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Desert Hawk Gold (DHGC)

Filed: 7 Aug 20, 3:53pm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2020.

 

or

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 For the transition period from _______________________to___________________________

 

Commission File Number: 333-169701

 

Desert Hawk Gold Corp.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada 82-0230997
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
   
1290 Holcomb Ave. Reno, NV 89502
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
   
(775) 337-8057
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class Trading Symbol(s) Name of each exchange on which registered
     

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes  ☒  No  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

Yes  ☒  No  ☐

 

No Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filerAccelerated filer
Non-accelerated filerSmaller reporting Company Emerging growth company  

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

Yes  ☐  No  ☒

 

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of the issuer’s common stock, as of August 4, 2020: 26,831,603.

 

 

 

 

  

DESERT HAWK GOLD CORP.

Form 10-Q

June 30, 2020

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION1
Item 1. Financial Statements1
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations16
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk19
Item 4. Controls and Procedures19
  
PART II – OTHER INFORMATION20
Item 1A. Risk Factors20
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures21
Item 6. Exhibits21
  
SIGNATURES22

  

i

 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

 

DESERT HAWK GOLD CORP
BALANCE SHEETS (unaudited)

 

  June 30,  December 31, 
  2020  2019 
ASSETS      
       
CURRENT ASSETS      
Cash $337,518  $2,116,432 
Inventories (Note 5)  5,654,480   4,333,682 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets  70,329   181,030 
Total Current Assets  6,062,327   6,631,144 
         
PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT, net (Note 6)  5,716,963   5,287,515 
MINERAL PROPERTIES AND INTERESTS, net (Note 7)  3,741,526   3,729,637 
RECLAMATION BONDS (Note 4)  759,726   759,351 
         
TOTAL ASSETS $16,280,542  $16,407,647 
         
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)        
         
CURRENT LIABILITIES        
Accounts payable and accrued expenses $816,154  $436,881 
Notes payable - equipment, current portion (Note 12)  1,151,198   1,302,239 
Pre-Paid forward gold contract liability, current portion (Note 3)  1,756,440   189,351 
Settlement of consulting contract payable (Note 14)  200,000   200,000 
Total Current Liabilities  3,923,792   2,128,471 
         
LONG-TERM LIABILITIES        
Note payable - SBA (Note 11)  463,497   - 
Note payable - equipment (Note 12)  307,383   - 
Asset retirement obligation (Note 13)  998,688   826,637 
Pre-Paid forward gold contract liability (Note 3)  11,843,560   13,410,649 
   13,613,128   14,237,286 
TOTAL LIABILITIES  17,536,920   16,365,757 
         
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Note 19)        
         
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT) (Note 15)        
Preferred stock, $0.001 par value, 10,000,000 shares authorized; none issued or outstanding  -   - 
Common stock, $0.001 par value, 100,000,000 shares authorized;  26,631,603 and 26,631,603 shares issued and outstanding  26,633   26,633 
Additional paid-in capital  9,466,475   9,466,475 
Accumulated deficit  (10,749,486)  (9,451,218)
Total Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)  (1,256,378)  41,890 
         
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT) $16,280,542  $16,407,647 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

1

 

 

DESERT HAWK GOLD CORP
STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS (unaudited)

 

  Three Months Ended  Six Months Ended 
  June 30,  June 30,  June 30,  June 30, 
  2020  2019  2020  2019 
REVENUE            
Sales of product $1,393,967  $-  $2,706,047  $- 
                 
EXPENSES                
General production and project costs  946,963   391,134   2,332,484   391,134 
Depreciation and amortization  298,475   82,310   590,826   184,782 
Other operating costs  122,959   52,352   299,650   197,621 
Exploration expense  38,144   71,154   342,350   71,154 
Legal and professional  15,146   59,600   89,382   152,121 
Officers and directors fees  87,718   85,077   171,472   156,845 
Consulting expense  -   117,617   -   437,617 
General and administrative  69,446   82,988   129,682   109,597 
(Gain) loss on disposition of equipment  2,127   -   162   51,950 
   1,580,978   942,232   3,956,008   1,752,821 
                 
OPERATING LOSS  (187,011)  (942,232)  (1,249,961)  (1,752,821)
                 
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE)                
Interest and other income  -   -   375   - 
Interest expense - equipment financing  (20,214)  (7,359)  (47,829)  (7,359)
Interest expense - related parties  -   -   -   (31,412)
Interest expense - other  (853)  -   (853)  (129)
Loss on settlement of consulting contract (Note 14)  -   -   -   (900,000)
Loss on settlement of redeemable stock  -   -   -   (63,094)
Financing expense  -   -   -   (28,663)
   (21,067)  (7,359)  (48,307)  (1,030,657)
                 
LOSS BEFORE INCOME TAXES  (208,078)  (949,591)  (1,298,268)  (2,783,478)
INCOME TAXES  -   -   -   - 
NET LOSS $(208,078) $(949,591) $(1,298,268) $(2,783,478)
                 
BASIC AND DILUTED NET LOSS PER SHARE $(0.01) $(0.04) $(0.05) $(0.11)
WEIGHTED AVERAGE NUMBER OF COMMON SHARES OUTSTANDING - BASIC AND DILUTED  26,631,603   26,631,603   26,631,603   24,534,918 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

2

 

 

DESERT HAWK GOLD CORP
STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (unaudited)

 

  Six Months Ended 
  June 30,  June 30, 
  2020  2019 
       
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:      
Net loss $(1,298,268) $(2,783,478)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used by operating activities:        
Depreciation and amortization  590,826   184,782 
Accretion of asset retirement obligation  46,688   37,346 
Gain on settlement of asset retirement obligation  -   (20,451)
Loss on disposal of equipment, net  162   51,950 
Common stock issued for consulting contract settlement  -   100,000 
Common stock issued for settlement of redeemable stock  -   52,000 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:        
Inventories  (1,320,797)  (147,321)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets  110,701   (57,521)
Accounts payable and accrued expenses  379,273   (609,555)
Accrued liabilities - officer wages  -   (922,039)
Interest payable - related parties  -   (463,993)
Settlement of consulting contract payable  -   200,000 
Net cash used by operating activities  (1,491,415)  (4,378,280)
         
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:        
Additions to property and equipment  (459,312)  (638,948)
Additions to mineral properties and interests  -   (900,000)
Increase in reclamation bonds  (375)  (13,945)
Net cash used by investing activities  (459,687)  (1,552,893)
         
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:        
Proceeds from note payable - SBA  463,497   - 
Proceeds from note payable - related parties  -   91,680 
Proceeds from forward gold contract liability, net  -   10,600,000 
Payment of obligation under capital lease - related party  -   (69,562)
Payment of notes payable - equipment  (291,309)  (423,138)
Payment of short term note payable - related parties  -   (340,680)
Payment of convertible debt - related parties  -   (1,350,000)
Net cash provided by financing activities  172,188   8,508,300 
         
NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH  (1,778,914)  2,577,127 
CASH, BEGINNING OF PERIOD  2,116,432   8,716 
         
CASH, END OF PERIOD $337,518  $2,585,843 
         
NON-CASH FINANCING AND INVESTING ACTIVITIES:        
Common stock issued for mineral properties and interests  -  $2,200,000 
Equipment acquired with notes payable $447,650  $526,772 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

3

 

 

DESERT HAWK GOLD CORP
STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (unaudited)
For the three-month periods ended June 30, 2020 and June 30, 2019

 

  Common Stock  Additional
Paid-in
  Accumulated  Total
Stockholders’ Equity
 
  Shares  Amount  Capital  Deficit  (Deficit) 
Balance, March 31, 2019  26,631,603  $26,633  $9,466,475  $(7,508,812) $1,984,296 
                     
Net loss  -   -   -   (949,591)  (949,591)
                     
Balance, June 30, 2019  26,631,603  $26,633  $9,466,475  $(8,458,403) $1,034,705 
                     
Balance, March 31, 2020  26,631,603  $26,633  $9,466,475  $(10,541,408) $(1,048,300)
                     
Net loss  -   -   -   (208,078)  (208,078)
                     
Balance, June 30, 2020  26,631,603  $26,633  $9,466,475  $(10,749,486) $(1,256,378)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

4

 

 

DESERT HAWK GOLD CORP
STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT) (unaudited)
For the six-month periods ended June 30, 2020 and June 30, 2019

 

  Common Stock  Additional
Paid-in
  Accumulated  Total
Stockholders’ Equity
 
  Shares  Amount  Capital  Deficit  (Deficit) 
Balance, December 31, 2018  20,881,603  $20,753  $7,120,355  $(5,674,925) $1,466,183 
                     
Common stock issued in connection with acquiring mineral proprerties and interests (Note 7)  5,500,000   5,500   2,194,500   -   2,200,000 
                     
Common stock issued in connection with settlement of consulting contract (Note 14)  250,000   250   99,750   -   100,000 
                     
Common stock released in settlement of redeemable stock  -   130   51,870   -   52,000 
                     
Net loss  -   -   -   (2,783,478)  (2,783,478)
                     
Balance, June 30, 2019  26,631,603  $26,633  $9,466,475  $(8,458,403) $1,034,705 
                     
Balance, December 31, 2019  26,631,603  $26,633  $9,466,475  $(9,451,218) $41,890 
                     
Net loss              (1,298,268)  (1,298,268)
                     
Balance, June 30, 2020  26,631,603  $26,633  $9,466,475  $(10,749,486) $(1,256,378)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

5

 

 

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS

 

Desert Hawk Gold Corp. (the “Company”), a Nevada Corporation, was incorporated on November 5, 1957. The Company commenced its current mining activities on May 1, 2009.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2009, the Company entered into Joint Venture Agreements with the Clifton Mining Company (“Clifton”), the Woodman Mining Company and the Moeller Family Trust for the lease of certain of their property interests in the Gold Hill Mining District of Utah.  In 2011, the Company entered into an agreement with DMRJ Group, (a Platinum Partners related entity), which allowed for long term funding of the Kiewit project and helped to provide cash flow for operations during the period from 2009 until 2014 while the permitting process was ongoing. The final permit needed to begin development of the Kiewit property was received in January 2014 and development began in February 2014. Construction at the site was substantially complete on September 30, 2014. Revenue from the heap leach operation began in October 2014 with the first sales of gold concentrate. Production commenced and revenues of approximately $12,400,000 from sales of gold and other metals concentrate have been received through June 30, 2020.

 

Prior to March 2019, ongoing undercapitalization continued to hamper the Company’s ability to operate. Due to lack of funding, the Company was temporarily shut down beginning third quarter of 2017. On March 7, 2019, the Company successfully finalized a prepaid forward gold contract liability agreement (the Pre-Paid Forward Gold Purchase Agreement (the “Purchase Agreement”)) that provided funding and enabled production to resume later in 2019. See Note 3.

 

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

In the opinion of management, the accompanying unaudited interim balance sheets and statements of operations, cash flows and stockholders’ equity contain all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring items, necessary to present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of June 30, 2020, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the three and six month periods ended June 30, 2020 and 2019. The operating and financial results for the Company for the six months ended June 30, 2020 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

These unaudited interim financial statements have been prepared by management in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles used in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) and are presented in U.S. dollars. These unaudited interim financial statements do not include all note disclosures required by U.S. GAAP on an annual basis, and therefore should be read in conjunction with the annual audited financial statements included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 30, 2020.

 

This summary of significant accounting policies of the Company is presented to assist in understanding the Company’s financial statements. The financial statements and notes are representations of the Company’s management, which is responsible for their integrity and objectivity. These accounting policies conform to U.S. GAAP and have been consistently applied in the preparation of the financial statements.

 

Accounting Method

 

The Company’s financial statements are prepared using the accrual basis of accounting in accordance with U.S. GAAP.

 

Accounting for Stock Options and Stock Awards Granted to Employees and Nonemployees

 

All transactions in which goods or services are received for the issuance of shares of the Company’s common stock or options to purchase shares of common stock are accounted for based on the fair value of the equity interest issued. For stock options, the Company estimates the fair value of stock-based compensation using the Black-Scholes model, which requires the input of some subjective assumptions. These assumptions include estimating the length of time employees will retain their vested stock options before exercising them (“expected life”), the estimated volatility of the Company’s common stock price over the expected term (“volatility”), the risk-free interest rate and the dividend yield. Changes in the subjective assumptions can materially affect the estimate of the fair value of stock-based compensation.

 

6

 

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect certain reported amounts and disclosures. Significant estimates used in preparing these financial statements include those assumed in estimating the number of gold ounces in and costing of inventories, the recoverability of the cost of mining claims, asset retirement obligation, stock-based compensation, determination of the fair value of common stock issued, deferred tax assets and related valuation allowances. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Reclassifications

 

Certain reclassifications have been made to conform prior periods’ amounts to the current presentation. These reclassifications have no effect on the results of operations, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows previously reported.

 

Inventories

 

The recovery of gold from certain oxide ores is achieved through the heap leaching process. Under this method, mineralized material is placed on a leach pad where it is treated with a chemical solution, which dissolves the gold contained in the material. The resulting “pregnant” solution is further processed in a plant where gold is recovered. The Company records ore on leach pad, solution in carbon columns in process and gold concentrate, at average production cost per gold ounce, less provisions required to reduce inventory to net realizable value. Production costs include the cost of mineralized material processed; direct and indirect materials and consumables; direct labor; repairs and maintenance; utilities; amortization of property, equipment, and mineral properties; and mine administrative expenses. Costs are removed from ore on leach pads as ounces are recovered, based on the average cost per recoverable ounce of gold on the leach pad.

 

Estimates of recoverable gold on the leach pad are calculated from the quantities of material placed on the leach pad (measured tons added to the leach pad), the grade of material placed on the leach pad (based on assay data) and an estimated recovery percentage (based on ore type). The nature of the leaching process inherently limits the ability to precisely monitor inventory levels. As a result, actual gold ounces recovered are regularly monitored and estimates are refined based on actual results over time. As of June 30, 2020, the Company had a limited operating history and actual results only over a short period of time. Due to this, estimates of recoverable gold are based primarily on initial tests with only limited refinements.

 

Variations between actual and estimated quantities resulting from changes in assumptions and estimates that do not result in write-downs to net realizable value are accounted for on a prospective basis. The ultimate recovery of gold from a leach pad will not be known until the leaching process is concluded. The quantification of material inventory on the leach pad is based on estimates of the quantities of gold at each balance sheet date that the Company expects to recover during the next 12 months. See Note 5.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Sales of gold concentrate sold directly to customers are recorded as revenues and receivables upon completion of the performance obligations and transfer of control of the product to the customer. For concentrate sales, the performance obligation is met, the transaction price can be reasonably estimated, and revenue is recognized generally at the time of shipment at estimated forward prices for the anticipated month of settlement. Due to the time elapsed from shipment to the customer and the final settlement with the customer, prices at which sales of the Company’s concentrates will be settled are estimated. Previously recorded sales and accounts receivable are adjusted to the estimated settlement metals prices until final settlement by the customer.

 

Sales and accounts receivable for concentrate shipments are recorded net of charges by the customer for treatment, refining, smelting losses, and other charges negotiated with the customers. Charges are estimated upon shipment of concentrates based on contractual terms, and actual charges typically do not vary materially from estimates. See Note 17.

 

Loss Per Share

 

Basic earnings per share includes no dilution and is computed by dividing net loss available to common shareholders by the weighted average common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted earnings per share reflect the potential dilution of securities that could share in the earnings of the Company.

 

For the six months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, common stock equivalents of 2,400,000 associated with the Company’s outstanding stock options were excluded from the calculation of diluted earnings per share because they were anti-dilutive due to the net loss for the periods then ended.

 

7

 

 

Going Concern

 

As shown in the accompanying financial statements, the Company had an accumulated deficit of $10,749,486 through June 30, 2020 and net loss of $1,298,268 for the six month period ended June 30, 2020 which raises substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded assets, or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary in the event the Company cannot continue in existence.

 

Although production has restarted in 2019, it has not yet reached optimum levels. The timing and amount of capital requirements will depend on a number of factors, including demand for products, metals market pricing, and the availability of opportunities for expansion through affiliations and other business relationships. Although management has procured funding through a forward sales agreement (Note 3) they intend to continue to seek new capital from equity securities issuances to provide funds needed to increase liquidity, fund internal growth, and fully implement its business plan. The Company’s management believes that it has sufficient funds to meet its obligations and continue production over the next twelve months, however there are no assurances that will occur.

 

New Accounting Pronouncements

 

Accounting Standards Updates Adopted

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-13 Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework-Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement. The update removes, modifies and makes additions to the disclosure requirements on fair value measurements. The update was adopted as of January 1, 2020, and its adoption did not have a material impact on the Company’s financial statements.

 

Accounting Standards Updates to Become Effective in Future Periods

 

In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU No. 2019-12 Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes. The update contains a number of provisions intended to simplify the accounting for income taxes. The update is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, with early adoption permitted. Management is evaluating the impact of this update on the Company’s financial statements.

 

Other accounting standards that have been issued or proposed by FASB that do not require adoption until a future date are not expected to have a material impact on the financial statements upon adoption.

 

NOTE 3 – PREPAID FORWARD GOLD CONTRACT LIABILITY

 

During the first quarter of 2019, the Company entered into and closed a Pre-Paid Forward Gold Purchase Agreement (the “Purchase Agreement”) with PDK Utah Holdings L.P. (“PDK”) for the sale and purchase by PDK of gold produced from the Company’s mining property. Under the terms of the original Purchase Agreement, PDK initially agreed to purchase a total of 73,910 ounces of gold from the Company. The Company agreed to deliver ounces of gold produced from the Kiewit property to PDK. The Company would receive proceeds from PDK at the then current spot price less a discount specified in the Purchase Agreement. Prepayment was to be made in three tranches, with the initial tranche in the amount of $11,200,000 having been made upon execution of the Purchase Agreement on March 7, 2019 (the “Initial Funding”), $4,500,000 for Tranche 2 to occur at least six months following the Initial Funding date, and $5,500,000 for Tranche 3 to occur at least 10 months following the Initial Funding date, provided that all conditions precedent for funding Tranches 2 and 3 are met. From the Initial Funding, the Company paid an upfront fee of $600,000 to PDK for expenses incurred in connection with the transaction. The first gold delivery of 655 ounces is due December 2020.

 

The Purchase Agreement contains a participation payment whereby PDK receives a portion of the proceeds from gold sold by the Company to a third party. The amount of proceeds due to PDK is based upon a percentage of proceeds over a set gold price per ounce. In addition, PDK may reduce the required number of ounces to be sold in exchange for common shares of the Company. As security for the obligations of the Company under the Purchase Agreement, the Company has granted PDK a security interest in all of the assets of the Company and has issued and recorded a Leasehold Deed of Trust, Assignment of Leases, Rents, As Extracted Collateral and Contracts, Security Agreement and Fixture Filing. The Purchase Agreement contains representations and warranties, as well as affirmative and negative covenants customary to a transaction of this nature.

 

On October 31, 2019, the Company and PDK amended the Purchase Agreement and entered into the Amended Pre-Paid Forward Agreement (the “Amended Agreement”) to adjust the second and third tranches paid to the Company, to reduce the total number of ounces of gold subject to the Purchase Agreement, and to revise other provisions therein. The second tranche was reduced from $4,500,000 to $1,600,000, and the third tranche was reduced from $5,500,000 to $1,400,000. The second tranche was received on October 31, 2019 upon execution of the Amended Agreement and the third tranche was received on December 27, 2019, with funds to be dedicated in accordance with the revised budget furnished with the Amended Agreement. The amendment also reduced the total number of ounces of gold to be delivered under the agreement from 73,910 to 47,045.

 

8

 

 

The prepayment has been accounted for as deferred revenue and is presented as a prepaid forward gold contract liability on the balance sheet at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 with a total balance of $13,600,000 which is the $14,200,000 received from PDK in Tranches 1-3, less the $600,000 upfront fee paid by the Company in 2019.

 

Under the terms of the Amended Agreement, the Company is obligated to deliver gold in the following quantities:

 

Months Gold Ounces per Month  

Total Gold Ounces

 
December 2020  655   655 
January 2021 to March 2021  896   2,688 
April 2021 to March 2022  911   10,932 
April 2022 to March 2023  1,396   16,752 
April 2023 to December 2023  1,753   15,777 
January 2024  241   241 
       47,045 

 

The Amended Agreement also altered the total amount that PDK may reduce the number of ounces of gold to be delivered under the Amended Agreement in exchange for common shares of the Company. Under the Amended Agreement, PDK may reduce the required number of ounces by up to 8,000 ounces in exchange for common shares of the Company.

 

NOTE 4 – RECLAMATION BONDS

 

At June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Company has a surety bond of $674,000 in an escrow account with the bonding company for reclamation of its property. This escrowed amount is held at Bank of New York, Mellon for the Company’s benefit. It may not be released to the Company without the prior consent of the surety bondholder. The escrowed amount does not earn interest.

 

In March 2019, as part of the Amended Lease (Note 7), the Company returned the Cactus Mill property and the reclamation bond of $42,802 on that property to Clifton Mining Company.

 

Total reclamation bonds posted at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 are $759,726 and $759,351, respectively, which consists of the above escrowed amount along with certificate of deposits held with the state of Utah for the remaining bonds on the property, including exploration bonds.

 

NOTE 5 – INVENTORIES

 

Inventories at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 consists of the following:

 

  June 30,
2020
  December 31,
2019
 
Ore on leach pad $5,143,858  $3,903,297 
Carbon column in process  298,972   235,762 
Finished goods  211,650   194,623 
Total $5,654,480  $4,333,682 

 

Inventories at June 30, 2020 were valued at cost. Inventories at December 31, 2019 were valued at net realizable value because production costs were greater than the amount the Company expected to receive on the sale of the estimated gold ounces contained in inventories at both period-end dates.

 

9

 

 

NOTE 6 - PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

The following is a summary of property and equipment at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019:

 

  June 30,  December 31, 
  2020  2019 
Equipment $6,167,434  $5,336,011 
Furniture and fixtures  6,981   6,981 
Electronic and computer equipment  50,587   50,587 
Vehicles  315,905   256,815 
Land improvements  44,840   44,840 
   6,585,747   5,695,234 
Less accumulated depreciation  (2,661,569)  (2,254,961)
   3,924,178   3,440,273 
         
Kiewit property facilities  2,497,436   2,497,436 
Less accumulated amortization  (704,651)  (650,194)
   1,792,785   1,847,242 
         
Total $5,716,963  $5,287,515 

 

For the Kiewit property facilities amortization expense of $26,194 and $54,457, which is based on units of production, was recognized for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020. Amortization in the amount of $(39,541) and nil was recognized for the three and six months ended June 30, 2019.

 

NOTE 7 – MINERAL PROPERTIES AND INTERESTS

 

Mineral properties and interests as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 are as follows:

 

  June 30,
2020
  December 31,
2019
 
       
Kiewit and all other sites $3,700,000  $3,700,000 
JJS property  250,000   250,000 
   3,950,000   3,950,000 
Less accumulated amortization  (577,833)  (475,401)
   3,372,167   3,474,599 
Asset retirement obligation        
Kiewit Site  529,289   452,193 
Kiewit Exploration  28,377   11,126 
JJS property  31,016   - 
Total  588,682   463,319 
Less accumulated amortization  (219,323)  (208,281)
   369,359   255,038 
         
Total $3,741,526  $3,729,637 

 

On June 13, 2019, the Company entered into an agreement whereby the Company acquired 20 claims adjacent to the Kiewit property from Ben Julian, LLC for $250,000, known as the JJS Property. Although drilling has commenced on this property, permitting has not been completed and production has not yet begun.

 

In 2009, the Company entered into a Joint Venture Agreement with the Clifton Mining Company (“Clifton”) and the Woodman Mining Company for the lease of their property interests in the Gold Hill Mining District of Utah. In March 2019, the Company and Clifton entered into a Second Amended and Restated Lease Agreement (the “Amended Lease”).   Under the terms of this Amended Lease, the Company relinquished its leasehold interest in all but 10 of the patented mining claims, for which it retained only the surface rights, and 66 of the unpatented lode mining claims previously held by the Company. The Cactus Mill property was returned to Clifton Mining Company as part of this agreement.

  

10

 

 

As consideration for entering into the Amended Lease, the Company issued 5,500,000 shares of its common stock with a fair value of $2,200,000 which increased the carrying value of the mineral properties and interests. In addition, the Company and Clifton entered into a Registration Rights Agreement to register for resale the shares issued to Clifton which requires the Company to register the shares within 18 months (which is September 7, 2020) following the initial funding received under the Purchase Agreement (Note 3). In the event the Company does not register the shares within the 18-month period, the Company is obligated to pay Clifton a royalty equal to 2.5% of the net smelter returns from the minerals generated from the Company’s mining claims. The registration of these shares was filed and became effective on April 14, 2020.

 

Under the terms of the initial 2009 Joint Venture Agreement, the Company was required to pay a 4% net smelter royalty (“NSR”) on base metals in all other areas except for production from the Kiewit gold property and a NSR on gold and silver, except for production from the Kiewit gold property, based on a sliding scale of between 2% and 15% based on the price of gold or silver, as applicable.  The Company was also required to pay Clifton a 6% NSR on any production from the Kiewit gold property.

 

As part of the Purchase Agreement (Note 3) finalized in March 2019, these NSRs were bought out by the Company from Clifton and two other minority royalty holders at a cost of $900,000 which increased the carrying value of the mineral properties and interests. The buyer of the Purchase Agreement (Note 3), PDK, acquired a 4% NSR, previously held by Clifton, on the Kiewit property for $2,200,000. PDK remitted the funds for the NSR directly to Clifton. PDK will receive a 4% net NSR on proceeds from the sale of gold and silver from the Kiewit and JJS properties.

 

During the quarter ended March 31, 2020, the Company revised its estimate of gold ounces to be produced from its mineral properties and interests. The updated estimate considered actual gold ounce recoveries since production began and indicated and inferred resources as the Company has no proven and probable reserves. The new estimate resulted in increased gold ounces at January 1, 2020 from 39,480 gold ounces to 98,066 gold ounces. Amortization of the mineral properties and interests based on total units of production was $49,180 and $102,432 for the three and six-month periods ended June 30, 2020. Amortization for these periods was based on the updated estimate. Amortization for the three and six-month periods ended June 30, 2019 was $(39,541) and nil.

 

NOTE 8 – SHORT-TERM NOTES PAYABLE – RELATED PARTIES

 

During 2018 and the first quarter of 2019, the Company entered into several short-term notes payable with the convertible debt holders (Note 9) and with the Company’s president. Total borrowed was $91,680 during the first quarter 2019 and $249,000 during the year ended December 31, 2018. The notes bore interest at 10%, had a 2% loan initiation fee, and were due in full on March 31, 2019. These short-term notes were repaid in full, including 10% interest and a 2% loan initiation fee, in March 2019 as part of the terms of the Purchase Agreement. Interest expense recognized on these loans was nil and $5,820 for the three months ended June 30, 2020 and June 30, 2019, respectively.

 

NOTE 9 – CONVERTIBLE DEBT – RELATED PARTIES

 

At December 31, 2018, the Company had outstanding convertible promissory notes to two of its minority shareholders, for a total of $1,350,000 plus accrued interest of $456,750. All of these notes were paid in full, including accrued interest, on March 7, 2019 with funds received under the Purchase Agreement.

 

Interest expense recognized on these loans was $24,412 for the six months ended June 30, 2019.

 

NOTE 10 – OBLIGATION UNDER CAPITAL LEASE — RELATED PARTY

 

A capital lease was entered into on June 20, 2016 with RMH Overhead, LLC for mining and crushing equipment valued at $185,618, some of which had been previously owned by the Company. RMH Overhead, LLC is an entity owned by the Company’s president, Rick Havenstrite. Lease payments were paid in full, including accrued interest and late fees, in March 2019 with funds received under the Purchase Agreement. The equipment is being amortized over the estimated useful life of the equipment. Accumulated amortization at December 31, 2018 was $66,292. The Company now owns the equipment which is included in property and equipment on the balance sheet. Interest expense recognized on this obligation under capital lease was $1,968 for the quarter ended March 31, 2019.

 

NOTE 11 – NOTE PAYABLE - SBA

 

In April 2020, the Company received a loan of $463,497 pursuant to the Paycheck Protection Program (the “PPP”) under Division A, Title I of the CARES Act, which was enacted March 27, 2020. The loan, which was in the form of a Note dated April 16, 2020 issued by the Company, matures on April 9, 2025 and bears interest at a rate of 1% per annum, payable monthly commencing on August 15, 2021. The Note may be prepaid by the Company at any time prior to maturity with no prepayment penalties. Under the terms of the PPP, certain amounts of the loan may be forgiven if they are used for qualifying expenses as described in the CARES Act. Qualifying expenses include payroll costs, costs used to continue group health care benefits, mortgage payments, rent, and utilities. The Company intends to use the entire loan amount for qualifying expenses, but there is no guarantee that the loan will be forgiven.

 

11

 

 

NOTE 12 – NOTES PAYABLE – EQUIPMENT

 

The following is a summary of the equipment notes payable:

 

  June 30,
2020
  December 31,
2019
 
Note payable to Wheeler Machinery, collateralized by a used 374D L Excavator, due in 12 monthly installments of $19,575, beginning June 2020, including interest at 8%, with a balloon payment due in June 2021 of $150,164. $359,000  $- 
Note payable to ICM Solutions, LLC, collateralized by 3 grasshopper leg systems, due in 12 monthly installments of $4,365, beginning April 2020, including interest at 9%, with a balloon payment of $41,696 due in April 2021.  80,596   - 
Note payable to Epiroc, collateralized by a used Epiroc drill, due in 6 monthly installments of $22,235, beginning October 2019, the balloon amount of $488,317 was refinanced in April 2020, with a new loan in that amount, due in 36 monthly payments of $14,679 including interest at 5.2%.  463,231   563,368 
Note payable to Wheeler Machinery, collateralized by a used CAT 740 Haul truck, originally due in 11 monthly installments of $14,475, beginning May 2019, including interest at 9%, with a balloon payment due in April 2020 of $168,873. This agreement has been extended, with original terms, for an indefinite term.  141,081   206,682 
Note payable to Wheeler Machinery, collateralized by a used D8T dozer, due in 11 monthly payments of $19,125, beginning August 2019, including interest at 10%, with a balloon payment due in July 2020 of $350,281. This agreement has been extended, with original terms, for an indefinite term.  363,483   441,989 
Note payable to Komatsu Equipment, collateralized by a used PC490 Excavator, due in 11 monthly payments of $10,320, beginning July 2019, including interest at 9%, with a balloon payment due in March 2020 of $71,372. This was refinanced by Komatsu in May 2020 with 1 payment of $28,823 and 12 monthly payments of $1,903 including interest at 4.6%.  51,190   90,200 
   1,458,581   1,302,239 
Current portion  (1,151,198)  (1,302,239)
Long term portion $307,383  $- 
Principal payments due are as follows for the twelve months ended:        
June 30, 2021 $1,151,198     
June 30, 2022  164,037     
June 30, 2023  143,346     
  $1,458,581     

 

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NOTE 13 –ASSET RETIREMENT OBLIGATION

 

Changes in the asset retirement obligation for the six-month periods ended June 30, 2020 and 2019 are as follows:

 

  June 30,
2020
  June 30,
2019
 
Asset retirement obligation, beginning of period $826,637  $792,747 
Reduction in liability due to transfer of Cactus Mill property  -   (40,802)
Obligation incurred:        
Kiewit properties  94,347   - 
JJS property  31,016   - 
Accretion expense  46,688   37,346 
Asset retirement obligation, end of period $998,688  $789,291 

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Cactus Mill property was returned to Clifton as part of the terms of the Amended Lease (Note 7). The net asset retirement cost of $17,120 and obligation of $40,802 relating to the Cactus Mill property were eliminated resulting in a gain on settlement of asset retirement obligation of $20,451 recognized in general and administrative expense in the statement of operations.

 

In the first quarter of 2020, the Company updated the asset retirement obligation to reflect a plan for reclamation and closure of the mine at the end of its life which resulted in an increase of estimated undiscounted costs of $198,365. The asset retirement asset and obligation increased by $125,363 as a result of a change in the estimated timing of costs and the impact of discounting the costs to present value. The estimated reclamation costs were discounted using credit adjusted, risk-free interest rate of 10% from the time we incurred the obligation to the time we expect to pay the retirement obligation.

 

NOTE 14 – SETTLEMENT OF CONSULTING CONTRACT

 

On March 29, 2018, the Company entered into a five-year Agency Agreement (the “Agency Agreement”) with H&H Metals Corp., a New York corporation (“H&H”). Under the terms of the Agency Agreement, H&H agreed to provide certain advisory services in regard to natural resources activities and to assist in securing purchasers for minerals produced from its mining properties.

 

On January 16, 2019, the Company negotiated a termination of the Agency Agreement (the “Termination Agreement”) with H&H. Under the terms of the Termination Agreement, the Company paid H&H $600,000 in cash and agreed to pay an additional $200,000 within 18 months. The Company also issued 250,000 shares of its common stock with a fair value of $100,000 to H&H. In addition, Phillip H. Holme, a principal of H&H, became a director of the Company. In April 2020, Mr. Holme passed away unexpectedly. No decision has been made at this time about a replacement to fill the vacancy on the Board of Director caused by Mr. Holme’s death.

 

The Company recognized a loss on settlement of consulting contract of $900,000 during the quarter ended March 31, 2019. The balance of $200,000 is due in July 2020 under the terms of the settlement agreement and has not yet been paid.

 

NOTE 15 - CAPITAL STOCK

 

Common Stock

 

The Company is authorized to issue 100,000,000 shares of common stock. All shares have equal voting rights and have one vote per share. Voting rights are not cumulative and, therefore, the holders of more than 50% of the common stock could, if they choose to do so, elect all of the directors of the Company.

 

2020 Activity

 

During the six-month period ended June 30, 2020, the Company had the following transaction relating to common stock:

 

The Company commenced a private placement offering of our common stock on June 22, 2020. The offer includes 10,000,000 shares of common stock at a price of $1.00 per share to accredited investors only and expires on September 30, 2020. In July 2020 to date, $200,000 was raised through this offering.

 

2019 Activity

 

During the six-month period ended June 30, 2019, the Company had the following transactions relating to common stock. All shares issued were valued at $0.40 per share based on the most recent sale of common stock for cash:

 

Issued 5,500,000 shares of common stock to Clifton in connection with the Amended Lease (Note 7). The fair value of these shares was $2,200,000.

 

13

 

 

Issued 250,000 shares of common stock to H&H in connection with settlement of a consulting contract (Note 14). The fair value of these shares was $100,000.

 

In connection with the settlement of stock redeemable with gold proceeds issued in 2012, the Company allowed investors to retain 130,000 shares of common stock that had been issued in connection with a financing in 2012. The fair value of these shares was $52,000.

 

Preferred Stock

 

The Company’s Articles of Incorporation authorized 10,000,000 shares of $0.001 par value Preferred Stock available for issuance with such rights and preferences, including liquidation, dividend, conversion, and voting rights, as the Board of Directors may determine.

 

NOTE 16 – RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

In addition to transactions disclosed in Note 14, the Company had the following related party transactions.

 

The Company has a month to month lease agreement for its office space with RMH Overhead, LLC, a company owned by Rick Havenstrite, the Company’s President and a director. The Company recognized rent expense of $3,500 and $8,000 for the three and six-month periods ended June 30, 2020. The Company also recognized rent expense of $3,000 and $6,000 for the three and six-month periods ended June 30, 2019, under this lease.

 

The Company compensates directors for their contributions to the management of the Company, with one director receiving $6,000 per month and other directors receiving $5,000 per quarter. At June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, there was no accrued compensation due to directors.

 

NOTE 17 – REVENUE RECOGNITION

 

Product sales for the three and six-month periods ended June 30, 2020 are shown below. There were no product sales for the three and six-month periods ended June 30, 2019. At June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Company did not have a gold sales receivable balance. All revenue for the three and six-month periods ended June 30, 2020 and 2019 was from sales to Asahi Refining USA, Inc.

  

  Three months ended June 30,
2020
  Six months ended June 30,
2020
 
Gold $1,733,906  $3,328,820 
Silver  16,296   31,885 
Total product sales  1,750,202   3,360,705 
Less: Royalties  (47,045)  (117,008)
Upside participation payments  (236,932)  (410,921)
Outside processing charges  (72,258)  (126,729)
   (356,235)  (654,658)
Sales of product $1,393,967  $2,706,047 

 

Royalties payable at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 were $70,008 and $36,074, respectively. Upside participation payable at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 was $95,824 and nil, respectively. Upside participation payable represents a payment whereby PDK receives a portion of the proceeds of gold sold by the Company to a third party based on a percentage of proceeds over a fixed gold price. See Note 3.

 

NOTE 18 – STOCK OPTIONS

 

The Company has reserved 2,400,000 shares under its 2018 Stock Incentive Plan (the “Plan”). The Plan was adopted by the board of directors on March 28, 2018, retroactive to February 23, 2018, as a vehicle for the recruitment and retention of qualified employees, officers, directors, consultants, and other service providers. The Plan is administered by the Board of Directors. The Company may issue, to eligible persons, restricted common stock, incentive and non-statutory options, stock appreciation rights and restricted stock units. The terms and conditions of awards under the Plan will be determined by the Board of Directors.

 

Outstanding options at June 30, 2020 were 2,400,000, have a remaining life of 2.7 years, and had no intrinsic value. No options were granted, expired, or were exercised during the three and six-month periods ended June 30, 2020.

 

14

 

 

NOTE 19– COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

In addition to commitments disclosed in Notes 3 and 7, the Company had the following commitments and contingencies.

 

Employment Agreements

 

The Company has an employment agreement with Mr. Havenstrite as President of the Company, which is ongoing. The agreement, as amended, requires Mr. Havenstrite to meet certain time requirements and limits the number of other board member obligations in which he can participate. The agreement allows for a base annual salary of $144,000 plus certain performance compensation upon fulfillment of established goals. The agreement allows the board of directors to terminate Mr. Havenstrite’s employment at any time, providing for a severance payment upon termination without cause.

 

At June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 there was no accrued compensation due to officers of the Company.

 

Finder’s Agreement

 

On May 11, 2018, the Company entered into an agreement with Mount Royal Consultants (Mount Royal) to assist in finding prospective investors. Mount Royal would receive a finder’s fee of 7% for a connection with a company that resulted in a qualified investment consisting of equity securities or a fee of 3% for a connection with a company that resulted in a purchase of debt securities. On March 7, 2019, the Company closed a Purchase Agreement (Note 3) to a buyer for the purchase of gold produced from the Company’s mining property. This agreement was deemed to be subject to the finder’s fee and resulted in a payment to Mount Royal of $318,000, 3% of the $10,600,000 beneficially received by the Company in accordance with the terms of the Purchase Agreement. On November 1, 2019, an additional payment of 3% of the Tranche 2 payment received by the Company resulted in a payment of $48,000 to Mount Royal and a third payment of $42,000 was issued after receipt of the Tranche 3 payment on December 27, 2019.

 

Future amounts to be received from investors could also be subject to this agreement. During the three and six-month periods ended June 30, 2020, the Company recognized no consulting expense relating to this agreement. Shares sold in July 2020 pursuant to the private placement offering were not subject to this agreement.

 

Mining Leases

 

Annual claims fees are currently $155 per claim plus administrative and school trust land fees. Total paid for claims fees in 2019 was $14,794. Claims fees are due in August for the year beginning in September of that year.

 

NOTE 20 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

COVID -19

 

The Company’s operations and business have experienced disruption due to the unprecedented conditions surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic spreading throughout the United States and elsewhere, causing disruptions to the Company’s business operations and management. These disruptions are most evident in our ability to retain and house employees while maintaining proper social distancing and with delays in obtaining materials and supplies. There has also been a reduction in the availability of equipment financing. These disruptions continue to hamper operations.

 

The Company commenced a private placement offering of our common stock on June 22, 2020. The offer includes 10,000,000 shares of common stock at a price of $1.00 per share to accredited investors only and expires on September 30, 2020. In July 2020 to date, $200,000 was raised through this offering.

 

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Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” section and audited financial statements and related notes thereto included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019 and with the unaudited financial statements and related notes thereto presented in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

 

Forward-looking statements

 

The statements contained in this report that are not historical facts, including, but not limited to, statements found in the section entitled “Risk Factors,” are forward-looking statements that represent management’s beliefs and assumptions based on currently available information. Forward-looking statements include the information concerning our possible or assumed future results of operations, business strategies, competitive position, potential growth opportunities, potential operating performance improvements, ability to retain and recruit personnel, the effects of competition, and the effects of future legislation or regulations. Forward-looking statements include all statements that are not historical facts and can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as the words “believes,” “intends,” “may,” “should,” “anticipates,” “expects,” “could,” “plans,” or comparable terminology or by discussions of strategy or trends. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot give any assurances that these expectations will prove to be correct. Such statements by their nature involve risks and uncertainties that could significantly affect expected results, and actual future results could differ materially from those described in such forward-looking statements.

 

Among the factors that could cause actual future results to differ materially are the risks and uncertainties discussed in this Prospectus. While it is not possible to identify all factors, we continue to face many risks and uncertainties including, but not limited to, the following:

 

 environmental hazards;

 

 metallurgical and other processing problems;

 

 unusual or unexpected geological formations;

 

 need for additional funding to continue operations;
   
 global economic and political conditions;

 

 staffing considerations in remote locations;

 

 disruptions in credit and financial markets;

 

 global productive capacity;

 

 changes in product costing; and

 

competitive technology positions and operating interruptions (including, but not limited to, labor disputes, leaks, fires, flooding, landslides, power outages, explosions, unscheduled downtime, transportation interruptions, war and terrorist activities); and

 

disruptions due to global pandemics or civil unrest.

 

Mining operations are subject to a variety of existing laws and regulations relating to exploration, permitting procedures, safety precautions, property reclamation, employee health and safety, air and water quality standards, pollution and other environmental protection controls, all of which are subject to change and are becoming more stringent, and costly to comply with. Should one or more of these risks materialize (or the consequences of such a development worsen), or should the underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results could differ materially from those expected. We disclaim any intention or obligation to update publicly or revise such statements whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

 

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These risk factors could cause our results to differ materially from those expressed in forward-looking statements.

 

Overview

 

We are a mineral exploration company located in the Gold Hill Mining District in Tooele County, Utah. We are currently focused on exploration and development of our Kiewit claims and operation of a heap leach processing facility.

 

We were originally incorporated in the State of Idaho on November 5, 1957. For several years we bought and sold mining leases and claims, but in 1995 we ceased all principal business operations. In 2008, we changed our corporate domicile from the State of Idaho to the State of Nevada. In May 2009, we raised funds to recommence mining activities. In July 2009, we entered into agreements to commence exploration activities on mining claims in the Gold Hill Mining District located in Tooele County, Utah. We hold leasehold interests within the Gold Hill Mining District consisting of 66 unpatented mining claims and 30 patented claims. From these claims we have centered our exploration activities on the Kiewit site.

 

During 2018 we settled our outstanding debt with DMRJ Group I, LLC and repurchased and retired all outstanding preferred shares issued to them under the 2010 Investment Agreement with them.

 

During 2019 we secured funding of $13,600,000 (net) from PDK Utah Holdings LP under the terms of the Pre-Paid Forward Gold Purchase Agreement dated March 7, 2019. We also renegotiated our lease with Clifton Mining and released all but the current unpatented and patented mining claims. We also reacquired the existing royalties from Clifton and its affiliates and issued a royalty to PDK equal to 4% of the net smelter returns from our mine. An additional 20 claims, known as the JJS Property, were also acquired.

 

We suspended our mining operations in June 2016 because of depressed metal prices and lack of funds. We resumed operations in Spring 2018 and again suspended operations in October 2018 for lack of funding. Since securing funding in March 2019, we have recommenced mining operations.

  

Results of Operations for the Three Months Ended June 30, 2020 and 2019.

 

The operating loss of $187,011 for the three months ended June 30, 2020 as compared to the operating loss of $942,232 for the three months ended June 30, 2019 represents decreased losses in the amount of $755,221. Decreased losses are due to the commencement of ongoing operations in mid-2019 resulting in metals sales in the three months ended June 30, 2020. During the quarters ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, we had net losses of $208,078 and $949,591, respectively. This represents a decrease in net loss of $741,513 for the quarter ended June 30, 2020 over the quarter ended June 30, 2019.

 

Results of Operations for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2020 and 2019.

 

The operating loss of $1,248,961 for the six months ended June 30, 2020 as compared to the operating loss of $1,752,821 for the six months ended June 30, 2019 represent decreased losses in the amount of $503,860. Decreased losses are due to the commencement of ongoing operations and metal sales in 2020 offset by the reduction in fees associated with finding a lender, including legal and accounting fees as well as consulting fees in association with the Purchase Agreement finalized on March 7, 2019. During the six months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, we had net losses of $1,298,268 and $2,783,478, respectively. This represents a decrease in net loss of $1,485,210 for the six months ended June 30, 2020 over the six months ended June 30, 2019.

 

17

 

 

Liquidity and Cash Flow

 

Net cash used by operating activities was $1,491,415 during the six-month period ended June 30, 2020, compared with cash used by operating activities of $4,378,280 during the six-month period ended June 30, 2019. This $2,886,865 decrease in the amount of cash used by operating activities is primarily attributable to the payment of accrued expenses and accounts payables in 2019 and to the decrease in operating loss during the six months ended June 30, 2020, which was based on the resumption of metals sales.

 

Net cash used by investing activities was $459,687 during the six-month period ended June 30, 2020 compared to $1,552,893 during the six-month period ended June 30, 2019. This decrease of $1,093,206 during the six-month period ended June 30, 2020 was due to the purchase of royalty interests as part of the Purchasing Agreement in the six-month period ended June 30, 2019.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities was $172,188 during the six-month period ended June 30, 2020, compared with $8,508,300 cash provided by financing activities during the six-month period ended June 30, 2019. The decrease of $8,336,112 in cash provided by financing activities in the six-month period ended June 30, 2020 was due primarily to proceeds received in 2019 from the Pre-Paid Forward Gold Purchase Agreement.

 

As a result of the above, cash decreased by $1,778,914 during the six-month period ended June 30, 2020, leaving us with a cash balance of $337,518 as of June 30, 2020.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

The selection and application of accounting policies is an important process that has developed as our business activities have evolved and as the accounting rules have changed. Accounting rules generally do not involve a selection among alternatives, but involve an implementation and interpretation of existing rules, and the use of judgment, to the specific set of circumstances existing in our business. Discussed below are the accounting policies that we believe are critical to our financial statements due to the degree of uncertainty regarding the estimates or assumptions involved and the magnitude of the asset, liability, revenue or expense being reported. See Note 2, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies,” in our attached unaudited financial statements for a discussion of those policies.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Sales of all metal products are recorded as revenues when title and risk of loss transfer to the purchaser. Sales to the purchaser are recorded at gross sales price less charges for treatment, refining, smelting and other sales charges.

 

Mineral Exploration and Development Costs

 

We account for mineral exploration costs in accordance with ASC 932 Extractive Activities. All exploration expenditures are expensed as incurred, previously capitalized costs are expensed in the period the property is abandoned. Expenditures to explore new mines, to define further mineralization in existing bodies of mineralized material, and to expand the capacity of operating mines, are capitalized and amortized on a units-of-production basis over proven and probable reserves.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories consist of estimated gold on the heap leach pad and in the carbon process system and are valued at the lower of production cost or market value. Gold on the heap leach pad is estimated to be 80% complete for cost purposes and gold in the process system is estimated at 95% complete.

 

Mineral Properties

 

We account for mineral properties in accordance with ASC 930 Extractive Activities-Mining. Costs of acquiring mineral properties are capitalized by project area upon purchase of the associated claims. Mineral properties are periodically assessed for impairment of value and any diminution in value.

  

Reclamation and Remediation

 

Remediation, reclamation and mine closure costs are based principally on legal and regulatory requirements. Management estimates costs associated with reclamation of mining properties as well as remediation costs for inactive properties. We use assumptions about future costs, capital costs and reclamation costs. Such assumptions are based on our current mining plan and the best available information for making such estimates.

 

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For non-operating properties, we accrue costs associated with environmental remediation obligations when it is probable that such costs will be incurred and that they are reasonably estimable. Such costs are based on management’s estimate of amounts expected to be incurred when the remediation work is performed.

 

Financial Instruments

 

The Company’s financial instruments include cash and cash equivalents as well as various notes payable. All instruments are accounted for on a historical cost basis, which, due to the short maturity and interest rates of these financial instruments, approximates fair value at June 30, 2020 and 2019. 

 

Going Concern

 

As shown in the accompanying financial statements, the Company had an accumulated deficit of $10,749,486 through June 30, 2020 which raises substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded assets, or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary in the event the Company cannot continue in existence.

 

Although production restarted in 2019, it has not yet reached optimum levels. The timing and amount of capital requirements will depend on a number of factors, including demand for products, metals market pricing, and the availability of opportunities for expansion through affiliations and other business relationships. Although management has procured funding through Purchase Agreement, they intend to continue to seek new capital from equity securities issuances to provide funds needed to increase liquidity, fund internal growth, and fully implement its business plan. However, with the funding received under the Purchase Agreement during first quarter of 2019, and ongoing metals sales, the Company believes it has the ability to meet its obligations for the next twelve months.

 

If the going concern assumption were not appropriate for these financial statements, then adjustments would be necessary to the carrying values of the assets and liabilities, the reported revenues and expenses, and the balance sheet classifications used.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements that are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, revenues, result of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources.

 

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

As a smaller reporting company, we have elected not to provide the disclosure required by this item.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Control and Procedures

 

Our Chief Executive Officer, who serves as our principal executive officer; and our Treasurer, who serves as our principal financial officer, after evaluating the effectiveness of our “disclosure controls and procedures” (as defined in Rule 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act) as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (the “Evaluation Date”), have concluded that as of the Evaluation Date, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective to provide assurance that information we are required to disclose in reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive and financial officers, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act) that occurred during the quarter ended June 30, 2020, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal controls over financial reporting.

 

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PART II – OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

The following risk factors represent material changes from risk factors as previously disclosed in the Company’s 2019 Form 10-K filed with the Commission on March 30, 2020:

 

A pandemic, epidemic or outbreak of an infectious disease in the markets in which we operate or that otherwise impacts our operations, facilities, or suppliers could adversely impact our business.

 

If a pandemic, epidemic, or outbreak of an infectious disease including the recent outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a novel coronavirus (COVID-19) first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, or other public health crisis were to affect our markets or facilities or those of our suppliers, our business could be adversely affected. Consequences of the coronavirus outbreak are resulting in disruptions in or restrictions on our and others’ ability to travel. In particular, the staff of government permitting agencies cannot easily perform their required site visits and office closures at government sites for staff charged with approving our permits have affected our ability to proceed timely with permitting work. Staffing at the mine site has become more difficult and requires more of management’s time to ensure that proper social distancing is maintained among the employees while they are working.  Due to the remote location of the mine, special accommodations are required to obtain and retain employees who may not be able to find adequate housing due to the results of the virus.  Special arrangements are necessary to ensure that employees are able to commute to work without violating the distancing standards. In addition, effects of the virus have caused delays in shipping times for chemicals and supplies used at the mine.

 

If such an infectious disease broke out at our office, facilities, or work sites, our operations may be affected significantly, our productivity may be affected, our ability to complete projects in accordance with our contractual obligations may be affected, and we may incur increased labor and materials costs. If the suppliers, ore processors, or others with which we contract are affected by an outbreak of infectious disease, service work may be delayed, and we may incur increased labor and materials costs. If our subcontractors with whom we work were affected by an outbreak of infectious disease, our labor supply may be affected, and we may incur increased labor costs. In addition, we may experience difficulties with certain suppliers or with vendors in their supply chains, and our business could be affected if we become unable to procure essential chemicals, equipment, supplies or services in adequate quantities and at acceptable prices. We could incur substantial delays in obtaining necessary permits to operate our business.

 

Further, infectious outbreak may cause disruption to the U.S. economy, or the local or foreign economies of the markets in which we operate, cause shortages of materials, increase costs associated with obtaining materials, affect job growth and consumer confidence, adversely affect the value of the gold or other minerals extracted at the mine, or cause economic changes that we cannot anticipate. Overall, the potential impact of a pandemic, epidemic or outbreak of an infectious disease with respect to our market or our facilities is difficult to predict and could adversely impact our business.

 

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In response to the COVID-19 situation, federal, state and local governments (or other governments or bodies) are considering placing, or have placed, restrictions on travel and conducting or operating business activities. At this time those restrictions are very fluid and evolving. We have been and will continue to be impacted by those restrictions. Given that the type, degree and length of such restrictions are not known at this time, we cannot predict the overall impact of such restrictions on us, our customers, our subcontractors and supply chain, others that we work with or the overall economic or governmental environment. As such, the impact these restrictions may have on our financial position, operating results and liquidity cannot be reasonably estimated at this time, but the impact likely would be material. In addition, due to the speed with which the COVID-19 situation is developing and evolving, there is uncertainty around its ultimate impact on public health, business operations and the overall economy. Therefore, the negative impact on our financial position, operating results and liquidity cannot be reasonably estimated at this time, but the impact may be material.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

The information concerning mine safety violations or other regulatory matters required by Section 1503(a) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and Item 104 of Regulation S-K is included in exhibit 95 to this quarterly report.

 

Item 6. Exhibits

 

Exhibit No. Description
31.1 Rule 15d-14(a) Certification by Principal Executive Officer
31.2 Rule 15d-14(a) Certification by Principal Financial Officer
32.1 Section 1350 Certification of Principal Executive Officer
32.2 Section 1350 Certification of Principal Financial Officer
95 Mine Safety Disclosure
101.INS XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

  

SIGNATURE PAGE FOLLOWS

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

 Desert Hawk Gold Corp.
  
  /s/ Rick Havenstrite
Date: August 7, 2020By:Rick Havenstrite, Chief Executive Officer
  (Principal Executive Officer)
   
Date: August 7, 2020By:/s/ Marianne Havenstrite
  Marianne Havenstrite, Treasurer
  (Principal Accounting and Financial Officer)

 

 

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