Docoh
Loading...

PNM PNM Resources

Filed: 29 Apr 21, 8:00pm
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2021


Name of Registrant, State of Incorporation, Address Of Principal Executive Offices, Telephone Number, Commission File No., IRS Employer Identification No.
PNM Resources, Inc.
(A New Mexico Corporation)
414 Silver Ave. SW
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87102-3289
Telephone Number - (505) 241-2700
Commission File No. - 001-32462
IRS Employer Identification No. - 85-0468296

Public Service Company of New Mexico
(A New Mexico Corporation)
414 Silver Ave. SW
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87102-3289
Telephone Number - (505) 241-2700
Commission File No. - 001-06986
IRS Employer Identification No. - 85-0019030

Texas-New Mexico Power Company
(A Texas Corporation)
577 N. Garden Ridge Blvd.
Lewisville, Texas 75067
Telephone Number - (972) 420-4189
Commission File No. - 002-97230
IRS Employer Identification No. - 75-0204070


Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
RegistrantTitle of each classTrading Symbol(s)Name of exchange on which registered
PNM Resources, Inc.Common Stock, no par valuePNMNew York Stock Exchange

Indicate by check mark whether each registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
PNM Resources, Inc. (“PNMR”)YesNo
Public Service Company of New Mexico (“PNM”)YesNo
Texas-New Mexico Power Company (“TNMP”)YesNo

(NOTE: As a voluntary filer, not subject to the filing requirements, TNMP filed all reports under Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months.)







Indicate by check mark whether each registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).
PNMRYesNo
PNMYesNo
TNMPYesNo

Indicate by check mark whether registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer
Accelerated
filer
Non-accelerated
filer
Smaller reporting companyEmerging growth company
PNMR
Large accelerated
filer

Accelerated
filer
Non-accelerated filerSmaller reporting companyEmerging growth company
PNM
Large accelerated
filer
Accelerated
filer
Non-accelerated filerSmaller reporting companyEmerging growth company
TNMP

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether any of the registrants is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes   No

As of April 23, 2021, 85,834,874 shares of common stock, no par value per share, of PNMR were outstanding.

The total number of shares of common stock of PNM, no par value per share, outstanding as of April 23, 2021 was 39,117,799 all held by PNMR (and none held by non-affiliates).

The total number of shares of common stock of TNMP, $10 par value per share, outstanding as of April 23, 2021 was 6,358 all held indirectly by PNMR (and none held by non-affiliates).

PNM AND TNMP MEET THE CONDITIONS SET FORTH IN GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS (H) (1) (a) AND (b) OF FORM 10-Q AND ARE THEREFORE FILING THIS FORM WITH THE REDUCED DISCLOSURE FORMAT PURSUANT TO GENERAL INSTRUCTION (H) (2).

This combined Form 10-Q is separately filed by PNMR, PNM, and TNMP.  Information contained herein relating to any individual registrant is filed by such registrant on its own behalf.  Each registrant makes no representation as to information relating to the other registrants.  When this Form 10-Q is incorporated by reference into any filing with the SEC made by PNMR, PNM, or TNMP, as a registrant, the portions of this Form 10-Q that relate to each other registrant are not incorporated by reference therein.


2

PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES

INDEX


3

GLOSSARY
Definitions:  
2017 IRPPNM’s 2017 IRP
2020 IRPPNM’s 2020 IRP
DCOSTNMP’s applications for a distribution cost recovery factor
ABCWUAAlbuquerque Bernalillo County Water Utility Authority
ACE RuleAffordable Clean Energy Rule
AEP OnSite PartnersAEP OnSite Partners, LLC, a subsidiary of American Electric Power, Inc.
Afton  Afton Generating Station
AFUDCAllowance for Funds Used During Construction
ALJ  Administrative Law Judge
AMIAdvanced Metering Infrastructure
AMSAdvanced Meter System
AOCI  Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income
APS  Arizona Public Service Company, the operator and a co-owner of PVNGS and Four Corners
ARO  Asset Retirement Obligation
ARPAlternative Revenue Program
ASUAccounting Standards Update
AvangridAvangrid, Inc., a New York corporation
BART  Best Available Retrofit Technology
Board  Board of Directors of PNMR
BSERBest system of emission reduction technology
BTU  British Thermal Unit
CAAClean Air Act
CARES ActCoronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act
CCAECoalition for Clean Affordable Energy
CCRCoal Combustion Residuals
CFIUSCommittee on Foreign Investment in the United States
CFRECitizens for Fair Rates and the Environment
CIACContributions in Aid of Construction
CO2
  Carbon Dioxide
COVID-19Novel coronavirus global pandemic
CSACoal Supply Agreement
CTC  Competition Transition Charge
DC CircuitUnited States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
DOE  United States Department of Energy
DOI  United States Department of Interior
EGUElectric Generating Unit
EIM  California Independent System Operator Western Energy Imbalance Market
EPA  United States Environmental Protection Agency
ERCOT  Electric Reliability Council of Texas
ESGEnvironmental, Social, and Governance principles
ETAThe New Mexico Energy Transition Act
EUEAThe New Mexico Efficient Use of Energy Act
Exchange ActSecurities Exchange Act of 1934
FarmingtonThe City of Farmington, New Mexico
FASB  Financial Accounting Standards Board
FCCFederal Communications Commission
FERC  Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
Four Corners  Four Corners Power Plant
Four Corners Abandonment ApplicationPNM’s January 8, 2021 application for approval for the abandonment of Four Corners and issuance of a securitized financing order
Four Corners CSAFour Corners’ coal supply contract with NTEC
Four Corners Purchase and Sale AgreementPNM’s pending sale of its 13% ownership interest in Four Corners to NTEC
FPPAC  Fuel and Purchased Power Adjustment Clause
FTCFederal Trade Commission
FTYFuture Test Year
4

GAAP  Generally Accepted Accounting Principles in the United States of America
GHG  Greenhouse Gas Emissions
GWh  Gigawatt hours
HSRHart-Scott Rodino Antitrust Improvement Act of 1976
IberdrolaIberdrola, S.A., a corporation organized under the laws of the Kingdom of Spain, and 81.5% owner of Avangrid
IRCInternal Revenue Code
IRPIntegrated Resource Plan
IRS  Internal Revenue Service
ISFSIIndependent Spent Fuel Storage Installation
kVKilovolt
KW  Kilowatt
KWh  Kilowatt Hour
La Joya Wind ILa Joya Wind Facility generating 166 MW of output that became operational in February 2021
La Joya Wind IILa Joya Wind Facility generating 140 MW of output that is expected to be operational in March 2021
Leased InterestLeased capacity in PVNGS Unit 1 and Unit 2
LIBOR  London Interbank Offered Rate
Lightning Dock GeothermalLightning Dock geothermal power facility, also known as the Dale Burgett Geothermal Plant
MD&A  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
MergerThe merger of Merger Sub with and into PNMR pursuant to the Merger Agreement, with PNMR surviving the Merger as a direct, wholly-owned subsidiary of Avangrid
Merger AgreementThe Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated October 20, 2020, between PNMR, Avangrid and Merger Sub
Merger Backstop Revolving Facility$300.0 million 364-day revolving credit facility
Merger Backstop Term Loan$50.0 million 364-day delayed-draw term loan credit facility
Merger SubNM Green Holdings, Inc., a New Mexico corporation and wholly-owned subsidiary of Avangrid which will merge with and into PNMR at the effective time of the Merger (defined below)
MMBTU  Million BTUs
Moody’s  Moody’s Investor Services, Inc.
MW  Megawatt
MWh  Megawatt Hour
NAAQSNational Ambient Air Quality Standards
Navajo Acts  Navajo Nation Air Pollution Prevention and Control Act, Navajo Nation Safe Drinking Water Act, and Navajo Nation Pesticide Act
NDT  Nuclear Decommissioning Trusts for PVNGS
NEENew Energy Economy
New Mexico WindNew Mexico Wind Energy Center
NM 2015 Rate CaseRequest for a General Increase in Electric Rates Filed by PNM on August 27, 2015
NM 2016 Rate CaseRequest for a General Increase in Electric Rates Filed by PNM on December 7, 2016
NM CapitalNM Capital Utility Corporation, an unregulated wholly-owned subsidiary of PNMR, now known as
New Mexico PPA Corporation
NM District CourtUnited States District Court for the District of New Mexico
NM Supreme CourtNew Mexico Supreme Court
NMAG  New Mexico Attorney General
NMED  New Mexico Environment Department
NMMMDThe Mining and Minerals Division of the New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department
NMPRC  New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
NMRDNM Renewable Development, LLC, owned 50% each by PNMR Development and AEP OnSite Partners, LLC
NOx  Nitrogen Oxides
NPDESNational Pollutant Discharge Elimination System
NRC  United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission
NSR  New Source Review
NTEC  Navajo Transitional Energy Company, LLC, an entity owned by the Navajo Nation
OATTOpen Access Transmission Tariff
OCI  Other Comprehensive Income
5

OPEB  Other Post-Employment Benefits
OSMUnited States Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement
PCRBs  Pollution Control Revenue Bonds
PMParticulate Matter
PNM  Public Service Company of New Mexico and Subsidiaries
PNM 2017 New Mexico Credit FacilityPNM’s $40.0 Million Unsecured Revolving Credit Facility
PNM 2019 $40.0 Million Term LoanPNM’s $40.0 Million Unsecured Term Loan
PNM 2020 Term LoanPNM’s $250.0 million Unsecured Term Loan issued on April 15, 2020, of which $100.0 million was repaid on April 30, 2020
PNM Floating Rate PCRBsPNM's $100.3 million PCRBs remarketed on July 1, 2020
PNM Revolving Credit FacilityPNM’s $400.0 Million Unsecured Revolving Credit Facility
PNMR  PNM Resources, Inc. and Subsidiaries
PNMR 2015 Term
Loan
PNMR’s $150.0 Million Three-Year Unsecured Term Loan that matured on March 9, 2018
PNMR 2018 SUNSPNMR’s $300.0 Million Senior Unsecured Notes issued on March 9, 2018
PNMR 2018 Two-Year Term LoanPNMR’s $50.0 Million Two-Year Unsecured Term Loan
PNMR 2019 Term LoanPNMR’s $150.0 Million Unsecured Term Loan
PNMR 2020 Forward Equity Sale AgreementsPNMR’s Block Equity Sale of 6.2 million Shares of PNMR Common Stock with Forward Sales Agreement
PNMR 2020 Term LoanPNMR’s $150.0 million Unsecured Term Loan that matures on January 31, 2022
PNMR 2020 Delayed-Draw Term LoanPNMR’s $300.0 million Unsecured Delayed-Draw Term Loan that matures on January 31, 2022
PNMR DevelopmentPNMR Development and Management Company, an unregulated wholly-owned subsidiary of PNMR
PNMR Development Revolving Credit FacilityPNMR Development’s $40.0 million Unsecured Revolving Credit Facility
PNMR Development Term LoanPNMR Development’s $65.0 Million Unsecured Term Loan that matures on January 31, 2022
PNMR Revolving Credit FacilityPNMR’s $300.0 Million Unsecured Revolving Credit Facility
PPA  Power Purchase Agreement
PSD  Prevention of Significant Deterioration
PUCT  Public Utility Commission of Texas
PV  Photovoltaic
PVNGS  Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station
PVNGS Leased Interest Abandonment ApplicationApplication with the NMPRC requesting approval for the decertification and abandonment of 114MW of leased PVNGS capacity
RCT  Reasonable Cost Threshold
REANew Mexico’s Renewable Energy Act of 2004
Red Mesa WindRed Mesa Wind Energy Center
REP  Retail Electricity Provider
RMC  Risk Management Committee
ROEReturn on Equity
RPS  Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard
S&P  Standard and Poor’s Ratings Services
SEC  United States Securities and Exchange Commission
Securitized BondsEnergy transition bonds
SIP  State Implementation Plan
SJCC  San Juan Coal Company
SJGS  San Juan Generating Station
6

SJGS Abandonment ApplicationPNM’s July 1, 2019 consolidated application seeking NMPRC approval to retire PNM’s share of SJGS in 2022, for related replacement generating resources, and for the issuance of securitized bonds under the ETA
SJGS CSASan Juan Generating Station Coal Supply Agreement
SJGS RASan Juan Project Restructuring Agreement
SO2
  Sulfur Dioxide
SRP  Salt River Project
SUNsSenior Unsecured Notes
Tax ActFederal tax reform legislation enacted on December 22, 2017, commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act
TECA  Texas Electric Choice Act
Tenth CircuitUnited States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit
TEPTransportation Electrification Program
TNMP  Texas-New Mexico Power Company and Subsidiaries
TNMP 2018 Rate CaseTNMP’s General Rate Case Application Filed May 30, 2018
TNMP Revolving Credit Facility  TNMP’s $75.0 Million Secured Revolving Credit Facility
U.S.The Unites States of America
US Supreme CourtUnited States Supreme Court
Valencia  Valencia Energy Facility
VIEVariable Interest Entity
Western Spirit LineA 153-mile 345-kV transmission line that PNM has agreed to purchase, subject to certain conditions being met prior to closing
WestmorelandWestmoreland Coal Company
Westmoreland Loan$125.0 Million of funding provided by NM Capital to WSJ
WFB LOC FacilityLetter of credit arrangements with Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., entered into in August 2020
WRAWestern Resource Advocates
WSJWestmoreland San Juan, LLC, an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of Westmoreland
WSJ LLCWestmoreland San Juan, LLC, a subsidiary of Westmoreland Mining Holdings, LLC, and current owner of SJCC

7

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EARNINGS (LOSS)
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
(In thousands, except per share amounts)
Electric Operating Revenues:
Contracts with customers$346,585 $322,983 
Alternative revenue programs(909)426 
Other electric operating revenue19,031 10,213 
Total electric operating revenues364,707 333,622 
Operating Expenses:
Cost of energy115,396 98,710 
Administrative and general59,465 46,032 
Energy production costs36,896 33,618 
Depreciation and amortization69,874 68,973 
Transmission and distribution costs17,317 17,286 
Taxes other than income taxes22,593 21,265 
Total operating expenses321,541 285,884 
Operating income43,166 47,738 
Other Income and Deductions:
Interest income3,559 3,423 
Gains on investment securities968 (32,849)
Other income4,252 2,316 
Other (deductions)(3,290)(3,473)
Net other income and deductions5,489 (30,583)
Interest Charges25,884 30,434 
Earnings (Loss) before Income Taxes22,771 (13,279)
Income Taxes (Benefits)1,566 (1,880)
Net Earnings (Loss)21,205 (11,399)
(Earnings) Attributable to Valencia Non-controlling Interest(3,494)(3,729)
Preferred Stock Dividend Requirements of Subsidiary(132)(132)
Net Earnings (Loss) Attributable to PNMR$17,579 $(15,260)
Net Earnings (Loss) Attributable to PNMR per Common Share:
Basic$0.20 $(0.19)
Diluted$0.20 $(0.19)
Dividends Declared per Common Share$0.3275 $0.3075 

The accompanying notes, as they relate to PNMR, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.


8

PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)
(Unaudited)

Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Net Earnings (Loss)$21,205 $(11,399)
Other Comprehensive Income:
Unrealized Gains on Available-for-Sale Debt Securities:
Net change in unrealized holding gains arising during the period, net of income tax (expense) of $845 and $1,088(2,481)(3,195)
Reclassification adjustment for (gains) included in net earnings, net of income tax expense of $919 and $301(2,699)(884)
Pension Liability Adjustment:
Reclassification adjustment for amortization of experience losses recognized as net periodic benefit cost, net of income tax (benefit) of $(530) and $(527)1,557 1,548 
Fair Value Adjustment for Cash Flow Hedges:
Change in fair market value, net of income tax (expense) benefit of $(317) and $507930 (1,491)
Reclassification adjustment for (gains) losses included in net earnings, net of income tax expense (benefit) of $158 and $10(466)(28)
Total Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)(3,159)(4,050)
Comprehensive Income (Loss)18,046 (15,449)
Comprehensive (Income) Attributable to Valencia Non-controlling Interest(3,494)(3,729)
Preferred Stock Dividend Requirements of Subsidiary(132)(132)
Comprehensive Income (Loss) Attributable to PNMR$14,420 $(19,310)

The accompanying notes, as they relate to PNMR, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

9

PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Cash Flows From Operating Activities:
Net earnings (loss)$21,205 $(11,399)
Adjustments to reconcile net earnings (loss) to net cash flows from operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization78,857 77,535 
Deferred income tax expense (benefit)1,447 (1,826)
(Gains) losses on investment securities(967)32,849 
Stock based compensation expense4,219 3,801 
Allowance for equity funds used during construction(2,621)(1,195)
Other, net3,234 776 
Changes in certain assets and liabilities:
Accounts receivable and unbilled revenues17,205 14,027 
Materials, supplies, and fuel stock4,305 3,806 
Other current assets(18,978)105 
Other assets6,561 7,429 
Accounts payable(9,647)(1,224)
Accrued interest and taxes76 (10,830)
Other current liabilities(4,369)(3,570)
Other liabilities(14,050)(16,485)
Net cash flows from operating activities86,477 93,799 
Cash Flows From Investing Activities:
Additions to utility plant and non-utility plant(172,235)(140,208)
Proceeds from sales of investment securities123,596 149,355 
Purchases of investment securities(126,485)(152,108)
Investments in NMRD(10,000)
Distributions from NMRD572 
Other, net97 122 
Net cash flows used in investing activities(174,455)(152,839)

The accompanying notes, as they relate to PNMR, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
10

PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)

Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Cash Flows From Financing Activities:
Revolving credit facilities borrowings (repayments), net$165,500 $115,500 
Long-term borrowings220,000 
Repayment of long-term debt(300,000)
Proceeds from stock option exercise24 
Awards of common stock(9,027)(11,498)
Dividends paid(28,243)(24,625)
Valencia’s transactions with its owner(5,243)(6,434)
Transmission interconnection and security deposit arrangements5,460 370 
Refunds paid under transmission interconnection arrangements(584)(1,744)
Debt issuance costs and other, net(292)(137)
Net cash flows from financing activities47,571 71,456 
Change in Cash, Restricted Cash, and Equivalents(40,407)12,416 
Cash, Restricted Cash, and Equivalents at Beginning of Period47,928 3,833 
Cash, Restricted Cash, and Equivalents at End of Period$7,521 $16,249 
Supplemental Cash Flow Disclosures:
Interest paid, net of amounts capitalized$23,317 $26,658 
Income taxes paid (refunded), net$$(131)
Supplemental schedule of noncash investing activities:
(Increase) decrease in accrued plant additions$49,092 $6,699 

The accompanying notes, as they relate to PNMR, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

11

PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Unaudited)
March 31,
2021
December 31,
2020
(In thousands)
ASSETS
Current Assets:
Cash and cash equivalents$7,521 $47,928 
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for credit losses of $11,274 and $8,333102,462 113,410 
Unbilled revenues42,953 55,504 
Other receivables17,979 23,797 
Materials, supplies, and fuel stock62,113 66,417 
Regulatory assets29,133 202 
Income taxes receivable5,553 5,672 
Other current assets60,764 64,549 
Total current assets328,478 377,479 
Other Property and Investments:
Investment securities437,028 440,115 
Equity investment in NMRD87,769 90,655 
Other investments186 284 
Non-utility property, net23,872 24,075 
Total other property and investments548,855 555,129 
Utility Plant:
Plant in service, held for future use, and to be abandoned8,532,455 8,480,799 
Less accumulated depreciation and amortization2,883,146 2,835,170 
5,649,309 5,645,629 
Construction work in progress282,704 218,719 
Nuclear fuel, net of accumulated amortization of $47,253 and $41,36798,502 100,801 
Net utility plant6,030,515 5,965,149 
Deferred Charges and Other Assets:
Regulatory assets555,150 557,790 
Goodwill278,297 278,297 
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net of accumulated amortization99,017 105,133 
Other deferred charges102,997 100,877 
Total deferred charges and other assets1,035,461 1,042,097 
$7,943,309 $7,939,854 

The accompanying notes, as they relate to PNMR, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

12

PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Unaudited)
March 31,
2021
December 31,
2020
(In thousands, except share information)
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Current Liabilities:
Short-term debt$197,500 $32,000 
Current installments of long-term debt1,010,559 575,518 
Accounts payable110,577 169,317 
Customer deposits4,877 6,606 
Accrued interest and taxes68,164 68,206 
Regulatory liabilities6,890 7,471 
Operating lease liabilities28,160 27,460 
Dividends declared28,243 28,243 
Other current liabilities56,150 62,841 
Total current liabilities1,511,120 977,662 
Long-term Debt, net of Unamortized Premiums, Discounts, and Debt Issuance Costs2,205,133 2,719,632 
Deferred Credits and Other Liabilities:
Accumulated deferred income taxes702,008 694,512 
Regulatory liabilities854,748 850,228 
Asset retirement obligations185,700 183,421 
Accrued pension liability and postretirement benefit cost54,274 58,101 
Operating lease liabilities71,492 81,065 
Other deferred credits259,079 255,230 
Total deferred credits and other liabilities2,127,301 2,122,557 
Total liabilities5,843,554 5,819,851 
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 11)00
Cumulative Preferred Stock of Subsidiary
without mandatory redemption requirements ($100 stated value; 10,000,000 shares authorized; issued and outstanding 115,293 shares)11,529 11,529 
Equity:
PNMR common stockholders’ equity:
Common stock (0 par value; 120,000,000 shares authorized; issued and outstanding 85,834,874 shares)1,425,133 1,429,941 
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss), net of income taxes(82,342)(79,183)
Retained earnings688,175 698,707 
Total PNMR common stockholders’ equity2,030,966 2,049,465 
Non-controlling interest in Valencia57,260 59,009 
Total equity2,088,226 2,108,474 
$7,943,309 $7,939,854 

The accompanying notes, as they relate to PNMR, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

13

PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
(Unaudited)
Attributable to PNMRNon-
controlling
Interest
in Valencia
Common
Stock
AOCIRetained
Earnings
Total PNMR Common Stockholders’ EquityTotal
Equity
(In thousands)
Balance at December 31, 2020$1,429,941 $(79,183)$698,707 $2,049,465 $59,009 $2,108,474 
Net earnings before subsidiary preferred stock dividends— — 17,711 17,711 3,494 21,205 
Total other comprehensive income (loss)— (3,159)— (3,159)— (3,159)
Subsidiary preferred stock dividends— — (132)(132)— (132)
Dividends declared on common stock— — (28,111)(28,111)— (28,111)
Awards of common stock(9,027)— — (9,027)— (9,027)
Stock based compensation expense4,219 — — 4,219 — 4,219 
Valencia’s transactions with its owner— — — — (5,243)(5,243)
Balance at March 31, 2021$1,425,133 $(82,342)$688,175 $2,030,966 $57,260 $2,088,226 


Balance at December 31, 2019$1,150,552 $(99,377)$627,523 $1,678,698 $63,052 $1,741,750 
Net earnings (loss) before subsidiary preferred stock dividends— — (15,128)(15,128)3,729 (11,399)
Total other comprehensive income (loss)— (4,050)— (4,050)— (4,050)
Subsidiary preferred stock dividends— — (132)(132)— (132)
Dividends declared on common stock— — (24,493)(24,493)— (24,493)
Proceeds from stock option exercise24 — — 24 — 24 
Awards of common stock(11,498)— — (11,498)— (11,498)
Stock based compensation expense3,801 — — 3,801 — 3,801 
Valencia’s transactions with its owner— — — — (6,434)(6,434)
Balance at March 31, 2020$1,142,879 $(103,427)$587,770 $1,627,222 $60,347 $1,687,569 

The accompanying notes, as they relate to PNMR, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
14


PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
A WHOLLY-OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF PNM RESOURCES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EARNINGS (LOSS)
(Unaudited)

Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Electric Operating Revenues:
Contracts with customers$251,206 $235,759 
Alternative revenue programs976 2,161 
Other electric operating revenue19,031 10,213 
Total electric operating revenues271,213 248,133 
Operating Expenses:
Cost of energy88,886 74,524 
Administrative and general47,134 41,668 
Energy production costs36,896 33,618 
Depreciation and amortization41,949 41,449 
Transmission and distribution costs10,659 10,915 
Taxes other than income taxes12,639 12,354 
Total operating expenses238,163 214,528 
Operating income33,050 33,605 
Other Income and Deductions:
Interest income3,595 3,496 
Gains (losses) on investment securities968 (32,849)
Other income2,708 1,509 
Other (deductions)(2,432)(2,687)
Net other income and deductions4,839 (30,531)
Interest Charges12,893 17,629 
Earnings (Loss) before Income Taxes24,996 (14,555)
Income Taxes (Benefits)2,834 (2,359)
Net Earnings (Loss)22,162 (12,196)
(Earnings) Attributable to Valencia Non-controlling Interest(3,494)(3,729)
Net Earnings (Loss) Attributable to PNM18,668 (15,925)
Preferred Stock Dividends Requirements(132)(132)
Net Earnings (Loss) Available for PNM Common Stock$18,536 $(16,057)

The accompanying notes, as they relate to PNM, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

15

PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
A WHOLLY-OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF PNM RESOURCES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Net Earnings (Loss)$22,162 $(12,196)
Other Comprehensive Income:
Unrealized Gains on Available-for-Sale Debt Securities:
Net change in unrealized holding gains arising during the period, net of income tax (expense) of $845 and $1,088(2,481)(3,195)
Reclassification adjustment for (gains) included in net earnings, net of income tax expense of $919 and $301(2,699)(884)
Pension Liability Adjustment:
Reclassification adjustment for amortization of experience losses recognized as net periodic benefit cost, net of income tax (benefit) of $(530) and $(527)1,557 1,548 
Total Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)(3,623)(2,531)
Comprehensive Income (Loss)18,539 (14,727)
Comprehensive (Income) Attributable to Valencia Non-controlling Interest(3,494)(3,729)
Comprehensive Income (Loss) Attributable to PNM$15,045 $(18,456)

The accompanying notes, as they relate to PNM, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

16

PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
A WHOLLY-OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF PNM RESOURCES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Cash Flows From Operating Activities:
Net earnings (loss)$22,162 $(12,196)
Adjustments to reconcile net earnings (loss) to net cash flows from operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization50,108 49,422 
Deferred income tax expense (benefit)2,910 (2,141)
(Gains) losses on investment securities(967)32,849 
Allowance for equity funds used during construction(2,135)(1,044)
Other, net911 811 
Changes in certain assets and liabilities:
Accounts receivable and unbilled revenues17,491 11,927 
Materials, supplies, and fuel stock4,341 4,340 
Other current assets(21,763)(393)
Other assets5,780 4,612 
Accounts payable(934)(260)
Accrued interest and taxes14,729 5,917 
Other current liabilities(1,911)746 
Other liabilities(13,196)(12,588)
Net cash flows from operating activities77,526 82,002 
Cash Flows From Investing Activities:
Utility plant additions(88,198)(70,586)
Proceeds from sales of investment securities123,596 149,355 
Purchases of investment securities(126,485)(152,108)
Other, net97 122 
Net cash flows used in investing activities(90,990)(73,217)

The accompanying notes, as they relate to PNM, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

17

PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
A WHOLLY-OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF PNM RESOURCES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)

Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Cash Flows From Financing Activities:
Revolving credit facilities borrowings (repayments), net$(10,000)$2,000 
Dividends paid(132)(132)
Valencia’s transactions with its owner(5,243)(6,434)
Transmission interconnection and security deposit arrangements3,810 370 
Refunds paid under transmission interconnection arrangements(584)(1,744)
Debt issuance costs and other, net87 (81)
Net cash flows from financing activities(12,062)(6,021)
Change in Cash, Restricted Cash, and Equivalents(25,526)2,764 
Cash, Restricted Cash, and Equivalents at Beginning of Period31,446 1,001 
Cash, Restricted Cash, and Equivalents at End of Period$5,920 $3,765 
Supplemental Cash Flow Disclosures:
Interest paid, net of amounts capitalized$7,568 $9,397 
Income taxes paid (refunded), net$$
Supplemental schedule of noncash investing activities:
(Increase) decrease in accrued plant additions$30,828 $(2,366)

The accompanying notes, as they relate to PNM, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

18

PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
A WHOLLY-OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF PNM RESOURCES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Unaudited)
March 31,
2021
December 31,
2020
(In thousands)
ASSETS
Current Assets:
Cash and cash equivalents$5,920 $31,446 
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for credit losses of $9,918 and $8,33375,607 88,239 
Unbilled revenues33,927 43,724 
Other receivables16,160 21,814 
Affiliate receivables8,983 8,819 
Materials, supplies, and fuel stock56,132 60,472 
Regulatory assets29,133 
Income taxes receivable15,782 15,706 
Other current assets50,441 51,908 
Total current assets292,085 322,128 
Other Property and Investments:
Investment securities437,028 440,115 
Other investments22 120 
Non-utility property, net9,661 9,505 
Total other property and investments446,711 449,740 
Utility Plant:
Plant in service, held for future use, and to be abandoned6,057,687 6,022,753 
Less accumulated depreciation and amortization2,189,978 2,158,915 
3,867,709 3,863,838 
Construction work in progress165,809 148,962 
Nuclear fuel, net of accumulated amortization of $47,253 and $41,36798,502 100,801 
Net utility plant4,132,020 4,113,601 
Deferred Charges and Other Assets:
Regulatory assets456,374 457,953 
Goodwill51,632 51,632 
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net of accumulated amortization91,652 97,461 
Other deferred charges90,672 88,518 
Total deferred charges and other assets690,330 695,564 
$5,561,146 $5,581,033 

The accompanying notes, as they relate to PNM, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

19

PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
A WHOLLY-OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF PNM RESOURCES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Unaudited)
March 31,
2021
December 31,
2020
(In thousands, except share information)
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDER’S EQUITY
Current Liabilities:
Short-term debt$$10,000 
Current installments of long-term debt345,701 345,570 
Accounts payable89,288 121,050 
Affiliate payables8,475 14,058 
Customer deposits4,877 6,606 
Accrued interest and taxes47,434 32,630 
Regulatory liabilities4,734 5,419 
Operating lease liabilities25,868 25,130 
Dividends declared132 132 
Other current liabilities36,410 33,737 
Total current liabilities562,919 594,332 
Long-term Debt, net of Unamortized Premiums, Discounts, and Debt Issuance Costs1,351,494 1,351,050 
Deferred Credits and Other Liabilities:
Accumulated deferred income taxes586,266 579,150 
Regulatory liabilities663,429 664,873 
Asset retirement obligations184,982 182,718 
Accrued pension liability and postretirement benefit cost52,826 56,273 
Operating lease liabilities66,657 75,941 
Other deferred credits204,128 201,415 
Total deferred credits and liabilities1,758,288 1,760,370 
Total liabilities3,672,701 3,705,752 
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 11)00
Cumulative Preferred Stock
without mandatory redemption requirements ($100 stated value; 10,000,000 shares authorized; issued and outstanding 115,293 shares)11,529 11,529 
Equity:
PNM common stockholder’s equity:
Common stock (0 par value; 40,000,000 shares authorized; issued and outstanding 39,117,799 shares)1,494,918 1,494,918 
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss), net of income taxes(82,134)(78,511)
Retained earnings406,872 388,336 
Total PNM common stockholder’s equity1,819,656 1,804,743 
Non-controlling interest in Valencia57,260 59,009 
Total equity1,876,916 1,863,752 
$5,561,146 $5,581,033 

The accompanying notes, as they relate to PNM, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
20

PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
A WHOLLY-OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF PNM RESOURCES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
(Unaudited)
Attributable to PNM
Total PNM
Common
Stockholder’s
Equity
Non-
controlling
 Interest in Valencia
Common
Stock
AOCIRetained
Earnings
Total
Equity
(In thousands)
Balance at December 31, 2020$1,494,918 $(78,511)$388,336 $1,804,743 $59,009 $1,863,752 
Net earnings— — 18,668 18,668 3,494 22,162 
Total other comprehensive income (loss)— (3,623)— (3,623)— (3,623)
Dividends declared on preferred stock— — (132)(132)— (132)
Valencia’s transactions with its owner— — — — (5,243)(5,243)
Balance at March 31, 2021$1,494,918 $(82,134)$406,872 $1,819,656 $57,260 $1,876,916 

Balance at December 31, 2019$1,264,918 $(99,055)$283,516 $1,449,379 $63,052 $1,512,431 
Net earnings (loss)— — (15,925)(15,925)3,729 (12,196)
Total other comprehensive income (loss)— (2,531)— (2,531)— (2,531)
Dividends declared on preferred stock— — (132)(132)— (132)
Dividends declared on common stock— — (40,654)(40,654)— (40,654)
Valencia’s transactions with its owner— — — — (6,434)(6,434)
Balance at March 31, 2020$1,264,918 $(101,586)$226,805 $1,390,137 $60,347 $1,450,484 


The accompanying notes, as they relate to PNM, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
21


TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
A WHOLLY-OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF PNM RESOURCES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EARNINGS
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Electric Operating Revenues:
Contracts with customers$95,379 $87,224 
Alternative revenue programs(1,885)(1,735)
Total electric operating revenues93,494 85,489 
Operating Expenses:
Cost of energy26,510 24,186 
Administrative and general12,230 10,773 
Depreciation and amortization22,190 21,836 
Transmission and distribution costs6,658 6,371 
Taxes other than income taxes8,881 7,978 
Total operating expenses76,469 71,144 
Operating income17,025 14,345 
Other Income and Deductions:
Other income1,386 670 
Other (deductions)(324)(109)
Net other income and deductions1,062 561 
Interest Charges8,475 7,172 
Earnings before Income Taxes9,612 7,734 
Income Taxes877 642 
Net Earnings$8,735 $7,092 

The accompanying notes, as they relate to TNMP, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.


22

TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
A WHOLLY-OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF PNM RESOURCES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Cash Flows From Operating Activities:
Net earnings$8,735 $7,092 
Adjustments to reconcile net earnings to net cash flows from operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization22,428 22,117 
Deferred income tax expense (benefit)(1,471)(2,090)
Other, net(477)(141)
Changes in certain assets and liabilities:
Accounts receivable and unbilled revenues(286)2,099 
Materials and supplies(36)(534)
Other current assets1,231 939 
Other assets1,322 2,310 
Accounts payable(3,182)(1,828)
Accrued interest and taxes(9,911)(11,376)
Other current liabilities(373)(2,681)
Other liabilities(1,310)(700)
Net cash flows from operating activities16,670 15,207 
Cash Flows From Investing Activities:
Utility plant additions(76,149)(60,419)
Net cash flows used in investing activities(76,149)(60,419)
Cash Flows From Financing Activities:
Revolving credit facilities borrowings (repayments), net43,100 55,000 
Transmission interconnection arrangements1,650 
Debt issuance costs and other, net(71)(53)
Net cash flows from financing activities44,679 54,947 
Change in Cash and Cash Equivalents(14,800)9,735 
Cash and Cash Equivalents at Beginning of Period14,800 1,000 
Cash and Cash Equivalents at End of Period$$10,735 
Supplemental Cash Flow Disclosures:
Interest paid, net of amounts capitalized$9,229 $8,452 
Income taxes paid (refunded), net$$(131)
Supplemental schedule of noncash investing activities:
(Increase) decrease in accrued plant additions$13,465 $2,839 

The accompanying notes, as they relate to TNMP, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
23

TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
A WHOLLY-OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF PNM RESOURCES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Unaudited)
March 31,
2021
December 31,
2020
(In thousands)
ASSETS
Current Assets:
Cash and cash equivalents$$14,800 
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for credit losses of $1,356 and 026,855 25,171 
Unbilled revenues9,026 11,780 
Other receivables3,610 3,703 
Affiliate receivables64 
Materials and supplies5,981 5,945 
Regulatory assets202 
Other current assets897 1,738 
Total current assets46,433 63,339 
Other Property and Investments:
Other investments164 164 
Non-utility property, net12,942 13,298 
Total other property and investments13,106 13,462 
Utility Plant:
Plant in service and plant held for future use2,208,601 2,193,270 
Less accumulated depreciation and amortization548,896 537,707 
1,659,705 1,655,563 
Construction work in progress107,000 61,359 
Net utility plant1,766,705 1,716,922 
Deferred Charges and Other Assets:
Regulatory assets98,776 99,837 
Goodwill226,665 226,665 
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net of accumulated amortization6,937 7,206 
Other deferred charges4,628 5,149 
Total deferred charges and other assets337,006 338,857 
$2,163,250 $2,132,580 

The accompanying notes, as they relate to TNMP, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
24

TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
A WHOLLY-OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF PNM RESOURCES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Unaudited)
March 31,
2021
December 31,
2020
(In thousands, except share information)
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDER’S EQUITY
Current Liabilities:
Short-term debt$43,100 $
Accounts payable16,973 33,620 
Affiliate payables3,460 5,883 
Accrued interest and taxes31,626 41,538 
Regulatory liabilities2,156 2,052 
 Operating lease liabilities2,185 2,193 
Other current liabilities6,051 4,486 
Total current liabilities105,551 89,772 
Long-term Debt, net of Unamortized Premiums, Discounts, and Debt Issuance Costs853,639 853,673 
Deferred Credits and Other Liabilities:
Accumulated deferred income taxes145,582 145,369 
Regulatory liabilities191,319 185,355 
Asset retirement obligations718 703 
Accrued pension liability and postretirement benefit cost1,448 1,828 
Operating lease liabilities4,515 4,779 
Other deferred credits26,065 25,423 
Total deferred credits and other liabilities369,647 363,457 
Total liabilities1,328,837 1,306,902 
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 11)00
Common Stockholder’s Equity:
Common stock ($10 par value; 12,000,000 shares authorized; issued and outstanding 6,358 shares)64 64 
Paid-in-capital685,166 685,166 
Retained earnings149,183 140,448 
Total common stockholder’s equity834,413 825,678 
$2,163,250 $2,132,580 

The accompanying notes, as they relate to TNMP, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

25

TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
A WHOLLY-OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF PNM RESOURCES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN COMMON STOCKHOLDER’S EQUITY
(Unaudited)

Common StockPaid-in CapitalRetained EarningsTotal Common Stockholder’s Equity
(In thousands)
Balance at December 31, 2020$64 $685,166 $140,448 $825,678 
Net earnings— — 8,735 8,735 
Balance at March 31, 2021$64 $685,166 $149,183 $834,413 

Balance at December 31, 2019$64 $614,166 $140,397 $754,627 
Net earnings— — 7,092 7,092 
Dividends declared on common stock— — (11,347)(11,347)
Balance at March 31, 2020$64 $614,166 $136,142 $750,372 


The accompanying notes, as they relate to TNMP, are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
26


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


(1)    Significant Accounting Policies and Responsibility for Financial Statements

Financial Statement Preparation

In the opinion of management, the accompanying unaudited interim Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements reflect all normal and recurring accruals and adjustments that are necessary to present fairly the consolidated financial position at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, and the consolidated results of operations, comprehensive income, and cash flows for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could ultimately differ from those estimated. Weather causes the Company’s results of operations to be seasonal in nature and the results of operations presented in the accompanying Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements are not necessarily representative of operations for an entire year.

The Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements include disclosures for PNMR, PNM, and TNMP. This report uses the term “Company” when discussing matters of common applicability to PNMR, PNM, and TNMP. Discussions regarding only PNMR, PNM, or TNMP are so indicated. Certain amounts in the 2020 Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto have been reclassified to conform to the 2021 financial statement presentation.

These Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements are unaudited. Certain information and note disclosures normally included in the annual audited Consolidated Financial Statements have been condensed or omitted, as permitted under the applicable rules and regulations. Readers of these financial statements should refer to PNMR’s, PNM’s, and TNMP’s audited Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto that are included in their respective 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

GAAP defines subsequent events as events or transactions that occur after the balance sheet date but before financial statements are issued or are available to be issued. Based on their nature, magnitude, and timing, certain subsequent events may be required to be reflected at the balance sheet date and/or required to be disclosed in the financial statements. The Company has evaluated subsequent events accordingly.

Principles of Consolidation

The Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements of each of PNMR, PNM, and TNMP include their accounts and those of subsidiaries in which that entity owns a majority voting interest. PNM also consolidates Valencia. See Note 6. PNM owns undivided interests in several jointly-owned power plants and records its pro-rata share of the assets, liabilities, and expenses for those plants. The agreements for the jointly-owned plants provide that if an owner were to default on its payment obligations, the non-defaulting owners would be responsible for their proportionate share of the obligations of the defaulting owner. In exchange, the non-defaulting owners would be entitled to their proportionate share of the generating capacity of the defaulting owner. There have been 0 such payment defaults under any of the agreements for the jointly-owned plants.

PNMR Services Company expenses, which represent costs that are primarily driven by corporate level activities, are charged to the business segments. These services are billed at cost and are reflected as general and administrative expenses in the business segments. Other significant intercompany transactions between PNMR, PNM, and TNMP include interest and income tax sharing payments, as well as equity transactions, and interconnection billings. See Note 15. All intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated.

Dividends on Common Stock

Dividends on PNMR’s common stock are declared by the Board. The timing of the declaration of dividends is dependent on the timing of meetings and other actions of the Board. The Board declared dividends on common stock of $0.3275 per share in March 2021 and $0.3075 per share in February 2020, which are reflected as "Dividends Declared per Common Share" on the PNMR Condensed Consolidated Statements of Earnings.

PNM declared cash dividends on its common stock to PNMR of $40.7 million in the three months ended March 31, 2020 that were subsequently paid on April 6, 2020. TNMP declared cash dividends on its common stock to PNMR of $11.3 million in the three months ended March 31, 2020 that were subsequently paid on April 1, 2020. Neither PNM nor TNMP declared or paid any cash dividends in the three months ended March 31, 2021.


27


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

(2)     Segment Information

The following segment presentation is based on the methodology that management uses for making operating decisions and assessing performance of its various business activities. A reconciliation of the segment presentation to the GAAP financial statements is provided.

PNM

PNM includes the retail electric utility operations of PNM that are subject to traditional rate regulation by the NMPRC. PNM provides integrated electricity services that include the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity for retail electric customers in New Mexico. PNM also includes the generation and sale of electricity into the wholesale market, as well as providing transmission services to third parties. The sale of electricity includes the asset optimization of PNM’s jurisdictional capacity, as well as the capacity excluded from retail rates. FERC has jurisdiction over wholesale power and transmission rates.

TNMP

TNMP is an electric utility providing services in Texas under the TECA. TNMP’s operations are subject to traditional rate regulation by the PUCT. TNMP provides transmission and distribution services at regulated rates to various REPs that, in turn, provide retail electric service to consumers within TNMP’s service area. TNMP also provides transmission services at regulated rates to other utilities that interconnect with TNMP’s facilities.

Corporate and Other

The Corporate and Other segment includes PNMR holding company activities, primarily related to corporate level debt and PNMR Services Company. The activities of PNMR Development, NM Capital, and the equity method investment in NMRD are also included in Corporate and Other. Eliminations of intercompany transactions are reflected in the Corporate and Other segment.

The following tables present summarized financial information for PNMR by segment. PNM and TNMP each operate in only 1 segment. Therefore, tabular segment information is not presented for PNM and TNMP.

PNMR SEGMENT INFORMATION
PNMTNMPCorporate
and Other
PNMR Consolidated
(In thousands)
Three Months Ended March 31, 2021
Electric operating revenues$271,213 $93,494 $$364,707 
Cost of energy88,886 26,510 115,396 
Utility margin182,327 66,984 249,311 
Other operating expenses107,328 27,769 1,174 136,271 
Depreciation and amortization41,949 22,190 5,735 69,874 
Operating income (loss)33,050 17,025 (6,909)43,166 
Interest income3,595 (36)3,559 
Other income1,244 1,062 (376)1,930 
Interest charges(12,893)(8,475)(4,516)(25,884)
Segment earnings (loss) before income taxes24,996 9,612 (11,837)22,771 
Income taxes (benefit)2,834 877 (2,145)1,566 
Segment earnings (loss)22,162 8,735 (9,692)21,205 
Valencia non-controlling interest(3,494)(3,494)
Subsidiary preferred stock dividends(132)(132)
Segment earnings (loss) attributable to PNMR$18,536 $8,735 $(9,692)$17,579 
At March 31, 2021:
Total Assets$5,561,146 $2,163,250 $218,913 $7,943,309 
Goodwill$51,632 $226,665 $$278,297 
28


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


PNMTNMPCorporate
and Other
PNMR Consolidated
(In thousands)
Three Months Ended March 31, 2020
Electric operating revenues$248,133 $85,489 $$333,622 
Cost of energy74,524 24,186 98,710 
Utility margin173,609 61,303 234,912 
Other operating expenses98,555 25,122 (5,476)118,201 
Depreciation and amortization41,449 21,836 5,688 68,973 
Operating income (loss)33,605 14,345 (212)47,738 
Interest income3,496 (73)3,423 
Other income (deductions)(34,027)561 (540)(34,006)
Interest charges(17,629)(7,172)(5,633)(30,434)
Segment earnings (loss) before income taxes(14,555)7,734 (6,458)(13,279)
Income taxes (benefit)(2,359)642 (163)(1,880)
Segment earnings (loss)(12,196)7,092 (6,295)(11,399)
Valencia non-controlling interest(3,729)(3,729)
Subsidiary preferred stock dividends(132)(132)
Segment earnings (loss) attributable to PNMR$(16,057)$7,092 $(6,295)$(15,260)
At March 31, 2020:
Total Assets$5,260,528 $1,913,270 $201,321 $7,375,119 
Goodwill$51,632 $226,665 $$278,297 

The Company defines utility margin as electric operating revenues less cost of energy. Cost of energy consists primarily of fuel and purchase power costs for PNM and costs charged by third-party transmission providers for TNMP. The Company believes that utility margin provides a more meaningful basis for evaluating operations than electric operating revenues since substantially all such costs are offset in revenues as fuel and purchase power costs are passed through to customers under PNM’s FPPAC and third-party transmission costs are passed on to customers through TNMP’s transmission cost recovery factor. Utility margin is not a financial measure required to be presented and is considered a non-GAAP measure.


29


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

(3)   Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)

Information regarding accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 is as follows:
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
PNMCorporate and OtherPNMR Consolidated
Unrealized
Gains on
Available-for-Sale Debt
Securities
Pension
Liability
Adjustment
Fair Value
Adjustment
for Cash
Flow Hedges
TotalTotal
(In thousands)
Balance at December 31, 2020$20,403 $(98,914)$(78,511)$(672)$(79,183)
Amounts reclassified from AOCI (pre-tax)(3,618)2,087 (1,531)(624)(2,155)
Income tax impact of amounts reclassified919 (530)389 158 547 
Other OCI changes (pre-tax)(3,326)— (3,326)1,247 (2,079)
Income tax impact of other OCI changes845 — 845 (317)528 
Net after-tax change(5,180)1,557 (3,623)464 (3,159)
Balance at March 31, 2021$15,223 $(97,357)$(82,134)$(208)$(82,342)

Balance at December 31, 2019$10,638 $(109,693)$(99,055)$(322)$(99,377)
 Amounts reclassified from AOCI (pre-tax)(1,185)2,075 890 (38)852 
Income tax impact of amounts reclassified301 (527)(226)10 (216)
 Other OCI changes (pre-tax)(4,283)— (4,283)(1,998)(6,281)
Income tax impact of other OCI changes1,088 — 1,088 507 1,595 
Net after-tax change(4,079)1,548 (2,531)(1,519)(4,050)
Balance at March 31, 2020$6,559 $(108,145)$(101,586)$(1,841)$(103,427)

The Condensed Consolidated Statements of Earnings include pre-tax amounts reclassified from AOCI related to Unrealized Gains on Available-for-Sale Debt Securities in gains (losses) on investment securities, related to Pension Liability Adjustment in other (deductions), and related to Fair Value Adjustment for Cash Flow Hedges in interest charges. The income tax impacts of all amounts reclassified from AOCI are included in income taxes in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Earnings.


30


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

(4)    Earnings Per Share

Dual presentation of basic and diluted earnings per share is presented in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Earnings of PNMR. PNMR’s potentially dilutive shares consist of restricted stock and PNMR common stock issuable in 2020 under the PNMR 2020 Forward Equity Sale Agreements, which are calculated under the treasury stock method. See Note 7 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

Information regarding the computation of earnings per share is as follows:

Three Months Ended
March 31,
20212020
(In thousands, except per share amounts)
Net Earnings (Loss) Attributable to PNMR$17,579 $(15,260)
Average Number of Common Shares:
Outstanding during period85,835 79,654 
    Vested awards of restricted stock
196 217 
Average Shares – Basic86,031 79,871 
Dilutive Effect of Common Stock Equivalents:
Restricted stock24 
Average Shares – Diluted86,055 79,871 
Net Earnings (Loss) Per Share of Common Stock:
Basic$0.20 $(0.19)
Diluted$0.20 $(0.19)
(1) No potentially dilutive restricted stock or PNMR common stock under the PNMR 2020 Forward Equity Sale Agreements have been included in the computation of Average Shares – Diluted for the three months ended March 31, 2020 since the effect would be anti-dilutive.

(5)   Electric Operating Revenues

PNMR is an investor-owned holding company with 2 regulated utilities providing electricity and electric services in New Mexico and Texas. PNMR’s electric utilities are PNM and TNMP.

Additional information concerning electric operating revenue is contained in Note 4 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

Accounts Receivable and Allowance for Credit Losses

Accounts receivable consists primarily of trade receivables from customers. In the normal course of business, credit is extended to customers on a short-term basis. The Company estimates the allowance for credit losses on trade receivables based on historical experience and estimated default rates. Accounts receivable balances are reviewed monthly, adjustments to the allowance for credit losses are made as necessary, and amounts that are deemed uncollectible are written off. As a result of the economic conditions resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, PNM updated its allowance for accounts receivable balances and recorded incremental credit losses of $1.6 million and $0.3 million in the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020. The NMPRC issued an order authorizing all public utilities to create a regulatory asset to defer incremental costs related to COVID-19, including increases in uncollectible accounts. See discussion regarding regulatory treatment in Note 12.

In February 2021, Texas experienced a severe winter storm delivering the coldest temperatures in 100 years for many parts of the state. As a result, the ERCOT market was not able to deliver sufficient generation load to the grid resulting in significant, statewide outages as ERCOT directed transmission operators to curtail thousands of firm load megawatts. TNMP complied with ERCOT directives to curtail delivery of electricity in its service territory and did not experience significant outages on its system outside of the ERCOT directed curtailments. During the weather event, generators experienced an
31


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

extreme spike in market driven fuel prices and in turn charged REPs excessive market driven power prices which eventually get passed to end users on their electricity bill. Given the uncertainty of the collectability of end users bills by REP’s, ERCOT also increased the collateral required by REPs in order to do business within ERCOT's Balancing Authority. In response to the uncertainty, TNMP has performed an analysis of its accounts receivable balances and has recorded an allowance for credit losses of $1.4 million as of March 31, 2021. TNMP has regulatory authorization to defer bad debt expense (credit losses) from defaulting REPs to a regulatory asset and seek recovery in a general rate case.

Disaggregation of Revenues

A disaggregation of revenues from contracts with customers by the type of customer is presented in the table below. The table also reflects alternative revenue program revenues ("ARP") and other revenues.
PNMTNMPPNMR Consolidated
Three Months Ended March 31, 2021(In thousands)
Electric Operating Revenues:
Contracts with customers:
Retail electric revenue
Residential$114,669 $35,094 $149,763 
Commercial81,934 29,429 111,363 
Industrial18,900 7,293 26,193 
Public authority4,587 1,482 6,069 
Economy energy service10,581 10,581 
Transmission17,503 21,121 38,624 
Miscellaneous3,032 960 3,992 
Total revenues from contracts with customers251,206 95,379 346,585 
Alternative revenue programs976 (1,885)(909)
Other electric operating revenues19,031 19,031 
Total Electric Operating Revenues$271,213 $93,494 $364,707 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2020
Electric Operating Revenues:
Contracts with customers:
Retail electric revenue
Residential$102,809 $31,898 $134,707 
Commercial86,349 28,685 115,034 
Industrial19,466 6,533 25,999 
Public authority4,347 1,423 5,770 
Economy energy service5,253 5,253 
Transmission14,167 18,012 32,179 
Miscellaneous3,368 673 4,041 
Total revenues from contracts with customers235,759 87,224 322,983 
Alternative revenue programs2,161 (1,735)426 
Other electric operating revenues10,213 10,213 
Total Electric Operating Revenues$248,133 $85,489 $333,622 

Contract Balances

Performance obligations related to contracts with customers are typically satisfied when the energy is delivered and the customer or end-user utilizes the energy. Accounts receivable from customers represent amounts billed, including amounts under ARPs. For PNM, accounts receivable reflected on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets, net of allowance for credit losses, includes $73.2 million at March 31, 2021 and $86.2 million at December 31, 2020 resulting from contracts with customers. All of TNMP’s accounts receivable results from contracts with customers.

32


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

Contract assets are an entity’s right to consideration in exchange for goods or services that the entity has transferred to a customer when that right is conditioned on something other than the passage of time (for example, the entity’s future performance). The Company had 0 contract assets as of March 31, 2021 or December 31, 2020. Contract liabilities arise when consideration is received in advance from a customer before satisfying the performance obligations. Therefore, revenue is deferred and not recognized until the obligation is satisfied. Under its OATT, PNM accepts upfront consideration for capacity reservations requested by transmission customers, which requires PNM to defer the customer’s transmission capacity rights for a specific period of time. PNM recognizes the revenue of these capacity reservations over the period it defers the customer's capacity rights. Other utilities pay PNM and TNMP in advance for the joint-use of their utility poles. These revenues are recognized over the period of time specified in the joint-use contract, typically for one calendar year. Deferred revenues on these arrangements are recorded as contract liabilities. PNMR's, PNM's, and TNMP's contract liabilities and related revenues are insignificant for all periods presented. The Company has no other arrangements with remaining performance obligations to which a portion of the transaction price would be required to be allocated.

(6)     Variable Interest Entities

How an enterprise evaluates and accounts for its involvement with variable interest entities, focuses primarily on whether the enterprise has the power to direct the activities that most significantly impact the economic performance of a variable interest entity (“VIE”). This evaluation requires continual reassessment of the primary beneficiary of a VIE. Additional information concerning PNM’s VIEs is contained in Note 10 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

Valencia

PNM has a PPA to purchase all of the electric capacity and energy from Valencia, a 155 MW natural gas-fired power plant near Belen, New Mexico, through May 2028. A third party built, owns, and operates the facility while PNM is the sole purchaser of the electricity generated. PNM is obligated to pay fixed operation and maintenance and capacity charges in addition to variable operation and maintenance charges under this PPA. For the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, PNM paid $4.9 million and $5.0 million for fixed charges and $0.2 million and $0.4 million for variable charges. PNM does not have any other financial obligations related to Valencia. The assets of Valencia can only be used to satisfy its obligations and creditors of Valencia do not have any recourse against PNM’s assets. During the term of the PPA, PNM has the option, under certain conditions, to purchase and own up to 50% of the plant or the VIE. The PPA specifies that the purchase price would be the greater of 50% of book value reduced by related indebtedness or 50% of fair market value.

PNM sources fuel for the plant, controls when the facility operates through its dispatch, and receives the entire output of the plant, which factors directly and significantly impact the economic performance of Valencia. Therefore, PNM has concluded that the third-party entity that owns Valencia is a VIE and that PNM is the primary beneficiary of the entity since PNM has the power to direct the activities that most significantly impact the economic performance of Valencia and will absorb the majority of the variability in the cash flows of the plant. As the primary beneficiary, PNM consolidates Valencia in its financial statements. Accordingly, the assets, liabilities, operating expenses, and cash flows of Valencia are included in the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements of PNM although PNM has no legal ownership interest or voting control of the VIE. The assets and liabilities of Valencia set forth below are immaterial to PNM and, therefore, not shown separately on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. The owner’s equity and net income of Valencia are considered attributable to non-controlling interest.

Summarized financial information for Valencia is as follows:
Results of Operations
Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Operating revenues$5,127 $5,353 
Operating expenses1,633 1,624 
Earnings attributable to non-controlling interest$3,494 $3,729 

33


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

Financial Position
March 31,December 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Current assets$3,282 $3,911 
Net property, plant, and equipment55,035 55,744 
Total assets58,317 59,655 
Current liabilities1,057 646 
Owners’ equity – non-controlling interest$57,260 $59,009 

Westmoreland San Juan Mining, LLC

As discussed in the subheading Coal Supply in Note 11, PNM purchases coal for SJGS under the SJGS CSA. On October 9, 2018, Westmoreland filed a Current Report on Form 8-K with the SEC announcing it had filed voluntary petitions for relief under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. On March 15, 2019, Westmoreland emerged from Chapter 11 bankruptcy as a privately held company owned and operated by a group of its former creditors. Under the reorganization, the assets of SJCC were sold to Westmoreland San Juan Mining, LLC (“WSJ LLC”), a subsidiary of Westmoreland Mining Holdings, LLC. As successor entity to SJCC, WSJ LLC assumed all rights and obligations of SJCC including obligations to PNM under the SJGS CSA and to PNMR under letter of credit support agreements.

PNMR issued $30.3 million in letters of credit to facilitate the issuance of reclamation bonds required in order for SJCC to mine coal to be supplied to SJGS. As discussed above, WSJ LLC assumed the rights and obligations of SJCC, including obligations to PNMR for the letters of credit. The letters of credit support results in PNMR having a variable interest in WSJ LLC since PNMR is subject to possible loss in the event performance by PNMR is required under the letters of credit support. PNMR considers the possibility of loss under the letters of credit support to be remote since the purpose of posting the bonds is to provide assurance that WSJ LLC performs the required reclamation of the mine site in accordance with applicable regulations and all reclamation costs are reimbursable under the SJGS CSA. Also, much of the mine reclamation activities will not be performed until after the expiration of the SJGS CSA. In addition, each of the SJGS participants has established and actively fund trusts to meet future reclamation obligations.
WSJ LLC is considered a VIE.  PNMR’s analysis of its arrangements with WSJ LLC concluded that WSJ LLC has the ability to direct its mining operations, which is the factor that most significantly impacts the economic performance of WSJ LLC.  Other than PNM being able to ensure that coal is supplied in adequate quantities and of sufficient quality to provide the fuel necessary to operate SJGS in a normal manner, the mining operations are solely under the control of WSJ LLC, including developing mining plans, hiring of personnel, and incurring operating and maintenance expenses. Neither PNMR nor PNM has any ability to direct or influence the mining operation.  PNM’s involvement through the SJGS CSA is a protective right rather than a participating right and WSJ LLC has the power to direct the activities that most significantly impact the economic performance of WSJ LLC.  The SJGS CSA requires WSJ LLC to deliver coal required to fuel SJGS in exchange for payment of a set price per ton, which is escalated over time for inflation.  If WSJ LLC is able to mine more efficiently than anticipated, its economic performance will be improved.  Conversely, if WSJ LLC cannot mine as efficiently as anticipated, its economic performance will be negatively impacted.  Accordingly, PNMR believes WSJ LLC is the primary beneficiary and, therefore, WSJ LLC is not consolidated by either PNMR or PNM. The amounts outstanding under the letters of credit support constitute PNMR’s maximum exposure to loss from the VIE at March 31, 2021.

(7)    Fair Value of Derivative and Other Financial Instruments

Additional information concerning energy related derivative contracts and other financial instruments is contained in Note 9 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. Fair value is based on current market quotes as available and is supplemented by modeling techniques and assumptions made by the Company to the extent quoted market prices or volatilities are not available. External pricing input availability varies based on commodity location, market liquidity, and term of the agreement. Valuations of derivative assets and liabilities take into account nonperformance risk, including the effect of counterparties’ and the Company’s credit risk. The Company regularly assesses the validity and availability of pricing data for its derivative transactions. Although the Company
34


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

uses its best judgment in estimating the fair value of these instruments, there are inherent limitations in any estimation technique.

Energy Related Derivative Contracts
Overview

The primary objective for the use of commodity derivative instruments, including energy contracts, options, swaps, and futures, is to manage price risk associated with forecasted purchases of energy and fuel used to generate electricity, as well as managing anticipated generation capacity in excess of forecasted demand from existing customers. PNM’s energy related derivative contracts manage commodity risk. PNM is required to meet the demand and energy needs of its customers. PNM is exposed to market risk for the needs of its customers not covered under the FPPAC.

Beginning January 1, 2018, PNM is exposed to market risk for its 65 MW interest in SJGS Unit 4, which is held as merchant plant as ordered by the NMPRC. PNM has entered into agreements to sell power from 36 MW of that capacity to a third party at a fixed price for the period January 1, 2018 through May 31, 2022, subject to certain conditions. Under these agreements, PNM is obligated to deliver 36 MW of power only when SJGS Unit 4 is operating.  These agreements are not considered derivatives because there is no notional amount due to the unit-contingent nature of the transactions.

PNM and Tri-State have a hazard sharing agreement that expires in May 2022. Under this agreement, each party sells the other party 100 MW of capacity and energy from a designated generation resource on a unit contingent basis, subject to certain performance guarantees.  Both the purchases and sales are made at the same market index price.  This agreement serves to reduce the magnitude of each party’s single largest generating hazard and assists in enhancing the reliability and efficiency of their respective operations. PNM passes the sales and purchases through to customers under PNM’s FPPAC.

PNM’s operations are managed primarily through a net asset-backed strategy, whereby PNM’s aggregate net open forward contract position is covered by its forecasted excess generation capabilities or market purchases. PNM could be exposed to market risk if its generation capabilities were to be disrupted or if its load requirements were to be greater than anticipated. If all or a portion of load requirements were required to be covered as a result of such unexpected situations, commitments would have to be met through market purchases. TNMP does not enter into energy related derivative contracts.

Commodity Risk

Marketing and procurement of energy often involve market risks associated with managing energy commodities and establishing positions in the energy markets, primarily on a short-term basis. PNM routinely enters into various derivative instruments such as forward contracts, option agreements, and price basis swap agreements to economically hedge price and volume risk on power commitments and fuel requirements and to minimize the effect of market fluctuations. PNM monitors the market risk of its commodity contracts in accordance with approved risk and credit policies.

Unusually cold weather in February 2021 resulted in higher than expected natural gas and purchased power costs. PNM mitigated the impacts from the cold weather by securing gas supplies in advance, engaging in market purchases when lower prices were available, and adjusting plant operation of its gas units to minimize reliance on higher-priced gas supplies. PNM estimates the impact of the cold weather conditions in 2021 resulted in approximately $20 million of additional natural gas costs and approximately $8 million in additional purchased power costs. These increases will be passed through to customers under the FPPAC over the remainder of 2021.

Accounting for Derivatives

Under derivative accounting and related rules for energy contracts, PNM accounts for its various instruments for the purchase and sale of energy, which meet the definition of a derivative, based on PNM’s intent. During the three months ended March 31, 2021 and the year ended December 31, 2020, PNM was not hedging its exposure to the variability in future cash flows from commodity derivatives through designated cash flows hedges. The derivative contracts recorded at fair value that do not qualify or are not designated for cash flow hedge accounting are classified as economic hedges. Economic hedges are defined as derivative instruments, including long-term power agreements, used to economically hedge generation assets, purchased power and fuel costs, and customer load requirements. Changes in the fair value of economic hedges are reflected in results of operations and are classified between operating revenues and cost of energy according to the intent of the hedge. PNM has no trading transactions.

35


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

Commodity Derivatives

PNM’s commodity derivative instruments that are recorded at fair value, all of which are accounted for as economic hedges and considered Level 2 fair value measurements, are presented in the following line items on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets:
Economic Hedges
March 31,
2021
December 31,
2020
(In thousands)
Other current assets$1,097 $1,096 
Other deferred charges183 455 
1,280 1,551 
Other current liabilities(1,097)(1,096)
Other deferred credits(183)(455)
(1,280)(1,551)
Net$$

PNM’s commodity derivative instruments in the above table are subject to master netting agreements whereby assets and liabilities could be offset in the settlement process. PNM does not offset fair value and cash collateral for derivative instruments under master netting arrangements and the above table reflects the gross amounts of fair value assets and liabilities for commodity derivatives. All of the assets and liabilities in the table above at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 result from PNM’s hazard sharing arrangements with Tri-State. The hazard sharing arrangements are net-settled upon delivery.

At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, PNM had 0 amounts recognized for the legal right to reclaim cash collateral. However, at both March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, amounts posted as cash collateral under margin arrangements were $0.5 million, which is included in other current assets on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. At both March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, obligations to return cash collateral were $0.9 million, which is included in other deferred credits on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

PNM has a NMPRC-approved hedging plan to manage fuel and purchased power costs related to customers covered by its FPPAC. There were 0 amounts hedged under this plan as of March 31, 2021 or December 31, 2020.
The effects of mark-to-market commodity derivative instruments on PNM’s revenues and cost of energy during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 were less than $0.1 million. Commodity derivatives had no impact on OCI for the periods presented.

PNM has 0 open energy or gas commodity volume positions at March 31, 2021 or December 31, 2020.

PNM has contingent requirements to provide collateral under commodity contracts having an objectively determinable collateral provision that are in net liability positions and are not fully collateralized with cash. In connection with managing its commodity risks, PNM enters into master agreements with certain counterparties. If PNM is in a net liability position under an agreement, some agreements provide that the counterparties can request collateral if PNM’s credit rating is downgraded; other agreements provide that the counterparty may request collateral to provide it with “adequate assurance” that PNM will perform; and others have no provision for collateral. At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, PNM had 0 such contracts in a net liability position.

Non-Derivative Financial Instruments

The carrying amounts reflected on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets approximate fair value for cash, receivables, and payables due to the short period of maturity. Investment securities are carried at fair value. Investment securities consist of PNM assets held in the NDT for its share of decommissioning costs of PVNGS and trusts for PNM’s share of final reclamation costs related to the coal mines serving SJGS and Four Corners. See Note 11. At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the fair value of investment securities included $376.8 million and $379.2 million for the NDT and $60.2 million and $60.9 million for the mine reclamation trusts.

36


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

PNM records a realized loss as an impairment for any available-for-sale debt security that has a fair value that is less than its carrying value. At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, PNM had 0 available-for-sale debt securities for which carrying value exceeds fair value and there are 0 impairments considered to be “other than temporary” that are included in AOCI and not recognized in earnings. All gains and losses resulting from sales and changes in the fair value of equity securities are recognized immediately in earnings. Gains and losses recognized on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Earnings related to investment securities in the NDT and reclamation trusts are presented in the following table:

Three Months Ended
March 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Equity securities:
Net gains (losses) from equity securities sold$2,022 $(1,315)
Net gains (losses) from equity securities still held(3,166)(18,931)
Total net gains (losses) on equity securities(1,144)(20,246)
Available-for-sale debt securities:
Net gains (losses) on debt securities2,112 (12,603)
Net gains (losses) on investment securities$968 $(32,849)

The proceeds and gross realized gains and losses on the disposition of securities held in the NDT and coal mine reclamation trusts are shown in the following table. Realized gains and losses are determined by specific identification of costs of securities sold. Gross realized losses shown below exclude the (increase)/decrease in realized impairment losses of $1.1 million and $(12.7) million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020.

Three Months Ended
March 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Proceeds from sales$123,596 $149,355 
Gross realized gains$8,692 $5,825 
Gross realized (losses)$(3,443)$(7,035)

At March 31, 2021, the available-for-sale debt securities held by PNM, had the following final maturities:

Fair Value
(In thousands)
Within 1 year$31,510 
After 1 year through 5 years71,643 
After 5 years through 10 years103,946 
After 10 years through 15 years18,105 
After 15 years through 20 years11,804 
After 20 years34,529 
$271,537 

Fair Value Disclosures

The Company determines the fair values of its derivative and other financial instruments based on the hierarchy which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. There are three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value. Level 1 inputs are quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the reporting entity has the ability to access at the measurement date. Level 2 inputs are inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

37


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

For investment securities, Level 2 and Level 3 fair values are provided by fund managers utilizing a pricing service. For Level 2 fair values, the pricing provider predominantly uses the market approach using bid side market values based upon a hierarchy of information for specific securities or securities with similar characteristics. Fair values of Level 2 investments in mutual funds are equal to net asset value. For commodity derivatives, Level 2 fair values are determined based on market observable inputs, which are validated using multiple broker quotes, including forward price, volatility, and interest rate curves to establish expectations of future prices. Credit valuation adjustments are made for estimated credit losses based on the overall exposure to each counterparty. For the Company’s long-term debt, Level 2 fair values are provided by an external pricing service. The pricing service primarily utilizes quoted prices for similar debt in active markets when determining fair value. The valuation of Level 3 investments, when applicable, requires significant judgment by the pricing provider due to the absence of quoted market values, changes in market conditions, and the long-term nature of the assets. The Company has no Level 3 investments as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. Management of the Company independently verifies the information provided by pricing services.

Items recorded at fair value by PNM on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets are presented below by level of the fair value hierarchy along with gross unrealized gains on investments in available-for-sale debt securities:
GAAP Fair Value Hierarchy
TotalQuoted Prices in Active Markets for Identical Assets (Level 1)Significant Other Observable Inputs (Level 2)Unrealized Gains
(In thousands)
March 31, 2021
Cash and cash equivalents$11,590 $11,590 $
Equity securities:
Corporate stocks, common86,527 86,527 
Corporate stocks, preferred9,835 3,456 6,379 
Mutual funds and other57,539 57,498 41 
Available-for-sale debt securities:
     U.S. government58,575 31,193 27,382 $388 
     International government15,380 15,380 1,641 
     Municipals47,188 47,188 2,080 
     Corporate and other150,394 150,394 16,334 
          $437,028 $190,264 $246,764 $20,443 
December 31, 2020
Cash and cash equivalents$6,107 $6,107 $
Equity securities:
Corporate stocks, common85,271 85,271 0
Corporate stocks, preferred9,910 3,608 6,302 0
Mutual funds and other58,817 58,762 55 0
Available-for-sale debt securities:
     U.S. government55,839 29,579 26,260 $950 
     International government16,032 16,032 2,537 
     Municipals50,139 50,139 2,779 
     Corporate and other158,000 157,997 21,121 
          $440,115 $183,330 $256,785 $27,387 


38


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

The carrying amounts and fair values of long-term debt, all of which are considered Level 2 fair value measurements and are not recorded at fair value on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets, are presented below:

Carrying AmountFair Value
March 31, 2021(In thousands)
PNMR$3,215,692 $3,157,858 
PNM$1,697,195 $1,561,816 
TNMP$853,639 $931,042 
December 31, 2020
PNMR$3,295,150 $3,355,761 
PNM$1,696,620 $1,602,547 
TNMP$853,673 $1,006,722 

The carrying amount and fair value of the Company’s other investments presented on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets are not material and not shown in the above table.

(8)    Stock-Based Compensation

PNMR has various stock-based compensation programs, including stock options, restricted stock, and performance shares granted under the Performance Equity Plan (“PEP”). Although certain PNM and TNMP employees participate in the PNMR plans, PNM and TNMP do not have separate employee stock-based compensation plans. The Company has 0t awarded stock options since 2010 and all employee stock options expired or were exercised as of February 2020. Certain restricted stock awards are subject to achieving performance or market targets. Other awards of restricted stock are only subject to time vesting requirements. Additional information concerning stock-based compensation under the PEP is contained in Note 12 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

Restricted stock under the PEP refers to awards of stock subject to vesting, performance, or market conditions rather than to shares with contractual post-vesting restrictions. Generally, the awards vest ratably over three years from the grant date of the award. However, awards with performance or market conditions vest upon satisfaction of those conditions. In addition, plan provisions provide that upon retirement, participants become 100% vested in certain stock awards. The vesting period for awards of restricted stock to non-employee members of the Board is one-year.

The stock-based compensation expense related to restricted stock awards without performance or market conditions to participants that are retirement eligible on the grant date is recognized immediately at the grant date and is not amortized. Compensation expense for other such awards is amortized over the shorter of the requisite vesting period or the period until the participant becomes retirement eligible. Compensation expense for performance-based shares is recognized ratably over the performance period as required service is provided and is adjusted periodically to reflect the level of achievement expected to be attained. Compensation expense related to market-based shares is recognized ratably over the measurement period, regardless of the actual level of achievement, provided the employees meet their service requirements. At March 31, 2021, PNMR had unrecognized expense related to stock awards of $6.7 million, which is expected to be recognized over an average of 2.1 years.

PNMR receives a tax deduction for certain stock option exercises during the period the options are exercised, generally for the excess of the price at which the options are sold over the exercise prices of the options, and a tax deduction for the value of restricted stock at the vesting date. All excess tax benefits and deficiencies are recorded to tax expense and classified as operating cash flows when used to reduce income taxes payable. See Note 14.

The grant date fair value for restricted stock and stock awards with internal Company performance targets is determined based on the market price of PNMR common stock on the date of the agreements reduced by the present value of future dividends that will not be received prior to vesting. The grant date fair value is applied to the total number of shares that are anticipated to vest, although the number of performance shares that ultimately vest cannot be determined until after the performance periods end. The grant date fair value of stock awards with market targets is determined using Monte Carlo simulation models, which provide grant date fair values that include an expectation of the number of shares to vest at the end of the measurement period.

39


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

The following table summarizes the weighted-average assumptions used to determine the awards grant date fair value:

Three Months Ended March 31,
Restricted Shares and Performance Based Shares20212020
Expected quarterly dividends per share$0.3275 $0.3075 
Risk-free interest rate0.32 %0.72 %
Market-Based Shares
Dividend yield2.76 %2.51 %
Expected volatility33.69 %19.41 %
Risk-free interest rate0.29 %0.72 %

The following table summarizes activity in restricted stock awards, including performance-based and market-based shares for the three months ended March 31, 2021:

Restricted Stock
SharesWeighted-
Average
Grant Date Fair Value
Outstanding at December 31, 2020168,061 $40.77 
Granted194,075 43.68 
Exercised(189,098)42.26 
Forfeited(851)43.77 
Outstanding at March 31, 2021172,187 $42.41 

PNMR’s current stock-based compensation program provides for performance and market targets through 2023. Included in the above table are 124,941 previously awarded shares that were earned for the 2018-2020 performance measurement period and ratified by the Board in February 2021 (based upon achieving market and performance targets at near "maximum" levels). Excluded from the table above are 142,080, 142,047 and 152,414 shares for the three-year performance periods ending in 2021, 2022 and 2023 that will be awarded if all performance and market criteria are achieved at maximum levels and all executives remain eligible.

The following table provides additional information concerning restricted stock activity, including performance-based and market-based shares, and stock options:
Three Months Ended March 31,
Restricted Stock20212020
Weighted-average grant date fair value$43.68 $36.88 
Total fair value of restricted shares that vested (in thousands)$8,967 $11,269 
Stock Options
Total intrinsic value of options exercised (in thousands)$$84 

(9)   Financing

The Company’s financing strategy includes both short-term and long-term borrowings. The Company utilizes short-term revolving credit facilities, as well as cash flows from operations, to provide funds for both construction and operating expenditures. Depending on market and other conditions, the Company will periodically sell long-term debt or enter into term loan arrangements and use the proceeds to reduce borrowings under the revolving credit facilities or refinance other debt. Each of the Company’s revolving credit facilities and term loans contains a single financial covenant that requires the maintenance of a debt-to-capitalization ratio. For the PNMR and PNMR Development agreements this ratio must be maintained at less than or
40


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

equal to 70%, and for the PNM and TNMP agreements this ratio must be maintained at less than or equal to 65%. The Company’s revolving credit facilities and term loans generally also contain customary covenants, events of default, cross-default provisions, and change-of-control provisions. PNM must obtain NMPRC approval for any financing transaction having a maturity of more than 18 months. In addition, PNM files its annual informational financing filing and short-term financing plan with the NMPRC. Additional information concerning financing activities is contained in Note 7 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

Financing Activities

In August 2020, PNMR entered into letter of credit arrangements with Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. (the "WFB LOC Facility") under which letters of credit aggregating $30.3 million were issued to facilitate the posting of reclamation bonds currently held by WSJ LLC (who assumed all the obligations of SJCC post-bankruptcy). The reclamation bonds were required to be posted in connection with permits relating to the operation of the San Juan mine.

On March 9, 2018, PNMR issued $300.0 million aggregate principal amount of 3.25% SUNs (the “PNMR 2018 SUNs”), which matured on March 9, 2021. The proceeds from the offering were used to repay the $150.0 million PNMR 2015 Term Loan that was due on March 9, 2018 and to reduce borrowings under the PNMR Revolving Credit Facility. On December 22, 2020, PNMR entered into the $300.0 million PNMR 2020 Delayed-Draw Term Loan that matures in January 2022 and drew $80.0 million to refinance existing indebtedness and for other corporate purposes. On March 9, 2021, PNMR utilized the remaining $220.0 million of capacity under the PNMR 2020 Delayed-Draw Term Loan to repay an equivalent amount of the PNMR 2018 SUNs. The remaining $80.0 million repayment of the PNMR 2018 SUNs was funded through borrowings under the PNMR Revolving Credit Facility.

On October 20, 2020, the execution of the Merger Agreement constituted a “Change of Control” under certain PNMR, TNMP and PNMR Development debt agreements. Under each of the specified debt agreements, a “Change of Control” constitutes an “Event of Default,” pursuant to which the lender parties thereto have the right to accelerate the indebtedness under the debt agreements. The definition of Change of Control under the PNM debt agreements and PNM note purchase agreements was not triggered by the execution of the Merger Agreement.

On October 26, 2020, PNMR, TNMP and PNMR Development entered into amendment agreements with the lender parties thereto to amend the definition of "Change of Control" such that the entry into the Merger Agreement would not constitute a Change of Control and to waive the Event of Default arising from entry into the Merger Agreement. The amended Change of Control definition under the PNMR, TNMP, and PNMR Development debt agreements will, however, be triggered again upon the closing of the Merger. Prior to the closing of the Merger, the Company intends to coordinate with the lenders and Avangrid to either amend the definition of Change of Control permitting Avangrid ownership of the Company; or to refinance or enter into new debt agreements that would include Avangrid as an owner of the Company. The Change of Control provisions in the PNM debt agreements and PNM note purchase agreements are not triggered by the close of the Merger.

The documents governing TNMP's aggregate $750.0 million of outstanding First Mortgage Bonds ("TNMP FMBs") obligated TNMP to offer, within 30 business days following the signing of the Merger Agreement, to prepay all $750.0 million outstanding TNMP FMBs at 100% of the principal amount, plus accrued and unpaid interest thereon, but without any make-whole amount or other premium. TNMP made such offer to prepay the TNMP FMBs in accordance with the terms of the TNMP FMBs, and none of the holders of the TNMP FMBs accepted TNMP’s offer. The documents governing the TNMP FMBs require TNMP to make another offer, within 30 business days of closing of the Merger, to prepay all outstanding TNMP FMBs at par. TNMP will make such offer to prepay the TNMP FMBs in accordance with the terms of the TNMP FMBs; however, holders of the TNMP FMBs are not required to tender their TNMP FMBs and may accept or reject such offer to prepay.

The information in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q is for informational purposes only and is neither an offer to purchase, nor a solicitation of an offer to sell, subscribe for or buy any securities in any jurisdiction pursuant to the proposed transactions or otherwise, nor shall there be any sale, issuance or transfer of securities in any jurisdiction in contravention of applicable law. Similar to the offer to prepay made after signing the Merger Agreement, the post-Merger closing offer to prepay the TNMP FMBs will be made only pursuant to an offer to prepay, which will set forth the terms and conditions of the offer to prepay.

At March 31, 2021, variable interest rates were 1.07% on the PNMR 2019 Term Loan that matures in June 2021, 1.21% on the PNMR 2020 Term Loan that matures in January 2022, 1.36% on the PNMR 2020 Delayed-Draw Term Loan that
41


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

matures in January 2022, 0.76% on the PNM 2019 $40.0 million Term Loan that matures in June 2021, 0.14% on the PNM Floating Rate PCRBs in the weekly mode, and 1.48% on the PNMR Development Term Loan that matures in January 2022.

Short-term Debt and Liquidity

Currently, the PNMR Revolving Credit Facility has a financing capacity of $300.0 million and the PNM Revolving Credit Facility has a financing capacity of $400.0 million. Both facilities currently expire on October 31, 2023 and contain options to be extended through October 2024, subject to approval by a majority of the lenders. PNM also has the $40.0 million PNM 2017 New Mexico Credit Facility that expires on December 12, 2022. The TNMP Revolving Credit Facility is a $75.0 million revolving credit facility secured by $75.0 million aggregate principal amount of TNMP first mortgage bonds that matures on September 23, 2022 and contains 2 one-year extension options, subject to approval by a majority of the lenders. PNMR Development has a $40.0 million revolving credit facility that expires on January 31, 2022. PNMR Development has the option to further increase the capacity of this facility to $50.0 million upon 15-days advance notice, subject to approval by the lender. The PNMR Development Revolving Credit Facility bears interest at a variable rate and contains terms similar to the PNMR Revolving Credit Facility. PNMR has guaranteed the obligations of PNMR Development under the facility. PNMR Development uses the facility to finance its participation in NMRD and for other activities. Variable interest rates under these facilities are based on LIBOR but contain provisions which allow for the replacement of LIBOR with other widely accepted interest rates.

Short-term debt outstanding consists of:
March 31,December 31,
Short-term Debt20212020
(In thousands)
PNM:
PNM Revolving Credit Facility$$
PNM 2017 New Mexico Credit Facility10,000 
10,000 
TNMP Revolving Credit Facility43,100 
PNMR:
PNMR Revolving Credit Facility114,400 12,000 
     PNMR Development Revolving Credit Facility40,000 10,000 
$197,500 $32,000 

At March 31, 2021, the weighted average interest rate was 1.61% for the PNMR Revolving Credit Facility, 1.11% for the PNMR Development Revolving Credit Facility, and 0.86% for the TNMP Revolving Credit Facility. There were 0 borrowings outstanding under the PNM 2017 New Mexico Revolving Credit Facility at March 31, 2021.

In addition to the above borrowings, PNMR, PNM, and TNMP had letters of credit outstanding of $3.4 million, $2.2 million, and 0 at March 31, 2021 that reduce the available capacity under their respective revolving credit facilities. The above table excludes intercompany debt. As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, neither PNM 0r TNMP had any intercompany borrowings from PNMR. PNMR had $32.4 million and 0 in intercompany borrowings from PNMR Development at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. PNMR Development had 0 and $0.3 million in intercompany borrowings from PNMR at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

In 2017, PNMR entered into 3 separate four-year hedging agreements whereby it effectively established fixed interest rates of 1.926%, 1.823%, and 1.629%, plus customary spreads over LIBOR for 3 separate tranches, each of $50.0 million, of its variable rate debt. On March 23, 2021 the 1.926% fixed interest rate hedge agreement expired according to its terms and the remaining agreements are expected to expire in May 2021. The hedge agreements are accounted for as cash flow hedges and had fair values of $0.3 million and $0.9 million at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 that are included in other current liabilities on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. As discussed in Note 3, changes in the fair value of the cash flow hedges are deferred in AOCI and amounts reclassified to the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Earnings are recorded in interest charges. The fair values were determined using Level 2 inputs under the fair value hierarchy, including using forward LIBOR curves under the mid-market convention to discount cash flows over the remaining term of the agreement.

42


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

At April 23, 2021, PNMR, PNM, TNMP, and PNMR Development had availability of $184.4 million, $395.9 million, $24.5 million, and 0 under their respective revolving credit facilities, including reductions of availability due to outstanding letters of credit. PNM had $40.0 million of availability under the PNM 2017 New Mexico Credit Facility. Total availability at April 23, 2021, on a consolidated basis, was $644.8 million for PNMR. Availability under PNM's Revolving Credit Facility and total availability at PNMR, on a consolidated basis, does not reflect a reduction of $100.3 million that PNM has reserved to provide liquidity support for the PNM Floating Rate PCRBs. As of April 23, 2021, PNM, TNMP, and PNMR Development had 0 borrowings from PNMR under their intercompany loan agreements however, PNMR had $32.4 million in borrowings from PNMR Development. At April 23, 2021, PNMR, PNM, and TNMP had invested cash of $0.9 million, 0, and 0.

The Company’s debt arrangements have various maturities and expiration dates. The PNM 2019 $40.0 million Term Loan matures in June 2021. In addition, PNM has $146.0 million of PCRBs that must be repriced and $160.0 million of SUNs that mature in October 2021, with an option to repay the SUNs at par as early as July 1, 2021. The $150.0 million PNMR 2019 Term Loan matures in June 2021. The $150.0 million PNMR 2020 Term Loan, the $300.0 million PNMR 2020 Delayed-Draw Term Loan, and the $65.0 million PNMR Development Term Loan all mature in January 2022. Additional information on debt maturities is contained in Note 7 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

(10)   Pension and Other Postretirement Benefit Plans

PNMR and its subsidiaries maintain qualified defined benefit pension plans, postretirement benefit plans providing medical and dental benefits, and executive retirement programs (collectively, the “PNM Plans” and “TNMP Plans”). PNMR maintains the legal obligation for the benefits owed to participants under these plans. The periodic costs or income of the PNM Plans and TNMP Plans are included in regulated rates to the extent attributable to regulated operations. The Company presents the service cost component of its net periodic benefit costs in administrative and general expenses and the non-service costs components in other income (deductions), net of amounts capitalized or deferred to regulatory assets and liabilities, on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Earnings. PNM and TNMP receive a regulated return on the amounts funded for pension and OPEB plans in excess of accumulated periodic cost or income to the extent included in retail rates (a “prepaid pension asset”).

Additional information concerning pension and OPEB plans is contained in Note 11 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K. Annual net periodic benefit cost for the plans is actuarially determined using the methods and assumptions set forth in that note and is recognized ratably throughout the year. Differences between TNMP's annual net periodic costs (income) and amounts included in its regulated rates are deferred to regulatory assets or liabilities, for recovery or refund in future rate proceedings.

PNM Plans

The following table presents the components of the PNM Plans’ net periodic benefit cost:

Three Months Ended March 31,
Pension PlanOPEB PlanExecutive Retirement Program
202120202021202020212020
(In thousands)
Components of Net Periodic Benefit Cost
Service cost$$$$10 $$
Interest cost4,036 4,985 477 613 90 122 
Expected return on plan assets(7,133)(7,363)(1,042)(1,387)
Amortization of net loss4,541 4,465 87 100 101 
Amortization of prior service cost(138)— 
Net Periodic Benefit Cost (Income)$1,444 $1,949 $(559)$(677)$190 $223 

PNM did 0t make any contributions to its pension plan trust in the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 and does 0t anticipate making any contributions to the pension plan in 2021 or 2022 but expects to contribute $10.8 million in 2023, $11.5 million in 2024, and $10.6 million in 2025 based on current law, funding requirements, and estimates of portfolio performance. Funding assumptions were developed using a discount rate of 2.9%. Actual amounts to be funded in the future will be dependent on the actuarial assumptions at that time, including the appropriate discount rate. PNM may make additional
43


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

contributions at its discretion. PNM did 0t make any cash contributions to the OPEB trust in the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, however, a portion of the disbursements attributable to the OPEB trust are paid by PNM and are therefore considered to be contributions to the OPEB plan. Payments by PNM on behalf of the PNM OPEB plan were $0.9 million and $1.1 million in the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020. These payments are expected to total $3.3 million in 2021 and $13.1 million for 2022-2025. Disbursements under the executive retirement program, which are funded by PNM and considered to be contributions to the plan, were $0.4 million and $0.3 million in the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 and are expected to total $1.3 million during 2021 and $4.9 million for 2022-2025.

TNMP Plans

The following table presents the components of the TNMP Plans’ net periodic benefit cost:

Three Months Ended March 31,
Pension PlanOPEB PlanExecutive Retirement Program
202120202021202020212020
(In thousands)
Components of Net Periodic Benefit Cost
Service cost$$$11 $12 $$
Interest cost435 544 77 93 
Expected return on plan assets(795)(821)(102)(134)
Amortization of net (gain) loss312 315 (80)(81)
Amortization of prior service cost
Net Periodic Benefit Cost (Income)$(48)$38 $(94)$(110)$13 $12 

TNMP did 0t make any contributions to its pension plan trust in the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 and does 0t anticipate making any contributions to the pension plan in 2021 through 2025 based on current law, funding requirements, and estimates of portfolio performance. Funding assumptions were developed using a discount rate of 2.9%. Actual amounts to be funded in the future will depend on the actuarial assumptions at that time, including the appropriate discount rate. TNMP may make additional contributions at its discretion. TNMP did 0t make any contributions to the OPEB trust in the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 and does 0t expect to make contributions to the OPEB trust during the period 2021-2025. Disbursements under the executive retirement program, which are funded by TNMP and considered to be contributions to the plan, were 0 in the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 and are expected to total $0.1 million during 2021 and $0.3 million in 2022-2025.

(11)   Commitments and Contingencies

Overview
There are various claims and lawsuits pending against the Company. In addition, the Company is subject to federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations and periodically participates in the investigation and remediation of various sites. In addition, the Company periodically enters into financial commitments in connection with its business operations. Also, the Company is involved in various legal and regulatory proceedings in the normal course of its business. See Note 12. It is not possible at this time for the Company to determine fully the effect of all litigation and other legal and regulatory proceedings on its financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.

With respect to some of the items listed below, the Company has determined that a loss is not probable or that, to the extent probable, cannot be reasonably estimated. In some cases, the Company is not able to predict with any degree of certainty the range of possible loss that could be incurred. The Company assesses legal and regulatory matters based on current information and makes judgments concerning their potential outcome, giving due consideration to the nature of the claim, the amount and nature of any damages sought, and the probability of success. Such judgments are made with the understanding that the outcome of any litigation, investigation, or other legal proceeding is inherently uncertain. The Company records liabilities for matters where it is probable a loss has been incurred and the amount of loss is reasonably estimable. The actual outcomes of the items listed below could ultimately differ from the judgments made and the differences could be material. The Company cannot make any assurances that the amount of reserves or potential insurance coverage will be sufficient to cover the cash obligations that might be incurred as a result of litigation or regulatory proceedings. Except as otherwise disclosed, the
44


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

Company does not expect that any known lawsuits, environmental costs, and commitments will have a material effect on its financial condition, results of operations, or cash flows.

Additional information concerning commitments and contingencies is contained in Note 16 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

Commitments and Contingencies Related to the Environment

Nuclear Spent Fuel and Waste Disposal

Nuclear power plant operators are required to enter into spent fuel disposal contracts with the DOE that require the DOE to accept and dispose of all spent nuclear fuel and other high-level radioactive wastes generated by domestic power reactors. Although the Nuclear Waste Policy Act required the DOE to develop a permanent repository for the storage and disposal of spent nuclear fuel by 1998, the DOE announced that it would not be able to open the repository by 1998 and sought to excuse its performance of these requirements. In November 1997, the DC Circuit issued a decision preventing the DOE from excusing its own delay but refused to order the DOE to begin accepting spent nuclear fuel. Based on this decision and the DOE’s delay, a number of utilities, including APS (on behalf of itself and the other PVNGS owners, including PNM), filed damages actions against the DOE in the Court of Federal Claims. The lawsuits filed by APS alleged that damages were incurred due to DOE’s continuing failure to remove spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste from PVNGS. In August 2014, APS and the DOE entered into a settlement agreement that establishes a process for the payment of claims for costs incurred through December 31, 2019. In July 2020, APS accepted the DOE's extension of the settlement agreement for recovery of costs incurred through December 31, 2022. Under the settlement agreement, APS must submit claims annually for payment of allowable costs. PNM records estimated claims on a quarterly basis. The benefit from the claims is passed through to customers under the FPPAC to the extent applicable to NMPRC regulated operations.

PNM estimates that it will incur approximately $59.6 million (in 2019 dollars) for its share of the costs related to the on-site interim storage of spent nuclear fuel at PVNGS during the term of the operating licenses. PNM accrues these costs as a component of fuel expense as the nuclear fuel is consumed. At both March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, PNM had a liability for interim storage costs of $12.8 million, which is included in other deferred credits.

PVNGS has sufficient capacity at its on-site Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (“ISFSI”) to store all of the nuclear fuel that will be irradiated during the initial operating license period, which ends in December 2027.  Additionally, PVNGS has sufficient capacity at its on-site ISFSI to store a portion of the fuel that will be irradiated during the period of extended operation, which ends in November 2047.  If uncertainties regarding the U.S. government’s obligation to accept and store spent fuel are not favorably resolved, APS will evaluate alternative storage solutions that may obviate the need to expand the ISFSI to accommodate all of the fuel that will be irradiated during the period of extended operation.

The Energy Transition Act

In 2019, the Governor signed into New Mexico state law Senate Bill 489, known as the Energy Transition Act (“ETA”). The ETA became effective as of June 14, 2019 and sets a statewide standard that requires investor-owned electric utilities to have specified percentages of their electric-generating portfolios be from renewable and zero-carbon generating resources. The ETA amends the REA and requires utilities operating in New Mexico to have renewable portfolios equal to 40% by 2025, 50% by 2030, 80% by 2040, and 100% zero-carbon energy by 2045. The ETA also amends sections of the REA to allow for the recovery of undepreciated investments and decommissioning costs related to qualifying EGUs that the NMPRC has required be removed from retail jurisdictional rates, provided replacement resources to be included in retail rates have lower or zero-carbon emissions. The ETA requires the NMPRC to review and approve utilities’ annual renewable portfolio plans to ensure compliance with the RPS. The ETA also directs the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Board to adopt standards of performance that limit CO2 emissions to no more than 1,100 lbs. per MWh beginning January 1, 2023 for new or existing coal-fired EGUs with original installed capacities exceeding 300 MW.

The ETA provides for a transition from fossil-fuel generation resources to renewable and other carbon-free resources through certain provisions relating to the abandonment of coal-fired generating facilities. These provisions include the use of energy transition bonds, which are designed to be highly rated bonds that can be issued to finance certain costs of abandoning coal-fired facilities that are retired prior to January 1, 2023 for facilities operated by a “qualifying utility,” or prior to January 1, 2032 for facilities that are not operated by a qualifying utility. The amount of energy transition bonds that can be issued to recover abandonment costs is limited to the lesser of $375.0 million or 150% of the undepreciated investment of the facility as of the abandonment date. Proceeds provided by energy transition bonds must be used only for purposes related to providing
45


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

utility service to customers and to pay energy transition costs (as defined by the ETA). These costs may include plant decommissioning and coal mine reclamation costs provided those costs have not previously been recovered from customers or disallowed by the NMPRC or by a court order. Proceeds from energy transition bonds may also be used to fund severances for employees of the retired facility and related coal mine and to promote economic development, education and job training in areas impacted by the retirement of the coal-fired facilities. Energy transition bonds must be issued under a NMPRC-approved financing order, are secured by “energy transition property,” are non-recourse to the issuing utility, and repaid by a non-bypassable charge paid by all customers of the issuing utility. These customer charges are subject to an adjustment mechanism designed to provide for timely and complete payment of principal and interest due under the energy transition bonds.

The ETA also provides that utilities must obtain NMPRC approval of competitively procured replacement resources that shall be evaluated based on their cost, economic development opportunity, ability to provide jobs with comparable pay and benefits to those lost upon retirement of the facility, and that do not exceed emissions thresholds specified in the ETA. In determining whether to approve replacement resources, the NMPRC must give preference to resources with the least environmental impacts, those with higher ratios of capital costs to fuel costs, and those located in the school district of the abandoned facility. The ETA also provides for the procurement of energy storage facilities and gives utilities discretion to maintain, control, and operate these systems to ensure reliable and efficient service.

The ETA will have a significant impact on PNM’s future generation portfolio, including PNM’s planned retirement of SJGS in 2022 and the planned Four Corners exit in 2024. PNM cannot predict the full impact of the ETA or the outcome of its pending and potential future generating resource abandonment and replacement resource filings with the NMPRC. See additional discussion in Note 12 of PNM’s SJGS and Four Corners Abandonment Applications.

The Clean Air Act

Regional Haze

In 1999, EPA developed a regional haze program and regional haze rules under the CAA. The rule directs each of the 50 states to address regional haze. Pursuant to the CAA, states are required to establish goals for improving visibility in national parks and wilderness areas (also known as Class I areas) and to develop long-term strategies for reducing emissions of air pollutants that cause visibility impairment in their own states and for preventing degradation in other states. States must establish a series of interim goals to ensure continued progress by adopting a new SIP every ten years. In the first SIP planning period, states were required to conduct BART determinations for certain covered facilities, including utility boilers, built between 1962 and 1977 that have the potential to emit more than 250 tons per year of visibility impairing pollution. If it was demonstrated that the emissions from these sources caused or contributed to visibility impairment in any Class I area, BART must have been installed by the beginning of 2018. For all future SIP planning periods, states must evaluate whether additional emissions reduction measures may be needed to continue making reasonable progress toward natural visibility conditions.

In 2017, EPA published revisions to the regional haze rule in the Federal Register. EPA also provided a companion draft guidance document for public comment. The new rule delayed the due date for the next cycle of SIPs from 2019 to 2021, altered the planning process that states must employ in determining whether to impose “reasonable progress” emission reduction measures, and gave new authority to federal land managers to seek additional emission reduction measures outside of the states’ planning process. Finally, the rule made several procedural changes to the regional haze program, including changes to the schedule and process for states to file 5-year progress reports. EPA’s new rule was challenged by numerous parties. On January 19, 2018, EPA filed a motion to hold the case in abeyance in light of several letters issued by EPA on January 17, 2018 to grant various petitions for reconsideration of the 2017 rule revisions. EPA’s decision to revisit the 2017 rule is not a determination on the merits of the issues raised in the petitions.

On December 20, 2018, EPA released a new guidance document on tracking visibility progress for the second planning period. EPA is allowing states discretion to develop SIPs that may differ from EPA’s guidance as long as they are consistent with the CAA and other applicable regulations. On August 20, 2019, EPA finalized the draft guidance that was released in 2016 as a companion to the regional haze rule revisions. The final guidance differs from the draft in several ways but is likely to be reconsidered by the Biden Administration. SIPs for the second planning period are due in July 2021. NMED is currently preparing its SIP for the second compliance period and has notified PNM that it will not be required to submit a regional haze four-factor analysis for SJGS since PNM will retire its share of SJGS in 2022. PNM cannot predict the outcome of these matters with respect to Four Corners.


46


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions

On August 3, 2015, EPA established standards to limit CO2 emissions from power plants. EPA took three separate but related actions in which it: (1) established the Carbon Pollution Standards for new, modified, and reconstructed power plants; (2) established the Clean Power Plan to set standards for carbon emission reductions from existing power plants; and (3) released a proposed federal plan associated with the final Clean Power Plan. The Clean Power Plan was published on October 23, 2015.

Multiple states, utilities, and trade groups filed petitions for review in the DC Circuit to challenge both the Carbon Pollution Standards for new sources and the Clean Power Plan for existing sources. Challengers successfully petitioned the US Supreme Court for a stay of the Clean Power Plan. However, before the DC Circuit could issue an opinion regarding either the Carbon Pollution Standards or the Clean Power Plan, the Trump Administration asked that the case be held in abeyance while the rule was being re-evaluated, which was granted.

On June 19, 2019, EPA repealed the Clean Power Plan, promulgated the ACE Rule, and revised the implementing regulations for all emission guidelines. EPA set the Best System of Emissions Reduction ("BSER") for existing coal-fired power plants as heat rate efficiency improvements based on a range of "candidate technologies" that can be applied inside the fence-line. Rather than setting a specific numerical standard of performance, EPA's rule directed states to determine which of the candidate technologies to apply to each coal-fired unit and establish standards of performance based on the degree of emission reduction achievable based on the application of BSER. On September 17, 2019, the DC Circuit issued an order that granted motions by various petitioners, including industry groups and EPA, to dismiss the cases challenging the Clean Power Plan as moot due to EPA’s issuance of the ACE Rule.

However, on January 19, 2021, the DC Circuit issued an opinion in American Lung Association and American Public Health Association v. EPA, et al. regarding challenges to the ACE Rule. The DC Circuit vacated the ACE Rule and remanded the record back to the EPA for further consideration consistent with its opinion, finding that EPA misinterpreted the CAA when it determined that the language of section 111 unambiguously barred consideration of emissions reductions options that were not applied at the source. An appeal via petitions for certiorari to the US Supreme Court will remain available until June 2021. While the DC Circuit did not uphold the ACE Rule, it did not reinstate the Clean Power Plan. EPA filed a motion seeking a partial stay of the mandate as to the repeal of the Clean Power Plan, to ensure the court’s order will not render effective the now out-of-date Clean Power Plan. On February 22, 2021, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit granted EPA’s motion, indicating that it would withhold issuance of the mandate with respect to the repeal of the Clean Power Plan until EPA responds to the court’s remand in a new rulemaking action. The litigation over the Carbon Pollution Standards remains held in abeyance but could be reactivated by the parties upon a determination by the court that the Biden Administration is unlikely to finalize the revisions proposed in 2018 and that reconsideration of the rule has concluded.

While corresponding NSR reform regulations were proposed as part of the proposed ACE Rule, the final rule did not include such reform measures. Unrelated to the ACE Rule, EPA issued a proposed rule on August 1, 2019, to clarify one aspect of the pre-construction review process for evaluating whether the NSR permitting program would apply to a proposed project at an existing source of emissions. The final rule on NSR Project Emissions Accounting became effective on December 24, 2020, clarifying that both emissions increases and decreases resulting from a project are to be considered in determining whether the proposed project will result in an increase in air emissions. However, the rule may be reconsidered by the Biden Administration.

On January 27, 2021, President Biden signed an extensive Executive Order aimed at addressing climate change concerns domestically and internationally. The order is intended to build on the initial climate-related actions the Biden Administration took on January 20, 2021. It addresses a wide range of issues, including establishing climate change concerns as an essential element of U.S. foreign and security policy, identifying a process to determine the U.S. INDC under the Paris Agreement, and establishing a Special Presidential Envoy for Climate that will sit on the National Security Council. On April 22, 2021, at the Earth Day Summit, as part of the U.S.’s re-entry into the Paris Agreement, President Biden unveiled the goal to cut U.S. emissions by 50% - 52% from 2005 levels by 2030, nearly double the GHG emissions reduction target set by the Obama Administration. The 2030 goal joins President Biden’s other climate goals which include a carbon pollution-free power sector by 2035 and a net-zero emissions economy by no later than 2050.

PNM’s review of the GHG emission reductions standards that may occur as a result of legislation or regulation under the Biden Administration and in response to the court's ruling on the ACE Rule is ongoing. PNM cannot predict the impact these standards may have on its operations or a range of the potential costs of compliance, if any.

47


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

National Ambient Air Quality Standards (“NAAQS”)

The CAA requires EPA to set NAAQS for pollutants reasonably anticipated to endanger public health or welfare. EPA has set NAAQS for certain pollutants, including NOx, SO2, ozone, and particulate matter.

NOx Standard – On April 18, 2018, EPA published the final rule to retain the current primary health-based NOx standards of which NO2 is the constituent of greatest concern and is the indicator for the primary NAAQS. EPA concluded that the current 1-hour and annual primary NO2 standards are requisite to protect public health with an adequate margin of safety. The rule became effective on May 18, 2018.

SO2 Standard – On May 13, 2014, EPA released the draft data requirements rule for the 1-hour SO2 NAAQS, which directs state and tribal air agencies to characterize current air quality in areas with large SO2 sources to identify maximum 1-hour SO2 concentrations. This characterization requires areas be designated as attainment, nonattainment, or unclassifiable for compliance with the 1-hour SO2 NAAQS. 

On August 11, 2015, EPA released the Data Requirements Rule for SO2, telling states how to model or monitor to determine attainment or nonattainment with the new 1-hour SO2 NAAQS.  NMED submitted the first annual report for SJGS as required by the Data Requirements Rule in June 2018. That report recommended that no further modeling was warranted due to decreased SO2 emissions. NMED submitted the second and third annual modeling report to EPA in July 2019 and July 2020. Those reports retained the recommendation that no further modeling is needed at this time and is subject to EPA review.

On February 25, 2019, EPA announced its final decision to retain without changes the primary health-based NAAQS for SO2. Specifically, EPA will retain the current 1-hour standard for SO2, which is 75 parts per billion, based on the 3-year average of the 99th percentile of daily maximum 1-hour SO2 concentrations.

On March 26, 2021, EPA published in the Federal Register the initial air quality designations for all remaining areas not yet designated under the 2010 SO2 Primary NAAQS. This is EPA’s fourth and final set of actions to designate areas of the U.S. for the 2010 SO2 NAAQS. All areas of New Mexico have been designated attainment/unclassifiable through four rounds
of designations by the EPA.

Ozone Standard – On October 1, 2015, EPA finalized the new ozone NAAQS and lowered both the primary and secondary 8-hour standard from 75 to 70 parts per billion. With ozone standards becoming more stringent, fossil-fueled generation units will come under increasing pressure to reduce emissions of NOx and volatile organic compounds since these are the pollutants that form ground-level ozone. On July 13, 2020, EPA proposed to retain the existing ozone NAAQS based on a review of the full body of currently available scientific evidence and exposure/risk information. EPA finalized its decision to retain the ozone NAAQS in a notice published on December 31, 2020 making it immediately effective. The Center for Biological Diversity filed a lawsuit on February 25, 2021, challenging the decision to retain the existing ozone standard, and the Biden Administration has included the decision in its list of actions that may be reconsidered.

On November 10, 2015, EPA proposed a rule revising its Exceptional Events Rule, which outlines the requirements for excluding air quality data (including ozone data) from regulatory decisions if the data is affected by events outside an area’s control. The proposed rule is important in light of the more stringent ozone NAAQS final rule since western states like New Mexico and Arizona are subject to elevated background ozone transport from natural local sources, such as wildfires and stratospheric inversions, and transported via winds from distant sources in other regions or countries. EPA finalized the rule on October 3, 2016 and released related guidance in 2018 and 2019 to help implement its new exceptional events policy.

During 2017 and 2018, EPA released rules establishing area designations for ozone. In those rules, San Juan County, New Mexico, where SJGS and Four Corners are located, is designated as attainment/unclassifiable and only a small area in Doña Ana County, New Mexico is designated as marginal non-attainment. Although Afton is located in Doña Ana County, it is not located within the small area designated as non-attainment for the 2015 ozone standard. The rule became effective May 8, 2018. Attainment plans for non-attainment areas are due in August 2021.

NMED has responsibility for bringing the small area in Doña Ana County designated as marginal/non-attainment for ozone into compliance and will look at all sources of NOx and volatile organic compounds. On November 22, 2019, EPA issued findings that several states, including New Mexico, had failed to submit SIPs for the 8-hour ozone NAAQS. In response, in December 2019, NMED published the Public Review Draft of the New Mexico 2013 NAAQS Good Neighbor SIP that outlines the strategies and emissions control measures that are expected to improve air quality in the area by May 8, 2021. These strategies and measures would aim to reduce the amount of NOx and volatile organic compounds emitted to the
48


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

atmosphere and will rely upon current or upcoming federal rules, new or revised state rules, and other programs. Comments or requests for a public hearing were required by January 21, 2020.

NMED Air Quality Bureau has completed a draft retrospective demonstration showing that this area would be in attainment of the NAAQS but for international emissions. This demonstration allows the area to maintain a marginal non-attainment status and eliminates the need for additional planning requirements and emission reductions. NMED is seeking public comment on the draft document through May 14, 2021.

PNM does not believe there will be material impacts to its facilities as a result of NMED’s non-attainment designation of the small area within Doña Ana County. Until EPA approves attainment designations for the Navajo Nation and releases a proposal to implement the revised ozone NAAQS, PNM is unable to predict what impact the adoption of these standards may have on Four Corners. PNM cannot predict the outcome of this matter.

PM Standard – On January 30, 2020, EPA published in the Federal Register a notice announcing the availability of its final Policy Assessment for the Review of the NAAQS for Particulate Matter (the "Final PA"). The final assessment was prepared as part of the review of the primary and secondary PM NAAQS. In the assessment, EPA recommended lowering the primary annual PM2.5 standard to between 8 µg/m3 and 10 µg/m3. However, on April 30, 2020, EPA published a proposed rule to retain the current standards for PM due to uncertainties in the data relied upon in the Final PA. EPA accepted comments on the proposed rule through June 29, 2020. On December 7, 2020, EPA announced it will retain, without revision, the existing primary (health-based) and secondary (welfare-based) NAAQS for PM, and EPA published a notice of that final action on December 18, 2020, making it immediately effective. On January 14, 2021, several states and New York City filed a petition for review in the DC Circuit, challenging EPA’s final rule retaining the current primary and secondary PM NAAQS. On February 9, 2021, a similar lawsuit was filed by the Center for Biological Diversity in the DC Circuit. The Biden Administration has also included the decision in its list of actions that may be reconsidered.

Navajo Nation Environmental Issues

Four Corners is located on the Navajo Nation and is held under easements granted by the federal government, as well as agreements with the Navajo Nation which grant each of the owners the right to operate on the site. The Navajo Acts purport to give the Navajo Nation Environmental Protection Agency authority to promulgate regulations covering air quality, drinking water, and pesticide activities, including those activities that occur at Four Corners. In October 1995, the Four Corners participants filed a lawsuit in the District Court of the Navajo Nation challenging the applicability of the Navajo Acts to Four Corners. In May 2005, APS and the Navajo Nation signed an agreement resolving the dispute regarding the Navajo Nation’s authority to adopt operating permit regulations under the Navajo Nation Air Pollution Prevention and Control Act. As a result of this agreement, APS sought, and the court granted, dismissal of the pending litigation in the Navajo Nation Supreme Court and the Navajo Nation District Court, to the extent the claims relate to the CAA. The agreement does not address or resolve any dispute relating to other aspects of the Navajo Acts. PNM cannot currently predict the outcome of these matters or the range of their potential impacts.

Cooling Water Intake Structures

In 2014, EPA issued a rule establishing national standards for certain cooling water intake structures at existing power plants and other facilities under the Clean Water Act to protect fish and other aquatic organisms by minimizing impingement mortality (the capture of aquatic wildlife on intake structures or against screens) and entrainment mortality (the capture of fish or shellfish in water flow entering and passing through intake structures).

To minimize impingement mortality, the rule provides operators of facilities, such as SJGS and Four Corners, 7 options for meeting Best Technology Available (“BTA”) standards for reducing impingement. SJGS has a closed-cycle recirculating cooling system, which is a listed BTA and may also qualify for the “de minimis rate of impingement” based on the design of the intake structure. The permitting authority must establish the BTA for entrainment on a site-specific basis, taking into consideration an array of factors, including endangered species and social costs and benefits. Affected sources must submit source water baseline characterization data to the permitting authority to assist in the determination. Compliance deadlines under the rule are tied to permit renewal and will be subject to a schedule of compliance established by the permitting authority.

The rule is not clear as to how it applies and what the compliance timelines are for facilities like SJGS that have a cooling water intake structure and only a multi-sector general stormwater permit. However, EPA has indicated that it is contemplating a December 31, 2023 compliance deadline. PNM is working with EPA regarding this issue and does not expect
49


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

material changes as a result of any requirements that may be imposed upon SJGS, particularly given the NMPRC's April 1, 2020 approval for PNM to retire its share of SJGS by June 2022.

On May 23, 2018, several environmental groups sued EPA Region IX in the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit Court over EPA’s failure to timely reissue the Four Corners NPDES permit. The petitioners asked the court to issue a writ of mandamus compelling EPA Region IX to take final action on the pending NPDES permit by a reasonable date. EPA subsequently reissued the NPDES permit on June 12, 2018. The permit did not contain conditions related to the cooling water intake structure rule as EPA determined that the facility has achieved BTA for both impingement and entrainment by operating a closed-cycle recirculation system. On July 16, 2018, several environmental groups filed a petition for review with EPA’s Environmental Appeals Board ("EAB") concerning the reissued permit. The environmental groups alleged that the permit was reissued in contravention of several requirements under the Clean Water Act and did not contain required provisions concerning certain revised effluent limitation guidelines, existing-source regulations governing cooling-water intake structures, and effluent limits for surface seepage and subsurface discharges from coal-ash disposal facilities. On December 19, 2018, EPA withdrew the Four Corners NPDES permit in order to examine issues raised by the environmental groups. Withdrawal of the permit moots the appeal pending before the EAB. EAB thereafter dismissed the environmental groups’ appeal. EPA issued an updated NPDES permit on September 30, 2019. The permit was stayed pending an appeal filed by several environmental groups on November 1, 2019 to EAB. Oral argument was heard on September 3, 2020. The EAB issued an order denying the petition for review on September 30, 2020. The denial was based on the EAB's determination that the petitioners had failed to demonstrate that review of the permit was warranted on any of the grounds presented in the petition. PNM cannot predict whether there will be further appeals of this matter or whether the outcome of any such appeal will have a material impact on PNM’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

Effluent Limitation Guidelines

On June 7, 2013, EPA published proposed revised wastewater effluent limitation guidelines establishing technology-based wastewater discharge limitations for fossil fuel-fired electric power plants.  EPA signed the final Steam Electric Effluent Limitation Guidelines rule on September 30, 2015. The final rule, which became effective on January 4, 2016, phased in the new, more stringent requirements in the form of effluent limits for arsenic, mercury, selenium, and nitrogen for wastewater discharged from wet scrubber systems and zero discharge of pollutants in ash transport water that must be incorporated into plants’ NPDES permits. The 2015 rule required each plant to comply between 2018 and 2023 depending on when it needs a new or revised NPDES permit.

The Steam Electric Effluent Limitation Guidelines rule was challenged in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit by numerous parties. On April 12, 2017, EPA signed a notice indicating its intent to reconsider portions of the rule, and on August 22, 2017, the Fifth Circuit issued an order severing the issues under reconsideration and holding the case in abeyance as to those issues. However, the court allowed challenges to other portions of the rule to proceed. On April 12, 2019, the Fifth Circuit granted those challenges and issued an opinion vacating several portions of the rule, specifically those related to legacy wastewater and leachate, for which the court deemed the standards selected by EPA arbitrary and capricious.

On September 18, 2017, EPA published a final rule for postponement of certain compliance dates. The rule postponed the earliest date on which compliance with the effluent limitation guidelines for these waste streams would be required from November 1, 2018 until November 1, 2020. On November 22, 2019, EPA published a proposed rule revising the original Effluent Limitation Guidelines while maintaining the compliance dates. Comments were due January 21, 2020. On October 13, 2020, EPA published in the Federal Register the final Steam Electric Effluent Limitation Guidelines and standards for the Steam Electric Power Generating Point Source Category, revising the final 2015 guidelines for both flue gas desulfurization wastewater and bottom ash transport water. The rule will require compliance with new limits as soon as possible on or after October 13, 2021, (beginning one year after the publication date) but no later than December 31, 2025.

Because SJGS is zero discharge for wastewater and is not required to hold a NPDES permit, it is expected that minimal to no requirements will be imposed. Reeves Station discharges cooling tower blowdown to a publicly owned treatment plant and holds an NPDES permit. It is expected that minimal to no requirements will be imposed at Reeves Station.

See "Cooling Water Intake Structures" above for additional discussion of Four Corners' current NPDES permit. Four Corners may be required to change equipment and operating practices affecting boilers and ash handling systems, as well as change its waste disposal techniques during the next NPDES permit renewal in 2023. PNM is unable to predict the outcome of these matters or a range of the potential costs of compliance.


50


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

Santa Fe Generating Station

PNM and NMED are parties to agreements under which PNM has installed a remediation system to treat water from a City of Santa Fe municipal supply well and an extraction well to address gasoline contamination in the groundwater at the site of PNM’s former Santa Fe Generating Station and service center. A 2008 NMED site inspection report states that neither the source nor extent of contamination at the site has been determined and that the source may not be the former Santa Fe Generating Station. During 2013 and 2014, PNM and NMED collected additional samples that showed elevated concentrations of nitrate and volatile organic compounds in some of the monitoring wells at the site. In addition, one monitoring well contained free-phase hydrocarbon products. PNM collected a sample of the product for “fingerprint” analysis. The results of this analysis indicated the product was a mixture of older and newer fuels. The presence of newer fuels in the sample suggests the hydrocarbon product likely originated from off-site sources. In December 2015, PNM and NMED entered into a memorandum of understanding to address changing groundwater conditions at the site under which PNM agreed to continue hydrocarbon investigation under the supervision of NMED. Qualified costs are eligible for payment through the New Mexico Corrective Action Fund (“CAF”), which is administered by the NMED Petroleum Storage Tank Bureau. In March 2019, PNM received notice from NMED that an abatement plan for the site is required to address concentrations of previously identified compounds, unrelated to those discussed above, found in the groundwater. NMED approved PNM’s abatement plan proposal, which covers field work and reporting.

Field work related to the investigation under both the CAF and abatement plan requirements was completed in October 2019. Activities and findings associated with the field work were presented in two separate reports and released to stakeholders in early 2020. Subsequent field work was completed in July 2020 and two reports were released supporting PNM’s contention that off-site sources have impacted, and are continuing to impact, the local groundwater in the vicinity of the former Santa Fe Generating Station.

PNM is preparing work plans for proposed activities to be conducted in 2021. The work plans will be submitted to NMED for review and approval. PNM is prepared to commence work shortly after receiving NMED approval.

The City of Santa Fe has stopped operating its well at the site, which is needed for PNM’s groundwater remediation system to operate. As a result, PNM has stopped performing remediation activities at the site. However, PNM’s monitoring and other abatement activities at the site are ongoing and will continue until the groundwater meets applicable federal and state standards or until the NMED determines remediation is not required, whichever is earlier. PNM is not able to assess the duration of this project or estimate the impact on its obligations if PNM is required to resume groundwater remediation activities at the site. PNM is unable to predict the outcome of these matters.

Coal Combustion Residuals Waste Disposal

CCRs consisting of fly ash, bottom ash, and gypsum generated from coal combustion and emission control equipment at SJGS are currently disposed of in the surface mine pits adjacent to the plant. SJGS does not operate any CCR impoundments or landfills. The NMMMD currently regulates mine reclamation activities at the San Juan mine, including placement of CCRs in the surface mine pits, with federal oversight by the OSM. APS disposes of CCRs in ponds and dry storage areas at Four Corners.  Ash management at Four Corners is regulated by EPA and the New Mexico State Engineer’s Office.

EPA’s final coal ash rule, which became effective on October 19, 2015, included a non-hazardous waste determination for coal ash and sets minimum criteria for existing and new CCR landfills and surface impoundments. On December 16, 2016, the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act (the “WIIN Act”) was signed into law to address critical water infrastructure needs in the U.S. and contains a number of provisions related to the CCR rules. Among other things, the WIIN Act allows, but does not require, states to develop and submit CCR permit programs for EPA approval, provides flexibility for states to incorporate EPA’s final rule for CCRs or develop other criteria that are at least as protective as EPA’s final rule, and requires EPA to approve state permit programs within 180 days of submission by the state. Because states are not required to implement their own CCR permit programs, EPA will implement the permit program in states that choose not to implement a program, subject to Congressional funding. Until permit programs are in effect, EPA has authority to directly enforce the CCR rule. For facilities located within the boundaries of Native American reservations, such as the Navajo Nation where Four Corners is located, EPA is required to develop a federal permit program regardless of appropriated funds. There is no timeline for establishing either state or federal permitting programs.

On July 30, 2018, EPA published a rule that constitutes “Phase One, Part One” of its ongoing reconsideration and revision of the April 17, 2015 coal ash rule. The final rule includes two types of revisions. The first revision extended the deadline to allow EGUs with unlined impoundments or that fail to meet the uppermost aquifer requirement to continue to
51


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

receive coal ash until October 31, 2020. The rule also authorized a “Participating State Director” or EPA to approve suspension of groundwater monitoring and to issue certifications related to the location restrictions, design criteria, groundwater monitoring, remedy selection and implementation. The revisions also modify groundwater protection standards for certain constituents, which include cobalt, molybdenum, lithium, and lead without a maximum contamination level.

On August 14, 2019, EPA published the “Phase Two” proposed rule in the Federal Register with comments due on October 15, 2019. This rule proposes revisions to reporting and accessibility to public information, the definition of CCR piles, the definition of beneficial use, and the requirements for management of CCR piles. On March 12, 2021, EPA published notice in the Federal Register that it was reopening the comment period on its prior notice that announced the availability of new information and data pertaining to the Phase Two proposed rule. EPA extended the comment period for an additional 60 days, until May 11, 2021.

On December 2, 2019, EPA published the proposed Part A CCR rule requiring a new date of August 31, 2020 for companies to initiate closure of unlined CCR impoundments and changing the classification of compacted soil-lined or clay-lined surface impoundments from “lined” to “unlined”. EPA’s final Part A CCR rule was issued on August 28, 2020 and became effective on September 28, 2020. This rule finalizes the classification of soil-lined and clay-lined surface impoundments as unlined, triggering closure or retrofit requirements for those impoundments and gives operators until April 11, 2021 to cease receipt of waste at these units and begin the closure process. On March 3, 2020, EPA issued a proposed rule, Part B, addressing demonstrations for clay liners and regulations addressing beneficial use for closure of surface impoundments. On October 16, 2020, EPA released a prepublication draft copy of the final Part B rule. This rule did not include beneficial use of CCR for closure, which EPA explains will be addressed in subsequent rulemaking action. EPA intends to issue several other rulemakings covering legacy ponds and finalizing parts of previously proposed rules. These proposed rules and final rules are expected in 2021.

On February 20, 2020, EPA published a proposed rule establishing a federal permitting program for the handling of CCR within the boundaries of Native American reservations and in states without their own federally authorized state programs. Permits for units within the boundaries of Native American reservations would be due 18 months after the effective date of the rule. The deadline to provide comments was extended to August 7, 2020. The final rule is expected in May 2021. PNM cannot predict the outcome of EPA’s rule making activity or the outcome of any related litigation, and whether or how such a ruling would affect operations at Four Corners.

The CCR rule does not cover mine placement of coal ash. OSM is expected to publish a proposed rule covering mine placement in the future and will likely be influenced by EPA’s rule and the determination by EPA that CCRs are non-hazardous. PNM cannot predict the outcome of OSM’s proposed rulemaking regarding CCR regulation, including mine placement of CCRs, or whether OSM’s actions will have a material impact on PNM’s operations, financial position, or cash flows. Based upon the requirements of the final Part A CCR rule, PNM conducted a CCR assessment at SJGS and made minor modifications at the plant to ensure that there are no facilities that would be considered impoundments or landfills under the rule. PNM would seek recovery from its retail customers of all CCR costs for jurisdictional assets that are ultimately incurred.

Utilities that own or operate CCR disposal units, such as those at Four Corners, as indicated above, were required to collect sufficient groundwater sampling data to initiate a detection monitoring program.  Four Corners completed the analysis for its CCR disposal units, which identified several units that will need corrective action or will need to cease operations and initiate closure by April 11, 2021. As part of this assessment, Four Corners will continue to gather additional groundwater data and perform remedial evaluations. At this time, PNM does not anticipate its share of the cost to complete these corrective actions, to close the CCR disposal units, or to gather and perform remedial evaluations on groundwater at Four Corners will have a significant impact on its operations, financial position, or cash flows.

Other Commitments and Contingencies
Coal Supply

SJGS
The coal requirements for SJGS are supplied by WSJ LLC. In addition to coal delivered to meet the current needs of SJGS, PNM has prepaid the current San Juan mine owner and operator, WSJ LLC, for certain coal mined but not yet delivered to the plant site. At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, prepayments for coal, which are included in other current assets, amounted to $24.8 million and $26.3 million. Additional information concerning the coal supply for SJGS is contained in Note 16 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

52


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

In conjunction with the activities undertaken to comply with the CAA for SJGS PNM and the other owners of SJGS evaluated alternatives for the supply of coal to SJGS. On July 1, 2015, PNM and Westmoreland entered into a new coal supply agreement (the “SJGS CSA”), pursuant to which Westmoreland, through its indirectly wholly-owned subsidiary SJCC, agreed to supply all of the coal requirements of SJGS through June 30, 2022. PNM and Westmoreland also entered into agreements under which CCR disposal and mine reclamation services for SJGS would be provided. As discussed in Note 6, WSJ LLC assumed the rights and obligations of SJCC under the SJGS CSA and the agreements for CCR disposal and mine reclamation services.

Pricing under the SJGS CSA is primarily fixed, with adjustments to reflect changes in general inflation. The pricing structure takes into account that WSJ LLC has been paid for coal mined but not delivered. PNM has provided notice to Westmoreland that PNM does not intend to extend the term of the SJGS CSA or to negotiate a new coal supply agreement for SJGS, which will result in the current agreement expiring on its own terms on June 30, 2022. See additional discussion of PNM’s SJGS Abandonment Application in Note 12.

The SJGS RA sets forth terms under which PNM acquired the coal inventory, including coal mined but not delivered, of the exiting SJGS participants as of January 1, 2016, and supplied coal to the SJGS exiting participants for the period from January 1, 2016 through December 31, 2017, and is supplying coal to the SJGS remaining participants over the term of the SJGS CSA. Coal costs under the SJGS CSA are significantly less than under the previous arrangement with SJCC. Since substantially all of PNM’s coal costs are passed through the FPPAC, the benefit of the reduced costs is passed through to PNM’s customers.

In connection with certain mining permits relating to the operation of the San Juan mine, the San Juan mine owner was required to post reclamation bonds of $118.7 million with the NMMMD. In order to facilitate the posting of reclamation bonds by sureties on behalf of the San Juan mine owner, PNMR entered into the WFB LOC Facility under which letters of credit aggregating $30.3 million have been issued. As discussed in Note 6, on March 15, 2019, the assets owned by SJCC were sold to WSJ LLC, a subsidiary of Westmoreland Mining Holdings, LLC. Under the sale agreement, WSJ LLC assumed the rights and obligations of SJCC including obligations to PNMR under the outstanding letters of credit.

Four Corners

APS purchases all of Four Corners’ coal requirements from NTEC, an entity owned by the Navajo Nation, under the Four Corners CSA that expires in 2031. The coal comes from reserves located within the Navajo Nation. NTEC has contracted with Bisti Fuels Company, LLC, a subsidiary of The North American Coal Corporation, for management and operation of the mine. The contract provides for pricing adjustments over its term based on economic indices. PNM's share of the coal costs is being recovered through the FPPAC. In connection with the exit of Four Corners, PNM would make payments of $75.0 million to NTEC for relief from its obligations under the coal supply agreements for Four Corners after December 31, 2024. PNM is not proposing to recover the $75.0 million from ratepayers and, if approved as filed, would not be recovered through the FPPAC. See Note 12 for additional information on PNM's Four Corners Abandonment Application. See additional discussion of the Four Corners CSA in Note 17 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

Coal Mine Reclamation

As indicated under Coal Combustion Residuals Waste Disposal above, SJGS currently disposes of CCRs in the surface mine pits adjacent to the plant and Four Corners disposes of CCRs in ponds and dry storage areas. As discussed in Note 16 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K, in conjunction with the proposed shutdown of SJGS Units 2 and 3 to comply with the BART requirements of the CAA, periodic updates to the coal mine reclamation study were requested by the SJGS participants. These updates have generally increased PNM's share of the estimated cost of mine reclamation and have included adjustments to reflect the December 2017 shutdown of SJGS Units 2 and 3, the terms of the reclamation services agreement with WSJ LLC, and changes to reflect the requirements of the 2015 San Juan mine permit plan.

In late 2020, a mine reclamation cost study was completed for the mine that serves SJGS and in December 2020, PNM remeasured its liability, which resulted in an increase in the overall reclamation costs of $3.6 million, due primarily to higher inflationary factors. As a result, PNM recorded a less than $0.1 million decrease in the liability at December 31, 2020 related to the underground mine and a decrease to the regulatory assets on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets and recorded a $3.6 million increase in the liability associated with the surface mine as regulatory disallowances and restructuring costs on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Earnings. PNM’s estimate of the costs necessary to reclaim the mine that serves SJGS
53


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

is subject to many assumptions, including the timing of reclamation, generally accepted practices at the time reclamation activities occur, and then current inflation and discount rates. PNM cannot predict the ultimate cost to reclaim the mine that serves SJGS and would seek to recover all costs related to reclaiming the underground mine from its customers but could be exposed to additional loss related to surface mine reclamation.

A coal mine reclamation study for the mine that serves Four Corners was issued in 2019. The study reflected operation of the mine through 2031, the term of the Four Corners CSA. The study resulted in a net increase in PNM’s share of the coal mine reclamation obligation of $0.8 million, which was primarily driven by lower overhead costs offset by an increase driven by a reduction in the discount rate used by PNM to measure the liability during the year ended December 31, 2019. As discussed in Note 12, PNM remains responsible for its share of costs associated with mine reclamation under the Four Corners Purchase and Sale Agreement with NTEC. NTEC and PNM will complete a reclamation study in 2024 providing the final mine reclamation cost estimate on the date of ownership transfer. PNM will make its final reclamation payment to NTEC based on the reclamation study in 2024 and will have no further obligations regarding the mine reclamation after 2024. PNM determined that events and circumstances regarding Four Corners, including the Four Corners Purchase and Sale Agreement with NTEC and the Four Corners Abandonment Application, indicated that it is more likely than not that PNM’s share of Four Corners coal mine reclamation obligation would be settled in 2024, rather than 2031. As of December 31, 2020, PNM remeasured its Four Corners coal mine reclamation liability and recorded a decrease to the liability of $2.5 million on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet and a decrease to regulatory disallowances and restructuring costs on the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Earnings.

Based on the most recent estimates and PNM’s ownership share of SJGS, PNM’s remaining payments as of March 31, 2021, for mine reclamation, in future dollars, are estimated to be $78.4 million for the surface mines at both SJGS and Four Corners and $35.1 million for the underground mine at SJGS. At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, liabilities, in current dollars, of $70.4 million and $71.7 million for surface mine reclamation and $26.6 million and $26.1 million for underground mine reclamation were recorded in other deferred credits.

Under the terms of the SJGS CSA, PNM and the other SJGS owners are obligated to compensate WSJ LLC for all reclamation costs associated with the supply of coal from the San Juan mine. The SJGS owners entered into a reclamation trust funds agreement to provide funding to compensate WSJ LLC for post-term reclamation obligations. As discussed in Note 16 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K, as part of the restructuring of SJGS ownership the SJGS owners negotiated the terms of an amended agreement to fund post-term reclamation obligations under the CSA. The trust funds agreement requires each owner to enter into an individual trust agreement with a financial institution as trustee, create an irrevocable reclamation trust, and periodically deposit funds into the reclamation trust for the owner’s share of the mine reclamation obligation. Deposits, which are based on funding curves, must be made on an annual basis. As part of the restructuring of SJGS ownership discussed above, the SJGS participants agreed to adjusted interim trust funding levels. PNM funded $3.2 million in 2020 and based on PNM’s reclamation trust fund balance at March 31, 2021, the current funding curves indicate PNM’s required contributions to its reclamation trust fund would be $5.5 million in 2021, $6.2 million in 2022, and 0 in 2023.

Under the Four Corners CSA, PNM is required to fund its ownership share of estimated final reclamation costs in annual installments into an irrevocable escrow account solely dedicated to the final reclamation cost of the surface mine at Four Corners. PNM contributed $2.0 million in 2020 and anticipates providing additional funding of $2.1 million in each of the years from 2021 through 2024. As discussed above, under the terms of the Four Corners Purchase and Sale Agreement with NTEC, PNM will make its final reclamation payment to NTEC based on the reclamation study in 2024 and will have no further obligations regarding the mine reclamation.

If future estimates increase the liability for surface mine reclamation, the excess would be expensed at that time. The impacts of changes in New Mexico state law as a result of the enactment of the ETA and regulatory determinations made by the NMPRC may also affect PNM’s financial position, results of operations, and cash flows. See additional discussion regarding PNM’s 2018 Compliance Filing and its SJGS and Four Corners Abandonment Applications in Note 12. PNM is currently unable to determine the outcome of these matters or the range of possible impacts.

Continuous Highwall Mining Royalty Rate

In August 2013, the DOI Bureau of Land Management (“BLM”) issued a proposed rulemaking that would retroactively apply the surface mining royalty rate of 12.5% to continuous highwall mining (“CHM”).  Comments regarding the rulemaking were due on October 11, 2013, and PNM submitted comments in opposition to the proposed rule. There is no legal deadline for adoption of the final rule.
54


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


SJCC, as former owner and operator of San Juan mine, utilized the CHM technique from 2000 to 2003, and with the approval of the Farmington, New Mexico Field Office of BLM to reclassify the final highwall as underground reserves, applied the 8.0% underground mining royalty rate to coal mined using CHM and sold to SJGS.  In March 2001, SJCC learned that the DOI Minerals Management Service (“MMS”) disagreed with the application of the underground royalty rate to CHM.  In August 2006, SJCC and MMS entered into an agreement tolling the statute of limitations on any administrative action to recover unpaid royalties until BLM issued a final, non-appealable determination as to the proper rate for CHM-mined coal.  The proposed BLM rulemaking has the potential to terminate the tolling provision of the settlement agreement. Underpaid royalties of approximately $5 million for SJGS would become due if the proposed BLM rule is adopted as proposed.  PNM’s share of any amount that is ultimately paid would be approximately 46.3%, none of which would be passed through PNM’s FPPAC. PNM is unable to predict the outcome of this matter.

PVNGS Liability and Insurance Matters

Public liability for incidents at nuclear power plants is governed by the Price-Anderson Nuclear Industries Indemnity Act, which limits the liability of nuclear reactor owners to the amount of insurance available from both commercial sources and an industry-wide retrospective payment plan. In accordance with this act, the PVNGS participants are insured against public liability exposure for a nuclear incident up to $13.7 billion per occurrence. PVNGS maintains the maximum available nuclear liability insurance in the amount of $450 million, which is provided by American Nuclear Insurers. The remaining $13.2 billion is provided through a mandatory industry-wide retrospective assessment program. If losses at any nuclear power plant covered by the program exceed the accumulated funds, PNM could be assessed retrospective premium adjustments. Based on PNM’s 10.2% interest in each of the 3 PVNGS units, PNM’s maximum potential retrospective premium assessment per incident for all 3 units is $42.1 million, with a maximum annual payment limitation of $6.2 million, to be adjusted periodically for inflation.

The PVNGS participants maintain insurance for damage to, and decontamination of, property at PVNGS in the aggregate amount of $2.8 billion, a substantial portion of which must first be applied to stabilization and decontamination. These coverages are provided by Nuclear Electric Insurance Limited (“NEIL”). The primary policy offered by NEIL contains a sublimit of $2.25 billion for non-nuclear property damage. If NEIL’s losses in any policy year exceed accumulated funds, PNM is subject to retrospective premium adjustments of $5.4 million for each retrospective premium assessment declared by NEIL’s Board of Directors due to losses. The insurance coverages discussed in this and the previous paragraph are subject to certain policy conditions, sublimits, and exclusions.

PVNGS Water Supply Litigation

In 1986, an action commenced regarding the rights of APS and the other PVNGS participants to the use of groundwater and effluent at PVNGS. APS filed claims that dispute the court’s jurisdiction over PVNGS’ groundwater rights and their contractual rights to effluent relating to PVNGS and, alternatively, seek confirmation of those rights. In 1999, the Arizona Supreme Court issued a decision finding that certain groundwater rights may be available to the federal government and Native American tribes. In addition, the Arizona Supreme Court issued a decision in 2000 affirming the lower court’s criteria for resolving groundwater claims. Litigation on these issues has continued in the trial court. No trial dates have been set in these matters. PNM does not expect that this litigation will have a material impact on its results of operation, financial position, or cash flows.

San Juan River Adjudication

In 1975, the State of New Mexico filed an action in NM District Court to adjudicate all water rights in the San Juan River Stream System, including water used at Four Corners and SJGS. PNM was made a defendant in the litigation in 1976. In March 2009, then President Obama signed legislation confirming a 2005 settlement with the Navajo Nation. Under the terms of the settlement agreement, the Navajo Nation’s water rights would be settled and finally determined by entry by the court of two proposed adjudication decrees.  The court issued an order in August 2013 finding that no evidentiary hearing was warranted in the Navajo Nation proceeding and, on November 1, 2013, issued a Partial Final Judgment and Decree of the Water Rights of the Navajo Nation approving the proposed settlement with the Navajo Nation. A number of parties subsequently appealed to the New Mexico Court of Appeals. PNM entered its appearance in the appellate case and supported the settlement agreement in the NM District Court. On April 3, 2018, the New Mexico Court of Appeals issued an order affirming the decision of the NM District Court. Several parties filed motions requesting a rehearing with the New Mexico Court of Appeals seeking clarification of the order, which were denied. The State of New Mexico and various other appellants filed a writ of certiorari with the NM Supreme Court. The NM Supreme Court granted the State of New Mexico’s petition and denied the
55


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

other parties’ requests. The issues regarding the Navajo Nation settlement have been briefed and are awaiting a decision by the NM Supreme Court. Adjudication of non-Indian water rights is ongoing.

PNM is participating in this proceeding since PNM’s water rights in the San Juan Basin may be affected by the rights recognized in the settlement agreement and adjudicated to the Navajo Nation, which comprise a significant portion of water available from sources on the San Juan River and in the San Juan Basin and which have priority in times of shortages. PNM is unable to predict the ultimate outcome of this matter or estimate the amount or range of potential loss and cannot determine the effect, if any, of any water rights adjudication on the present arrangements for water at SJGS and Four Corners. Final resolution of the case cannot be expected for several years. An agreement reached with the Navajo Nation in 1985, however, provides that if Four Corners loses a portion of its rights in the adjudication, the Navajo Nation will provide, for an agreed upon cost, sufficient water from its allocation to offset the loss.

Navajo Nation Allottee Matters

In September 2012, 43 landowners filed a notice of appeal with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (“BIA”) appealing a March 2011 decision of the BIA Regional Director regarding renewal of a right-of-way for a PNM transmission line. The landowners claim to be allottees, members of the Navajo Nation, who pursuant to the Dawes Act of 1887, were allotted ownership in land carved out of the Navajo Nation and allege that PNM is a rights-of-way grantee with rights-of-way across the allotted lands and are either in trespass or have paid insufficient fees for the grant of rights-of-way or both.  The allottees generally allege that they were not paid fair market value for the right-of-way, that they were denied the opportunity to make a showing as to their view of fair market value, and thus denied due process. The allottees filed a motion to dismiss their appeal with prejudice, which was granted in April 2014. Subsequent to the dismissal, PNM received a letter from counsel on behalf of what appears to be a subset of the 43 landowner allottees involved in the appeal, notifying PNM that the specified allottees were revoking their consents for renewal of right of way on six specific allotments.  On January 22, 2015, PNM received a letter from the BIA Regional Director identifying 10 allotments with rights-of-way renewals that were previously contested. The letter indicated that the renewals were not approved by the BIA because the previous consent obtained by PNM was later revoked, prior to BIA approval, by the majority owners of the allotments. It is the BIA Regional Director’s position that PNM must re-obtain consent from these landowners. On July 13, 2015, PNM filed a condemnation action in the NM District Court regarding the approximately 15.49 acres of land at issue. On September 18, 2015, the allottees filed a separate complaint against PNM for federal trespass. On December 1, 2015, the court ruled that PNM could not condemn 2 of the 5 allotments at issue based on the Navajo Nation’s fractional interest in the land. PNM filed a motion for reconsideration of this ruling, which was denied. On March 31, 2016, the Tenth Circuit granted PNM’s petition to appeal the December 1, 2015 ruling. Both matters have been consolidated. Oral argument before the Tenth Circuit was heard on January 17, 2017. On May 26, 2017, the Tenth Circuit affirmed the district court. On July 8, 2017, PNM filed a Motion for Reconsideration en banc with the Tenth Circuit, which was denied. The NM District Court stayed the case based on the Navajo Nation’s acquisition of interests in 2 additional allotments and the unresolved ownership of the fifth allotment due to the owner’s death. On November 20, 2017, PNM filed its petition for writ of certiorari with the US Supreme Court, which was denied. The underlying litigation continues in the NM District Court. On March 27, 2019, several individual allottees filed a motion for partial summary judgment on the issue of trespass. The Court held a hearing on the motion on June 18, 2019, and took the motion under advisement. The parties have reached an agreement in principal. The parties are negotiating the specific terms of the settlement documents. PNM cannot yet determine the outcome of these matters.

Merger-Related Litigation

NaN purported shareholders of PNMR filed lawsuits against PNMR and the members of the Board challenging the proposed Merger with Avangrid. The lawsuits all challenged the adequacy of the disclosures in the definitive proxy statement filed by PNMR with the SEC on January 5, 2021, and sought, among other things, to enjoin the Merger or, if the Merger has been consummated, to rescind the Merger or an award of damages, and an award of attorneys’ and experts’ fees and expenses. NaN of the lawsuits were filed in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York and 1 was filed in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York. The lawsuits pending in the Southern District of New York were consolidated in the case captioned In re PNM Resources, Inc. Shareholder Litigation, Consolidated Civil Action No. 1:20-CV-10874. The 5 plaintiffs in the consolidated action in the Southern District of New York filed notices of voluntary dismissal, and, on April 9, 2021, the Court ordered the Clerk of Court to close the consolidated action and all member cases. As of April 23, 2021, all five cases filed in the Southern District of New York have been closed. The case pending in the Eastern District of New York is captioned Durlacher v. PNM Resources, Inc., et al., Case No. 1:21-cv-0024. Defendants have not been served with the complaint in this case. PNMR believes that the claims raised in the action are without merit and if it were to be served, PNM would defend against them vigorously.

56


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

(12)   Regulatory and Rate Matters

The Company is involved in various regulatory matters, some of which contain contingencies that are subject to the same uncertainties as those described in Note 11. Additional information concerning regulatory and rate matters is contained in Note 17 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

PNM

Renewable Portfolio Standard

The REA provides for streamlined proceedings for approval of utilities’ renewable energy procurement plans, assures that utilities recover costs incurred consistent with approved procurement plans, and requires the NMPRC to establish a RCT for the procurement of renewable resources to prevent excessive costs being added to rates. The ETA sets a RCT of $60 per MWh using an average annual levelized resource cost basis. PNM makes renewable procurements consistent with the NMPRC approved plans and recovers certain renewable procurement costs from customers through a rate rider. See Renewable Energy Rider below.

Included in PNM’s approved procurement plans are the following renewable energy resources:

158 MW of PNM-owned solar-PV facilities
A PPA through 2044 for the output of New Mexico Wind, having a current aggregate capacity of 200 MW, and a PPA through 2035 for the output of Red Mesa Wind, having an aggregate capacity of 102 MW
A PPA through 2040 for 140 MW of output from La Joya Wind II
A PPA through 2042 for the output of the Lightning Dock Geothermal facility with a current capacity of 11 MW
Solar distributed generation, aggregating 169.5 MW at March 31, 2021, owned by customers or third parties from whom PNM purchases any net excess output and RECs

Renewable Energy Rider

The NMPRC has authorized PNM to recover certain renewable procurement costs through a rate rider billed on a per KWh basis. In its 2020 renewable energy procurement plan, which became effective on January 1, 2021, PNM proposed to collect $67.8 million for the year. The NMPRC approved recovery of $65.5 million through the rider, reflecting the rejection of PNM's request to recover the $2.3 million Sky Blue regulatory asset in 2021. PNM recorded revenues from the rider of $15.9 million in the three months ended March 31, 2021, and $15.1 million in the three months ended March 31, 2020.

Under the renewable rider, if PNM’s earned rate of return on jurisdictional equity in a calendar year, adjusted for items not representative of normal operations, exceeds the NMPRC-approved rate by 0.5%, PNM is required to refund the excess to customers during May through December of the following year. PNM did not exceed such limitation in 2020.

Energy Efficiency and Load Management

Program Costs and Incentives/Disincentives

The New Mexico Efficient Use of Energy Act (“EUEA”) requires public utilities to achieve specified levels of energy savings and to obtain NMPRC approval to implement energy efficiency and load management programs. The EUEA requires the NMPRC to remove utility disincentives to implementing energy efficiency and load management programs and to provide incentives for such programs. The NMPRC has adopted a rule to implement this act. PNM’s costs to implement approved programs and incentives are recovered through a rate rider. During the 2019 New Mexico legislative session, the EUEA was amended to, among other things, include a decoupling mechanism for disincentives, preclude a reduction to a utility’s ROE based on approval of disincentive or incentive mechanisms, establish energy savings targets for the period 2021 through 2025, and require that annual program funding be 3% to 5% of an electric utility's annual customer bills excluding gross receipt taxes, franchise and right-of-way access fees, provided that a customer's annual cost not exceed seventy-five thousand dollars.

In 2019, PNM submitted a filing to address incentives to be earned in 2020. PNM’s proposed incentive mechanism was similar to that approved for 2018 and 2019 with minor modifications to reflect input from interested parties. The proposed incentive mechanism includes a base incentive of 7.1% of program costs, or approximately $1.8 million, based on savings of 59 GWh in 2020 with a sliding scale that provides for additional incentive if savings exceed 68 GWh. No hearings were considered necessary and PNM’s 2020 energy efficiency rider reflecting the 2020 incentive became effective beginning
57


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

December 30, 2019. On, April 15, 2021 PNM filed its 2020 Energy Efficiency Annual Report which reconciles the actual 2020 profit incentive collections with the profit incentive authorized by the NMPRC resulting in an additional $0.8 million incentive to be collected during the remainder of 2021. The additional incentive was authorized for 2020 because annual energy savings for the year exceeded 87 GWh, and was the maximum level of profit incentive allowed under the approved mechanism. PNM will begin collecting the additional incentive effective May 27, 2021, unless suspended by the NMPRC.

On April 15, 2020, PNM filed an application for energy efficiency and load management programs to be offered in 2021, 2022, and 2023. The proposed program portfolio consists of twelve programs with a total annual budget of $31.4 million in 2021, $31.0 million in 2022, and $29.6 million in 2023. The application also sought approval of an annual base incentive of 7.1% of the portfolio budget if PNM were to achieve energy savings of at least 80 GWh in a year. The proposed incentive would increase if PNM is able to achieve savings greater than 80 GWh in a year. The application also proposed an advanced metering infrastructure (“AMI”) pilot program, which included the installation of 5,000 AMI meters at a cost of $2.9 million. PNM proposed the pilot program to comply with an NMPRC order denying PNM’s February 2016 application to replace its existing customer metering equipment with AMI. PNM did not recommend the AMI pilot program due to the limited benefits that are cost-effective under a pilot structure. On September 17, 2020, the Hearing Examiner in the case issued a recommended decision recommending that PNM's proposed energy efficiency and load management program be approved, with the exception of the proposed AMI pilot program. On October 28, 2020, the NMPRC issued an order adopting the recommended decision in its entirety.

2020 Decoupling Petition

As discussed above, the legislature amended the EUEA to, among other things, include a decoupling mechanism for disincentives. On May 28, 2020, PNM filed a petition for approval of a rate adjustment mechanism that would decouple the rates of its residential and small power rate classes. Decoupling is a rate design principle that severs the link between the recovery of fixed costs of the utility through volumetric charges. PNM proposed to record the difference between the annual revenue per customer derived from the cost of service approved in the NM 2015 Rate Case and the annual revenue per customer actually recovered from the rate classes beginning on January 1, 2021. If approved, on January 1, 2022, PNM would begin to collect the difference from customers if the revenue per customer from the NM 2015 Rate Case exceeds the actual revenue recovered in 2021, or return the difference to customers if the actual revenue per customer recovered in 2021 exceeds the revenue per customer from the NM 2015 Rate Case. On July 13, 2020, NEE, ABCWUA, the City of Albuquerque, and Bernalillo County filed motions to dismiss the petition on the grounds that approving PNM’s proposed rate adjustment mechanism outside of a general rate case would result in retroactive ratemaking and piecemeal ratemaking. The motions to dismiss also allege that PNM’s proposed rate adjustment mechanism is inconsistent with the EUEA. Responses to the motions to dismiss were filed on August 7, 2020. On September 16, 2020, ABCWUA, Bernalillo County, CCAE, the City of Albuquerque, NEE, NMAG, Staff and WRA filed testimony. CCAE and WRA support PNM's petition, but recommend that the rate adjustment mechanism not take effect until new rates are approved in PNM's next general rate case. The other parties filing testimony oppose PNM's petition. On October 2, 2020, PNM requested an order to vacate the public hearing, scheduled to begin October 13, 2020, and staying the proceeding until the NMPRC decides whether to entertain a petition to issue a declaratory order resolving the issues raised in the motions to dismiss. On October 7, 2020, the Hearing Examiner approved PNM's request to stay the proceeding and vacate the public hearing and required PNM to file a petition for declaratory order by October 30, 2020. On October 30, 2020, PNM filed a petition for declaratory order asking the NMPRC to issue an order finding that full revenue decoupling is authorized by the EUEA. On November 4, 2020, ABCWUA and Bernalillo County jointly filed a competing petition asking the NMPRC to issue a declaratory order on the EUEA’s requirements related to disincentives. On November 24, 2020, the NMAG requested that the NMPRC deny both petitions for declaratory orders and instead address disincentives under the EUEA in a rulemaking. On March 17, 2021, the NMPRC issued an order granting the petitions for declaratory order, commencing a declaratory order proceeding to address the petitions, denying the NMAG’s request to initiate a rulemaking, and appointing a hearing examiner to preside over the declaratory order proceeding. On March 30, 2021, the Hearing Examiner issued a procedural order that requires initial briefs to be filed on June 7, 2021, response briefs to be filed on June 28, 2021, and schedules an oral argument for July 15, 2021. PNM cannot predict the outcome of this matter.

Integrated Resource Plans

NMPRC rules require that investor owned utilities file an IRP every three years. The IRP is required to cover a 20-year planning period and contain an action plan covering the first four years of that period.


58


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

2020 IRP

NMPRC rules required PNM to file its 2020 IRP in July 2020. On March 16, 2020, PNM filed a motion to extend the deadline to file its 2020 IRP to six months after the NMPRC issues a final order approving a replacement resource portfolio and closes the docket in the bifurcated SJGS Abandonment Application and replacement resource proceedings. On April 8, 2020, the NMPRC approved PNM's motion to extend the deadline to file its 2020 IRP as requested. On January 29, 2021, PNM filed its 2020 IRP addressing the 20-year planning period from 2020 through 2040. The plan focuses on a carbon-free electricity portfolio by 2040 that would eliminate coal at the end of 2024. This includes replacing the power from San Juan with a mix of approved carbon-free resources and the plan to exit Four Corners at the end of 2024. The plan highlights the need for additional investments in a diverse set of resources, including renewables to supply carbon-free power, energy storage to balance supply and demand, and efficiency and other demand-side resources to mitigate load growth.
Abandonment Applications made under the ETA

As discussed in Note 11, the ETA sets a statewide standard that requires investor-owned electric utilities to have specified percentages of their electric-generating portfolios be from renewable and zero-carbon generating resources. The ETA also provides for a transition from fossil-fuel generation resources to renewable and other carbon-free resources through certain provisions relating to the abandonment of coal-fired generating facilities. These provisions include the use of energy transition bonds, which are designed to be highly rated bonds that can be issued to finance certain costs of abandoning coal-fired facilities that are retired prior to January 1, 2023, for facilities operated by a “qualifying utility,” or prior to January 1, 2032, for facilities that are not operated by the qualifying utility.

SJGS Abandonment Application

On July 1, 2019, PNM filed a Consolidated Application for the Abandonment and Replacement of SJGS and Related Securitized Financing Pursuant to the ETA (the “SJGS Abandonment Application”). The SJGS Abandonment Application sought NMPRC approval to retire PNM’s share of SJGS after the existing coal supply and participation agreements end in June 2022, for approval of replacement resources, and for the issuance of approximately $361 million of energy transition bonds (the “Securitized Bonds”). PNM’s request for the issuance of Securitized Bonds included approximately $283 million of forecasted undepreciated investments in SJGS at June 30, 2022, an estimated $28.6 million for plant decommissioning and coal mine reclamation costs, approximately $9.6 million in upfront financing costs, and approximately $20.0 million for job training and severance costs for affected employees. Proceeds from the Securitization Bonds would also be used to fund approximately $19.8 million for economic development in the four corners area.

On July 10, 2019, the NMPRC issued an order requiring the SJGS Abandonment Application be considered in two proceedings: one addressing SJGS abandonment and related financing and the other addressing replacement resources. After multiple filings, proceedings, requests for clarification and legal challenges, on January 29, 2020, the NM Supreme Court issued a ruling requiring the NMPRC to apply the ETA to all aspects of PNM’s SJGS Abandonment Application, indicating any previous NMPRC orders inconsistent with the ruling should be vacated, and denying parties’ request for stay. The NM Supreme Court issued a subsequent opinion, on July 23, 2020, more fully explaining the legal rationale for the January 29, 2020 ruling. Hearings on the abandonment and securitized financing proceedings were held in December 2019 and hearings on replacement resources were held in January 2020.

On February 21, 2020, the Hearing Examiners issued two recommended decisions recommending approval of PNM’s proposed abandonment of SJGS, subject to approval of replacement resources, and approval of PNM’s proposed financing order to issue Securitized Bonds.  The Hearing Examiners recommended that PNM be authorized to abandon SJGS by June 30, 2022, and to record regulatory assets for certain other abandonment costs that are not specifically addressed under the provisions of the ETA to preserve its ability to recover the costs in a future general rate case. The Hearing Examiner recommended that this authority only extend to the deferral of the costs and it not be an approval of any ratemaking treatment. The Hearing Examiners also recommended PNM be authorized to issue Securitized Bonds of up to $361 million and establish a rate rider to collect non-bypassable customer charges for repayment of the bonds and be subject to bi-annual adjustments (the “Energy Transition Charge”). The Hearing Examiners recommended an interim rate rider adjustment upon the start date of the Energy Transition Charge to provide immediate credits to customers for the full value of PNM’s revenue requirement related to SJGS until those reductions are reflected in base rates. In addition, the Hearing Examiners recommended PNM be granted authority to establish regulatory assets to recover costs that PNM will pay prior to the issuance of the Securitized Bonds, including costs associated with the bond issuances as well as for severances, job training, economic development, and workforce training. On April 1, 2020, the NMPRC unanimously approved the Hearing Examiners' recommended decisions regarding the abandonment of SJGS and the related securitized financing under the ETA.
59


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


On April 10, 2020, CFRE and NEE filed a notice of appeal with the NM Supreme Court of the NMPRC's approval of PNM's request to issue securitized financing under the ETA. The NM Supreme Court granted motions to intervene filed by PNM, WRA, CCAE, and the Sierra Club. On May 8, 2020, CFRE and NEE filed a joint statement of issues with the NM Supreme Court which asserts that the NMPRC improperly applied the ETA and that the ETA violates the New Mexico Constitution. On June 19, 2020, WRA filed a motion to dismiss CFRE and NEE’s constitutional challenges to the ETA on the ground that the New Mexico Constitution provides that only New Mexico district courts have original jurisdiction over the claims. On July 24, 2020, the NM Supreme Court issued an order denying WRA’s motion to dismiss. On August 17, 2020, the appellants filed a Brief in Chief and on October 5, 2020, PNM, WRA, CCAE and Sierra Club filed Answer Briefs. PNM cannot predict the outcome of this matter.

PNM evaluated the consequences of the NMPRC's April 1, 2020 orders approving the abandonment of SJGS and the related issuance of Securitized Bonds. This evaluation indicated that it is probable that PNM will be required to fund severances for PNM employees at the facility upon its retirement in 2022 and for PNMR shared services employees providing administrative and other support services to SJGS. In addition, the evaluation indicated that it is probable PNM will be obligated to fund severances and other costs for the WSJ LLC employees and to fund certain state agencies for economic development and workforce training upon the issuance of the Securitized Bonds. As a result, in March 2020, PNMR and PNM recorded obligations of $9.4 million and $8.1 million for estimated severances, $8.9 million for obligations to fund severances and other costs of WSJ LLC employees, and to fund $19.8 million to state agencies for economic development and workforce training upon the issuance of the Securitized Bonds. The total amount recorded for these estimates of $38.1 million and $36.8 million is reflected in other deferred credits and as a corresponding deferred regulatory asset on PNMR's and PNM's Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets at December 31, 2020. These estimates may be adjusted in future periods as the Company refines its expectations. In addition, as discussed above these costs may be challenged by parties pursuant to the notices of appeal filed with the NM Supreme Court on April 10, 2020.

On June 24, 2020, the Hearing Examiners issued a recommended decision on PNM's request for approval of replacement resources that addressed the entire portfolio of replacement resources, which superseded a previous partial recommended decision issued on March 27, 2020. The Hearing Examiners concluded that the ultimate selection of a portfolio of replacement resources involves policy considerations that are the province of the NMPRC and stated that they did not intend to make that decision for the NMPRC. On July 29, 2020, the NMPRC issued an order approving resource selection criteria identified in the ETA and would include PPAs for 650 MW of solar and 300 MW of battery storage. The order also granted in part PNM’s request for an extension of time for PNM to file the application to implement the replacement resource portfolio. PNM has 60 days from the date of the order to file an application in a separate docket seeking approval of the proposed final, executed contracts, for any replacement resources that are not currently in evidence that have been approved by the NMPRC.

On September 28, 2020, PNM filed its application for approval of the final executed contracts for the replacement resources. In addition, PNM provided updated costs estimates of $8.1 million for the SJGS replacement resources, based on the NMPRC authorization to create regulatory assets granted in the abandonment order, which it plans to seek recovery of in a future general rate case. On November 13, 2020, the Hearing Examiner issued a recommended decision recommending approval of a 200 MW solar PPA combined with a 100 MW battery storage agreement and the 100 MW solar PPA combined with a 30 MW battery storage agreement. On December 2, 2020, the NMPRC issued an order adopting the recommended decision in its entirety.

Additional information concerning the SJGS Abandonment Application is contained in Note 17 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

Four Corners Abandonment Application

On November 1, 2020, PNM entered into the Four Corners Purchase and Sale Agreement with NTEC, pursuant to which PNM agreed to sell its 13% ownership interest (other than certain transmission assets) in Four Corners to NTEC. The sale is contingent upon NMPRC approval and expected to close by the end of 2024. In connection with the sale, PNM would make payments of $75.0 million to NTEC for relief from its obligations under the coal supply agreement for Four Corners after December 31, 2024. Pursuant to the Four Corners Purchase and Sale Agreement, PNM will retain its current plant decommissioning and coal mine reclamation obligations, subject to the final mine reclamation study and payment at the end of 2024. PNM will have no obligation for reclamation after 2024. PNM made an initial payment to NTEC of $15.0 million in November 2020, subject to refund with interest upon termination of the Four Corners Purchase and Sale Agreement prior to closing. Under the terms of the Four Corners Purchase and Sale Agreement, upon receipt of the NMPRC approval, PNM
60


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

would make a final payment of $60.0 million. The initial $15.0 million payment was recorded in other current assets on the Consolidated Balance Sheet as of December 31, 2020.

On January 8, 2021, PNM filed the Four Corners Abandonment Application, which seeks NMPRC approval to exit PNM’s share of Four Corners as of December 31, 2024, and to issue approximately $300 million of energy transition bonds as provided by the ETA. PNM’s request for the issuance of Securitized Bonds included approximately $272 million of forecasted undepreciated investments in Four Corners at December 31, 2024, an estimated $4.6 million for plant decommissioning costs, estimated $7.3 million in upfront financing costs, and estimated $16.5 million in economic development. PNM intends to submit a separate application for NMPRC approval of a replacement resource portfolio following NMPRC action on this application. This deferral is authorized by the ETA and will provide for adequate time to complete a competitive bid process to develop and finalize a replacement resource portfolio from feasible replacement resources for NMPRC consideration.

On January 26, 2021, Sierra Club filed a motion in the Four Corners Abandonment Application requesting that the NMPRC order PNM to file supplemental testimony addressing the prudence of Four Corners investments or alternatively that the NMPRC dismiss the Four Corners Abandonment Application and permit PNM to refile after the prudence issue is resolved. In addition, on January 28, 2021, NEE and CFRE filed a motion requesting that the NMPRC dismiss the application, stating that approval of the abandonment would be contrary to the provision of the REA that prevents the sale of carbon dioxide emitting electricity-generating resources as a means of complying with the RPS, and that the Four Corners Abandonment Application does not demonstrate that the sale of 200 MW to NTEC will not result in a net detriment to public interest. Parties filed positions on the sufficiency of PNM’s application on February 11, 2021. On February 18, 2021, PNM filed a consolidated response to the motions and the positions on the sufficiency of the application which defended the legal sufficiency of PNM’s application and addressed potential amendments to the application and testimonies. On February 26, 2021, the Hearing Examiner issued an order on the sufficiency of the Four Corners Application finding that the application was deficient on its face and fails to adequately support whether or not the sale and transfer of PNM’s interest in Four Corners to NTEC is in the public interest. However, given the NMPRC’s preference to address Four Corners issues in the case, as well as PNM’s concession on filing an amended application, the Hearing Examiner did not recommend that the case be dismissed. The order requires PNM to file an amended application by March 15, 2021; establishes that the nine-month period for review of the amended application shall start on the date of PNM’s filing of the amended application and run through December 15, 2021; requires PNM to file supplemental testimony addressing the prudence of its investment in Four Corners; requires PNM to more explicitly address the statutory standards for approval of the proposed transfer to NTEC; and requires PNM to file a motion to withdraw the January 8, 2021 Four Corners Application. On March 15, 2021, PNM filed an amended application and supplemental testimony for the approval of the abandonment and transfer of Four Corners and issuance of a financing order pursuant to the ETA and a motion to withdraw the January 8, 2021 Four Corners Application. The amended application and supplemental testimony provided additional information to support PNM's request to abandon its interest in Four Corners and transfer that interest to NTEC, and also provided additional detail explaining how the proposed sale and abandonment provides a net public benefit. On March 19, 2021, the Hearing Examiner issued a procedural order requiring Staff and intervenors to file testimony on or before July 12, 2021, requiring any rebuttal testimony be filed on or before August 2, 2021, and scheduling a hearing to begin on August 31, 2021. The procedural order also requires that if a settlement is reached, any stipulation be filed no later than July 12, 2021.

On October 30, 2020, NEE filed a formal complaint with the NMPRC seeking an investigation into the reasonableness and lawfulness of PNM’s continued reliance on “climate-altering and uneconomic coal” at Four Corners. NEE explained that they withdrew their Supreme Court appeal of the NM 2016 Rate Case under the notion that PNM would be filing a rate case in 2019 and they would be able to challenge the Four Corners expenditures in that case. NEE explained that because PNM has delayed its rate case several times, Four Corners has remained “imprudently” in rates. NEE asked that PNM be required to demonstrate that PNM’s investment in Four Corners was prudent. NEE stated if the NMPRC deems PNM’s investment as imprudent, ratepayers will be held harmless and all costs including carrying charges, effective October 30, 2020, and going forward, be denied. On February 10, 2021, the NMPRC denied NEE’s complaint and stated that issues related to Four Corners prudence should be addressed in the Four Corners Abandonment Application. On February 22, 2021, NEE filed a Motion for Reconsideration of the NMPRC’s February 10, 2021 order, which was denied on March 10, 2021. On April 9, 2021, NEE filed a Notice of Appeal with the NM Supreme Court regarding their formal complaint on Four Corners. PNM cannot predict the outcome of this matter.

The financial impact of an early exit of Four Corners and the NMPRC approval process are influenced by many factors outside of PNM’s control, including the overall political and economic conditions of New Mexico. See additional discussion of the ETA in Note 11. PNM cannot predict the outcome of these matters.


61


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

PVNGS Leased Interest Abandonment Application

On April 2, 2021, PNM filed an application with the NMPRC requesting approval for the decertification and abandonment of 114 MW of leased PVNGS capacity, sale and transfer of related assets, and approval to procure new resources ("PVNGS Leased Interest Abandonment Application"). As discussed in Note 13, PNM currently controls leased capacity in PVNGS Unit 1 and Unit 2 under 5 separate leases ("Leased Interest") that were approved and certificated by the predecessor agency to the NMPRC in the 1980s. NaN of the 5 leases for 104 MW of Leased Interest terminate on January 15, 2023, while the remaining lease for 10 MW of Leased Interest terminates on January 15, 2024. Associated with the Leased Interest are certain PNM-owned assets and nuclear fuel that are necessary for the ongoing operation and maintenance of the Leased Interest and integration of the Leased Interest generation to the transmission network. PNM has determined that there will be net benefits to its customers to return the Leased Interest to the lessors in conformity with the leases, sell and transfer the related PNM-owned assets, and to replace these Leased Interest with new resources. In the application PNM is requesting NMPRC authorization to decertify and abandon its Leased Interest and to create regulatory assets for the associated remaining undepreciated investments with consideration of cost recovery of the undepreciated investments in a future rate case. PNM is also seeking NMPRC approval to sell and transfer the PNM-owned assets and nuclear fuel supply associated with the Leased Interest to SRP, which will be acquiring the Leased Interest from the lessors upon termination of the existing leases. In addition, PNM is seeking NMPRC approval for a 150 MW solar PPA combined with a 40 MW battery storage agreement, and a stand-alone 100 MW battery storage agreement to replace the Leased Interest. To ensure system reliability and load needs are met in 2023, when a majority of the leases expire, PNM is also requesting NMPRC approval for a 300 MW solar PPA combined with a 150 MW battery storage agreement. PNM's application sought a six-month regulatory time frame. On April 21, 2021, the NMPRC issued an order assigning a hearing examiner and stated PNM's request to abandon the Leased Interest does not have any statutory or rule time limitation and the six-month limit in which the NMPRC must issue an order regarding the request for approvals of the solar PPAs and battery storage agreements does not begin until after the NMPRC acts on the abandonment request. In addition to approval by the NMPRC, PNM and SRP require NRC approval for the transfer of the associated possessory licenses at the end of the term of each of the respective leases. PNM cannot predict the outcome of this matter.

Facebook, Inc. Data Center Project

PNM has a special service contract to provide service to Facebook, Inc. for a data center being constructed in PNM’s service area. Facebook’s service requirements include the acquisition by PNM of a sufficient amount of new renewable energy resources and RECs to match the energy and capacity requirements of the data center. The cost of renewable energy procured is passed through to Facebook under a rate rider. A special service rate is applied to Facebook’s energy consumption in those hours of the month when their consumption exceeds the energy production from the renewable resources. As of March 31, 2021, PNM is procuring energy from 130 MW of solar-PV capacity from NMRD, a 50% equity method investee of PNMR Development. See additional discussion of NMRD in Note 16.

PNM has NMPRC approval for several PPAs to purchase renewable energy and RECs to supply renewable energy to the data center. Details related to these PPAs can be found in Note 17 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

On February 8, 2021, PNM filed an application with the NMPRC for approval to service the data center for an additional 190 MW of solar PPA combined with 100 MW of battery storage and a 50 MW solar PPA expected to be operational in 2023. In its application, PNM filed a Motion for Expedited Consideration seeking an expedited schedule for this proceeding that would provide a Final Order by June 1, 2021, in order to facilitate timely completion of the renewable resources to meet the expected completion date of the data center expansion. On February 17, 2021, the NMPRC approved an order with a schedule targeting a final order by June 1, 2021. On April 14, 2021, Staff filed testimony recommending that the NMPRC either extend the targeted date for issuance of a final order to provide more time to review PNM’s application or, in the alternative, issue an order approving the two proposed PPAs and denying the 100 MW of battery storage. PNM filed rebuttal to Staff’s testimony on April 21, 2021. On April 28, 2021, the NMPRC issued an order finding that it requires additional time to review and that a hearing will be held with a hearing examiner presiding. The order sets a procedural schedule to endeavor to provide a Final Order by the end of June 2021.

COVID-19 Regulatory Matters

In March 2020, PNM and other utilities voluntarily implemented a temporary suspension of disconnections and late payment fees for non-payment of utility bills in response to the impacts of the novel coronavirus global pandemic (“COVID-19”). On March 18, 2020, the NMPRC conducted an emergency open meeting for the purpose of adopting
62


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

emergency amendments to its rules governing service to residential customers. The NMPRC’s emergency order is applicable during the duration of the Governor of New Mexico's emergency executive order and allows for the closure of payment centers, prohibits the discontinuance of a residential customer’s service for non-payment, and suspends the expiration of medical certificates for certain customers. On April 27, 2020, PNM, El Paso Electric Company, New Mexico Gas Company, and Southwestern Public Service Company filed a joint motion with the NMPRC requesting authorization to track costs resulting from each utility's response to the COVID-19 outbreak. The utilities propose these incremental costs and uncollected customer accounts receivable resulting from COVID-19 during the period March 11, 2020 through December 31, 2020, be recorded as a regulatory asset. On June 24, 2020, the NMPRC issued an order authorizing all public utilities regulated by the NMPRC to create a regulatory asset to defer incremental costs related to COVID-19, including increases to bad debt expense incurred during the period beginning March 11, 2020 through the termination of the Governor of New Mexico’s emergency executive order. The NMPRC order requires public utilities creating regulatory assets to pursue all federal, state, or other subsidies available, to record a regulatory liability for all offsetting cost savings resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, and allows PNM to request recovery in future ratemaking proceedings. As a result, PNM had deferred incremental costs related to COVID-19 of $10.7 million and $8.8 million in regulatory assets on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. In addition, PNM had costs savings related to COVID-19 of $0.9 million in regulatory liabilities on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. The NMPRC’s order also imposed additional quarterly reporting requirements on public utilities creating regulatory assets that include changes in customer usage and increased costs and savings recorded to regulatory assets and liabilities.

On February 3, 2021, the NMPRC issued an order finding that the temporary mandatory moratorium on disconnections of residential utility customers shall be in effect from the date of the order for 100 days (May 14, 2021). At the end of the moratorium, a 90-day transition period will begin, which continues the temporary moratorium on disconnections to provide the utilities additional time to assist residential customers with arrearages to enter into installment agreements. The transition period may be a mandatory continuation of the temporary moratorium on disconnections if the Governor of New Mexico’s executive order remains in effect or may be a consensual continuation of the moratorium on disconnections if the Governor of New Mexico’s executive order terminates or expires prior to the end of the transition period. All regulated public utilities may begin disconnections at the end of the transition period.

Transportation Electrification Program

On December 18, 2020, in compliance with New Mexico Statute, PNM filed its PNM 2022-2023 Transportation Electrification Program (“TEP”) for approval with the NMPRC. PNM’s requested TEP includes a budget of approximately $8.4 million with flexibility of 25%. As proposed, up to 25% of the program budget will be dedicated to low and moderate income customers and is based on a model with no company ownership of charging facilities. PNM’s proposed TEP provides incentives through rebates to both residential and non-residential customers towards the purchase of chargers and/or behind-the-meter infrastructure. PNM’s TEP includes a request for a modified rate to add an electric vehicle pilot with a time-of-use option, a new non-residential electric vehicle time-of-use rate pilot without demand charges and implementation of a new rider to collect the actual costs of the TEP. PNM’s application requested NMPRC approval by the end of August 2021 and authority to file a new TEP by the end of June 2023. Response and rebuttal testimonies are due on May 3, 2021 and May 13, 2021, respectively, and a hearing is scheduled to commence on May 24, 2021. PNM cannot predict the outcome of this matter.

Unexecuted Transmission Service Agreements (TSAs) with Leeward Renewable Energy

On March 12, 2021, PNM filed four unexecuted TSAs with FERC totaling 145 MW with Leeward Energy. The unexecuted TSAs provide long-term firm, point-to-point transmission service on PNM’s transmission system. The unexecuted TSAs are based on the pro-forma transmission service agreements with certain non-conforming provisions under Attachment A of PNM’s OATT and include PNM’s OATT rate. PNM is filing the unexecuted TSAs at the request of Leeward because the parties have been unable to reach an agreement on the terms and conditions for transmission service. In particular, Leeward believes the rate under the unexecuted TSAs should be an incremental rate while PNM believes the appropriate rate is its OATT rate.

On April 2, 2021, Leeward Energy and Pattern Energy separately protested PNM’s March 12, 2021 filing of four unexecuted TSAs with Leeward Energy. The parties are requesting that FERC direct PNM to apply the same rate to the unexecuted TSAs as the incremental rate assessed to the Western Spirit transmission facilities, inclusive of Leeward’s network upgrades and requested service, or, in the alternative, initiate hearing and settlement judge procedures to address the unjust and unreasonable application of the FERC’s “higher of” policy. On April 19, 2021, PNM filed a motion for leave to answer and contested the arguments made by Leeward Energy and Pattern Energy. In its response, PNM stated that it disagrees with the parties' pricing scheme because doing so would not recognize all the transmission facilities necessary to provide Leeward
63


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

service, does not hold PNM's other transmission customers harmless, and is inconsistent with FERC pricing policy and precedent. PNM further explains that the proposal to include its FERC approved embedded rate in the unexecuted TSAs is just and reasonable and should be accepted by FERC. PNM cannot predict the outcome of this matter.

TNMP

Recovery of TNMP Rate Case Costs

Recovery of the cost of TNMP’s rate case was moved into a separate proceeding to begin after the conclusion of the TNMP 2018 Rate Case discussed in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K. TNMP sought recovery of costs incurred through August 2019 in the amount of $3.8 million and proposed these costs be collected from customers over a three-year period. In October 2019, TNMP and other parties to the proceedings filed an unopposed settlement stipulation that reduced TNMP’s cost recovery to $3.3 million and provide for recovery over a period not to exceed three-years beginning on March 1, 2020. On January 16, 2020, the PUCT approved the settlement. As a result of the PUCT's order, TNMP recorded a pre-tax write-off of $0.5 million in December 2019.

Transmission Cost of Service Rates

TNMP can update its transmission cost of service (“TCOS”) rates twice per year to reflect changes in its invested capital although updates are not allowed while a general rate case is in process. Updated rates reflect the addition and retirement of transmission facilities, including appropriate depreciation, federal income tax and other associated taxes, and the approved rate of return on such facilities.

The following sets forth TNMP’s recent interim transmission cost rate increases:

Effective DateApproved Increase in Rate BaseAnnual Increase in Revenue
(In millions)
March 27, 202059.2 7.8 
October 7, 202010.8 2.0 
March 12, 2021112.6 14.1 

Periodic Distribution Rate Adjustment

PUCT rules permit interim rate adjustments to reflect changes in investments in distribution assets. Distribution utilities may file for a periodic rate adjustment between April 1 and April 8 of each year as long as the electric utility is not earning more than its authorized rate of return using weather-normalized data.

On April 6, 2020, TNMP filed its 2020 DCOS that requested an increase in TNMP's annual distribution revenue requirement of $14.7 million based on net incremental capital distribution investments of $149.2 million. On June 26, 2020, the parties filed a unanimous settlement for a $14.3 million annual distribution revenue requirement with rates effective September 1, 2020. Subsequently, the ALJ issued an order on June 30, 2020, approving interim rates effective September 1, 2020, and remanded the case to the PUCT for approval. On August 13, 2020, the PUCT approved the unanimous settlement. On April 5, 2021, TNMP filed its 2021 DCOS that requests an increase in TNMP annual distribution revenue requirement of $14.0 million based on an increase in rate base of $104.5 million. TNMP requested a procedural schedule that would result in rates being effective in September 2021. TNMP cannot predict the outcome of this matter.

Energy Efficiency

TNMP recovers the costs of its energy efficiency programs through an energy efficiency cost recovery factor (“EECRF”), which includes projected program costs, under and over collected costs from prior years, rate case expenses, and performance bonuses (if programs exceed mandated savings goals). TNMP’s 2019 EECRF filing requested recovery of $5.9 million, including a performance bonus of $0.8 million, and became effective on March 1, 2020. TNMP’s 2020 EECRF filing requested recovery of $5.9 million, including a performance bonus of $1.0 million, and became effective on March 1, 2021.

64


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)


COVID-19 Electricity Relief Program

On March 26, 2020, the PUCT issued an order establishing an electricity relief program for electric utilities, REPs, and customers impacted by COVID-19. The program allowed providers to implement a rider to collect unpaid residential retail customer bills and to ensure these customers continued to have electric service. In addition, the program provided transmission and distribution providers access to zero-interest loans from ERCOT. Collectively, ERCOT’s loans could not exceed $15 million. The program had a term of six months unless extended by the PUCT. In a separate order, the PUCT authorized electric utilities to establish a regulatory asset for costs related to COVID-19. These costs included but were not limited to costs related to unpaid accounts.

TNMP filed its rider on March 30, 2020. The rider was effective immediately and established a charge of $0.33 per MWh in accordance with the PUCT's order. Final collections under the rider exceeded unpaid residential retail customer bills and are presented net as a regulatory liability of $0.1 million on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. Other COVID-19 related costs of $0.8 million and $0.7 million were also recorded as a regulatory asset on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. On April 14, 2020, TNMP executed an interest-free loan agreement to borrow $0.5 million from ERCOT and on October 30, 2020, the balance of the loan was repaid.

On August 27, 2020, the PUCT issued an order determining that new enrollments in the program should end on August 31, 2020, and benefits under the program should end on September 30, 2020, to allow eligible customers a minimum of one month of benefits from the program. All requests for reimbursement were made by November 30, 2020. On December 4, 2020, TNMP filed to end collections under the tariff. Final collections under the rider were made on December 11, 2020. On January 14, 2021, TNMP made a final compliance filing for the electricity relief program.

Advanced Meter System Deployment

TNMP was notified by its largest AMS service provider that its existing communication platform would be decommissioned in February 2022. TNMP evaluated technological alternatives for its AMS and on October 2, 2020, filed an application with the PUCT for authorization to implement necessary upgrades of approximately $46 million by November 2022. On January 14, 2021, the PUCT approved TNMP's application, TNMP will seek recovery of the investment associated with the upgrade in a future general rate proceeding or distribution cost recovery factor filing.

(13)     Lease Commitments

The Company leases office buildings, vehicles, and other equipment. In addition, PNM leases interests in PVNGS Units 1 and 2 and certain rights-of-way agreements are classified as leases. All of the Company's leases with terms in excess of one year are recorded on the balance sheet by recording a present value lease liability and a corresponding right-of-use asset. Operating lease expense is recognized within operating expenses according to the use of the asset on a straight-line basis. Financing lease costs, which are comprised primarily of fleet and office equipment leases commencing after January 1, 2019, are recognized by amortizing the right-of-use asset on a straight-line basis and by recording interest expense on the lease liability. Financing lease right-of-use assets amortization is reflected in depreciation and amortization and interest on financing lease liabilities is reflected as interest charges on the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Statements of Earnings.

See additional discussion of the Company's leasing activities in Note 8 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

PVNGS

PNM leases interests in Units 1 and 2 of PVNGS. The PVNGS leases were entered into in 1985 and 1986 and initially were scheduled to expire on January 15, 2015 for the 4 Unit 1 leases and January 15, 2016 for the 4 Unit 2 leases. Following procedures set forth in the PVNGS leases, PNM notified 4 of the lessors under the Unit 1 leases and 1 lessor under the Unit 2 lease that it would elect to renew those leases on the expiration date of the original leases. The 4 Unit 1 leases now expire on January 15, 2023 and the 1 Unit 2 lease now expires on January 15, 2024. The annual lease payments during the renewal periods aggregate $16.5 million for PVNGS Unit 1 and $1.6 million for Unit 2.

The terms of each of the extended leases do not provide for additional renewal options beyond their currently scheduled expiration dates. PNM had the option to purchase the assets underlying each of the extended leases at their fair market value or
65


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

to return the lease interests to the lessors on the expiration dates. On June 11, 2020, PNM provided notice to the lessors and the NMPRC of its intent to return the assets underlying both the PVNGS Unit 1 and Unit 2 leases upon their expiration in January 2023 and 2024. Although PNM elected to return the assets underlying the extended leases, PNM retains certain obligations related to PVNGS, including costs to decommission the facility. PNM is depreciating its capital improvements related to the extended leases using NMPRC approved rates through the end of the NRC license period for each unit, which expire in June 2045 for Unit 1 and in June 2046 for Unit 2. On April 5, 2021, PNM and SRP entered into an Asset Purchase and Sale Agreement, pursuant to which PNM agreed to sell to SRP certain PNM-owned assets and nuclear fuel necessary to the ongoing operation and maintenance of leased capacity in PVNGS Unit 1 and Unit 2, which SRP has agreed to acquire from the lessors upon termination of the existing leases. The proposed transaction between PNM and SRP is subject to receipt by PNM of approval by the NMPRC and PNM and SRP require NRC approval for the transfer of the associated possessory licenses at the end of the term of each of the respective leases. If the proposed transaction is not consummated, PNM may be required to retain all or a portion of its currently leased capacity in PVNGS or be exposed to other claims for damages by the lessors. PNM will seek to recover its undepreciated investments, as well as any other obligations related to PVNGS from NM retail customers. See PVNGS Leased Interest Abandonment Application discussion in Note 12.

PNM is exposed to loss under the PVNGS lease arrangements upon the occurrence of certain events that PNM does not consider reasonably likely to occur. Under certain circumstances (for example, the NRC issuing specified violation orders with respect to PVNGS or the occurrence of specified nuclear events), PNM would be required to make specified payments to the lessors and take title to the Leased Interests. If such an event had occurred as of March 31, 2021, amounts due to the lessors under the circumstances described above would be up to $146.5 million, payable on July 15, 2021 in addition to the scheduled lease payments due on that date.

Land Easements and Rights-of-Ways

Many of PNM’s electric transmission and distribution facilities are located on lands that require the grant of rights-of-way from governmental entities, Native American tribes, or private parties. PNM has completed several renewals of rights-of-way, the largest of which is a renewal with the Navajo Nation. PNM is obligated to pay the Navajo Nation annual payments of $6.0 million, subject to adjustment each year based on the Consumer Price Index, through 2029. PNM’s April 2021 payment for the amount due under the Navajo Nation right-of-way lease was $7.3 million, which included amounts due under the Consumer Price Index adjustment. Changes in the Consumer Price Index subsequent to January 1, 2019 are considered variable lease payments.

PNM has other prepaid rights-of-way agreements that are not accounted for as leases or recognized as a component of plant in service. PNM reflects the unamortized balance of these prepayments in other deferred charges on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets and recognizes amortization expense associated with these agreements in the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Earnings over their term. As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the unamortized balance of these rights-of-ways was $55.1 million and $55.8 million. PNM recognized amortization expense associated with these agreements of $1.0 million and $0.9 million in the three ended March 31, 2021 and 2020.

Fleet Vehicles and Equipment

Fleet vehicle and equipment leases commencing on or after January 1, 2019 are classified as financing leases. Fleet vehicle and equipment leases existing as of December 31, 2018 are classified as operating leases. The Company’s fleet vehicle and equipment lease agreements include non-lease components for insignificant administrative and other costs that are billed over the life of the agreement. At March 31, 2021, residual value guarantees on fleet vehicle and equipment leases are $0.9 million, $1.4 million, and $2.3 million for PNM, TNMP, and PNMR Consolidated.


66


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

Information related to the Company’s operating leases recorded on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets is presented below:
March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
PNMTNMPPNMR ConsolidatedPNMTNMPPNMR Consolidated
(In thousands)
Operating leases:
Operating lease assets, net of amortization$91,652 $6,937 $99,017 $97,461 $7,206 $105,133 
Current portion of operating lease liabilities25,868 2,185 28,160 25,130 2,193 27,460 
Long-term portion of operating lease liabilities66,657 4,515 71,492 75,941 4,779 81,065 


As discussed above, the Company classifies its fleet vehicle and equipment leases and its office equipment leases commencing on or after January 1, 2019 as financing leases. Information related to the Company’s financing leases recorded on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets is presented below:

March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
PNMTNMPPNMR ConsolidatedPNMTNMPPNMR Consolidated
(In thousands)
Financing leases:
Non-utility property$12,140 $13,535 $25,997 $11,453 $13,299 $25,055 
Accumulated depreciation(2,575)(2,833)(5,528)(2,044)(2,241)(4,383)
Non-utility property, net9,565 10,702 20,469 9,409 11,058 20,672 
Other current liabilities2,119 2,436 4,641 1,993 2,397 4,470 
Other deferred credits7,225 8,272 15,616 7,176 8,669 15,972 

Information concerning the weighted average remaining lease terms and the weighted average discount rates used to determine the Company’s lease liabilities as of March 31, 2021 is presented below:

PNMTNMPPNMR Consolidated
Weighted average remaining lease term (years):
Operating leases6.073.415.89
Financing leases4.704.694.67
Weighted average discount rate:
Operating leases3.96 %3.94 %3.96 %
Financing leases2.71 %2.81 %2.76 %


67


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

Information for the components of lease expense is as follows:

Three Months Ended March 31, 2021
PNMTNMPPNMR Consolidated
(In thousands)
Operating lease cost:$6,735 $653 $7,429 
Amounts capitalized(226)(559)(785)
Total operating lease expense$6,509 $94 $6,644 
Financing lease cost:
Amortization of right-of-use assets532 613 1,167 
Interest on lease liabilities62 76 139 
Amounts capitalized(368)(625)(993)
Total financing lease expense226 64 313 
Variable lease expense63 63 
Short-term lease expense124 132 
Total lease expense for the period$6,922 $160 $7,152 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2020
PNMTNMPPNMR Consolidated
(In thousands)
Operating lease cost:$6,893 $774 $7,735 
Amounts capitalized(291)(634)(925)
Total operating lease expense$6,602 $140 $6,810 
Financing lease cost:
Amortization of right-of-use assets247 289 553 
Interest on lease liabilities45 56 103 
Amounts capitalized(175)(283)(458)
Total financing lease expense117 62 198 
Variable lease expense32 32 
Short-term lease expense85 86 
Total lease expense for the period$6,836 $203 $7,126 

Supplemental cash flow information related to the Company’s leases is as follows:

Three Months EndedThree Months Ended
March 31, 2021March 31, 2020
PNMTNMPPNMR ConsolidatedPNMTNMPPNMR Consolidated
(In thousands)
Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities:
Operating cash flows from operating leases$9,246 $97 $9,401 $9,351 $166 $9,658 
Operating cash flows from financing leases21 30 16 27 
Finance cash flows from financing leases186 71 278 80 51 147 
Non-cash information related to right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for lease obligations:
Operating leases$$317 $317 $$$
Financing leases758 387 1,164 1,463 2,802 4,272 

68


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

Capitalized costs excluded from the operating and financing cash paid for leases above for the three months ended March 31, 2021, are $0.2 million and $0.4 million at PNM, $0.6 million and $0.6 million at TNMP, and $0.8 million and $1.0 million at PNMR. For the three months ended March 31, 2020, capitalized costs excluded are $0.3 million and $0.2 million at PNM, $0.6 million and $0.3 million at TNMP, and $0.9 million and $0.5 million at PNMR. These capitalized costs are reflected as investing activities on the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020.

Future expected lease payments are shown below:
As of March 31, 2021
PNMTNMPPNMR Consolidated
FinancingOperatingFinancingOperatingFinancingOperating
(In thousands)
Remainder of 2021$1,760 $17,099 $2,032 $1,831 $3,858 $19,025 
20222,296 26,544 2,613 2,039 4,995 28,653 
20232,229 17,477 2,431 1,548 4,710 19,063 
20241,565 7,915 1,956 945 3,529 8,897 
2025935 6,919 1,233 763 2,168 7,721 
Later years1,156 27,521 1,153 76 2,308 27,815 
Total minimum lease payments9,941 103,475 11,418 7,202 21,568 111,174 
Less: Imputed interest597 10,950 710 502 1,311 11,522 
Lease liabilities as of March 31, 2021$9,344 $92,525 $10,708 $6,700 $20,257 $99,652 

The above table includes $11.0 million, $15.1 million, and $26.1 million for PNM, TNMP, and PNMR at March 31, 2021 for expected future payments on fleet vehicle and equipment leases that could be avoided if the leased assets were returned and the lessor is able to recover estimated market value for the equipment from third parties. The Company’s contractual commitments for leases that have not yet commenced are insignificant.

(14)   Income Taxes

In December 2017, comprehensive changes in United States federal income taxes were enacted through legislation commonly known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”). The Tax Act made many significant modifications to the tax laws, including reducing the federal corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21% effective January 1, 2018. The Tax Act also eliminated federal bonus depreciation for utilities, limited interest deductibility for non-utility businesses and limited the deductibility of officer compensation. During 2020, the IRS issued final regulations related to certain officer compensation and, in January 2021, issued final regulations on interest deductibility that provide a 10% “de minimis” exception that allows entities with predominantly regulated activities to fully deduct interest expenses. In addition, in 2019, the IRS issued regulations interpreting Tax Act amendments to depreciation provisions of the IRC that allow the Company to claim a bonus depreciation deduction on certain construction projects placed in service subsequent to the third quarter of 2017. See additional discussion of the impacts of the Tax Act in Note 18 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K. On March 27, 2020, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”) was enacted. Among other things, the CARES Act includes tax provisions that generally loosen restrictions on NOL utilization and business interest deductions, and accelerate refunds of previously generated alternative minimum tax credits. In addition, the CARES Act includes a temporary provision allowing businesses to defer payments to the government for some payroll taxes. In 2020, the Company applied for $5.2 million of accelerated refunds of previously generated alternative minimum tax credits and deferred $7.0 million of payments for certain payroll taxes. The CARES Act provisions related to NOL utilization and business interest deductions are not applicable for the Company.

Beginning February 2018, PNM’s NM 2016 Rate Case reflects the reduction in the federal corporate income tax rate, including amortization of excess deferred federal and state income taxes. In accordance with the order in that case, PNM is returning the protected portion of excess deferred federal income taxes to customers over the average remaining life of plant in service as of December 31, 2017, the unprotected portion of excess deferred federal income taxes to customers over a period of approximately twenty-three years, and excess deferred state income taxes to customers over a period of three years. The approved settlement in the TNMP 2018 Rate Case includes a reduction in customer rates to reflect the impacts of the Tax Act beginning on January 1, 2019. PNMR, PNM, and TNMP will amortize federal and state excess deferred income taxes of $24.5
69


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

million, $15.2 million, and $9.3 million in 2021. See additional discussion of PNM’s NM 2016 Rate Case and TNMP’s 2018 Rate Case in Note 17 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

The Company makes an estimate of its anticipated effective tax rate for the year as of the end of each quarterly period within its fiscal year. In interim periods, income tax expense is calculated by applying the anticipated annual effective tax rate to year-to-date earnings before income taxes. Certain unusual or infrequently occurring items, including excess tax benefits related to stock awards and taxes on Merger-related costs are excluded from the estimated annual effective tax rate calculation. At March 31, 2021, PNMR, PNM, and TNMP estimated their effective income tax rates for the year ended December 31, 2021 would be 12.91%, 15.40%, and 10.67%. The primary difference between the statutory income tax rates and the effective tax rates is the effect of the reduction in income tax expense resulting from the amortization of excess deferred federal income taxes. During the three months ended March 31, 2021, income tax expense calculated by applying the expected annual effective income tax rate to earnings before income taxes was further reduced by excess tax benefits related to stock awards of $0.7 million for PNMR, of which $0.5 million was allocated to PNM and $0.2 million was allocated to TNMP, and by tax benefits of $1.2 million on Merger-related costs for PNMR.

(15)   Related Party Transactions

PNMR, PNM, TNMP, and NMRD are considered related parties, as is PNMR Services Company, a wholly-owned subsidiary of PNMR that provides corporate services to PNMR and its subsidiaries in accordance with shared services agreements. These services are billed at cost on a monthly basis to the business units. In addition, PNMR provides construction and operations and maintenance services to NMRD, a 50% owned subsidiary of PNMR Development. PNM purchases renewable energy from certain NMRD-owned facilities at a fixed price per MWh of energy produced. PNM also provides interconnection services to PNMR Development and NMRD. See Note 16 for additional discussion of NMRD.

The table below summarizes the nature and amount of related party transactions of PNMR, PNM, TNMP, and NMRD:

Three Months Ended
March 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Services billings:
PNMR to PNM$26,225 $22,123 
PNMR to TNMP10,365 8,727 
PNM to TNMP118 76 
TNMP to PNMR12 35 
PNMR to NMRD55 76 
Renewable energy purchases:
PNM from NMRD2,585 1,519 
Interconnection billings:
PNM to NMRD220 
PNM to PNMR
NMRD to PNM1,276 
Interest billings:
PNMR to PNM
PNM to PNMR36 81 
PNMR to TNMP
Income tax sharing payments:
PNMR to PNM
TNMP to PNMR

(16)   Equity Method Investment

As discussed in Note 1 of the Company's 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K, PNMR Development and AEP OnSite Partners created NMRD in September 2017 to pursue the acquisition, development, and ownership of renewable energy generation projects, primarily in the state of New Mexico. As of March 31, 2021, NMRD’s renewable energy capacity in operation was 135.1 MW. PNMR Development and AEP OnSite Partners each have a 50% ownership interest in NMRD. The
70


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

investment in NMRD is accounted for using the equity method of accounting because PNMR’s ownership interest results in significant influence, but not control, over NMRD and its operations.

In the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, PNMR Development made cash contributions of 0 and $10.0 million to NMRD to be used primarily for its construction activities. In February 2021, NMRD paid PNMR Development a dividend of $3.0 million of which, $2.4 million represents PNMR Development's cumulative equity in earnings of NMRD as of March 31, 2021 and is presented as cash flows from operating activities on the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows. The portion of the dividend in excess of PNMR Development's cumulative equity in earnings of NMRD amounting to $0.6 million is presented as cash flows from investing activities.

PNMR presents its share of net earnings from NMRD in other income on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Earnings. Summarized financial information for NMRD is as follows:

Results of Operations
Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Operating revenues$2,750 $1,667 
Operating expenses2,522 1,580 
Net earnings$228 $87 

Financial Position
March 31,December 31,
20212020
(In thousands)
Current assets$5,005 $8,046 
Net property, plant, and equipment170,032 172,585 
Non-current assets2,133 1,900 
Total assets177,170 182,531 
Current liabilities1,249 841 
Non-current liabilities383 380 
Owners’ equity$175,538 $181,310 

(17)     Merger

On October 20, 2020, PNMR, Avangrid, and Merger Sub, entered into the Merger Agreement pursuant to which Merger Sub will merge with and into PNMR, with PNMR surviving the Merger as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Avangrid.

Pursuant to the Merger Agreement, each issued and outstanding share of the common stock of PNMR (other than (i) the issued shares of PNMR common stock that are owned by Avangrid, Merger Sub, PNMR or any wholly-owned subsidiary of Avangrid or PNMR, which will be automatically cancelled at the time the Merger is consummated (the "Effective Time") and (ii) shares of PNMR common stock outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time and held by a holder who has not voted in favor of, or consented in writing to, the Merger who is entitled to, and who has demanded, payment for fair value of such shares) will be converted into the right to receive $50.30 in cash.

The proposed Merger has been unanimously approved by the Boards of Directors of PNMR, Avangrid and Merger Sub and approved by PNMR shareholders at the Special Meeting of Shareholders held on February 12, 2021. On January 20, 2021, the FTC notified PNMR and Avangrid that early termination of the waiting period under the HSR Act in connection with the Merger was granted. CFIUS completed its review of the Merger on February 2, 2021, and has concluded that there are no unresolved national security concerns with respect to the Merger. On March 10, 2021 PNMR and Avangrid received FCC approval of the transfer of operating licenses related to the Merger. If the Merger is not completed within 180 days of March 10, 2021, then extension of FCC approval will be required. On April 20, 2021 FERC issued an order authorizing the Merger. Consummation of the Merger remains subject to the satisfaction or waiver of certain customary closing conditions, including, without limitation, the absence of any material adverse effect on PNMR, the receipt of required regulatory approvals (including
71


PNM RESOURCES, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF NEW MEXICO AND SUBSIDIARIES
TEXAS-NEW MEXICO POWER COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)

the PUCT, the NMPRC, and the NRC) and the agreements relating to the divestiture of Four Corners being in full force and effect and all applicable regulatory filings associated therewith being made. The agreement related to the divestiture has been entered into and related filings have been made with the NMPRC. The Merger is currently expected to close in the second half of 2021.

On March 30, 2021 TNMP, Merger Sub, Avangrid and all parties to the stipulation (the "Signatories") filed a unanimous stipulation and agreement in its Joint Application for approval of the Merger. The Signatories to the unanimous stipulation agree that a negotiated resolution of this proceeding is in the public interest, will conserve the parties' resources, and will eliminate controversy. The approval of the unanimous stipulation is included on the PUCT's May 6, 2021 open meeting agenda. On April 20, 2021, PNM, PNMR, Merger Sub, Avangrid (the "Joint Applicants"), the NMAG, WRA, the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 611, Dine, Nava Education Project, the San Juan Citizens Alliance and To Nizhoni Ani, entered into a stipulation and agreement in the Joint Application for approval of Merger pending before the NMPRC. On April 23, 2021, an amended stipulation was filed, which joined CCAE in the stipulation and updated certain stipulated regulatory requirements. On April 25, 2021, the Hearing Examiner in the case issued an order vacating the pre-hearing conference and procedural schedule. The order requires the Joint Applicants to meet with all parties to discuss and negotiate, in good faith, a potential stipulation and establishes a deadline of May 7, 2021 for the Joint Applicants to file a stipulation and a proposed procedural schedule.

In connection with the Merger, Iberdrola, S.A., a corporation organized under the laws of the Kingdom of Spain (“Iberdrola”), which owns 81.5% of the outstanding common stock of Avangrid, has provided Avangrid a commitment letter (the "Iberdrola Funding Commitment Letter"), pursuant to which Iberdrola has unilaterally agreed to provide to Avangrid, or arrange the provision to Avangrid of, funds to the extent necessary for Avangrid to consummate the Merger, including the payment of the aggregate Merger consideration. To the extent Avangrid wishes to effect a funding transaction under the Iberdrola Funding Commitment Letter in order to pay the Merger consideration, the specific terms of any such transaction will be negotiated between Iberdrola and Avangrid on an arm's length basis and must be approved by both (i) a majority of the members of the unaffiliated committee of the board of directors of Avangrid, and (ii) the entire board of directors of Avangrid. Under the terms of such commitment letter, Iberdrola has agreed to negotiate with Avangrid the specific terms of any transaction effecting such funding commitment promptly and in good faith, with the objective that such terms shall be commercially reasonable and approved by Avangrid. Avangrid’s and Merger Sub’s obligations under the Merger Agreement are not conditioned upon Avangrid obtaining financing.

The Merger Agreement provides for certain customary termination rights including the right of either party to terminate the Merger Agreement if the Merger is not completed on or before January 20, 2022 (subject to a three-month extension by either party if all of the conditions to the closing, other than the conditions related to obtaining regulatory approvals, have been satisfied or waived). The Merger Agreement further provides that, upon termination of the Merger Agreement under certain specified circumstances (including if Avangrid terminates the Merger Agreement due to a change in recommendation of the Board or if PNMR terminates the Merger Agreement to accept a superior proposal (as defined in the Merger Agreement)), PNMR will be required to pay Avangrid a termination fee of $130.0 million. In addition, the Merger Agreement provides that (i) if the Merger Agreement is terminated by either party due to a failure of a regulatory closing condition and such failure is the result of Avangrid’s breach of its regulatory covenants or (ii) Avangrid fails to effect the closing when all closing conditions have been satisfied and it is otherwise obligated to do so under the Merger Agreement, then, in either such case, upon termination of the Merger Agreement, Avangrid will be required to pay PNMR a termination fee of $184.0 million as the sole and exclusive remedy. Upon the termination of the Merger Agreement under certain specified circumstances involving a breach of the Merger Agreement, either PNMR or Avangrid will be required to reimburse the other party’s reasonable and documented out-of-pocket fees and expenses up to $10.0 million (which amount will be credited toward, and offset against, the payment of any applicable termination fee).
72

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations for PNMR is presented on a combined basis, including certain information applicable to PNM and TNMP. The MD&A for PNM and TNMP is presented as permitted by Form 10-Q General Instruction H(2). This report uses the term “Company” when discussing matters of common applicability to PNMR, PNM, and TNMP. A reference to a “Note” in this Item 2 refers to the accompanying Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited) included in Item 1, unless otherwise specified. Certain of the tables below may not appear visually accurate due to rounding.

MD&A FOR PNMR

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Overview and Strategy

PNMR is a holding company with two regulated utilities serving approximately 801,000 residential, commercial, and industrial customers and end-users of electricity in New Mexico and Texas. PNMR’s electric utilities are PNM and TNMP. PNMR strives to create a clean and bright energy future for customers, communities, and shareholders. PNMR’s strategy and decision-making are focused on safely providing reliable, affordable, and environmentally responsible power built on a foundation of Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) principles.

Recent Developments

Merger

On October 20, 2020, PNMR, Avangrid and Merger Sub entered into the Merger Agreement pursuant to which Merger Sub will merge with and into PNMR, with PNMR surviving the Merger as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Avangrid.

Pursuant to the Merger Agreement, each issued and outstanding share of the common stock of PNMR (other than (i) the issued shares of PNMR common stock that are owned by Avangrid, Merger Sub, PNMR or any wholly-owned subsidiary of Avangrid or PNMR, which will be automatically cancelled at the Effective Time and (ii) shares of PNMR common stock outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time and held by a holder who has not voted in favor of, or consented in writing to, the Merger who is entitled to, and who has demanded, payment for fair value of such shares) at the Effective Time will be converted into the right to receive $50.30 in cash.

The proposed Merger has been unanimously approved by the Boards of Directors of PNMR, Avangrid and Merger Sub and approved by PNMR shareholders at the Special Meeting of Shareholders held on February 12, 2021. On January 20, 2021, the FTC notified PNMR and Avangrid that early termination of the waiting period under the HSR Act in connection with the Merger was granted. CFIUS completed its review of the Merger on February 2, 2021, and has concluded that there are no unresolved national security concerns with respect to the Merger. On March 10, 2021, PNMR and Avangrid received FCC approval of the transfer of operating licenses related to the Merger. If the Merger is not completed within 180 days of March 10, 2021, then extension of FCC approval will be required. On April 20, 2021, FERC issued an order authorizing the Merger. Consummation of the Merger remains subject to the satisfaction or waiver of certain customary closing conditions, including, without limitation, the absence of any material adverse effect on PNMR, the receipt of required regulatory approvals (including the PUCT, the NMPRC, and the NRC), and the agreements relating to the divestiture of Four Corners being in full force and effect and all applicable regulatory filings associated therewith being made. The agreement relating to the divestiture of Four Corners has been entered into and related filings have been made with the NMPRC. The Merger is currently expected to close in the second half of 2021.

On March 30, 2021, TNMP, Merger Sub, Avangrid and all parties to the stipulation (the "Signatories") filed a unanimous stipulation and agreement in its Joint Application for approval of the Merger. The Signatories to the unanimous stipulation agree that a negotiated resolution of this proceeding is in the public interest, will conserve the parties' resources, and will eliminate controversy. The approval of the unanimous stipulation is included on the PUCT's May 6, 2021 open meeting agenda. On April 20, 2021, PNM, PNMR, Merger Sub, Avangrid (the "Joint Applicants"), the NMAG, WRA, the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 611, Dine, Nava Education Project, the San Juan Citizens Alliance and To Nizhoni Ani, entered into a stipulation and agreement in the Joint Application for approval of Merger pending before the NMPRC. On April 23, 2021, an amended stipulation was filed, which joined CCAE in the stipulation and updated certain stipulated regulatory requirements. On April 25, 2021, the Hearing Examiner in the case issued an order vacating the pre-hearing conference and procedural schedule. The order requires the Joint Applicants to meet with all parties to discuss and negotiate, in good faith, a potential stipulation and establishes a deadline of May 7, 2021 for the Joint Applicants to file a stipulation and a proposed procedural schedule.


73

EIM

On April 1, 2021, PNM joined and began participating in the EIM. The EIM is a real-time wholesale energy trading market operated by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) that enables participating electric utilities to buy and sell energy. The EIM aggregates the variability of electricity generation and load for multiple balancing authority areas and utility jurisdictions. In addition, the EIM facilitates greater integration of renewable resources through the aggregation of flexible resources by capturing diversity benefits from the expanding geographic footprint and the expanded potential uses for those resources. PNM completed a cost-benefit analysis, which indicated participation in the EIM would provide substantial benefits to retail customers. In 2018, PNM filed an application with the NMPRC requesting, among other things, to recover an estimated $20.9 million of initial capital investments and authorization to establish a regulatory asset to recover an estimated $7.4 million of other expenses that would be incurred in order to join the EIM. The NMPRC approved the establishment of a regulatory asset but deferred certain rate making issues, including but not limited to issues related to implementation and ongoing EIM costs and savings, the prudence and reasonableness of costs to be included in the regulatory asset, and the period over which costs would be charged to customers until PNM’s next general rate case filing.

Texas Winter Storm

In mid-February 2021, Texas experienced a severe winter storm delivering the coldest temperatures in 100 years for many parts of the state. As a result, the ERCOT market was not able to deliver sufficient generation load to the grid resulting in significant, statewide outages as ERCOT directed transmission operators to curtail thousands of firm load megawatts. TNMP complied with ERCOT directives to curtail the delivery of electricity in its service territory and did not experience significant outages on its system outside of the ERCOT directed curtailments. Though several REPs have filed for bankruptcy, TNMP has regulatory authorization to defer bad debt expense from REPs to a regulatory asset and seek recovery in a general rate case. At this time, the Company does not expect significant financial impacts related to this event.

Financial and Business Objectives
PNMR is focused on achieving three key financial objectives:

Earning authorized returns on regulated businesses
Delivering at or above industry-average earnings and dividend growth
Maintaining investment grade credit ratings

In conjunction with these objectives, PNM and TNMP are dedicated to:

Maintaining strong employee safety, plant performance, and system reliability
Delivering a superior customer experience
Demonstrating environmental stewardship in business operations, including transitioning to an emissions-free generating portfolio by 2040
Supporting the communities in their service territories

Earning Authorized Returns on Regulated Businesses

PNMR’s success in accomplishing its financial objectives is highly dependent on two key factors: fair and timely regulatory treatment for its utilities and the utilities’ strong operating performance. The Company has multiple strategies to achieve favorable regulatory treatment, all of which have as their foundation a focus on the basics: safety, operational excellence, and customer satisfaction, while engaging stakeholders to build productive relationships. Both PNM and TNMP seek cost recovery for their investments through general rate cases, periodic cost of service filings, and various rate riders.

Fair and timely rate treatment from regulators is crucial to PNM and TNMP in earning their allowed returns and critical for PNMR to achieve its financial objectives. PNMR believes that earning allowed returns is viewed positively by credit rating agencies and that improvements in the Company’s ratings could lower costs to utility customers.

Additional information about rate filings is provided in Note 17 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

State Regulation

The rates PNM and TNMP charge customers are subject to traditional rate regulation by the NMPRC, FERC, and the PUCT.

New Mexico 2016 Rate Case – In January 2018, the NMPRC approved a settlement agreement that authorized PNM to implement an increase in base non-fuel rates of $10.3 million, which includes a reduction to reflect the impact of the decrease in
74

the federal corporate income tax rate and updates to PNM’s cost of debt (aggregating $47.6 million annually). This order was on PNM's application for a general increase in retail electric rates filed in December 2016 (the "NM 2016 Rate Case"). The key terms of the order include:

A ROE of 9.575%
A requirement to return to customers over a three-year period the benefit of the reduction in the New Mexico corporate income tax rate to the extent attributable to PNM’s retail operations (Note 14)
A disallowance of PNM’s ability to collect an equity return on certain investments aggregating $148.1 million at Four Corners, but allowing recovery of a debt-only return
An agreement to not implement non-fuel base rate changes, other than changes related to PNM’s rate riders, with an effective date prior to January 1, 2020
A requirement to consider the prudency of PNM’s decision to continue its participation in Four Corners in PNM's next general rate case filing

PNM implemented 50% of the approved increase for service rendered beginning February 1, 2018, and implemented the rest of the increase for service rendered beginning January 1, 2019.

On December 29, 2020, Sierra Club filed a motion to re-open the NM 2016 Rate Case. The motion requests that the NMPRC re-open the NM 2016 Rate Case for the limited purpose of conducting a prudence review of certain Four Corners capital expenditures that the NMPRC deferred in its order approving the settlement agreement. Alternatively, Sierra Club requested that the deferred prudence review be conducted, and given weight as appropriate, in the Four Corners Abandonment Application. On February 10, 2021, the NMPRC rejected Sierra Club’s motion to re-open the NM 2016 Rate Case and stated that issues on whether the terms of the ETA provide an opportunity for consideration of prudence for Four Corners undepreciated investments included in a financing order or what effects the rates approved in the NM 2016 Rate Case may have on determining energy transition cost should be considered in the Four Corners Abandonment Application.

2020 Decoupling Petition – On May 28, 2020, PNM filed a petition for approval of a rate adjustment mechanism that would decouple the rates of its residential and small power rate classes. Decoupling is a rate design principle that severs the link between the recovery of fixed costs of the utility through volumetric charges. If approved, customer bills would not be impacted until January 1, 2022. On October 2, 2020, PNM requested an order to vacate the public hearing and stay the proceeding until the NMPRC decides whether to entertain a petition to issue a declaratory order resolving the issues raised in the motions to dismiss. On October 7, 2020, the Hearing Examiner approved PNM's request to stay the proceeding and vacate the public hearing and on October 30, 2020 PNM filed a petition for declaratory order asking the NMPRC to issue an order finding that full revenue decoupling is authorized by the EUEA. On March 17, 2021, the NMPRC issued an order granting PNM's petition for declaratory order which commences a proceeding to address petitions. See Note 12. PNM cannot predict the outcome of this matter.

PVNGS Leased Interest Abandonment Application - On April 2, 2021, PNM filed the PVNGS Leased Interest Abandonment Application. In the application PNM is requesting NMPRC authorization to decertify and abandon its Leased Interest and to create regulatory assets for the associated remaining undepreciated investments with consideration of cost recovery of the undepreciated investments in a future rate case. PNM is also seeking NMPRC approval to sell and transfer the PNM-owned assets and nuclear fuel supply associated with the Leased Interest to SRP, which will be acquiring the Leased Interest from the lessors upon termination of the existing leases. In addition, PNM is seeking NMPRC approval for a 150 MW solar PPA combined with a 40 MW battery storage agreement, and a stand-alone 100 MW battery storage agreement to replace the Leased Interest. To ensure system reliability and load needs are met in 2023, when a majority of the leases expire, PNM is also requesting NMPRC approval for a 300 MW solar PPA combined with a 150 MW battery storage agreement. For additional information on PNM's Leased Interest and the associated abandonment application see Note 12 and Note 13.

Advanced Metering Currently, TNMP has more than 242,000 advanced meters across its service territory. Beginning in 2019, the majority of costs associated with TNMP’s AMS program are being recovered through base rates. On October 2, 2020, TNMP filed an application with the PUCT for authorization to implement necessary technological upgrades of approximately $46 million to its AMS program by November 2022. On January 14, 2021, the PUCT approved TNMP's application. TNMP will seek recovery of the investment associated with the upgrade in a future general rate proceeding or distribution cost recovery factor filing.

In February 2016, PNM filed an application with the NMPRC requesting approval of a project to replace its existing customer metering equipment with Advanced Metering Infrastructure (“AMI”), which was denied. As ordered by the NMPRC, PNM’s 2020 filing for energy efficiency programs to be offered in 2021, 2022, and 2023 included a proposal for an AMI pilot project, although PNM did not recommend the proposal due to the limited benefits that are cost-effective under a pilot structure. On September 17, 2020, the Hearing Examiner in the energy efficiency case issued a recommended decision recommending that PNM's proposed 2021 energy efficiency and load management program be approved, with the exception of the proposed AMI pilot program. On October 28, 2020, the NMPRC approved the recommended decision.

75

Rate Riders and Interim Rate Relief The PUCT has approved mechanisms that allow TNMP to recover capital invested in transmission and distribution projects without having to file a general rate case. The NMPRC has approved PNM recovering fuel costs through the FPPAC, as well as rate riders for renewable energy and energy efficiency. These mechanisms allow for more timely recovery of investments.

On April 5, 2021, TNMP filed its 2021 DCOS that requested an increase in annual distribution revenues of $14.0 million. TNMP requested a procedural schedule that would result in rates being effective in September 2021. See Note 12.

FERC Regulation

Rates PNM charges wholesale transmission customers are subject to traditional rate regulation by FERC. Rates charged to wholesale electric transmission customers are based on a formula rate mechanism pursuant to which rates for wholesale transmission service are calculated annually in accordance with an approved formula. The formula includes updating cost of service components, including investment in plant and operating expenses, based on information contained in PNM’s annual financial report filed with FERC, as well as including projected transmission capital projects to be placed into service in the following year. The projections included are subject to true-up. Certain items, including changes to return on equity and depreciation rates, require a separate filing to be made with FERC before being included in the formula rate.

In May 2019, PNM filed an application with FERC requesting approval to purchase a new 153-mile long 345-kV transmission line and related facilities (the “Western Spirit Line”). Under related agreements, PNM will provide transmission service to approximately 800 MW of new wind generation to be located in eastern New Mexico beginning in 2021 using an incremental rate. All necessary regulatory approvals for PNM to purchase and provide transmission service from the Western Spirit Line have been obtained.

On March 12, 2021, PNM filed four unexecuted TSAs with FERC totaling 145 MW with Leeward Energy. The unexecuted TSAs provide long-term firm, point-to-point transmission service on PNM’s transmission system. The unexecuted TSAs are based on the pro-forma transmission service agreements with certain non-conforming provisions under Attachment A of PNM’s OATT and include PNM’s OATT rate. PNM is filing the unexecuted TSAs at the request of Leeward because the parties have been unable to reach an agreement on the terms and conditions for transmission service. See Note 12.

Delivering At or Above Industry-Average Earnings and Dividend Growth

PNMR’s financial objective to deliver at or above industry-average earnings and dividend growth enables investors to realize the value of their investment in the Company’s business. Earnings growth is based on ongoing earnings, which is a non-GAAP financial measure that excludes from GAAP earnings certain non-recurring, infrequent, and other items that are not indicative of fundamental changes in the earnings capacity of the Company’s operations. PNMR uses ongoing earnings to evaluate the operations of the Company and to establish goals, including those used for certain aspects of incentive compensation, for management and employees.

PNMR targets a dividend payout ratio in the 50% to 60% range of its ongoing earnings. PNMR expects to provide at or above industry-average dividend growth in the near-term. The Board will continue to evaluate the dividend on an annual basis, considering sustainability and growth, capital planning, and industry standards.

Under the terms of the Merger Agreement, PNMR has agreed not to declare, set aside, make or pay any dividend or other distribution, payable in cash, stock, property or otherwise, with respect to any of its equity securities, or make any other actual, constructive or deemed distribution in respect of any equity securities (except (i) PNMR may continue the declaration and payment of planned regular quarterly cash dividends on PNMR common stock for each quarterly period ended after the date of the Merger Agreement, in an amount not to exceed $0.3275 for any fiscal quarters in 2021 and 2022, with usual record and payment dates in accordance with past dividend practice, and (ii) for any cash dividend or cash distribution by a wholly-owned subsidiary of PNMR to PNMR or another wholly-owned subsidiary of PNMR).

The Board approved the following increases in the indicated annual common stock dividend:

Approval DatePercent Increase
December 20196.0%
December 20206.5%

Maintaining Investment Grade Credit Ratings

The Company is committed to maintaining investment grade credit ratings in order to reduce the cost of debt financing and to help ensure access to credit markets, when required. See the subheading Liquidity included in the full discussion of Liquidity and Capital Resources below for the specific credit ratings for PNMR, PNM, and TNMP. All of the credit ratings issued by both Moody’s and S&P on the Company’s debt continue to be investment grade.
76


Business Focus

To achieve its business objectives, focus is directed in key areas: Safe, Reliable and Affordable Power; Utility Plant and Strategic Investments; Environmentally Responsible Power; and Customer, Stakeholders, and Community Engagement. The Company works closely with its stakeholders to ensure that resource plans and infrastructure investments benefit from robust public dialogue and balance the diverse needs of our communities. Equally important is the focus of PNMR’s utilities on customer satisfaction and community engagement.

Safe, Reliable, and Affordable Power

Safety is the first priority of our business and core value of the Company. PNMR utilizes a Safety Management System to provide clear direction, objectives and targets for managing safety performance and minimizing risks and empowers employees to "Be the Reason Everyone Goes Home Safe".

PNMR measures reliability and benchmark performance of PNM and TNMP against other utilities using industry-standard metrics, including System Average Interruption Duration Index ("SAIDI"), System Average Interruption Frequency Index ("SAIFI") and Customer Average Interruption Duration Index ("CAIDI"). PNM's and TNMP's investment plans include projects designed to support reliability and reduce the amount of time customers are without power.

PNMR and its utilities are aware of the important roles they play in enhancing economic vitality in their service territories. Management believes that maintaining strong and modern electric infrastructure is critical to ensuring reliability and supporting economic growth. When contemplating expanding or relocating their operations, businesses consider energy affordability and reliability to be important factors. PNM and TNMP strive to balance service affordability with infrastructure investment to maintain a high level of electric reliability and to deliver a safe and superior customer experience. Investing in PNM’s and TNMP’s infrastructure is critical to ensuring reliability and meeting future energy needs. Both utilities have long-established records of providing customers with safe and reliable electric service.

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic and President Trump declared the COVID-19 pandemic a national emergency in the U.S. The Company continues to closely monitor developments and has taken and continues to take steps to mitigate the potential risks related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Company has assessed and updated its existing business continuity plans in response to the impacts of the pandemic through crisis team meetings and working with other utilities and operators. It has identified its critical workforce, staged backups and limited access to control rooms and critical assets. The Company has worked to protect the safety of its employees using a number of measures, including minimizing exposure to other employees and the public and supporting work-from-home and flexible arrangements for all applicable job functions. The Company is also working with its suppliers to manage the impacts to its supply chain and remains focused on the integrity of its information systems and other technology systems used to run its business. However, the Company cannot predict the extent or duration of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, its effects on the global, national or local economy, or on the Company's financial position, results of operations, and cash flows. The Company will continue to monitor developments related to COVID-19 and will remain focused on protecting the health and safety of its customers, employees, contractors, and other stakeholders, and on its objective to provide safe, reliable, affordable and environmentally responsible power. As discussed in Note 12, both PNM and TNMP suspended disconnecting certain customers for past due bills, waived late fees during the pandemic, and have been provided regulatory mechanisms to recover these and other costs resulting from COVID-19.

Utility Plant and Strategic Investments

Utility Plant Investments – During the 2019 and 2020 periods, PNM and TNMP together invested $1.3 billion in utility plant, including substations, power plants, nuclear fuel, and transmission and distribution systems. New Mexico’s clean energy future depends on a reliable, resilient, secure grid to deliver an evolving mix of energy resources to customers. PNM has launched the Wired for the Future capital initiative, which emphasizes new investments in its transmission and distribution infrastructure with three primary objectives: delivering clean energy, enhancing customer satisfaction and increasing grid resilience. Projects are aimed at advancing the infrastructure beyond its original architecture to a more flexible and redundant system accommodating growing amounts of intermittent and distributed generation resources and integrating evolving technologies that provide long-term customer value. See the subheading Capital Requirements included in the full discussion of Liquidity and Capital Resources below for additional discussion of the Company’s projected capital requirements.

Strategic Investments – In 2017, PNMR Development and AEP OnSite Partners created NMRD to pursue the acquisition, development, and ownership of renewable energy generation projects, primarily in the state of New Mexico. Abundant renewable resources, large tracts of affordable land, and strong government and community support make New Mexico a favorable location for renewable generation. New Mexico ranks third in the Nation for energy potential from solar power according to the Nebraska Department of Energy & Energy Sun Index and ranks third in the Nation for land-based wind capacity according to the U.S. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. PNMR Development and AEP OnSite
77

Partners each have a 50% ownership interest in NMRD. Through NMRD, PNMR anticipates being able to provide additional renewable generation solutions to customers within and surrounding its regulated jurisdictions through partnering with a subsidiary of one of the United States’ largest electric utilities. As of March 31, 2021, NMRD’s renewable energy capacity in operation was 135.1 MW, which includes 130 MW of solar-PV facilities to supply energy to the Facebook data center located within PNM’s service territory, 1.9 MW to supply energy to Columbus Electric Cooperative located in southwest New Mexico, 2.0 MW to supply energy to the Central New Mexico Electric Cooperative, and 1.2 MW of solar-PV facilities to supply energy to the City of Rio Rancho, New Mexico. In addition, PNM's February 8, 2021 application with the NMPRC for approval to service the Facebook data center includes construction of a 50 MW solar facility owned by NMRD, which is expected to be operational in 2023. NMRD actively explores opportunities for additional renewable projects, including large-scale projects to serve future data centers and other customer needs.

Integrated Resource Plan

NMPRC rules require that investor-owned utilities file an IRP every three years. The IRP is required to cover a 20-year planning period and contain an action plan covering the first four years of that period.

NMPRC rules required PNM to file its 2020 IRP in July 2020. In April 2020, the NMPRC approved PNM's request to extend the deadline to file its 2020 IRP until six months after the NMPRC issues a final order approving replacement resources in PNM’s SJGS Abandonment Application. On January 29, 2021, PNM filed its 2020 IRP. The plan focuses on a carbon-free electricity portfolio by 2040 that would eliminate coal at the end of 2024. This includes replacing the power from San Juan with a mix of approved carbon-free resources and the plan to exit Four Corners at the end of 2024. The plan highlights the need for additional investments in a diverse set of resources, including renewables to supply carbon-free power, energy storage to balance supply and demand, and efficiency and other demand-side resources to mitigate load growth.

Environmentally Responsible Power
PNMR has a long-standing record of environmental stewardship. PNM’s environmental focus is in three key areas:

Developing strategies to provide reliable and affordable power while transitioning to a 100% emissions-free generating portfolio by 2040
Preparing PNM’s system to meet New Mexico’s increasing renewable energy requirements as cost-effectively as possible
Increasing energy efficiency participation

PNMR’s corporate website (www.pnmresources.com) includes a dedicated section providing key environmental and other sustainability information related to PNM’s and TNMP’s operations and other information that collectively demonstrates the Company’s commitment to ESG principles. This information highlights plans for PNM to be coal-free by 2024 (subject to regulatory approval) and to achieve an emissions-free generating portfolio by 2040.

On September 21, 2020, PNM announced an agreement to partner with Sandia National Laboratories in research and development projects focused on energy resiliency, clean energy, and national security. The partnership demonstrates PNMR's commitment to ESG principles and its support of projects that further its emissions-free generation goals and plans for a reliable, resilient, and secure grid to deliver New Mexico's clean energy future.

The Energy Transition Act (“ETA”)

On June 14, 2019, Senate Bill 489, known as the ETA, became effective. The ETA amends the REA and requires utilities operating in New Mexico to have renewable portfolios equal to 20% by 2020, 40% by 2025, 50% by 2030, 80% by 2040, and 100% zero-carbon energy by 2045. The ETA also amends sections of the REA to allow for the recovery of undepreciated investments and decommissioning costs related to qualifying EGUs that the NMPRC has required be removed from retail jurisdictional rates, provided replacement resources to be included in retail rates have lower or zero-carbon emissions. The ETA provides for a transition from fossil-fueled generating resources to renewable and other carbon-free resources by allowing utilities to issue securitized bonds, or “energy transition bonds,” related to the retirement of certain coal-fired generating facilities to qualified investors. See additional discussion of the ETA in Note 11 and in Note 16 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

PNM expects the ETA will have a significant impact on PNM’s future generation portfolio, including PNM’s planned retirement of SJGS in 2022 and the planned Four Corners exit in 2024. PNM cannot predict the full impact of the ETA on potential future generating resource abandonment and replacement filings with the NMPRC.

SJGS Abandonment Application – As discussed in Note 12, on July 1, 2019, PNM filed a Consolidated Application for the Abandonment and Replacement of SJGS and Related Securitized Financing Pursuant to the ETA (the “SJGS Abandonment Application”). The SJGS Abandonment Application sought NMPRC approval to retire PNM’s share of SJGS in mid-2022, and
78

for approval of replacement resources and the issuance of approximately $361 million of Securitized Bonds as provided by the ETA.

The NMPRC issued an order requiring the SJGS Abandonment Application be considered in two proceedings: one addressing SJGS abandonment and related financing and the other addressing replacement resources but did not definitively indicate if the abandonment and financing proceedings would be evaluated under the requirements of the ETA. After several requests for clarification and legal challenges, in January 2020, the NM Supreme Court ruled the NMPRC is required to apply the ETA to all aspects of PNM’s SJGS Abandonment Application, and that any previous NMPRC orders inconsistent with their ruling should be vacated.

In February 2020, the Hearing Examiners issued two recommended decisions recommending approval of PNM’s proposed abandonment of SJGS, subject to approval of the separate replacement resources proceeding, and approval of PNM’s proposed financing order to issue Securitized Bonds.  The Hearing Examiners recommended, among other things, that PNM be authorized to abandon SJGS by June 30, 2022, to issue Securitized Bonds of up to $361 million, and to establish a rate rider to collect non-bypassable customer charges for repayment of the bonds (the “Energy Transition Charge”). The Hearing Examiners recommended an interim rate rider adjustment upon the start date of the Energy Transition Charge to provide immediate credits to customers for the full value of PNM’s revenue requirement related to SJGS until those reductions are reflected in base rates. In addition, the Hearing Examiners recommended PNM be granted authority to establish regulatory assets to recover costs that PNM will pay prior to the issuance of the Securitized Bonds, including costs associated with the bond issuances as well as for severances, job training, and economic development funds. On April 1, 2020, the NMPRC unanimously approved the Hearing Examiners' recommended decisions regarding the abandonment of SJGS and the Securitized Bonds.

On June 24, 2020, the Hearing Examiners issued a second recommended decision on PNM's request for approval of replacement resources that addressed the entire portfolio of replacement resources. On July 29, 2020, the NMPRC issued an order approving resource selection criteria identified in the ETA that include PPA's for 650 MW of solar and 300 MW of battery storage. See additional discussion of the ETA and PNM’s San Juan Abandonment Application in Notes 11 and 12.

Four Corners Abandonment Application - On January 8, 2021, PNM filed the Four Corners Abandonment Application, which seeks NMPRC approval to exit PNM’s 13% share of Four Corners as of December 31, 2024, and issuance of approximately $300 million of energy transition bonds as provided by the ETA. As ordered by the Hearing Examiner in the case, PNM filed an amended application and testimony on March 15, 2021. The amended application provided additional information to support PNM's request, provided background on the NMPRC's consideration of the prudence of PNM's investment in Four Corners in the NM 2016 Rate Case and explained how the proposed sale and abandonment provides a net public benefit. If approved, PNM would exit its 200 MW ownership interest in Four Corners seven years earlier than planned and accelerate its exit of coal to 2024. See additional discussion of the ETA and PNM’s Four Corners Abandonment Application in Notes 11 and 12.

PNM enhanced its plan to exit Four Corners and emphasized its ESG strategy to reduce carbon emissions on March 12, 2021 with an announcement for additional plans for seasonal operations at Four Corners beginning in the fall of 2023. The solution for seasonal operations ensures the plant will be available to serve each owners' customer needs during times of peak energy use while minimizing operations during periods of low demand. This approach results in an estimated annual 20 to 25 percent reduction in carbon emissions at the plant and retains jobs and royalty payments for the Navajo Nation.

Other Environmental Matters SJGS and Four Corners may be required to comply with environmental rules that affect coal-fired generating units, including regional haze rules and the ETA.  On June 19, 2019, EPA repealed the Clean Power Plan, promulgated the ACE Rule, and revised the implementing regulations for all emission guidelines issued under the CAA Section 111(d). EPA set the Best System of Emissions Reduction (“BSER”) for existing coal-fired power plants as heat rate efficiency improvements based on a range of “candidate technologies” that can be applied inside the fence-line. Rather than setting a specific numerical standard of performance, EPA’s rule directs states to determine which of the candidate technologies to apply to each coal-fired unit and establish standards of performance based on the degree of emission reduction achievable based on the application of BSER. However, on January 19, 2021, the DC Circuit issued an opinion vacating and remanding the rule, holding that it was based on a misconstruction of Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act. In addition, on January 27, 2021, President Biden signed an executive order requiring a review of environmental regulations issued under the Trump Administration, which will include a review of the ACE rule. The Biden Administration has made clear that it will seek greater authority in regulating greenhouse gas emissions to address climate change.

SJGS may also be required to comply with additional CO2 emissions restrictions issued by the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Board pursuant to the recently enacted ETA. PNM cannot predict the impact these standards may have on its operations or a range of the potential costs of compliance, if any.

PNMR is building upon its ESG goal of 100% emissions-free generation by 2040 with plans for additional emissions reductions through the electrification of its vehicle fleet. Growing the number of electric vehicles within the Company's fleet
79

will benefit the environment and lower fuel costs furthering the commitment to ESG principles. Under the commitment, existing fleet vehicles will be replaced as they are retired with an increasing percentage of electric vehicles. The new goals call for 25% of all light duty fleet purchases to be electric by 2025 and 50% to be electric by 2030.

To demonstrate PNMR’s commitment to increase the electrification of vehicles in its service territory, PNM filed a Transportation Electrification Program (“TEP”) with the NMPRC on December 18, 2020. The TEP supports customer adoption of electric vehicles by focusing on addressing the barriers to electric vehicle adoption and encourage use. PNM’s proposed program budget will be dedicated to low and moderate income customers by providing rebates to both residential and non-residential customers towards the purchase of chargers and/or behind-the-meter infrastructure. See Note 12.

Renewable Energy

PNM’s renewable procurement strategy includes utility-owned solar capacity, as well as solar, wind and geothermal energy purchased under PPAs. As of March 31, 2021, PNM has 158 MW of utility-owned solar capacity in operation. In addition, PNM purchases power from a customer-owned distributed solar generation program that had an installed capacity of 169.5 MW at March 31, 2021. PNM also owns the 500 KW PNM Prosperity Energy Storage Project. The project was one of the first combinations of battery storage and solar-PV energy in the nation and involved extensive research and development of advanced grid concepts. The facility also was the nation’s first solar storage facility fully integrated into a utility’s power grid. PNM also purchases the output from New Mexico Wind, a 200 MW wind facility, and the output of Red Mesa Wind, an existing 102 MW wind energy center. PNM's 2020 renewable energy procurement plan was approved by the NMPRC in January 2020 and includes a PPA to procure 140 MW of renewable energy and RECs from La Joya Wind II beginning in March 2021. The NMPRC's approved portfolio to replace the planned retirement of SJGS will result in PNM executing solar PPAs of 650 MW combined with 300 MW of battery storage facilities. The majority of these renewable resources are key means for PNM to meet the RPS and related regulations that require PNM to achieve prescribed levels of energy sales from renewable sources, including those set by the recently enacted ETA, without exceeding cost requirements.

As discussed in Strategic Investments above, PNM is currently purchasing the output of 130 MW of solar capacity from NMRD that is used to serve the Facebook data center which includes two 25-year PPAs to purchase renewable energy and RECs from an aggregate of approximately 100 MW of capacity from two solar-PV facilities constructed by NMRD to supply power to Facebook, Inc. The first 50 MW of these facilities began commercial operations in November 2019 and the second 50 MW facility began commercial operations in July 2020. Additionally, PNM has entered into three separate 25-year PPAs to purchase renewable energy and RECs to be used by PNM to supply additional renewable power to the Facebook data center. These PPAs include the purchase of power and RECs from a 50 MW wind project, which was placed in commercial operation in November 2018, a 166 MW wind project which became operational in February 2021, and a 50 MW solar-PV project to be operational in December 2021. On February 8, 2021, PNM filed an application with the NMPRC for approval to service the Facebook data center for an additional 190 MW of solar PPA combined with 100 MW of battery storage and a 50 MW solar PPA expected to be operational in 2023. See Note 12.

On May 31, 2019, PNM filed an application with the NMPRC for approval of a program under which qualified governmental and large commercial customers could participate in a voluntary renewable energy procurement program ("PNM Solar Direct"). The costs of the program would be recovered directly from subscribing customers through a rate rider, including the costs to procure renewable energy from 50 MW of solar-PV facilities under a 15-year PPA. These facilities are expected to be placed in commercial operation in September 2021. In March 2020, the NMPRC approved PNM's application, including the rate rider and PPA.

PNM will continue to procure renewable resources while balancing the impact to customers’ electricity costs in order to meet New Mexico’s escalating RPS and carbon-free resource requirements.

Energy Efficiency

Energy efficiency plays a significant role in helping to keep customers’ electricity costs low while meeting their energy needs and is one of the Company’s approaches to supporting environmentally responsible power. PNM’s and TNMP’s energy efficiency and load management portfolios continue to achieve robust results. In 2020, incremental energy saved as a result of new participation in PNM’s portfolio of energy efficiency programs exceeded 87 GWh, which was the maximum level of profit incentive allowed under the NMPRC approved program. This is equivalent to the annual consumption of approximately 12,155 homes in PNM’s service territory. PNM’s load management and annual energy efficiency programs also help lower peak demand requirements. In 2020, TNMP’s incremental energy saved as a result of new participation in TNMP’s energy efficiency programs is estimated to be approximately 17 GWh. This is equivalent to the annual consumption of approximately 2,011 homes in TNMP’s service territory. TNMP’s High-Performance Homes residential new construction energy efficiency program was honored for the 6th year in a row by ENERGY STAR. This recognition includes the program’s 4th straight Partner of the Year Sustained Excellence Award. For information on PNM's and TNMP's energy efficiency filing with the NMPRC and PUCT see Note 12.

80

Water Conservation and Solid Waste Reduction

PNM continues its efforts to reduce the amount of fresh water used to make electricity (about 35% more efficient than in 2007). Continued growth in PNM’s fleet of solar and wind energy sources, energy efficiency programs, and innovative uses of gray water and air-cooling technology have contributed to this reduction. Water usage has continued to decline as PNM has substituted less fresh-water-intensive generation resources to replace SJGS Units 2 and 3 starting in 2018, as water consumption at that plant has been reduced by approximately 50%. As the Company moves forward with its mission to achieve 100% carbon-free generation by 2040, it expects that more significant water savings will be gained. PNM has set a goal to reduce freshwater use 80% by 2035 and 90% by 2040 from 2005 levels. Focusing on responsible stewardship of New Mexico’s scarce water resources improves PNM’s water-resilience in the face of persistent drought and ever-increasing demands for water to spur the growth of New Mexico’s economy.

In addition to the above areas of focus, the Company is working to reduce the amount of solid waste going to landfills through increased recycling and reduction of waste. In 2020, 18 of the Company’s 23 facilities met the solid waste diversion goal of a 65% diversion rate. The Company expects to continue to do well in this area in the future.

Customer, Stakeholder, and Community Engagement

Another key element of the Company’s commitment to ESG principles is fostering relationships with its customers, stakeholders and communities. The Company strives to deliver a superior customer experience. Through outreach, collaboration, and various community-oriented programs, the Company has demonstrated a commitment to building productive relationships with stakeholders, including customers, community partners, regulators, intervenors, legislators, and shareholders. PNM continues to focus its efforts to enhance the customer experience through customer service improvements, including enhanced customer service engagement options, strategic customer outreach, and improved communications. These efforts are supported by market research to understand the varying needs of customers, identifying and establishing valued services and programs, and proactively communicating and engaging with customers. As a result, PNM has seen significant gains in customer satisfaction in recent years in both the JD Power Electric Utility Residential Customer Satisfaction StudySM and its own proprietary relationship surveys. In September 2020, J.D, Power also ranked PNM as one of the top performers in the industry for improved impression of the company based on PNM's response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Company has leveraged a number of communications channels and strategic content to better serve and engage its many stakeholders. PNM’s website www.pnm.com, provides the details of major regulatory filings, including general rate requests, as well as the background on PNM’s efforts to maintain reliability, keep prices affordable, and protect the environment. The Company’s website is also a resource for information about PNM’s operations and community outreach efforts, including plans for building a sustainable energy future for New Mexico and to transition to an emissions-free generating portfolio by 2040. PNM has also leveraged social media in communications with customers on various topics such as education, outage alerts, safety, customer service, and PNM’s community partnerships in philanthropic projects. As discussed above, PNMR's corporate website, www.pnmresources.com, includes a dedicated section providing additional information regarding the Company’s commitment to ESG principles and other sustainability efforts.

With reliability being the primary role of a transmission and distribution service provider in Texas’ deregulated market, TNMP continues to focus on keeping end-users updated about interruptions and to encourage consumer preparation when severe weather is forecasted. Last summer, TNMP provided a 33-person team for two weeks in support of another utility that experienced significant damage to their transmission and distribution system as a result of Hurricane Laura.

Local relationships and one-on-one communications remain two of the most valuable ways both PNM and TNMP connect with their stakeholders. Both companies maintain long-standing relationships with governmental representatives and key electricity consumers to ensure that these stakeholders are updated on Company investments and initiatives. Key electricity consumers also have dedicated Company contacts that support their important service needs.

Another demonstration of the Company's commitment to ESG principles is the Company’s tradition of supporting the communities it serves in New Mexico and Texas. This support extends beyond corporate giving and financial donations from the PNM Resources Foundation to also include collaborations on community projects, customer low-income assistance programs, and employee volunteerism. In response to COVID-19, additional efforts were made in each of these areas and exhibit the Company’s core value of caring for its customers and communities.

During the three years ending December 31, 2020, corporate giving contributed $7.7 million to civic, educational, environmental, low income, and economic development organizations. PNMR recognizes its responsibility to support programs and organizations that enrich the quality of life across its service territories and seeks opportunities to further demonstrate its commitment in these areas as needs arise. In response to COVID-19 community needs, PNMR donated to an Emergency Action Fund in partnership with key local agencies to benefit approximately ninety nonprofits and small businesses facing challenges due to lack of technology, shifting service needs, and cancelled fundraising events. Additionally, employee teams have supported first responders and other front-line workers through the delivery of food and other supplies often
81

procured from local businesses struggling during stay-at-home orders. PNM also donated to the Pueblo Relief Fund and delivered personal protective supplies to pueblo areas and tribal nations throughout New Mexico. While its service territory does not include the Navajo Nation, PNM’s operations include generating facilities and employees in this region that has been disproportionately affected by the pandemic. In response, employee teams focused efforts to this region and also provided available supplies of personal protective equipment. PNM has also collaborated with the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Wireless ("NTUAW") to set up wireless “hot spots” throughout the Navajo Nation in areas without internet access to assist first responders and support continued education opportunities amidst school closures. These actions supplement PNM’s continued support for the Navajo Nation. The PNM Navajo Nation Workforce Training Scholarship Program provides support for Navajo tribal members and encourages the pursuit of education and training in existing and emerging jobs in the communities in which they live. In 2019, PNM invested an additional $500,000 into this scholarship program to further assist in the development and education of the Navajo Nation workforce. PNM has invested in paid summer college engineering internship programs for American Indian students available in the greater Albuquerque area. PNM also continues to partner in the Light up Navajo project, piloted in 2019 and modeled after mutual aid to connect homes without electricity to the power grid. In 2020, PNM also partnered with key local organizations to initiate funding for programs focused on diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Another important outreach program is tailored for low-income customers and includes the PNM Good Neighbor Fund to provide customer assistance with their electric utility bills. COVID-19 has increased the needs of these customers along with customers who may not otherwise need to seek assistance. In addition to the suspension of customer disconnections and expansion of customer payment plans, PNM responded with increased communications through media outlets and customer outreach to connect customers with nonprofit community service providers offering financial assistance, food, clothing, medical programs, and services for seniors. As a result of these communication efforts, 3,487 families in need have received emergency assistance through the PNM Good Neighbor Fund during 2020.

Additionally, as a part of corporate giving, on October 1, 2020, PNM introduced $2.0 million in funding for new COVID Customer Relief Programs to support income-qualified residential customers and small business customers who have been impacted by the financial challenges created by COVID-19 and have past due electric bills. Qualified customers that pay a portion of their past-due balance can receive assistance toward their remaining balance.

Volunteerism is also an important facet of employee culture keeping our communities safer, stronger, smarter and more vibrant. In 2020, PNM and TNMP employees and retirees contributed over 6,200 virtual and in-person volunteer hours serving local communities by supporting at least 250 organizations. Volunteers also participate in a company-wide annual Day of Service at nonprofits across New Mexico and Texas along with participation on a variety of nonprofit boards and independent volunteer activities throughout the year.

In addition to the extensive engagement both PNM and TNMP have with nonprofit organizations in their communities, the PNM Resources Foundation provides more than $1 million in grant funding each year across New Mexico and Texas. These grants help nonprofits innovate or sustain programs to grow and develop business, develop and implement environmental programs, and provide educational opportunities. Beginning in 2020, the PNM Resources Foundation is funding grants with a three-year focus on decreasing homelessness, increasing access to affordable housing, reducing carbon emissions, and community safety with an emphasis on COVID-19 programs. As part of this emphasis, $0.4 million has been awarded to nonprofits in New Mexico and Texas to assist with work being done on the front lines of the pandemic for community safety, with a focus on helping senior citizens and people currently experiencing homelessness during the shelter-in-place directives. In 2020, the PNM Resources Foundation expanded its matching donation program to offer 2-to-1 matching on employee donations made to social justice nonprofits and increased the annual amount of matching donations available to each of its employees. PNM Resources Foundation awarded $0.3 million of additional grants to non-profits supporting TNMP communities following the winter storm in February 2021.

Economic Factors

PNM In the three months ended March 31, 2021, PNM experienced a decrease in weather normalized commercial load of 9.6%, mostly offset by an increase in weather normalized retail load of 7.3% compared to 2020 primarily due to New Mexico state restrictions related to COVID-19. PNM did not experience significant impacts to its other customer classes.

TNMP In the three months ended March 31, 2021, TNMP experienced an increase in volumetric weather normalized retail load of 3.1% compared to 2020. Weather normalized demand-based load, excluding retail transmission customers in the three months ended March 31, 2021 is flat when compared to 2020. TNMP has experienced increased volumetric usage related to residential consumers offset by decreases in its demand based commercial consumer class as a result of impacts related to COVID-19.

The Company is unable to determine the duration or final impacts from COVID-19 as discussed in more detail in Item 1A. Risk Factors of the 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K. The Company does not currently expect significant negative impacts to customer usage at PNM and TNMP resulting from the economic impacts of COVID-19. However, if current
82

economic conditions worsen, the Company may be required to implement additional measures such as reducing or delaying operating and maintenance expenses and planned capital expenditures.

Results of Operations

Net earnings (loss) attributable to PNMR were $17.6 million, or $0.20 per diluted share in the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to $(15.3) million, or $(0.19) per diluted share, in 2019. Among other things, earnings in the three months ended March 31, 2021, benefited from higher weather normalized residential load at PNM, higher volumetric load at TNMP, colder weather at PNM and TNMP, higher transmission rates at PNM and TNMP, higher distribution rates at TNMP, lower surface mine reclamation expense and lower accretion expense at PNM, lower interest expense at PNM, improved performance on PNM's NDT and coal mine reclamation investment securities and higher equity AFUDC at PNM and TNMP. These increases were partially offset by lower weather normalized commercial load at PNM, higher operational and maintenance expense, including higher plant maintenance and administrative costs at PNM, higher employee related, outside service and vegetation management expense at PNM and TNMP, increased depreciation and higher property taxes at PNM and TNMP due to increased plant in service, and higher interest charges at TNMP. Additional information on factors impacting results of operations for each segment is discussed below under Results of Operations.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

PNMR and PNM have revolving credit facilities with capacities of $300.0 million and $400.0 million that currently expire in October 2023. Both facilities provide for short-term borrowings and letters of credit and can be extended through October 2024, subject to approval by a majority of the lenders. In addition, PNM has a $40.0 million revolving credit facility with banks having a significant presence in New Mexico that expires in December 2022, and TNMP has a $75.0 million revolving credit facility, which expires in September 2022 and contains two one-year extension options, subject to approval by a majority of the lenders. PNMR Development has a revolving credit facility with a capacity of $40.0 million that expires in January 2022 and gives PNM the option, subject to lender approval, to further increase the capacity up to $50.0 million upon 15-days advance notice. The PNMR Development Revolving Credit Facility bears interest at a variable rate and contains terms similar to the PNMR Revolving Credit Facility. Total availability for PNMR on a consolidated basis was $644.8 million at April 23, 2021. Total availability at PNMR, on a consolidated basis, does not reflect a reduction of $100.3 million that PNM has reserved to provide liquidity support for the PNM Floating Rate PCRBs. The Company utilizes these credit facilities and cash flows from operations to provide funds for both construction and operational expenditures. PNMR also has intercompany loan agreements with each of its subsidiaries.

PNMR projects that its consolidated capital requirements, consisting of construction expenditures and dividends, will total $4.6 billion for 2021 - 2025, including amounts expended through March 31, 2021. The construction expenditures include estimated amounts for an anticipated expansion of PNM’s transmission system, including the planned purchase of the Western Spirit Line, and expenditures for PNM’s Wired for the Future capital initiative.

To fund capital spending requirements to meet growth that balances earnings goals, credits metrics and liquidity needs, the Company may enter into financing arrangements in 2021. A complete listing of current financing arrangements is contained in Note 7 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the 2020 Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

See discussion of the NMPRC's April 1, 2020 approval of PNM's request to issue approximately $361 million of Securitized Bonds upon the retirement of SJGS in 2022, and the related appeal of that order to the NM Supreme Court in Note 12.

After considering the effects of these financings and the Company's short-term liquidity position as of April 23, 2021, the Company has consolidated maturities of long-term and short-term debt aggregating approximately $1,215.7 million through April 2022. In addition to internal cash generation, the Company anticipates that it will be necessary to obtain additional long-term financing in the form of debt refinancing, new debt issuances, and/or new equity in order to fund its capital requirements during the 2021-2025 period. The Company currently believes that its internal cash generation, existing credit arrangements, and access to public and private capital markets will provide sufficient resources to meet the Company’s capital requirements for at least the next twelve months. The Company is in compliance with its debt covenants.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto. Trends and contingencies of a material nature are discussed to the extent known. Refer also to Disclosure Regarding Forward Looking Statements and to Part II, Item 1A. Risk Factors.


83

A summary of net earnings attributable to PNMR is as follows:

 Three Months Ended March 31,
 2021 2020 Change
 (In millions, except per share amounts)
Net earnings (loss) attributable to PNMR$17.6  $(15.3) $32.9 
Average diluted common and common equivalent shares86.1  79.9  6.2 
Net earnings (loss) attributable to PNMR per diluted share$0.20  $(0.19) $0.39 


The components of the change in net earnings attributable to PNMR are:

Three Months Ended
March 31, 2021
(In millions)
PNM$34.6 
TNMP1.6 
Corporate and Other(3.4)
Net change$32.9 

Information regarding the factors impacting PNMR’s operating results by segment are set forth below.

Segment Information

The following discussion is based on the segment methodology that PNMR’s management uses for making operating decisions and assessing performance of its various business activities. See Note 2 for more information on PNMR’s operating segments.

PNM

PNM defines utility margin as electric operating revenues less cost of energy, which consists primarily of fuel and purchase power costs. PNM believes that utility margin provides a more meaningful basis for evaluating operations than electric operating revenues since substantially all fuel and purchase power costs are offset in revenues as those costs are passed through to customers under PNM’s FPPAC. Utility margin is not a financial measure required to be presented and is considered a non-GAAP measure.

The following table summarizes the operating results for PNM:

Three Months Ended March 31,
20212020Change
(In millions)
Electric operating revenues$271.2 $248.1 $23.1 
Cost of energy88.9 74.5 14.4 
     Utility margin182.3 173.6 8.7 
Operating expenses107.3 98.6 8.7 
Depreciation and amortization41.9 41.4 0.5 
     Operating income33.1 33.6 (0.5)
Other income (deductions)4.8 (30.5)35.3 
Interest charges(12.9)(17.6)4.7 
     Segment earnings (loss) before income taxes25.0 (14.6)39.6 
Income (taxes) benefit(2.8)2.4 (5.2)
Valencia non-controlling interest(3.5)(3.7)0.2 
Preferred stock dividend requirements(0.1)(0.1)— 
Segment earnings$18.5 $(16.1)$34.6 


84

The following table shows total GWh sales, including the impacts of weather, by customer class and average number of customers:
Three Months Ended March 31,
Percentage
20212020Change
(Gigawatt hours, except customers)
Residential828.2 768.2 7.8 %
Commercial752.4 838.7 (10.3)
Industrial380.0 334.3 13.7 
Public authority47.4 48.5 (2.3)
Economy energy service (1)
129.1 166.5 (22.5)
Other sales for resale746.4 605.2 23.3 
2,883.5 2,761.4 4.4 %
Average retail customers (thousands)538.8 533.0 1.1 %

(1) PNM purchases energy for a large customer on the customer’s behalf and delivers the energy to the customer’s location through PNM’s transmission system. PNM charges the customer for the cost of the energy as a direct pass through to the customer with only a minor impact in utility margin resulting from providing ancillary services.

Operating ResultsThree Months Ended March 31, 2021 compared to 2020

The following table summarizes the significant changes to utility margin:
Three Months
Ended
March 31, 2021
Change
Utility margin:(In millions)
Retail customer usage/load Weather normalized KWh sales decreased 9.6% for commercial customers mostly offset by increased sales to residential customers of 7.3%
$(0.1)
Weather – Colder weather in 2021; heating degree days were 10.1% higher in 2021
1.5 
Leap Year Decreased revenue in 2021 due to additional day in 2020
(1.8)
Transmission Higher revenues under formula transmission rates, the addition of a new customer, and higher volumes
2.8 
Rate riders Includes renewable energy, fuel clause, and energy efficiency riders which are partially offset in operating expense
4.3 
Coal mine reclamation Lower expense on surface mine reclamation in 2021 and the 2020 remeasurement of PNM’s obligation for Four Corners and SJGS coal mine reclamation (Note 11)
1.9 
Other0.1 
Net Change$8.7 


85

The following tables summarize the primary drivers for changes in operating expenses, depreciation and amortization, other income (deductions), interest charges, and income taxes:
Three Months
Ended
March 31, 2021
Change
Operating expenses:(In millions)
Higher plant maintenance and administrative costs at SJGS, Four Corners, and gas fired plants partially offset by lower costs for PVNGS$2.8