor is an affiliate of the General Partner, the General Partner has a conflict of interest with respect to its responsibilities to manage the

 

8


Partnership for the benefit of the Limited Partners, and to prevent violations of the Partnership’s trading policies and to monitor for excessive trading by the Trading Advisor. In addition, the General Partner has a conflict of interest with respect to its responsibility to review the trading performance of the Partnership and a disincentive to terminate the advisory relationship between the Trading Advisor and the Partnership. There have been no arm’s-length negotiations with respect to the management and incentive fees that the Trading Advisor will charge the Trading Company or with respect to the other terms of the advisory agreement entered into with the Trading Advisor.

MiFID II. Each of the European Union’s re-cast Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (2014/65/EU) (the “MiFID II Directive”), the delegated and implementing European Union (“EU”) regulations made thereunder, the laws and regulations introduced by Member States of the EU to implement the MiFID II Directive and the EU’s Markets in Financial Instruments Regulation (600/2014) (“MiFIR” and, together with the MiFID II Directive, “MiFID II”) impose new regulatory obligations on the Trading Advisor. These regulatory obligations may impact on, and constrain the implementation of, the investment strategy of the Partnership and lead to increased compliance obligations upon and accrued expenses for the Trading Advisor and/or the Partnership.

Epidemics and Pandemics. Since the mid-1990s, the world has seen a number of outbreaks of new viral illnesses of varying severity, including avian flus, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), the H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu), and COVID-19 caused by the novel Coronavirus known as SARS–CoV-2. The responses to these outbreaks have varied as has their impact on human health, local economies, national economies and the global economy, and it is impossible at the outset of any such outbreak to estimate accurately what the ultimate impact of any such outbreak will be. Protective measures taken by governments and the private sector, including the General Partner and Trading Advisor, to mitigate the spread of any such illness, including travel restrictions and outright bans, quarantines, work-from-home arrangements, mandatory business closures and shelter-in-place orders may lead to, or may be expected to lead to, wide spread economic damage, resulting in severe disruptions in the markets in which the Partnership trades and, potentially, adversely affecting the Partnership’s profit potential; and the spread of any such illness within the offices of the General Partner and/or the Trading Advisor, the Partnership’s service providers, and/or the exchanges and other components of market infrastructure could severely impair the operational capabilities of the General Partner and/or the Trading Advisor, the Partnership’s service providers or various markets themselves resulting in harm to the Partnership’s business and its operating results.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.

Not applicable.

Item 2. Properties.

The Partnership does not own or use any physical properties in the conduct of its business. The General Partner and various service providers perform services for the Partnership from their offices.

Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

The General Partner is not aware of any pending legal proceedings to which either the Partnership is a party or to which any of its assets are subject. In addition there are no pending material legal proceedings involving either the General Partner or Trading Advisor.

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

Not applicable.

 

9


PART II

Item 5. Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

(a)    Market Information.

There is no trading market for the Units, and none is likely to develop. Units may be redeemed upon 10 days’ written notice to the General Partner at their Net Asset Value as of the last business day of each calendar month; provided, however, that each Limited Partner must maintain a minimum investment of $25,000 and $10,000, respectively of Class A Units (or Class A-2 Units) and Class B Units (or Class B-2 Units), in the Partnership following any redemption initiated by such Limited Partner in order to remain invested in the Partnership.

(b)    Holders.

As of December 31, 2020, there were 290 holders of Class A Units, 30 holders of Class A-2 Units, 327 holders of Class B Units and 0 holders of Class B-2 Units.

(c)    Dividends.

No distributions or dividends have been made on the Units, and the General Partner has no present intention to make any.

(d)    Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans.

None.

(e)    Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities; Use of Proceeds from Registered Securities.

The Partnership may admit additional Limited Partners to the Partnership and permit additional capital contributions to be made to the Partnership as of the first business day of any calendar month or at such other times as the General Partner may determine. On the first business day of October 2020, November 2020 and December 2020, the Partnership sold Class A Units to existing and new Limited Partners in the amount of $0, $109,999 and $0, respectively; Class A-2 Units to existing and new Limited Partners in the amount of $0, $208,001 and $0, respectively; Class B Units to existing and new Limited Partners in the amount of $0, $0 and $210,000, respectively; and Class B-2 Units to existing and new Limited Partners in the amount of $0, $0 and $0, respectively. There were no underwriting discounts or commissions in connection with the sales of the Units described above.

(f)    Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

Pursuant to the Limited Partnership Agreement, a Limited Partner may redeem some or all of its Units as of the last business day of each calendar month at the then current month-end Net Asset Value. The redemption of Units has no impact on the value of Units that remain outstanding, and Units are not reissued once redeemed. The following table summarizes the amount of Units redeemed during the three months ended December 31, 2020:

 

   Class A Units   Class A-2 Units   Class B Units   Class B-2 Units 

Date of

Redemption:

  Amount
Redeemed:
   Amount
Redeemed:
   Amount
Redeemed:
   Amount
Redeemed:
 

(last business day)

        

October 2020

  $554,965       $324,502     

November 2020

  $1,556,220       $915,701     

December 2020

  $496,299       $818,334     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

TOTAL

  $2,607,484       $2,058,537     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

10


Item 6. Selected Financial Data.

The following is a summary of operations for the fiscal years 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017 and 2016 and total assets of the Partnership at December 31, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017 and 2016.

 

 

 For the
Year Ended
December 31,
2020
  For the Year
Ended
December 31,
2019
  For the Year
Ended
December 31,
2018
  For the Year
Ended
December 31,
2017
  For the Year
Ended
December 31,
2016
 
Revenue:*     
Total net realized and unrealized gains (losses) $9,655,632  $13,208,515  $1,245,752  $18,205,710  $(7,289,110
Interest income  510,991   1,856,022   1,764,072   854,933   293,762 
Other Income   102,311   -   -   - 
Expenses:**     
Incentive fees  -   -   -   -   - 
Management fees  2,603,364   2,811,368   3,276,649   3,796,264   4,734,252 
Servicing fees  871,180   941,605   1,098,660   1,272,301   1,588,234 
Brokerage commissions  138,727   190,659   284,613   486,447   652,371 
Administrative expenses  865,122   915,399   1,182,114   909,312   1,282,068 
Net income (loss)  5,688,230  $10,307,877  $(2,832,242 $12,596,319  $(15,252,273
Total assets  86,720,650  $92,358,800  $105,907,806  $122,096,273  $143,034,688 
Total Partnership capital  84,817,626  $90,128,836  $99,736,784  $119,598,097  $139,406,484 
Net Asset Value per outstanding unit - Class A - Series 1  4,040.79  $3,773.02  $3,379.30  $3,449.91  $3,120.88 
Net Asset Value per outstanding unit - Class A - Series 2  4,682.16  $4,317.43  $3,818.72  $3,849.96  $3,439.38 
Net Asset Value per outstanding unit Class B - Series 1  4,040.61  $3,772.86  $3,379.15  $3,449.76  $3,120.74 
Net Asset Value per outstanding unit - Class B - Series 2  -  $-  $3,604.14***  $3,850.01  $3,439.44 
Increase (decrease) in Net Asset Value per Class A - Series 1 unit^  237.00  $387.36  $(70.61 $315.48  $(331.06
Increase (decrease) in Net Asset Value per Class A - Series 2 unit^  395.07  $511.82  $(31.24 $396.34  $(219.86
Increase (decrease) in Net Asset Value per Class B - Series 1 unit^  253.32  $394.51  $(70.61 $305.71  $(319.17
Increase (decrease) in Net Asset Value per Class B - Series 2 unit***  -  $  $(245.87 $410.60  $(309.74

 

*

Allocated to the Partnership from its investment in the Trading Company. The Trading Company generates revenue from the trading of futures, foreign exchange, forward currency contracts and treasury bills.

**

Expenses include the Partnership’s allocation of expenses from its investment in the Trading Company in addition to direct expenses of the Partnership.

***

Ending Net Asset Value per unit calculated immediately prior to final redemption.

^

Based on weighted average units outstanding during the year.

 

11


Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

Reference is made to “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.” The information contained therein is essential to, and should be read in conjunction with, the following analysis.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Units may be offered for sale as of the first business day, and may be redeemed as of the last business day, of each month.

The Partnership raises additional capital only through the sale of Units and capital is increased through trading profits (if any) and interest income. The Partnership does not engage in borrowing. The Partnership, not being an operating company, does not incur capital expenditures. It functions solely as a passive trading vehicle, investing the substantial majority of its assets in the Trading Company. Its remaining capital resources are used only as assets available to make further investments in the Trading Company and to pay Partnership expenses. Accordingly, the amount of capital raised for the Partnership should not have a significant impact on its operations.

Partnership assets not invested in the Trading Company are maintained in cash and cash equivalents in bank accounts or accounts with The Bank of New York Mellon and are readily available to the Partnership. The Partnership may redeem any part or all of its limited partnership interest in the Trading Company at any month-end at the net asset value per unit of the Trading Company. The Trading Company’s assets are generally held as cash or cash equivalents which are used to margin futures and provide collateral for forward contracts and other OTC contract positions and are withdrawn, as necessary, to pay redemptions (to the Partnership and other investors in the Trading Company). Other than potential market-imposed limitations on liquidity, due, for example, to limited open interest in certain futures markets or to daily price fluctuation limits, which are inherent in the Trading Company’s futures trading, the Trading Company’s assets are highly liquid and are expected to remain so.

During its operations through December 31, 2020, the Partnership experienced no meaningful periods of illiquidity in any of the numerous markets in which it trades.

Critical Accounting Policies

The Partnership records its transactions in futures contracts, forward contracts and other derivatives, including related income and expenses, on a trade-date basis. Open futures contracts traded on an exchange are valued at fair value, which is based on the closing settlement price on the exchange where the futures contract is traded by the Partnership on the day with respect to which the Partnership’s Net Asset Value is being determined. Open forward contracts and other derivatives are valued at fair value using independent pricing services, which use market observable inputs in their valuations. If the General Partner determines the fair value of an investment cannot be accurately determined pursuant to the foregoing methods, such investment shall be assigned such fair value as the General Partner may determine in its sole discretion.

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions, such as accrual of expenses, that affect the amounts and disclosures reported in the financial statements. Based on the nature of the business and operations engaged in by the Partnership, the General Partner believes that the estimates utilized in preparing the Partnership’s financial statements are appropriate and reasonable; however, actual results could differ from the estimates. The estimates do not provide a range of possible results that would require the exercise of subjective judgment. The General Partner further believes that, based on the nature of the business and operations of the Partnership, no other reasonable assumptions relating to the application of the Partnership’s critical accounting estimates other than those to be used would likely result in materially different amounts from those reported. The Partnership’s significant accounting policies are described in detail in Note 2 to the Financial Statements.

 

12


Allocations by Market Sector

The following table indicates the percentage of the Partnership’s assets allocated to initial margin for the Partnership’s open trading positions by market sector as of December 31, 2020. The Partnership’s capitalization was $84,817,626 as of December 31, 2020. Also see Item 7A, “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk,” below.

 

Fiscal Year 2020 
Market Sector  Margin Allocation
as of December 31st
   % of Capitalization
as of December 31st
 

Agriculturals

  $1,280,651    1.51% 

Bonds

  $1,307,752    1.54% 

Credit

  $723,836    0.85% 

Currencies

  $2,777,315    3.27% 

Energy

  $1,042,110    1.23% 

Interest rates

  $589,168    0.69% 

Metals

  $1,982,019    2.34% 

Stock indices

  $4,676,287    5.51% 

Total*

  $14,379,139    16.94% 

 

*

Total amount does not foot due to rounding.

Results of Operations

Due to the nature of the Partnership’s trading, the Partnership’s income or loss from operations may vary widely from period to period. Management cannot predict whether the Partnership’s future Net Asset Value per Unit will increase or experience a decline. The Partnership was organized in September 1997 under the Delaware Revised Uniform Limited Partnership Act and commenced operations on April 3, 1998.

Performance Summary

The Partnership is a speculative managed futures fund which trades pursuant to the AHL Diversified Program, indirectly through its investment in the Trading Company. The AHL Diversified Program is a futures and forward OTC price trend-following, trading system. The AHL Diversified Program is entirely quantitative in nature and implements trading positions on the basis of statistical analyses of past price histories. The AHL Diversified Program, like most trend-following systems, is designed in the anticipation that most of its trades will be unprofitable; the objective of overall profitability depends on the system identifying certain major trends which occur and recognizing significant profits from participating in such trends.

The past performance of the AHL Diversified Program is not necessarily indicative of its future results. This is the case with all speculative trading strategies. Moreover, the markets in which the AHL Diversified Program is active have seen major changes in recent years, including the influx of entirely different classes of market participants. These changed circumstances may mean that the markets in which the Trading Advisor has previously traded on behalf of the Trading Company are not necessarily representative of those in which it trades on behalf of the Trading Company currently.

As a speculative futures fund, the Partnership (through the Trading Company) effectively maintains all of its capital in reserve. The Trading Company does not “buy” or “sell” futures or forward contracts in the traditional sense; rather, through taking positions in these markets, the Trading Company, and thus the Partnership indirectly, acquires loss/profit exposure and uses its capital to cover losses and provide margin (which constitutes a good faith deposit towards the Trading Company’s (but not the Partnership’s) obligation to pay such losses) to support its open positions. Each of the Partnership and the Trading Company maintains most of its capital in cash and cash equivalents.

Futures trading programs are proprietary and confidential. As is the case with any speculative futures fund, it is impossible to predict how the Partnership will perform. It is not possible, as it is in the case of an operating business, to predict performance trends, analyze future market conditions or evaluate the likely success or failure of the Partnership.

 

13


There are certain general market conditions in which the Partnership is more likely to be profitable than in others. For example, in trendless or stagnant markets, the AHL Diversified Program is unlikely to be profitable. On the other hand, trending markets with substantial price change momentum can be favorable to the AHL Diversified Trading Program. However, because of the continually changing population of market participants as well as supply and demand characteristics, it cannot be predicted how the AHL Diversified Program, and thus the Partnership, will perform in any given market conditions.

 

    

2020

31-Dec -20

   

2019

31-Dec -19

 

Ending Equity

  $84,817,626   $90,128,836 

 

14


2020

Net assets decreased $5,311,210 for the year ended December 31, 2020. This decrease was attributable to subscriptions in the amount of $4,408,673, redemptions in the amount of $15,408,113 and net income from operations of $5,688,230.

For the year ended December 31, 2020, the Partnership accrued or paid total expenses of $4,483,238, including $871,180 in servicing fees, $2,603,364 in General Partner administrative fees and Trading Advisor management fees, and $1,008,694 in other expenses. Interest of $510,991 was earned or accrued on the Partnership’s cash and cash equivalent investments.

The Net Asset Value of a Class A Unit increased by $267.77 to $4,040.79. The Net Asset Value of a Class B Unit increased by $267.75 to $4,040.61. The Net Asset Value of a Class A-2 Unit increased by $364.73 to $4,682.16.

Equity trading for the Partnership was largely negative throughout January and February, driven largely by long positioning. In January, Asian indices such as Taiwan’s TAIEX and China’s H-Shares fared worst, offsetting gains from a long position in the Australian SPI 200 Index, while in February, the previously-profitable long position in Australian SPI 200 Index, as well as long positions in S&P TSX 60 Index and the Nikkei Index were among the worst performers. In March, the Partnership’s equity positions turned net-short early on in the month, and these short positions generally ended up the month’s top performers. Most notable of these were in the Hang Seng index and the Russell 2000 Index, while further gains came from a long position in the VIX Volatility Index. In April, a sharp reversal in the equity markets saw losses on the short positioning built up in the Partnership in March, as net short positioning as well as a long VIX position finished in the red overall, with the long VIX position and shorts in TAIEX futures detracting most. This trend continued into May as a strong equity rally drove further losses on the Partnership’s built up short positioning, the worst being the VIX and Tokyo Stock Exchange indices, as well as the Australian SPI 200. The losses continued in June as the Partnership’s equities trading finished the month marginally in the red, despite moving from flat to small net long as the month progressed. In July, the Partnership’s long positioning in equities led the overall portfolio, as the NASDAQ 100 and S&P 500 outperforming developed market peers, more than outweighing an inconsequential loss from a short in the French CAC40 index. The gains in these positions did not continue into August, however, as equity trading finished the month in red, led by losses in the S&P 500 and NASDAQ 100. In October, global equities had their worst week since March, and the Partnership’s overall long positions, particularly in Australian and Swedish indices, posted losses. In November, the overall long positioning proved more profitable, as positions in indices were largely positive, particularly Asian indices such as the Nikkei and Taiwan MSCI. Losses in indices such as the FTSE gave the sector its biggest loss. To end the year, the Partnership saw positive gains in its equity positions, with the Taiwan MSCI index being the top performer on the month.

The Partnership’s fixed income trading started out 2020 as a constant performer, bringing in positive returns throughout the first quarter. The Partnership’s position in Italian bonds brought in positive returns in January, and while such positions experienced losses in February and March, profitable positions in US Treasuries more than made up for any such losses. The profitable positions continued into April and May as positions in Canadian bonds and Short Sterling were top performers in April and UK interest rate futures and shorts in German bonds in May being among the Partnership’s top performers. In June, while the Partnership overall saw very minor losses in fixed income, UK interest rates futures and long positions in Italian bonds experienced positive performance. In the third quarter, the Partnership’s fixed income started strong, as July saw the Partnership’s long positions in Italian 10-year bonds experience the most gains as yields traded below 1% for the first-time since the outset of the pandemic. However, this tread was reversed in August, as largest losses of the month occurred in the Partnership’s predominately long positions in fixed income, driven by long positions in 10 year Gilts and 10 year Australian bonds. September saw the returns level out and end the quarter with minor gains, as a long position in 10-year Italian government bonds was the top performer, offsetting a loss from the Partnership’s short position in German bonds. In the fourth quarter, the Partnership had a downward trend, posting losses in fixed income trading in each of the three months. In October, Losses were experienced trading US and UK markets as benchmark yields nudged higher. These losses continued into November, as prices of bonds broadly fell, and the Partnership saw losses in the Partnership’s German and UK bonds. December saw positive returns from long positions in UK and Italian bonds offset by longs in Australian bonds and shorts in German bonds.

The Partnership’s commodities trading was profitable in the first quarter of 2020, posting gains in all three months. In January, the biggest contributors on both the upside and downside were in energies, as short natural gas positions in the US and UK were positive while long oil positions posted losses. In other commodities, a long palladium position was positive, offsetting losses produced by shorts in coffee and copper. This trend continued into February where energy shorts in US natural gas and oil and shorts in zinc realized gains, more than offsetting losses in precious metals such as silver and platinum as prices became increasingly volatile. In March, the gains were led by the Partnership’s short positions in crude and copper, offsetting losses from agricultural commodity positions, such as longs in cocoa and sugar. The performance of commodities continued into the start of the second quarter, where losses in short copper and shorts in U.S. natural gas were marginally offset by gains in WTI crude oil in April. However, these gains did not continue for the rest of the quarter. In May, the Partnership’s short

 

15


positions in crude oil and aluminum, and positions in sugar and wheat, offset gains from soyameal and coffee. In June, short positions in base metals, aluminum in particular, offset profits short positions in US natural gas, and agricultural short positions in sugar and corn offset minor gains from the Partnership’s short position in wheat. To start the third quarter, the Partnership’s long positions in gold and silver were top performers across the portfolio in June, offsetting losses from the Partnership’s short positions in aluminum and coffee, though this trend reversed in August as trading ultimately ended with minor losses for the month. Long positions in copper and silver were top performers, while losses were experienced from short positions in aluminum and wheat. In September, the Partnership’s predominantly long positions in commodities posted losses, as gains from long positions in soybeans, corn and gas oil were not enough to offset losses led by long positions in coffee, silver and brent crude oil. Commodity trading for the Partnership ended the year strong, as the Partnership experienced gains in the sector all three months. In October, this was led by longs in soyabeans and shorts in gas oil and crude oil, offsetting losses in metals, copper in particular. In November, the Partnership’s long positions in soyabeans continued to post positive returns, assisted by a long position in copper; both of these mere more than enough to offset losses from positions in brent crude oil, WTI crude oil and cocoa. In December, the Partnership posted gains from long positions in each of energies, metals, and agriculturals, with soyabeans as the top performer in the asset class.

The Partnership’s currency trading started the year posting minor losses in January, as the Partnership’s long positions in the New Zealand dollar and the South African rand offset gains from short positions in South American currencies such as the Chilean peso against US dollar. The trading changed course, however, posting gains in both February and march, as short positions in the Brazilian real and Australian dollar against the US dollar posted strong returns for both months, offsetting losses from other positions, such as US dollar crosses against developed market currencies such as the Japanese yen and Euro. The performance of the Partnership’s short positions in the Brazilian real continued into the second quarter, as the position posted gains again in April; however, these gains were outweighed by losses in the previously-profitable Australian dollar position. May saw further losses in currency trading, as losses were driven by short Euro and Chilean peso positions. In June, the Partnership’s FX net positioning changed from long to short the US dollar and saw losses, most notably in the Mexican peso and Japanese yen, though these were partially offset by gains in the British pound against the Australian dollar. The third quarter continued this downward trend, as the majority of the Partnership’s July losses came from its FX trading, as established short positions in UK sterling, Chilean peso and the Swiss Franc against the dollar experienced notable losses. In August, the Partnership was able to recover some gains in the currency sector the Partnership’s short positioning in the US dollar, most notably against the Canadian dollar and Indian rupee offset a loss in a short position of the US dollar against the South African rand. In September, the FX trading once again reversed course to finish the third quarter in the red, as the Partnership’s long positions in the US dollar against the UK sterling and the Swedish krona posted some of the Partnership’s largest losses. In October, FX trading finished slightly in the red, as late-month movements hurt longs in many pairs versus the US dollar, such as the Indian rupee and Japanese yen; on the other hand, some positive gains were seen in a long the Chinese renminbi position. In November, the Partnership’s long positions in emerging market FX, most notably the Mexican peso and South African rand experienced gains, while long Euro positioning detracted, however, mainly against the Polish zloty. The Partnership’s performance in currency trading ended the year strong, as commodity currencies such as the South African rand and Australian dollar were top performers for the Partnership, offsetting losses from a short position in the Swiss franc against the US dollar.

Credit trading for the Partnership started the year down, as losses from a long credit position in European 5yr Crossover iTraxx Index in January continued into February, where they were joined by additional losses from positions in the the US 5yr CDX Index. In March the Partnership’s positioning in credit also migrated from long to short as the month progressed and overall trading finished marginally in the black with gains principally coming from high yield credit indices. To start the second quarter, April saw the Partnership’s credit positions post losses after credit spreads tightened, with the Partnership’s short positions in the European 5-year Crossover iTraxx and the US High Yield CDX Index amongst the bottom performers. This continued into May as the Partnership’s index positions ended up in the red, with losses in the European 5yr Crossover iTraxx Index and the US High Yield CDX Index detracting most. Credit trading finished the first half of the year with minor losses in June, as HY spreads steadily widened. The third quarter started out better for the Partnership, as positions posted largely flat performance in July, ending the month marginally in the black. Gains continued into August as all of the Partnership’s credit positions finished in the black, with European indices topping the charts, though this course reversed in September, as the Partnership’s credit trading finished in the red, led by losses from short protection positions in US 5-year CDX index and European 5-year Crossover iTraxx. In October, performance in credit was mixed, though ultimately ended at a loss, as overall positioning flipped from long to short, and performance in European investment-grade names was affected most while similar quality names in the US eked out a small positive return. To finish up the year, credit trading was largely flat in November, which continued into December, when the European 5y Crossover Index was the top-performing instrument in the asset class, while a widening of the US investment grade index generated a loss.

 

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2019

Net assets decreased $9,607,948 for the year ended December 31, 2019. This decrease was attributable to subscriptions in the amount of $1,295,747, redemptions in the amount of $21,211,572 and net income from operations of $10,307,877.

For the year ended December 31, 2019, the Partnership accrued or paid total expenses of $4,858,971, including $941,605 in servicing fees, $2,811,368 in General Partner administrative fees and Trading Advisor management fees, and $1,105,998 in other expenses. Interest of $1,856,022 was earned or accrued on the Partnership’s cash and cash equivalent investments and other income earned was $102,311.

The Net Asset Value of a Class A Unit increased by $393.72 to $3,773.02. The Net Asset Value of a Class B Unit increased by $498.71 to $4,317.43. The Net Asset Value of a Class A-2 Unit increased by $393.71 to $3,772.86.

In the first quarter of 2019, equity trading proved to be a poor performer for the Partnership, as large losses in January driven by the sharp trend reversal in the equity markets’ 2018 performance battered the Partnership’s short positioning. In February and March, the slightly positive returns in the Partnership’s equity positions were mainly driven by the Partnership’s long positions in indices. During the second quarter, the Partnership’s net long equities position made equities the top performing asset class in April, however, a sharp reversal occurred in May as the Partnership’s previously profitable long positions suffered losses that were further exacerbated by losses in the Partnership’s short positions in VIX futures. In June, long stock index positions recovered from their downturn in May and finished slightly positive. Third quarter trading saw further losses in the Partnership’s equity positions as long positions in the Australian SPI 200 futures and the FTSE 100 generated notable losses in August, followed by a mixed performance consisting of losses from longs in the Russell 2000 and Korean KOSPI indices and gains in longs in Euro-STOXX and Australian SPI 200 in September. The Partnership’s fourth quarter equity trading reversed course and saw gains in all three months. In October, minor gains came from index longs in Swedish, Taiwanese and Japanese equity futures. November and December both saw notable gains in equity trading as equity indices continued to reach all-time highs. The Fund’s dominantly long equity positions in the Australian SPI 200, S&P500 and NASDAQ 100 drove much of the gains in November, and the Fund’s long stock index positions, as well as positions in emerging market equities, generated strong gains for the Partnership in December.

The Partnership’s fixed-income trading saw strong performances in the first and second quarter before reversing course towards the end of the third quarter. Gains from the Partnership’s exposure to Israeli swaps and French and German bonds in January and long positions in European and U.S. government bonds in March were enough to outweigh February’s losses in fixed-income trading, which were driven by long exposure to U.S. Treasuries and Italian bonds. The Partnership started the second quarter with losses in its dominantly long fixed income positions, most notably in Short Sterling and Israeli swaps. In May, gains in the Partnership’s positions in U.S. Treasuries and Short Sterling outweighed the smaller number of negative positions, such as Italian bonds. June saw continued strong performance in fixed income, as the Partnership recognized gains from long positions in U.S. and European government bonds. To start the third quarter, gains in Italian 10yr BTPs outweighed losses in U.S. Treasuries in July. In August, gains from the Partnership’s long positions in U.S. 10-year Treasuries and other long-bond positions outweighed the smaller number of modest losing positions in U.S. 2-year notes and Brazilian swaps. In September, the Partnership’s general success in fixed-income trading came to an end, as large losses in multiple positions, particularly U.S. Treasuries, outweighed the small gains from Italian bonds. Fourth quarter fixed-income trading was similarly unprofitable for the Partnership. In October, the Partnership’s positions in Japanese 10Yr bonds, shorter-dated U.S. Treasuries and German bunds drove a majority of the Partnership’s losses in the fixed-income sector. In November, small gains in short-term instruments in U.S. and Australia were not enough to outweigh the Partnership’s losses, led by Italian 10Yr debt. Finally, the Partnership ended the year with minor losses in fixed-income trading as profitable short positions in German and Canadian 10yr bonds were outweighed by losses in long positions in Italian and Australian bonds.

The Partnership’s commodity trading saw both notable gains and losses over the course of the year. In January, short positions in wheat, copper and aluminum outweighed gains on long positions in palladium. The Partnership’s short exposure to oil further contributed to the sector’s monthly losses as oil prices reversed a 3-month trend that had seen crude fall by more than 40%. In February, a long palladium positions and short wheat exposure contributed to the Partnership’s gains in its commodity trading, though the Partnership’s long palladium position led to large losses for the Partnership’s commodities trading in March when a collapse in palladium prices during the last week of March pummeled the Partnership’s long exposure to the metal. April saw the Partnership’s short positions in the wheat market outweigh the losses experienced by Partnership’s short position in U.K. natural gas. Commodity trading had mixed returns in May, and ultimately ended up down, as losses from short positions in grains outweighed gains from short positions in copper and both U.K. and U.S. natural gas markets. In June, commodities trading was once again mixed, with short positions in sugar driving losses and offsetting profits from long positions in palladium and short positions in U.K. and U.S. natural gas markets. The third quarter was again mixed for commodities trading, as July saw the Partnership’s short positions in U.K. natural gas and positions in nickel and coal outweighed gains from short positions in iron ore and longs in gold and carbon emissions, while agricultural trading finished down on the back of losses from sugar. The Partnership’s commodities trading was very profitable in August, led by the Partnership’s long position in metals,

 

17


particularly gold and silver, while shorts in sugar and wheat also made gains, helping to offset losses from trading in energies, particularly a short position in RBOB gasoline. Reversing course in September, the Partnership’s largest losses were attributable to its commodities trading, where gains from a long position on palladium, whose price continued to hit record highs, was not sufficient to offset losses from other commodity markets, particularly longs in gold and shorts in sugar and wheat. Continuing this trend, in October, losses from the Partnership’s short position in U.S. natural gas and positions in cocoa and soybeans outweighed gains in its long palladium position, while longs in other metals, particularly nickel, gold and silver led to further losses in November. Positive performance in the Partnership’s short position in U.K. natural gas bolstered the Partnership’s December performance, as commodity trading proved profitable to close out the year.

Trading in currency was mixed for the Partnership over the course of the year. In January, the Partnership’s positions in developed markets, including Canada, Australia and the U.K., provided losses offsetting profitable long positions in certain emerging market currencies, including those of South Africa, Brazil and Turkey, produced positive performance. In February the Partnership’s currency trading but ended the month with negative performance as losses from long exposure to the South African rand and Brazilian Real outdistanced gains from short exposure to the Swedish Krona and Japanese Yen. Continuing this trend into March, the gains made in a short Euro position were outweighed by losses on a range of markets including the Mexican Peso and Turkish Lira. In the second quarter, the Partnership’s net long positions in the U. S. dollar drove the Partnership’s performance: in April, the strength of the U.S. dollar against many currencies led to a strong performance, though the top sector performer in April was a long in the Mexican peso against the U.S. dollar; in May, gains from long U.S. dollar positions against the South Korean won and the Chilean peso were mostly offset by losses generated from short positions in the Japanese Yen, which reached a four-month high against the U.S. dollar; and in June, modest gains on long Russian ruble positions were outweighed by losses from the Partnership’s long positions in U.S. dollar against the South Korean won, Chilean peso, Euro and New Zealand dollar. Dominant long U.S. dollar positions against the Euro and South Korean Won, and short positioning in pounds saw notable gains in July, while losses came from trading in South African rand and Polish zloty. In August, a stronger U.S. dollar broadly benefitted the Partnership’s long U.S. dollar position as the South Korean won and the Chilean peso, alongside other emerging and developed currencies, struggled. September saw losses from the Partnership’s shorts in the Mexican peso and South Korean won overcome gains from shorts in the Euro and Swiss franc and longs in the Turkish lira to end the third quarter on a positive note. This trend did not continue into the fourth quarter, where October saw the Partnership’s net long position in the U.S. dollar experience losses, particularly against the Euro, Sterling, Polish zloty and Turkish lira, which outweighed gains from longs in the Mexican peso and long positioning in Euros against the Norwegian krone. In November, weakened South American currencies lead to profitable a position short in the Chilean peso versus the U.S. dollar, outweighing losses from a long in the Mexican peso against the U.S. dollar. December’s currency trading results were notably mixed, as currency positions made up four of the Partnership’s five top positions, led by a long in the Mexican peso against the U.S. dollar, as well as four of the Partnership’s five bottom positions, led by a short position in the Swiss franc.

Throughout 2019, the Partnership’s credit trading was a steady performer, with positions either remaining largely flat or sustaining slight gains or losses each month. To start the year, credit trading in January was mixed and concluded the month with slightly negative results as losses stemming from long protection positions early in January edged out gains. In February, the Partnership’s credit trading with long exposure to the European 5yr iTraxx Index provided steady gains, and in March, the Partnership continued its positive credit trading performance, finishing the month in positive territory. The Partnership experienced gains in April from investment-grade indices in both the U.S. and Europe that more than offset the losses generated from a long in the Korean KOSPI, The Partnership’s short protection positions generated losses in May due to the widening spread on the E.U. 5-year Crossover iTraxx, though reversed course in June and July, generating gains when credit spreads tightened across all credit indices. Widening spreads in August led to minor losses, while September and October trading was essentially flat, with minor gains for each month being driven from a performance in the U.S., while European credit trading detracted. Credit trading ended the year on a positive note, as investment grade indices tightened in November, benefitting every one of the Partnership’s positions, most notably US 5y CDX. Similarly, in December, every one of the indices traded by the Partnership ended the month in the black, with the most notable performers being investment-grade and high-yield corporate credit in the U.S.

 

18


2018

Net assets decreased $19,861,313 for the year ended December 31, 2018. This decrease was attributable to subscriptions in the amount of $4,815,565, redemptions in the amount of $21,844,636 and net loss from operations of $2,832,242.

For the year ended December 31, 2018, the Partnership accrued or paid total expenses of $5,842,070, including $1,098,660 in servicing fees, $3,276,679 in General Partner administrative fees and Trading Advisor management fees, and $1,466,734 in other expenses. Interest of $1,764,072 was earned or accrued on the Partnership’s cash and cash equivalent investments.

The Net Asset Value of a Class A Unit decreased by $70.61 to $3,379.30. The Net Asset Value of a Class B Unit decreased by $31.24 to $3,818.72. The Net Asset Value of a Class A-2 Unit decreased by $70.61 to $3,379.15. The pre-redemption Net Asset Value of a Class B-2 Unit decreased by $245.87 to $3,604.14.

In the equities sector, the Partnership’s positions produced net losses during the first and second quarters. Despite realizing notable profits in January from its long exposure to equity markets, the Partnership’s long positioning subsequently sustained losses in February and March on account of falling equity markets, including a significant one-day points loss in the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500. During the second quarter, losses continued to be sustained from short positions in the VIX and Australian SPI 200 indices as well as long exposure to the FTSE Italia All Share index, the Singapore MSCI and the Hang Seng index. Third quarter trading produced negative, yet more neutral returns as losses from long exposure to the Russell 2000 and the Nifty index in September were offset by gains generated from long exposure to the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq 100 in July and August, respectively. Fourth quarter equity trading also brought mixed results. Downward price movements in October battered the Partnership’s positioning in the S&P 500 while the Partnership’s short exposure to the Hang Seng and Kospi indices suffered losses amidst November rebounding in the Asian equity markets. With the S&P 500 losing as much as 16% intra-month, the Partnership realized notable profits from its net short positions in December, particularly with respect to Russell 2000 Index futures.

With respect to fixed-income trading, the Partnership started and ended the year with strong returns but suffered losses in the second and third quarters. Gains were achieved in January and February on short exposure to U.S. 10-year treasuries, while in March, profits from long positions in European 10-year bonds outweighed losses from unprofitable short positions in Canadian and Japanese government bonds. The second and third quarters brought a reversal of fortunes as the Partnership suffered from long exposure to U.S. 5-year treasury notes and the German bund in April, short positioning in Canadian and U.S. Treasuries in May and long European exposure including German bunds and French bonds in July and September. The Partnership thereafter experienced a return to profitability in the fixed-income sector with short positions in U.S. instruments performing positively in October in the face of increasing U.S. interest rates across key maturities. With equity markets experiencing significant volatility in December, the Partnership’s long exposure to Japanese, Australian and U.S. fixed-income instruments generated notable gains despite partially offsetting losses from short positions in Canadian bond futures.

Although starting off the first quarter as a drag on Partnership performance, commodities trading provided mixed results during the course of the year. In January, losses from U.S. natural gas and copper positions outweighed gains from the trading of other energies such as crude oil, and energies and metals trading continued to generate notable losses in February. March performance was mostly flat with gains realized from long energy positioning and short agricultural exposure partially offset by losses sustained from long metals positions. The Partnership experienced more sustained, although modest, positive performance from second quarter commodity trading. In April, the Partnership’s energy trading was the profit leader in large part due to long exposure to Brent crude and UK natural gas, while more modest gains were achieved in May and June from continued long exposure to energies and short positioning in certain agriculturals such as corn. Third and fourth quarter performance was more mixed. In July, long positions in crude oil and short exposure to wheat resulted in net losses despite shorts in metals, sugar and coffee providing gains. August trading produced strong results with the Partnership’s short exposure to silver, copper and coffee generating notable gains and outweighing losses from short positions in natural gas. Long oil positions in September benefitted from a continued rise in oil prices and short exposure to cocoa also performed positively. Losses sustained in October from shorts in sugar and coffee and long oil positions were largely made up in November as the Partnership’s long exposure to U.S. natural gas benefitted from a 50% surge in price during the first two weeks of the month and short oil positions benefitted from a 22% intra-month decline. December trading ended largely even with gains from long palladium, short aluminum and short oil positions mostly offset by losses in other metals and long exposure to U.S. natural gas.

The Partnership’s currency trading was fairly mixed over the year. In January, long exposure to the currencies of several emerging market economies outpaced losses from the Partnership’s exposure to the Swiss franc and Mexican peso. These gains were returned in February, however, from short exposure to the U.S. dollar against the Indian rupee and Brazilian real. Although March gains and losses largely offset each other, April currency trading yielded the weakest performance across the Partnership’s trading sectors with the largest losses resulting from long exposure to the Mexican peso and Russian ruble against the U.S. dollar. May trading experienced a rebound, particularly from a long position in the U.S. dollar against the

 

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Turkish lira which fell to record lows mid-month. Long exposure to U.S. dollars against a range of developed and emerging market currencies continued to serve as the Partnership’s strongest contributors of June performance. The reverse was true in July as short exposure to several emerging market currencies led to the largest detractors from Partnership performance. In August, short positions in Turkish lira against the U.S. dollar benefitted from the lira falling by a third. Such gains were partially offset, however, by short positions in the Canadian dollar and Swedish krona. The theme of mixed performance continued in the fourth quarter where dominant long U.S. positions experienced gains in October while short U.S. dollar positions against developed market currencies suffered in November. Currency trading ended the year also mixed but weakly positive as gains from a short position in the Canadian dollar against the U.S. dollar was largely offset by losses sustained from the Partnership’s switching positions in the Japanese yen.

Trading in the credit sector served as a mild drag on the Partnership’s overall performance in 2018. The Partnership’s exposure to most credit indices, notably in the investment-grade space, generated gains in January as did long credit positions in April and short credit protection in September, however, these gains were outweighed by moderate losses sustained during the remaining months of the year. Widening credit spreads in February, May and November and trend reversals in March each resulted in modest losses for the Partnership. In June, long exposure to Brazilian swaps outweighed gains from long exposure to Taiwanese swaps, while in August, the exposure to EU indices, both main and crossover, suffered and outdistanced gains from U.S. high yield and emerging market credit.

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

Introduction

Past Results Are Not Necessarily Indicative of Future Performance

The Partnership is a speculative commodity pool. Unlike an operating company, the risk of market sensitive instruments is integral, not incidental, to the Partnership’s main line of business.

Market movements result in frequent changes in the fair market value of the Partnership’s open positions and, consequently, in its earnings and cash flow. The Partnership’s market risk is influenced by a wide variety of factors, including the level and volatility of interest rates, exchange rates, equity price levels, the market value of financial instruments and contracts, the diversification effects among the Partnership’s open positions and the liquidity of the markets in which it trades.

The Partnership can rapidly acquire and/or liquidate both long and short positions in a wide range of different markets. Consequently, it is not possible to predict how a particular future market scenario will affect performance, and the Partnership’s past performance is not necessarily indicative of its future results.

Value at Risk is a measure of the maximum amount which the Partnership could reasonably be expected to lose in a given market sector. However, the inherent uncertainty of the Partnership’s speculative trading and the recurrence in the markets traded by the Partnership of market movements far exceeding expectations could result in actual trading or non-trading losses far beyond the indicated Value at Risk or the Partnership’s experience to date (i.e., “risk of ruin”). In light of the foregoing as well as the risks and uncertainties intrinsic to all future projections, the inclusion of the quantification included in this section should not be considered to constitute any assurance or representation that the Partnership’s losses in any market sector will be limited to Value at Risk or by the Partnership’s attempts to manage its market risk.

Materiality, as used in this section “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk,” is based on an assessment of reasonably possible market movements and the potential losses caused by such movements, taking into account the leverage, optionality and multiplier features of the Partnership’s market sensitive instruments.

Quantifying the Partnership’s Trading Value at Risk

Quantitative Forward-Looking Statements

The following quantitative disclosures regarding the Partnership’s market risk exposures contain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the safe harbor from civil liability provided for such statements by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (set forth in Section 27A of the Securities Act and Section 21E of the Exchange Act). All quantitative disclosures in this section are deemed to be forward-looking statements for purposes of the safe harbor, except for statements of historical fact.

 

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The Partnership’s risk exposure in the various market sectors traded by the General Partner is quantified below in terms of Value at Risk. Due to the Partnership’s mark-to-market accounting, any loss in the fair value of the Partnership’s open positions is directly reflected in the Partnership’s earnings (realized or unrealized) and cash flow (at least in the case of exchange-traded contracts in which profits and losses on open positions are settled daily through variation margin).

For regulatory purposes, initial margin requirements have been used by the Partnership as the measure of its Value at Risk. For trading and internal risk monitoring purposes, a different approach based on simulated market movements is used. Initial margin requirements include a credit risk factor and a maintenance margin factor and thus overstate the maximum one-day loss reflected by the maintenance margin requirement by the amount of the credit risk factor used in setting initial margin requirements. Maintenance margin requirements are set by dealers, exchanges and OTC clearing counterparties to equal or exceed 95-99% of the maximum one-day losses in the fair value of any given contract incurred during the time period over which historical price fluctuations are researched for purposes of establishing margin levels. The maintenance margin levels are established by dealers, exchanges and OTC clearing counterparties using historical price studies as well as an assessment of current market volatility (including the implied volatility of the options on a given futures contract) and economic fundamentals to provide a probabilistic estimate of the maximum expected near-term one-day price fluctuation.

In the case of market sensitive instruments that are not exchange traded (almost exclusively currencies in the case of the Partnership), dealers’ margins have been used as Value at Risk.

The fair value of the Partnership’s futures and forward positions does not have any optionality component. However, the General Partner may also trade commodity options on behalf of the Partnership. The Value at Risk associated with options would be reflected in the margin requirement attributable to the instrument underlying each option.

In quantifying the Partnership’s Value at Risk, 100% positive correlation in the different positions held in each market risk category has been assumed. Consequently, the margin requirements applicable to the open contracts have simply been aggregated to determine each trading category’s aggregate Value at Risk. The diversification effects resulting from the fact that the Partnership’s positions are rarely, if ever, 100% positively correlated have not been reflected.

The Partnership’s Trading Value at Risk in Different Market Sectors

The following table indicates the average, highest and lowest amount of trading Value at Risk associated with the Partnership’s open positions by market category for the year ended December 31, 2020. During 2020, the Partnership’s average quarter-end capitalization was $87,152,773.

 

Fiscal Year 2020 
Market Sector  Average
Value at
Risk
   % of Average
Capitalization
   Highest
Value at
Risk
   Lowest
Value at
Risk
 

Agriculturals

  $1,059,892    1.22%   $1,280,651   $909,456 

Bonds

  $1,433,257    1.64%   $2,070,593   $672,596 

Credit

  $538,939    0.62%   $723,836   $227,288 

Currencies

  $1,822,763    2.09%   $2,777,315   $880,521 

Energies

  $855,823    0.98%   $1,042,110   $659,035 

Interest rates

  $1,109,238    1.27%   $2,403,527   $509,723 

Metals

  $1,399,026    1.61%   $1,982,019   $1,123,559 

Stock indices

  $2,448,212    2.81%   $4,676,287   $965,589 

Total*

  $10,667,150    12.24%    16,956,338    5,947,767 

Average, highest and lowest Value at Risk amounts relate to the quarter-end amounts during the fiscal year. Average capitalization is the average of the Partnership’s capitalization at the end of each quarter during the fiscal year 2020.

 

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The following table indicates the average, highest and lowest amount of trading Value at Risk associated with the Partnership’s open positions by market category for the year ended December 31, 2019. During 2019, the Partnership’s average quarter-end capitalization was $92,305,861.

 

Fiscal Year 2019 
Market Sector  Average
Value at
Risk
   % of Average
Capitalization
   Highest
Value at
Risk
   Lowest
Value at
Risk
 

Agriculturals

  $1,609,470    1.74%   $2,146,005   $1,308,807 

Bonds

  $1,896,557    2.05%   $2,633,413   $1,110,140 

Credit

  $2,680,225    2.90%   $4,112,343   $707,966 

Currencies

  $6,627,233    7.18%   $7,420,241   $5,893,783 

Energies

  $1,131,506    1.23%   $1,583,401   $726,702 

Interest rates

  $1,512,215    1.64%   $2,121,499   $928,514 

Metals

  $1,865,042    2.02%   $2,365,864   $1,279,515 

Stock indices

  $5,348,285    5.79%   $6,585,052   $4,144,732 

Total*

  $22,670,533    24.56%   $28,967,818   $16,100,159 

 

*

Certain total amounts do not foot due to rounding.

Average, highest and lowest Value at Risk amounts relate to the quarter-end amounts during the fiscal year. Average capitalization is the average of the Partnership’s capitalization at the end of each quarter during the fiscal year 2019.

Material Limitations on Value at Risk as an Assessment of Market Risk

The face value of the market sector instruments held by the Partnership is typically many times the applicable initial or maintenance margin requirement (maintenance margin requirements generally ranging between approximately 1% and 10% of contract face value) as well as many times the capitalization of the Partnership. The magnitude of the Partnership’s open positions creates a “risk of ruin” not typically found in most other investment vehicles. Because of the size of its positions, certain market conditions — unusual, but historically recurring from time to time — could cause the Partnership to incur severe losses over a short period of time. The foregoing Value at Risk table — as well as the past performance of the Partnership — gives no indication of this “risk of ruin.”

Non-Trading Risk

The Partnership has non-trading market risk on its foreign cash balances not needed for margin. However, these balances (as well as any market risk they represent) are immaterial.

The Partnership also has non-trading cash flow risk as a result of holding a substantial portion of its assets in U.S. government securities (Treasury Bills) and interest-bearing bank accounts. These cash and cash equivalents are placed with highly rated counterparties with a priority placed on preservation of capital and reputation (i.e., appropriate level of credit risk, market risk and reputation risk) and liquidity (i.e., appropriate level of liquidity risk).

Qualitative Disclosures Regarding Primary Trading Risk Exposures

The following qualitative disclosures regarding the Partnership’s market risk exposures — except for (i) those disclosures that are statements of historical fact and (ii) the descriptions of how the General Partner manages the Partnership’s primary market risk exposures — constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act and Section 21E of the Exchange Act. The Partnership’s primary market risk exposures as well as the strategies used and to be used by the General Partner for managing such exposures are subject to numerous uncertainties, contingencies and risks, any one of which could cause the actual results of the Partnership’s risk controls to differ materially from the objectives of such strategies. Government interventions, defaults and expropriations, illiquid markets, the emergence of dominant fundamental factors, political upheavals, changes in historical price relationships, an influx of new market participants, increased regulation and many other factors could result in material losses as well as in material changes to the risk exposures and the risk management strategies of the Partnership. There can be no assurance that the Partnership’s current market exposure and/or risk management strategies will not change materially or that any such strategies will be effective in either the short- or long-term. Investors must be prepared to lose all or substantially all of their investment in the Partnership.

 

22


The following were the primary trading risk exposures of the Partnership as of December 31, 2020, by market sector.

Fixed Income. Interest rate movements directly affect the price of the sovereign bond futures positions held by the Partnership and indirectly the value of its stock index and currency positions. Interest rate movements in one country as well as relative interest rate movements between countries may materially impact the Partnership’s profitability. The Partnership’s primary interest rate exposure is to interest rate fluctuations in United States, Italy, Australia, United Kingdom and Canada. However, the Partnership also may take positions in futures contracts on the government debt of smaller nations. The General Partner anticipates that G-7 interest rates, both long-term and short-term, will remain the primary market exposure of the Partnership for the foreseeable future.

Currencies. Exchange rate risk is the principal market exposure of the Partnership. The Partnership’s currency exposure is to exchange rate fluctuations, primarily fluctuations which disrupt the historical pricing relationships between different currencies and currency pairs. These fluctuations are influenced by interest rate changes as well as political and general economic conditions. The Partnership trades in a large number of currencies, including cross-rates — i.e., positions between two currencies other than the U.S. dollar. As of December 31, 2020, the Partnership’s primary currency exposures were in the U.S. dollar versus the Euro, Mexican Peso, Australian Dollar and South African Rand.

Stock Indices. The Partnership’s primary equity exposure, through stock index futures, is to equity price risk in the G-7 countries. As of December 31, 2020, the Partnership’s primary exposures were in the Australian SPI 200 Index, Hang Send, Nikkei Index and MSCI Emerging Market Index. The Partnership is primarily exposed to the risk of adverse price trends or static markets in the major North American, European and Asian indices. (Static markets would not cause major market changes but could make it difficult for the Partnership to avoid numerous small losses.)

Metals. The AHL Diversified Program used for the Partnership trades precious and base metals. As of December 31, 2020, the Partnership’s primary metals market exposures were in copper, aluminum, silver and zinc.

Agricultural. The Partnership’s primary commodities exposure is to agricultural price movements, which are often directly affected by severe or unexpected weather conditions. Soybeans, corn, sugar, cocoa and cotton accounted for the substantial bulk of the Partnership’s commodities exposure as of December 31, 2020.

Energy. The Partnership’s primary energy market exposure is to gas and oil price movements, often resulting from political developments in the Middle East and economic conditions worldwide. Energy prices are volatile and substantial profits and losses have been and are expected to continue to be experienced in this market. As of December 31, 2020, the main exposures were in crude oil and natural gas.

Qualitative Disclosures Regarding Non-Trading Risk Exposure

The following were the only non-trading risk exposures of the Partnership as of December 31, 2020.

Foreign Currency Balances. The Partnership’s primary foreign currency balance is in Euro. The Partnership controls the non-trading risk of these balances by regularly converting these balances back into U.S. dollars (no less frequently than twice a month).

Cash Positions. The Partnership’s only market exposure in instruments held other than for trading is in its cash portfolio. The Partnership holds only cash in U.S. Treasury Bills and interest-bearing bank accounts. This cash is placed with highly rated counterparties with a priority placed on preservation of capital and reputation (i.e., appropriate level of credit risk, market risk and reputation risk) and liquidity (i.e., appropriate level of liquidity risk) with durations no longer than 1 year.

Qualitative Disclosures Regarding Means of Managing Risk Exposure

Risk management is an essential component of AHL’s investment management process. AHL has put in place a risk management framework which is designed to identify, monitor and mitigate the portfolio, operational and outsourcing risks relevant to its operations. AHL’s risk management framework is part of, and is supported by, the overarching risk management framework of its parent company, Man Group plc. Key principles of AHL’s risk management framework include the segregation of functions and duties where material conflicts of interest may arise and having an appropriate degree of independent and senior management oversight of business activities. As part of this independent oversight, AHL’s activities are subject to regular review by an internal audit function.

The AHL Diversified Program employs a systematic, statistically based investment strategy that is designed to identify and capitalize on trends and other inefficiencies in markets around the world. Trading signals are generated and executed via a finely tuned trading and implementation infrastructure. This process is quantitative, meaning that investment decisions are entirely driven by mathematical models based on quantitative analysis of historical relationships. It is underpinned by rigorous risk control, ongoing research, diversification and the constant quest for efficiency. Portfolio risk management consists primarily

 

23


of monitoring risk measures and ensuring the systems remain within prescribed limits. The major risk monitoring measures and focus areas include value-at-risk, stress testing, implied volatility, leverage, margin-to-equity ratios and net exposures to sectors and different currencies.

Diversification is also a key feature of AHL’s risk management, as well as its investment, process. As well as emphasizing sector and market diversification, the AHL Diversified Program has been constructed to achieve diversification by combining various investment strategies. The AHL Diversified Program trades approximately 250 markets and these markets may be accessed directly or indirectly and include, without limitation, stock indices, bonds, currencies, short-term interest rates, energies, credits, metals and agriculturals. Another important aspect of diversification is the fact that the models generate signals across different timeframes, ranging from two to three days to several months. In line with the principle of diversification, the approach to portfolio construction and asset allocation is premised on the importance of deploying investment capital across the full range of sectors and markets. Particular attention is paid to correlation of markets and sectors, expected returns, trading costs and market liquidity. Portfolios are regularly reviewed and, when necessary, adjusted to reflect changes in these factors. AHL also has a systematic process for adjusting its market risk exposure in real time to reflect changes in the volatility, a measure of risk, of individual markets.

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

Financial statements meeting the requirements of Regulation S-X are listed following this report as Exhibit 13.1 and are incorporated by reference into this Item 8.

The following summarized quarterly financial information presents the results of operations for the periods ended March 31, June 30, September 30 and December 31, 2020 and 2019. This information has not been audited.

 

    Fourth Quarter
2020
  Third Quarter
2020
  Second Quarter
2020
  First Quarter
2020
 
Interest income*   22,556   27,339   129,456   331,640 
Other Income*      4,845       
Net Realized and Unrealized Gains (Losses)*   9,463,661   (1,054,387  (7,444,804  8,893,326 
Expenses**   (1,089,827  (1,409,542  (1,103,293  (1,235,731
Net Income (Loss)   8,396,390   (2,278,754  (8,418,641  7,989,235 
Net Income (Loss) Per Unit of Partnership Interest - Class A - Series 1   384.61   (98.84  (361.66  327.51 
Net Income (Loss) Per Unit of Partnership Interest - Class A - Series 2   480.34   (103.97  (400.97  410.05 
Net Income (Loss) Per Unit of Partnership Interest - Class B - Series 1   383.56   (100.67  (360.61  334.42 
Net Income (Loss) Per Unit of Partnership Interest - Class B - Series 2             

 

    Fourth Quarter
2019
  Third Quarter
2019
  Second Quarter
2019
  First Quarter
2019
 
Interest income*   389,035   505,995   485,296   475,696 
Other Income*      102,311       
Net Realized and Unrealized Gains (Losses)*   (1,652,230  6,155,538   7,658,953   1,046,254 
Expenses**   (1,081,310  (1,268,291  (1,242,616  (1,266,754
Net Income (Loss)   (2,344,505  5,495,553   6,901,633   255,196 
Net Income (Loss) Per Unit of Partnership Interest - Class A - Series 1   (96.01  218.92   259.83   8.98 
Net Income (Loss) Per Unit of Partnership Interest - Class A - Series 2   (95.03  269.02   289.87   25.59 
Net Income (Loss) Per Unit of Partnership Interest - Class B - Series 1   (97.73  224.04   259.59   4.84 
Net Income (Loss) Per Unit of Partnership Interest - Class B - Series 2             

 

*

Allocated to the Partnership from its investment in the Trading Company. The Trading Company generates revenue from trading of futures, foreign exchange and forward currency contracts.

**

Expenses include the Partnership’s allocation of expenses from its investment in the Trading Company in addition to direct expenses of the Partnership.

 

24


Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.

None.

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures.

The General Partner, with the participation of the General Partner’s Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer, has evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Partnership’s disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the fiscal year for which this Annual Report on Form 10-K is being filed. Based on such evaluation, the General Partner’s Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer have concluded that the Partnership’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requires the General Partner to evaluate annually the effectiveness of its internal controls over financial reporting as of the end of each fiscal year, and to include a management report assessing the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting in all annual reports. There were no significant changes in the General Partner’s internal control over financial reporting during the three-month period ended December 31, 2020 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Partnership’s internal control over financial reporting.

Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

The General Partner is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over the financial reporting of the Partnership. Internal control over financial reporting is defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act, as a process designed by, or under the supervision of, a company’s principal executive and principal financial officers and effected by a company’s board of directors, management and other personnel, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with the accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The General Partner’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that:

 

 

pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the Partnership;

 

 

provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements of the Partnership in accordance with the accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, and that receipts and expenditures of the Partnership are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the General Partner; and

 

 

provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the Partnership’s assets that could have a material effect on its financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

The management of the General Partner assessed the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting with respect to the Partnership as of December 31, 2020. In making this assessment, management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control — Integrated Framework (2013). Based on its assessment, management has concluded that, as of December 31, 2020, the General Partner’s internal control over financial reporting with respect to the Partnership is effective based on those criteria.

There were no significant changes in the General Partner’s internal controls with respect to the Partnership or in other factors applicable to the Partnership that could significantly affect these controls subsequent to the date of their evaluation.

Item 9B. Other Information.

As of January 15, 2021, Eric Burl resigned as President of Man Investments (USA) Corp., the Partnership’s general partner. As of the same date, Michelle Robyn Grew was appointed as President of Man Investment (USA) Corp. As of March 25, 2021, Michelle Robyn Grew resigned as President of Man Investments (USA) Corp. As of the same date, Shanta Puchtler was appointed as President of Man Investments (USA) Corp. His biography is set forth under Item 10 hereof.

 

25


PART III

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.

(a, b)    Identification of Directors and Executive Officers

(i) As a limited partnership, the Partnership itself has no directors or executive officers. The Partnership’s affairs are managed by the General Partner. Man Investments (USA) Corp., a Delaware corporation, is the general partner of the Partnership.

Mr. Shanta Puchtler is the president and principal executive officer of the General Partner, and Mr. Colin Bettison is principal financial officer of the General Partner for purposes of the management of the Partnership. Their biographies are set forth below.

Shanta Puchtler, born October 1965, is President of Man Group and a member of the Man Group Senior Executive Committee. He also leads Man Group’s Data Science group as well as the firm’s Quantitative Alpha Research Lab in Sofia, Bulgaria.

Previously, Shanta was CEO of Man Numeric and prior to that, co-CIO and Head of Research, directing research efforts focused on new alpha sources, product design and risk modelling. Prior to joining Man Numeric in 1999 as a research analyst, Shanta was an electronic commerce technology analyst at Forrester Research, a Cambridge, Massachusetts-based market research firm. He also co-founded an electronic commerce company, which focused on the analysis of on-line buying behavior. Shanta received a Bachelor of Arts degree in computer science from Dartmouth College, graduating summa cum laude, and is a CFA charterholder.

Colin Bettison, born October 1979, is currently Man Group’s Head of Operations for Man Americas, based in New York. Colin is responsible for the oversight of all operations areas for Man’s business lines in the Americas. Prior to his relocation to the US in April 2015, Colin was responsible for the Middle Office Accounting groups within Man for the Single Manager areas of the business, also overseeing the Risk and Portfolio Analysis, and Client and Performance Reporting teams. Prior to joining GLG (acquired by Man in 2010) in 2007, Colin worked for Merrill Lynch in their Credit Capital Markets area as a Product Accountant for the Credit Derivatives desk, and prior to that Colin trained as a Chartered Accountant with Tenon Group in London. Colin holds a BA (Hons) in Mathematical Sciences from the University of Oxford.

(c)    Identification of Certain Significant Employees

None.

(d)    Family Relationships

None.

(e)    Business Experience

See Item 10 (a, b) above.

(f)    Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings

None.

(g)    Promoters and Control Persons

Not applicable.

(h)    Code of Ethics

The Partnership has no employees, officers or directors and is controlled by the General Partner. The General Partner has adopted a Global Code of Ethics that applies to its principal executive officer and principal financial officer. A copy of this Global Code of Ethics may be obtained at no charge by written request to Man Investments (USA) Corp., 452 5th Ave., 27th Floor, New York, NY 10018 or by calling: (212) 649-6600 (ask for the Chief Legal Officer).

 

26


(i)    Audit Committee Financial Expert

Because the Partnership has no employees or directors, the Partnership has no audit committee. The Partnership is managed by the General Partner. Mr. Colin Bettison, principal financial officer for the General Partner, serves as the Partnership’s “audit committee financial expert.” Mr. Bettison is not independent of the management of the General Partner. The General Partner is not required to have, and does not have, independent directors.

Item 11. Executive Compensation.

The Partnership itself has no officers, directors or employees. None of the principals, officers or employees of the General Partner receive compensation from the Partnership. The General Partner invests all or substantially all of the Partnership’s assets in the Trading Company. The Trading Advisor makes all trading decisions for the Trading Company. The General Partner receives a monthly general partner administrative fee from the Partnership in an amount equal to 0.0833% of the month-end Net Asset Value of the Partnership (approximately a 1% annually). The Partnership pays the Trading Advisor, an affiliate of the General Partner, a monthly management fee in an amount equal to 0.1667% of the Partnership’s month-end Net Asset Value (approximately 2% annually) and 20% of any Net New Appreciation, described above under Item 1, achieved by the Partnership as of the end of each calendar month. The Trading Advisor may pay a portion of its management fees to the General Partner.

The officers and employees of the General Partner and Trading Advisor are compensated by the General Partner and Trading Advisor in their respective positions. These officers receive no other compensation from the Partnership. The Partnership has no compensation plans or arrangements relating to a change in control of either the Partnership, the General Partner or the Trading Advisor.

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.

(a)    Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

None.

(b)    Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial  Owners

The General Partner knows of no persons who own beneficially more than 5% of the Partnership’s Units. All of the Partnership’s general partner interest is held by the General Partner.

(c)    Security Ownership of Management

The Partnership has no officers or directors. Under the terms of the Limited Partnership Agreement, the Partnership’s affairs are managed by the General Partner. As of December 31, 2020, the General Partner’s interest in the Partnership was valued at $753,098 which constituted 0.89% of total partners’ capital.

As of December 31, 2020, no director, executive officer or member of the General Partner beneficially owned Units in the Partnership.

(d)    Changes in Control

There are no arrangements known to the Partnership or General Partner the operation of which would result in a change in control of the Partnership; provided, however, that pursuant to the Limited Partnership Agreement, the General Partner may admit additional or substitute general partners and may withdraw as general partner of the Partnership.

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.

The Partnership paid the General Partner and Trading Advisor aggregate administrative and management fees of $2,603,364 for the year ended December 31, 2020. The Partnership paid the Trading Advisor $0 in incentive fees for the year ended December 31, 2020. The Partnership paid Man Investments Inc., an affiliate of the General Partner and Trading Advisor that

 

27


serves as the lead placement agent for the Partnership, $871,180 in servicing fees for the year ended December 31, 2020. The General Partner’s interest in the Partnership earned net income of $49,905 for the year ended December 31, 2020.

The Partnership has not and does not make any loans to the General Partner, its affiliates, their respective officers, directors or employees or the immediate family members of any of the foregoing, or to any entity, trust or other estate in which any of the foregoing has any interest, or to any other person (provided that the purchase of U.S. government instruments and the deposit of Partnership assets with banks, futures brokers and foreign exchange counterparties in connection with the trading operations of the Partnership are not considered to be loans).

None of the General Partner, its affiliates, their respective officers, directors and employees or the immediate family members of any of the foregoing, or any entity trust or other estate in which any of the foregoing has any interest has, to date, sold any asset, directly or indirectly, to the Partnership.

The Partnership has no directors, officers or employees and is managed by the General Partner. The General Partner is managed by its principals, none of whom is independent of the General Partner.

Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services.

(1)    Audit Fees

The aggregate fees for professional services provided by Ernst & Young Ltd., and other member firms of the global Ernst and Young organization, the Partnership’s independent registered public accounting firm, for the audit of the Partnership’s annual financial statements and review of financial statements included in the Partnership’s quarterly reports for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 were approximately $266,000 and $266,000, respectively.

(2)    Audit-Related Fees

There were no fees for assurance and related services rendered by Ernst & Young Ltd. and other member firms of the global Ernst and Young organization for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019.

(3)    Tax Fees

The aggregate fees for services rendered by Ernst & Young Ltd. and other member firms of the global Ernst and Young organization for tax compliance, advice and planning services for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 were approximately $221,000 and $209,000, respectively.

(4)    All Other Fees

None.

(5)    Pre-Approval Policies

Neither the Partnership nor the General Partner has an audit committee to pre-approve accountant and auditor fees and services. In lieu of an audit committee, the principals of the General Partner pre-approve all billings prior to the commencement of services.    

 

28


PART IV

Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules.

(a)(1)    Financial Statements

The financial statements required by this Item are included herewith as Exhibit 13.1.    

(a)(2)    Financial Statement Schedules

All Schedules are omitted for the reason that they are not required or are not applicable because equivalent information has been included in the financial statements or the notes thereto.

(a)(3)    Exhibits as required by Item  601 of Regulation S-K

The following exhibits are included herewith.

 

Designation  Description
13.1  Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
31.1  Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification of President, Principal Executive Officer
31.2  Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certification of Principal Financial Officer
32.1  Section 1350 Certification of President, Principal Executive Officer
32.2  Section 1350 Certification of Principal Financial Officer
  101.INS  XBRL Instance Document
  101.SCH  XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
  101.CAL  XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
  101.DEF  XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
  101.LAB  XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
  101.PRE  XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document
The following exhibits are incorporated by reference herein from the exhibits of the same description and number filed on January 28, 2008 with the Partnership’s Registration Statement on Form 10 (Reg. No. 000-53043).
    3.1  Certificate of Limited Partnership of Man-AHL Diversified I L.P.
  10.3  Form of Selling Agreement between Man Investments (USA) Corp. and Man Investments Inc.
The following exhibit is incorporated by reference herein from the exhibit of the same description and number filed on August 13, 2014, for the quarterly period ended June 30, 2014, with the Partnership’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.
  10.1  Form of Trading Advisor Agreement between Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P., Man Investments (USA) Corp. and AHL Partners LLP
The following exhibit is incorporated by reference herein from the exhibit of the same description and number filed on August 14, 2018, for the quarterly period ended June 30, 2018, with the Partnership’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.
  4.1  Seventh Amended Limited Partnership Agreement of Man-AHL Diversified I L.P.

 

29


SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized, on March 30, 2021.

 

Signature  Title with General Partner Date

/s/ Shanta Puchtler

    Shanta Puchtler

  President, Principal Executive Officer March 30, 2021

/s/ Colin Bettison

    Colin Bettison

  Principal Financial Officer March 30, 2021

(Being the President, principal executive officer, the majority of the board of directors, and the principal financial officer of Man Investments (USA) Corp., in its capacity as the General Partner of the Registrant.)

Man Investments (USA) Corp.

General Partner of Registrant

March 30, 2021

 

By 

/s/ Shanta Puchtler

 

Shanta Puchtler

 President, Principal Executive Officer

 

30


INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS LOGO

 

Man-AHL Diversified I L.P.

  

Financial Statements

  

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

   F-2 

Statements of Financial Condition as of December 31, 2020 and 2019

   F-3 

Statements of Operations For the Years Ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018

   F-4 

Statements of Changes in Partner’s Capital For the Years Ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018

   F-5 

Statements of Cash Flows For the Years Ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018

   F-6 

Notes to Financial Statements

   F-7 
Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P.  

Financial Statements

  

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

   F-12 

Statements of Financial Condition as of December 31, 2020 and 2019

   F-13 

Condensed Schedules of Investments as of December 31, 2020 and 2019

   F-14 

Statements of Operations For the Years Ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018

   F-16 

Statements of Changes in Partner’s Capital For the Years Ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018

   F-17 

Statements of Cash Flows For the Years Ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018

   F-18 

Notes to Financial Statements

   F-19 

 

F-1


Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Limited Partners and General Partner of Man-AHL Diversified I L.P.

Opinion on the Financial Statements

We have audited the accompanying statements of financial condition of Man-AHL Diversified I L.P. (the “Partnership”) as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, and the related statements of operations, changes in partners’ capital and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2020, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Partnership at December 31, 2020 and 2019, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2020, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

Basis for Opinion

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Partnership’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Partnership’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Partnership in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Partnership is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Partnership’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

Critical Audit Matters

Critical audit matters are matters arising from the current period audit of the financial statements that were communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relate to accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgments. We determined that there are no critical audit matters.

/s/ Ernst & Young Ltd.

We have served as the Partnership’s auditor since 2012.

Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands

March 30, 2021

 

F-2


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED I L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION

 LOGO

 

    December 31,
2020
  December 31,
2019
 

ASSETS

   
Investment in Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P.  $            85,406,017  $            90,779,858 
Due from Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P.   1,314,633   1,578,942 
  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total assets

  $86,720,650  $92,358,800 
  

 

 

  

 

 

 
LIABILITIES AND PARTNERS’ CAPITAL   
LIABILITIES:   

Redemptions payable

  $1,314,633  $1,578,942 

Management fees payable

   212,244   226,756 

Servicing fees payable

   71,065   75,847 

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

   305,082   348,419 
  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total liabilities

   1,903,024   2,229,964 
  

 

 

  

 

 

 
PARTNERS’ CAPITAL:   

General Partner - Class A Series 1 (186.37 units outstanding at December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019)

   753,098   703,193 

Limited Partners - Class A Series 1 (13,570.15 and 15,716.22 units outstanding at December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively)

   54,834,087   59,297,638 

Limited Partners -Class A Series 2 (970.09 and 883.54 units outstanding at December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively)

   4,542,124   3,814,631 

Limited Partners - Class B Series 1 (6,110.04 and 6,974.39 units outstanding at December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively)

   24,688,317   26,313,374 
  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total partners’ capital

   84,817,626   90,128,836 
  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total liabilities and partners’ capital

  $86,720,650  $92,358,800 
  

 

 

  

 

 

 
NET ASSET VALUE PER OUTSTANDING UNIT OF PARTNERSHIP INTEREST - CLASS A Series 1  $4,040.79 $3,773.02
  

 

 

  

 

 

 
NET ASSET VALUE PER OUTSTANDING UNIT OF PARTNERSHIP INTEREST - CLASS A Series 2  $4,682.16 $4,317.43
  

 

 

  

 

 

 
NET ASSET VALUE PER OUTSTANDING UNIT OF PARTNERSHIP INTEREST - CLASS B Series 1  $4,040.61 $3,772.86
  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

*

Difference in net asset value recalculation and net asset value stated is caused by rounding differences.

See accompanying notes and attached financial statements of Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P.

 

F-3


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED I L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020,
2019 and 2018

 LOGO

 

   2020  2019  2018 
NET INVESTMENT INCOME (LOSS) ALLOCATED FROM MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.:   

Interest income

 $510,991  $1,856,022  $1,764,072 

Other income

  4,845   102,311   - 

Brokerage commissions

  (138,727  (190,659  (284,613

Interest expense

  (149,585  (194,333  (229,153

Administration fees

  (45,709  (67,900  (69,065

Professional fees

  (196,640  (143,129  (218,307

Shareholder expenses

  (110,113  (95,145  (164,660

Other expenses

  (37,622  (43,243  (77,208
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net investment income (loss) allocated from Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P.

  (162,560  1,223,924   721,066 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
PARTNERSHIP EXPENSES:   

Management fees

  2,603,364   2,811,368   3,276,679 

Servicing fees

  871,180   941,605   1,098,660 

Professional fees

  8,424   245,000   237,165 

Other expenses

  321,874   126,589   186,556 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total partnership expenses

  3,804,842   4,124,562   4,799,060 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net investment loss

  (3,967,402  (2,900,638  (4,077,994
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
REALIZED AND UNREALIZED GAINS (LOSSES) ON TRADING ACTIVITIES ALLOCATED FROM MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.:   

Net realized trading gains (losses) on closed contracts/agreements and foreign currency transactions

  7,179,551   15,093,794   (3,654,490

Net change in unrealized trading gains (losses) on securities

  3,599   479   28,032 

Net change in unrealized trading gains (losses) on open contracts/agreements and translation of foreign currency

  2,472,482   (1,885,758  4,872,210 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net gains (losses) on trading activities allocated from Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P.

  9,655,632   13,208,515   1,245,752 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
NET INCOME (LOSS) $5,688,230  $10,307,877  $(2,832,242
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
NET INCOME (LOSS) PER UNIT OF PARTNERSHIP INTEREST
(based on w eighted average units outstanding during the period)
   

CLASS A Series 1

 $237.00  $387.36  $(86.09
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

CLASS A Series 2

 $395.07  $511.82  $(46.40
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

CLASS B Series 1

 $253.32  $394.51  $(89.80
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

CLASS B Series 2

 $-  $-  $(268.70
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
WEIGHTED AVERAGE NUMBER OF UNITS OUTSTANDING DURING THE YEAR   

CLASS A Series 1

  15,324.07   16,992.92   21,545.67 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

CLASS A Series 2

  925.12   1,307.19   2,029.48 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

CLASS B Series 1

  6,675.17   7,747.43   9,722.09 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

CLASS B Series 2

  -   -   37.65 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

See accompanying notes and attached financial statements of Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P.

 

F-4


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED I L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN PARTNERS’ CAPITAL

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020,
2019 and 2018

 LOGO

 

  CLASS A Series 1  CLASS A Series 2  CLASS B Series 1  CLASS B Series 2  TOTAL 
  Limited Partners  General
Partner
  Limited Partners  Limited Partners  Limited Partners    
   Amount  Units  Amount  Units  Amount  Units  Amount  Units  Amount      Units  Amount  Units 
PARTNERS’ CAPITAL            
January 1, 2020 $59,297,638   15,716  $703,193   186  $3,814,631   884  $26,313,374   6,974   -   -  $90,128,836   23,760 

Subscriptions

  2,678,841   709   -   -   362,002   86   1,367,830   353   -   -   4,408,673   1,148 

Transfers

  -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   - 

Redemptions

  (10,724,256  (2,855  -   -   -   -   (4,683,857  (1,217  -   -   (15,408,113  (4,072

Net income (loss)

  3,581,864   -   49,905   -   365,491   -   1,690,970   -   -   -   5,688,230   - 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
PARTNERS’ CAPITAL            
December 31, 2020 $54,834,087   13,570  $753,098   186  $4,542,124   970  $24,688,317   6,110   -   -  $84,817,626   20,836 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
PARTNERS’ CAPITAL            
January 1, 2019 $62,850,528   18,599  $629,813   186  $7,092,725   1,857  $29,163,718   8,630   -   -  $99,736,784   29,272 

Subscriptions

  1,074,998   264   -   -   -   -   220,749   60   -   -   1,295,747   324 

Transfers

  32,658   10   -   -   -   -   (32,658  (10  -   -   -   - 

Redemptions

  (11,169,571  (3,157  -   -   (3,947,134  (973  (6,094,867  (1,706  -   -   (21,211,572  (5,836

Net income (loss)

  6,509,025   -   73,380   -   669,040   -   3,056,432   -   -   -   10,307,877   - 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
PARTNERS’ CAPITAL            
December 31, 2019 $59,297,638   15,716  $703,193   186  $3,814,631   884  $26,313,374   6,974   -   -  $90,128,836   23,760 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
PARTNERS’ CAPITAL            
January 1, 2018 $76,114,706   22,063  $642,973   186  $8,121,018   2,109  $34,560,968   10,018  $158,432   41  $119,598,097   34,417 

Subscriptions

  3,342,668   1,002   -   -   203,569   55   1,301,644   388   -   -   4,847,881   1,445 

Redemptions

  (14,765,096  (4,466  -   -   (1,137,685  (307  (5,825,857  (1,776  (148,314  (41  (21,876,952  (6,590

Net income (loss)

  (1,841,750  -   (13,160  -   (94,177  -   (873,037  -   (10,118  -   (2,832,242  - 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
PARTNERS’ CAPITAL            
December 31, 2018 $62,850,528   18,599  $629,813   186  $7,092,725   1,857  $29,163,718   8,630   -   -  $99,736,784   29,272 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Units and dollars have been rounded to the nearest whole number.

See accompanying notes and attached financial statements of Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P.

 

F-5


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED I L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020,
2019 and 2018

 LOGO

 

   2020  2019  2018 

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:

   

Net income (loss)

  $        5,688,230  $10,307,877  $(2,832,242) 

Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by operating activities:

   

Purchases of investments in Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P.

  (738,452  (57,742  (608,934

Sales of investments in Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P.

  15,869,674   28,039,187   18,764,219 

Net gain (loss) on trading activities and net investment loss allocated from investment in Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P.

  (9,493,072  (14,432,439  (1,966,818

Changes in assets and liabilities:

   

Management fees payable

  (14,512  (31,209  (39,507

Servicing fees payable

  (4,782  (10,632  (13,253

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

  (43,337  (7,005  11,703 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

  11,263,749   23,808,037   13,315,168 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:   

Proceeds from subscriptions

  4,408,673  1,295,747  4,815,565

Payments on redemptions

  (15,672,422  (25,103,784  (18,130,733
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

  (11,263,749  (23,808,037  (13,315,168
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH

  -   -   - 

CASH - Beginning of year

  -   -   - 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

CASH - End of year

 $-  $-  $- 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

*

Net of placement agent fees paid to Man Investments Inc. for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018 of $44,000, $20,250 and $27,881, respectively.

 

See accompanying notes and attached financial statements of Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P.

 

F-6


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED I L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

1.    ORGANIZATION OF THE PARTNERSHIP

Man-AHL Diversified I L.P. (a Delaware Limited Partnership) (the “Partnership”) was organized in September 1997 under the Delaware Revised Uniform Limited Partnership Act, and commenced operations on April 3, 1998, for the purpose of engaging in the speculative trading of futures and forward contracts and related instruments. The Partnership is a “feeder” fund in a “master-feeder” structure, whereby the Partnership invests substantially all of its assets in Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P. (the “Trading Company”). Man Investments (USA) Corp. (the “General Partner”), a Delaware corporation, serves as the Partnership’s General Partner. The General Partner is a subsidiary of Man Group plc, a Jersey public limited company that is listed on the London Stock Exchange. The General Partner oversees the operations and management of the Partnership.

AHL Partners LLP (the “Advisor”), a limited liability partnership established in England and Wales, acts as trading advisor to the Partnership. The Advisor is an affiliate of the General Partner and a subsidiary of Man Group plc. The Advisor is registered with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) as a commodity trading adviser and commodity pool operator and is a member of the National Futures Association (“NFA”) in such capacities, in addition to registration with the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom.

Man Investments Limited, a United Kingdom private limited company that is part of Man Group plc, is the managing member of the Advisor, and Man Investments Holdings Inc., a Delaware corporation that is part of Man Group plc, is the sole shareholder of the General Partner.

The Partnership’s units are distributed through the Partnership or other selling agents, including Man Investments Inc. (“MII”), an affiliate of the Advisor and General Partner. MII is a registered broker-dealer and a member of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”).

The Partnership filed a registration statement under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), which became effective in March 2008. The Partnership’s units are not, however, registered for sale through a public offering, and the General Partner does not intend to cause them to be so registered.

The Partnership offers two classes of units of limited partnership interests; Class A units are generally offered and Class B units are offered to retirement plan investors. Within Class A and Class B, units are issued in two separate series. They are Class A Series 1, Class A Series 2, Class B Series 1 and Class B Series 2. Except as described in Note 2 below in respect of fees, the classes of units are identical.

The Bank of New York Mellon serves as the administrator to the Partnership.

2.    SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The Partnership prepares its financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”). The General Partner has evaluated the structure, objectives and activities of the Partnership and the Trading Company and determined that the Partnership and the Trading Company meet the characteristics of an investment company. As such, these financial statements have applied the guidance as set forth in Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 946, Financial Services - Investment Companies. The following is a summary of the significant accounting and reporting policies used in preparing the financial statements.

Use of Estimates — The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires the General Partner to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities (and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities) at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Investment in Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P. — The Partnership’s investment in the Trading Company is valued at the fair value of the Partnership’s proportionate interest in the net assets of the Trading Company. The fair value of the Partnership’s investment in the Trading Company approximates the carrying amounts presented in the statements of financial condition. The Partnership records its proportionate share of the Trading Company’s income, expenses, and realized and

 

F-7


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED I L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

unrealized gains and losses. Investment transactions are recorded on a trade-date basis. In addition, the Partnership accrues its own expenses. The performance of the Partnership is directly affected by the performance of the Trading Company. Attached are the financial statements of the Trading Company, including the condensed schedules of investments, which are an integral part of these financial statements. Valuation of investments held by the Trading Company is discussed in the Trading Company’s notes to financial statements.

At December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Partnership owned 4,308.36 and 5,122.00 units, respectively, of the Trading Company. The Partnership’s aggregate ownership percentage of the Trading Company at December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 was 69.95% and 79.12%, respectively.

The Partnership is able to redeem its investment from the Trading Company on a monthly basis. As of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Partnership could redeem its investment without restriction at the month-end net asset value of the Trading Company.

Due from Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P. — The amounts Due from Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P. represent redemption requests made by the Partnership relating to its investment in the Trading Company. The requests have been received and recorded by the Trading Company but the proceeds have not been received by the Partnership. These amounts are ultimately due to limited partners of the Partnership as redemptions payable.

Expenses — The Advisor earns a monthly management fee in an amount equal to 0.1667% (2% annually) of the Partnership’s month-end Net Asset Value, as defined in the Limited Partnership Agreement (the “Agreement”). In addition, the General Partner earns a monthly general partner fee in an amount equal to 0.0833% (1% annually) of the month-end Net Asset Value of Class A Series 1 and Class B Series 1 units. The general partner fee is included in management fees in the statements of operations.

The Advisor also earns a monthly incentive fee equal to 20% of any Net New Appreciation, as defined in the Agreement, achieved by the Partnership. The incentive fee is retained by the Advisor even if subsequent losses are incurred; however, no subsequent incentive fees will be paid to the Advisor until any such trading losses are recouped by the Partnership. Because the incentive fees are paid on the Net New Appreciation of the Partnership as a whole, it is possible that certain Limited Partners may experience increases in the Net Asset Value of their units while paying no incentive fees on such increases in the Net Asset Value of such units as a result of the timing of the purchase of units. During the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018, no incentive fees were earned by the Advisor.

The Partnership pays a monthly servicing fee to MII in an amount equal to 0.0833% (1.00% annually) of the month-end Net Asset Value of Class A Series 1 and Class B Series 1 units and to 0.0625% (0.75% annually) of the month-end Net Asset Value of Class A Series 2 and Class B Series 2 units. For all classes of units, MII serves as the placement agent for the Partnership.

Revenue recognition — Income and expense are recognized on an accrual basis in the period in which they are incurred.

Derivative Contracts — The Partnership’s operating activities involve trading, indirectly through its investment in the Trading Company, in derivative contracts that involve varying degrees of market and credit risk. With respect to the Partnership’s investment in the Trading Company, the Partnership has limited liability, and, therefore, its maximum exposure to either market or credit loss is limited to the carrying value of its investment in the Trading Company, as set forth in the statements of financial condition.

Net Income (Loss) Per Unit — Net income (loss) per unit of Class A Series 1, Class A Series 2, Class B Series 1, or Class B Series 2 partnership interest is equal to the net income (loss) per class divided by the weighted average number of units outstanding per class. Weighted average number of units outstanding is the average of the units outstanding for each day during the period.

Income Taxes — The Partnership is not subject to federal, state, or local income tax. Such taxes are the liabilities of the individual partners and the amounts thereof will vary depending on the individual situation of each partner. Accordingly, there is no provision for income taxes in the accompanying financial statements. ASC 740, Income Taxes, defines how uncertain tax positions should be recognized, measured, presented, and disclosed in the financial statements and is applied to all open tax years. The Partnership has evaluated tax positions taken or expected to be taken in the course of preparing the Partnership’s

 

F-8


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED I L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

tax returns to determine whether the tax positions are more-likely-than-not to be sustained by the applicable tax authority. Based on this analysis of all tax jurisdictions and all open tax years subject to examination, there were no material tax positions not deemed to meet a more-likely-than-not-threshold. Therefore, no tax expense, including interest or penalties, was recorded for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018. To the extent that the Partnership records interest and penalties, they would be included in interest expense and other expenses, respectively, on the statements of operations. The following is the major tax jurisdiction for the Trading Company and the earliest tax year subject to examination: United States – 2017.

Other Income — Other income included in the Statement of Operations includes the proceeds received by the Trading Company relating to a class action award.

3.    LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT

The General Partner and each limited partner share in the profits and losses of the Partnership in proportion to the amount of capital held by each partner. However, no limited partner is liable for obligations of the Partnership in excess of its capital subscription and net profits or losses, if any.

The Partnership’s units are continuously offered as of the first business day of each month at Net Asset Value, as defined in the Agreement. Limited partners may redeem any or all of their units as of the end of any month at Net Asset Value per unit on 10 days prior written notice to the General Partner. The Partnership will be dissolved on December 31, 2037, or upon the occurrence of certain events, as specified in the Agreement.

The General Partner is required to make and maintain a general partner investment in the Partnership in an aggregate amount equal to the lesser of 1.01% of the net aggregate capital subscriptions of all partners, or $500,000.

Distributions (other than redemptions of units), if any, are made on a pro-rata basis at the sole discretion of the General Partner. No distributions were declared or paid during the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018.

Under the terms of the Agreement, the Partnership is liable for all costs associated with executing its business strategy. These costs include, but are not limited to, expenses associated with operations of the Partnership, such as management and incentive fees and other operating expenses, such as legal, audit, and tax return preparation fees.

4.    FINANCIAL GUARANTEES

The Partnership enters into administrative and other professional service contracts that contain a variety of indemnifications. The Partnership’s maximum exposure under these arrangements is not known; however, the Partnership has not had prior claims or losses pursuant to these contracts and expects the risk of loss to be remote.

 

F-9


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED I L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

5. FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

The following represents the ratios to average limited partners’ capital and other information for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018:

 

  2020  2019  2018 
   

Class A

Series 1

  

Class A

Series 2

  

Class B

Series 1

  

Class A

Series 1

  

Class A

Series 2

  

Class B

Series 1

  

Class A

Series 1

  

Class A

Series 2

  

Class B

Series 1

  

Class B

Series 2

 
Per unit operating performance:          

Beginning net asset value

 $3,773.02  $4,317.43  $3,772.86  $3,379.30  $3,818.72  $3,379.15  $3,449.91  $3,849.96  $3,449.76  $3,850.01 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
Income (loss) from investment operations:          

Net investment loss

  (175.46  (144.61  (174.74  (113.84  (72.65  (114.01  (125.47  (93.32  (125.25  (84.03

Net realized and change in unrealized gains (losses) on trading activities

  443.23   509.34   442.49   507.56   571.36   507.72   54.86   62.08   54.64   (161.84
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total income (loss) from investment operations

  267.77   364.73   267.75   393.72   498.71   393.71   (70.61  (31.24  (70.61  (245.87
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Ending net asset value

 $4,040.79  $4,682.16  $4,040.61  $3,773.02  $4,317.43  $3,772.86  $3,379.30  $3,818.72  $3,379.15  $3,604.142 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
Ratios to average partners’ capital 1:          

Expenses other than incentive fees

  5.21  3.85  5.18  5.21  4.25  5.23  5.36  4.09  5.36  3.78%3 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total expenses

  5.21  3.85  5.18  5.21  4.25  5.23  5.36  4.09  5.36  3.78%3 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net investment loss

  (4.61)%   (3.30)%   (4.59)%   (3.15)%   (1.80)%   (3.16)%   (3.77)%   (2.50)%   (3.77)%   (2.25)%3 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total return:

          

Total return before incentive fees

  7.10  8.45  7.10  11.65  13.06  11.65  (2.05)%   (0.81)%   (2.05)%   (6.39)%4 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total return after incentive fees

  7.10  8.45  7.10  11.65  13.06  11.65  (2.05)%   (0.81)%   (2.05)%   (6.39)%4 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

1

Includes amounts allocated from the Trading Company .

2

Ending NAV per share is calculated immediately prior to the final redemption.

3

Ratios have been annualized for the period.

4

Total return has not been annualized for the period.

Financial highlights are calculated for limited partners taken as a whole for each series. An individual partner’s returns and ratios may vary from these returns and ratios based on the timing of capital transactions.

 

F-10


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED I L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

6.    OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

The General Partner and the Advisor acknowledge the on-going outbreak of COVID-19 which has been causing economic disruption in most countries since the first quarter of 2020 and its potentially adverse economic impact on the issuers of the instruments in which the Partnership invests. This is an additional risk factor which could impact the operations and valuation of the Partnership’s assets after the period-end.

The Advisor is actively monitoring developments closely. Given the nature of the outbreak and the on-going developments, there is a high degree of uncertainty and it is not possible at this time to predict the extent and nature of the overall future impact on the Partnership.

7.    SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

For the period subsequent to December 31, 2020, through March 30, 2021, the date the financial statements were issued, the Partnership recorded limited partner subscriptions of $139,000 and limited partner redemptions of $1,258,957.

The General Partner has evaluated the impact of subsequent events on the Partnership through March 30, 2021, the date financial statements were issued, and noted no subsequent events that require adjustment to or disclosure in these financial statements, except as noted above.

 

F-11


Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Limited Partners and General Partner of Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P.

Opinion on the Financial Statements

We have audited the accompanying statements of financial condition of Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P. (the “Partnership”), including the condensed schedules of investments, as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, and the related statements of operations, changes in partners’ capital and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2020, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Partnership at December 31, 2020 and 2019, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2020, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

Basis for Opinion

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Partnership’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Partnership’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Partnership in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB and in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Partnership is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Partnership’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

Critical Audit Matters

Critical audit matters are matters arising from the current period audit of the financial statements that were communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relate to accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgments. We determined that there are no critical audit matters.

/s/ Ernst & Young Ltd.

We have served as the Partnership’s auditor since 2012.

Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands

March 30, 2021

 

F-12


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION

 LOGO

 

    December 31,
2020
   December 31,
2019
 
ASSETS    
Equity in trading accounts:    

Net unrealized trading gains on open futures contracts

  $            4,838,679   $            3,167,474 

Net unrealized trading gains on open forward contracts

   4,301,897    456,428 

Net unrealized trading gains on open swap agreements

   3,613,210    7,820,514 

Net premiums paid on credit default swap agreements

   4,418,752    7,177,944 

Due from brokers

   15,192,032    19,679,210 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total equity in trading accounts

   32,364,570    38,301,570 

Cash and cash equivalents

   11,507,859    1,460,824 

Investment in securities, at fair value (cost $79,986,217 and $79,538,940 at December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively)

   79,991,450    79,543,495 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

  $123,863,879   $119,305,889 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
LIABILITIES AND PARTNERS’ CAPITAL    
LIABILITIES:    

Net unrealized trading losses on open forward contracts

  $-   $2,569,584 

Net unrealized trading losses on open swap agreements

   8,453    - 

Net premiums received on credit default swap agreements

   -    170,833 

Due to brokers

   120,565    - 

Redemptions payable to Man-AHL Diversified I L.P.

   1,314,633    1,578,942 

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

   316,018    246,383 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

   1,759,669    4,565,742 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
PARTNERS’ CAPITAL:    

Limited Partners (6,159.62 and 6,473.89 units outstanding at December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively)

   122,104,210    114,740,147 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total partners’ capital

   122,104,210    114,740,147 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
Total liabilities and partners’ capital  $123,863,879   $119,305,889 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
NET ASSET VALUE PER OUTSTANDING UNIT OF PARTNERSHIP INTEREST  $19,823.33   $17,723.52 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See notes to financial statements.

 

F-13


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

CONDENSED SCHEDULES OF INVESTMENTS

 LOGO

 

  December 31, 2020  December 31, 2019 
   Fair Value  Percent of
Partners’ Capital
  Fair Value  Percent of
Partners’ Capital
 
FUTURES CONTRACTS - Long:    

Agricultural

 $2,018,724   1.6  $545,201   0.5 

Currencies

  -   -   (16,585  (0.0

Energy

  606,148   0.5   253,411   0.2 

Indices

  1,104,307   0.9   798,257   0.7 

Interest Rates

  338,024   0.3   (357,456  (0.3

Metals

  827,030   0.7   766,741   0.6 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total futures contracts - long

  4,894,233   4.0   1,989,569   1.7 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
FUTURES CONTRACTS - Short:    

Agricultural

 $(74,188  (0.1  (650,318  (0.6

Currencies

  38,179   0.1   -   - 

Energy

  (16,895  (0.0  1,075,976   0.9 

Indices

  20,850   0.0   325,822   0.3 

Interest Rates

  (23,500  (0.0  426,425   0.4 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total futures contracts - short

  (55,554  0.0   1,177,905   1.0 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
NET UNREALIZED TRADING GAINS (LOSSES) ON OPEN FUTURES CONTRACTS $4,838,679   4.0  $3,167,474   2.7 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
FORWARD CONTRACTS - Long:    

Australian dollars

 $1,042,637   1.0  $130,453   0.1 

Brazilian real

  64,704   0.1   414,564   0.4 

Mexican peso

  402,856   0.3   1,803,368   1.6 

Turkish lira

  59,332   0.0   (421,340  (0.4

Metal

  -   0.0   407   0.0 

New Zealand dollars

  389,111   0.3   613,957   0.5 

South African rand

  504,674   0.4   793,233   0.7 

South Korean won

  507,591   0.4   95,412   0.1 

U.K. pound

  644,027   0.5   716,083   0.6 

Other

  2,006,722   1.6   3,194,413   2.8 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total long forward contracts vs USD

  5,621,654   4.6   7,340,550   6.4 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
FORWARD CONTRACTS - Short:    

Australian dollars

 $(207,750  (0.2 $(495,566  (0.4

Brazilian real

  10,568   0.0   (563,815  (0.5

Mexican peso

  (71,285  (0.1  (888,543  (0.8

Turkish lira

  (47,022  (0.0  24,503   0.0 

New Zealand dollars

  (129,739  (0.1  (131,618  (0.1

South African rand

  (27,164  (0.0  (69,451  (0.1

South Korean won

  (188,367  (0.2  (278,157  (0.2

U.K. pound

  (490,252  (0.4  (1,460,324  (1.3

Other

  (1,244,279  (1.0  (4,871,032  (4.2
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total short forward contracts vs USD

  (2,395,290  (2.0  (8,734,003  (7.6
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Forward contracts - Cross currencies

  416,431   0.3   (497,943  (0.4

Forward contracts - Metal non USD

  659,102   0.5   (221,760  (0.2
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
  1,075,533   0.8   (719,703  (0.6
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
NET UNREALIZED TRADING GAINS (LOSSES) ON OPEN FORWARD CONTRACTS $4,301,897   3.4  $(2,113,156  (1.8
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

See notes to financial statements.

 

F-14


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

CONDENSED SCHEDULES OF INVESTMENTS (CONTINUED)

 LOGO

 

     December 31, 2020  December 31, 2019 
   Principal  Fair Value*  Percent of
Partners’ Capital
  Fair Value*  Percent of
Partners’ Capital
 
SWAP AGREEMENTS - Long:     

Credit default swaps - Buy protection centrally cleared (upfront premiums received $nil and $170,833, as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively)

  $-   0.0  $-   - 

Interest rate swaps

     

Brazilian Real (range of expirations: January 4, 2021 - January 4, 2021 and January 4, 2021 - March 19, 2025, as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively)

  $23,765,654   19.5  $26,764,802   23.4 

Other interest rate swaps

   -   -   5,444,619   4.7 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total swap agreements - long

   23,765,654   19.5   32,209,421   28.1 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
SWAP AGREEMENTS - Short:     

Credit default swaps - Sell protection centrally cleared (upfront premiums paid $4,418,752 and $7,177,944, as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively)

   277,791   0.2   2,500,929   2.2 

Interest rate swaps

     

Brazilian Real (range of expirations: January 4, 2021 - January 4, 2021 and January 4, 2021 - March 19, 2025, as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively)

   (20,438,688  (16.7  (22,743,954  (19.9

Other interest rate swaps

   -   -   (4,145,882  (3.6
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total swap agreements - short

   (20,160,897  (16.5  (24,388,907  (21.3
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
NET UNREALIZED TRADING GAINS/(LOSSES) ON OPEN SWAP AGREEMENTS  $3,604,757   3.0  $7,820,514   6.8 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
NET UNREALIZED TRADING GAINS/(LOSSES) ON OPEN CONTRACTS/AGREEMENTS  $12,745,333   10.4  $8,874,832   7.7 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
U.S. GOVERNMENT SECURITIES - Long:     

United States Treasury Bill 0% 06/18/20

  45,000,000  $-   -  $44,677,731   38.9 

United States Treasury Bill 0% 04/02/20

  35,000,000   -   -   34,865,764   30.4 

United States Treasury Bill 0% 03/18/21

  35,000,000   34,995,421   28.7   -   - 

United States Treasury Bill 0% 02/25/21

  45,000,000   44,996,029   36.8   -   - 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total U.S. government securities - long

   79,991,450   65.5   79,543,495   69.3 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
TOTAL INVESTMENT IN SECURITIES (COST $79,986,217 and $79,538,940 at December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively)  $79,991,450   65.5  $79,543,495   69.3 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

*

The Fair Value of Credit default swaps excludes upfront premiums received/paid which are presented separately in the Statement of Financial Condition. Refer to Note 2 for further details on the accounting treatment of premiums on Credit default swaps.

See notes to financial statements.

 

F-15


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020,
2019 and 2018

 LOGO

 

    2020  2019  2018 
NET INVESTMENT INCOME:    

Interest income

  $662,927  $2,345,377  $2,136,010 

Other income

   6,582   127,923   —   
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total investment income

  $669,509  $2,473,300  $2,136,010 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
EXPENSES    

Brokerage commissions

   185,443   241,046   342,946 

Interest expense - brokers

   198,547   245,499   276,420 

Administration fees

   60,917   85,761   83,396 

Professional fees

   265,775   180,780   265,070 

Shareholder expenses

   146,554   120,525   198,563 

Other expenses

   50,635   54,680   93,063 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total expenses

   907,871   928,291   1,259,458 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
Net investment income (loss)   (238,362  1,545,009   876,552 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
NET REALIZED AND UNREALIZED GAINS (LOSSES) ON TRADING ACTIVITIES:    

Net realized trading gains (losses) on closing contracts/agreements and foreign currency transactions

   9,581,117   19,486,958   (4,223,280

Net change in unrealized gains (losses) on translation of foreign currency

   137,697   (38,242  (188,527

Net change in unrealized trading gains (losses) on investments in securities

   678   (26  33,116 

Net change in unrealized trading gains (losses) on open contracts/agreements

   3,870,501   (2,297,082  6,187,191 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
Net gain (loss) on trading activities   13,589,993   17,151,608   1,808,500 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
NET INCOME (LOSS)  $13,351,631  $18,696,617  $2,685,052 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
NET INCOME (LOSS) PER UNIT OF PARTNERSHIP INTEREST
(based on weighted average units outstanding during the period)
  $2,046.42  $2,539.99  $287.61 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
WEIGHTED AVERAGE NUMBER OF UNITS OUTSTANDING DURING THE PERIOD       6,524.39       7,360.90       9,335.60 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

See notes to financial statements.

 

F-16


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN PARTNERS’ CAPITAL

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020,
2019 and 2018

 LOGO

 

   Limited Partners   General Partner   Total 
    Amount   Units   Amount   Units   Amount   Units 
PARTNERS’ CAPITAL - January 1, 2020  $114,740,147    6,474   $-    -   $114,740,147    6,474 

Subscriptions

   11,539,696    642    -    -    11,539,696    642 

Redemptions

   (17,527,264   (956   -    -    (17,527,264   (956

Net income

   13,351,631    -    -    -    13,351,631    - 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
PARTNERS’ CAPITAL - December 31, 2020  $122,104,210    6,160   $-    -   $122,104,210    6,160 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
PARTNERS’ CAPITAL - January 1, 2019  $125,638,900    8,264   $-    -   $125,638,900    8,264 

Subscriptions

   616,834    37    -    -    616,834    37 

Redemptions

   (30,212,204   (1,827   -    -    (30,212,204   (1,827

Net income

   18,696,617    -    -    -    18,696,617    - 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
PARTNERS’ CAPITAL - December 31, 2019  $114,740,147    6,474   $-    -   $114,740,147    6,474 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
PARTNERS’ CAPITAL - January 1, 2018  $142,156,033    9,569   $-    -   $142,156,033    9,569 

Subscriptions

   5,251,107    364    -    -    5,251,107    364 

Redemptions

   (24,453,292   (1,669   -    -    (24,453,292   (1,669

Net income

   2,685,052    -    -    -    2,685,052    - 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
PARTNERS’ CAPITAL - December 31, 2018  $125,638,900    8,264   $-    -   $125,638,900    8,264 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Units and dollars have been rounded to the nearest whole number.

 

See notes to financial statements.

 

F-17


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020,

2019 and 2018

 LOGO

 

    2020  2019  2018 
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:    

Net income (loss)

  $13,351,631  $18,696,617  $2,685,052 

Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by operating activities:

    

Purchases of investments in securities

   (174,903,623  (200,087,541  (211,082,175

Amortization of premium/discount on securities

   (542,281  (1,920,255  (1,575,676

Sales of investments in securities

   174,998,627   222,960,955   208,965,884 

Net change in unrealized trading (gains) losses on investments in securities

   (678  26   (33,116

Net change in unrealized trading (gains) losses on open contracts/agreements

   (3,870,501  2,297,082   (6,187,191

Changes in assets and liabilities:

    

Due from brokers

   4,487,178   (5,057,643  8,842,187 

Net premiums paid on credit default swap agreements

   2,759,192   (7,177,944  6,666,561 

Net premiums received on credit default swap agreements

   (170,833  (1,001,006  1,171,839 

Due to brokers

   120,565   -   - 

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

   69,635   (129,394  191,501 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

   16,298,912   28,580,897   9,644,866 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:    

Proceeds from subscriptions

   11,539,696   616,834   5,251,107 

Payments on redemptions

   (17,791,573  (34,995,400  (19,848,405
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

   (6,251,877  (34,378,566  (14,597,298
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS   10,047,035   (5,797,669  (4,952,432
    
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS—Beginning of year   1,460,824   7,258,493   12,210,925 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS—End of year  $11,507,859  $1,460,824  $7,258,493 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH ACTIVITY:    

Cash paid for interest during the period

  $198,547  $245,499  $276,420 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

See notes to financial statements.

 

F-18


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

1.    ORGANIZATION OF THE TRADING COMPANY

Man-AHL Diversified Trading Company L.P. (a Delaware Limited Partnership) (the “Trading Company”) was organized in November 1997 under the Delaware Revised Uniform Limited Partnership Act, and commenced operations on April 3, 1998, for the purpose of engaging in the speculative trading of futures and forward contracts and related instruments. Man Investments (USA) Corp. (the “General Partner”), a Delaware corporation, serves as the Trading Company’s general partner. The General Partner is a subsidiary of Man Group plc, a Jersey public limited company that is listed on the London Stock Exchange. The General Partner oversees the operations and management of the Trading Company.

The Trading Company was formed to serve as a trading vehicle for certain limited partnerships sponsored by the General Partner in a “master-feeder” structure. The limited partners, Man-AHL Diversified I L.P. and Man-AHL Diversified II L.P., are limited partnerships whose general partner is the General Partner.

AHL Partners LLP (the “Advisor”), a limited liability partnership established in England and Wales, acts as the trading advisor to the Trading Company. The Advisor is an affiliate of the General Partner and a subsidiary of Man Group plc. The Advisor is registered with the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) as a commodity trading adviser and commodity pool operator and is a member of the National Futures Association (“NFA”) in such capacities, in addition to registration with the Financial Conduct Authority in the United Kingdom.

Man Investments Limited, a United Kingdom private limited company that is part of Man Group plc, is the managing member of the Advisor, and Man Investments Holdings Inc., a Delaware corporation that is part of Man Group plc, is the sole shareholder of the General Partner.

The Bank of New York Mellon serves as the administrator to the Trading Company.

2.     SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The Trading Company prepares its financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”). The General Partner has evaluated the structure, objectives and activities of the Trading Company and determined that the Trading Company meets the characteristics of an investment company. As such, these financial statements have applied the guidance as set forth in the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 946, Financial Services — Investment Companies. The following is a summary of the significant accounting and reporting policies used in preparing the financial statements.

Use of Estimates — The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires the General Partner to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities (and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities) at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Due from Brokers — Due from brokers may consist of balances due from Credit Suisse Securities (USA) (“CS”), J.P. Morgan Chase Bank, N.A. and J.P. Morgan Securities LLC (“JPM”), Royal Bank of Scotland (“RBS”), Deutsche Bank AG, London Branch (“DB”), Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (“ML”), HSBC and Goldman Sachs (“GS”) (the “Brokers”). In general, the brokers pay the Trading Company interest monthly, based on agreed upon rates, on the Trading Company’s average daily balance.

Amounts due from brokers include local and foreign currency balances and balances posted as collateral. The amount of collateral held and included in due from brokers on the statements of financial condition is $15,192,032 and $19,679,208 as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively.

Due to Brokers — Due to brokers may consist of balances owed to its Brokers, as well as balances due to The Bank of New York Melon relating to securities or contracts, the Trading Company has purchased or entered into, but have not yet settled as of December 31, 2020.

 

F-19


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

Revenue recognition — Income and expenses are recognized on an accrual basis in the period in which they are incurred.

Realized gains and losses from periodic payments and settlements and unrealized changes in fair values are included in realized and unrealized gains and losses on contracts/agreements, respectively, in the statements of operations. All trading activities are accounted for on a trade-date basis. The cost of securities sold is accounted for on a first in first out basis.

Premiums and discounts on debt securities are amortized using the effective interest method and included within interest income on the statements of operations.

Derivative Contracts — In the normal course of business, the Trading Company enters into derivative contracts (“derivatives”) for trading purposes. Derivatives traded by the Trading Company include futures and forward contracts and swap agreements. The Trading Company records derivatives at fair value. Futures contracts, which are traded on a national exchange, are valued at the close price as of the valuation day, or if no sale occurred on such day, at the close price on the most recent date on which a sale occurred. Forward contracts, which are not traded on a national exchange, are valued at fair value using independent pricing services, which mainly use market observable inputs in their valuations. Swaps are contractual agreements between two parties to exchange streams of payments over time based on specified notional amounts. The Trading Company’s swap agreements consist of interest rate swaps and credit default swaps. Swap agreements are valued at fair value using independent pricing services. Upfront premiums paid or received by the Trading Company upon entering a credit default swap agreement are treated as part of the cost/proceeds of the credit default swap agreement and are reflected as part of net premiums paid or received on the statements of financial condition. Upon termination of a credit default swap transaction, the amount included in the cost is reversed and becomes part of realized gain or loss.

Foreign Currency — All assets and liabilities of the Trading Company denominated in foreign currencies are translated into U.S. dollar amounts at the mean between the bid and ask market rates for such currencies on the date of valuation. Purchases and sales of foreign investments are converted at the prevailing rate of exchange on the respective date of such transactions. The Trading Company does not isolate that portion of realized gains and losses on investments which is due to changes in foreign exchange rates from that which is due to changes in market prices of the investments. Such changes are included with the net realized gains or losses on trading activities.

Cash and Cash Equivalents — Cash and cash equivalents include unrestricted cash, short-term interest-bearing money market accounts and U.S. government securities with original maturities of 90 days or less, held with The Bank of New York Mellon. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, the Trading Company maintains cash balances with The Bank of New York Mellon. As of December 31, 2020, the Trading Company did not hold any foreign cash balances. As of December 31, 2019, the Trading Company held foreign cash balances totaling $223,755 with a cost of $218,636. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, the Trading Company did not hold any U.S. Treasury Bills in cash and cash equivalents.

Investments in Securities — Investments in Securities include U.S. government securities with original maturities of more than 90 days, held with The Bank of New York Mellon. As of December 31, 2020, the Trading Company holds $79,991,450 of U.S. Treasury Bills in securities. These U.S. Treasury Bills, with a maturity date ranging from February 25, 2021 to March 18, 2021, have a total face value of $80,000,000. As of December 31, 2019, the Trading Company holds $79,543,495 of U.S. Treasury Bills in securities. These U.S. Treasury Bills, with a maturity date ranging from April 2, 2020 to June 18, 2020, have a total face value of $80,000,000. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, all U.S. Treasury Bills are classified as Level 2 investments in the fair value hierarchy.

Income Taxes — The Trading Company is treated as a partnership for tax purposes and therefore is not subject to federal, state, or local income tax. Such taxes are the liabilities of the individual partners and the amounts thereof will vary depending on the individual situation of each partner. Accordingly, there is no provision for income taxes in the accompanying financial statements. ASC 740, Income Taxes, defines how uncertain tax positions should be recognized, measured, presented, and disclosed in the financial statements and is applied to all open tax years. The Trading Company has evaluated tax positions taken or expected to be taken in the course of preparing the Trading Company’s tax returns to determine whether the tax positions are more likely than not to be sustained by the applicable tax authority. Based on this analysis of all tax jurisdictions

 

F-20


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

and all open tax years subject to examination, there were no material tax positions not deemed to meet a more-likely-than-not-threshold. Therefore, no tax expense, including interest or penalties, was recorded for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018. To the extent that the Trading Company records interest and penalties, they would be included in interest expense and other expenses, respectively, on the statements of operations. The following is the major tax jurisdiction for the Trading Company and the earliest tax year subject to examination: United States – 2017.

Net Income (Loss) Per Unit — Net income (loss) per unit of partnership interest is equal to the net income (loss) divided by the weighted average number of units outstanding. Weighted average number of units outstanding is the average of the units outstanding for each day during the period.

Other Income — Other income included in the statements of operations includes the proceeds received by the Trading Company relating to a class action award.

3.    LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT

The General Partner and limited partners share in the profits and losses of the Trading Company in proportion to the amount of capital held by each partner. However, no limited partner is liable for obligations of the Trading Company in excess of its capital contribution and net profits or losses, if any. The General Partner owned no direct interest in the Trading Company during the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018.

Distributions (other than redemption of units), if any, are made on a pro-rata basis at the sole discretion of the General Partner. No distributions were declared or paid during the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018.

Partner contributions occur as of the first day of any month at the opening net asset value. Limited partners may redeem any or all of their units as of the end of any month at the net asset value per unit with 10 days prior written notice to the General Partner. The General Partner may suspend redemptions of units of the Trading Company if the Trading Company’s ability to withdraw capital from any investment is restricted. The Trading Company will be dissolved on December 31, 2037, or upon the occurrence of certain events, as specified in the Trading Company’s limited partnership agreement.

4.    FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

The Trading Company defines fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between willing market participants at the measurement date under current market conditions. The fair value of the Trading Company’s assets and liabilities which qualify as financial instruments approximates the carrying amounts presented on the statements of financial condition.

The inputs used to determine the fair value of the Trading Company’s investments are summarized in the three broad levels listed below:

 

 

Level 1 — quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities

 

 

Level 2 — investments with significant market observable inputs

 

 

Level 3 — investments with significant unobservable inputs, which may include the Trading Company’s own assumptions in determining the fair value of investments

 

F-21


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

Futures contracts are valued based on end of day quoted prices from the exchange and are categorized as Level 1 investments in the fair value hierarchy. Treasury bills, forward contracts and swap agreements are valued at fair value using independent pricing services, which use market observable inputs in their valuations, and are categorized as Level 2 investments in the fair value hierarchy. As of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Trading Company did not have any positions categorized as Level 3 investments in the fair value hierarchy. The following is a summary categorization as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, of the Trading Company’s investments based on the level of inputs utilized in determining the value of such investments:

   Fair Value Measurements 
Investments  As of
December 31,
2020
           Level 1  Level 2  Level 3 

Assets

     

Treasury bills

  $79,991,450  $-  $79,991,450  $ 

Futures contracts

   5,360,776   5,360,776   -    

Forward contracts

   10,075,685   -   10,075,685    

Swap agreements*

   24,052,471   -   24,052,471    
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total Assets

   119,480,382   5,360,776   114,119,606    
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Liabilities

     

Futures contracts

   (522,097  (522,097  -    

Forward contracts

   (5,773,788  -   (5,773,788   

Swap agreements*

   (20,447,714  -   (20,447,714   
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total Liabilities

   (26,743,599  (522,097  (26,221,502   
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net Fair Value

  $92,736,783  $4,838,679  $87,898,104  $ 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 
   Fair Value Measurements 
Investments  As of
December 31,
2019
  Level 1  Level 2  Level 3 

Assets

     

Treasury bills

  $79,543,495  $-  $79,543,495  $ 

Futures contracts

   4,995,338   4,995,338   -    

Forward contracts

   13,200,938   -   13,200,938    

Swap agreements*

   34,757,966   -   34,757,966    
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total Assets

   132,497,737   4,995,338   127,502,399    
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Liabilities

     

Futures contracts

   (1,827,864  (1,827,864  -    

Forward contracts

   (15,314,094  -   (15,314,094   

Swap agreements*

   (26,937,452  -   (26,937,452   
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total Liabilities

   (44,079,410  (1,827,864  (42,251,546   
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net Fair Value

  $88,418,327  $3,167,474  $85,250,853  $ 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

*

The Fair Value of Credit default swaps excludes upfront premiums received/paid which are presented separately in the Statement of Financial Condition. Refer to Note 2 for further details on the accounting treatment of premiums on Credit default swaps.

The Trading Company discloses the amounts of transfers and reasons for those transfers between levels of the fair value hierarchy, based on the levels assigned under the hierarchy at the reporting period end. There were no transfers between levels as of December 31, 2020 or 2019 based on the levels assigned at December 31, 2019 or 2018.

 

F-22


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

5.    DERIVATIVE FINANICIAL INSTRUMENTS AND CONCENTRATIONS OF CREDIT RISK

The Trading Company seeks to achieve its investment objective by participation in the AHL Diversified Program directed on behalf of the Trading Company by the Advisor. The AHL Diversified Program is a price trend-following trading system, entirely quantitative in nature, and implements trading positions on the basis of statistical analyses of past price histories. The objective of the AHL Diversified Program is to deliver substantial capital growth for commensurate levels of volatility over the medium term, independent of the movement of the stock and bond markets, through the speculative trading, directly and indirectly, of physical commodities, futures contracts, spot and forward contracts, swaps and options on the foregoing, exchanges of futures for physical transactions and other investments on domestic and international exchanges and markets (including the interbank and over-the-counter markets (“OTC”)). The AHL Diversified Program trades globally in several market sectors, including, without limitation, currencies, bonds, energies, stock indices, interest rates, metals and agriculture.

All of the strategies and systems of the AHL Diversified Program are designed to target defined volatility levels rather than returns, and the investment process is underpinned by computer-supported analytical instruments and disciplined real-time risk and management information systems. A proprietary risk measurement method similar to the industry standard “value-at-risk” helps ensure that the rule-based decisions that drive the investment process remain within pre-defined risk parameters. Margin-to-equity ratios are monitored daily, and the level of exposure in each market is quantifiable at any time and is adjusted in accordance with market volatility. Market correlation is closely monitored to prevent over-concentration of risk and ensure optimal portfolio weightings. Market liquidity is examined with the objective of ensuring that the Trading Company will be able to initiate and close out trades as indicated by AHL Diversified Program’s systems at market prices, while brokerage selection and trade execution are continually monitored with the objective of ensuring quality market access.

Futures contracts, forward contracts and swap agreements are recorded on the trade date. Upon entering into futures contracts, forward contracts and swap agreements, the Trading Company may be required to deposit cash or collateral with the brokers. Gains or losses are realized when contracts are matured or closed. Unrealized gains or losses on open contracts and agreements (the difference between contract trade price and fair value) are reported in the statements of financial condition.

Interest rate swaps relate to agreements taken out by the Trading Company with major brokers in which the Trading Company either receives or pays a floating rate of interest in return for paying or receiving, respectively, a fixed rate of interest, on the same notional amount for a specified period of time. In the normal course of business, the payment flows are netted against each other, with the difference being paid by one party to the other. Changes in the value of the interest rate swap agreements and amounts received or paid in connection with those changes, are recognized as realized trading gains (losses) on closed contracts/agreements in the statements of operations. The risks related to trading in interest rate swaps include changes in market value and the possible inability of the counterparty to fulfill its obligations under the agreement.

The Trading Company may enter into short sales. In order to facilitate a short sale, the Trading Company borrows the applicable financial instrument from a broker or counterparty and delivers it to a buyer. A short sale by the Trading Company creates an obligation on the part of the Trading Company to thereafter purchase the financial instrument in the market at the prevailing market price and deliver it to the broker or counterparty from which it was borrowed. The Trading Company is exposed to the risk of loss to the extent that the price of a financial instrument sold short by the Trading Company increases from the time the Trading Company borrows the financial instrument to the time the Trading Company purchases it in the market to satisfy the Trading Company’s delivery obligation. Consequently, the ultimate cost to the Trading Company to acquire a financial instrument sold short may exceed the amount recognized in financial statements.

The Trading Company may enter into credit default swap agreements to provide a measure of protection against the default of an issuer (as buyer of protection) and/or gain credit exposure to an issuer to which it is not otherwise exposed (as seller of protection). Credit default swaps are agreements in which one party pays fixed periodic payments to a counterparty in consideration for a guarantee from the counterparty to make a specific payment should a negative credit event take place (e.g. default, bankruptcy, debt restructuring, etc.). The Trading Company may either buy or sell (write) credit default swaps. As a buyer, upon the occurrence of a specified negative credit event, the Trading Company will either receive from the seller an amount equal to the notional amount of the swap and deliver the referenced security or underlying securities comprising an

 

F-23


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

index or receive a net settlement of cash equal to the notional amount of the swap less the agreed upon recovery value of the security or underlying securities comprising an index. As a seller (writer), upon the occurrence of a specified negative credit event, the Trading Company will either pay the buyer an amount equal to the notional amount of the swap and take delivery of the referenced security or underlying securities comprising an index or pay a net settlement of cash equal to the notional amount of the swap less the agreed upon recovery value of the security or underlying securities comprising an index. In the event of default by the counterparty, the Trading Company may recover amounts paid under the agreement either partially or in total by offsetting any payables and/or receivables with collateral held or pledged. The counterparty risk for centrally-cleared credit default swap agreements is generally lower than for credit default swap agreements not centrally-cleared. However, there can be no assurance that the clearing organization, or its members, will satisfy its obligations to the Trading Company.

These periodic payments received or made under swap agreements by the Trading Company are included in net realized trading gains (losses) on closed contracts/agreements in the statements of operations. When the swap is terminated, the Trading Company will record a realized gain (loss) equal to the difference between the proceeds from (or cost of) closing the transaction and the Trading Company’s basis in the contract, if any.

Swap transactions involve, to varying degrees, elements of credit and market risk in excess of the amounts recognized on the statements of financial condition. Such risks involve the possibility that there will be no liquid market for these agreements, that the counterparty or the clearing organization to the agreements may default on its obligation to perform or disagree as to the meaning of the contractual terms in the agreements, and that there may be unfavorable changes in interest rates and/or market values associated with these transactions.

As of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the total fair value and notional amounts of credit default swaps on indices where the Trading Company is the seller is presented in the following table by contract terms:

 

   Fair Value and Notional Amounts by Contract Term 
   December 31, 2020   December 31, 2019 
   1-5 years   1-5 years 
Credit spread (in basis points)  Fair
            Value
   Notional
            Amount
   Fair
     Value
   Notional
           Amount
 

0-100

  $28,076   $80,000,000   $641,489   $175,000,000 

101-250

   168,860    10,000,000    237,204    20,000,000 

251-350

   80,855    10,000,000    1,622,236    15,000,000 

351-450

   -    -    -    - 

450+

   -    -    -    - 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

  $277,791   $100,000,000   $2,500,929   $210,000,000 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The notional amount represents the maximum potential pay out that the Trading Company could be required to make if a credit event were to occur under each agreement. The maximum payout amount may be offset by the subsequent sale, if any, of assets obtained via the execution of a payout event, upfront fees received upon entering into the contracts, or net amounts received from the settlement of offsetting purchased protection in credit default swap contracts entered into by the Trading Company for the same reference entity or entities. As of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, all credit default swap contracts entered into by the Trading Company are on indices. The credit spread of the underlying indices, derived from the fair value at December 31, 2020 of each credit default swap where the Trading Company is a seller, ranged between 48 basis points and 293 basis points. The credit spread of the underlying indices, derived from the fair value at December 31, 2019 of each credit default swap where the Trading Company is a seller, ranged between 44 basis points and 281 basis points. The credit spread is generally indicative of the status of the underlying risk of default by the applicable reference entity or index and is likely to be different than the contractual spread on the credit default swap. Higher credit spreads are indicative of a higher likelihood of non-performance by the Trading Company. As of December 31, 2020 the Trading Company posted cash collateral of $668,956, and as of December 31, 2019, the Trading Company posted cash collateral of $3,044,358, with respective

 

F-24


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

counterparties on these agreements in the normal course of business. As of December 31, 2020, all open credit default swap agreements on selling protection have a maturity date of December 20, 2025. As of December 31, 2019, all open credit default swap agreements on selling protection have a maturity date of December 20, 2024.

During the year ended December 31, 2020, the Trading Company traded 72,578 exchange-traded futures contracts and settled 151,092 forward contracts and 1,385 swap agreements. During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Trading Company traded 95,902 exchange-traded futures contracts and settled 233,718 forward contracts and 1,026 swap agreements.

As of December 31, 2020, the gross notional value of open forward contracts is $1,436,289,478 and the gross notional value of open swap contracts is $96,409,493. As of December 31, 2019, the gross notional value of open forward contracts is $2,674,274,863 and the gross notional value of open swap contracts is $243,523,554. The trading activity of open forward and swap contracts as of December 31, 2020 and 2019 is indicative of the trading activity throughout the year.

The Trading Company trades derivative financial instruments that involve varying degrees of market and credit risk. Market risks may arise from unfavorable changes in interest rates, foreign exchange rates, or the fair values of the instruments underlying the contracts. All contracts are stated at fair value, and changes in those values are reflected in the net change in unrealized trading gains (losses) on open contracts/agreements in the statements of operations. Credit risk arises from the potential inability of counterparties to perform in accordance with the terms of a contract. The credit risk for OTC derivative contracts is limited to the net unrealized gain plus any collateral posted net of unrealized losses or upfront fees posted, if any, for each counterparty for which a netting agreement exists and is included in the statements of financial condition. Upfront fees are listed on the statements of financial condition as net premiums paid/received on credit default swap agreements and are shown net by counterparty for which a netting agreement exists. Counterparty relationships are governed by various contracts. These contracts can be based on industry standard agreements, such as International Swap and Derivatives Association agreements for OTC contracts. These agreements set forth each party’s basic rights, responsibilities, and duties. These agreements also contain information regarding financial terms and conditions, as well as termination and events of default provisions. Certain agreements contain provisions that require the Trading Company to post additional collateral upon the occurrence of specific credit risk related events or upon notice from the counterparty. As the Trading Company’s trading strategies are dependent upon the existence of these agreements, the Trading Company’s counterparties usually have multiple specified events under which they can terminate individual transactions or the entire agreement. These are most commonly related to declines in assets under management and performance below certain thresholds during a specified period. It is not guaranteed that counterparties will move to terminate individual transactions or entire agreements if a “trigger event” were to occur; however, it is their right to do so, and such a move could severely impact the Trading Company’s portfolio. At December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the OTC contracts subject to such trigger events in a net liability position were the foreign currency forward contracts, interest rate swap agreements and credit default swap agreements. The details of the net liability positions by counterparty are disclosed later in this note on the additional disclosures regarding the offsetting of derivative liabilities table. The ultimate amounts that may be required as payment to settle the derivative instruments in connection with the triggering of such credit contingency features as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, may differ from the net liability amounts recorded as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, and such differences can be material.

For exchange-traded futures contracts, the clearing organization functions as the central counterparty for each transaction and, therefore, bears the risk of settlement to and from counterparties, which mitigates the credit risk of these instruments.

As of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, all credit default swaps held by the Trading Company are centrally cleared swaps.

 

F-25


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

The following table presents the fair value of the Trading Company’s derivative instruments and net presentation on statements of financial condition:

 

  

December 31, 2020

 
  

Asset Derivatives

  

Liability Derivatives

 
Primary Risk Exposure Statements of Financial
Condition
      Fair Value  Statements of Financial
Condition
       Fair Value 

Open forward contracts

 Gross unrealized trading gains on open forward contracts  Gross unrealized trading losses on open forward contracts 

Currencies

  $9,376,456   $(5,733,661

Metals

   699,229    (40,127
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total open forward contracts

   10,075,685    (5,773,788
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Open futures contracts

 Gross unrealized trading gains on open futures contracts  Gross unrealized trading losses on open futures contracts 

Agricultural

   2,048,224    (103,688

Currencies

   38,179    - 

Energy

   747,340    (158,087

Indices

   1,337,586    (212,429

Interest rates

   362,417    (47,893

Metals

   827,030    - 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total open futures contracts

   5,360,776    (522,097
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Open swap agreements

 Gross unrealized trading gains on open swap agreements  Gross unrealized trading losses on open swap agreements 

Credit

   286,818    (9,027

Interest rates

   23,765,653    (20,438,687
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total open swap agreements

   24,052,471    (20,447,714
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Derivatives

  $39,488,932   $(26,743,599
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

F-26


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

  

December 31, 2019

 
  

Asset Derivatives

  

Liability Derivatives

 
Primary Risk Exposure Statements of Financial
Condition
      Fair
Value
  Statements of Financial
Condition
       Fair
Value
 

Open forward contracts

 Gross unrealized trading gains on open forward contracts  Gross unrealized trading losses on open forward contracts 

Currencies

  $13,192,268   $(15,084,071

Metals

   8,670    (230,023
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total open forward contracts

   13,200,938    (15,314,094
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
Open futures contracts Gross unrealized trading gains on open futures contracts  Gross unrealized trading losses on open futures contracts 

Agricultural

   625,956    (731,073

Currencies

   -    (16,585

Energy

   1,478,135    (148,748

Indices

   1,681,749    (557,670

Interest rates

   441,482    (372,513

Metals

   768,016    (1,275
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total open futures contracts

   4,995,338    (1,827,864
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Open swap agreements

 Gross unrealized trading gains on open swap agreements  Gross unrealized trading losses on open swap agreements 

Credit

   2,500,929    - 

Interest rates

   32,257,037    (26,937,452
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total open swap agreements

   34,757,966    (26,937,452
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Derivatives

  $52,954,242   $(44,079,410
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

F-27


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

The following table presents the impact of derivative instruments on the statements of operations:

 

   For the years ended December 31, 
  2020  2019  2018 
Location of gain or loss recognized in income on derivatives  Gain (Loss) on
derivatives
  Gain (Loss) on
derivatives
  Gain (Loss) on
derivatives
 

Forward contracts

    

Currencies

  $(1,402,756 $1,331,618  $1,582,937 

Metals

   1,224,692   (716,042  112,625 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net realized trading gains (losses) on closed contracts/agreements

  $(178,064 $615,576  $1,695,562 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Currencies

  $5,534,598  $(2,865,501 $2,160,521 

Metals

   880,455   (638,304  (371,413
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net change in unrealized trading gains (losses) on open contracts/agreements

  $6,415,053  $(3,503,805 $1,789,108 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Futures contracts

    

Agricultural

  $(176,479 $(1,116,430 $(2,798,376

Currencies

   (30,716  216,317   628,415 

Energy

   5,537,763   (1,810,750  4,366,517 

Indices

   (3,842,475  (2,461,079  (4,558,031

Interest rates

   6,013,738   20,885,828   (438,963

Metals

   3,847,393   706,354   (546,563
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net realized trading gains (losses) on closed contracts/agreements

  $11,349,224  $16,420,240  $(3,347,001
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Agricultural

  $2,049,653  $(633,274 $(106,757

Currencies

   54,764   18,037   (210,264

Energy

   (740,134  500,826   (168,173

Indices

   1,078   (100,284  (54,362

Interest rates

   245,555   (3,612,537  4,246,094 

Metals

   60,289   398,658   (470,285
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net change in unrealized trading gains (losses) on open contracts/agreements

  $1,671,205  $(3,428,574 $3,236,253 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Swap agreements

    

Credit default swaps

  $(2,496,306 $722,658  $(1,603,375

Interest rate swaps

   1,097,636   1,405,647   (1,055,644
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net realized trading gains (losses) on closed contracts/agreements

  $(1,398,670 $2,128,305  $(2,659,019
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Credit default swaps

  $(2,223,138 $2,630,240  $(482,321

Interest rate swaps

   (1,992,619  2,005,057   1,644,151��
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net change in unrealized trading gains (losses) on open contracts/agreements

  $(4,215,757 $4,635,297  $1,161,830 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Amounts in the table above exclude foreign exchange spot contracts.

 

F-28


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

As described above, the Trading Company may enter into netting agreements with its derivative contract counterparties whereby the Trading Company may, under certain circumstances, offset with the counterparty certain derivative financial instruments’ payables and/or receivables with collateral held and/or posted and create one single net payment. As of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Trading Company was subject to netting agreements that allowed for amounts owed between the Trading Company and its counterparty to be netted. The party that has the larger payable pays the excess of the larger amount over the smaller amount to the other party. The netting agreements do not apply to amounts owed to or from different counterparties.

The following table provides additional disclosures regarding the offsetting of derivative assets presented in the statements of financial condition:

 

  

Gross
Amounts of
   Recognized

Assets

  

Gross

Amount

Offset in the

Statements
of Financial

      Condition

  

Net Amounts
of Assets
presented

in the
Statements of
Financial

Condition

  Gross Amounts Not Offset
in the Statements of
Financial Condition
   

 

 
 

Financial

Instruments

  

Cash

Collateral

Received

  

Net

    Amount

 
       

As of December 31, 2020

      

Open futures contracts

      

Bank of America Merrill Lynch

 $3,515,386  $(216,100 $3,299,286  $-  $-  $3,299,286 

Credit Suisse

  771,846   (121,684  650,162   -   -   650,162 

JPMorgan Chase

  1,073,544   (184,313  889,231   -   -   889,231 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total open futures contracts

 $5,360,776  $(522,097 $4,838,679  $-  $-  $4,838,679 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Open forward contracts

      

Deutsche Bank

 $1,662,251  $(1,122,191 $540,060  $-  $-  $540,060 

HSBC

  4,143,434   (2,609,820  1,533,614   -   -   1,533,614 

JPMorgan Chase

  699,229   (40,127  659,102   -   -   659,102 

Royal Bank of Scotland

  3,570,771   (2,001,650  1,569,121   -   -   1,569,121 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total open forward contracts

 $10,075,685  $(5,773,788 $4,301,897  $-  $-  $4,301,897 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Open swap agreements

      

Credit Suisse

 $205,389  $-  $205,389  $-  $-  $205,389 

Goldman Sachs

  574   (574  -   -   -   - 

JPMorgan Chase

  23,846,508   (20,438,687  3,407,821   -   -   3,407,821 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total open swap agreements

 $24,052,471  $(20,439,261 $3,613,210  $-  $-  $3,613,210 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

F-29


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

  

Gross
Amounts of
   Recognized

Assets

  

Gross

Amount

Offset in the

Statements
of Financial

      Condition

  

Net Amounts
of Assets
presented

in the
Statements of
Financial

Condition

  Gross Amounts Not Offset
in the Statements of
Financial Condition
   

 

 
 

Financial

Instruments

  

Cash

Collateral

Received

  

Net

    Amount

 
       

As of December 31, 2019

      

Open futures contracts

      

Bank of America Merrill Lynch

 $2,274,795  $(629,543 $1,645,252  $-  $-  $1,645,252 

Credit Suisse

  718,032   (697,088  20,944   -   -   20,944 

JPMorgan Chase

  2,002,511   (501,233  1,501,278   -   -   1,501,278 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total open futures contracts

 $4,995,338  $(1,827,864 $3,167,474  $-  $-  $3,167,474 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Open forward contracts

      

Deutsche Bank

 $1,704,868  $(1,704,868 $-  $-  $-  $- 

HSBC

  6,089,855   (6,089,855  -   -   -   - 

JPMorgan Chase

  8,263   (8,263  -   -   -   - 

Royal Bank of Scotland

  5,397,952   (4,941,524  456,428   -   -   456,428 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total open forward contracts

 $13,200,938  $(12,744,510 $456,428  $-  $-  $456,428 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Open swap agreements

      

Credit Suisse

 $640,035  $-  $640,035  $-  $-  $640,035 

Deutsche Bank

  3,464,513   (2,877,261  587,252   -   -   587,252 

Goldman Sachs

  238,658   
-
 
  238,658   -   -   238,658 

JPMorgan Chase

  30,414,760   (24,060,191  6,354,569   -   -   6,354,569 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total open sw ap agreements

 $34,757,966  $(26,937,452 $7,820,514  $-  $-  $7,820,514 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

F-30


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

The following table provides additional disclosures regarding the offsetting of derivative liabilities presented in the statements of financial condition:

 

  

Gross
Amounts of
   Recognized

Assets

  

Gross

Amount

Offset in the

Statements
of Financial

      Condition

  

Net Amounts
of Assets
presented

in the
Statements of
Financial

Condition

  Gross Amounts Not Offset
in the Statements of
Financial Condition
   

 

 
 

Financial

Instruments

  

Cash

Collateral

Received

  

Net

    Amount

 
       

As of December 31, 2020

      

Open futures contracts

      

Bank of America Merrill Lynch

 $216,100  $(216,100 $-  $-  $-  $- 

Credit Suisse

  121,684   (121,684  -   -   -   - 

JPMorgan Chase

  184,313   (184,313  -   -   -   - 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total open futures contracts

 $522,097  $(522,097 $-  $-  $-  $- 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Open forward contracts

      

Deutsche Bank

 $1,122,191  $(1,122,191 $-  $-  $-  $- 

HSBC

  2,609,820   (2,609,820  -   -   -   - 

JPMorgan Chase

  40,127   (40,127  -   -   -   - 

Royal Bank of Scotland

  2,001,650   (2,001,650  -   -   -   - 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total open forward contracts

 $5,773,788  $(5,773,788 $-  $-  $-  $- 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Open swap agreements

      

Goldman Sachs

 $9,027  $(574 $8,453  $-  $8,453  $- 

JPMorgan Chase

  20,438,687   (20,438,687  -   -   -   - 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total open swap agreements

 $20,447,714  $(20,439,261 $8,453  $-  $8,453  $- 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

F-31


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

  

Gross
Amounts of
   Recognized

Assets

  

Gross

Amount

Offset in the

Statements
of Financial

      Condition

  

Net Amounts
of Assets
presented

in the
Statements of
Financial

Condition

  Gross Amounts Not Offset
in the Statements of
Financial Condition
   

 

 
 

Financial

Instruments

  

Cash

Collateral

Received

  

Net

    Amount

 
       

As of December 31, 2019

      

Open futures contracts

      

Bank of America Merrill Lynch

 $629,543  $(629,543 $-  $-  $-  $- 

Credit Suisse

  697,088   (697,088  -   -   -   - 

JPMorgan Chase

  501,233   (501,233  -   -   -   - 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total open futures contracts

 $1,827,864  $(1,827,864 $-  $-  $-  $- 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Open forward contracts

      

Deutsche Bank

 $2,046,477  $(1,704,868 $341,609  $-  $341,609  $- 

HSBC

  8,096,070   (6,089,855  2,006,215   -   2,006,215   - 

JPMorgan Chase

  230,023   (8,263  221,760   -   221,760   - 

Royal Bank of Scotland

  4,941,524   (4,941,524  -   -   -   - 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total open forw ard contracts

 $15,314,094  $(12,744,510 $2,569,584  $-  $2,569,584  $- 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Open swap agreements

      

Credit Suisse

 $-  $-  $-  $-  $-  $- 

Deutsche Bank

  2,877,261   (2,877,261  -   -   -   - 

Goldman Sachs

  -   -   -   -   -   - 

JPMorgan Chase

  24,060,191   (24,060,191  -   -   -   - 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total open sw ap agreements

 $26,937,452  $(26,937,452 $-  $-  $-  $- 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

F-32


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

Only the amount of the collateral up to the net amount of liabilities presented on the statements of financial condition is disclosed above. The table below lists additional amounts of collateral pledged:

 

    Additional
Collateral
Pledged
 

As of December 31, 2020

  

Open swap agreements

  

Goldman Sachs

  $1,595,151 

As of December 31, 2019

  

Open forward contracts

  

Deutsche Bank

  $2,055,802 

HSBC

  $2,976,528 

6.    FINANCIAL GUARANTEES

The Trading Company enters into administrative and other professional service contracts that contain a variety of indemnifications. The Trading Company’s maximum exposure under these arrangements is not known; however, the Trading Company has not had prior claims or losses pursuant to these contracts and expects the risk of loss to be remote.

7.    FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

The following represents the ratios to average partners’ capital and other information for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018:

 

              2020            2019             2018 

Per unit operating performance:

     

Beginning net asset value

  $17,723.52  $15,203.61   $14,855.39 

Income (loss) from investment operations:

     

Net investment gain (loss)

   (36.79  210.56    94.35 

Net realized and change in unrealized gains (losses) on trading activities and translation of foreign currency

   2,136.60   2,309.35    253.87 
  

 

 

  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total income (loss) from investment operations

   2,099.81   2,519.91    348.22 
  

 

 

  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ending net asset value

  $19,823.33  $17,723.52   $15,203.61 
  

 

 

  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Ratios to average partners’ capital:

     

Expenses

   0.77%   0.76%    0.93% 
  

 

 

  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net investment gain (loss)

   (0.20)%   1.27%    0.65% 
  

 

 

  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total return

   11.85%   16.57%    2.34% 
  

 

 

  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Financial highlights are calculated for all partners taken as a whole. An individual partner’s returns and ratios may vary from these returns and ratios based on the timing of capital transactions.

 

F-33


MAN-AHL DIVERSIFIED TRADING COMPANY L.P.

(A Delaware Limited Partnership)

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 LOGO

 

8.    OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

The General Partner and the Advisor acknowledge the on-going outbreak of COVID-19 which has been causing economic disruption in most countries since the first quarter of 2020 and its potentially adverse economic impact on the issuers of the instruments in which the Trading Company invests. This is an additional risk factor which could impact the operations and valuation of the Trading Company’s assets after the period-end.

The Advisor is actively monitoring developments closely. Given the nature of the outbreak and the on-going developments, there is a high degree of uncertainty and it is not possible at this time to predict the extent and nature of the overall future impact on the Trading Company.

9.    SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

For the period subsequent to December 31, 2020 through March 30, 2021, the date the financial statements were issued, the Trading Company recorded limited partner subscriptions of $1,114,000, and limited partner redemptions of $1,258,857.

The General Partner has evaluated the impact of subsequent events on the Trading Company through March 30, 2021, the date the financial statements were issued, and noted no subsequent events that require adjustment to or disclosure in these financial statements, except as noted above.

 

F-34