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GNTY Guaranty Bancshares, Inc.

Filed: 12 Mar 21, 9:00am

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from             to             .

Commission File Number: 001-38087

 

GUARANTY BANCSHARES, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Texas

 

75-1656431

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. employer identification no.)

 

 

 

16475 Dallas Parkway, Suite 600

 

 

Addison, Texas

 

75001

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip code)

 

(888) 572 - 9881

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class of Securities

 

Trading Symbol

 

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

Common Stock, par value $1.00 per share

 

GNTY

 

NASDAQ Global Select Market

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

Yes  No 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.

Yes  No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.   Yes  No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).  Yes  No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 under the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes  No 

The aggregate market value of the shares of common stock held by non-affiliates based on the closing price of the common stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market on June 30, 2020, the last day of the Registrant's most recently completed second fiscal quarter, was approximately $254.6 million.

At March 10, 2021, the Company had 12,053,597 outstanding shares of common stock, par value $1.00 per share.

 

Documents Incorporated By Reference:

Portions of the registrant’s Definitive Proxy Statement relating to the 2021 Annual Meeting of Shareholders are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K to the extent stated herein. Such Definitive Proxy Statement will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the end of the registrant’s fiscal year ended December 31, 2020.

 

 


GUARANTY BANCSHARES, INC.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I

 

Page

Item 1.

Business

1

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

17

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

42

Item 2.

Properties

42

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

43

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

43

PART II

 

 

Item 5.

Market for Registrant's Common Equity,  Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

43

Item 6.

Selected Financial Data

45

Item 7.

Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Result of Operations

48

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

82

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

83

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

84

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures

84

Item 9B.

Other Information

85

PART III

 

 

Item 10.

Directors, Executives Officers and Corporate Governance

85

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

85

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

85

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, And Director Independence

85

Item 14.

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

85

PART IV

 

 

Item 15.

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

86

 

Index to Exhibits

86

Item 16.

Form 10-K Summary

88

Signatures

89

Consolidated Financial Statements

F-1

 

 

 

 


PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

Our Company

Except where the context otherwise requires or where otherwise indicated, references in this Annual Report on Form 10-K to “we,” “us,” “our,” “our company,” the “Company” or “Guaranty” refer to Guaranty Bancshares, Inc. and our wholly-owned banking subsidiary, Guaranty Bank & Trust, N.A. and the terms “Bank” and "Guaranty Bank & Trust" refer to Guaranty Bank & Trust, N.A.

We are a bank holding company, with corporate headquarters in Addison, Texas and operational headquarters in Mount Pleasant, Texas. Through our wholly owned subsidiary, Guaranty Bank & Trust, a national banking association, we provide a wide range of relationship-driven commercial and consumer banking, as well as trust and wealth management, products and services that are tailored to meet the needs of small- and medium-sized businesses, professionals and individuals. The Bank currently operates 31 full service banking locations in East Texas, Central Texas, the Dallas/Fort Worth metropolitan statistical area (MSA) and the Houston MSA. As of December 31, 2020, we had total assets of $2.74 million, total net loans of $1.87 billion, total deposits of $2.29 billion and total shareholders’ equity of $272.6 million.

We completed an initial public offering of our common stock in May 2017 as an emerging growth company under the JOBS Act. Our common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol "GNTY."

Our History and Growth

Guaranty Bank & Trust was originally chartered as a Texas state banking association over a century ago in 1913, and converted its charter to a national banking association in 2012. Guaranty was incorporated in 1990 to serve as the holding company for Guaranty Bank & Trust. Since our founding, we have built a strong reputation based on financial stability and community leadership. Our growth has been consistent and primarily organic, both through growth in our established markets and the entry into new markets with de novo banking locations. In 2013, we expanded from our East Texas markets by opening a de novo banking location in Bryan/College Station, Texas. In 2017, we opened de novo banking locations in Fort Worth and Austin, Texas. In late 2020, we opened a second de novo location in Austin and plan to open a third de novo location just outside of Austin in the town of Georgetown, Texas during the second quarter of 2021. We have achieved organic growth by enhancing our lending and deposit relationships with existing customers and attracting new customers, as well as cross-selling our deposit, mortgage, trust and wealth management and treasury management products.

We have also supplemented our organic growth and leveraged our strong deposit base with strategic acquisitions during the past five years. In 2015, we acquired both Texas Leadership Bank and DCB Financial, allowing us to expand our footprint into the Dallas/Fort Worth MSA. In 2018, we entered the Houston MSA through our acquisition of Westbound Bank. Our expansion strategy has enabled us to access markets with stronger loan demand, achieve consistent growth, maintain stable operating efficiencies, recruit top bankers, preserve our historically conservative credit culture, and provide shareholders with stable earnings throughout credit cycles.

 

Since our initial expansion outside of East Texas in 2013, we have grown our network of banking locations from 18 banking locations in 11 Texas communities to 31 banking locations in 24 Texas communities.

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Our Community Banking Philosophy and Culture

We focus on a community-based relationship model, as opposed to a line of business model, because we believe the community-based relationship model promotes an entrepreneurial attitude within our Company while providing personal attention and solutions tailored to our customers. Our culture is one of employee ownership and it is something we take very seriously. In 2016, we formally documented our culture in a book called “The Guaranty Culture,” which we give to all prospective new hires and directors before they join our team so that they clearly understand who we are, how we work, what we believe, how we make decisions and what we admire in people.

We believe a great bank requires the right amount of two forms of capital: financial and human. We understand that our ability to successfully deploy our financial capital is directly related to our ability to bring the right talents together to lead our teams. This focus on human capital has rewarded us with a cohesive group of directors, officers and employees that we believe is our greatest asset. We have invested in a robust management development program designed to develop comprehensive bankers who understand all aspects of our operations and embrace our core values. The training program generally lasts 12-18 months and includes rotations through each primary department of the Bank. Successful graduates of our training program are typically promoted to a managerial position upon completion and we currently have graduates in management, lending and operational roles. Several of the Bank’s market presidents and managers are graduates of our training program.

During 2020, we continued to expand and grow the offerings provided via Guaranty University, an online professional and continuing education resource for our employees. In addition, our second class of our Leadership Development Program (LDP) graduated in November 2020. The LDP program caters to our Senior Vice Presidents including department heads, market leaders and lenders and has proven to be a valuable source of growth and improvement to our leadership participants. In 2021, we plan to launch the Emerging Leaders Program for our VP associates in all departments. The Emerging Leaders Program is an in-depth year-long course in which employees who exhibit leadership aptitude participate in online courses, in-person leadership classes and team building activities that allow them to learn about and improve upon various leadership traits and skills.

We have developed a network of banking locations strategically positioned in separate and distinct communities. Each community where we have a banking location is overseen by a local market president or manager, and we emphasize local decision-making by experienced bankers supported by centralized risk and credit oversight. We believe that employing local decision makers, supported by industry-leading technology and centralized operational and credit administration support from our corporate headquarters, allows us to serve our customers’ individual needs while managing risk on a uniform basis. We intend to repeat this scalable model in each market in which we are able to identify high-caliber bankers with a strong banking team. We empower these bankers to implement our operating strategy, grow our customer base and provide the highest level of customer service possible. We believe our organizational approach enables us to attract and retain talented bankers and banking teams who desire the combination of the Bank’s size and loan limits, dedication to culture, commitment to our communities, local decision-making authority, compensation structure and focus on relationship banking.

Growth and Expansion Strategies

Our strategic plan is to be a leading Texas bank holding company with a commitment to operate as a community bank as we continue to execute our expansion strategy. Our expansion strategy is to generate shareholder value through the following:

 

Maintain Focus on Organic Growth. Focusing on organic growth is a strategy that allows us to generate stable funding sources without the non-amortizing goodwill assets and core deposit intangibles that strategic acquisitions might add to our balance sheet. We believe that a strong core deposit base is extremely valuable and desirable in allowing our bank to grow despite continued interest rate competition from bank and non-bank sources, and serves us well when alternative funding sources become more expensive. As such, we also believe that our significant core deposit franchise in East Texas provides a stable funding source for meaningful loan growth in existing and new markets. In addition, we strive to build comprehensive banking relationships with new borrowers through deposit and treasury management products and services.

 

Pursue Strategic Acquisitions. We intend to continue to grow through strategic acquisitions within our current markets and in other complementary markets, however the culture, economics and location of potential new acquisitions is critical in our decision making. We seek acquisitions that provide meaningful financial benefits through long-term organic growth opportunities and expense reductions, while maintaining our current risk profile. We believe that many smaller financial institutions will consider us an ideal long-term

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partner due to our community banking philosophy, commitment to employee stock ownership and our culture of teamwork.

 

Establish De Novo Banking Locations. We intend to open de novo banking locations in our existing and other attractive markets in Texas to further diversify our banking location network. In 2020, we opened a second de novo banking location in Austin, Texas and plan to open a third de novo location just outside of Austin in Georgetown, Texas in 2021.

 

Increase Earnings Streams. We seek to maintain asset quality in a manner that allows us to maintain our current earnings streams, while also providing additional services such as robust treasury management, trust and wealth management and Small Business Association guaranteed loans to our customers in order to augment and diversify our revenue sources. For the year ended December 31, 2020, noninterest income represented approximately $23.0 million, or 20.4%, of our total revenue of $113.0 million (defined as net interest income plus noninterest income).

The charts below illustrate our meaningful asset, loan, deposit and net income growth for the last five years:

 

(1)

Total loans, including loans held for sale.

(2)

Core earnings defined as pre-tax, pre-provision, pre-PPP related net earnings. See our reconciliation of non-GAAP financial measures to their most directly comparable GAAP financial measures under the caption “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Non-GAAP Financial Measures.”

 

Although we are devoting substantial resources in furtherance of our expansion strategy, there are no assurances that we will be able to further implement our expansion strategy or that any of the components of our expansion strategy will be successful.

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We believe the following competitive strengths support our growth and expansion strategy:

 

Experienced Executive Management Team. The Bank has a seasoned and experienced executive management team with more than 300 years of experience in financial services businesses. Our executive management team has successfully managed profitable organic growth, executed acquisitions, developed a strong credit culture and implemented a relationship-based approach to commercial and consumer banking. In addition, our executive management team has extensive knowledge of the bank regulatory landscape, significant experience navigating interest rate and credit cycles and a long history of working together.

 

Employee Ownership Mentality. As of December 31, 2020, our Company only directors, our executive officers and our employee stock ownership plan, or KSOP, as a group, beneficially owned approximately 26.9% of our outstanding shares of common stock. Our KSOP owned 11.2% of our outstanding shares. Many of our employees’ interests in the KSOP represent material portions of their net worth, particularly our long-tenured employees. We believe that the KSOP’s material ownership position promotes an owner-operator mentality among our employees, from senior officers to entry-level employees, which we believe enhances our employees’ dedication to our organization and the execution of our strategy.

 

Proven Successful Execution of Growth Strategies. We have developed a strategic growth plan that allows the Company to quickly identify and efficiently execute corporate transactions that we believe enhance our geographic footprint and enterprise value. Since 2011, we have successfully integrated ten acquired locations into our Company through what we believe is an effective combination of comprehensive integration planning, extensive management experience with expansion, and a welcoming and flexible culture of employee ownership. In that same time period, we also established nine de novo locations outside of our historical East Texas market, achieving our objectives for organic growth within our anticipated time periods and successfully integrating new local management teams and employees into our Company. Accordingly, we have a proven track record of executing value-added acquisitions and achieving consistent, meaningful organic growth.

 

Scalable Platform. Utilizing the significant prior experience of our management team and employees, we believe that we have built a strong and scalable operational platform, including technology and banking processes and infrastructure, capable of supporting future organic growth and acquisitions when the right opportunities arise. We maintain operational systems and staffing that we believe are stronger than necessarily required for a financial institution of our size in order to successfully execute integrations when needed and accommodate future growth without a commensurate need for expansion of our back office capabilities. We believe our platform allows us to focus on growing the revenue-generating divisions of our business while maintaining our operational efficiencies, resulting in improved profitability.

 

Disciplined Credit Culture and Robust Risk Management Systems. We seek to prudently mitigate and manage our risks through a disciplined, enterprise-wide approach to risk management, particularly credit, compliance, operational and interest rate risk. All of the Bank’s executive officers serve on the Bank’s Enterprise Risk Management Committee. We endeavor to maintain asset quality through an emphasis on local market knowledge, long-term customer relationships, consistent and thorough underwriting for all loans and a conservative credit culture.

 

Brand Strength and Reputation. We believe our brand recognition, including the Guaranty name and our iconic “G” logo, which is prominently displayed in all of our advertising and marketing materials and has been trademarked to preserve its integrity, is an important element of our business model and a key driver of our future growth. We believe our reputation for providing personal and dependable service and active community involvement is well established in our traditional East Texas market, and we are continuously striving to replicate that brand awareness and reputation in our newer markets of the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex, Houston metroplex and Central Texas through a high level of community involvement, deliberate and effective digital marketing and the targeted hiring of employees with strong relationships and reputations within these markets.

 

Stable and Growing Core Deposit Base. We believe our traditional East Texas market provides a historically stable source of core deposits that serves as a great source of funding when there is volatility in interest rates and an increasing desire for core deposits make them more difficult and more expensive to attract, especially in competitive markets. As we enter new markets, we believe that our stable core deposit base enhances our ability to pursue loans in large, high growth markets and to fund other revenue sources such as our warehouse lending division.

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Our Banking Services

Lending Activities. We offer a variety of loans, including commercial lines of credit, working capital loans, commercial real estate-backed loans (including loans secured by owner occupied commercial properties), term loans, equipment financing, acquisition, expansion and development loans, borrowing base loans, real estate construction loans, homebuilder loans, letters of credit and other loan products to small- and medium-sized businesses, real estate developers, mortgage lenders, manufacturing and industrial companies and other businesses. We also offer various consumer loans to individuals and professionals including residential real estate loans, home equity loans, installment loans, unsecured and secured personal lines of credit, and standby letters of credit. Lending activities originate from the efforts of our bankers, with an emphasis on lending to individuals, professionals, small- to medium-sized businesses and commercial companies located in our market areas. Although all lending involves a degree of risk, we believe that commercial business loans and commercial real estate loans present greater risks than other types of loans in our portfolio. We work to mitigate these risks through conservative underwriting policies and consistent monitoring of credit quality indicators.

We adhere to what we believe are disciplined underwriting standards, but also remain cognizant of the need to serve the credit needs of customers in our primary market areas by offering flexible loan solutions in a responsive and timely manner. We maintain asset quality through an emphasis on local market knowledge, long-term customer relationships, consistent and thorough underwriting for all loans and a conservative credit culture. We also seek to maintain a broadly diversified loan portfolio across customer, product and industry types. Our lending policies do not provide for any loans that are highly speculative, subprime, or that have high loan-to-value ratios. These components, together with active credit management, are the foundation of our credit culture, which we believe is critical to enhancing the long-term value of our organization to our customers, employees, shareholders and communities.

We have a service-driven, relationship-based, business-focused credit culture, rather than a price-driven, transaction-based culture. Substantially all of our loans are made to borrowers located or operating in our primary market areas with whom we have ongoing relationships across various product lines. The limited number of loans secured by properties located in out-of-market areas have been made strictly to borrowers who are well-known to us.

Our credit approval policies provide for various levels of officer and senior management lending authority for new credits and renewals, which are based on position, capability and experience. Loans in excess of an individual officer’s lending limit may be approved by two or more executive officers, with stacking authority, combining their individual lending limits, up to a current maximum of $5.0 million. Loans presenting aggregate lending exposure in excess of $5.0 million are subject to approval of the Bank’s Directors’ Loan Committee, although all loans with aggregate exposure over $1.0 million are provided for review. These limits are reviewed periodically by the Bank’s board of directors. We believe that our credit approval process provides for thorough underwriting and efficient decision making.

Credit risk management involves a partnership between our loan officers and our credit approval, credit administration and collections personnel. We conduct monthly loan meetings, attended by substantially all of our loan officers, related loan production staff and credit administration staff at which asset quality and delinquencies are reviewed. Our evaluation and compensation program for our loan officers includes significant goals, such as the percentages of past due loans and charge-offs to total loans in the officer’s portfolio, that we believe motivate the loan officers to focus on the origination and maintenance of high quality credits consistent with our strategic focus on asset quality.

Deposit Activities. Our deposits serve as the primary funding source for lending, investing and other general banking purposes. We provide a full range of deposit products and services, including a variety of checking and savings accounts, certificates of deposit, money market accounts, debit cards, remote deposit capture, online banking, mobile banking, e-Statements, bank-by-mail and direct deposit services. We also offer business accounts and cash management services, including business checking and savings accounts and treasury management services. We solicit deposits through our relationship-driven team of dedicated and accessible bankers and through community focused marketing. We also seek to cross-sell deposit products at loan origination.

Given the diverse nature of our banking location network and our relationship-driven approach to our customers, we believe our deposit base is comparatively less sensitive to interest rate variations than our competitors. Nevertheless, we attempt to competitively price our deposit products to promote core deposit growth. We believe that our loan pricing encourages deposits from our loan customers.

Guaranty Bank & Trust Wealth Management Group. We deliver a comprehensive suite of trust services through Guaranty Bank & Trust Wealth Management Group, a division of our Bank. We provide traditional trustee, custodial and escrow services for institutional and individual accounts, including corporate escrow accounts, serving as custodian for

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self-directed individual retirement accounts and other retirement accounts. In addition, we offer clients comprehensive investment management solutions whereby we manage all or a portion of a client’s investment portfolio on a discretionary basis. Finally, we provide retirement plan services, such as 401(k) programs, through a national vendor.

Other Products and Services. We offer banking products and services that are attractively priced with a focus on customer convenience and accessibility. We offer a full suite of online banking services including access to account balances, online transfers, online bill payment and electronic delivery of customer statements, as well as ATMs, and banking by telephone, mail and personal appointment. We also offer debit cards, night depository, direct deposit, cashier’s checks, and letters of credit, as well as treasury management services, including wire transfer services, positive pay, remote deposit capture and automated clearinghouse services.

Investments

We manage our investment portfolio primarily for liquidity purposes, with a secondary focus on returns. We separate our portfolio into two categories: (1) short-term investments with maturities less than one year, including federal funds sold; and (2) investments with maturities exceeding one year (the current effective duration is approximately 2.92 years), all of which are classified as available for sale and can be used for pledging on public deposits, selling under repurchase agreements and meeting unforeseen liquidity needs. We regularly evaluate the composition of this category as changes occur with respect to the interest rate yield curve. Although we may sell investment securities from time to time to take advantage of changes in interest rate spreads, it is our policy not to sell investment securities unless we can reinvest the proceeds at a similar or higher spread, so as not to take gains to the detriment of future income.

Our Markets

We consider our current market regions to be East Texas, Central Texas, the Dallas/Fort Worth MSA and the Houston MSA. We serve these communities from our corporate headquarters in Addison, Texas, our operational headquarters in Mount Pleasant, Texas and through a network of 15 banking locations within East Texas, five banking locations in Central Texas, seven banking locations in the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex and four banking locations in the Houston metroplex. As part of our strategic plan, we intend to further diversify our markets through entry into other large metropolitan markets in Texas and/or continued expansion in our existing newer markets.

Competition

The banking and financial services industry is highly competitive, and we compete with a wide range of financial institutions within our markets, including local, regional and national commercial banks and credit unions. We also compete with mortgage companies, brokerage firms, consumer finance companies, mutual funds, securities firms, insurance companies, third-party payment processors, fintech companies and other financial intermediaries for certain of our products and services. Some of our competitors are not subject to the regulatory restrictions and level of regulatory supervision applicable to us.

Interest rates on loans and deposits, as well as prices on fee-based services, are typically significant competitive factors within banking and financial services industry. Many of our competitors are much larger financial institutions that have greater financial resources than we do and compete aggressively for market share. These competitors attempt to gain market share through their financial product mix, pricing strategies and banking center locations. Other important competitive factors in our industry and markets include office locations and hours, quality of customer service, community reputation, continuity of personnel and services, capacity and willingness to extend credit, and ability to offer sophisticated banking products and services. While we seek to remain competitive with respect to fees charged, interest rates and pricing, we believe that our broad and sophisticated commercial banking product suite, our high-quality customer service culture, our positive reputation and long-standing community relationships will enable us to compete successfully within our markets and enhance our ability to attract and retain customers.

Human Capital Resources

As of December 31, 2020, we employed 467 full-time equivalent persons. We provide extensive training to our employees in an effort to ensure that our customers receive superior customer service. None of our employees are represented by any collective bargaining unit or are parties to a collective bargaining agreement. We consider our relations with our employees to be good. For additional information regarding our human capital resources, please see the Definitive Proxy Statement for our Annual Meeting of Shareholders being held on May 19, 2021, a copy of which will be filed with the SEC.

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Our Corporate Information

Our principal executive offices are located at 16475 Dallas Parkway, Suite 600, Addison, Texas 75001, and our telephone number is (888) 572-9881. Our website is www.gnty.com. We make available at this address, free of charge, our annual report on Form 10-K, our annual report to shareholders, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, or the Exchange Act, as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is electronically filed with, or furnished to, the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC. These documents are also available on the SEC's website at www.sec.gov. The information contained on or accessible from our website does not constitute part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and is not incorporated by reference herein.

Supervision and Regulation

The U.S. banking industry is highly regulated under federal and state law. Consequently, our growth and earnings performance will be affected not only by management decisions and general and local economic conditions, but also by the statutes administered by, and the regulations and policies of, various governmental regulatory authorities. These authorities include the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve (“Federal Reserve”), Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ("FDIC"), Consumer Financial Protection Bureau ("CFPB"), Office of the Comptroller of the Currency ("OCC), Internal Revenue Service ("IRS") and state taxing authorities. The effect of these statutes, regulations and policies, and any changes to such statutes, regulations and policies, can be significant and cannot be predicted.

The material statutory and regulatory requirements that are applicable to the Company and its subsidiaries are summarized below. The description below is not intended to summarize all laws and regulations applicable to the Company and its subsidiaries, and is based upon the statutes, regulations, policies, interpretive letters and other written guidance that are in effect as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Guaranty Bancshares, Inc.

As a bank holding company, we are subject to regulation under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, or the BHC Act, and to supervision, examination and enforcement by the Federal Reserve. The BHC Act and other federal laws subject bank holding companies to particular restrictions on the types of activities in which they may engage, and to a range of supervisory requirements and activities, including regulatory enforcement actions for violations of laws and regulations. The Federal Reserve’s jurisdiction also extends to any company that we directly or indirectly control, such as any nonbank subsidiaries and other companies in which we own a controlling investment.

Financial Services Industry Reform. In 2010, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, or Dodd-Frank Act, was enacted. The Dodd-Frank Act broadly affected the financial services industry by implementing changes to the financial regulatory landscape aimed at strengthening the sound operation of the financial services sector.

In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act addressed many investor protection, corporate governance and executive compensation matters affecting publicly-traded companies. However, the Jumpstart our Business Startups Act of 2012, or JOBS Act, provided certain exceptions to these requirements for so long as a publicly-traded company qualifies as an emerging growth company. In 2018, the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act, or EGRRCPA, revised certain aspects of the Dodd-Frank Act. Among other things, EGRRCPA exempts banks with less than $10 billion in assets (and total trading assets and trading liabilities of 5% or less of total assets) from Volcker Rule requirements relating to proprietary trading and clarifies definitions pertaining to HVCRE, which require higher capital allocations, so that only loans with increased risk are subject to higher risk weightings. Further changes effected by the passage of EGRRCPA are discussed below.

Revised Rules on Regulatory Capital. Regulatory capital rules pursuant to the Basel III requirements, released in July 2013 and effective January 1, 2015, implemented higher minimum capital requirements for bank holding companies and banks. These rules include a new common equity Tier 1, or CET1, capital requirement and establish criteria that instruments must meet to be considered common equity Tier 1 capital, additional Tier 1 capital or Tier 2 capital. The revised capital rules require banks and bank holding companies to maintain a minimum CET1 capital ratio of 4.5% of risk-based assets, a total Tier 1 capital ratio of 6.0% of risk-based assets, a total capital ratio of 8.0% of risk-based assets and a leverage ratio of 4.0% of average assets.

The capital rules also require banks to maintain a CET1 capital ratio of 6.5%, a total Tier 1 capital ratio of 8.0%, a total capital ratio of 10.0% and a leverage ratio of 5.0% to be deemed “well capitalized” for purposes of certain rules and prompt corrective action requirements. The risk-based ratios include a “capital conservation buffer” of 2.5% above its minimum risk-based capital requirements that must be composed of common equity Tier 1 capital. This buffer will help to

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ensure that banking organizations conserve capital when it is most needed, allowing them to better weather periods of economic stress. The buffer is measured relative to risk-weighted assets. An institution would be subject to limitations on certain activities including payment of dividends, share repurchases and discretionary bonuses to executive officers if its capital level is below the buffered ratio.

The EGRRCPA directed the federal banking agencies to develop a new, optional capital ratio for use by eligible community banks. Effective January 1, 2020, certain banks and their holding companies that satisfy the definition of a qualifying community banking organization, or QCBO, have the option to elect out of complying with the Basel III Capital Rules and to instead comply with the community bank leverage ratio, or CBLR, of 9%. On April 6, 2020, federal banking regulators issued two interim final rules that make changes to the CBLR framework. The first interim rules temporarily reduced the threshold to qualify as well capitalized from 9% to 8%, subject to the bank meeting certain conditions. It also establishes a two-quarter grace period for qualifying community banking organizations whose leverage ratios fall below the 8% CBLR requirement, so long as the banking organization maintains a leverage ratio of 7% or greater. The second interim final rule provides a transition from the temporary 8% CBLR requirement to a 9% CBLR requirement. It establishes a minimum CBLR of 8% for the second through fourth quarters of 2020, 8.5% for 2021, and 9% thereafter, and maintains a two-quarter grace period for qualifying community banking organizations whose leverage ratios fall no more than 100 basis points below the applicable CBLR requirement.

A QCBO is defined as a bank, a savings association, a bank holding company or a savings and loan holding company with:

 

total consolidated assets of less than $10 billion;

 

total off-balance sheet exposures (excluding derivatives other than credit derivatives and unconditionally cancelable commitments) of 25% or less of total consolidated assets;

 

total trading assets and trading liabilities of 5% or less of total consolidated assets;

 

MSAs of 25% or less of CBLR tangible equity; and

 

temporary difference DTAs of 25% or less of CBLR tangible equity.

A QCBO may elect out of complying with the Basel III Capital Rules if, at the time of the election, the QCBO has a CBLR above 9%. The numerator of the CBLR is referred to as ‘‘CBLR tangible equity’’ and is calculated as the QCBO’s total capital as reported in compliance with Call Report and FR Y-9C instructions, or Reporting Instructions (prior to including non-controlling interests in consolidated subsidiaries) less:

 

Accumulated other comprehensive income (referred to in the industry as AOCI);

 

Intangible assets, calculated in accordance with Reporting Instructions, other than mortgage servicing assets; and

 

Deferred tax assets that arise from net operating loss and tax credit carry forwards net of any related valuations allowances.

The denominator of the CBLR is the QCBO’s average assets, calculated in accordance with Reporting Instructions and less intangible assets and deferred tax assets deducted from CBLR tangible equity. At this time, the Company and the Bank have not elected to comply with the community bank leverage ratio framework, but the Company and the Bank will continue to consider making such election in the future.

Imposition of Liability for Undercapitalized Subsidiaries. Bank regulators are required to take prompt corrective action to resolve problems associated with insured depository institutions whose capital declines below certain levels. In the event an institution becomes undercapitalized, it must submit a capital restoration plan. The capital restoration plan will not be accepted by the regulators unless each company having control of the undercapitalized institution guarantees the subsidiary’s compliance with the capital restoration plan up to a certain specified amount. Any such guarantee from a depository institution’s holding company is entitled to a priority of payment in bankruptcy.

The aggregate liability of the holding company of an undercapitalized bank is limited to the lesser of 5.0% of the institution’s assets at the time it became undercapitalized or the amount necessary to cause the institution to be adequately capitalized. The bank regulators have greater power in situations where an institution becomes significantly or critically undercapitalized or fails to submit a capital restoration plan. For example, a bank holding company controlling such an institution can be required to obtain prior Federal Reserve approval of proposed dividends, or might be required to consent to a consolidation or to divest the troubled institution or other affiliates.

Acquisitions by Bank Holding Companies. The BHC Act requires every bank holding company to obtain the prior approval of the Federal Reserve before it acquires all or substantially all of the assets of any bank, or ownership or control

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of any voting shares of any bank or bank holding company if after such acquisition it would own or control, directly or indirectly, more than 5.0% of the voting shares of such bank or bank holding company. In approving bank or bank holding company acquisitions by bank holding companies, the Federal Reserve is required to consider, among other things, the effect of the acquisition on competition, the financial condition, managerial resources and future prospects of the bank holding company and the banks concerned, the convenience and needs of the communities to be served (including the record of performance under the CRA), the effectiveness of the applicant in combating money laundering activities and the extent to which the proposed acquisition would result in greater or more concentrated risks to the stability of the U.S. banking or financial system. Our ability to make future acquisitions will depend on our ability to obtain approval for such acquisitions from the Federal Reserve. The Federal Reserve could deny our application based on the above criteria or other considerations. For example, we could be required to sell banking centers as a condition to receiving regulatory approval, which condition may not be acceptable to us or, if acceptable to us, may reduce the benefit of a proposed acquisition.

Control Acquisitions. Federal and state laws, including the BHC Act and the Change in Bank Control Act, or CBCA, impose additional prior notice or approval requirements and ongoing regulatory requirements on any investor that seeks to acquire direct or indirect “control” of an FDIC-insured depository institution or bank holding company. Whether an investor “controls” a depository institution is based on all of the facts and circumstances surrounding the investment. As a general matter, an investor is deemed to control a depository institution or other company if the investor owns or controls 25.0% or more of any class of voting securities. Subject to rebuttal, an investor is presumed to control a depository institution or other company if the investor owns or controls 10.0% or more of any class of voting securities and either the depository institution or company is a public company or no other person will hold a greater percentage of that class of voting securities after the acquisition. If an investor’s ownership of our voting securities were to exceed certain thresholds, the investor could be deemed to “control” us for regulatory purposes, which could subject such investor to regulatory filings or other regulatory consequences. The requirements of the BHC Act and the CBCA could limit our access to capital and could limit parties who could acquire shares of our common stock.

Regulatory Restrictions on Dividends; Source of Strength. Guaranty Bancshares, Inc. is regarded as a legal entity separate and distinct from Guaranty Bank & Trust. The principal source of the Company’s revenues is dividends received from Guaranty Bank & Trust. Federal law currently imposes limitations upon certain capital distributions by national banks, such as certain cash dividends, payments to repurchase or otherwise acquire its shares, payments to shareholders of another institution in a cash-out merger and other distributions charged against capital. The Federal Reserve and OCC regulate all capital distributions by the Bank directly or indirectly to the Company, including dividend payments. The Federal Reserve has issued a policy statement that provides that a bank holding company should not pay dividends unless (1) its net income over the last four quarters (net of dividends paid) has been sufficient to fully fund the dividends, (2) the prospective rate of earnings retention appears to be consistent with the capital needs, asset quality and overall financial condition of the bank holding company and its subsidiaries and (3) the bank holding company will continue to meet minimum required capital adequacy ratios. Accordingly, we should not pay cash dividends that exceed our net income in any year or that can only be funded in ways that weaken our financial strength, including by borrowing money to pay dividends.

Under Federal Reserve policy, bank holding companies have historically been required to act as a source of financial and managerial strength to each of their banking subsidiaries, and the Dodd-Frank Act codified this policy as a statutory requirement. Under this requirement, the Company is expected to commit resources to support Guaranty Bank & Trust, including at times when we may not be in a financial position to provide such resources. Any capital loans by a bank holding company to any of its subsidiary banks are subordinate in right of payment to deposits and to certain other indebtedness of such subsidiary banks. As discussed below, a bank holding company, in certain circumstances, could be required to guarantee the capital restoration plan of an undercapitalized banking subsidiary. If the capital of Guaranty Bank & Trust were to become impaired, the Federal Reserve could assess the Company for the deficiency. If the Company failed to pay the assessment within three months, the Federal Reserve could order the sale of the Company’s stock in Guaranty Bank & Trust to cover the deficiency.

In the event of a bank holding company’s bankruptcy under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, the trustee will be deemed to have assumed and will be required to cure immediately any deficit under any commitment by the debtor holding company to any of the federal banking agencies to maintain the capital of an insured depository institution, and any claim for breach of such obligation will generally have priority over most other unsecured claims.

Scope of Permissible Activities. Under the BHC Act, the Company is prohibited from acquiring a direct or indirect interest in or control of more than 5.0% of the voting shares of any company that is not a bank or financial holding company and from engaging directly or indirectly in activities other than those of banking, managing or controlling banks or furnishing services to or performing services for its subsidiary banks, except that the Company may engage in, directly or indirectly, and may own shares of companies engaged in certain activities found by the Federal Reserve to be so

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closely related to banking or managing and controlling banks as to be a proper incident thereto. These activities include, among others, operating a mortgage, finance, credit card or factoring company; performing certain data processing operations; providing investment and financial advice; acting as an insurance agent for certain types of credit-related insurance; leasing personal property on a full-payout, nonoperating basis; and providing certain stock brokerage and investment advisory services. In approving acquisitions or the addition of activities, the Federal Reserve considers, among other things, whether the acquisition or the additional activities can reasonably be expected to produce benefits to the public, such as greater convenience, increased competition, or gains in efficiency, that outweigh such possible adverse effects as undue concentration of resources, decreased or unfair competition, conflicts of interest or unsound banking practices.

Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, also known as the Financial Services Modernization Act of 1999, effective March 11, 2000, or the GLB Act, amended the BHC Act and eliminated the barriers to affiliations among banks, securities firms, insurance companies and other financial service providers. The GLB Act permitted bank holding companies to become financial holding companies and thereby affiliate with securities firms and insurance companies and engage in other activities that are financial in nature. The GLB Act defines “financial in nature” to include, among other things, securities underwriting, dealing and market making; sponsoring mutual funds and investment companies; insurance underwriting and agency; merchant banking activities; and activities that the Federal Reserve has determined to be closely related to banking. No regulatory approval will be required for a financial holding company to acquire a company, other than a bank or savings association, engaged in activities that are financial in nature or incidental to activities that are financial in nature, as determined by the Federal Reserve. We currently have no plans to make a financial holding company election, although we may make a financial holding company election in the future if we desire to engage in any lines of business that are impermissible for bank holding companies but permissible for financial holding companies.

Safe and Sound Banking Practices. Bank holding companies are not permitted to engage in unsafe and unsound banking practices. The Federal Reserve’s Regulation Y, for example, generally requires a bank holding company to provide the Federal Reserve with prior notice of any redemption or repurchase of its own equity securities, if the consideration to be paid, together with the consideration paid for any repurchases or redemptions in the preceding year, is equal to 10.0% or more of the bank holding company’s consolidated net worth. The Federal Reserve may oppose the transaction if it believes that the transaction would constitute an unsafe or unsound practice or would violate any law or regulation. In certain circumstances, the Federal Reserve could take the position that paying a dividend would constitute an unsafe or unsound banking practice.

The Federal Reserve has broad authority to prohibit activities of bank holding companies and their nonbanking subsidiaries which represent unsafe and unsound banking practices, result in breaches of fiduciary duty or which constitute violations of laws or regulations, and can assess civil money penalties or impose enforcement action for such activities. The penalties can be as high as $1,000,000 for each day the activity continues.

Anti-tying Restrictions. Bank holding companies and their affiliates are prohibited from tying the provision of certain services, such as extensions of credit, to other nonbanking services offered by a bank holding company or its affiliates.

Guaranty Bank & Trust, N.A.

The Bank is subject to various requirements and restrictions under the laws of the United States, and to regulation, supervision and examination by the OCC. The Bank is also an insured depository institution and, therefore, subject to regulation by the FDIC, although the OCC is the Bank’s primary federal regulator. The OCC and the FDIC have the power to enforce compliance with applicable banking statutes and regulations. Such requirements and restrictions include requirements to maintain reserves against deposits, restrictions on the nature and amount of loans that may be made and the interest that may be charged thereon and restrictions relating to investments and other activities of the Bank.

Capital Adequacy Requirements. The OCC monitors the capital adequacy of the Bank by using a combination of risk-based guidelines and leverage ratios. The OCC considers the Bank’s capital levels when taking action on various types of applications and when conducting supervisory activities related to the safety and soundness of the Bank and the banking system. Under the revised capital rules which became effective on January 1, 2015, national banks are required to maintain four minimum capital standards: (1) a Tier 1 capital to adjusted total assets ratio, or “leverage capital ratio,” of at least 4.0%, (2) a Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets ratio, or “Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio,” of at least 6.0%, (3) a total risk-based capital (Tier 1 plus Tier 2) to risk-weighted assets ratio, or “total risk-based capital ratio,” of at least 8.0%, and (4) a CET1 capital ratio of 4.5%. In addition, the OCC’s prompt corrective action standards discussed below, in effect,

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increase the minimum regulatory capital ratios for banking organizations. These capital requirements are minimum requirements. Higher capital levels may be required if warranted by the particular circumstances or risk profiles of individual institutions, or if required by the banking regulators due to the economic conditions impacting our market. For example, OCC regulations provide that higher capital may be required to take adequate account of, among other things, interest rate risk and the risks posed by concentrations of credit, nontraditional activities or securities trading activities.

Corrective Measures for Capital Deficiencies. The federal banking regulators are required by the Federal Deposit Insurance Act, or FDI Act, to take “prompt corrective action” with respect to capital-deficient institutions that are FDIC-insured. Agency regulations define, for each capital category, the levels at which institutions are “well capitalized,” “adequately capitalized,” “undercapitalized,” “significantly undercapitalized” and “critically undercapitalized.” Under the revised capital rules, which became effective on January 1, 2015, a “well capitalized” bank has a total risk-based capital ratio of 10.0% or higher, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 8.0% or higher, a leverage ratio of 5.0% or higher, a CET1 capital ratio of 6.5% or higher, and is not subject to any written agreement, order or directive requiring it to maintain a specific capital level for any capital measure. An “adequately capitalized” bank has a total risk-based capital ratio of 8.0% or higher, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 6.0% or higher, a leverage ratio of 4.0% or higher (3.0% or higher if the bank was rated a composite 1 in its most recent examination report and is not experiencing significant growth), a CET1 capital ratio of 4.5% or higher, and does not meet the criteria for a well-capitalized bank. A bank is “undercapitalized” if it fails to meet any one of the ratios required to be adequately capitalized.

In addition to requiring undercapitalized institutions to submit a capital restoration plan, agency regulations contain broad restrictions on certain activities of undercapitalized institutions including asset growth, acquisitions, branch establishment and expansion into new lines of business. With certain exceptions, an insured depository institution is prohibited from making capital distributions, including dividends, and is prohibited from paying management fees to control persons if the institution would be undercapitalized after any such distribution or payment.

As a national bank’s capital decreases, the OCC’s enforcement powers become more severe. A significantly undercapitalized national bank is subject to mandated capital raising activities, restrictions on interest rates paid and transactions with affiliates, removal of management and other restrictions. The OCC has very limited discretion in dealing with a critically undercapitalized national bank and is virtually required to appoint a receiver or conservator.

Banks with risk-based capital and leverage ratios below the required minimums may also be subject to certain administrative actions, including the termination of deposit insurance upon notice and hearing, or a temporary suspension of insurance without a hearing in the event the institution has no tangible capital.

Branching. National banks are required by the National Bank Act to adhere to branching laws applicable to state banks in the states in which they are located. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, de novo interstate branching by national banks is permitted if, under the laws of the state where the branch is to be located, a state bank chartered in that state would have been permitted to establish a branch. Under current Texas law, banks are permitted to establish branch offices throughout Texas with prior regulatory approval. In addition, with prior regulatory approval, banks are permitted to acquire branches of existing banks located in Texas. Banks located in Texas may also branch across state lines by merging with banks or by purchasing a branch of another bank in other states if allowed by the applicable states’ laws.

Restrictions on Transactions with Affiliates and Insiders. Transactions between the Bank and its nonbanking subsidiaries and/or affiliates, including the Company, are subject to Section 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act and Regulation.

In general, Section 23A of the Federal Reserve Act imposes limits on the amount of such transactions, and also requires certain levels of collateral for loans to affiliated parties. It also limits the amount of advances to third parties which are collateralized by the securities or obligations of the Company or its subsidiaries. Covered transactions with any single affiliate may not exceed 10.0% of the capital stock and surplus of the Bank, and covered transactions with all affiliates may not exceed, in the aggregate, 20.0% of the Bank’s capital and surplus. For a bank, capital stock and surplus refers to the bank’s Tier 1 and Tier 2 capital, as calculated under the risk-based capital guidelines, plus the balance of the allowance for credit losses excluded from Tier 2 capital. The Bank’s transactions with all of its affiliates in the aggregate are limited to 20.0% of the foregoing capital. “Covered transactions” are defined by statute to include a loan or extension of credit to an affiliate, as well as a purchase of securities issued by an affiliate, a purchase of assets (unless otherwise exempted by the Federal Reserve) from the affiliate, the acceptance of securities issued by the affiliate as collateral for a loan, and the issuance of a guarantee, acceptance or letter of credit on behalf of an affiliate. In addition, in connection with covered transactions that are extensions of credit, the Bank may be required to hold collateral to provide added security to the Bank, and the types of permissible collateral may be limited. The Dodd-Frank Act generally enhances the restrictions on transactions with affiliates, including an expansion of what types of transactions are covered transactions to include

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credit exposures related to derivatives, repurchase agreement and securities lending arrangements and an increase in the amount of time for which collateral requirements regarding covered transactions must be satisfied.

Affiliate transactions are also subject to Section 23B of the Federal Reserve Act which generally requires that certain transactions between the Bank and its affiliates be on terms substantially the same, or at least as favorable to the Bank, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with or involving other nonaffiliated persons. The Federal Reserve has also issued Regulation W which codifies prior regulations under Sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act and interpretive guidance with respect to affiliate transactions.

The restrictions on loans to directors, executive officers, principal shareholders and their related interests (collectively referred to herein as “insiders”) contained in Section 22(h) of the Federal Reserve Act and in Regulation O promulgated by the Federal Reserve apply to all insured institutions and their subsidiaries and bank holding companies. These restrictions include limits on loans to one borrower and conditions that must be met before such a loan can be made. There is also an aggregate limitation on all loans to insiders and their related interests. Generally, the aggregate of these loans cannot exceed the institution’s total unimpaired capital and surplus, although a bank’s regulators may determine that a lesser amount is appropriate. Loans to senior executive officers of a bank are even further restricted. Insiders are subject to enforcement actions for accepting loans in violation of applicable restrictions.

Restrictions on Distribution of Bank Dividends and Assets. Dividends paid by the Bank have provided a substantial part of the Company’s operating funds and for the foreseeable future it is anticipated that dividends paid by the Bank to the Company will continue to be our principal source of operating funds. Earnings and capital adequacy requirements serve to limit the amount of dividends that may be paid by the Bank. In general terms, federal law provides that the Bank’s board of directors may, from time to time and as it deems expedient, declare a dividend out of its net profits. Generally, the total of all dividends declared in a year shall not, unless approved by the OCC, exceed the net profits of that year combined with its net profits of the past two years. At December 31, 2020, the Bank had $24.9 million available for payment of dividends.

In addition, under the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act of 1991, or FDICIA, the Bank may not pay any dividend if it is undercapitalized or the payment of the dividend would cause it to become undercapitalized. The OCC may further restrict the payment of dividends by requiring that the Bank maintain a higher level of capital than otherwise required for it to be adequately capitalized for regulatory purposes. Moreover, if, in the opinion of the OCC, the Bank is engaged in an unsound practice (which could include the payment of dividends), it may require, generally after notice and hearing, that the Bank cease such practice. The OCC has indicated that paying dividends that deplete a depository institution’s capital base to an inadequate level would be an unsafe banking practice. The OCC has also issued policy statements providing that insured depository institutions generally should pay dividends only out of current operating earnings.

Further, in the event of a liquidation or other resolution of an insured depository institution, the claims of depositors and other general or subordinated creditors are entitled to a priority of payment over the claims of holders of any obligation of the institution to its shareholders, including any depository institution holding company (such as us) or any shareholder or creditor thereof.

Incentive Compensation Guidance. The federal banking agencies have issued comprehensive guidance on incentive compensation policies intended to ensure that the incentive compensation policies of banking organizations do not undermine the safety and soundness of those organizations by encouraging excessive risk-taking. The incentive compensation guidance sets expectations for banking organizations concerning their incentive compensation arrangements and related risk-management, control and governance processes. The incentive compensation guidance, which covers all employees that have the ability to materially affect the risk profile of an organization, either individually or as part of a group, is based upon three primary principles: (1) balanced risk-taking incentives, (2) compatibility with effective controls and risk management and (3) strong corporate governance. Any deficiencies in compensation practices that are identified may be incorporated into the organization’s supervisory ratings, which can affect its ability to make acquisitions or take other actions. In addition, under the incentive compensation guidance, a banking organization’s federal supervisor may initiate enforcement action if the organization’s incentive compensation arrangements pose a risk to the safety and soundness of the organization. Further, a provision of the Basel III capital standards described above would limit discretionary bonus payments to bank executives if the institution’s regulatory capital ratios fail to exceed certain thresholds. A number of federal regulatory agencies proposed rules that would require enhanced disclosure of incentive-based compensation arrangements initially in April 2011, and again in April and May 2016, but the rules have not been finalized and would mostly apply to banking organizations with over $50 billion in total assets. The scope and content of the U.S. banking regulators’ policies on executive compensation are continuing to develop and are likely to continue evolving in the near future.

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Audit Reports. For insured institutions with total assets of $1.0 billion or more, requirements include financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP, management’s certifications signed by our and the Bank’s chief executive officer and chief accounting or financial officer concerning management’s responsibility for the financial statements, and an attestation by the auditors regarding the Bank’s internal controls must be submitted. For institutions with total assets of more than $3.0 billion, independent auditors may be required to review quarterly financial statements. FDICIA requires that the Bank have an independent audit committee, consisting of outside directors who are independent of management of the Bank. The committees of such institutions must include members with experience in banking or financial management, must have access to outside counsel and must not include representatives of large customers. The Bank’s audit committee consists entirely of independent directors.

Deposit Insurance Assessments. The FDIC insures the deposits of federally insured banks up to prescribed statutory limits for each depositor through the Deposit Insurance Fund and safeguards the safety and soundness of the banking and thrift industries. The maximum amount of deposit insurance for banks and savings institutions is $250,000 per depositor. The amount of FDIC assessments paid by each insured depository institution is based on its relative risk of default as measured by regulatory capital ratios and other supervisory factors and is calculated based on an institution’s average consolidated total assets minus average tangible equity.

We are generally unable to control the amount of premiums that we are required to pay for FDIC insurance. At least semi-annually, the FDIC will update its loss and income projections for the Deposit Insurance Fund and, if needed, will increase or decrease assessment rates, following notice-and-comment rulemaking, if required. If there are additional bank or financial institution failures or if the FDIC otherwise determines to increase assessment rates, the Bank may be required to pay higher FDIC insurance premiums. Any future increases in FDIC insurance premiums may have a material and adverse effect on our earnings.

Financial Modernization. Under the GLB Act, banks may establish financial subsidiaries and engage, subject to limitations on investment, in activities that are financial in nature, other than insurance underwriting as principal, insurance company portfolio investment, real estate development, real estate investment, annuity issuance and merchant banking activities. To do so, a bank must be well capitalized, well managed and have a CRA rating from its primary federal regulator of satisfactory or better. Subsidiary banks of financial holding companies or banks with financial subsidiaries must remain well capitalized and well managed in order to continue to engage in activities that are financial in nature without regulatory actions or restrictions. Such actions or restrictions could include divestiture of the “financial in nature” subsidiary or subsidiaries. In addition, a financial holding company or a bank may not acquire a company that is engaged in activities that are financial in nature unless each of the subsidiary banks of the financial holding company or the bank has a CRA rating of satisfactory of better. Neither we nor the Bank maintains a financial subsidiary.

Brokered Deposit Restrictions. Insured depository institutions that are categorized as adequately capitalized institutions under the FDI Act and corresponding federal regulations cannot accept, renew or roll over brokered deposits, without receiving a waiver from the FDIC, and are subject to restrictions on the interest rates that can be paid on any deposits. The EGRRCPA exempted reciprocal deposits from the definition of brokered deposits. Insured depository institutions that are categorized as undercapitalized capitalized institutions under the FDI Act and corresponding federal regulations may not accept, renew, or roll over brokered deposits. The Bank is not currently subject to such restrictions.

Concentrated Commercial Real Estate Lending Regulations. The federal banking regulatory agencies have promulgated guidance governing financial institutions with concentrations in commercial real estate lending. The guidance provides that a bank has a concentration in commercial real estate lending if (1) total reported loans for acquisition, construction, land development, and other land represent 100.0% or more of total capital or (2) total reported loans secured by multifamily and nonfarm residential properties and loans for acquisition, construction, land development, and other land represent 300.0% or more of total capital and the bank’s commercial real estate loan portfolio has increased 50% or more during the prior 36 months. Owner occupied loans are excluded from this second category. If a concentration is present, management must employ heightened risk management practices that address, among other things, Board and management oversight and strategic planning, portfolio management, development of underwriting standards, risk assessment and monitoring through market analysis and stress testing, and maintenance of increased capital levels as needed to support the level of commercial real estate lending. We are currently operating with real estate loan portfolios within such percentage levels.

Community Reinvestment Act. The CRA and the regulations issued thereunder are intended to encourage banks to help meet the credit needs of their entire assessment area, including low and moderate income neighborhoods, consistent with the safe and sound operations of such banks. These regulations also provide for regulatory assessment of a bank’s record in meeting the needs of its assessment area when considering applications to establish branches, merger applications and applications to acquire the assets and assume the liabilities of another bank. The Financial Institution Reform Recovery and Enforcement Act, or FIRREA, requires federal banking agencies to make public a rating of a bank’s

13


performance under the CRA. In the case of a bank holding company, the CRA performance record of the banks involved in the transaction are reviewed in connection with the filing of an application to acquire ownership or control of shares or assets of a bank or to merge with any other bank holding company. An unsatisfactory CRA record could substantially delay approval or result in denial of an application. The Bank received a “satisfactory” rating in its most recent CRA examination.

Consumer Laws and Regulations. The Bank is subject to numerous laws and regulations intended to protect consumers in transactions with the Bank. These laws include, among others, laws regarding unfair, deceptive and abusive acts and practices, usury laws, and other federal consumer protection statutes. These federal laws include the Electronic Fund Transfer Act, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, the Real Estate Procedures Act of 1974, the S.A.F.E. Mortgage Licensing Act of 2008, the Truth in Lending Act and the Truth in Savings Act, among others. Many states and local jurisdictions have consumer protection laws analogous, and in addition, to those enacted under federal law. These laws and regulations mandate certain disclosure requirements and regulate the manner in which financial institutions must deal with customers when taking deposits, making loans and conducting other types of transactions. Failure to comply with these laws and regulations could give rise to regulatory sanctions, customer rescission and registration rights, action by state and local attorneys general and civil or criminal liability.

In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act created the CFPB. The CFPB has broad authority to regulate the offering and provision of consumer financial products. The Dodd-Frank Act gives the CFPB authority to supervise and examine depository institutions with more than $10.0 billion in assets for compliance with these federal consumer laws. The authority to supervise and examine depository institutions with $10.0 billion or less in assets for compliance with federal consumer laws remains largely with those institutions’ primary regulators. However, the CFPB may participate in examinations of these smaller institutions on a “sampling basis” and may refer potential enforcement actions against such institutions to their primary regulators. Accordingly, the CFPB may participate in examinations of the Bank, which currently has assets of less than $10.0 billion, and could supervise and examine our other direct or indirect subsidiaries that offer consumer financial products or services. The CFPB also has supervisory and examination authority over certain nonbank institutions that offer consumer financial products. The Dodd-Frank Act identifies a number of covered nonbank institutions, and also authorizes the CFPB to identify additional institutions that will be subject to its jurisdiction. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act permits states to adopt consumer protection laws and regulations that are stricter than those regulations promulgated by the CFPB, and state attorneys general are permitted to enforce consumer protection rules adopted by the CFPB against certain institutions.

Mortgage Lending Rules. The Dodd-Frank Act authorized the CFPB to establish certain minimum standards for the origination of residential mortgages, including a determination of the borrower’s ability to repay. Under the Dodd-Frank Act and related rules, financial institutions may not make a residential mortgage loan unless they make a “reasonable and good faith determination” that the consumer has a “reasonable ability” to repay the loan. The Dodd-Frank Act allows borrowers to raise certain defenses to foreclosure but provides a full or partial safe harbor from such defenses for loans that are “qualified mortgages.” The rules define “qualified mortgages,” imposing both underwriting standards - for example, a borrower’s debt-to-income ratio may not exceed 43.0% - and limits on the terms of their loans. Certain loans, including interest-only loans and negative amortization loans, cannot be qualified mortgages. EGRRCPA, among other matters, expanded the definition of qualified mortgages for banks with less than $10 billion in assets.

Anti-Money Laundering and OFAC. Under federal law, including the Bank Secrecy Act, or BSA, and the USA PATRIOT Act of 2001, certain financial institutions, such as the Bank, must maintain anti-money laundering programs that include established internal policies, procedures and controls; a designated BSA officer; an ongoing employee training program; and testing of the program by an independent audit function. Financial institutions are also prohibited from entering into specified financial transactions and account relationships and must meet enhanced standards for due diligence and customer identification especially in their dealings with foreign financial institutions and foreign customers. Financial institutions must take reasonable steps to conduct enhanced scrutiny of account relationships to guard against money laundering and to report any suspicious transactions, and law enforcement authorities have been granted increased access to financial information maintained by financial institutions. The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, or FinCEN, issued final rules under the BSA in July 2016 that clarify and strengthen the due diligence requirements for banks with regard to their customers.

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The Office of Foreign Assets Control, or OFAC, administers laws and Executive Orders that prohibit U.S. entities from engaging in transactions with certain prohibited parties. OFAC publishes lists of persons and organizations suspected of aiding, harboring or engaging in terrorist acts, known as Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons. Generally, if a bank identifies a transaction, account or wire transfer relating to a person or entity on an OFAC list, it must freeze the account or block the transaction, file a suspicious activity report and notify the appropriate authorities.

Bank regulators routinely examine institutions for compliance with these obligations and they must consider an institution’s compliance in connection with the regulatory review of applications, including applications for bank mergers and acquisitions. Failure of a financial institution to maintain and implement adequate programs to combat money laundering and terrorist financing and comply with OFAC sanctions, or to comply with relevant laws and regulations, could have serious legal, reputational and financial consequences for the institution.

Privacy. The federal banking regulators have adopted rules that limit the ability of banks and other financial institutions to disclose non-public information about consumers to non-affiliated third parties. These limitations require disclosure of privacy policies to consumers and, in some circumstances, allow consumers to prevent disclosure of certain personal information to a non-affiliated third party. These regulations affect how consumer information is transmitted through financial services companies and conveyed to outside vendors. In addition, consumers may also prevent disclosure of certain information among affiliated companies that is assembled or used to determine eligibility for a product or service, such as that shown on consumer credit reports and asset and income information from applications. Consumers also have the option to direct banks and other financial institutions not to share information about transactions and experiences with affiliated companies for the purpose of marketing products or services. In addition to applicable federal privacy regulations, the Bank is subject to certain state privacy laws.

Federal Home Loan Bank System. The FHLB system, of which the Bank is a member, consists of 12 regional FHLBs governed and regulated by the Federal Housing Finance Board, or FHFB. The FHLBs serve as reserve or credit facilities for member institutions within their assigned regions. The reserves are funded primarily from proceeds derived from the sale of consolidated obligations of the FHLB system. The FHLBs make loans (i.e., advances) to members in accordance with policies and procedures established by the FHLB and the Boards of directors of each regional FHLB.

As a system member, according to currently existing policies and procedures, the Bank is entitled to borrow from the Dallas FHLB provided it posts acceptable collateral. The Bank is also required to own a certain amount of capital stock in the FHLB. The Bank is in compliance with the stock ownership rules with respect to such advances, commitments and letters of credit and collateral requirements with respect to home mortgage loans and similar obligations. All loans, advances and other extensions of credit made by the FHLB to the Bank are secured by a portion of the respective mortgage loan portfolio, certain other investments and the capital stock of the FHLB held by the Bank.

Enforcement Powers. The federal banking agencies, including our primary federal regulator, the OCC, have broad enforcement powers, including the power to terminate deposit insurance, impose substantial fines and other civil and criminal penalties, and appoint a conservator or receiver. Failure to comply with applicable laws, regulations and supervisory agreements, breaches of fiduciary duty or the maintenance of unsafe and unsound conditions or practices could subject the Company or the Bank and their subsidiaries, as well as their respective officers, directors, and other institution-affiliated parties, to administrative sanctions and potentially substantial civil money penalties. For example, the regulatory authorities may appoint the FDIC as conservator or receiver for a banking institution (or the FDIC may appoint itself, under certain circumstances) if any one or more of a number of circumstances exist, including, without limitation, the fact that the banking institution is undercapitalized and has no reasonable prospect of becoming adequately capitalized, fails to become adequately capitalized when required to do so, fails to submit a timely and acceptable capital restoration plan or materially fails to implement an accepted capital restoration plan.

Effect of Governmental Monetary Policies

The commercial banking business is affected not only by general economic conditions but also by U.S. fiscal policy and the monetary policies of the Federal Reserve. Some of the instruments of monetary policy available to the Federal Reserve include changes in the discount rate on member bank borrowings, the fluctuating availability of borrowings at the “discount window,” open market operations, the imposition of and changes in reserve requirements against member banks’ deposits and certain borrowings by banks and their affiliates and assets of foreign branches. These policies influence to a significant extent the overall growth of bank loans, investments, and deposits and the interest rates charged on loans or paid on deposits. We cannot predict the nature of future fiscal and monetary policies or the effect of these policies on our operations and activities, financial condition, results of operations, growth plans or future prospects.

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Impact of Current Laws and Regulations

The cumulative effect of these laws and regulations, while providing certain benefits, adds significantly to the cost of our operations and thus have a negative impact on our profitability. There has also been a notable expansion in recent years of financial service providers that are not subject to the examination, oversight, and other rules and regulations to which we are subject. Those providers, because they are not so highly regulated, may have a competitive advantage over us and may continue to draw large amounts of funds away from traditional banking institutions, with a continuing adverse effect on the banking industry in general.

Future Legislation and Regulatory Reform

In light of current economic conditions, regulators have increased their focus on the regulation of financial institutions. From time to time, various legislative and regulatory initiatives are introduced in Congress and state legislatures. New regulations and statutes are regularly proposed that contain wide-ranging proposals for altering the structures, regulations and competitive relationships of financial institutions operating in the United States. We cannot predict whether or in what form any proposed regulation or statute will be adopted or the extent to which our business may be affected by any new regulation or statute. Future legislation, regulation and policies, and the effects of that legislation and regulation and those policies, may have a significant influence on our operations and activities, financial condition, results of operations, growth plans or future prospects and the overall growth and distribution of loans, investments and deposits. Such legislation, regulation and policies have had a significant effect on the operations and activities, financial condition, results of operations, growth plans and future prospects of commercial banks in the past and are expected to continue to do so.

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ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. Before you decide to invest in our common stock, you should carefully consider the risks described below, together with all other information included in this Annual Report on Form 10K, including the disclosures in “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our consolidated financial statements and the related notes included in “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.” The following is a summary of the significant risk factors that we believe could adversely affect our business, followed by more detailed descriptions of those risks. We believe the risks described below are the risks that are material to us as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10K. If any of the following risks actually occur, our business, financial condition, results of operations and growth prospects could be materially and adversely affected. In that case, you could experience a partial or complete loss of your investment.

 

Risks Related to Our Business

 

 

We may not be able to implement aspects of our expansion strategy, which may adversely affect our ability to maintain our historical earnings trends.

 

We may not be able to overcome the integration and other risks associated with acquisitions, which could have an adverse effect on our ability to implement our business strategy.

 

As a business operating in the financial services industry, adverse conditions in the general business or economic environment could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations in the future.

 

We may not be able to adequately measure and limit our credit risk, which could lead to unexpected losses.

 

We are dependent on the use of data and modeling in our management’s decision-making, and faulty data or modeling approaches could negatively impact our decision-making ability or possibly subject us to regulatory scrutiny in the future.

 

The small- to medium-sized businesses that we lend to may have fewer resources to weather adverse business developments, which may impair our borrowers’ ability to repay loans.

 

Our commercial real estate and real estate construction loan portfolio exposes us to credit risks that may be greater than the risks related to other types of loans.

 

Because a significant portion of our loan portfolio is comprised of real estate loans, negative changes in the economy affecting real estate values and liquidity could impair the value of collateral securing our real estate loans and result in loan and other losses.

 

Appraisals and other valuation techniques we use in evaluating and monitoring loans secured by real property, other real estate owned and repossessed personal property may not accurately describe the net value of the asset.

 

Our allowance for credit losses may prove to be insufficient to absorb potential losses in our loan portfolio.

 

If we fail to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to report our financial results accurately and timely, in which case our business may be harmed, investors may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, we could be subject to regulatory penalties and the price of our common stock may decline.

 

We rely heavily on our executive management team and other key employees, and we could be adversely affected by the unexpected loss of their services.

 

A lack of liquidity could impair our ability to fund operations and adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We may need to raise additional capital in the future, and such capital may not be available when needed or at all.

 

We are subject to interest rate risk and fluctuations in interest rates may adversely affect our earnings.

 

Our business is concentrated in, and largely dependent upon, the continued growth and welfare of our primary markets, and adverse economic conditions in these markets could negatively impact our operations and customers.

 

We face strong competition from financial services companies and other companies that offer banking services.

 

Our trust and wealth management division derives its revenue from noninterest income and is subject to operational, compliance, reputational, fiduciary and strategic risks that could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Negative public opinion regarding our company or failure to maintain our reputation in the communities we serve could adversely affect our business and prevent us from growing our business.

 

We could recognize losses on investment securities held in our securities portfolio, particularly if interest rates increase or economic and market conditions deteriorate.

 

The accuracy of our financial statements and related disclosures could be affected if the judgments, assumptions or estimates used in our critical accounting policies are inaccurate.

 

System failure or cyber security breaches of our network security could subject us to increased operating costs as well as litigation and other potential losses.

 

We have a continuing need for technological change, and we may not have the resources to effectively implement new technology, or we may experience operational challenges when implementing new technology or technology needed to compete effectively with larger institutions may not be available to us on a cost effective basis.

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We are subject to certain operational risks, including, but not limited to, customer, employee or third-party fraud and data processing system failures and errors.

 

Our primary markets are susceptible to natural disasters and other catastrophes that could negatively impact the economies of our markets, our operations or our customers, any of which could have an adverse effect on us.

 

If the goodwill that we have recorded or may record in connection with a business acquisition becomes impaired, it could require charges to earnings.

 

We may be adversely affected by changes in U.S. tax laws.

 

Risk Related to Regulation of Our Industry

 

 

The ongoing implementation of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, or the Dodd-Frank Act, could adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

We operate in a highly regulated environment and the laws and regulations that govern our operations, corporate governance, executive compensation and accounting principles, or changes in them, or our failure to comply with them, could adversely affect us.

 

Federal banking agencies periodically conduct examinations of our business, including compliance with laws and regulations, and our failure to comply with any supervisory actions to which we are or become subject as a result of such examinations could adversely affect us.

 

We are subject to stringent capital requirements, which may result in lower returns on equity, require the raising of additional capital, limit our ability to repurchase shares or pay dividends and discretionary bonuses, or result in regulatory action.

 

Financial institutions, such as the Bank, face a risk of noncompliance and enforcement action with the Bank Secrecy Act and other anti-money laundering statutes and regulations.

 

We are subject to numerous laws designed to protect consumers, including the Community Reinvestment Act and fair lending laws, and failure to comply with these laws could lead to a wide variety of sanctions.

 

Monetary policies and regulations of the Federal Reserve could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We are subject to commercial real estate lending guidance issued by the federal banking regulators that impacts our operations and capital requirements.

 

Risks Related to an Investment in Our Common Stock

 

 

The market price of our common stock may be subject to substantial fluctuations, which may make it difficult for you to sell your shares at the volume, prices and times desired.

 

Securities analysts may not initiate or continue coverage on us.

 

Our management and board of directors have significant control over our business.

 

The holders of our existing debt obligations, as well as debt obligations that may be outstanding in the future, will have priority over our common stock with respect to payment in the event of liquidation, dissolution or winding up and with respect to the payment of interest.

 

We may issue shares of preferred stock in the future, which could make it difficult for another company to acquire us or could otherwise adversely affect holders of our common stock, which could depress the price of our common stock.

 

We are an emerging growth company, and the reduced regulatory and reporting requirements applicable to emerging growth companies may make our common stock less attractive to investors.

 

Our dividend policy may change without notice, and our future ability to pay dividends is subject to restrictions.

 

Our corporate organizational documents and provisions of federal and state law to which we are subject contain certain provisions that could have an anti-takeover effect and may delay, make more difficult or prevent an attempted acquisition that you may favor or an attempted replacement of our board of directors or management.

 

An investment in our common stock is not an insured deposit and is subject to risk of loss.

 

Risks Related to Our Business

We may not be able to implement aspects of our expansion strategy, which may adversely affect our ability to maintain our historical earnings trends.

Our expansion strategy focuses on organic growth, supplemented by strategic acquisitions and expansion of the Bank’s banking location network, or de novo branching. We may not be able to execute on aspects of our expansion strategy, which may impair our ability to sustain our historical rate of growth or prevent us from growing at all. More specifically, we may not be able to generate sufficient new loans and deposits within acceptable risk and expense tolerances, obtain the personnel or funding necessary for additional growth or find suitable acquisition candidates. Various factors, such as economic conditions and competition with other financial institutions, may impede or prohibit the growth

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of our operations, the opening of new banking locations and the consummation of acquisitions. Further, we may be unable to attract and retain experienced bankers, which could adversely affect our growth. The success of our strategy also depends on our ability to effectively manage growth, which is dependent upon a number of factors, including our ability to adapt our credit, operational, technology and governance infrastructure to accommodate expanded operations. If we fail to implement one or more aspects of our strategy, we may be unable to maintain our historical earnings trends, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may not be able to manage the risks associated with our anticipated growth and expansion through de novo branching.

Our business strategy includes evaluating strategic opportunities to grow through de novo branching, and we believe that banking location expansion has been meaningful to our growth since inception. De novo branching carries with it certain potential risks, including significant startup costs and anticipated initial operating losses; an inability to gain regulatory approval; an inability to secure the services of qualified senior management to operate the de novo banking location and successfully integrate and promote our corporate culture; poor market reception for de novo banking locations established in markets where we do not have a preexisting reputation; challenges posed by local economic conditions; challenges associated with securing attractive locations at a reasonable cost; and the additional strain on management resources and internal systems and controls. Failure to adequately manage the risks associated with our anticipated growth through de novo branching could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may not be able to overcome the integration and other risks associated with acquisitions, which could have an adverse effect on our ability to implement our business strategy.

Although we plan to continue to grow our business organically and through de novo branching, we also intend to pursue acquisition opportunities that we believe complement our activities and have the ability to enhance our profitability and provide attractive risk-adjusted returns. Our acquisition activities could be material to our business and involve a number of risks, including the following:

 

intense competition from other banking organizations and other acquirers for potential merger candidates;

 

market pricing for desirable acquisitions resulting in returns that are less attractive than we have traditionally sought to achieve;

 

incurring time and expense associated with identifying and evaluating potential acquisitions and negotiating potential transactions, resulting in our attention being diverted from the operation of our existing business;

 

using inaccurate estimates and judgments to evaluate credit, operations, management and market risks with respect to the target institution or assets;

 

potential exposure to unknown or contingent liabilities of banks and businesses we acquire, including consumer compliance issues;

 

the time and expense required to integrate the operations and personnel of the combined businesses;

 

experiencing higher operating expenses relative to operating income from the new operations;

 

losing key employees and customers;

 

reputational issues if the target’s management does not align with our culture and values;

 

significant problems relating to the conversion of the financial and customer data of the target;

 

integration of acquired customers into our financial and customer product systems;

 

risks of impairment to goodwill; or

 

regulatory timeframes for review of applications may limit the number and frequency of transactions we may be able to consummate.

Depending on the condition of any institution or assets or liabilities that we may acquire, that acquisition may, at least in the near term, adversely affect our capital and earnings and, if not successfully integrated with our organization, may continue to have such effects over a longer period. We may not be successful in overcoming these risks or any other problems encountered in connection with pending or potential acquisitions, and any acquisition we may consider will be subject to prior regulatory approval. Our inability to overcome these risks could have an adverse effect on our ability to

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implement our business strategy, which, in turn, could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

A key piece of our expansion strategy is a focus on decision-making authority at the branch and market level, and our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be adversely affected if our local teams do not follow our internal policies or are negligent in their decision-making.

In order to be able to provide the responsive and individualized customer service that distinguishes us from competitors and in order to attract and retain management talent, we empower our local management teams to make certain business decisions on the local level. Lending authorities are assigned to branch presidents and their banking teams based on their experience, with all loan relationships in excess of internal specified maximums being reviewed by the Bank’s Directors’ Loan Committee, comprised of senior management of the Bank, or the Bank’s board of directors, as the case may be. Our local lenders may not follow our internal procedures or otherwise act in our best interests with respect to their decision-making. A failure of our employees to follow our internal policies, or actions taken by our employees that are negligent or not in our best interests could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

As a business operating in the financial services industry, adverse conditions in the general business or economic environment could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations in the future.

Our business and operations, which primarily consist of lending money to customers in the form of loans, borrowing money from customers in the form of deposits and investing in securities, are sensitive to general business and economic conditions in the United States. Uncertainty about the federal fiscal policymaking process, and the medium and long-term fiscal outlook of the federal government and U.S. economy, is a concern for businesses, consumers and investors in the U.S. In addition, economic conditions in foreign countries, including global political hostilities or public health outbreaks and uncertainty over the stability of foreign currency, could affect the stability of global financial markets, which could hinder domestic economic growth. The current economic environment is characterized by interest rates at historically low levels, which impacts our ability to attract deposits and to generate attractive earnings through our investment portfolio and we are unable to predict changes in market interest rates. In addition, financial institutions in Texas can be affected by volatility with the oil and gas industry and significant decreases in energy prices. Although we do not have material direct exposure to the oil and gas industry, we retain some indirect exposure, as some of our customers’ businesses are directly affected by volatility with the oil and gas industry and energy prices.

The spread of COVID-19 has created a global public health crisis that has resulted in unprecedented uncertainty, volatility and disruption in financial markets and in governmental, commercial and consumer activity in the United States and globally. Governmental responses to the pandemic have included orders closing businesses not deemed essential and directing individuals to restrict their movements, observe social distancing and shelter in place. These actions, together with responses to the pandemic by businesses and individuals, have resulted in rapid decreases in commercial and consumer activity, temporary closures of many businesses that have led to loss of revenues and a rapid increase in unemployment, material decreases in oil and gas prices and in business valuations, disrupted global supply chains, market downturns and volatility, changes in consumer behavior related to pandemic fears, related emergency response legislation and an expectation that Federal Reserve policy will maintain a low interest rate environment for the foreseeable future. These changes have a significant adverse effect on the markets in which we conduct our business and the demand for our products and services.

Business and consumer customers of the Bank are experiencing varying degrees of financial distress, which may adversely affect their ability to timely pay interest and principal on their loans and the value of the collateral securing their obligations. This in turn has influenced the recognition of credit losses in our loan portfolios and has increased our allowance for credit losses. Disruptions to our customers' businesses could also result in declines in, among other things, wealth management revenue. These developments as a consequence of the pandemic have materially impacted our business and the businesses of our customers and may have a material adverse effect on our financial results in future periods.

While vaccinations for COVID-19 are now available in limited quantities, COVID-19 is not yet fully contained as different strains of the virus have developed and logistical and political issues with deployment of vaccinations, both in the US and abroad. As a result, COVID-19 could still impact significantly more households and businesses. Given the ongoing and dynamic nature of the circumstances, it is not possible to accurately predict the extent, severity or duration of these conditions or when normal economic and operating conditions will resume. For this reason, the extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic affects our business, operations and financial condition, as well as our regulatory capital and liquidity

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ratios and credit ratings, is highly uncertain and unpredictable and depends on, among other things, new information that may emerge concerning the scope, duration and severity of the COVID-19 virus, mutations of the virus and actions taken by governmental authorities and other parties in response to the pandemic. If the pandemic is prolonged, the adverse impact on the markets in which we operate and on our business, operations and financial condition could deepen.

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and the related adverse local and national economic consequences, we could be subject to any of the following risks, any of which could have a material, adverse effect on our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations:

 

Demand for our products and services may decline, making it difficult to grow assets and income.

 

If the pandemic results in further reductions in economic activity, or if the pandemic-related reductions in economic activity persist for a longer time than customers expect, and high levels of unemployment continue for an extended period of time, loan delinquencies, problem assets, and foreclosures may increase, resulting in increased charges and reduced income.

 

Collateral for loans, especially real estate, may decline in value, which could cause credit losses to increase.

 

Our allowance for credit losses may have to be increased if borrowers experience financial difficulties beyond any applicable modification periods, which will adversely affect our net income.

 

The net worth and liquidity of loan guarantors may decline, impairing their ability to honor commitments to us.

 

As the result of the decline in the Federal Reserve Board’s target federal funds rate, the yield on our assets may decline to a greater extent than the decline in our cost of interest-bearing liabilities, reducing our net interest margin and spread and reducing net income.

 

A material decrease in net income or a net loss over several quarters could result in a decrease in the rate of our quarterly cash dividend.

 

Our trust and wealth management revenues may decline with continuing market turmoil.

 

A prolonged weakness in economic conditions resulting in a reduction of future projected earnings could result in our recording a valuation allowance against our current outstanding deferred tax assets.

 

We rely on third party vendors for certain services and the unavailability of a critical service due to the COVID-19 outbreak could have an adverse effect on us.

 

FDIC premiums may increase if the agency experiences additional resolution costs.

 

We may be subject to litigation as a result of our participation in PPP and other programs implemented in response to COVID-19, or changes in the terms of such programs or in the forgiveness or guaranty processes may adversely affect our net income.

We may not be able to adequately measure and limit our credit risk, which could lead to unexpected losses.

The business of lending is inherently risky, including risks that the principal of or interest on any loan will not be repaid timely or at all or that the value of any collateral supporting the loan will be insufficient to cover our outstanding exposure. These risks may be affected by the strength of the borrower’s business sector and local, regional and national market and economic conditions. Many of our loans are made to small- to medium-sized businesses that may be less able to withstand competitive, economic and financial pressures than larger borrowers. Our risk management practices, such as monitoring the concentration of our loans within specific industries and our credit approval practices, may not adequately reduce credit risk, and our credit administration personnel, policies and procedures may not adequately adapt to changes in economic or any other conditions affecting customers and the quality of the loan portfolio. Many of our borrowers have received modifications of their loan terms or are reliant on temporary government programs, or both, and the ability of such borrowers to service their debt after such modifications and temporary government programs expire is dependent on a number of factors that are currently unknown, including the severity of the pandemic at the time of such expiration, government-imposed restrictions applicable to each borrower’s business at such time, and consumer attitudes and behavior. A failure to effectively measure and limit the credit risk associated with our loan portfolio could lead to unexpected losses and have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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We are dependent on the use of data and modeling in our management’s decision-making, and faulty data or modeling approaches could negatively impact our decision-making ability or possibly subject us to regulatory scrutiny in the future.

The use of statistical and quantitative models and other quantitative analyses is endemic to bank decision-making, and the employment of such analyses is becoming increasingly widespread in our operations. Liquidity stress testing, interest rate sensitivity analysis, and the identification of possible violations of anti-money laundering regulations are all examples of areas in which we are dependent on models and the data that underlies them. The use of statistical and quantitative models is also becoming more prevalent in regulatory compliance. While we are not currently subject to annual Dodd-Frank Act stress testing, or DFAST, and the Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review, or CCAR, submissions, we anticipate that model-derived testing may become more extensively implemented by regulators in the future.

We anticipate data-based modeling will penetrate further into bank decision-making, particularly risk management efforts, as the capacities developed to meet rigorous stress testing requirements are able to be employed more widely and in differing applications. While we believe these quantitative techniques and approaches improve our decision-making, they also create the possibility that faulty data or flawed quantitative approaches could negatively impact our decision-making ability or, if we become subject to regulatory stress-testing in the future, adverse regulatory scrutiny. Secondarily, because of the complexity inherent in these approaches, misunderstanding or misuse of their outputs could similarly result in suboptimal decision-making.

The small- to medium-sized businesses that we lend to may have fewer resources to weather adverse business developments, which may impair our borrowers’ ability to repay loans.

We focus our business development and marketing strategy primarily on small- to medium-sized businesses. As of December 31, 2020, we had approximately $1.21 billion of loans to businesses, which represents approximately 64.8% of our total loan portfolio. Small- to medium-sized businesses frequently have smaller market shares than their competition, may be more vulnerable to economic downturns, often need substantial additional capital to expand or compete and may experience substantial volatility in operating results, any of which may impair a borrower’s ability to repay a loan. In addition, the success of a small- and medium-sized business often depends on the management skills, talents and efforts of a small group of people, and the death, disability or resignation of one or more of these people could have an adverse effect on the business and its ability to repay its loan. If our borrowers are unable to repay their loans, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

Our commercial real estate and real estate construction loan portfolio exposes us to credit risks that may be greater than the risks related to other types of loans.

As of December 31, 2020, approximately $943.1 million, or 50.5%, of our total loans were nonresidential real estate loans (including owner occupied commercial real estate loans), which included approximately $270.4 million, or 14.5%, of our total loans, that were construction and land development loans. These loans typically involve repayment dependent upon income generated, or expected to be generated, by the property securing the loan in amounts sufficient to cover operating expenses and debt service. The availability of such income for repayment may be adversely affected by changes in the economy or local market conditions. These loans expose a lender to greater credit risk than loans secured by other types of collateral because the collateral securing these loans is typically more difficult to liquidate due to the fluctuation of real estate values. Additionally, non-owner occupied commercial real estate loans generally involve relatively large balances to single borrowers or related groups of borrowers. Unexpected deterioration in the credit quality of our non-owner occupied commercial real estate loan portfolio could require us to increase our allowance for credit losses, which would reduce our profitability and could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Construction and land development loans also involve risks because loan funds are secured by a project under construction and the project is of uncertain value prior to its completion. It can be difficult to accurately evaluate the total funds required to complete a project, and construction lending often involves the disbursement of substantial funds with repayment dependent, in part, on the success of the ultimate project rather than the ability of a borrower or guarantor to repay the loan. If we are forced to foreclose on a project prior to completion, we may be unable to recover the entire unpaid portion of the loan. In addition, we may be required to fund additional amounts to complete a project, incur taxes, maintenance and compliance costs for a foreclosed property and may have to hold the property for an indeterminate period of time, any of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Because a significant portion of our loan portfolio is comprised of real estate loans, negative changes in the economy affecting real estate values and liquidity could impair the value of collateral securing our real estate loans and result in loan and other losses.

As of December 31, 2020, approximately $1.35 billion, or 72.5%, of our total loans were loans with real estate as a primary or secondary component of collateral. Real estate values in many Texas markets have experienced periods of fluctuation over the last five years. The market value of real estate can fluctuate significantly in a short period of time. As a result, adverse developments affecting real estate values and the liquidity of real estate in our primary markets or in Texas generally could increase the credit risk associated with our loan portfolio, and could result in losses that adversely affect credit quality, financial condition and results of operations. Negative changes in the economy affecting real estate values and liquidity in our market areas could significantly impair the value of property pledged as collateral on loans and affect our ability to sell the collateral upon foreclosure without a loss or additional losses. Collateral may have to be sold for less than the outstanding balance of the loan, which could result in losses on such loans. Such declines and losses would have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. If real estate values decline, it is also more likely that we would be required to increase our allowance for loan losses, which would adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Appraisals and other valuation techniques we use in evaluating and monitoring loans secured by real property, other real estate owned and repossessed personal property may not accurately describe the net value of the asset.

In considering whether to make a loan secured by real property, we generally require an appraisal of the property. However, an appraisal is only an estimate of the value of the property at the time the appraisal is made, and, as real estate values may change significantly in value in relatively short periods of time (especially in periods of heightened economic uncertainty), this estimate may not accurately describe the net value of the real property collateral after the loan is made. As a result, we may not be able to realize the full amount of any remaining indebtedness when we foreclose on and sell the relevant property. In addition, we rely on appraisals and other valuation techniques to establish the value of our other real estate owned, or OREO, and personal property that we acquire through foreclosure proceedings and to determine certain estimated losses. If any of these valuations are inaccurate, our combined and consolidated financial statements may not reflect the correct value of our OREO, and our allowance for credit losses may not reflect accurate estimate losses. This could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. As of December 31, 2020, we held OREO and repossessed property and equipment that was valued at $404,000 and $6,000, respectively.

We engage in lending secured by real estate and may be forced to foreclose on the collateral and own the underlying real estate, subjecting us to the costs and potential risks associated with the ownership of the real property, or consumer protection initiatives or changes in state or federal law may substantially raise the cost of foreclosure or prevent us from foreclosing at all.

Since we originate loans secured by real estate, we may have to foreclose on the collateral property to protect our investment and may thereafter own and operate such property, in which case we would be exposed to the risks inherent in the ownership of real estate. As of December 31, 2020, we held approximately $404,000 in OREO in a special purpose subsidiary that is currently marketed for sale. The amount that we, as a mortgagee, may realize after a default is dependent upon factors outside of our control, including, but not limited to general or local economic condition, environmental cleanup liability, assessments, interest rates, real estate tax rates, operating expenses of the mortgaged properties, ability to obtain and maintain adequate occupancy of the properties, zoning laws, governmental and regulatory rules, and natural disasters. Our inability to manage the amount of costs or size of the risks associated with the ownership of real estate, or write-downs in the value of other real estate owned, could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Additionally, consumer protection initiatives or changes in state or federal law may substantially increase the time and expense associated with the foreclosure process or prevent us from foreclosing at all. While historically Texas has had foreclosure laws that are favorable to lenders, a number of states in recent years have either considered or adopted foreclosure reform laws that make it substantially more difficult and expensive for lenders to foreclose on properties in default, and we cannot be certain that Texas will not adopt similar legislation in the future. Foreclosure and eviction moratoria were put in place in many markets in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and those moratoria may delay or prevent foreclosures. Additionally, federal regulators have prosecuted a number of mortgage servicing companies for alleged consumer law violations. If new state or federal laws or regulations are ultimately enacted that significantly raise the cost of foreclosure or raise outright barriers, such could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operation.

A portion of our loan portfolio is comprised of commercial loans secured by receivables, inventory, equipment or other commercial collateral, the deterioration in value of which could expose us to credit losses.

As of December 31, 2020, approximately $306.0 million, or 16.4%, of our total loans were commercial loans to businesses, excluding PPP. In general, these loans are collateralized by general business assets, including, among other things, accounts receivable, inventory and equipment, and most are backed by a personal guaranty of the borrower or principal. These commercial loans are typically larger in amount than loans to individuals and, therefore, have the potential for larger losses on a single loan basis. Additionally, the repayment of commercial loans is subject to the ongoing business operations of the borrower. The collateral securing such loans generally includes moveable property such as equipment and inventory, which may decline in value more rapidly than we anticipate exposing us to increased credit risk. In addition, a portion of our customer base, including customers in the energy and real estate business, may be in industries which are particularly sensitive to commodity prices or market fluctuations, such as energy prices. Accordingly, negative changes in commodity prices and real estate values and liquidity could impair the value of the collateral securing these loans. Significant adverse changes in the economy or local market conditions in which our commercial lending customers operate could cause rapid declines in loan collectability and the values associated with general business assets resulting in inadequate collateral coverage that may expose us to credit losses and could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Our allowance for credit losses may prove to be insufficient to absorb potential losses in our loan portfolio.

We maintain an allowance for credit losses that represents management’s judgment of probable losses and risks inherent in our loan portfolio. As of December 31, 2020, our allowance for loan losses totaled $33.6 million, which represents approximately 1.80% of our total loans. The level of the allowance reflects management’s continuing evaluation of general economic conditions, diversification and seasoning of the loan portfolio, historic loss experience, identified credit problems, delinquency levels and adequacy of collateral. The determination of the appropriate level of the allowance for credit losses is inherently highly subjective and requires us to make significant estimates of and assumptions regarding current credit risks and future trends, all of which may undergo material changes. Inaccurate management assumptions, deterioration of economic conditions affecting borrowers, new information regarding existing loans, identification or deterioration of additional problem loans, acquisition of problem loans and other factors, both within and outside of our control, may require us to increase our allowance for credit losses. In addition, our regulators, as an integral part of their periodic examination, review our methodology for calculating, and the adequacy of, our allowance for credit losses and may direct us to make additions to the allowance based on their judgments about information available to them at the time of their examination. Further, if actual charge-offs in future periods exceed the amounts allocated to the allowance for credit losses, we may need additional provisions for credit losses to restore the adequacy of our allowance for credit losses. Finally, the measure of our allowance for credit losses is dependent on the adoption and interpretation of accounting standards. The Financial Accounting Standards Board recently issued a new credit impairment model, the Current Expected Credit Loss, or CECL model, which became applicable to us on January 1, 2020. CECL requires financial institutions to estimate and develop a provision for credit losses at origination for the lifetime of the loan, as opposed to reserving for incurred or probable losses up to the balance sheet date. Under the CECL model, credit deterioration is reflected in the income statement in the period of origination or acquisition of the loan, with changes in expected credit losses due to further credit deterioration or improvement reflected in the periods in which the expectation changes. Accordingly, the CECL model required many financial institutions, like the Bank, to increase their allowances for credit losses. Increases in our level of allowance for credit losses for any reason, could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

If we fail to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to report our financial results accurately and timely, in which case our business may be harmed, investors may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, we could be subject to regulatory penalties and the price of our common stock may decline.

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting and for evaluating and reporting on that system of internal control. Our internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. As a public company, we are required to comply with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and other rules that govern public companies. In particular, we are required to certify our compliance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act beginning with our second annual report on Form 10-K, which will require us to furnish annually a report by management on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. In addition, unless we remain an emerging growth company and elect additional transitional relief available to emerging growth companies, our independent registered public accounting firm may be required to report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting beginning as of that second annual report on Form 10-K.

We will continue to periodically test and update, as necessary, our internal control systems, including our financial reporting controls. Our actions, however, may not be sufficient to result in an effective internal control environment, and any future failure to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting could impair the reliability of our financial statements which in turn could harm our business, impair investor confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports and our access to the capital markets and cause the price of our common stock to decline and subject us to regulatory penalties.

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We rely heavily on our executive management team and other key employees, and we could be adversely affected by the unexpected loss of their services.

Our success depends in large part on the performance of our executive management team and other key personnel, as well as on our ability to attract, motivate and retain highly qualified senior and middle management and other skilled employees. Competition for qualified employees is intense, and the process of locating key personnel with the combination of skills, attributes and business relationships required to execute our business plan may be lengthy. We may not be successful in retaining our key employees, and the unexpected loss of services of one or more of our key personnel could have an adverse effect on our business because of their skills, knowledge of and business relationships within our primary markets, years of industry experience and the difficulty of promptly finding qualified replacement personnel. If the services of any of our key personnel should become unavailable for any reason, we may not be able to identify and hire qualified persons on terms acceptable to us, or at all, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and future prospects.

We earn income by originating residential mortgage loans for resale in the secondary mortgage market, and disruptions in that market could reduce our operating income.

Historically, we have earned income by originating mortgage loans for sale in the secondary market. A historical focus of our loan origination and sales activities has been to enter into formal commitments and informal agreements with larger banking companies and mortgage investors. Under these arrangements, we originate single family mortgages that are priced and underwritten to conform to previously agreed criteria before loan funding and are delivered to the investor shortly after funding. For the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, we earned approximately $6.8 million and $2.9 million, respectively, from these activities. However, in the recent past, disruptions in the secondary market for residential mortgage loans have limited the market for, and liquidity of, most mortgage loans other than conforming Fannie Mae and Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, or Freddie Mac, loans. The effects of these disruptions in the secondary market for residential mortgage loans may reappear.

In addition, because government-sponsored entities like Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, who account for a substantial portion of the secondary market, are governed by federal law, any future changes in laws that significantly affect the activity of these entities could, in turn, adversely affect our operations. In September 2008, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were placed into conservatorship by the federal government. The federal government has for many years considered proposals to reform Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, but the results of any such reform and their impact on us are difficult to predict. To date, no reform proposal has been enacted.

These disruptions may not only affect us but also the ability and desire of mortgage investors and other banks to purchase residential mortgage loans that we originate. As a result, we may not be able to maintain or grow the income we receive from originating and reselling residential mortgage loans, which would reduce our operating income. Additionally, we may be required to hold mortgage loans that we originated for sale, increasing our exposure to interest rate risk and the value of the residential real estate that serves as collateral for the mortgage loan.

Delinquencies, defaults and foreclosures in residential mortgages create a higher risk of repurchases and indemnity requests.

We originate residential mortgage loans for sale to government-sponsored enterprises, such as Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and other investors. As a part of this process, we make various representations and warranties to these purchasers that are tied to the underwriting standards under which the investors agreed to purchase the loan. If a representation or warranty proves to be untrue, we could be required to repurchase one or more of the mortgage loans or indemnify the investor. Repurchase and indemnity obligations tend to increase during weak economic times, as investors seek to pass on the risks associated with mortgage loan delinquencies to the originator of the mortgage. If we are forced to repurchase additional mortgage loans that we have previously sold to investors, or indemnify those investors, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

A lack of liquidity could impair our ability to fund operations and adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Liquidity is essential to our business. We rely on our ability to generate deposits and effectively manage the repayment and maturity schedules of our loans and investment securities, respectively, to ensure that we have adequate liquidity to fund our operations. An inability to raise funds through deposits, borrowings, the sale of our investment securities, the sale of loans, and other sources could have a substantial negative effect on our liquidity.

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Our most important source of funds is deposits. As of December 31, 2020, approximately $1.91 billion, or 83.1%, of our total deposits were demand, savings and money market accounts. Historically our savings, money market deposit accounts and demand accounts have been stable sources of funds. However, these deposits are subject to potentially dramatic fluctuations in availability or price due to certain factors that may be outside of our control, such as a loss of confidence by customers in us or the banking sector generally, customer perceptions of our financial health and general reputation, increasing competitive pressures from other financial services firms for consumer or corporate customer deposits, changes in interest rates and returns on other investment classes, which could result in significant outflows of deposits within short periods of time or significant changes in pricing necessary to maintain current customer deposits or attract additional deposits, increasing our funding costs and reducing our net interest income and net income.

The $378.7 million remaining balance of deposits consisted of certificates of deposit, of which $306.8 million, or 13.4% of our total deposits, were due to mature within one year. Historically, a majority of our certificates of deposit are renewed upon maturity as long as we pay competitive interest rates. These customers are, however, interest-rate conscious and may be willing to move funds into higher-yielding investment alternatives. If customers transfer money out of the Bank’s deposits and into other investments such as money market funds, we would lose a relatively low-cost source of funds, increasing our funding costs and reducing our net interest income and net income.

Other primary sources of funds consist of cash flows from operations, maturities and sales of investment securities, and proceeds from the issuance and sale of our equity and debt securities to investors. Additional liquidity is provided by our ability to borrow from the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas and the Federal Home Loan Bank of Dallas, or the FHLB. We also may borrow funds from third-party lenders, such as other financial institutions. Our access to funding sources in amounts adequate to finance or capitalize our activities, or on terms that are acceptable to us, could be impaired by factors that affect us directly or the financial services industry or economy in general, such as disruptions in the financial markets or negative views and expectations about the prospects for the financial services industry. Our access to funding sources could also be affected by a decrease in the level of our business activity as a result of a downturn in Texas or by one or more adverse regulatory actions against us.

Any decline in available funding could adversely impact our ability to originate loans, invest in securities, meet our expenses, or fulfill obligations such as repaying our borrowings or meeting deposit withdrawal demands, any of which could, in turn, have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may need to raise additional capital in the future, and such capital may not be available when needed or at all.

We may need to raise additional capital, in the form of additional debt or equity, in the future to have sufficient capital resources and liquidity to meet our commitments and fund our business needs and future growth, particularly if the quality of our assets or earnings were to deteriorate significantly. Our ability to raise additional capital, if needed, will depend on, among other things, conditions in the capital markets at that time, which are outside of our control, and our financial condition. Economic conditions and a loss of confidence in financial institutions may increase our cost of funding and limit access to certain customary sources of capital, including interbank borrowings, repurchase agreements and borrowings from the discount window of the Federal Reserve System. We may not be able to obtain capital on acceptable terms — or at all. Any occurrence that may limit our access to the capital markets, such as a decline in the confidence of debt purchasers, depositors of our bank or counterparties participating in the capital markets or other disruption in capital markets, may adversely affect our capital costs and our ability to raise capital and, in turn, our liquidity. Further, if we need to raise capital in the future, we may have to do so when many other financial institutions are also seeking to raise capital and would then have to compete with those institutions for investors. An inability to raise additional capital on acceptable terms when needed could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

We have a concentration of deposit accounts with state and local municipalities that is a material source of our funding, and the loss of these deposits or significant fluctuations in balances held by these public bodies could force us to fund our business through more expensive and less stable sources.

As of December 31, 2020, $324.9 million, or approximately 14.2%, of our total deposits consisted of deposit accounts of public bodies, such as state or local municipalities, or public funds. These types of deposits are often secured and typically fluctuate on a seasonal basis due to timing differences between tax collection and expenditures. Withdrawals of deposits or significant fluctuation in a material portion of our largest public fund depositors could force us to rely more heavily on borrowings and other sources of funding for our business and withdrawal demands, adversely affecting our net interest margin and results of operations. We may also be forced, as a result of any withdrawal of deposits, to rely more heavily on other, potentially more expensive and less stable funding sources. Consequently, the occurrence of any of these events could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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We are subject to interest rate risk and fluctuations in interest rates may adversely affect our earnings.

The majority of our banking assets and liabilities are monetary in nature and subject to risk from changes in interest rates. Like most financial institutions, our earnings are significantly dependent on our net interest income, the principal component of our earnings, which is the difference between interest earned by us from our interest-earning assets, such as loans and investment securities, and interest paid by us on our interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowings. We expect that we will periodically experience “gaps” in the interest rate sensitivities of our assets and liabilities, meaning that either our interest-bearing liabilities will be more sensitive to changes in market interest rates than our interest-earning assets, or vice versa. In either event, if market interest rates should move contrary to our position, this “gap” will negatively impact our earnings. The impact on earnings is more adverse when the slope of the yield curve flattens, that is, when short-term interest rates increase more than long-term interest rates or when long-term interest rates decrease more than short-term interest rates. Many factors impact interest rates, including governmental monetary policies, inflation, recession, changes in unemployment, the money supply and international economic weakness and disorder and instability in domestic and foreign financial markets. As of December 31, 2020, approximately 52.6% of our interest-earning assets and approximately 49.3% of our interest-bearing liabilities had a variable rate. Our interest rate sensitivity profile was asset sensitive as of December 31, 2020, meaning that we estimate our net interest income would increase more from rising interest rates than from falling interest rates.

Interest rate increases often result in larger payment requirements for our borrowers, which increases the potential for default and could result in a decrease in the demand for loans. At the same time, the marketability of the property securing a loan may be adversely affected by any reduced demand resulting from higher interest rates. In a declining interest rate environment, there may be an increase in prepayments on loans as borrowers refinance their loans at lower rates. In addition, in a low interest rate environment, loan customers often pursue long-term fixed rate credits, which could adversely affect our earnings and net interest margin if rates increase. Changes in interest rates also can affect the value of loans, securities and other assets. An increase in interest rates that adversely affects the ability of borrowers to pay the principal or interest on loans may lead to an increase in nonperforming assets and a reduction of income recognized, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and cash flows. Further, when we place a loan on nonaccrual status, we reverse any accrued but unpaid interest receivable, which decreases interest income. At the same time, we continue to have a cost to fund the loan, which is reflected as interest expense, without any interest income to offset the associated funding expense. Thus, an increase in the amount of nonperforming assets would have an adverse impact on net interest income. If short-term interest rates continue to remain at their historically low levels for a prolonged period and assuming longer-term interest rates fall further, we could experience net interest margin compression as our interest-earning assets would continue to reprice downward while our interest-bearing liability rates could fail to decline in tandem. Such an occurrence would have an adverse effect on our net interest income and could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may be adversely affected by changes in the method of determining the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), or the replacement of LIBOR with an alternative reference rate, for our variable rate loans, derivative contracts and other financial assets and liabilities.

Our balance sheet includes certain assets and liabilities which are directly or indirectly dependent on LIBOR to establish their interest rate and/or value. The U.K. Financial Conduct Authority announced in 2017 that it would no longer compel banks to submit rates for the calculation of LIBOR after 2021, although in 2020 it announced that certain LIBOR-based indices would continue through 2023. It is not possible to predict whether banks will continue to provide LIBOR submissions to the administrator of LIBOR, whether LIBOR rates will cease to be published or supported in the future or whether any additional reforms to LIBOR may be enacted in the United Kingdom or elsewhere. It is expected that a transition away from the widespread use of LIBOR to alternative rates is likely to occur during the next several years.

The impact of these developments on our business and financial results is not yet known. The transition from LIBOR may cause us to incur increased costs and additional risk. Uncertainty as to the nature of alternative reference rates and as to potential changes in or other reforms to LIBOR may adversely affect LIBOR rates and the value of LIBOR-based loans. If LIBOR rates are no longer available, any successor or replacement interest rates may perform differently, which may affect our net interest income, change our market risk profile and require changes to our risk, pricing and hedging strategies. Any failure to adequately manage this transition could adversely impact our reputation.

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Our business is concentrated in, and largely dependent upon, the continued growth and welfare of our primary markets, and adverse economic conditions in these markets could negatively impact our operations and customers.

Our business, financial condition and results of operations are affected by changes in the economic conditions of our primary markets of East Texas, Central Texas, Houston MSA and the Dallas/Fort Worth MSA. Our success depends to a significant extent upon the business activity, population, income levels, employment trends, deposits and real estate activity in our primary markets. Economic conditions within our primary markets, and the state of Texas in general, are influenced by the energy sector generally and the price of oil and gas specifically. Although our customers’ business and financial interests may extend well beyond our primary markets, adverse conditions that affect our primary markets, including future declines in oil prices, could reduce our growth rate, affect the ability of our customers to repay their loans, affect the value of collateral underlying our loans, affect our ability to attract deposits and generally affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and future prospects. Due to our geographic concentration within our primary markets, we may be less able than other larger regional or national financial institutions to diversify our credit risks across multiple markets.

We face strong competition from financial services companies and other companies that offer banking services.

We operate in the highly competitive financial services industry and face significant competition for customers from financial institutions located both within and beyond our principal markets. We compete with commercial banks, savings banks, credit unions, nonbank financial services companies and other financial institutions operating within or near the areas we serve. Additionally, certain large banks headquartered outside of our markets and large community banking institutions target the same customers we do. In addition, as customer preferences and expectations continue to evolve, technology has lowered barriers to entry and made it possible for banks to expand their geographic reach by providing services over the internet and for nonbanks to offer products and services traditionally provided by banks, such as automatic transfer and automatic payment systems. The banking industry is experiencing rapid changes in technology, and, as a result, our future success will depend in part on our ability to address our customers’ needs by using technology. Customer loyalty can be influenced by a competitor’s new products, especially offerings that could provide cost savings or a higher return to the customer. Increased lending activity of competing banks following the recent downturn has also led to increased competitive pressures on loan rates and terms for high-quality credits. We may not be able to compete successfully with other financial institutions in our markets, and we may have to pay higher interest rates to attract deposits, accept lower yields to attract loans and pay higher wages for new employees, resulting in lower net interest margins and reduced profitability.

Many of our non-bank competitors are not subject to the same extensive regulations that govern our activities and may have greater flexibility in competing for business. The financial services industry could become even more competitive as a result of legislative, regulatory and technological changes and continued consolidation. In addition, some of our current commercial banking customers may seek alternative banking sources as they develop needs for credit facilities larger than we may be able to accommodate. Our inability to compete successfully in the markets in which we operate could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Our trust and wealth management division derives its revenue from noninterest income and is subject to operational, compliance, reputational, fiduciary and strategic risks that could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our trust and wealth management division subjects us to a number of different risks from our commercial activities, any of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Operational or compliance risk entails inadequate or failed internal processes, people and systems or changes driven by external events. Success in the trust and wealth management business is highly dependent on reputation. Damage to our reputation from negative opinion in the marketplace could adversely impact both revenue and net income. Such results could also be affected by errors in judgment by management or the board, the improper implementation of business decisions or by unexpected external events. Our success in this division is also dependent upon our continuing ability to generate investment results that satisfy our clients and attract prospective clients, which may be adversely impacted by factors that are outside of our control. In addition, our trust and wealth management division is subject to fiduciary risks and risks associated with adverse decisions regarding the scope of fiduciary liabilities. If any claims or legal actions regarding our fiduciary role are not resolved in a manner favorable to us, we may be exposed to significant financial liability and our reputation could be damaged. Either of these results may adversely impact demand for our products and services, including those unrelated to our trust and wealth management division, or otherwise have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operation.

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Additional risks resulting from our mortgage warehouse lending business could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

A portion of our lending involves the origination of mortgage warehouse lines of credit. Risks associated with our mortgage warehouse loans include credit risks relating to the mortgage bankers that borrow from us, including the risk of intentional misrepresentation or fraud; changes in the market value of mortgage loans originated by the mortgage banker, the sale of which is the expected source of repayment of the borrowings under a warehouse line of credit, due to changes in interest rates during the time in warehouse; and originations of mortgage loans that are unsalable or impaired, which could lead to decreased collateral value and the failure of a purchaser of the mortgage loan to ultimately purchase the loan from the mortgage banker. Any one or a combination of these events may adversely affect our loan portfolio and may result in increased delinquencies, loan losses and increased future provision levels, which, in turn, could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

New lines of business, products, product enhancements or services may subject us to additional risks.

From time to time, we implement new lines of business, or offer new products and product enhancements as well as new services within our existing lines of business and we will continue to do so in the future. There are substantial risks and uncertainties associated with these efforts, particularly in instances where the markets are not fully developed. In implementing, developing or marketing new lines of business, products, product enhancements or services, we may invest significant time and resources, although we may not assign the appropriate level of resources or expertise necessary to make these new lines of business, products, product enhancements or services successful or to realize their expected benefits. Further, initial timetables for the introduction and development of new lines of business, products, product enhancements or services may not be achieved, and price and profitability targets may not prove feasible. External factors, such as compliance with regulations, competitive alternatives and shifting market preferences, may also impact the ultimate implementation of a new line of business or offerings of new products, product enhancements or services. Furthermore, any new line of business, product, product enhancement or service could have a significant impact on the effectiveness of our system of internal controls. Failure to successfully manage these risks in the development and implementation of new lines of business or offerings of new products, product enhancements or services could have an adverse impact on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Negative public opinion regarding our company or failure to maintain our reputation in the communities we serve could adversely affect our business and prevent us from growing our business.

As a community bank, our reputation within the communities we serve is critical to our success. We believe we have set ourselves apart from our competitors by building strong personal and professional relationships with our customers and by being active members of the communities we serve. As such, we strive to enhance our reputation by recruiting, hiring and retaining employees who share our core values of being an integral part of the communities we serve and delivering superior service to our customers. If our reputation is negatively affected by the actions of our employees or otherwise, we may be less successful in attracting new talent and customers or may lose existing customers, and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected. Further, negative public opinion can expose us to litigation and regulatory action and delay and impede our efforts to implement our expansion strategy, which could further adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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We could recognize losses on investment securities held in our securities portfolio, particularly if interest rates increase or economic and market conditions deteriorate.

While we attempt to invest a significant majority of our total assets in loans (our loan to asset ratio was 68.1% as of December 31, 2020), we invest a percentage of our total assets (13.9% as of December 31, 2020) in investment securities with the primary objectives of providing a source of liquidity, providing an appropriate return on funds invested, managing interest rate risk, meeting pledging requirements and meeting regulatory capital requirements. As of December 31, 2020, the fair value of our available for sale investment securities portfolio was $380.8 million, which included a net unrealized gain of $17.7 million. Factors beyond our control can significantly and adversely influence the fair value of securities in our portfolio. For example, fixed-rate securities are generally subject to decreases in market value when interest rates rise. Additional factors include, but are not limited to, rating agency downgrades of the securities, defaults by the issuer or individual borrowers with respect to the underlying securities, and instability in the credit markets. Any of the foregoing factors could cause other-than-temporary impairment in future periods and result in realized losses. The process for determining whether impairment is other-than-temporary usually requires difficult, subjective judgments about the future financial performance of the issuer and any collateral underlying the security in order to assess the probability of receiving all contractual principal and interest payments on the security. Because of changing economic and market conditions affecting interest rates, the financial condition of issuers of the securities and the performance of the underlying collateral, we may recognize realized and/or unrealized losses in future periods, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The accuracy of our financial statements and related disclosures could be affected if the judgments, assumptions or estimates used in our critical accounting policies are inaccurate.

The preparation of financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with GAAP requires us to make judgments, assumptions and estimates that affect the amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. Our critical accounting policies, which are included in the section captioned “Item 7: Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, describe those significant accounting policies and methods used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements that we consider “critical” because they require judgments, assumptions and estimates that materially affect our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures. As a result, if future events or regulatory views concerning such analysis differ significantly from the judgments, assumptions and estimates in our critical accounting policies, those events or assumptions could have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures, in each case resulting in our needing to revise or restate prior period financial statements, cause damage to our reputation and the price of our common stock, and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

There could be material changes to our financial statements and disclosures if there are changes in accounting standards or regulatory interpretations of existing standards

From time to time the Financial Accounting Standards Board or the SEC may change the financial accounting and reporting standards that govern the preparation of our financial statements. Such changes may result in us being subject to new or changing accounting and reporting standards. In addition, the bodies that interpret the accounting standards (such as banking regulators or outside auditors) may change their interpretations or positions on how new or existing standards should be applied. These changes may be beyond our control, can be hard to predict and can materially impact how we record and report our financial condition and results of operations. In some cases, we could be required to apply a new or revised standard retrospectively, or apply an existing standard differently and retrospectively, in each case resulting in our needing to revise or restate prior period financial statements, which could materially change our financial statements and related disclosures, cause damage to our reputation and the price of our common stock, and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our operations could be interrupted if our third-party service providers experience difficulty, terminate their services or fail to comply with banking regulations.

We outsource some of our operational activities and accordingly depend on a number of relationships with third-party service providers. Specifically, we rely on third parties for certain services, including, but not limited to, core systems support, informational website hosting, internet services, online account opening and other processing services. Our business depends on the successful and uninterrupted functioning of our information technology and telecommunications systems and third-party servicers. The failure of these systems, a cyber security breach involving any of our third-party service providers, or the termination or change in terms of a third-party software license or service agreement on which any of these systems is based, could interrupt our operations. Because our information technology and telecommunications systems interface with and depend on third-party systems, we could experience service denials if

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demand for such services exceeds capacity or such third-party systems fail or experience interruptions. Replacing vendors or addressing other issues with our third-party service providers could entail significant delay, expense and disruption of service.

As a result, if these third-party service providers experience difficulties, are subject to cyber security breaches, or terminate their services, and we are unable to replace them with other service providers, particularly on a timely basis, our operations could be interrupted. If an interruption were to continue for a significant period of time, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected. Even if we are able to replace third-party service providers, it may be at a higher cost to us, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, the Bank’s primary federal regulator, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, or OCC, has issued guidance outlining the expectations for third-party service provider oversight and monitoring by financial institutions. The federal banking agencies, including the OCC, have recently issued enforcement actions against financial institutions for failure in oversight of third-party providers and violations of federal banking law by such providers when performing services for financial institutions. Accordingly, our operations could be interrupted if any of our third-party service providers experience difficulty, are subject to cyber security breaches, terminate their services or fail to comply with banking regulations, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, our failure to adequately oversee the actions of our third-party service providers could result in regulatory actions against the Bank, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

System failure or cyber security breaches of our network security could subject us to increased operating costs as well as litigation and other potential losses.

Our computer systems and network infrastructure could be vulnerable to hardware and cyber security issues. Our operations are dependent upon our ability to protect our computer equipment against damage from fire, power loss, telecommunications failure or a similar catastrophic event. We could also experience a breach by intentional or negligent conduct on the part of employees or other internal sources. Any damage or failure that causes an interruption in our operations could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, our operations are dependent upon our ability to protect our computer systems and network infrastructure, including our digital, mobile and internet banking activities, against damage from physical break-ins, cyber security breaches and other disruptive problems caused by the internet or other users. Such computer break-ins and other disruptions would jeopardize the security of information stored in and transmitted through our computer systems and network infrastructure, which may result in significant liability, damage our reputation and inhibit the use of our internet banking services by current and potential customers. We regularly add additional security measures to our computer systems and network infrastructure to mitigate the possibility of cyber security breaches, including firewalls and penetration testing. However, it is difficult or impossible to defend against every risk being posed by changing technologies as well as acts of cyber-crime. Increasing sophistication of cyber criminals and terrorists make keeping up with new threats difficult and could result in a system breach. Controls employed by our information technology department and cloud vendors could prove inadequate. A breach of our security that results in unauthorized access to our data could expose us to a disruption or challenges relating to our daily operations, as well as to data loss, litigation, damages, fines and penalties, significant increases in compliance costs and reputational damage, any of which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We have a continuing need for technological change, and we may not have the resources to effectively implement new technology, or we may experience operational challenges when implementing new technology or technology needed to compete effectively with larger institutions may not be available to us on a cost effective basis.

The financial services industry is undergoing rapid technological changes with frequent introductions of new technology-driven products and services. In addition to better serving customers, the effective use of technology increases efficiency and enables financial institutions to reduce costs. Our future success will depend, at least in part, upon our ability to address the needs of our customers by using technology to provide products and services that will satisfy customer demands for convenience as well as to create additional efficiencies in our operations as we continue to grow and expand our products and service offerings. We may experience operational challenges as we implement these new technology enhancements or products, which could impair our ability to realize the anticipated benefits from such new technology or require us to incur significant costs to remedy any such challenges in a timely manner.

Many of our larger competitors have substantially greater resources to invest in technological improvements. Third parties upon which we rely for our technology needs may not be able to develop on a cost effective basis systems

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that will enable us to keep pace with such developments. As a result, they may be able to offer additional or superior products compared to those that we will be able to provide, which would put us at a competitive disadvantage. We may lose customers seeking new technology-driven products and services to the extent we are unable to provide such products and services. Accordingly, the ability to keep pace with technological change is important and the failure to do so could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We are subject to certain operational risks, including, but not limited to, customer, employee or third-party fraud and data processing system failures and errors.

Employee errors and employee or customer misconduct could subject us to financial losses or regulatory sanctions and seriously harm our reputation. Misconduct by our employees could include hiding unauthorized activities from us, improper or unauthorized activities on behalf of our customers or improper use of confidential information. It is not always possible to prevent employee errors and misconduct, and the precautions we take to prevent and detect this activity may not be effective in all cases. Employee errors could also subject us to financial claims for negligence.

We maintain a system of internal controls to mitigate operational risks, including data processing system failures and errors and customer or employee fraud, as well as insurance coverage designed to protect us from material losses associated with these risks, including losses resulting from any associated business interruption. If our internal controls fail to prevent or detect an occurrence, or if any resulting loss is not insured or exceeds applicable insurance limits, it could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, we rely heavily upon information supplied by third parties, including the information contained in credit applications, property appraisals, title information, equipment pricing and valuation and employment and income documentation, in deciding which loans we will originate, as well as the terms of those loans. If any of the information upon which we rely is misrepresented, either fraudulently or inadvertently, and the misrepresentation is not detected prior to loan funding, the value of the loan may be significantly lower than expected, or we may fund a loan that we would not have funded or on terms we would not have extended. Whether a misrepresentation is made by the applicant or another third party, we generally bear the risk of loss associated with the misrepresentation. A loan subject to a material misrepresentation is typically unsellable or subject to repurchase if it is sold prior to detection of the misrepresentation. The sources of the misrepresentations are often difficult to locate, and it is often difficult to recover any of the resulting monetary losses we may suffer, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our primary markets are susceptible to natural disasters and other catastrophes that could negatively impact the economies of our markets, our operations or our customers, any of which could have an adverse effect on us.

A significant portion of our business is generated from our primary markets of East Texas, Central Texas, the Dallas/Fort Worth MSA and the Houston MSA, which are susceptible to damage by tornadoes, floods, droughts, hurricanes and other natural disasters and adverse weather. In addition to natural disasters, man-made events, such as acts of terror and governmental response to acts of terror, malfunction of the electronic grid and other infrastructure breakdowns, could adversely affect economic conditions in our primary markets. These catastrophic events can disrupt our operations, cause widespread property damage, and severely depress the local economies in which we operate. If the economies in our primary markets experience an overall decline as a result of a catastrophic event, demand for loans and our other products and services could be reduced. In addition, the rates of delinquencies, foreclosures, bankruptcies and losses on loan portfolios may increase substantially, as uninsured property losses or sustained job interruption or loss may materially impair the ability of borrowers to repay their loans. Moreover, the value of real estate or other collateral that secures the loans could be materially and adversely affected by a catastrophic event. A natural disaster or other catastrophic event could, therefore, result in decreased revenue and loan losses that have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may be subject to environmental liabilities in connection with the real properties we own and the foreclosure on real estate assets securing our loan portfolio.

In the course of our business, we may purchase real estate in connection with our acquisition and expansion efforts, or we may foreclose on and take title to real estate or otherwise be deemed to be in control of property that serves as collateral on loans we make. As a result, we could be subject to environmental liabilities with respect to those properties. We may be held liable to a governmental entity or to third parties for property damage, personal injury, investigation and clean-up costs incurred by these parties in connection with environmental contamination, or we may be required to investigate or clean up hazardous or toxic substances or chemical releases at a property. The costs associated with investigation or remediation activities could be substantial. In addition, if we are the owner or former

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owner of a contaminated site, we may be subject to common law claims by third parties based on damages and costs resulting from environmental contamination emanating from the property.

The cost of removal or abatement may substantially exceed the value of the affected properties or the loans secured by those properties, we may not have adequate remedies against the prior owners or other responsible parties and we may not be able to resell the affected properties either before or after completion of any such removal or abatement procedures. If material environmental problems are discovered before foreclosure, we generally will not foreclose on the related collateral or will transfer ownership of the loan to a subsidiary. It should be noted, however, that the transfer of the property or loans to a subsidiary may not protect us from environmental liability. Furthermore, despite these actions on our part, the value of the property as collateral will generally be substantially reduced or we may elect not to foreclose on the property and, as a result, we may suffer a loss upon collection of the loan. Any significant environmental liabilities could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We are subject to claims and litigation pertaining to intellectual property.

Banking and other financial services companies, such as our company, rely on technology companies to provide information technology products and services necessary to support their day-to-day operations. Technology companies frequently enter into litigation based on allegations of patent infringement or other violations of intellectual property rights. In addition, patent holding companies seek to monetize patents they have purchased or otherwise obtained. Competitors of our vendors, or other individuals or companies, may from time to time claim to hold intellectual property sold to us by our vendors. Such claims may increase in the future as the financial services sector becomes more reliant on information technology vendors. The plaintiffs in these actions frequently seek injunctions and substantial damages.

Regardless of the scope or validity of such patents or other intellectual property rights, or the merits of any claims by potential or actual litigants, we may have to engage in protracted litigation. Such litigation is often expensive, time-consuming, disruptive to our operations and distracting to management. If we are found to infringe one or more patents or other intellectual property rights, we may be required to pay substantial damages or royalties to a third party. In certain cases, we may consider entering into licensing agreements for disputed intellectual property, although no assurance can be given that such licenses can be obtained on acceptable terms or that litigation will not occur. These licenses may also significantly increase our operating expenses. If legal matters related to intellectual property claims were resolved against us or settled, we could be required to make payments in amounts that could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

If the goodwill that we have recorded or may record in connection with a business acquisition becomes impaired, it could require charges to earnings.

Goodwill represents the amount by which the cost of an acquisition exceeded the fair value of net assets we acquired in connection with the purchase of another financial institution. We review goodwill for impairment at least annually, or more frequently if a triggering event occurs which indicates that the carrying value of the asset might be impaired.

Our goodwill impairment test involves a two-step process. Under the first step, the estimation of fair value of the reporting unit is compared to its carrying value including goodwill. If step one indicates a potential impairment, the second step is performed to measure the amount of impairment, if any. If the carrying amount of the reporting unit goodwill exceeds the implied fair value of that goodwill, an impairment loss is recognized in an amount equal to that excess. Any such adjustments are reflected in our results of operations in the periods in which they become known. As of December 31, 2020, our goodwill totaled $32.2 million. While we have not recorded any impairment charges since we initially recorded the goodwill, there can be no assurance that our future evaluations of our existing goodwill or goodwill we may acquire in the future will not result in findings of impairment and related write-downs, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may be adversely affected by changes in U.S. tax laws.

The tax laws applicable to our business activities may change over time. Legislative initiatives, including initiatives currently under discussion, may impact our results of operations by increasing the corporate income tax rate applicable to our business or by enacting other changes that increase our effective tax rate.

The enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, or TCJA, on December 22, 2017 made significant changes to the Internal Revenue Code, many of which are highly complex and may require interpretations and implementing regulations. As a result of the TCJA’s reduction of the corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21%, we recorded a one-time, non-cash

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charge to income tax provision of $1.7 million during the fourth quarter of 2017 to reduce the value of our net deferred tax assets.

The TCJA includes a number of provisions that impact the banking industry, borrowers and the market for residential real estate. These changes include: (i) a lower limit on the deductibility of mortgage interest on single-family residential mortgage loans, (ii) the elimination of interest deductions for home equity loans, (iii) a limitation on the deductibility of business interest expense, and (iv) a limitation on the deductibility of property taxes and state and local income taxes. The TCJA may have an adverse effect on the market for and the valuation of residential properties, as well as on the demand for such loans in the future, and could make it harder for borrowers to make their loan payments. The value of the properties securing loans in our loan portfolio may be adversely impacted as a result of the changing economics of home ownership. Such an impact could require an increase in our provision for loan losses, which would reduce our profitability and could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Risks Related to the Regulation of Our Industry

The ongoing implementation of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, or the Dodd-Frank Act, could adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

On July 21, 2010, the Dodd-Frank Act was signed into law, and the process of implementation is ongoing. The Dodd-Frank Act imposes significant regulatory and compliance changes on many industries, including ours. There remains significant uncertainty surrounding the manner in which the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act will ultimately be implemented by the various regulatory agencies and the full extent of the impact of the requirements on our operations is unclear, especially in light of the Trump administration’s executive order calling for a full review of the Dodd-Frank Act and the regulations promulgated under it. The changes resulting from the Dodd-Frank Act may impact the profitability of our business activities, require changes to certain of our business practices, require the development of new compliance infrastructure, impose upon us more stringent capital, liquidity and leverage requirements or otherwise adversely affect our business. These changes may also require us to invest significant management attention and resources to evaluate and make any changes necessary to comply with new statutory and regulatory requirements. Failure to comply with the new requirements or with any future changes in laws or regulations could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

On May 24, 2018, the EGRRCPA became law. Among other things, the EGRRCPA changes certain of the regulatory requirements of the Dodd-Frank Act and includes provisions intended to relieve the regulatory burden on community banks. We cannot currently predict the impact of this legislation on us. Any future legislative changes could have a material impact on our profitability, the value of assets held for investment or the value of collateral for loans. Future legislative changes could also require changes to business practices and potentially expose us to additional costs, liabilities, enforcement action and reputational risk.

We operate in a highly regulated environment and the laws and regulations that govern our operations, corporate governance, executive compensation and accounting principles, or changes in them, or our failure to comply with them, could adversely affect us.

Banking is highly regulated under federal and state law. As such, we are subject to extensive regulation, supervision and legal requirements that govern almost all aspects of our operations. These laws and regulations are not intended to protect our shareholders. Rather, these laws and regulations are intended to protect customers, depositors, the Deposit Insurance Fund and the overall financial stability of the United States. These laws and regulations, among other matters, prescribe minimum capital requirements, impose limitations on the business activities in which we can engage, limit the dividend or distributions that the Bank can pay to us, restrict the ability of institutions to guarantee our debt and impose certain specific accounting requirements on us that may be more restrictive and may result in greater or earlier charges to earnings or reductions in our capital than GAAP would require. Compliance with laws and regulations can be difficult and costly, and changes to laws and regulations often impose additional operating costs. Our failure to comply with these laws and regulations, even if the failure follows good faith effort or reflects a difference in interpretation, could subject us to restrictions on our business activities, enforcement actions and fines and other penalties, any of which could adversely affect our results of operations, regulatory capital levels and the price of our securities. Further, any new laws, rules and regulations, such as the Dodd-Frank Act, could make compliance more difficult or expensive or otherwise adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Federal banking agencies periodically conduct examinations of our business, including compliance with laws and regulations, and our failure to comply with any supervisory actions to which we are or become subject as a result of such examinations could adversely affect us.

As part of the bank regulatory process, the OCC and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, or Federal Reserve, periodically conduct examinations of our business, including compliance with laws and regulations. If, as a result of an examination, one of these federal banking agencies were to determine that the financial condition, capital resources, asset quality, earnings prospects, management, liquidity, asset sensitivity, risk management or other aspects of any of our operations have become unsatisfactory, or that our Company, the Bank or their respective management were in violation of any law or regulation, it may take a number of different remedial actions as it deems appropriate. These actions include the power to enjoin “unsafe or unsound” practices, to require affirmative actions to correct any conditions resulting from any violation or practice, to issue an administrative order that can be judicially enforced, to direct an increase in our capital levels, to restrict our growth, to assess civil monetary penalties against us, the Bank or their respective officers or directors, to remove officers and directors and, if it is concluded that such conditions cannot be corrected or there is an imminent risk of loss to depositors, to terminate the Bank’s deposit insurance. If we become subject to such regulatory actions, our business, financial condition, results of operations and reputation could be adversely affected.

We are subject to stringent capital requirements, which may result in lower returns on equity, require the raising of additional capital, limit our ability to repurchase shares or pay dividends and discretionary bonuses, or result in regulatory action.

The Dodd-Frank Act required the federal banking agencies to establish stricter risk-based capital requirements and leverage limits to apply to banks and bank and savings and loan holding companies, referred to herein as the Basel III capital rules. See the section in Item 1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K captioned “Supervision and Regulation — Guaranty Bancshares, Inc. — Revised Rules on Regulatory Capital.”

As a result of the enactment of the Basel III capital rules, we became subject to increased required capital levels. Our inability to comply with these more stringent capital requirements could, among other things, result in lower returns on equity; require the raising of additional capital; limit our ability to repurchase shares or pay dividends and discretionary bonuses; or result in regulatory actions, any of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operation.

Many of our new activities and expansion plans require regulatory approvals, and failure to obtain them may restrict our growth.

We intend to complement and expand our business by pursuing strategic acquisitions of financial institutions and other complementary businesses. Generally, we must receive federal regulatory approval before we can acquire an FDIC-insured depository institution or related business. In determining whether to approve a proposed acquisition, federal banking regulators will consider, among other factors, the effect of the acquisition on competition, our financial condition, our future prospects, and the impact of the proposal on U.S. financial stability. The regulators also review current and projected capital ratios and levels, the competence, experience and integrity of management and its record of compliance with laws and regulations, the convenience and needs of the communities to be served (including the acquiring institution’s record of compliance under the Community Reinvestment Act, or the CRA) and the effectiveness of the acquiring institution in combating money laundering activities. Such regulatory approvals may not be granted on terms that are acceptable to us, or at all. We may also be required to sell banking locations as a condition to receiving regulatory approval, which condition may not be acceptable to us or, if acceptable to us, may reduce the benefit of any acquisition.

In addition to the acquisition of existing financial institutions, as opportunities arise, we plan to continue de novo branching as a part of our expansion strategy. De novo branching and acquisitions carry with them numerous risks, including the inability to obtain all required regulatory approvals. The failure to obtain these regulatory approvals for potential future strategic acquisitions and de novo banking locations could impact our business plans and restrict our growth.

Financial institutions, such as the Bank, face a risk of noncompliance and enforcement action with the Bank Secrecy Act and other anti-money laundering statutes and regulations.

The Bank Secrecy Act, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001, or the USA PATRIOT Act, and other laws and regulations require financial institutions, among other duties, to institute and maintain an effective anti-money laundering program and file suspicious

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activity and currency transaction reports as appropriate. The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, established by the U.S. Department of the Treasury, or the Treasury Department, to administer the Bank Secrecy Act, is authorized to impose significant civil money penalties for violations of those requirements and has recently engaged in coordinated enforcement efforts with the individual federal banking regulators, as well as the U.S. Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration and the Internal Revenue Service. There is also increased scrutiny of compliance with the sanctions programs and rules administered and enforced by the Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control.

In order to comply with regulations, guidelines and examination procedures in this area, we have dedicated significant resources to our anti-money laundering program. If our policies, procedures and systems are deemed deficient, we could be subject to liability, including fines and regulatory actions such as restrictions on our ability to pay dividends and the inability to obtain regulatory approvals to proceed with certain aspects of our business plans, including acquisitions and de novo branching.

We are subject to numerous laws designed to protect consumers, including the Community Reinvestment Act and fair lending laws, and failure to comply with these laws could lead to a wide variety of sanctions.

The CRA, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Fair Housing Act and other fair lending laws and regulations impose nondiscriminatory lending requirements on financial institutions. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, or CFPB, the U.S. Department of Justice and other federal agencies are responsible for enforcing these laws and regulations. The CFPB was created under the Dodd-Frank Act to centralize responsibility for consumer financial protection with broad rulemaking authority to administer and carry out the purposes and objectives of federal consumer financial laws with respect to all financial institutions that offer financial products and services to consumers. The CFPB is also authorized to prescribe rules applicable to any covered person or service provider, identifying and prohibiting acts or practices that are “unfair, deceptive, or abusive” in connection with any transaction with a consumer for a consumer financial product or service, or the offering of a consumer financial product or service. The ongoing broad rulemaking powers of the CFPB have potential to have a significant impact on the operations of financial institutions offering consumer financial products or services. The CFPB has indicated that it may propose new rules on overdrafts and other consumer financial products or services, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations if any such rules limit our ability to provide such financial products or services.

A successful regulatory challenge to an institution’s performance under the CRA, fair lending or consumer lending laws and regulations could result in a wide variety of sanctions, including damages and civil money penalties, injunctive relief, restrictions on mergers and acquisitions activity, restrictions on expansion, and restrictions on entering new business lines. Private parties may also have the ability to challenge an institution’s performance under fair lending laws in private class action litigation. Such actions could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Increases in FDIC insurance premiums could adversely affect our earnings and results of operations.

We are generally unable to control the amount of premiums that we are required to pay for FDIC insurance. As a result of economic conditions and the enactment of the Dodd-Frank Act, the FDIC has in recent years increased deposit insurance assessment rates, which in turn raised deposit premiums for many insured depository institutions. If recent increases in premiums are insufficient for the Deposit Insurance Fund to meet its funding requirements, further special assessments or increases in deposit insurance premiums may be required. Further, if there are additional financial institution failures that affect the Deposit Insurance Fund, we may be required to pay higher FDIC premiums. Our FDIC insurance related costs were $821,000 for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to $173,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019, reflecting the receipt and application of a credit in 2019 that was not received in 2020. Any future additional assessments, increases or required prepayments in FDIC insurance premiums could adversely affect our earnings and results of operations.

The Federal Reserve may require us to commit capital resources to support the Bank.

The Federal Reserve requires a bank holding company to act as a source of financial and managerial strength to its subsidiary banks and to commit resources to support its subsidiary banks. Under the “source of strength” doctrine that was codified by the Dodd-Frank Act, the Federal Reserve may require a bank holding company to make capital injections into a troubled subsidiary bank at times when the bank holding company may not be inclined to do so and may charge the bank holding company with engaging in unsafe and unsound practices for failure to commit resources to such a subsidiary bank. Accordingly, we could be required to provide financial assistance to the Bank if it experiences financial distress.

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A capital injection may be required at a time when our resources are limited, and we may be required to borrow the funds or raise capital to make the required capital injection. Any loan by a bank holding company to its subsidiary bank is subordinate in right with payment to deposits and certain other indebtedness of such subsidiary bank. In the event of a bank holding company’s bankruptcy, the bankruptcy trustee will assume any commitment by the holding company to a federal bank regulatory agency to maintain the capital of a subsidiary bank. Moreover, bankruptcy law provides that claims based on any such commitment will be entitled to a priority of payment over the claims of the holding company’s general unsecured creditors, including the holders of any note obligations. Thus, any borrowing by a bank holding company for the purpose of making a capital injection to a subsidiary bank often becomes more difficult and expensive relative to other corporate borrowings.

We could be adversely affected by the soundness of other financial institutions.

Financial services institutions are interrelated as a result of trading, clearing, counterparty or other relationships. We have exposure to many different industries and counterparties, and routinely execute transactions with counterparties in the financial services industry, including commercial banks, brokers and dealers, investment banks and other institutional clients. Many of these transactions expose us to credit risk in the event of a default by a counterparty or client. In addition, our credit risk may be exacerbated when our collateral cannot be foreclosed upon or is liquidated at prices not sufficient to recover the full amount of the credit or derivative exposure due. Any such losses could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Monetary policies and regulations of the Federal Reserve could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition to being affected by general economic conditions, our earnings and growth are affected by the policies of the Federal Reserve. An important function of the Federal Reserve is to regulate the U.S. money supply and credit conditions. Among the instruments used by the Federal Reserve to implement these objectives are open market purchases and sales of securities by the Federal Reserve, adjustments of both the discount rate and the federal funds rate and changes in reserve requirements against bank deposits. These instruments are used in varying combinations to influence overall economic growth and the distribution of credit, bank loans, investments and deposits. Their use also affects interest rates charged on loans or paid on deposits.

The monetary policies and regulations of the Federal Reserve have had a significant effect on the operating results of commercial banks in the past and are expected to continue to do so in the future. Although we cannot determine the effects of such policies on us at this time, such policies could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We are subject to commercial real estate lending guidance issued by the federal banking regulators that impacts our operations and capital requirements.

The federal banking regulators have issued guidance regarding concentrations in commercial real estate lending directed at institutions that have particularly high concentrations of commercial real estate loans within their lending portfolios. This guidance suggests that institutions whose commercial real estate loans exceed certain percentages of capital should implement heightened risk management practices appropriate to their concentration risk and may be required to maintain higher capital ratios than institutions with lower concentrations in commercial real estate lending. Based on our commercial real estate concentration as of December 31, 2020, we believe that we are operating within the guidelines. However, increases in our commercial real estate lending, particularly as we expand into metropolitans markets and make more of these loans, could subject us to additional supervisory analysis. We cannot guarantee that any risk management practices we implement will be effective to prevent losses relating to our commercial real estate portfolio. Management has implemented controls to monitor our commercial real estate lending concentrations, but we cannot predict the extent to which this guidance will impact our operations or capital requirements.

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Risks Related to an Investment in Our Common Stock

The market price of our common stock may be subject to substantial fluctuations, which may make it difficult for you to sell your shares at the volume, prices and times desired.

The market price of our common stock may be highly volatile, which may make it difficult for you to resell your shares at the volume, prices and times desired. There are many factors that may affect the market price and trading volume of our common stock, including, without limitation:

 

actual or anticipated fluctuations in our operating results, financial condition or asset quality;

 

changes in economic or business conditions;

 

the effects of, and changes in, trade, monetary and fiscal policies, including the interest rate policies of the Federal Reserve;

 

publication of research reports about us, our competitors, or the financial services industry generally, or changes in, or failure to meet, securities analysts’ estimates of our financial and operating performance, or lack of research reports by industry analysts or ceasing of coverage;

 

operating and stock price performance of companies that investors deemed comparable to us;

 

additional or anticipated sales of our common stock or other securities by us or our existing shareholders;

 

additions or departures of key personnel;

 

perceptions in the marketplace regarding our competitors or us, including the perception that investment in Texas is unattractive or less attractive during periods of low oil prices;

 

significant acquisitions or business combinations, strategic partnerships, joint ventures or capital commitments by or involving our competitors or us;

 

other economic, competitive, governmental, regulatory and technological factors affecting our operations, pricing, products and services; and

 

other news, announcements or disclosures (whether by us or others) related to us, our competitors, our primary markets or the financial services industry.

The stock market and, in particular, the market for financial institution stocks have experienced substantial fluctuations in recent years, which in many cases have been unrelated to the operating performance and prospects of particular companies. In addition, significant fluctuations in the trading volume in our common stock may cause significant price variations to occur. Increased market volatility may materially and adversely affect the market price of our common stock, which could make it difficult to sell your shares at the volume, prices and times desired.

The market price of our common stock could decline significantly due to actual or anticipated issuances or sales of our common stock in the future.

We may issue shares of our common stock or other securities from time to time as consideration for future acquisitions and investments and pursuant to compensation and incentive plans. If any such acquisition or investment is significant, the number of shares of our common stock, or the number or aggregate principal amount, as the case may be, of other securities that we may issue may in turn be substantial. We may also grant registration rights covering those shares of our common stock or other securities in connection with any such acquisitions and investments.

We cannot predict the size of future issuances of our common stock or the effect, if any, that future issuances and sales of our common stock will have on the market price of our common stock. Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock (including shares of our common stock issued in connection with an acquisition or under a compensation or incentive plan), or the perception that such sales could occur, may adversely affect prevailing market prices for our common stock and could impair our ability to raise capital through future sales of our securities.

Securities analysts may not initiate or continue coverage on us.

The trading market for our common stock depends, in part, on the research and reports that securities analysts publish about us and our business. We do not have any control over these securities analysts, and they may not cover us. If one or more of these analysts cease to cover us or fail to publish regular reports on us, we could lose visibility in the

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financial markets, which could cause the price or trading volume of our common stock to decline. If we are covered by securities analysts and are the subject of an unfavorable report, the price of our common stock may decline.

Our management and board of directors have significant control over our business.

As of December 31, 2020, our Company only directors and executive officers beneficially owned an aggregate of 2,204,578 shares, or approximately 19.9%, of our issued and outstanding shares of common stock, including 316,349 shares that are held by our KSOP and allocated to the accounts of our named executive officers. As of December 31, 2020, our KSOP owned an aggregate of 1,225,828 shares, or approximately 11.2% of our issued and outstanding shares. A committee consisting of four independent directors of the Company, which we refer to herein as the KSOP Committee, currently serves as trustee of the KSOP. Each KSOP participant will have the right to vote the shares allocated to such participant’s account on all matters requiring a vote of our shareholders, but the KSOP committee, as trustee of the KSOP, retains sole voting power over all shares held by the KSOP that are not allocated to participants’ accounts and all shares for which they have received no voting instructions from the participant. As of December 31, 2020, there were no shares owned by our KSOP that were unallocated to participants’ accounts.

As a result of their significant control over our business, our management and board of directors may be able to significantly affect the outcome of the election of directors and the potential outcome of other matters submitted to a vote of our shareholders, such as mergers, the sale of substantially all of our assets and other extraordinary corporate matters. The interests of these insiders could conflict with the interests of our other shareholders, including you.

The holders of our existing debt obligations, as well as debt obligations that may be outstanding in the future, will have priority over our common stock with respect to payment in the event of liquidation, dissolution or winding up and with respect to the payment of interest.

In the event of any liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the Company, our common stock would rank below all claims of debt holders against us. As of December 31, 2020, we had a senior, unsecured line of credit with an available balance of $25.0 million, with $12.0 million advanced. We also had $9.5 million of subordinated debt obligations and approximately $10.3 million of junior subordinated debentures issued to statutory trusts that, in turn, issued $10.0 million of trust preferred securities. Payments of the principal and interest on the trust preferred securities are conditionally guaranteed by us. Our debt obligations are senior to our shares of common stock. As a result, we must make payments on our debt obligations before any dividends can be paid on our common stock. In the event of our bankruptcy, dissolution or liquidation, these existing and any future debt obligations must be satisfied in full before any distributions can be made to the holders of our common stock. We have the right to defer distributions on our junior subordinated debentures (and the related trust preferred securities) for up to five years, during which time no dividends may be paid to holders of our common stock. To the extent that we issue additional debt obligations or junior subordinated debentures, the additional debt obligations or additional junior subordinated debentures will be senior to our shares of common stock.

We may issue shares of preferred stock in the future, which could make it difficult for another company to acquire us or could otherwise adversely affect holders of our common stock, which could depress the price of our common stock.

Our amended and restated certificate of formation authorizes us to issue up to 15,000,000 shares of one or more series of preferred stock. Our board of directors has the authority to determine the preferences, limitations and relative rights of shares of preferred stock and to fix the number of shares constituting any series and the designation of such series, without any further vote or action by our shareholders. Our preferred stock could be issued with voting, liquidation, dividend and other rights superior to the rights of our common stock. The potential issuance of preferred stock may delay or prevent a change in control of us, discouraging bids for our common stock at a premium over the market price, and materially adversely affect the market price and the voting and other rights of the holders of our common stock.

We are an emerging growth company, and the reduced regulatory and reporting requirements applicable to emerging growth companies may make our common stock less attractive to investors.

We are an emerging growth company, as defined in the JOBS Act. For as long as we continue to be an emerging growth company we may to take advantage of reduced regulatory and reporting requirements that are otherwise generally applicable to public companies. These include, without limitation, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced financial reporting requirements, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation, and exemptions from the requirements of holding non-binding advisory votes on executive compensation and golden parachute payments. The JOBS Act also permits an emerging growth company such as us to take advantage of an extended transition period to comply with new or revised accounting

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standards applicable to public companies. However, we have irrevocably “opted out” of this provision, and we will comply with new or revised accounting standards to the same extent that compliance is required for non-emerging growth companies.

We may take advantage of these provisions for up to five years, unless we earlier cease to be an emerging growth company, which would occur if our annual gross revenues exceed $1.0 billion, if we issue more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt in a three-year period or if the market value of our common stock held by non-affiliates exceeds $700.0 million as of any June 30, in which case we would no longer be an emerging growth company as of the following December 31. Investors may find our common stock less attractive because we intend to rely on certain of these exemptions, which may result in a less active trading market and increased volatility in our stock price.

We are dependent upon the Bank for cash flow, and the Bank’s ability to make cash distributions is restricted.

Our primary asset is Guaranty Bank & Trust. As such, the Company depends upon the Bank for cash distributions (through dividends on the Bank’s common stock) that the Company uses to pay its operating expenses, satisfy its obligations (including its junior subordinated debentures and other debt obligations) and to pay dividends on the Company’s common stock. Federal statutes, regulations and policies restrict the Bank’s ability to make cash distributions to the Company. These statutes and regulations require, among other things, that the Bank maintain certain levels of capital in order to pay a dividend. Further, the OCC has the ability to restrict the Bank’s payment of dividends by supervisory action. If the Bank is unable to pay dividends to the Company, we will not be able to satisfy our obligations or pay dividends on our common stock.

Our dividend policy may change without notice, and our future ability to pay dividends is subject to restrictions.

We anticipate that dividends will be declared and paid in the month following the end of each calendar quarter, and we anticipate paying a quarterly dividend on our common stock in an amount equal to approximately 25.0% to 30.0% of our net income for the immediately preceding quarter. However, holders of our common stock are entitled to receive only such cash dividends as our board of directors may declare out of funds legally available for such payments. Any declaration and payment of dividends on common stock will depend upon the ability of the Bank to make cash distributions to the Company, our earnings and financial condition, liquidity and capital requirements, the general economic and regulatory climate, our ability to service any equity or debt obligations senior to the common stock and other factors deemed relevant by our board of directors. Furthermore, consistent with our strategic plans, growth initiatives, capital availability, projected liquidity needs and other factors, we have made, and will continue to make, capital management decisions and policies that could adversely affect the amount of dividends, if any, paid to our common shareholders.

The Federal Reserve has indicated that bank holding companies should carefully review their dividend policy in relation to the organization’s overall asset quality, current and prospective earnings and level, composition and quality of capital. The guidance provides that we inform and consult with the Federal Reserve prior to declaring and paying a dividend that exceeds earnings for the period for which the dividend is being paid or that could result in an adverse change to our capital structure, including interest on the junior subordinated debentures underlying our trust preferred securities and our other debt obligations. If required payments on our outstanding junior subordinated debentures, held by our unconsolidated subsidiary trusts, or our other debt obligations, are not made or are deferred, or dividends on any preferred stock we may issue are not paid, we will be prohibited from paying dividends on our common stock.

Our corporate organizational documents and provisions of federal and state law to which we are subject contain certain provisions that could have an anti-takeover effect and may delay, make more difficult or prevent an attempted acquisition that you may favor or an attempted replacement of our board of directors or management.

Our certificate of formation and our bylaws (each as amended and restated) may have an anti-takeover effect and may delay, discourage or prevent an attempted acquisition or change of control or a replacement of our board of directors or management. Our governing documents include provisions that:

 

empower our board of directors, without shareholder approval, to issue our preferred stock, the terms of which, including voting power, are to be set by our board of directors;

 

divide our board of directors into three classes serving staggered three-year terms;

 

provide that directors may only be removed from office for cause and only upon a majority shareholder vote;

 

eliminate cumulative voting in elections of directors;

 

permit our board of directors to alter, amend or repeal our amended and restated bylaws or to adopt new bylaws;

41


 

require the request of holders of at least 50.0% of the outstanding shares of our capital stock entitled to vote at a meeting to call a special shareholders’ meeting;

 

prohibit shareholder action by less than unanimous written consent, thereby requiring virtually all actions to be taken at a meeting of the shareholders;

 

require shareholders that wish to bring business before annual or special meetings of shareholders, or to nominate candidates for election as directors at our annual meeting of shareholders, to provide timely notice of their intent in writing; and

 

enable our board of directors to increase, between annual meetings, the number of persons serving as directors and to fill the vacancies created as a result of the increase by a majority vote of the directors present at a meeting of directors.

In addition, certain provisions of Texas law, including a provision which restricts certain business combinations between a Texas corporation and certain affiliated shareholders, may delay, discourage or prevent an attempted acquisition or change in control. Furthermore, banking laws impose notice, approval, and ongoing regulatory requirements on any shareholder or other party that seeks to acquire direct or indirect “control” of an FDIC-insured depository institution or its holding company. These laws include the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended, or the BHC Act, and the Change in Bank Control Act, or the CBCA. These laws could delay or prevent an acquisition.

Furthermore, our amended and restated certificate of formation provides that the state courts located in Titus County, Texas, the county in which our legacy headquarters in Mount Pleasant lie, will be the exclusive forum for: (a) any actual or purported derivative action or proceeding brought on our behalf, (b) any action asserting a claim of breach of fiduciary duty by any of our directors or officers, (c) any action asserting a claim against us or our directors or officers arising pursuant to the TBOC, our certificate of formation, or our bylaws; or (d) any action asserting a claim against us or our officers or directors that is governed by the internal affairs doctrine. By becoming a shareholder of our Company, you will be deemed to have notice of and have consented to the provisions of our amended and restated certificate of formation related to choice of forum. The choice of forum provision in our amended and restated certificate of formation may limit our shareholders’ ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us. Alternatively, if a court were to find the choice of forum provision contained in our amended and restated certificate of formation to be inapplicable or unenforceable in an action, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving such action in other jurisdictions, which could adversely affect our business, operating results, and financial condition.

An investment in our common stock is not an insured deposit and is subject to risk of loss.

Any shares of our common stock you purchase will not be savings accounts, deposits or other obligations of any of our bank or non-bank subsidiaries and will not be insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any other government agency. Your investment will be subject to investment risk, and you must be capable of affording the loss of your entire investment.

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

The Bank currently operates 31 banking locations, all of which are located in Texas.  Our principal executive office is located at 16475 Dallas Parkway, Suite 600, Addison, Texas 75001.  The Bank currently operates banking locations in the following Texas locations: Austin (two locations), Bogata, Bryan, College Station (two locations), Commerce, Conroe, Dallas (two locations), Denton (two locations), Fort Worth, Hallsville, Houston (three locations), Longview, Mount Pleasant (two locations), Mount Vernon, New Boston, Paris (two locations), Pittsburg, Rockwall, Royse City, Sulphur Springs, and Texarkana (three locations).

As of December 31, 2020, we owned 21 of our branch locations, had one location in which we owned the building and had a long-term land lease on the real property associated with the branch, and leased the remaining nine locations.  The terms of our leases generally range from one to 15 years and give us the option to renew for subsequent terms of equal duration or otherwise extend the lease term subject to price adjustment based on market conditions at the time of renewal.  We believe that the nine leases to which we are subject are generally on terms consistent with prevailing market terms, and none of the leases are with our directors, officers, beneficial owners of more than 5% of our voting securities or any affiliates of the foregoing.  We believe that our facilities are in good condition and are adequate to meet our operating needs for the foreseeable future.

42


The Company is from time to time subject to claims and litigation arising in the ordinary course of business. These claims and litigation may include, among other things, allegations of violation of banking and other applicable regulations, competition law, labor laws and consumer protection laws, as well as claims or litigation relating to intellectual property, securities, breach of contract and tort. The Company intends to defend itself vigorously against any pending or future claims and litigation.

At this time, in the opinion of management, the likelihood is remote that the impact of such proceedings, either individually or in the aggregate, would have a material adverse effect on the Company combined results of operations, financial condition or cash flows. However, one or more unfavorable outcomes in any claim or litigation against the Company could have a material adverse effect for the period in which they are resolved. In addition, regardless of their merits or their ultimate outcomes, such matters are costly, divert management’s attention and may materially adversely affect the Company’s reputation, even if resolved in our favor.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

PART II

ITEM 5.  MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Information for Common Stock

 

Shares of our common stock are traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “GNTY.” Our shares have been traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market since May 9, 2017. Prior to that date, there was no public trading market for our common stock.

 

As of March 10, 2021, there were 361 holders of record of our common stock.  The number of holders of record does not represent the actual number of beneficial owners of our common stock because securities dealers and others frequently hold shares in “street name” for the benefit of individual owners who have the right to vote shares.

Dividend Policy

See "Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data—Quarterly Results of Operations" for the frequency and amount of cash dividends paid by us.  Also, see "Item 1. Business—Regulation and Supervision—Guaranty Bancshares, Inc.—Regulatory Restrictions on Dividends” for restrictions on our present or future ability to pay dividends, particularly those restrictions arising under federal and state banking laws.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities

None.

Equity Compensation Plan Information

See “Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.

43


Stock Performance Graph

The following table and graph compares the cumulative total shareholder return on our common stock to the cumulative total return of the S&P 500 Index and the SNL Bank Index for banks with $1.0 billion to $5.0 billion in total assets for the period beginning on May 9, 2017, the first day of trading of our common stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market through December 31, 2020. The following assumes $100 invested on May 9, 2017 in our common stock at our initial public offering price of $27.00 per share, otherwise reflects our stock and the S&P 500 and SNL Bank $1.0 to $5.0 Billion Index values as of close of trading, and assumes the reinvestment of dividends, if any. The historical stock price performance for our common stock shown on the graph below is not necessarily indicative of future stock performance.


 

 

 

May 9,

2017

 

 

December 31,

2017

 

 

December 31,

2018

 

 

December 31,

2019

 

 

December 31,

2020

 

Guaranty Bancshares, Inc.

 

$

100.00

 

 

$

114.98

 

 

$

114.01

 

 

$

128.63

 

 

$

120.79

 

S&P 500 Index

 

 

100.00

 

 

 

113.05

 

 

 

108.09

 

 

 

142.12

 

 

 

168.27

 

SNL Bank $1B - $5B Index

 

 

100.00

 

 

 

107.19

 

 

 

93.91

 

 

 

114.16

 

 

 

97.01

 

 

Source: S&P Global Market Intelligence

44


Stock Repurchases

In June 2019, the Company announced the adoption of a new stock repurchase program, which authorized the repurchase of up to 500,000 shares of the Company common stock, or approximately 4.0% of the outstanding common shares at that time. On March 13, 2020, the Company announced the termination of that stock repurchase program and the adoption of a new stock repurchase program that authorized the repurchase of up to 1,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. The stock repurchase program will be effective until the earlier of March 13, 2022, or the date all shares authorized for repurchase under the program have been repurchased, unless shortened or extended by the board of directors. The repurchase plan permits shares to be acquired from time to time in the open market or negotiated transactions at prices management considers to be attractive and in the best interest of both Guaranty and its shareholders, subject to compliance with applicable laws and regulations, general market and economic conditions, the financial and regulatory condition of Guaranty, liquidity and other factors. All repurchases shown in the table below were made pursuant to these stock repurchase programs in open market purchases, privately negotiated transactions or other means.

 

Period

 

Total

Number

of Shares

Purchased

 

 

Average Price

Paid per

Share

 

 

Total Number of Shares

Purchased as Part of

Publicly Announced

Plans or Programs

 

 

Maximum Number of

Shares that May Yet Be

Purchased Under the

Plans or Programs

 

October, 2020

 

 

10,800

 

 

 

27.40

 

 

 

10,800

 

 

 

647,647

 

November, 2020

 

 

70,424

 

 

 

29.53

 

 

 

70,424

 

 

 

577,223

 

December, 2020

 

 

14,700

 

 

 

29.81

 

 

 

14,700

 

 

 

562,523

 

Total

 

 

95,924

 

 

$

29.33

 

 

 

95,924

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ITEM 6.  SELECTED HISTORICAL CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL INFORMATION

The following tables set forth certain of our summary historical consolidated financial information for each of the periods indicated. The historical information as of and for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 has been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Form 10-K, and the selected historical consolidated financial information as of and for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016 has been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements not appearing in this Form 10-K. The historical results set forth below are not necessarily indicative of our future performance.

45


You should read the following together with the sections entitled “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this Form 10-K.

 

(Dollars in Thousands, except Per Share Amounts)

 

 

 

As of December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Selected Period End Balance Sheet Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

2,740,832

 

 

$

2,318,444

 

 

$

2,266,970

 

 

$

1,962,624

 

 

$

1,828,336

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

 

351,791

 

 

 

90,714

 

 

 

71,510

 

 

 

91,428

 

 

 

127,543

 

Securities available for sale

 

 

380,795

 

 

 

212,716

 

 

 

232,975

 

 

 

232,372

 

 

 

156,925

 

Securities held to maturity

 

 

 

 

 

155,458

 

 

 

163,164

 

 

 

174,684

 

 

 

189,371

 

Loans held for sale

 

 

5,542

 

 

 

2,368

 

 

 

1,795

 

 

 

1,896

 

 

 

2,563

 

Loans held for investment

 

 

1,866,819

 

 

 

1,706,395

 

 

 

1,659,535

 

 

 

1,359,544

 

 

 

1,243,925

 

Allowance for loan losses

 

 

33,619

 

 

 

16,202

 

 

 

14,651

 

 

 

12,859

 

 

 

11,484

 

Goodwill

 

 

32,160

 

 

 

32,160

 

 

 

32,160

 

 

 

18,742

 

 

 

18,742

 

Core deposit intangibles, net

 

 

2,999

 

 

 

3,853

 

 

 

4,706

 

 

 

2,724

 

 

 

3,308

 

Noninterest-bearing deposits

 

 

779,740

 

 

 

525,865

 

 

 

489,789

 

 

 

410,009

 

 

 

358,752

 

Interest-bearing deposits

 

 

1,506,650

 

 

 

1,430,939

 

 

 

1,381,691

 

 

 

1,266,311

 

 

 

1,218,039

 

Total deposits

 

 

2,286,390

 

 

 

1,956,804

 

 

 

1,871,480

 

 

 

1,676,320

 

 

 

1,576,791

 

Federal Home Loan Bank advances

 

 

109,101

 

 

 

55,118

 

 

 

115,136

 

 

 

45,153

 

 

 

55,170

 

Subordinated debentures

 

 

19,810

 

 

 

10,810

 

 

 

12,810

 

 

 

13,810

 

 

 

19,310

 

Line of credit

 

 

12,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18,286

 

KSOP-owned shares

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

31,661

 

Total shareholders’ equity less KSOP-owned shares

 

 

272,643

 

 

 

261,551

 

 

 

244,583

 

 

 

207,345

 

 

 

110,253

 

Pro forma total shareholders’ equity(1)

 

 

272,643

 

 

 

261,551

 

 

 

244,583

 

 

 

207,345

 

 

 

141,914

 

 

 

 

For the Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Selected Income Statement Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest income

 

$

89,982

 

 

$

78,870

 

 

$

68,916

 

 

$

59,630

 

 

$

53,840

 

Provision for loan losses

 

 

13,200

 

 

 

1,250

 

 

 

2,250

 

 

 

2,850

 

 

 

3,640

 

Net interest income after provision for loan losses

 

 

76,782

 

 

 

77,620

 

 

 

66,666

 

 

 

56,780

 

 

 

50,200

 

Noninterest income

 

 

23,037

 

 

 

16,962

 

 

 

15,303

 

 

 

14,279

 

 

 

13,016

 

Noninterest expense

 

 

66,522

 

 

 

62,525

 

 

 

56,774

 

 

 

48,382

 

 

 

46,380

 

Net realized (loss) gain on sale of securities

 

 

 

 

 

(22

)

 

 

(50

)

 

 

167

 

 

 

82

 

Income before income tax

 

 

33,297

 

 

 

32,057

 

 

 

25,195

 

 

 

22,677

 

 

 

16,836

 

Income tax expense

 

 

5,895

 

 

 

5,778

 

 

 

4,599

 

 

 

8,238

 

 

 

4,715

 

Net earnings

 

 

27,402

 

 

 

26,279

 

 

 

20,596

 

 

 

14,439

 

 

 

12,121

 

Dividends paid to common shareholders

 

 

8,599

 

 

 

8,128

 

 

 

7,031

 

 

 

5,562

 

 

 

4,615

 

 

 

 

As of and for the Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Per Share Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earnings per common share, basic

 

$

2.47

 

 

$

2.26

 

 

$

1.78

 

 

$

1.41

 

 

$

1.35

 

Earnings per common share, diluted

 

 

2.46

 

 

 

2.25

 

 

 

1.77

 

 

 

1.40

 

 

 

1.35

 

Book value per common share(2)

 

 

24.93

 

 

 

22.65

 

 

 

20.68

 

 

 

18.75

 

 

 

16.22

 

Tangible book value per common share(2)(3)

 

 

21.72

 

 

 

19.53

 

 

 

17.56

 

 

 

16.81

 

 

 

13.70

 

Weighted average common shares outstanding, basic

 

 

11,108,564

 

 

 

11,638,897

 

 

 

11,562,826

 

 

 

10,230,840

 

 

 

8,968,262

 

Weighted average common shares outstanding, diluted

 

 

11,141,345

 

 

 

11,705,099

 

 

 

11,653,766

 

 

 

10,313,369

 

 

 

8,976,328

 

46


 

 

 

As of and for the Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Summary Performance Ratios:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return on average assets(4)(5)

 

 

1.07

%

 

 

1.13

%

 

 

0.97

%

 

 

0.76

%

 

 

0.68

%

Return on average equity(4)(5)

 

 

10.39

 

 

 

10.37

 

 

 

9.03

 

 

 

7.78

 

 

 

8.34

 

Net interest margin(6)

 

 

3.74

 

 

 

3.68

 

 

 

3.49

 

 

 

3.38

 

 

 

3.27

 

Efficiency ratio(7)

 

 

58.86

 

 

 

65.23

 

 

 

67.37

 

 

 

65.61

 

 

 

69.46

 

Loans to deposits ratio(8)

 

 

81.65

 

 

 

87.20

 

 

 

88.68

 

 

 

81.10

 

 

 

78.89

 

Noninterest income to average assets(4)

 

 

0.90

 

 

 

0.73

 

 

 

0.72

 

 

 

0.75

 

 

 

0.73

 

Noninterest expense to average assets(4)

 

 

2.59

 

 

 

2.70

 

 

 

2.67

 

 

 

2.55

 

 

 

2.61

 

Summary Credit Quality Ratios:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nonperforming assets to total assets

 

 

0.48

%

 

 

0.53

%

 

 

0.34

%

 

 

0.44

%

 

 

0.53

%

Nonperforming loans to total loans(8)

 

 

0.68

 

 

 

0.66

 

 

 

0.35

 

 

 

0.29

 

 

 

0.35

 

Allowance for loan losses to nonperforming loans

 

 

264.61

 

 

 

143.86

 

 

 

248.70

 

 

 

321.15

 

 

 

260.47

 

Allowance for loan losses to total loans(8)

 

 

1.80

 

 

 

0.95

 

 

 

0.88

 

 

 

0.95

 

 

 

0.92

 

Net (recoveries) charge-offs to average loans outstanding(9)

 

 

0.02

 

 

 

(0.02

)

 

 

0.03

 

 

 

0.11

 

 

 

0.12

 

Capital Ratios:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total shareholders’ equity to total assets

 

 

9.95

%

 

 

11.28

%

 

 

10.79

%

 

 

10.56

%

 

 

7.76

%

Tangible common equity to tangible assets(10)

 

 

8.78

 

 

 

9.88

 

 

 

9.31

 

 

 

9.58

 

 

 

6.64

 

Common equity tier 1 capital (CET1) to risk-weighted assets

 

 

11.43

 

 

 

11.90

 

 

 

11.88

 

 

 

12.61

 

 

 

9.28

 

Tier 1 capital to average assets(4)

 

 

9.13

 

 

 

10.25

 

 

 

10.16

 

 

 

10.53

 

 

 

7.71

 

Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets

 

 

11.94

 

 

 

12.44

 

 

 

12.44

 

 

 

13.29

 

 

 

10.03

 

Total capital to risk-weighted assets

 

 

13.68

 

 

 

13.70

 

 

 

13.25

 

 

 

14.13

 

 

 

10.86

 

 

(1)

In accordance with provisions of the Internal Revenue Code applicable to private companies, prior to our listing on the NASDAQ Global Select Market, the terms of our KSOP provided that KSOP participants had the right, for a specified period of time, to require us to repurchase shares of our common stock that are distributed to them by the KSOP.  As a result, for the periods prior to our listing on the NASDAQ Global Select Market, the shares of common stock held by the KSOP are deducted from shareholders’ equity in our consolidated balance sheet. This repurchase right terminated upon the listing of our common stock on the NASDAQ Global Select Market on May 9, 2017.

(2)

Book value per common share and tangible book value per common share calculations reflect the Company’s pro forma total shareholders’ equity.

(3)

We calculate tangible book value per common share as total shareholders’ equity less goodwill, core deposit intangibles and other intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization at the end of the relevant period, divided by the outstanding number of shares of our common stock at the end of the relevant period.  Tangible book value per common share is a financial measure that is not recognized by, or calculated in accordance with, U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP, and, as we calculate tangible book value per common share, the most directly comparable GAAP financial measure is total shareholders’ equity per common share.  See our reconciliation of non-GAAP financial measures to their most directly comparable GAAP financial measures under the caption “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Non-GAAP Financial Measures.”

(4)

We calculate our average assets and average equity for a period by dividing the period end balances of our total assets or total shareholders’ equity, as the case may be, by the number of months in the period.

(5)

We have calculated our return on average assets and return on average equity for a period by dividing net earnings for that period by our average assets and average equity, as the case may be, for that period.

(6)

Net interest margin represents net interest income divided by average interest-earning assets. Net interest margin does not include the effect of taxes.

(7)

The efficiency ratio was calculated by dividing total noninterest expenses by net interest income plus noninterest income, excluding securities losses or gains.  Taxes are not part of this calculation.

(8)

Excludes loans held for sale of $5.5 million, $2.4 million, $1.8 million, $1.9 million and $2.6 million for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

(9)

Includes average outstanding balances of loans held for sale of $6.0 million, $2.7 million, $1.7 million, $1.7 million and $3.0 million for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

(10)

We calculate tangible common equity as total shareholders’ equity less goodwill, core deposit intangibles and other intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization, and we calculate tangible assets as total assets less goodwill and core deposit intangibles and other intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization. Tangible common equity to tangible assets is a financial measure that is not recognized by or calculated in accordance with GAAP, or a non-GAAP financial measure, and, as we calculate tangible common equity to tangible assets, the most directly comparable GAAP financial measure is total shareholders’ equity to total assets. See our reconciliation of non-GAAP financial measures to their most directly comparable GAAP financial measures under the caption “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Non-GAAP Financial Measures.”

 

47


ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with “Item 6. Selected Financial Data” and the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes included in "Item 8: Financial Statements and Supplementary Data."  This discussion and analysis contains forward-looking statements that are subject to certain risks and uncertainties and are based on certain assumptions that we believe are reasonable but may prove to be inaccurate. Certain risks, uncertainties and other factors, including those set forth under “Forward-Looking Statements,” “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, may cause actual results to differ materially from those projected results discussed in the forward-looking statements appearing in this discussion and analysis. We assume no obligation to update any of these forward-looking statements.

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements reflect our current views with respect to, among other things, future events and our financial performance. These statements are often, but not always, made through the use of words or phrases such as “may,” “should,” “could,” “predict,” “potential,” “believe,” “will likely result,” “expect,” “continue,” “will,” “anticipate,” “seek,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” “projection,” “would” and “outlook,” or the negative version of those words or other comparable words or phrases of a future or forward-looking nature. These forward-looking statements are not historical facts, and are based on current expectations, estimates and projections about our industry, management’s beliefs and certain assumptions made by management, many of which, by their nature, are inherently uncertain and beyond our control. Accordingly, we caution you that any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks, assumptions and uncertainties that are difficult to predict. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in these forward-looking statements are reasonable as of the date made, actual results may prove to be materially different from the results expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements.

There are or will be important factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those indicated in these forward-looking statements, including, but not limited to, the following:

 

our ability to prudently manage our growth and execute our strategy;

 

risks associated with our acquisition and de novo branching strategy;

 

business and economic conditions generally and in the financial services industry, nationally and within our primary markets;

 

deterioration of our asset quality;

 

changes in the value of collateral securing our loans;

 

changes in management personnel;

 

liquidity risks associated with our business;

 

interest rate risk associated with our business;

 

our ability to maintain important deposit customer relationships and our reputation;

 

operational risks associated with our business;

 

volatility and direction of market interest rates;

 

increased competition in the financial services industry, particularly from regional and national institutions;

 

changes in the laws, rules, regulations, interpretations or policies relating to financial institution, accounting, tax, trade, monetary and fiscal matters;

 

further government intervention in the U.S. financial system;

 

natural disasters and adverse weather, acts of terrorism, an outbreak of hostilities or public health outbreaks (such as coronavirus) or other international or domestic calamities, and other matters beyond our control; and

 

other factors that are discussed in "Item 1A. Risk Factors."

48


The foregoing factors should not be construed as exhaustive and should be read together with the other cautionary statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. If one or more events related to these or other risks or uncertainties materialize, or if our underlying assumptions prove to be incorrect, actual results may differ materially from what we anticipate. Accordingly, you should not place undue reliance on any such forward-looking statements. Any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which it is made, and we do not undertake any obligation to publicly update or review any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise. New factors emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict which will arise. In addition, we cannot assess the impact of each factor on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements.

General

The following discussion and analysis presents our financial condition and results of operations on a consolidated basis. However, because we conduct all of our material business operations through Guaranty Bank & Trust, the discussion and analysis relates to activities primarily conducted by Guaranty Bank & Trust.

As a bank holding company that operates through one segment, we generate most of our revenue from interest on loans and investments, customer service and loan fees, fees related to the sale of mortgage loans, and trust and wealth management services. We incur interest expense on deposits and other borrowed funds, as well as noninterest expense, such as salaries and employee benefits and occupancy expenses. We analyze our ability to maximize income generated from interest earning assets and control the interest expenses of our liabilities, measured as net interest income, through our net interest margin and net interest spread. Net interest income is the difference between interest income on interest-earning assets, such as loans and securities, and interest expense on interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowings, which are used to fund those assets. Net interest margin is a ratio calculated as net interest income divided by average interest-earning assets. Net interest spread is the difference between rates earned on interest-earning assets and rates paid on interest-bearing liabilities.

Changes in market interest rates and the interest rates we earn on interest-earning assets or pay on interest-bearing liabilities, as well as in the volume and types of interest-earning assets, interest-bearing and noninterest-bearing liabilities and shareholders’ equity, are usually the largest drivers of periodic changes in net interest spread, net interest margin and net interest income. Fluctuations in market interest rates are driven by many factors, including governmental monetary policies, inflation, deflation, macroeconomic developments, changes in unemployment, the money supply, political and international conditions and conditions in domestic and foreign financial markets. Periodic changes in the volume and types of loans in our loan portfolio are affected by, among other factors, economic and competitive conditions in Texas, as well as developments affecting the real estate, technology, financial services, insurance, transportation, manufacturing and energy sectors within our target markets and throughout the state of Texas.

Acquisitions

The comparability of our consolidated results of operations for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, compared to 2018, is affected by the acquisition of Westbound Bank on June 1, 2018. Therefore, the results of the acquired operations of Westbound Bank were included in our results of operations during all of 2020 and 2019, but only for a portion of 2018.

Impact of COVID-19

In March 2020, the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease ("COVID-19") was recognized as a pandemic by the World Health Organization. Global health concerns relating to COVID-19 have had, and will likely continue to have, a severe impact on the macroeconomic environment, leading to lower interest rates, depressed equity market valuations, heightened financial market volatility and significant disruption in banking and other financial activity in the areas we serve. During 2020, governmental responses to the pandemic included orders closing businesses not deemed essential and directing individuals to restrict their movements, observe social distancing and shelter in place. These actions, together with responses to the pandemic by businesses and individuals, resulted in rapid decreases in commercial and consumer activity, temporary or permanent closures of many businesses that led to a loss of revenues and a rapid increase in unemployment, material decreases in business valuations, disrupted global supply chains, market downturns and volatility, changes in consumer behavior related to pandemic fears, related emergency response legislation and an expectation that Federal Reserve policy will maintain a low interest rate environment for the foreseeable future. Despite the availability of a vaccine in late 2020, these risks and uncertainties remain as the demand for the vaccine outpaces the supply available, the extent to which the American public is willing to receive the vaccine remains unknown, and more contagious strains of the virus mutate both in the US and abroad.

49


The financial performance of the Company generally, and in particular the ability of borrowers to pay interest on and repay principal of outstanding loans and the value of collateral securing those loans, as well as demand for loans and other products and services that the Company offers and whose success it relies on to drive growth, are highly dependent upon the business environment in the primary markets in which we operate and in the United States as a whole. Unfavorable market conditions and uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic may result in a deterioration in the credit quality of borrowers, an increase in the number of loan delinquencies, defaults and charge-offs, additional provisions for credit losses, adverse asset values of the collateral securing loans and an overall material adverse effect on the quality of the loan portfolio.

On March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security ("CARES") Act was signed into law. It contained substantial tax and spending provisions intended to address the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. The CARES Act included the Paycheck Protection Program ("PPP"), a program designed to aid small- and medium-sized businesses through federally guaranteed loans distributed through banks. PPP loans were intended to provide eligible businesses with funding for payroll and other costs to help those businesses remain viable and allow their workers to pay their bills. PPP loans are forgivable to the extent that the borrower can demonstrate that the funds were used for such costs. Any amounts not forgiven will bear interest at 1% and be repayable over a term of 24 to 60 months from origination. PPP has been subject to amendments to increase the size of the program, extend the period in which loans could be made, extend the period for which costs could be forgiven and to provide additional flexibility to borrowers. In December 2020, several portions of the CARES Act were extended as part of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, including additional stimulus payments to consumers and a second round of PPP loans for small businesses. It is expected that there may be further changes to PPP, either through legislation or changes to forms and applications required under PPP.

Significant uncertainties as to future economic conditions exist, and we have taken measured actions during 2020 to ensure that we have the balance sheet strength to serve our clients and communities, including increases in liquidity and reserves supported by a strong capital position. Additionally, the economic pressures, coupled with the implementation of an expected loss methodology for determining our provision for credit losses as required by the current expected credit loss (“CECL”) methodology, contributed to an increased provision for credit losses in the first half of 2020. We continue to monitor the impact of COVID-19 closely, as well as any effects that may result from government stimulus and relief programs; however, the extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to impact our operations and financial results, as well as timing of economic recovery, remains uncertain.

Critical Accounting Policies

Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with GAAP and with general practices within the financial services industry. Application of these principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under current circumstances. These assumptions form the basis for our judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily available from independent, objective sources. We evaluate our estimates on an ongoing basis. Use of alternative assumptions may have resulted in significantly different estimates. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

We have identified the following accounting policies and estimates that, due to the difficult, subjective or complex judgments and assumptions inherent in those policies and estimates, and the potential sensitivity of our financial statements to those judgments and assumptions, are critical to an understanding of our financial condition and results of operations. We believe that the judgments, estimates and assumptions used in the preparation of our financial statements are appropriate.

Loans and Allowance for Credit Losses (ACL)

Loans are stated at the amount of unpaid principal, reduced by unearned income and an allowance for credit losses. Interest on loans is recognized using the simple-interest method on the daily balances of the principal amounts outstanding. Fees associated with the origination of loans and certain direct loan origination costs are netted and the net amount is deferred and recognized over the life of the loan as an adjustment of yield.

The accrual of interest on loans is discontinued when there is a clear indication that the borrower’s cash flow may not be sufficient to meet payments as they become due, which is generally when a loan is 90 days past due. A loan may continue to accrue interest, even if it is more than 90 days past due, if the loan is both well collateralized and it is in the process of collection. When a loan is placed on nonaccrual status, all previously accrued and unpaid interest is reversed. Interest income is subsequently recognized on a cash basis as long as the remaining book balance of the asset is deemed to be collectible. If collectability is questionable, then cash payments are applied to principal. Loans are

50


returned to accrual status when all the principal and interest amounts contractually due are brought current and future payments are reasonably assured in accordance with the terms of the loan agreement.

The allowance for credit losses is a valuation account that is deducted from the loans' amortized cost basis to present the net amount expected to be collected on the loans. Loans are charged off against the allowance when management believes the uncollectibility of a loan balance is confirmed. Recoveries will not exceed the aggregate of loan amounts previously charged-off and expected to be charged-off.

Management estimates the allowance balance using relevant available information, from internal and external sources, relating to past events, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts. We use the weighted-average remaining maturity method (WARM method) as the basis for the estimation of expected credit losses. The WARM method uses a historical average annual charge-off rate. This average annual charge-off rate contains loss content over a historical lookback period and is used as a foundation for estimating the credit loss reserve for the remaining outstanding balances of loans in a pool or segment of our loan portfolio at the balance sheet date. The average annual charge-off rate is applied to the contractual term, further adjusted for estimated prepayments, to determine the unadjusted historical charge-off rate. The calculation of the unadjusted historical charge-off rate is then adjusted for current conditions and for reasonable and supportable forecast periods. Adjustments to historical loss information are made for differences in current loan-specific risk characteristics such as differences in underwriting standards, portfolio mix, delinquency level, or term as well as for changes in environmental conditions, such as changes in unemployment rates, property values, or other relevant factors. These qualitative factors serve to compensate for additional areas of uncertainty inherent in the portfolio that are not reflected in our historic loss factors. In early 2020, to address the uncertainties resulting from COVID-19, an additional qualitative factor was added to specifically address COVID-related economic factors and potential credit losses, in addition to our standard qualitative factors.

The allowance for credit losses is measured on a collective (pool or segment) basis when similar risk characteristics exist. Our loan portfolio segments include both regulatory call report codes and internally identified risk ratings for our commercial loan segments and delinquency status for our consumer loan segments. We also have separate segments for our warehouse lines of credit, for our internally originated SBA loans, for our SBA loans acquired from Westbound Bank, and for loans originated under the PPP program.

In general, the loans in our portfolio have low historical credit losses. The credit quality of loans in our portfolio is impacted by delinquency status and debt service coverage generated by our borrowers’ businesses and fluctuations in the value of real estate collateral. Management considers delinquency status to be the most meaningful indicator of the credit quality of one-to-four single family residential, home equity loans and lines of credit and other consumer loans. In general, these types of loans do not begin to show signs of credit deterioration or default until they have been outstanding for some period of time, a process we refer to as “seasoning.” As a result, a portfolio of older loans will usually behave more predictably than a portfolio of newer loans. We consider the majority of our consumer type loans to be “seasoned” and that the credit quality and current level of delinquencies and defaults represents the level of reserve needed in the allowance for credit losses. If delinquencies and defaults were to increase, we may be required to increase our provision for loan losses, which would adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. Delinquency statistics are updated at least monthly.

Internal risk ratings are considered the most meaningful indicator of credit quality for new commercial and industrial, construction, and commercial real estate loans. Internal risk ratings are a key factor that impacts management’s estimates of loss factors used in determining the amount of the allowance for credit losses. Internal risk ratings are updated on a continuous basis.

Loans with unique risk characteristics are evaluated on an individual basis. Loans evaluated individually are excluded from the collective evaluation. When management determines that foreclosure is probable, expected credit losses are based on the fair value of the collateral at the reporting date, adjusted for selling costs as appropriate.

51


For off-balance sheet credit exposures, we estimate expected credit losses over the contractual period in which we are exposed to credit risk via a contractual obligation to extend credit, unless that obligation is unconditionally cancellable by us. The allowance for credit losses on off-balance sheet credit exposures is adjusted as a provision for credit loss expense. The estimate includes consideration of the likelihood that funding will occur and an estimate of expected credit losses on commitments expected to be funded over its estimated life.

From time to time, we modify our loan agreement with a borrower. A modified loan is considered a troubled debt restructuring (TDR) when two conditions are met: (i) the borrower is experiencing financial difficulty and (ii) concessions are made by us that would not otherwise be considered for a borrower with similar credit risk characteristics. Modifications to loan terms may include a lower interest rate, a reduction of principal, or a longer term to maturity. We review each troubled debt restructured loan and determine on a case by case basis if the loan can be grouped with its like segment for allowance consideration or whether it should be individually evaluated for a specific allowance for credit loss allocation. If individually evaluated, an allowance for credit loss allocation is based on either the present value of estimated future cash flows or the estimated fair value of the underlying collateral. Most modifications made as a direct result of COVID-19 are not TDRs pursuant to the CARES Act, the April 7, 2020 Interagency guidance, and GAAP.

We have certain lending policies and procedures in place that are designed to maximize loan income with an acceptable level of risk. Management reviews and approves these policies and procedures on a regular basis and makes changes as appropriate. Management receives frequent reports related to loan originations, quality, concentrations, delinquencies, non-performing and potential problem loans. Diversification in the loan portfolio is a means of managing risk associated with fluctuations in economic conditions, both by type of loan and geography.

Commercial and industrial loans are underwritten after evaluating and understanding the borrower’s ability to operate profitably and effectively. Underwriting standards are designed to determine whether the borrower possesses sound business ethics and practices and to evaluate current and projected cash flows to determine the ability of the borrower to repay their obligations as agreed. Commercial and industrial loans are primarily made based on the identified cash flows of the borrower and, secondarily, on the underlying collateral provided by the borrower. Most commercial and industrial loans are secured by the assets being financed or other business assets, such as accounts receivable or inventory, and include personal guarantees.

Real estate loans are also subject to underwriting standards and processes similar to commercial and industrial loans. These loans are underwritten primarily based on projected cash flows and, secondarily, as loans secured by real estate collateral. The repayment of real estate loans is generally largely dependent on the successful operation of the property securing the loans or the business conducted on the property securing the loan. Real estate loans may be more adversely affected by conditions in the real estate markets or in the general economy. The properties securing our real estate portfolio are generally diverse in terms of type and geographic location throughout the State of Texas. This diversity helps us reduce the exposure to adverse economic events that affect any single market or industry.

We utilize methodical credit standards and analysis to supplement our policies and procedures in underwriting consumer loans. Our loan policy addresses types of consumer loans that may be originated as well as the underlying collateral, if secured, which must be perfected. The relatively small individual dollar amounts of consumer loans that are spread over numerous individual borrowers also minimizes risk.

Emerging Growth Company

The JOBS Act permits an “emerging growth company” to take advantage of an extended transition period to comply with new or revised accounting standards applicable to public companies. However, we have “opted out” of this provision. As a result, we will comply with new or revised accounting standards to the same extent that compliance is required for non-emerging growth companies. Our decision to opt out of the extended transition period under the JOBS Act is irrevocable.

52


Performance Summary for the Years Ended December 31, 2020 and 2019

Net earnings were $27.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, as compared to $26.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2019. This performance resulted in basic earnings per share of $2.47 for the year ended December 31, 2020 as compared to $2.26 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The increase in net earnings over this period was largely due to the forgiveness and amortization of Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) loans and recognition of associated loan origination fees, as well as increased non-interest income from mortgage and warehouse lending activities and decreases in interest expense relative to interest income. There was also an eight basis point increase in our fully tax equivalent net interest margin from 3.69% in 2019 to 3.77% in 2020. The increase in earnings per share over this period was due to the increase in earnings described above as well as the repurchase of 658,607 shares of common stock during the year ended December 31, 2020.

Our return on average assets was 1.07% for the year ended December 31, 2020, as compared to 1.13% for the year ended December 31, 2019. Our return on average equity was 10.39% for the year ended December 31, 2020, as compared to 10.37% for the year ended December 31, 2019. The decrease in our return on average assets was primarily due to the 10.9% increase in the balance of total average assets caused by the addition of an average balance of $138.3 million in PPP loans to the balance sheet during the year (which earned 1% interest), while only adding $6.3 million in net loan fees on PPP loans to income during 2020.

Our fully tax equivalent net interest margin was 3.77% for the year ended December 31, 2020 and 3.69% for the year ended December 31, 2019. Our net interest margin increased primarily due to the maturity of higher-rate CDs, as well as continued reductions in interest rates for non-maturing deposits as market conditions have allowed during the year ended December 31, 2020. Our efficiency ratio was 58.86% for the year ended December 31, 2020, as compared to 65.23% for the year ended December 31, 2019. The improvement in our efficiency ratio for 2020 is largely attributable to increases in net interest income and noninterest income of 14.1% and 35.8%, respectively, compared to a relatively small 6.4% increase in noninterest expense during 2020.

Our total assets increased $422.4 million, or 18.2%, to $2.74 billion as of December 31, 2020, compared to $2.32 billion as of December 31, 2019. Total loans increased $160.4 million, or 9.4%, to $1.87 billion as of December 31, 2020, compared to $1.71 billion as of December 31, 2019. The increase in our total loans is primarily the result of outstanding PPP loan balances of $139.8 million, to 1,452 borrowers, as of December 31, 2020. Excluding the outstanding PPP balances as of December 31, 2020, gross loans increased $20.6 million, or 1.21% from the prior year. Total shareholders’ equity increased $11.1 million, or 4.2%, to $272.6 million as of December 31, 2020, compared to $261.6 million as of December 31, 2019. The increase in shareholders' equity was due primarily to the 4.3% increase in net earnings in 2020 and an increase in accumulated other comprehensive income of $11.4 million, which was due to a $12.0 million unrealized gain on available for sale securities during the year, partially offset by the repurchase of common stock and payment of dividends during 2020.

53


Large provisions for credit losses resulting from effects of COVID-19 and participation in the PPP program have created temporary extraordinary results in the calculation of net earnings and related performance ratios. With the credit outlook still uncertain as a result of COVID-19 and other economic factors, the following table illustrates net earnings and net core earnings per share, which are pre-tax, pre-provision and pre-extraordinary PPP income, as well as performance ratios for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019.

 

 

 

 

For The Years Ended

December 31,

 

(in thousands)

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Net earnings

 

$

27,402

 

 

$

26,279

 

Adjustments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Provision for credit losses

 

 

13,200

 

 

 

1,250

 

Income tax provision

 

 

5,895

 

 

 

5,778

 

PPP interest income, including fees

 

 

(6,270

)

 

 

 

Net interest expense on PPP-related borrowings

 

 

34

 

 

 

 

Net core earnings

 

$

40,261

 

 

$

33,307

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total average assets

 

$

2,571,003

 

 

$

2,318,939

 

Adjustments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PPP loans average balance

 

 

(138,291

)

 

 

 

Excess fed funds sold due to PPP-related borrowings

 

 

(22,951

)

 

 

 

Total average assets, adjusted

 

$

2,409,761

 

 

$

2,318,939

 

Total average equity

 

$

263,766

 

 

$

253,523

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PERFORMANCE RATIOS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net earnings to average assets (annualized)

 

 

1.07

%

 

 

1.13

%

Net earnings to average equity (annualized)

 

 

10.39

 

 

 

10.37

 

Net core earnings to average assets, as adjusted (annualized)

 

 

1.67

 

 

 

1.44

 

Net core earnings to average equity (annualized)

 

 

15.26

 

 

 

13.14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PER COMMON SHARE DATA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted-average common shares outstanding, basic

 

 

11,108,564

 

 

 

11,638,897

 

Earnings per common share, basic

 

$

2.47

 

 

$

2.26

 

Net core earnings per common share, basic

 

 

3.62

 

 

 

2.86

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

† Non-GAAP financial metric. Calculations of this metric and reconciliations to GAAP are included in "—Non-GAAP Financial Measures".

 

 

54


Results of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2020 and 2019

A discussion regarding our results of operations for the year ended December 31, 2019 compared to the year ended December 31, 2018 can be found under “Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Result of Operations” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019, filed with the SEC on March 13, 2020, which is available on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov and our Investor Relations website at investors.gnty.com.

Net Interest Income

Our operating results depend primarily on our net interest income. Fluctuations in market interest rates impact the yield and rates paid on interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities, respectively. Changes in the amount and type of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities also impact our net interest income. To evaluate net interest income, we measure and monitor (1) yields on our loans and other interest-earning assets, (2) the costs of our deposits and other funding sources, (3) our net interest spread and (4) our net interest margin. Because noninterest-bearing sources of funds, such as noninterest-bearing deposits and shareholders’ equity also fund interest-earning assets, net interest margin includes the benefit of these noninterest-bearing sources.

Net interest income, before the provision for credit losses, was $90.0 million compared to $78.9 million for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, an increase of $11.1 million, or 14.1%. The increase in net interest income resulted from a $10.6 million, or 44.9%, decrease in interest expense and a $481,000, or 0.5%, increase in interest income. Although there was a $183.8 million, or 10.9%, increase in average loans outstanding for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to the year ended December 31, 2019, that increase was offset by a 41 basis point decrease in the average yield on total loans. The increase in average loans outstanding was primarily due to loans originated through the PPP program and some organic growth. The $10.6 million decrease in interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2020 was primarily related to an average deposit rate decrease of 69 basis points, despite an $8.1 million, or 0.6%, increase in average interest-bearing deposits from 2019. Noninterest-bearing liabilities increased $195.6 million, or 39.0%, primarily due to the deposit of PPP proceeds into demand accounts at the Bank, as well as apparent changes in depositor spending habits during the year resulting from economic and other uncertainties due to COVID-19. The increases were primarily in noninterest-bearing demand accounts, offset by declines in certificate of deposits accounts. For the year ended December 31, 2020, net interest margin and net interest spread were 3.74% and 3.46%, respectively, compared to 3.68% and 3.25% for the year ended December 31, 2019, which reflects the decreases in interest expense discussed above relative to the increases in interest income.

55


Average Balance Sheet Amounts, Interest Earned and Yield Analysis

The following table presents an analysis of net interest income and net interest spread for the periods indicated, including average outstanding balances for each major category of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities, the interest earned or paid on such amounts, and the average rate earned or paid on such assets or liabilities, respectively. The table also sets forth the net interest margin on average total interest-earning assets for the same periods. Interest earned on loans that are classified as nonaccrual is not recognized in income; however the balances are reflected in average outstanding balances for the period. For the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, the amount of interest income not recognized on nonaccrual loans was not material. Any nonaccrual loans have been included in the table as loans carrying a zero yield.

 

 

 

For The Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

(in thousands)

 

Average

Outstanding

Balance

 

 

Interest

Earned/

Interest

Paid

 

 

Average

Yield/

Rate

 

 

Average

Outstanding

Balance

 

 

Interest

Earned/

Interest

Paid

 

 

Average

Yield/

Rate

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

interest-earning assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total loans(1)

 

$

1,872,914

 

 

$

93,335

 

 

 

4.98

%

 

$

1,689,108

 

 

$

90,980

 

 

 

5.39

%

Securities available for sale

 

 

338,510

 

 

 

7,798

 

 

 

2.30

 

 

 

229,351

 

 

 

5,715

 

 

 

2.49

 

Securities held to maturity

 

 

35,935

 

 

 

956

 

 

 

2.66

 

 

 

159,104

 

 

 

4,031

 

 

 

2.53

 

Nonmarketable equity securities

 

 

10,761

 

 

 

439

 

 

 

4.08

 

 

 

11,343

 

 

 

640

 

 

 

5.64

 

Interest-bearing deposits in other banks

 

 

146,659

 

 

 

514

 

 

 

0.35

 

 

 

53,783

 

 

 

1,195

 

 

 

2.22

 

Total interest-earning assets

 

 

2,404,779

 

 

 

103,042

 

 

 

4.28

 

 

 

2,142,689

 

 

 

102,561

 

 

 

4.79

 

Allowance for credit losses

 

 

(29,100

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(15,692

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Noninterest-earning assets

 

 

195,324

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

191,942

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

2,571,003

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

2,318,939

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest-bearing liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest-bearing deposits

 

$

1,468,353

 

 

$

11,624

 

 

 

0.79

%

 

$

1,460,215

 

 

$

21,611

 

 

 

1.48

%

Advances from FHLB and fed funds purchased

 

 

75,940

 

 

 

470

 

 

 

0.62

 

 

 

58,070

 

 

 

1,389

 

 

 

2.39

 

Line of credit

 

 

6,727

 

 

 

213

 

 

 

3.17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subordinated debentures

 

 

17,198

 

 

 

702

 

 

 

4.08

 

 

 

11,905

 

 

 

655

 

 

 

5.50

 

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase

 

 

18,115

 

 

 

51

 

 

 

0.28

 

 

 

10,901

 

 

 

36

 

 

 

0.33

 

Total interest-bearing liabilities

 

 

1,586,333

 

 

 

13,060

 

 

 

0.82

 

 

 

1,541,091

 

 

 

23,691

 

 

 

1.54

 

Noninterest-bearing liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Noninterest-bearing deposits

 

 

696,454

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

500,895

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accrued interest and other liabilities

 

 

24,450

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

23,430

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total noninterest-bearing liabilities

 

 

720,904

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

524,325

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shareholders’ equity

 

 

263,766

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

253,523

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

 

$

2,571,003

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

2,318,939

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest rate spread(2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.46

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.25

%

Net interest income

 

 

 

 

 

$

89,982

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

78,870

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest margin(3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.74

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.68

%

Net interest margin, fully taxable equivalent(4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.77

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.69

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1) Includes average outstanding balances of loans held for sale of $6.0 million and $2.7 million for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

(2) Net interest spread is the average yield on interest-earning assets minus the average rate on interest-bearing liabilities.

 

(3) Net interest margin is equal to net interest income divided by average interest-earning assets.

 

(4) Net interest margin on a taxable equivalent basis is equal to net interest income adjusted for nontaxable income divided by average interest-earning assets, using a marginal tax rate of 21%.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

56


To illustrate core net interest margin and remove the extraordinary impacts resulting from the PPP program, the table below excludes PPP loans and their associated fees and costs, as well as the average balance of related FHLB borrowings and fed funds sold, for the year ended December 31, 2020:

 

 

 

For the Year Ended December 31, 2020

 

(in thousands)

 

Average

Outstanding

Balance

 

 

Interest

Earned/

Interest

Paid

 

 

Average

Yield/ Rate

 

Total interest-earning assets

 

$

2,404,779

 

 

$

103,042

 

 

 

4.28

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total loans

 

 

1,872,914

 

 

 

93,335

 

 

 

4.98

 

Adjustments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PPP loans average balance and net fees(1)

 

 

(138,291

)

 

 

(6,270

)

 

 

4.53

 

Total loans, net of PPP effects

 

$

1,734,623

 

 

$

87,065

 

 

 

5.02

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total interest-bearing deposits in other banks

 

 

146,659

 

 

 

514

 

 

 

0.35

 

Adjustments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Excess fed funds sold due to PPP-related borrowings

 

 

(22,951

)

 

 

(23

)

 

 

0.10

 

Total interest-bearing deposits in other banks, net of PPP effects

 

$

123,708

 

 

$

491

 

 

 

0.40

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total interest-earning assets, net of PPP effects

 

$

2,243,537

 

 

$

96,749

 

 

 

4.31

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total advances from FHLB and fed funds purchased

 

 

75,940

 

 

 

470

 

 

 

0.62

 

Interest expense adjustment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PPP-related FHLB borrowings

 

 

(22,951

)

 

 

(57

)

 

 

0.25

 

Total  advances from FHLB and fed funds purchased, net of PPP effects

 

$

52,989

 

 

$

413

 

 

 

0.78

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest income

 

 

 

 

 

$

89,982

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest margin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.74

%

Net interest income, net of PPP effects

 

 

 

 

 

 

83,746

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest margin, net of PPP effects

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.73

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

† Non-GAAP financial metric. Calculations of this and reconciliations to GAAP are included in "—Non-GAAP Financial Measures"

 

(1) Interest earned consists of interest income of $1.4 million and net origination fees recognized in earnings of $4.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

 

The following table presents information regarding the dollar amount of changes in interest income and interest expense for the periods indicated for each major component of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities and distinguishes between the changes attributable to changes in volume and changes attributable to changes in interest rates. For purposes of this table, changes attributable to both rate and volume that cannot be segregated have been allocated to rate.

 

 

 

For the Year Ended December 31, 2020 vs. 2019

 

 

 

Increase (Decrease)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Due to Change in

 

 

Total Increase

 

(in thousands)

 

Volume

 

 

Rate

 

 

(Decrease)

 

Interest-earning assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total loans

 

$

9,907

 

 

$

(7,552

)

 

$

2,355

 

Securities available for sale

 

 

2,718

 

 

 

(635

)

 

 

2,083

 

Securities held to maturity

 

 

(3,116

)

 

 

41

 

 

 

(3,075

)

Nonmarketable equity securities

 

 

(33

)

 

 

(168

)

 

 

(201

)

Interest-earning deposits in other banks

 

 

2,062

 

 

 

(2,743

)

 

 

(681

)

Total increase (decrease) in interest income

 

$

11,538

 

 

$

(11,057

)

 

$

481

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest-bearing liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest-bearing deposits

 

$

120

 

 

$

(10,107

)

 

$

(9,987

)

Advances from FHLB and fed funds purchased

 

 

427

 

 

 

(1,346

)

 

 

(919

)

Line of credit

 

 

 

 

 

213

 

 

 

213

 

Subordinated debentures

 

 

291

 

 

 

(244

)

 

 

47

 

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase

 

 

24

 

 

 

(9

)

 

 

15

 

Total increase (decrease) in interest expense

 

 

862

 

 

 

(11,493

)

 

 

(10,631

)

Increase in net interest income

 

$

10,676

 

 

$

436

 

 

$

11,112

 

 

57


Provision for Credit Losses

The provision for credit losses is a charge to income in order to bring our allowance for credit losses to a level deemed appropriate by management based on factors such as historical loss experience, trends in classified and past due loans, volume and growth in the loan portfolio, current economic conditions in our markets and value of the underlying collateral. Loans are charged off against the allowance for credit losses when determined appropriate. Although management believes it uses the best information available to make determinations with respect to the provision for credit losses, future adjustments may be necessary if economic conditions differ from the assumptions used in making the determination. For a full description of the factors taken into account by our management in determining the allowance for credit losses see “— Financial Condition—Allowance for Credit Losses.”

The provision for credit losses for the year ended December 31, 2020 was $13.2 million compared to $1.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2019. The provision results largely from risk grade changes in the loan portfolio and from additional qualitative factor adjustments, specifically to address virus-related concerns, that were made in the first half of 2020 under the CECL model, and were primarily derived from changes in national GDP, Texas unemployment rates and national industry related CRE trends, all of which are impacted by the effects of COVID-19. Beginning in March 2020, the Bank closely reviewed its loan portfolio and spoke to borrowers about their financial hardships, if any, due to COVID-19. As a result, many borrowers in affected industries were downgraded to an appropriate risk rating to capture the additional risk and to work with borrowers to navigate through their cash flow or other financial uncertainties. Management believes the provisions made as a result of loan downgrades and qualitative factor adjustments in the CECL model appropriately capture the current credit risks associated with COVID-19. However, the outbreak of COVID-19, or mutating strains, could worsen in the short term, leading to possible changes in customer and consumer behavior and stronger response measures by government officials, and the timing of economic recovery remains uncertain.

As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, our allowance for credit losses was $33.6 million and $16.2 million, respectively. As of December 31, 2020, there was $15.5 million in loan balances past due 30 or more days and $12.7 million in loan balances for nonperforming (non-accrual) loans, compared to $8.3 million and $11.3 million, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2019.

The increase in nonperforming loans and assets resulted primarily from one SBA 7(a), partially guaranteed (75%) loan and one commercial loan, both of which were acquired in our June 2018 acquisition of Westbound Bank. To facilitate the workout of the SBA loan, we repurchased the guaranteed portion of the loan from a third party, resulting in an increased book balance of $3.1 million and a total book balance, which remains 75% SBA guaranteed, of $3.9 million. The increased book balance from the SBA loan of $3.1 million, combined with the commercial loan book balance of $1.1 million, comprises $4.2 million of the increase from December 31, 2019, which was partially offset by decreases in smaller dollar loans. Three SBA partially guaranteed (75%) loans relating to loans acquired from Westbound Bank, including the $3.1 million repurchased portion, are included in nonaccrual loans at December 31, 2020 and had combined book balances of $8.7 million. These loans were internally identified as problem assets prior to COVID-19 and are properly reserved using our CECL methodology. Management continues to work toward a satisfactory resolution for these three loans. Non-performing assets as a percentage of total loans at December 31, 2020 was 0.70%. Excluding these partially guaranteed SBA loans, non-performing assets as a percentage of total loans at December 31, 2020 would be 0.24% and, excluding PPP loans, would be 0.76%. The remaining $4.0 million in non-accrual loans as of December 31, 2020 consisted primarily of smaller dollar, first lien residential home loans and included one loan relationship with an outstanding balance of $1.1 million as of December 31, 2020.

Net charge-offs for the year ended December 31, 2020 totaled $331,000, compared to net recoveries of $301,000 in 2019. The increase in net charge-offs during 2020 resulted primarily from normal levels of charge-offs and recoveries during this year, as well as a recovery in 2019 of $487,000 from proceeds received from a life insurance policy that collateralized a loan that was charged off several years ago. Without this one recovery, net charge-offs for 2019 would have been $186,000.

58


The following table shows the ratio of net charge-offs (recoveries) to average loans outstanding by loan category for the dates indicated:

 

 

 

For the Year Ended December 31,

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Commercial and industrial

 

 

(0.01

)%

 

 

(0.09

)%

Real estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction and development

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial real estate

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farmland

 

 

 

 

 

 

1-4 family residential

 

 

0.02

%

 

 

 

Multi-family residential

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer and overdrafts

 

 

0.22

%

 

 

(0.07

)%

Agricultural

 

 

(0.01

)%

 

 

 

Overdrafts

 

 

62.89

%

 

 

44.38

%

Net charge-offs (recoveries) to total loans

 

 

0.22

%

 

 

(0.16

)%

 

Noninterest Income

Our primary sources of recurring noninterest income are service charges on deposit accounts, merchant and debit card fees, fiduciary income, gains on the sale of loans, and income from bank-owned life insurance. Noninterest income does not include loan origination fees to the extent they exceed the direct loan origination costs, which are generally recognized over the life of the related loan as an adjustment to yield using the interest method.

For the year ended December 31, 2020, noninterest income totaled $23.0 million, an increase of $6.1 million, or 35.8%, compared to $17.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2019. The following table presents, for the periods indicated, the major categories of noninterest income:

 

 

 

For The Year Ended December 31,

 

 

Increase

(Decrease)

 

(in thousands)

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2020 vs. 2019

 

Noninterest income:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Service charges

 

$

3,064

 

 

$

3,715

 

 

$

(651

)

Merchant and debit card fees

 

 

5,515

 

 

 

4,264

 

 

 

1,251

 

Fiduciary and custodial income

 

 

2,012

 

 

 

1,760

 

 

 

252

 

Gain on sale of loans

 

 

6,834

 

 

 

2,850

 

 

 

3,984

 

Bank-owned life insurance income

 

 

838

 

 

 

774

 

 

 

64

 

Loss on sales of investment securities

 

 

 

 

 

(22

)

 

 

22

 

Loan processing fee income

 

 

628

 

 

 

590

 

 

 

38

 

Warehouse lending fees

 

 

957

 

 

 

679

 

 

 

278

 

Mortgage fee income

 

 

771

 

 

 

323

 

 

 

448

 

Other noninterest income

 

 

2,418

 

 

 

2,029

 

 

 

389

 

Total noninterest income

 

$

23,037

 

 

$

16,962

 

 

$

6,075

 

 

Service Charges. We earn fees from our customers for deposit related services, and these fees typically constitute a significant and generally predictable component of our non-interest income. Beginning in March 2020, as a result of COVID-19, we waived certain service charges in sensitivity to our customers through June 30, 2020. Service fee income was $3.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 compared to $3.7 million in 2019, a decrease of $651,000, or 17.5%, resulting largely from COVID-19 related fee waivers, as well as fewer insufficient fee charges throughout the year, presumably resulting from changes in consumer spending habits and elevated deposit balances due to PPP and stimulus payments.

59


Merchant and Debit Card Fees. We earn interchange income related to the activity of our customers’ merchant debit card usage. Debit card interchange income was $5.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to $4.3 million in 2019, an increase of $1.3 million, or 29.3%. The increase was primarily due to a change in contract terms, an annual earnings credit received from our debit card vendor and growth in the number of DDAs and debit card usage volume during 2020. The total number of DDAs increased by 3,417 accounts, from 46,191 as of December 31, 2019 to 49,608 as of December 31, 2020.

Fiduciary and Custodial Income. We have trust powers and provide fiduciary and custodial services through our trust and wealth management division. Fiduciary income was $2.0 million and $1.8 million for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, an increase of $252,000, or 14.3%. The revenue increase resulted primarily from 32 new accounts that opened during 2020, which have generated additional income. Furthermore, revenue for our services fluctuates by month with the market value for all publicly-traded assets, which are primarily held in irrevocable trusts and investment management accounts that carry higher fees. Additionally, our custody-only assets are carried in a tiered percentage rate fee schedule charged against market value.

Gain on Sales of Loans. We originate long-term fixed-rate mortgage loans for resale into the secondary market. We also began selling Small Business Administration (SBA) loans on the secondary market during the second half of 2019. We sold 705 mortgage loans for $164.8 million during the year ended December 31, 2020 compared to 383 mortgage loans for $78.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2019. Gain on sale of loans was $6.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, an increase of $4.0 million, or 139.8%, compared to $2.9 million in 2019. The gain consisted of $6.1 million in mortgage loans and $756,000 in SBA 7(a) loans sold during the year, compared to $2.6 million of mortgage loans and $233,000 in SBA 7(a) loans sold during the prior year.

Bank-Owned Life Insurance. We invest in bank-owned life insurance due to its attractive nontaxable return and protection against the loss of our key employees. We record income based on the growth of the cash surrender value of these policies as well as the annual yield net of fees and charges, including mortality charges. Income from bank-owned life insurance increased by $64,000, or 8.3%, for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to 2019. The increase in income is primarily due to additional policies purchased on the lives of existing officers of the Company.

Warehouse Lending Fees. A portion of our lending involves the origination of mortgage warehouse lines of credit. Mortgage warehouse lending increased by $278,000, or 40.9% from December 31, 2019 to December 31, 2020. The large increase is primarily due to a decrease in mortgage loan rates during 2020, which resulted in an increase in mortgage refinances during the year.

Mortgage Fee Income. Mortgage fee income consists of the fees related to the origination and sale of mortgage loans to the secondary market. The increase of $448,000, or 138.7% from December 31, 2019 was primarily due to a decrease in mortgage loan rates during 2020, which resulted in an increase in new purchase mortgages and mortgage refinances during the year.

Other. This category includes a variety of other income producing activities such as wire transfer fees, check printing fees, loan administration fees, gains on sales of assets and real estate owned and other income. Other noninterest income increased $389,000, or 19.2%, in 2020 compared to 2019. Increases in other income during 2020 were primarily due to a $429,000 improvement in the fair value of our SBA servicing asset, offset by a decrease in administrative loan fee income of $46,000.

Noninterest Expense

Generally, noninterest expense is composed of all employee expenses and costs associated with operating our facilities, obtaining and retaining customer relationships and providing bank services. The largest component of noninterest expense is salaries and employee benefits. Noninterest expense also includes operational expenses, such as occupancy expenses, depreciation and amortization of our facilities and our furniture, fixtures and office equipment, professional and regulatory fees, including FDIC assessments, data processing expenses, and advertising and promotion expenses.

60


For the year ended December 31, 2020, noninterest expense totaled $66.5 million, an increase of $4.0 million, or 6.4%, compared to $62.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2019. The following table presents, for the periods indicated, the major categories of noninterest expense:

 

 

 

For The Year Ended December 31,

 

 

Increase

(Decrease)

 

(in thousands)

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2020 vs. 2019

 

Employee compensation and benefits

 

$

37,193

 

 

$

35,907

 

 

$

1,286

 

Non-staff expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Occupancy expenses

 

 

10,220

 

 

 

9,834

 

 

 

386

 

Amortization

 

 

1,349

 

 

 

1,378

 

 

 

(29

)

Software and technology

 

 

4,104

 

 

 

3,341

 

 

 

763

 

FDIC insurance assessment fees

 

 

821

 

 

 

173

 

 

 

648

 

Legal and professional fees

 

 

2,650

 

 

 

2,610

 

 

 

40

 

Advertising and promotions

 

 

1,498

 

 

 

1,655

 

 

 

(157

)

Telecommunication expense

 

 

864

 

 

 

676

 

 

 

188

 

ATM and debit card expense

 

 

1,951

 

 

 

1,347

 

 

 

604

 

Director and committee fees

 

 

846

 

 

 

873

 

 

 

(27

)

Other noninterest expense

 

 

5,026

 

 

 

4,731

 

 

 

295

 

Total noninterest expense

 

$

66,522

 

 

$

62,525

 

 

$

3,997

 

 

Employee Compensation and Benefits. Salaries and employee benefits are the largest component of noninterest expense and include payroll expense, the cost of incentive compensation, benefit plans, health insurance and payroll taxes.  Employee compensation and benefits increased $1.3 million, or 3.6%, to $37.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, from $35.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2019.  The increase resulted from primarily from standard annual salary increases, but was offset by approximately $862,000 due to deferred origination costs associated with PPP loans.

Software and Technology. Software and technology expenses increased $763,000, or 22.8%, from $3.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 to $4.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2020. The increase is attributable primarily to new software investments to improve online deposit account opening, further enhance treasury management capabilities and improve connectivity to support remote working and other technology capabilities.

FDIC Insurance Assessment Fees. FDIC insurance assessment fees increased $648,000, or 374.6%, from $173,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019 to $821,000 for year ended December 31, 2020. The increase was primarily the result of an FDIC assessment credit of $534,000 that was received and fully realized during 2019, thus reducing the prior year’s expense. Additionally, in the current year, there was an increase in the assessment rate used to calculate the fee, based on changes in our financial ratios.

Telecommunication Expense. Telecommunication expense increased from $676,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019, to $864,000 in 2020, an increase of $188,000, or 27.8%. The increase resulted primarily as a result of the beginning phase of a project designed to aggregate utility expenses for the purpose of cost control through bundled contracts and negotiated rates.

ATM and Debit Card Expense. We pay processing fees related to the activity of our customers’ ATM and debit card usage. ATM and debit card expenses were $2.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, an increase of $604,000, or 44.8%, compared to $1.3 million in 2019 as a result of increased ATM and debit card usage by our customers.

Other. This category includes operating and administrative expenses, such as stock option expense, expenses and losses related to repossession of assets, small hardware and software purchases, expense of the value of stock appreciation rights, losses incurred on problem assets, losses on sale of other real estate owned and other assets, other real estate owned expense and write-downs, business development expenses (i.e., travel and entertainment, charitable contributions and club memberships), insurance and security expenses. Other noninterest expense increased $295,000, or 6.2%, from $4.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2019 to $5.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2020. The increase was primarily due to losses as a result of disputed debit card, ACH and wire transfer transactions of $358,000 in 2020 compared to $232,000 in 2019, and additional charitable contributions of $465,000 in 2020. Additionally, stock option expense increased $85,000 as our equity awards continue to vest. These increases were offset by decreases

61


in expenses related to meals and entertainment, traveling, and training and education in the amounts of $128,000, $102,000, and $91,000, respectively.

Income Tax Expense

The amount of income tax expense we incur is influenced by the amounts of our pre-tax income, tax-exempt income and other nondeductible expenses. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are reflected at current income tax rates in effect for the period in which the deferred tax assets and liabilities are expected to be realized or settled. As changes in tax laws or rates are enacted, deferred tax assets and liabilities are adjusted through the provision for income taxes. Valuation allowances are established when necessary to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized.

For the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, income tax expense totaled $5.9 million and $5.8 million, respectively. The increase in income tax expense was primarily due to an increase in net earnings before taxes of $1.2 million. Our effective tax rates for the years ended 2020 and 2019 were 17.70% and 18.02%, respectively.

Financial Condition

Our total assets increased $422.4 million, or 18.2%, from $2.32 billion as of December 31, 2019 to $2.74 billion as of December 31, 2020. Our asset growth was primarily due to increases in total gross loans of $160.4 million and cash and cash equivalents of $261.1 million. The increase in loans resulted largely from our participation in the PPP loan program, and the increase in cash and cash equivalents resulted largely from the increase in deposit balances, also related to the PPP loan program.

Loan Portfolio

Our primary source of income is derived through interest earned on loans to small- to medium-sized businesses, commercial companies, professionals and individuals located in our primary market areas. A substantial portion of our loan portfolio consists of commercial and industrial loans and real estate loans secured by commercial real estate properties located in our primary market areas. Our loan portfolio represents the highest yielding component of our earning asset base.

Our loan portfolio is the largest category of our earning assets. As of December 31, 2020, total loans held for investment were $1.87 billion, an increase of $160.4 million, or 9.4%, from the December 31, 2019 balance of $1.71 billion. In addition to these amounts, $5.5 million and $2.4 million in loans were classified as held for sale as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively.

The increase in gross loans during the period included outstanding PPP loan balances of $139.8 million, to 1,452 borrowers, as of December 31, 2020. Excluding the outstanding balance of PPP loans, gross loans increased 1.2%, or $20.6 million, from December 31, 2019, which was primarily due to period-end increases in our mortgage warehouse loan balances.

Total loans, excluding those held for sale, as a percentage of deposits, were 81.6% and 87.2% as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively. Total loans, excluding those held for sale, as a percentage of total assets, were 68.1% and 73.6% as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively.

62


The following table summarizes our loan portfolio by type of loan as of the dates indicated:

 

 

 

As of December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

Commercial and industrial

 

$

445,771

 

 

 

23.88

%

 

$

279,583

 

 

 

16.38

%

 

$

261,779

 

 

 

15.77

%

 

$

197,508

 

 

 

14.53

%

 

$

223,712

 

 

 

17.98

%

Real estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction and development

 

 

270,407

 

 

 

14.48

%

 

 

280,498

 

 

 

16.44

%

 

 

237,503

 

 

 

14.31

%

 

 

196,774

 

 

 

14.47

%

 

 

129,631

 

 

 

10.42

%

Commercial real estate

 

 

594,216

 

 

 

31.83

%

 

 

567,360

 

 

 

33.25

%

 

 

582,519

 

 

 

35.10

%

 

 

418,137

 

 

 

30.76

%

 

 

368,077

 

 

 

29.59

%

Farmland

 

 

78,508

 

 

 

4.21

%

 

 

57,476

 

 

 

3.37

%

 

 

67,845

 

 

 

4.09

%

 

 

59,023

 

 

 

4.34

%

 

 

62,366

 

 

 

5.01

%

1-4 family residential

 

 

389,096

 

 

 

20.84

%

 

 

412,166

 

 

 

24.15

%

 

 

393,067

 

 

 

23.69

%

 

 

374,371

 

 

 

27.54

%

 

 

361,665

 

 

 

29.08

%

Multi-family residential

 

 

21,701

 

 

 

1.16

%

 

 

37,379

 

 

 

2.19

%

 

 

38,386

 

 

 

2.31

%

 

 

36,574

 

 

 

2.69

%

 

 

26,079

 

 

 

2.10

%

Consumer and overdrafts

 

 

51,386

 

 

 

2.75

%

 

 

53,574

 

 

 

3.14

%

 

 

55,159

 

 

 

3.33

%

 

 

51,561

 

 

 

3.79

%

 

 

53,494

 

 

 

4.30

%

Agricultural

 

 

15,734

 

 

 

0.85

%

 

 

18,359

 

 

 

1.08

%

 

 

23,277

 

 

 

1.40

%

 

 

25,596

 

 

 

1.88

%

 

 

18,901

 

 

 

1.52

%

Total loans held for investment

 

$

1,866,819

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

$

1,706,395

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

$

1,659,535

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

$

1,359,544

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

$

1,243,925

 

 

 

100.00

%

Total loans held for sale

 

$

5,542

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

2,368

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

1,795

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

1,896

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

2,563

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial and Industrial Loans. Commercial and industrial loans are underwritten after evaluating and understanding the borrower’s ability to operate profitably and effectively. These loans are primarily made based on the identified cash flows of the borrower, and secondarily, on the underlying collateral provided by the borrower. Most commercial and industrial loans are secured by the assets being financed or other business assets, such as accounts receivable or inventory, and generally include personal guarantees. Commercial and industrial loans increased $166.2 million, or 59.4%, to $445.8 million as of December 31, 2020 from $279.6 million as of December 31, 2019. The increase in the commercial and industrial portfolio is primarily because most PPP loans are included in this group, in addition to normal variances in the balances of underlying lines of credit.

Construction and Development. Construction and land development loans are comprised of loans to fund construction, land acquisition and land development construction. The properties securing the portfolio are located throughout Texas and are generally diverse in terms of type. Construction and development loans decreased $10.0 million, or 3.6%, to $270.4 million as of December 31, 2020 from $280.5 million as of December 31, 2019. The decrease resulted from normal fluctuations in construction project volume in our markets.

1-4 Family Residential. Our 1-4 family residential loan portfolio is comprised of loans secured by 1-4 family homes, which are both owner occupied and investor owned. Our 1-4 family residential loans have a relatively small balance spread across many individual borrowers compared to our other loan categories. Our 1-4 family residential loans decreased $23.1 million, or 5.6%, to $389.1 million as of December 31, 2020 from $412.2 million as of December 31, 2019. This decrease is primarily the result of fewer originations and some refinancing into secondary market channels.

Commercial Real Estate. Commercial real estate loans are underwritten primarily based on projected cash flows and, secondarily, as loans secured by real estate. These loans may be more adversely affected by conditions in the real estate markets or in the general economy. The properties securing the portfolio are located primarily within our markets and are generally diverse in terms of type. This diversity helps reduce our exposure to adverse economic events that affect any single industry. Commercial real estate loans increased $26.9 million, or 4.7%, to $594.2 million as of December 31, 2020 from $567.4 million as of December 31, 2019. The increase in commercial real estate loans during the periods was mostly driven by organic growth.

Other Loan Categories. Other categories of loans included in our loan portfolio include farmland and agricultural loans made to farmers and ranchers relating to their operations, multi-family residential loans and consumer loans. None of these categories of loans represents a significant portion of our total loan portfolio.

63


Contractual Loan Maturities. The contractual maturity ranges of loans in our loan portfolio and the amount of such loans with fixed and floating interest rates in each maturity range as of the dates indicated are summarized in the following tables:

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2020

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

One Year

or Less

 

 

One

Through

Five Years

 

 

After

Five Years

 

 

Total

 

Commercial and industrial

 

$

191,495

 

 

$

218,258

 

 

$

36,018

 

 

$

445,771

 

Real estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction and development

 

 

142,570

 

 

 

35,749

 

 

 

92,088

 

 

 

270,407

 

Commercial real estate

 

 

35,171

 

 

 

133,545

 

 

 

425,500

 

 

 

594,216

 

Farmland

 

 

13,634

 

 

 

10,689

 

 

 

54,185

 

 

 

78,508

 

1-4 family residential

 

 

34,312

 

 

 

31,178

 

 

 

323,606

 

 

 

389,096

 

Multi-family residential

 

 

221

 

 

 

8,389

 

 

 

13,091

 

 

 

21,701

 

Consumer

 

 

13,525

 

 

 

34,841

 

 

 

3,020

 

 

 

51,386

 

Agricultural

 

 

10,504

 

 

 

4,942

 

 

 

288

 

 

 

15,734

 

Total loans

 

$

441,432

 

 

$

477,591

 

 

$

947,796

 

 

$

1,866,819

 

Amounts with fixed rates

 

$

295,371

 

 

$

380,265

 

 

$

51,144

 

 

$

726,780

 

Amounts with floating rates

 

$

146,061

 

 

$

97,326

 

 

$

896,652

 

 

$

1,140,039

 

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2019

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

One Year

or Less

 

 

One

Through

Five Years

 

 

After

Five Years

 

 

Total

 

Commercial and industrial

 

$

175,896

 

 

$

70,188

 

 

$

33,499

 

 

$

279,583

 

Real estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction and development

 

 

89,386

 

 

 

96,169

 

 

 

94,943

 

 

 

280,498

 

Commercial real estate

 

 

44,172

 

 

 

105,648

 

 

 

417,540

 

 

 

567,360

 

Farmland

 

 

7,367

 

 

 

7,194

 

 

 

42,915

 

 

 

57,476

 

1-4 family residential

 

 

46,099

 

 

 

25,137

 

 

 

340,930

 

 

 

412,166

 

Multi-family residential

 

 

18,487

 

 

 

4,186

 

 

 

14,706

 

 

 

37,379

 

Consumer

 

 

15,450

 

 

 

35,238

 

 

 

2,886

 

 

 

53,574

 

Agricultural

 

 

11,834

 

 

 

6,463

 

 

 

62

 

 

 

18,359

 

Total loans

 

$

408,691

 

 

$

350,223

 

 

$

947,481

 

 

$

1,706,395

 

Amounts with fixed rates

 

$

281,989

 

 

$

265,377

 

 

$

58,863

 

 

$

606,229

 

Amounts with floating rates

 

$

126,702

 

 

$

84,846

 

 

$

888,618

 

 

$

1,100,166

 

 

Nonperforming Assets

Loans are considered past due if the required principal and interest payments have not been received as of the date such payments were due. Loans are placed on nonaccrual status when, in management’s opinion, the borrower may be unable to meet payment obligations as they become due, as well as when required by regulatory provisions. Loans may be placed on nonaccrual status regardless of whether or not such loans are considered past due. In general, we place loans on nonaccrual status when they become 90 days past due. We also place loans on nonaccrual status if they are less than 90 days past due if the collection of principal or interest is in doubt. When interest accrual is discontinued, all unpaid accrued interest is reversed from income. Interest income is subsequently recognized only to the extent cash payments are received in excess of principal due. Loans are returned to accrual status when all the principal and interest amounts contractually due are brought current and future payments are, in management’s opinion, reasonably assured.

We believe our conservative lending approach and focused management of nonperforming assets has resulted in sound asset quality and timely resolution of problem assets. We have several procedures in place to assist us in maintaining the overall quality of our loan portfolio. We have established underwriting guidelines to be followed by our bankers, and we also monitor our delinquency levels for any negative or adverse trends. There can be no assurance, however, that our loan portfolio will not become subject to increasing pressures from deteriorating borrower credit due to general economic conditions.

64


We had $13.1 million in nonperforming assets as of December 31, 2020, compared to $12.3 million as of December 31, 2019. We had $12.7 million in nonperforming loans as of December 31, 2020, compared to $11.3 million as of December 31, 2019. The increase in nonperforming loans and assets resulted primarily from one SBA 7(a), partially guaranteed (75%) loan and one commercial loan, both of which were acquired in our June 2018 acquisition of Westbound Bank. To facilitate the workout of the SBA loan, we repurchased the guaranteed portion of the loan from a third party, resulting in an increased book balance of $3.1 million and a total book balance, which remains 75% SBA guaranteed, of $3.9 million. The increased book balance from the SBA loan of $3.1 million, combined with the commercial loan book balance of $1.1 million, comprises $4.2 million of the increase from December 31, 2019, which was partially offset by decreases in smaller dollar loans. Three SBA partially guaranteed (75%) loans relating to loans acquired from Westbound Bank, including the $3.1 million repurchased portion, are included in nonaccrual loans at December 31, 2020 and had combined book balances of $8.7 million. These loans were internally identified as problem assets prior to COVID-19 and are properly reserved using our CECL methodology. Management continues to work toward a satisfactory resolution for these three loans. Excluding these partially guaranteed SBA loans, non-performing assets as a percentage of total loans at December 31, 2020 would be 0.24%.

The following table presents information regarding nonperforming assets at the dates indicated:

 

 

 

As of December 31,

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Nonaccrual loans

 

$

12,705

 

 

$

11,262

 

 

$

5,891

 

 

$

4,004

 

 

$

4,409

 

Accruing loans 90 or more days past due

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total nonperforming loans

 

 

12,705

 

 

 

11,262

 

 

 

5,891

 

 

 

4,004

 

 

 

4,409

 

Other real estate owned:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial real estate, construction and development, and farmland

 

 

 

 

 

105

 

 

 

34

 

 

 

758

 

 

 

1,074

 

Residential real estate

 

 

404

 

 

 

498

 

 

 

717

 

 

 

1,486

 

 

 

618

 

Total other real estate owned

 

 

404

 

 

 

603

 

 

 

751

 

 

 

2,244

 

 

 

1,692

 

Repossessed assets owned

 

 

6

 

 

 

392

 

 

 

971

 

 

 

2,466

 

 

 

3,530

 

Total other assets owned

 

 

410

 

 

 

995

 

 

 

1,722

 

 

 

4,710

 

 

 

5,222

 

Total nonperforming assets

 

$

13,115

 

 

$

12,257

 

 

$

7,613

 

 

$

8,714

 

 

$

9,631

 

Restructured loans-nonaccrual

 

$

90

 

 

$

101

 

 

$

335

 

 

$

 

 

$

43

 

Restructured loans-accruing

 

$

9,626

 

 

$

7,240

 

 

$

861

 

 

$

657

 

 

$

462

 

Ratio of nonaccrual loans to total loans(1)

 

 

0.68

%

 

 

0.66

%

 

 

0.35

%

 

 

0.29

%

 

 

0.35

%

Ratio of nonperforming assets to total assets

 

 

0.48

%

 

 

0.53

%

 

 

0.34

%

 

 

0.44

%

 

 

0.53

%

 

 

 

As of December 31,

 

(in thousands)

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Nonaccrual loans by category:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial and industrial

 

$

27

 

 

$

46

 

 

$

366

 

 

$

77

 

 

$

82

 

Real estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction and development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,825

 

Commercial real estate

 

 

10,604

 

 

 

6,860

 

 

 

3,700

 

 

 

1,422

 

 

 

415

 

Farmland

 

 

115

 

 

 

182

 

 

 

140

 

 

 

163

 

 

 

176

 

1-4 family residential

 

 

1,667

 

 

 

3,853

 

 

 

1,567

 

 

 

1,937

 

 

 

1,699

 

Multi-family residential

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

217

 

 

 

5

 

Consumer

 

 

212

 

 

 

279

 

 

 

66

 

 

 

138

 

 

 

192

 

Agricultural

 

 

80

 

 

 

42

 

 

 

52

 

 

 

50

 

 

 

15

 

Total

 

$

12,705

 

 

$

11,262

 

 

$

5,891

 

 

$

4,004

 

 

$

4,409

 

 

(1)

Excludes loans held for sale of $5.5 million, $2.4 million, $1.8 million, $1.9 million and $2.6 million for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

Potential Problem Loans

From a credit risk standpoint, we classify loans in one of five risk ratings: pass, special mention, substandard, doubtful or loss. Within the pass rating, we classify loans into one of the following five subcategories based on perceived credit risk, including repayment capacity and collateral security: superior, excellent, good, acceptable and acceptable/watch. The classifications of loans reflect a judgment about the risks of default and loss associated with the loan. We review the ratings on credits monthly. Ratings are adjusted to reflect the degree of risk and loss that is believed

65


to be inherent in each credit as of each monthly reporting period. Our methodology is structured so that specific ACL allocations are increased in accordance with deterioration in credit quality (and a corresponding increase in risk and loss) or decreased in accordance with improvement in credit quality (and a corresponding decrease in risk and loss).

Credits rated special mention show clear signs of financial weaknesses or deterioration in creditworthiness; however, such concerns are not so pronounced that we generally expect to experience significant loss within the short-term. Such credits typically maintain the ability to perform within standard credit terms and credit exposure is not as prominent as credits with a lower rating.

Credits rated substandard are those in which the normal repayment of principal and interest may be, or has been, jeopardized by reason of adverse trends or developments of a financial, managerial, economic or political nature, or important weaknesses which exist in collateral. A protracted workout on these credits is a distinct possibility. Prompt corrective action is therefore required to reduce exposure and to assure that adequate remedial measures are taken by the borrower. Credit exposure becomes more likely in such credits and a serious evaluation of the secondary support to the credit is performed.

Credits rated as doubtful have the weaknesses of substandard assets with the additional characteristic that the weaknesses make collection or liquidation in full questionable and there is a high probability of loss based on currently existing facts, conditions and values.

Credits rated as loss are charged-off. We have no expectation of the recovery of any payments in respect of credits rated as loss.

Loans that were modified for reasons related to the COVID-19 pandemic that are not currently required to pay, or are paying with interest only, are nevertheless considered performing so long as they are compliant with the terms of their modifications and are not classified as TDRs. Such loans are evaluated for classification, but the existence of a loan modification in accordance with the CARES Act does not necessarily result in an adverse classification.

Social distancing, stay-at-home orders and other measures as a result of COVID-19 have particularly affected the restaurant, hospitality, retail commercial real estate (CRE) and energy sectors. Excluding SBA partially guaranteed (75%) loans, the Bank has direct exposure, through total loan commitments with weighted average loan-to-values (“LTV”), as of December 31, 2020, of $26.4 million with 60.5% weighted average LTV to restaurants, $56.1 million with 51.5% weighted average LTV to retail CRE and $67.0 million with 56.5% weighted average LTV to hotel/hospitality borrowers. Many of the loans in these sectors were downgraded to pass-acceptable/watch or special mention risk ratings during the second quarter of 2020. Management will continue to closely monitor these borrowing relationships and work with borrowers to achieve positive outcomes, when necessary.

The following table summarizes the internal ratings of our performing loans and our nonaccrual loans by category as of:

 

 

 

December 31, 2020

 

(in thousands)

 

Pass

 

 

Special Mention

 

 

Substandard

 

 

Doubtful

 

 

Loss

 

 

Nonaccrual

 

 

Total

 

Commercial and industrial

 

$

438,975

 

 

$

5,829

 

 

$

940

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

27

 

 

$

445,771

 

Real estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction and development

 

 

267,767

 

 

 

1,346

 

 

 

1,294

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

270,407

 

Commercial real estate

 

 

550,724

 

 

 

13,280

 

 

 

19,608

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10,604

 

 

 

594,216

 

Farmland

 

 

78,229

 

 

 

35

 

 

 

129

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

115

 

 

 

78,508

 

1-4 family residential

 

 

387,261

 

 

 

168

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,667

 

 

 

389,096

 

Multi-family residential

 

 

21,701

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21,701

 

Consumer and overdrafts

 

 

51,059

 

 

 

115

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

212

 

 

 

51,386

 

Agricultural

 

 

15,577

 

 

 

36

 

 

 

41

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

80

 

 

 

15,734

 

Total

 

$

1,811,293

 

 

$

20,809

 

 

$

22,012

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

12,705

 

 

$

1,866,819

 

 

66


The following table summarizes the internal ratings of our loans by category as of:

 

 

 

December 31, 2019

 

(in thousands)

 

Pass

 

 

Special

Mention

 

 

Substandard

 

 

Doubtful

 

 

Loss

 

 

Total

 

Commercial and industrial

 

$

279,217

 

 

$

153

 

 

$

213

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

279,583

 

Real estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction and development

 

 

278,679

 

 

 

600

 

 

 

1,219

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

280,498

 

Commercial real estate

 

 

548,662

 

 

 

1,071

 

 

 

17,627

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

567,360

 

Farmland

 

 

57,152

 

 

 

91

 

 

 

233

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

57,476

 

1-4 family residential

 

 

409,896

 

 

 

1,425

 

 

 

845

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

412,166

 

Multi-family residential

 

 

37,379

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

37,379

 

Consumer and overdrafts

 

 

53,327

 

 

 

192

 

 

 

55

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

53,574

 

Agricultural

 

 

18,101

 

 

 

126

 

 

 

132

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18,359

 

Total

 

$

1,682,413

 

 

$

3,658

 

 

$

20,324

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

1,706,395

 

 

Allowance for Credit Losses

We maintain an allowance for credit losses (“ACL”) that represents management’s best estimate of the appropriate level of losses and risks inherent in our applicable financial assets under the current expected credit loss model. The amount of the allowance for credit losses should not be interpreted as an indication that charge-offs in future periods will necessarily occur in those amounts, or at all. The determination of the amount of allowance involves a high degree of judgement and subjectivity. Refer to Note 1 of the notes to the financial statements for discussion regarding our ACL methodologies for loans held for investment and available for sale securities.

For available for sale debt securities in an unrealized loss position, the Company evaluates the securities at each measurement date to determine whether the decline in the fair value below the amortized cost basis (impairment) is due to credit-related factors or noncredit-related factors. Any impairment that is not credit related is recognized in other comprehensive income, net of applicable taxes. Credit-related impairment is recognized as an ACL on the balance sheet, limited to the amount by which the amortized cost basis exceeds the fair value, with a corresponding adjustment to earnings through provision for credit loss expense. Upon adoption of ASC 326 on January 1, 2020, and as of December 31, 2020, the Company determined that all available for sale securities that experienced a decline in fair value below the amortized costs basis were due to noncredit-related factors, therefore no related ACL was recorded and there was no related provision expense recognized during the year ended December 31, 2020.

In determining the ACL for loans held for investment, we primarily estimate losses on segments of loans with similar risk characteristics and where the potential loss can be identified and reasonably determined. For loans that do not share similar risk characteristics with our existing segments, they are evaluated individually for an ACL. Our portfolio is segmented by regulatory call report codes, with additional segments for warehouse mortgage loans, SBA loans acquired from Westbound Bank, SBA loans originated by us, and SBA PPP loans. The segments are further disaggregated by internally assigned risk rating classifications. The balance of the ACL is determined using the current expected credit loss model, which considers historical loan loss rates, changes in the nature of our loan portfolio, overall portfolio quality, industry concentrations, delinquency trends, current economic factors and reasonable and supportable forecasts of the impact of future economic conditions on loan loss rates. Please see “Critical Accounting Policies - Allowance for Credit Losses.”

In connection with the review of our loan portfolio, we consider risk elements attributable to particular loan types or categories in assessing the quality of individual loans. Some of the risk elements we consider include:

 

for commercial and industrial loans, the debt service coverage ratio (income from the business in excess of operating expenses compared to loan repayment requirements), the operating results of the commercial, industrial or professional enterprise, the borrower’s business, professional and financial ability and expertise, the specific risks and volatility of income and operating results typical for businesses in that category and the value, nature and marketability of collateral;

 

for commercial mortgage loans and multifamily residential loans, the debt service coverage ratio, operating results of the owner in the case of owner occupied properties, the loan to value ratio, the age and condition of the collateral and the volatility of income, property value and future operating results typical of properties of that type;

67


 

for 1-4 family residential mortgage loans, the borrower’s ability to repay the loan, including a consideration of the debt to income ratio and employment and income stability, the loan-to-value ratio, and the age, condition and marketability of the collateral; and

 

for construction and development loans, the perceived feasibility of the project including the ability to sell developed lots or improvements constructed for resale or the ability to lease property constructed for lease, the quality and nature of contracts for presale or prelease, if any, experience and ability of the developer and loan to value ratio.

As of December 31, 2020, the allowance for credit losses totaled $33.6 million, or 1.80%, of total loans, excluding those held for sale, and totaled 1.95%, excluding PPP loans and loans held for sale. As of December 31, 2019, the allowance for loan losses totaled $16.2 million, or 0.95%, of total loans, excluding those held for sale. The increase in the ACL of $17.4 million, or 107.5%, was primarily driven by $4.5 million additional provision recorded upon adoption of ASC 326 on January 1, 2020 and by $13.2 million provision for credit losses recorded during 2020 specifically as a result of COVID-19 developments. The COVID-19 related adjustments resulted from changes in qualitative risk factor assumptions considered under our CECL model (primarily derived from changes in national GDP, Texas unemployment rates and national industry-related CRE trends) and from changes in loan risk ratings reflecting the effects of COVID-19.

The following table presents, as of and for the periods indicated, an analysis of the allowance for credit losses and other related data:

 

 

 

As of and for the Years Ended December 31,

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Average loans outstanding(1)

 

$

1,872,914

 

 

$

1,689,108

 

 

$

1,524,792

 

 

$

1,283,253

 

 

$

1,179,938

 

Gross loans outstanding at end of period(2)

 

$

1,866,819

 

 

$

1,706,395

 

 

$

1,659,535

 

 

$

1,359,544

 

 

$

1,243,925

 

Allowance for loan losses at beginning of the period

 

 

16,202

 

 

 

14,651

 

 

 

12,859

 

 

 

11,484

 

 

 

9,263

 

Impact of adopting ASC 326

 

 

4,548

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Provision for loan losses

 

 

13,200

 

 

 

1,250

 

 

 

2,250

 

 

 

2,850

 

 

 

3,640

 

Charge offs:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial and industrial

 

 

68

 

 

 

86

 

 

 

367

 

 

 

1,080

 

 

 

1,213

 

Real Estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction and development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

Commercial real estate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33

 

 

 

84

 

 

 

 

1-4 family residential

 

 

68

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

93

 

 

 

543

 

 

 

71

 

Consumer

 

 

155

 

 

 

72

 

 

 

254

 

 

 

344

 

 

 

269

 

Agriculture

 

 

18

 

 

 

89

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

242

 

 

 

 

Overdrafts

 

 

234

 

 

 

192

 

 

 

169

 

 

 

165

 

 

 

200

 

Total charge-offs

 

 

543

 

 

 

453

 

 

 

918

 

 

 

2,458

 

 

 

1,762

 

Recoveries:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial and industrial

 

 

101

 

 

 

508

 

 

 

111

 

 

 

797

 

 

 

17

 

Real Estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction and development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

Commercial real estate

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1-4 family residential

 

 

2

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

135

 

 

 

23

 

 

 

75

 

Consumer

 

 

37

 

 

 

111

 

 

 

90

 

 

 

108

 

 

 

121

 

Agriculture

 

 

20

 

 

 

89

 

 

 

65

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overdrafts

 

 

51

 

 

 

42

 

 

 

58

 

 

 

55

 

 

 

126

 

Total recoveries

 

 

212

 

 

 

754

 

 

 

460

 

 

 

983

 

 

 

343

 

Net (recoveries) charge-offs

 

 

331

 

 

 

(301

)

 

 

458

 

 

 

1,475

 

 

 

1,419

 

Allowance for loan losses at end of period

 

$

33,619

 

 

$

16,202

 

 

$

14,651

 

 

$

12,859

 

 

$

11,484

 

Ratio of allowance to end of period loans(2)

 

 

1.80

%

 

 

0.95

%

 

 

0.88

%

 

 

0.95

%

 

 

0.92

%

Ratio of net (recoveries) charge-offs to average loans(1)

 

 

0.02

%

 

 

-0.02

%

 

 

0.03

%

 

 

0.11

%

 

 

0.12

%

 

(1)

Includes average outstanding balances of loans held for sale of $6.0 million, $2.7 million, $1.7 million, $1.7 million and $3.0 million for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

(2)

Excludes loans held for sale of $5.5 million, $2.4 million, $1.8 million, $1.9 million and $2.6 million for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

68


We believe the successful execution of our expansion strategy through organic growth and strategic acquisitions is generally demonstrated by the upward trend in loan balances from December 31, 2016 to December 31, 2020. Loan balances, excluding loans held for sale, increased from $1.24 billion as of December 31, 2016, to $1.87 billion as of December 31, 2020. Total loans excluding PPP loans and loans held for sale were $1.73 billion as of December 31, 2020.  Net charge-offs have been minimal, representing on average 0.05% of average loan balances during the same period.

Although we believe that we have established our allowance for credit losses in accordance with GAAP and that the allowance for credit losses was adequate to provide for known and inherent losses in the portfolio at all times shown above, future provisions for loan losses will be subject to ongoing evaluations of the risks in our loan portfolio. If our primary market areas experience economic declines, if asset quality deteriorates or if we are successful in growing the size of our loan portfolio, our allowance could become inadequate and material additional provisions for loan losses could be required.

The following table shows the allocation of the allowance for credit losses among loan categories and certain other information as of the dates indicated. The allocation of the allowance for credit losses as shown in the table should neither be interpreted as an indication of future charge-offs, nor as an indication that charge-offs in future periods will necessarily occur in these amounts or in the indicated proportions. The total allowance is available to absorb losses from any loan category.

 

 

 

As of December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

to Total

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

to Total

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

to Total

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

to Total

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

to Total

 

Commercial and industrial

 

$

4,033

 

 

 

12.00

%

 

$

2,056

 

 

 

12.69

%

 

$

1,751

 

 

 

11.96

%

 

$

1,581

 

 

 

12.29

%

 

$

1,592

 

 

 

13.86

%

Real estate:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction and development

 

 

4,735

 

 

 

14.08

%

 

 

2,378

 

 

 

14.68

%

 

 

1,920

 

 

 

13.10

%

 

 

1,724

 

 

 

13.41

%

 

 

1,161

 

 

 

10.11

%

Commercial real estate

 

 

15,780

 

 

 

46.94

%

 

 

6,853

 

 

 

42.30

%

 

 

6,025

 

 

 

41.12

%

 

 

4,585

 

 

 

35.66

%

 

 

3,264

 

 

 

28.42

%

Farmland

 

 

1,220

 

 

 

3.63

%

 

 

570

 

 

 

3.52

%

 

 

643

 

 

 

4.39

%

 

 

523

 

 

 

4.07

%

 

 

482

 

 

 

4.20

%

1-4 family residential

 

 

6,313

 

 

 

18.78

%

 

 

3,125

 

 

 

19.29

%

 

 

2,868

 

 

 

19.58

%

 

 

3,022

 

 

 

23.50

%

 

 

3,960

 

 

 

34.48

%

Multi-family residential

 

 

363

 

 

 

1.08

%

 

 

409

 

 

 

2.52

%

 

 

631

 

 

 

4.31

%

 

 

629

 

 

 

4.89

%

 

 

281

 

 

 

2.45

%

Total real estate

 

 

28,411

 

 

 

84.51

%

 

 

13,335

 

 

 

82.31

%

 

 

12,087

 

 

 

82.50

%

 

 

10,483

 

 

 

81.53

%

 

 

9,148

 

 

 

79.66

%

Consumer and overdrafts

 

 

936

 

 

 

2.78

%

 

 

614

 

 

 

3.79

%

 

 

575

 

 

 

3.92

%

 

 

608

 

 

 

4.73

%

 

 

591

 

 

 

5.15

%

Agricultural

 

 

239

 

 

 

0.71

%

 

 

197

 

 

 

1.21

%

 

 

238

 

 

 

1.62

%

 

 

187

 

 

 

1.45

%

 

 

153

 

 

 

1.33

%

Total allowance for loan losses

 

$

33,619

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

$

16,202

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

$

14,651

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

$

12,859

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

$

11,484

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

Securities

We use our securities portfolio to provide a source of liquidity, provide an appropriate return on funds invested, manage interest rate risk, meet collateral requirements and meet regulatory capital requirements. As of December 31, 2020, the carrying amount of our investment securities totaled $380.8 million, an increase of $12.6 million, or 3.4%, compared to $368.2 million as of December 31, 2019. Investment securities represented 13.9% and 15.9% of total assets as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively.

Our investment portfolio consists of securities classified as available for sale. During the first quarter of 2020, we transferred all of our investment securities classified as held to maturity to available for sale in order to provide maximum flexibility to address liquidity and capital needs that may result from COVID-19. We believe these transfers are allowable under existing GAAP due to the isolated, non-recurring and unusual events resulting from the pandemic.

As of December 31, 2020, securities available for sale totaled $380.8 million, which includes the transfer of securities from our held to maturity portfolio, as well as purchases of mortgage backed securities at a cost of $28.7 million, municipal securities at a cost of $22.3 million, and corporate securities at a cost of $11.0 million. As of December 31, 2019, securities available for sale and securities held to maturity totaled $212.7 million and $155.5 million, respectively. Held to maturity securities represented 42.2% of our investment portfolio as of December 31, 2019. The carrying values of our investment securities classified as available for sale are adjusted for unrealized gain or loss, and any gain or loss is reported on an after-tax basis as a component of other comprehensive income in shareholders’ equity. As of December 31, 2020, the Company determined that all available for sale securities that experienced a decline in fair value below their

69


amortized cost basis were impacted by noncredit-related factors; therefore the Company carried no ACL with respect to our securities portfolio at December 31, 2020.

The following table summarizes the amortized cost and estimated fair value of our investment securities as of the dates shown:

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2020

 

(in thousands)

 

Amortized Cost

 

 

Gross

Unrealized

Gains

 

 

Gross

Unrealized

Losses

 

 

Fair Value

 

Corporate bonds

 

$

29,608

 

 

$

1,382

 

 

$

8

 

 

$

30,982

 

Municipal securities

 

 

164,668

 

 

 

11,036

 

 

 

 

 

 

175,704

 

Mortgage-backed securities

 

 

104,210

 

 

 

3,041

 

 

 

87

 

 

 

107,164

 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

 

 

64,611

 

 

 

2,335

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

66,945

 

Total

 

$

363,097

 

 

$

17,794

 

 

$

96

 

 

$

380,795

 

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2019

 

(in thousands)

 

Amortized Cost

 

 

Gross

Unrealized

Gains

 

 

Gross

Unrealized

Losses

 

 

Fair Value

 

Corporate bonds

 

$

19,667

 

 

$

592

 

 

$

 

 

$

20,259

 

Municipal securities

 

 

155,196

 

 

 

5,286

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

160,471

 

Mortgage-backed securities

 

 

98,332

 

 

 

748

 

 

 

348

 

 

 

98,732

 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

 

 

92,475

 

 

 

1,256

 

 

 

17

 

 

 

93,714

 

Total

 

$

365,670

 

 

$

7,882

 

 

$

376

 

 

$

373,176

 

 

We do not hold any Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac preferred stock, collateralized debt obligations, structured investment vehicles or second lien elements in our investment portfolio. As of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, our investment portfolio did not contain any securities that are directly backed by subprime or Alt-A mortgages, non-U.S. agency mortgage-backed securities or corporate collateralized mortgage obligations.

Prior to adoption of ASC 326, management evaluated securities for OTTI at least on a quarterly basis, and more frequently when economic or market conditions warranted such an evaluation. As of December 31, 2019, no OTTI was recorded.

The following tables set forth the fair value of available for sale securities and the amortized cost of held to maturity securities and, maturities and approximated weighted average yield based on estimated annual income divided by the average amortized cost of our securities portfolio as of the dates indicated. The contractual maturity of a mortgage-backed security is the date at which the last underlying mortgage matures.

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2020

 

 

 

Within One Year

 

 

After One Year but

Within Five Years

 

 

After Five Years but

Within Ten Years

 

 

After Ten Years

 

 

Total

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Amount

 

 

Yield

 

 

Amount

 

 

Yield

 

 

Amount

 

 

Yield

 

 

Amount

 

 

Yield

 

 

Total

 

 

Yield

 

Corporate bonds

 

$

 

 

 

 

$

18,839

 

 

2.96%

 

 

$

12,143

 

 

4.31%

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

$

30,982

 

 

3.49%

 

Municipal securities

 

 

4,154

 

 

2.84%

 

 

 

35,849

 

 

3.13%

 

 

 

51,823

 

 

3.39%

 

 

 

83,878

 

 

3.23%

 

 

 

175,704

 

 

3.25%

 

Mortgage-backed securities

 

 

170

 

 

3.37%

 

 

 

74,450

 

 

2.04%

 

 

 

22,104

 

 

2.05%

 

 

 

10,440

 

 

1.81%

 

 

 

107,164

 

 

2.02%

 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

 

 

9,641

 

 

1.49%

 

 

 

57,304

 

 

2.74%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

66,945

 

 

2.56%

 

Total

 

$

13,965

 

 

1.91%

 

 

$

186,442

 

 

2.56%

 

 

$

86,070

 

 

3.17%

 

 

$

94,318

 

 

3.07%

 

 

$

380,795

 

 

2.80%

 

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2019

 

 

 

Within One Year

 

 

After One Year but

Within Five Years

 

 

After Five Years but

Within Ten Years

 

 

After Ten Years

 

 

Total

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Amount

 

 

Yield

 

 

Amount

 

 

Yield

 

 

Amount

 

 

Yield

 

 

Amount

 

 

Yield

 

 

Total

 

 

Yield

 

Corporate bonds

 

$

1,018

 

 

2.79%

 

 

$

12,496

 

 

2.87%

 

 

$

6,745

 

 

3.47%

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

$

20,259

 

 

3.07%

 

Municipal securities

 

 

2,189

 

 

3.10%

 

 

 

31,497

 

 

3.02%

 

 

 

39,951

 

 

3.40%

 

 

 

82,127

 

 

3.07%

 

 

 

155,764

 

 

3.14%

 

Mortgage-backed securities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

55,974

 

 

2.45%

 

 

 

42,573

 

 

2.67%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

98,547

 

 

2.54%

 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

 

 

1,652

 

 

3.44%

 

 

 

91,952

 

 

2.70%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

93,604

 

 

2.72%

 

Total

 

$

4,859

 

 

3.15%

 

 

$

191,919

 

 

2.69%

 

 

$

89,269

 

 

3.05%

 

 

$

82,127

 

 

3.07%

 

 

$

368,174

 

 

2.87%

 

 

70


The contractual maturity of mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations is not a reliable indicator of their expected life because borrowers have the right to prepay their obligations at any time. Mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations are typically issued with stated principal amounts and are backed by pools of mortgage loans and other loans with varying maturities. The term of the underlying mortgages and loans may vary significantly due to the ability of a borrower to prepay. Monthly pay downs on mortgage-backed securities typically cause the average life of the securities to be much different than the stated contractual maturity. During a period of increasing interest rates, fixed rate mortgage-backed securities do not tend to experience heavy prepayments of principal, and, consequently, the average life of this security is typically lengthened. If interest rates begin to fall, prepayments may increase, thereby shortening the estimated life of this security. The weighted average life of our investment portfolio was 6.22 years with an estimated effective duration of 2.92 years as of December 31, 2020.

As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, we did not own securities of any one issuer, other than the U.S. government and its agencies, for which aggregate adjusted cost exceeded 10.0% of the consolidated shareholders’ equity.

The average yield of our securities portfolio was 2.80% as of December 31, 2020, down from 2.87% as of December 31, 2019. The decline in average yield resulted primarily from decreases in yields on mortgage backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations of 2.54% and 2.72% at December 31, 2019, respectively, to 2.02% and 2.56% at December 31, 2020, respectively. Municipal securities, mortgage backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations comprised 46.1%, 28.1% and 17.6% of the total portfolio, respectively, as of December 31, 2020, and 42.3%, 26.8% and 25.4%, respectively, as of December 31, 2019.

Deposits

We offer a variety of deposit products, which have a wide range of interest rates and terms, including demand, savings, money market and time accounts. We rely primarily on competitive pricing policies, convenient locations and personalized service to attract and retain these deposits.

Average deposits for the year ended December 31, 2020 were $2.16 billion, an increase of $203.7 million, or 10.4%, compared to $1.96 billion for the year ended December 31, 2019. The majority of the deposit balance increase was due to the deposit of PPP proceeds into demand accounts at the Bank, as well as apparent changes in depositor spending habits during the year resulting from economic and other uncertainties due to COVID-19. The average rate paid on total interest-bearing deposits was 0.79% and 1.48% for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The decrease in average rates for 2020 was driven primarily by the Federal Reserve reducing rates starting during the third quarter of 2019, with further decreases in 2020 in response to the economic uncertainty due to COVID-19.

The following table presents the average balances and average rates paid on deposits for the periods indicated:

 

 

 

For the Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Average

Balance

 

 

Average

Rate

 

 

Average

Balance

 

 

Average

Rate

 

NOW and interest-bearing demand accounts

 

$

293,111

 

 

0.44%

 

 

$

264,483

 

 

1.19%

 

Savings accounts

 

 

87,092

 

 

0.15%

 

 

 

71,940

 

 

0.30%

 

Money market accounts

 

 

642,239

 

 

0.47%

 

 

 

609,741

 

 

1.21%

 

Certificates and other time deposits

 

 

445,911

 

 

1.62%

 

 

 

514,051

 

 

2.11%

 

Total interest-bearing deposits

 

 

1,468,353

 

 

0.79%

 

 

 

1,460,215

 

 

1.48%

 

Noninterest-bearing demand accounts

 

 

696,454

 

 

 

 

 

500,895

 

 

 

Total deposits

 

$

2,164,807

 

 

0.54%

 

 

$

1,961,110

 

 

1.10%

 

 

The ratio of average noninterest-bearing deposits to average total deposits for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 was 32.2% and 25.5%, respectively.

Total deposits as of December 31, 2020 were $2.29 billion, an increase of $329.6 million, or 16.8%, compared to $1.96 billion as of December 31, 2019. The increase in 2020 was due primarily to the deposit of PPP proceeds into demand accounts at the Bank, as well as apparent changes in depositor spending habits during the year resulting from economic and other uncertainties due to COVID-19.

71


Noninterest-bearing deposits as of December 31, 2020 were $779.7 million compared to $525.9 million as of December 31, 2019, an increase of $253.9 million, or 48.3%.

Total savings and interest-bearing demand account balances as of December 31, 2020 were $1.51 billion, compared to $1.43 billion as of December 31, 2019, an increase of $75.7 million, or 5.3%.

The following table sets forth the amount of certificates of deposit greater than $100,000 by time remaining until maturity as of December 31, 2020:

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2020

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Amount

 

 

Weighted Average

Interest Rate

 

Under 3 months

 

$

93,603

 

 

 

1.23

%

3 to 6 months

 

 

38,225

 

 

 

0.74

%

6 to 12 months

 

 

86,110

 

 

 

0.76

%

12 to 24 months

 

 

36,050

 

 

 

1.22

%

24 to 36 months

 

 

8,848

 

 

 

2.17

%

36 to 48 months

 

 

2,821

 

 

 

2.26

%

Over 48 months

 

 

644

 

 

 

1.20

%

Total

 

$

266,301

 

 

 

1.05

%

 

Factors affecting the cost of funding interest-bearing assets include the volume of noninterest- and interest-bearing deposits, changes in market interest rates and economic conditions in our primary market areas and their impact on interest paid on deposits, as well as the ongoing execution of our balance sheet management strategy. Cost of funds is calculated as total interest expense divided by average total deposits plus average total borrowings. Our cost of funds was 0.82% and 1.54% in 2020 and 2019, respectively. The decrease in our cost of funds for 2020 was primarily due to decreases in rates on interest-bearing deposits, which were 0.79% and 1.48% in 2020 and 2019, respectively, and maturities of higher rate certificates of deposit during the year. The decrease in average rates for 2020 was driven primarily by the Federal Reserve reducing rates starting during the third quarter of 2019, with further decreases in 2020 in response to the economic uncertainty due to COVID-19.

Borrowings

We utilize short-term and long-term borrowings to supplement deposits to fund our lending and investment activities, each of which is discussed below.

Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) Advances. The FHLB allows us to borrow on a blanket floating lien status collateralized by certain securities and loans. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, total borrowing capacity of $476.5 million and $560.6 million, respectively, was available under this arrangement. Our outstanding FHLB advances mature within 4 years. As of December 31, 2020, approximately $1.37 billion in real estate loans were pledged as collateral for our FHLB borrowings. We utilize these borrowings to meet liquidity needs and to fund certain fixed rate loans in our portfolio. The following table presents our FHLB borrowings as of the dates indicated:

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

FHLB Advances

 

December 31, 2020

 

 

 

 

Amount outstanding at year-end

 

$

109,101

 

Weighted average interest rate at year-end

 

 

0.26

%

Maximum month-end balance during the year

 

$

150,613

 

Average balance outstanding during the year

 

$

75,940

 

Weighted average interest rate during the year

 

 

0.54

%

 

 

 

 

 

December 31, 2019

 

 

 

 

Amount outstanding at year-end

 

$

55,118

 

Weighted average interest rate at year-end

 

 

1.69

%

Maximum month-end balance during the year

 

$

80,134

 

Average balance outstanding during the year

 

$

58,070

 

Weighted average interest rate during the year

 

 

2.31

%

 

72


Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. The Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas has an available borrower in custody arrangement, which allows us to borrow on a collateralized basis. Certain commercial and industrial and consumer loans are pledged under this arrangement. We maintain this borrowing arrangement to meet liquidity needs pursuant to our contingency funding plan. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, $158.8 million and $178.7 million, respectively, was available under this arrangement. As of December 31, 2020, approximately $214.5 million in consumer and commercial and industrial loans was pledged as collateral. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, no borrowings were outstanding under this arrangement.

Other Borrowings. We have historically used a line of credit with a correspondent bank as a source of funding for working capital needs, the payment of dividends when there is a temporary timing difference in cash flows, and repurchases of equity securities. In March 2017, we entered into an unsecured revolving line of credit for $25.0 million, and in March 2020, we renewed that line of credit. The line of credit bears interest at the prime rate (3.25% as of December 31, 2020) subject to a floor of 3.50%, with quarterly interest payments, and matures in March 2021. As of December 31, 2020, there was a $12.0 million outstanding balance on the line of credit. As of December 31, 2019, there was no outstanding balance on this line of credit with the correspondent bank.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Liquidity

Liquidity involves our ability to raise funds to support asset growth and acquisitions or reduce assets to meet deposit withdrawals and other payment obligations, to maintain reserve requirements and otherwise to operate on an ongoing basis and manage unexpected events, such as COVID-19. For the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, liquidity needs were primarily met by core deposits, security and loan maturities and amortizing investment and loan portfolios. Although access to purchased funds from correspondent banks and overnight or longer term advances from the FHLB and the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas are available, and have been utilized on occasion to take advantage of investment opportunities, we do not generally rely on these external funding sources. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, we maintained two federal funds lines of credit with commercial banks that provide for the availability to borrow up to an aggregate $60.0 million in federal funds. There were no funds under these lines of credit outstanding as of December 31, 2020 and 2019. In addition to these federal funds lines of credit, our $25.0 million revolving line of credit discussed above in “Other Borrowings” provides an additional source of liquidity.

During the second quarter of 2020, we obtained a six-month advance of $100.0 million from the FHLB at a fixed interest rate of 0.25%, a maturity date of October 13, 2020 and no prepayment penalty, in order to provide additional liquidity for the SBA Paycheck Protection Program. The PPP loans generally self-funded with the proceeds of the loans deposited into noninterest bearing demand accounts at our Bank. As result, the $100.0 million advance was not necessary for liquidity and $50.0 million of the FHLB advance was repaid in June 2020, with the remaining $50.0 million repaid in early July 2020.

73


The following table illustrates, during the periods presented, the composition of our funding sources and the average assets in which those funds are invested as a percentage of average total assets for the period indicated. Average assets were $2.57 billion for the year ended December 31, 2020 and $2.32 billion for the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

 

 

For the Years Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

 

Average

 

 

Average

 

Sources of Funds:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deposits:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Noninterest-bearing

 

 

27.09

%

 

 

21.60

%

Interest-bearing

 

 

57.11

%

 

 

62.97

%

Advances from FHLB

 

 

2.95

%

 

 

2.50

%

Line of credit

 

 

0.26

%

 

 

 

Subordinated debentures

 

 

0.67

%

 

 

0.51

%

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase

 

 

0.70

%

 

 

0.47

%

Accrued interest and other liabilities

 

 

0.96

%

 

 

1.02

%

Shareholders’ equity

 

 

10.26

%

 

 

10.93

%

Total

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

100.00

%

Uses of Funds:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loans

 

 

71.72

%

 

 

72.16

%

Securities available for sale

 

 

13.17

%

 

 

9.89

%

Securities held to maturity

 

 

1.40

%

 

 

6.86

%

Nonmarketable equity securities

 

 

0.42

%

 

 

0.49

%

Federal funds sold

 

 

4.82

%

 

 

1.89

%

Interest-bearing deposits in other banks

 

 

5.70

%

 

 

2.32

%

Other noninterest-earning assets

 

 

2.77

%

 

 

6.39

%

Total

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Average noninterest-bearing deposits to average deposits

 

 

32.17

%

 

 

25.54

%

Average loans to average deposits

 

 

86.52

%

 

 

86.13

%

 

Our primary source of funds is deposits, and our primary use of funds is loans. We do not expect a change in the primary source or use of our funds in the foreseeable future. Our average loans, including average loans held for sale, increased 10.8% for the year ended December 31, 2020 compared to 2019. Our securities portfolio had a weighted average life of 6.22 years and an effective duration of 2.92 years as of December 31, 2020, and a weighted average life of 6.25 years and an effective duration of 3.47 years as of December 31, 2019. We predominantly invest excess deposits in overnight deposits with our correspondent banks, federal funds sold, securities, interest-bearing deposits at other banks or other short-term liquid investments until needed to fund loan growth.

As of December 31, 2020, we had $324.3 million in outstanding commitments to extend credit and $8.5 million in commitments associated with outstanding standby and commercial letters of credit. As of December 31, 2019, we had $440.7 million in outstanding commitments to extend credit and $9.1 million in commitments associated with outstanding standby and commercial letters of credit. Since commitments associated with letters of credit and commitments to extend credit may expire unused, the total outstanding may not necessarily reflect the actual future cash funding requirements.

As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, we had no exposure to future cash requirements associated with known uncertainties or capital expenditures of a material nature. As of December 31, 2020, we had cash and cash equivalents of $351.8 million, compared to $90.7 million as of December 31, 2019. The increase was primarily due to an increase in federal funds sold of $173.6 million, and an increase in interest bearing deposits at other banks of $79.6 million.

74


Capital Resources

Total shareholders’ equity increased to $272.6 million as of December 31, 2020, compared to $261.6 million as of December 31, 2019, an increase of $11.1 million, or 4.2%, after giving effect to $8.6 million in dividends paid to common shareholders in 2020. This increase was primarily the result of an increase in net earnings and unrealized gains on securities and was partially offset by the repurchase of 658,607 shares of common stock.

Capital management consists of providing equity and other instruments that qualify as regulatory capital to support current and future operations. Banking regulators view capital levels as important indicators of an institution’s financial soundness. As a general matter, FDIC-insured depository institutions and their holding companies are required to maintain minimum capital relative to the amount and types of assets they hold. We are subject to regulatory capital requirements at the bank holding company and bank levels. See "Item 1. Business—Guaranty Bank & Trust, N.A.—Regulation and Supervision—Capital Adequacy Requirements” for additional discussion regarding the regulatory capital requirements applicable to us and the Bank. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, the Company and the Bank were in compliance with all applicable regulatory capital requirements, and the Bank was classified as “well capitalized,” for purposes of the prompt corrective action regulations. As we deploy our capital and learn more about the economic impacts of COVID-19, our regulatory capital levels may decrease depending on our level of earnings and provisions for credit losses. However, we expect to closely monitor our loan portfolio, operating expenses and overall capital levels in order to remain in compliance with all regulatory capital standards applicable to us.

The following table presents the regulatory capital ratios for our Company and the Bank as of the dates indicated.

 

 

 

December 31, 2020

 

 

December 31, 2019

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Amount

 

 

Ratio

 

 

Amount

 

 

Ratio

 

Guaranty Bancshares, Inc. (consolidated)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total capital (to risk weighted assets)

 

$

263,144

 

 

 

13.20

%

 

$

253,793

 

 

 

13.29

%

Tier 1 capital (to risk weighted assets)

 

 

238,115

 

 

 

11.94

%

 

 

237,591

 

 

 

12.44

%

Tier 1 capital (to average assets)

 

 

238,115

 

 

 

9.13

%

 

 

237,591

 

 

 

10.29

%

Common equity tier 1 risk-based capital

 

 

227,805

 

 

 

11.43

%

 

 

227,281

 

 

 

11.90

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guaranty Bank & Trust, N.A.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total capital (to risk weighted assets)

 

$

285,490

 

 

 

14.32

%

 

$

249,643

 

 

 

13.07

%

Tier 1 capital (to risk weighted assets)

 

 

260,459

 

 

 

13.06

%

 

 

233,441

 

 

 

12.22

%

Tier 1 capital (to average assets)

 

 

260,459

 

 

 

9.99

%

 

 

233,441

 

 

 

10.11

%

Common equity tier 1 risk-based capital

 

 

260,459

 

 

 

13.06

%

 

 

233,441

 

 

 

12.22

%

 

Contractual Obligations

We have issued subordinated debentures relating to the issuance of trust preferred securities. In October 2002, we formed Guaranty (TX) Capital Trust II, which issued $3.0 million in trust preferred securities to a third party in a private placement. Concurrent with the issuance of the trust preferred securities, the trust issued common securities to the Company in the aggregate liquidation value of $93,000. The trust invested the total proceeds from the sale of the trust preferred securities and the common securities in $3.1 million of the Company’s junior subordinated debentures, which will mature on October 30, 2032. In July 2006, we formed Guaranty (TX) Capital Trust III, which issued $2.0 million in trust preferred securities to a third party in a private placement. Concurrent with the issuance of the trust preferred securities, the trust issued common securities to the Company in the aggregate liquidation value of $62,000. The trust invested the total proceeds from the sale of the trust preferred securities and the common securities in $2.1 million of the Company’s junior subordinated debentures, which will mature on October 1, 2036. In March 2015, we acquired DCB Trust I, which issued $5.0 million in trust preferred securities to a third party in a private placement. Concurrent with the issuance of the trust preferred securities, the trust issued common securities to the Company in the aggregate liquidation value of $155,000. The trust invested the total proceeds from the sale of the trust preferred securities and the common securities in $5.2 million of the Company’s junior subordinated debentures, which will mature on June 15, 2037.

75


With certain exceptions, the amount of the principal and any accrued and unpaid interest on the debentures are subordinated in right of payment to the prior payment in full of all of our senior indebtedness. The terms of the debentures are such that they qualify as Tier 1 capital under the Federal Reserve’s regulatory capital guidelines applicable to bank holding companies. Interest on Trust II Debentures is payable at a variable rate per annum, reset quarterly, equal to 3-month LIBOR plus 3.35%. Interest on the Trust III Debentures was payable at a fixed rate per annum equal to 7.43% until October 1, 2016 and is a variable rate per annum, reset quarterly, equal to 3-month LIBOR plus 1.67%. Interest on the DCB Trust I Debentures is payable at a variable rate per annum, reset quarterly, equal to 3-month LIBOR plus 1.80%. The interest is deferrable on a cumulative basis for up to five consecutive years following a suspension of dividend payments on all other capital stock. No principal payments are due until maturity for each of the debentures.

On any interest payment date on or after (1) June 15, 2012 for the DCB Trust I Debentures, (2) October 30, 2012 for the Trust II Debentures and (3) October 1, 2016 for the Trust III Debentures, and before their respective maturity dates, the debentures are redeemable, in whole or in part, for cash at our option on at least 30, but not more than 60, days’ notice at a redemption price equal to 100% of the principal amount to be redeemed, plus accrued interest to the date of redemption.

In December 2015, the Company issued $5.0 million in debentures, of which $2.5 million were issued to directors and other related parties. As of December 31, 2019, $4.5 million of the debentures had been repaid. The final $500,000 debenture was repaid during the second quarter of 2020.

 

On May 1, 2020, the Company issued $10.0 million in debentures to directors and other related parties. The debentures have stated maturity dates between November 1, 2020 and November 1, 2024, and bear interest at fixed annual rates between 1.00% and 4.00%. The Company pays interest semi-annually on May 1st and November 1st in arrears during the term of the debentures. $500,000 was paid off in November of 2020. The debentures are redeemable by the Company at its option, in whole in or part, at any time on or before the due date of any debenture. The redemption price is equal to 100% of the face amount of the debenture redeemed, plus all accrued but unpaid interest.

The following table summarizes contractual obligations and other commitments to make future payments as of December 31, 2020 (other than non-time deposit obligations), which consist of future cash payments associated with our contractual obligations.

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2020

 

(in thousands)

 

1 year

or less

 

 

More than 1

year but less

than 3 years

 

 

3 years or

more but less

than 5 years

 

 

5 years

or more

 

 

Total

 

Time deposits

 

$

306,760

 

 

$

64,012

 

 

$

7,878

 

 

$

 

 

$

378,650

 

Advances from FHLB

 

 

101,601

 

 

 

1,500

 

 

 

6,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

109,101

 

Subordinated debentures

 

 

 

 

 

5,500

 

 

 

4,000

 

 

 

10,310

 

 

 

19,810

 

Operating leases

 

 

1,683

 

 

 

3,079

 

 

 

3,059

 

 

 

5,718

 

 

 

13,539

 

Total

 

$

410,044

 

 

$

74,091

 

 

$

20,937

 

 

$

16,028

 

 

$

521,100

 

 

76


Off-Balance Sheet Items

In the normal course of business, we enter into various transactions, which, in accordance with GAAP, are not included in our consolidated balance sheets. We enter into these transactions to meet the financing needs of our customers. These transactions include commitments to extend credit and standby and commercial letters of credit, which involve, to varying degrees, elements of credit risk and interest rate risk in excess of the amounts recognized in our consolidated balance sheets.

Our commitments associated with outstanding standby and commercial letters of credit and commitments to extend credit expiring by period as of the date indicated are summarized below. Since commitments associated with letters of credit and commitments to extend credit may expire unused, the amounts shown do not necessarily reflect the actual future cash funding requirements.

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2020

 

(in thousands)

 

1 year

or less

 

 

More than

1 year but

less than

3 years

 

 

3 years or

more but

less than

5 years

 

 

5 years

or more

 

 

Total

 

Standby and commercial letters of credit

 

$

3,308

 

 

$

1,750

 

 

$

375

 

 

$

3,055

 

 

$

8,488

 

Commitments to extend credit

 

 

177,764

 

 

 

67,738

 

 

 

10,154

 

 

 

68,620

 

 

 

324,276

 

Total

 

$

181,072

 

 

$

69,488

 

 

$

10,529

 

 

$

71,675

 

 

$

332,764

 

 

Standby and commercial letters of credit are conditional commitments issued by us to guarantee the performance of a customer to a third party. In the event of nonperformance by the customer, we have rights to the underlying collateral, which can include commercial real estate, physical plant and property, inventory, receivables, cash and/or marketable securities. Our credit risk associated with issuing letters of credit is essentially the same as the risk involved in extending loan facilities to our customers. Management evaluated the likelihood of funding the standby and commercial letters of credit as of January 1, 2020, the adoption date of ASC 326, and as of December 31, 2020, and determined the likelihood to be improbable. Therefore, no ACL was recorded for standby and commercial letters of credit as of December 31, 2020.

Commitments to extend credit are agreements to lend to a customer as long as there is no violation of any condition established in the contract. Commitments generally have fixed expiration dates or other termination clauses and may require payment of a fee. Since many of the commitments are expected to expire without being fully drawn upon, the total commitment amounts disclosed above do not necessarily represent future cash requirements. We evaluate each customer’s creditworthiness on a case-by-case basis. The amount of collateral obtained, if considered necessary by us, upon extension of credit, is based on management’s credit evaluation of the customer.

Loan agreements executed in connection with construction loans and commercial lines of credit have standard conditions which must be met prior to the Company being required to provide additional funding, including conditions precedent that typically include: (i) no event of default or potential default has occurred; (ii) no material adverse events have taken place that would materially affect the borrower or the value of the collateral, (iii) the borrower remains in compliance with all loan obligations and covenants and has made no misrepresentations; (iv) the collateral has not been damaged or impaired; (v) the project remains on budget and in compliance with all laws and regulations; and (vi) all management agreements, lease agreements and franchise agreements that affect the value of the collateral remain in force. If the conditions precedent have not been met, the Company retains the option to cease current draws and/or future funding. As a result of these conditions within our loan agreements, management believes the credit risk of these off balance sheet items is minimal and we recorded no ACL with respect to these loan agreements upon adoption of ASC 326 or as of December 31, 2020.

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

Recently issued accounting pronouncements are summarized and discussed in Note 1 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements contained in Item 8 of this report.

Impact of Inflation

Our consolidated financial statements and related notes included in "Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" have been prepared in accordance with GAAP. GAAP requires the measurement of financial

77


position and operating results in terms of historical dollars, without considering changes in the relative value of money over time due to inflation or recession.

Unlike many industrial companies, substantially all of our assets and liabilities are monetary in nature. As a result, interest rates have a more significant impact on our performance than the effects of general levels of inflation. Interest rates may not necessarily move in the same direction or in the same magnitude as the prices of goods and services. However, other operating expenses do reflect general levels of inflation.

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

Our accounting and reporting policies conform to GAAP and the prevailing practices in the banking industry. However, we also evaluate our performance based on certain additional financial measures discussed in this Annual Report on Form 10-K as being non-GAAP financial measures. We classify a financial measure as being a non-GAAP financial measure if that financial measure excludes or includes amounts, or is subject to adjustments that have the effect of excluding or including amounts, that are included or excluded, as the case may be, in the most directly comparable measure calculated and presented in accordance with GAAP as in effect from time to time in the United States in our statements of income, balance sheets or statements of cash flows. Non-GAAP financial measures do not include operating and other statistical measures or ratios or statistical measures calculated using exclusively either financial measures calculated in accordance with GAAP, operating measures or other measures that are not non-GAAP financial measures or both.

The non-GAAP financial measures that we discuss in this Annual Report on Form 10-K should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for the most directly comparable or other financial measures calculated in accordance with GAAP. Moreover, the manner in which we calculate the non-GAAP financial measures that we discuss herein may differ from that of other companies reporting measures with similar names. It is important to understand how other banking organizations calculate their financial measures with names similar to the non-GAAP financial measures we have discussed in this Annual Report on Form 10-K when comparing such non-GAAP financial measures.

Tangible Book Value Per Common Share. Tangible book value per common share is a non-GAAP measure generally used by investors, financial analysts and investment bankers to evaluate financial institutions. We calculate (1) tangible common equity as total shareholders’ equity, less goodwill, core deposit intangibles and other intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization, and (2) tangible book value per common share as tangible common equity divided by shares of common stock outstanding. The most directly comparable GAAP financial measure for tangible book value per common share is book value per common share.

We believe that the tangible book value per common share measure is important to many investors in the marketplace who are interested in changes from period to period in book value per common share exclusive of changes in intangible assets. Goodwill and other intangible assets have the effect of increasing total book value while not increasing our tangible book value.

The following table reconciles, as of the dates set forth below, total shareholders’ equity to tangible common equity and presents tangible book value per common share compared to book value per common share:

 

 

 

As of December 31,

 

(dollars in thousands, except per share data)

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Tangible Common Equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total shareholders’ equity, including KSOP- owned shares

 

$

272,643

 

 

$

261,551

 

 

$

244,583

 

 

$

207,345

 

 

$

141,914

 

Adjustments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goodwill

 

 

(32,160

)

 

 

(32,160

)

 

 

(32,160

)

 

 

(18,742

)

 

 

(18,742

)

Core deposit intangible, net

 

 

(2,999

)

 

 

(3,853

)

 

 

(4,706

)

 

 

(2,724

)

 

 

(3,308

)

Total tangible common equity

 

$

237,484

 

 

$

225,538

 

 

$

207,717

 

 

$

185,879

 

 

$

119,864

 

Common shares outstanding(1)

 

 

10,935,415

 

 

 

11,547,443

 

 

 

11,829,868

 

 

 

11,058,956

 

 

 

8,751,923

 

Book value per common share

 

$

24.93

 

 

$

22.65

 

 

$

20.68

 

 

$

18.75

 

 

$

16.22

 

Tangible book value per common share

 

$

21.72

 

 

$

19.53

 

 

$

17.56

 

 

$

16.81

 

 

$

13.70

 

 

(1)

Excludes the dilutive effect, if any, of 32,781, 66,202, 90,940, 82,529, and 8,066 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of outstanding stock options as of December 31, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively.

78


Tangible book value per share increased from 2019 to 2020 primarily due to an increase in our total shareholders’ equity as a result of earnings and unrealized gains on securities, and by the repurchase of 658,607 shares of common stock during the year ended December 31, 2020.

Tangible Common Equity to Tangible Assets. Tangible common equity to tangible assets is a non-GAAP measure generally used by investors, financial analysts and investment bankers to evaluate financial institutions. We calculate tangible common equity as described above and tangible assets as total assets less goodwill, core deposit intangibles and other intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization. The most directly comparable GAAP financial measure for tangible common equity to tangible assets is total common shareholders’ equity to total assets.

We believe that this measure is important to many investors in the marketplace who are interested in the relative changes from period to period of tangible common equity to tangible assets, each exclusive of changes in intangible assets. Goodwill and other intangible assets have the effect of increasing both total shareholders’ equity and assets while not increasing our tangible common equity or tangible assets.

The following table reconciles, as of the dates set forth below, total tangible common equity and total assets to tangible assets:

 

 

 

As of December 31,

 

(dollars in thousands, except per share data)

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Tangible Common Equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total shareholders’ equity, including KSOP- owned shares

 

$

272,643

 

 

$

261,551

 

 

$

244,583

 

 

$

207,345

 

 

$

141,914

 

Adjustments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goodwill

 

 

(32,160

)

 

 

(32,160

)

 

 

(32,160

)

 

 

(18,742

)

 

 

(18,742

)

Core deposit intangible, net

 

 

(2,999

)

 

 

(3,853

)

 

 

(4,706

)

 

 

(2,724

)

 

 

(3,308

)

Total tangible common equity

 

$

237,484

 

 

$

225,538

 

 

$

207,717

 

 

$

185,879

 

 

$

119,864

 

Tangible Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

2,740,832

 

 

$

2,318,444

 

 

$

2,266,970

 

 

$

1,962,624

 

 

$

1,828,336

 

Adjustments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goodwill

 

 

(32,160

)

 

 

(32,160

)

 

 

(32,160

)

 

 

(18,742

)

 

 

(18,742

)

Core deposit intangible, net

 

 

(2,999

)

 

 

(3,853

)

 

 

(4,706

)

 

 

(2,724

)

 

 

(3,308

)

Total tangible assets

 

$

2,705,673

 

 

$

2,282,431

 

 

$

2,230,104

 

 

$

1,941,158

 

 

$

1,806,286

 

Tangible Common Equity to Tangible Assets

 

 

8.78

%

 

 

9.88

%

 

 

9.31

%

 

 

9.58

%

 

 

6.64

%

 

Core Earnings and Other COVID-19 Adjusted Measures. The following tables reconcile, as of and for the dates set forth below, various metrics impacted by the effects of COVID-19 on reported data (dollars in thousands, except per share data).

Net Core Earnings and Net Core Earnings per Common Share

 

 

For The Years Ended

December 31,

 

(in thousands)

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

Net earnings

 

$

27,402

 

 

$

26,279

 

Adjustments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Provision for credit losses