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FIVE Five Below

Filed: 18 Mar 21, 5:19pm

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
Form 10-K
    ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended January 30, 2021

OR

    TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from to

Commission file number: 001-35600
Five Below, Inc.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter) 
Pennsylvania75-3000378
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
701 Market Street
Suite 300 
Philadelphia
Pennsylvania 19106
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)(Zip Code)
(215)546-7909
(Registrant's Telephone Number, Including Area Code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act:
Title of each classTrading SymbolName of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, $0.01 par value per shareFIVEThe NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act: None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the securities act. Yes No
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large Accelerated Filer     Accelerated Filer        Non-Accelerated Filer            Smaller Reporting Company        Emerging Growth Company    

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes No  
As of July 31, 2020, the last business day of the registrant's most recently completed second fiscal quarter, the aggregate market value of common stock (based upon the last reported sales price on The NASDAQ Global Select Market) held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately 5,939,028,606.
The number of shares of the registrant’s common stock, $0.01 par value, outstanding as of March 17, 2021 was 55,963,161.





DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the registrant's Proxy Statement for the 2021 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on June 15, 2021 (hereinafter referred to as the “Proxy Statement”) are incorporated by reference into Part III of this report.




SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 10-K, or Annual Report, contains forward-looking statements pursuant to the “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements relate to expectations, beliefs, projections, future plans and strategies, anticipated events or trends and similar expressions concerning matters that are not historical facts or present facts or conditions, such as statements regarding our industry, business strategy, goals and expectations concerning our market position, future operations or results of operations, prospects and strategies for future growth, the introduction of new merchandise, the implementation of our marketing and branding strategies, margins, profitability, capital expenditures, liquidity and capital resources and other financial and operating information. Investors can identify these statements by the fact that they use words such as "anticipate," "assume,” "believe," "continue," "could," "estimate," "expect," "intend," "may," "plan," "potential," "predict," "project," "future" and similar terms and phrases, or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology.

The forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report reflect our views as of the date of this report about future events and are subject to risks, uncertainties, assumptions and changes in circumstances that may cause events or our actual activities or results to differ significantly from those expressed in any forward-looking statement. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future events, results, actions, levels of activity, performance or achievements. A number of important factors could cause actual results to differ materially from those indicated by the forward-looking statements, including, but not limited to, those factors described below, in Part I, Item 1A “Risk Factors,” and in Part II, Item 7 “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” These factors include without limitation:
uncertainties associated with the coronavirus (or COVID-19) pandemic, including closures of our stores, adverse impacts on our sales and operations, future impairment charges and the risk of global recession;
failure to successfully implement our growth strategy;
disruptions in our ability to select, obtain, distribute and market merchandise profitably;
reliance on merchandise manufactured outside of the United States;
the direct and indirect impact of recent and potential tariffs imposed and proposed by the United States on foreign imports, including, without limitation, the tariffs themselves, any counter-measures thereto and any indirect effects on consumer discretionary spending, which could increase the cost to us of certain products, lower our margins, increase our import related expenses, and reduce consumer spending for discretionary items, each of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of future operations;
the impact of price increases, such as, a reduction in our unit sales, damage to our reputation with our customers, and our becoming less competitive in the marketplace;
dependence on the volume of traffic to our stores and website;
inability to successfully build, operate or expand our distribution centers or network capacity;
disruptions to our distribution network or the timely receipt of inventory;
extreme weather conditions in the areas in which our stores are located could negatively affect our business and results of operations;
the risks of cyberattacks or other cyber incidents, such as the failure to secure customers' confidential or credit card information, or other private data relating to our employees or our company, including the costs associated with protection against or remediation of such incidents;
increased operating costs or exposure to fraud or theft due to customer payment-related risks;
inability to increase sales and improve the efficiencies, costs and effectiveness of our operations;
dependence on our executive officers, senior management and other key personnel or inability to hire additional qualified personnel;
inability to successfully manage our inventory balances and inventory shrinkage;
inability to meet our lease obligations;
the costs and risks of constructing and owning real property;
changes in our competitive environment, including increased competition from other retailers and the presence of online retailers;
the seasonality of our business;
inability to successfully implement our expansion into online retail;
disruptions to our information technology systems in the ordinary course or as a result of system upgrades;
natural disasters, adverse weather conditions, pandemic outbreaks (in addition to COVID-19), global political events, war and terrorism;
the impact of changes in tax legislation;
the impact to our financial performance related to insurance programs;
inability to protect our brand name, trademarks and other intellectual property rights;
the impact of product and food safety claims and effects of legislation; and
restrictions imposed by our indebtedness on our current and future operations.
Readers are urged to consider these factors carefully in evaluating the forward-looking statements and are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. All of the forward-looking statements we have included in this Annual Report are based on information available to us on the date of this report. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as otherwise required by law.



  










PART I

ITEM 1. BUSINESS
General
Five Below, Inc. was incorporated in Pennsylvania in January 2002. Our principal executive office is located at 701 Market Street, Suite 300, Philadelphia, PA 19106 and our telephone number is (215) 546-7909. Our corporate website address is www.fivebelow.com. The information contained on, or accessible through, our corporate website does not constitute part of this Annual Report. As used herein, “Five Below,” the “Company,” “we,” “us,” “our” or “our business” refers to Five Below, Inc. (collectively with its wholly owned subsidiary), except as expressly indicated or unless the context otherwise requires.
We purchase products in reaction to existing marketplace trends and, hence, refer to our products as “trend-right.” We use the term “dynamic” merchandise to refer to the broad range and frequently changing nature of the products we display in our stores. We use the term “power” shopping center to refer to an unenclosed shopping center with 250,000 to 750,000 square feet of gross leasable area that contains three or more “big box” retailers (large retailers with floor space over 50,000 square feet) and various smaller retailers with a common parking area shared by the retailers. We use the term “lifestyle” shopping center to refer to a shopping center or commercial development that is often located in suburban areas and combines the traditional retail functions of a shopping mall with leisure amenities oriented towards upscale consumers. We use the term “community” shopping center to refer to a shopping area designed to serve a trade area of 40,000 to 150,000 people where the lead tenant is a variety discount, junior department store and/or supermarket. We use the term “trade area” to refer to the geographic area from which the majority of a given retailer's customers come from. Trade areas vary by market based on geographic size, population density, demographics and proximity to alternative shopping opportunities.
We operate on a fiscal calendar widely used by the retail industry that results in a given fiscal year consisting of a 52- or 53-week period ending on the Saturday closest to January 31 of the following year. References to "fiscal year 2021" or "fiscal 2021" refer to the period from January 31, 2021 to January 29, 2022, which consists of a 52-week fiscal year. References to "fiscal year 2020" or "fiscal 2020" refer to the period from February 2, 2020 to January 30, 2021, which consists of a 52-week fiscal year. References to "fiscal year 2019" or "fiscal 2019" refer to the period from February 3, 2019 to February 1, 2020, which consists of a 52-week fiscal year. References to "fiscal year 2018" or "fiscal 2018" refer to the period from February 4, 2018 to February 2, 2019, which consists of a 52-week fiscal year. References to “fiscal year 2017” or “fiscal 2017” refer to the period from January 29, 2017 to February 3, 2018, which consists of a 53-week fiscal year. References to “fiscal year 2016” or “fiscal 2016” refer to the period from January 31, 2016 to January 28, 2017, which consists of a 52-week fiscal year. References to 2021, 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017, and 2016 are to our fiscal years unless otherwise specified. Due to the 53rd week in fiscal 2017, all comparable sales related to any reporting period during the year ended February 2, 2019 are reported on a restated calendar basis using the National Retail Federation's restated calendar comparing similar weeks.
Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic on our Business and Operations
As a result of the coronavirus (or COVID-19) pandemic in 2020, federal, state and local governments and private entities mandated various restrictions, including travel restrictions, restrictions on public gatherings, stay at home orders and advisories, and quarantining of people who may have been exposed to the virus. Such mandates required reduction of operating hours and forced temporary closures of certain retailers and other businesses.
As a result of these restrictions and out of concern for our customers and employees, we temporarily closed all of our stores as of March 20, 2020. We began reopening our stores at the end of April in compliance with federal, state and local requirements. As a result of the temporary store closures, we withheld store rent for the closure period. With respect to virtually all of our lease portfolio, we have resumed rent payments and, in most cases, agreed to rent deferrals and abatements related to this closure period with landlords. As a result, we do not expect that our prior rent withholdings or the associated deferrals and abatements agreed upon with landlords will have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of future operations.
As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, our business operations and results of operations, including our net sales, earnings and cash flows, were materially impacted in fiscal 2020 as a result of the temporary closures of our stores in the first half of 2020, and decreased customer traffic in stores, including, without limitation, as the result of limitations on the number of persons permitted in stores at one time by certain local and state regulations.
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Although our ability to operate improved in the second half of fiscal 2020, the ultimate health and economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic remain highly uncertain. If the pandemic were to worsen, our business operations and results of operations, including our net sales, earnings and cash flows, may be materially impacted for the foreseeable future, as a result of:
additional temporary closures of our stores;
continued decreased customer traffic in stores, including, without limitation, as the result of limitations on the number of persons permitted in stores at one time by certain local and state regulations;
• uncertainty of the extent to which customers will continue making purchases through our e-commerce website and through curbside pickup (if and where any stores are closed to the public);
• changes in consumer confidence and consumer spending habits, including spending for the merchandise that we sell, and negative trends in consumer purchasing patterns due to changes in consumers’ disposable income, credit availability and debt levels;
• disruption to our supply chain including the manufacturing, supply, distribution, transportation and delivery of our products;
• increased safety measures for our employees and customers at our stores, distribution centers and home office; and
• a slowdown in the U.S. and global economies, and an uncertain global economic outlook or a potential credit crisis.
To seek to mitigate the effects of the pandemic and to create financial flexibility, we took the following actions:
• a majority of our store and distribution center employees were furloughed in March and we covered the cost of health benefits for such furloughed employees through the end of May;
• we implemented a voluntary temporary base salary reduction of 50% for Joel Anderson, our Chief Executive Officer, and a 25% base salary reduction for the remainder of the executive leadership team that reports into Mr. Anderson. This compensation was reinstated in the second fiscal quarter of 2020 after substantially all of our stores were reopened;
• our Board of Directors elected to forgo its quarterly cash retainers for the first fiscal quarter of 2020;
• we implemented a temporary pay reduction for all salaried corporate employees and certain field and supply chain leadership (that has been reinstated now that substantially all of our stores have reopened) and delayed annual salary increases for corporate employees;
• as permitted by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security ("CARES") Act, we applied for and received payroll tax credits with the IRS, and elected to defer the payment of the employer's portion of FICA taxes;
• we implemented significant temporary non-payroll expense reductions, including advertising, occupancy and other store operating expenses, distribution and corporate office operating expenses, as well as professional and consulting fees;
• we temporarily ceased paying rent on all closed store locations; as discussed above, with respect to virtually all of our lease portfolio, we have resumed rent payments and, in many cases, agreed to rent deferrals and abatements related to this closure period with landlords;
• we cancelled certain vendor orders and delayed receipts on others in order to manage inventory levels, and extended payment terms for product and non-product vendors, although we have since returned to more normalized payment terms;
• we significantly reduced our 2020 capital expenditure budget, including reducing the number of new stores to be opened in 2020 and delaying purchase and construction of a new Midwest distribution center;
• we amended our Credit Agreement and increased our Revolving Credit Facility from $50 million to $225 million; and
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• we evolved our product mix to meet the needs of our customers by adding to our assortment of essential products, including consumables (such as cleaning and personal hygiene products), food and drink, fitness products, pet accessories, and products needed to support work-from-home and school-from-home.
Depending on future developments with respect to the COVID-19 pandemic, including any new federal, state and local governmental restrictions that may be imposed, we may determine to reinstate any of the foregoing mitigation measures that have been terminated or take any additional steps that we consider necessary.
All statements in this Annual Report concerning our current and planned operations, including plans concerning opening new stores and associated capital expenditures, are modified by reference to these recent developments, and our ability to carry out those plans are dependent on further developments associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information, see "Risks Relating to Our Business and Industry - The COVID-19 global pandemic and measures intended to prevent its spread present material uncertainty and risk and have had, and are expected to continue to have, a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations, financial condition, and cash flows." later in this Annual Report.
Our Company
Five Below is a rapidly growing specialty value retailer offering a broad range of trend-right, high-quality merchandise targeted at the tween and teen customer. We offer a dynamic, edited assortment of exciting products, most priced at $5 and below, including select brands and licensed merchandise across eight worlds: Style, Room, Sports, Tech, Create, Party, Candy and Now. We believe we are transforming the shopping experience of our target demographic with a differentiated merchandising strategy and high-energy retail concept, which allows our customers to “Let Go and Have Fun.” Based on our management’s experience and industry knowledge, we believe our customer-centric, experience-first, innovative approach to retail has led to a fiercely loyal customer base and has fostered universal appeal across a variety of age groups beyond our target demographic.
We opened the first Five Below store in the greater Philadelphia area in 2002 and, since then, have been expanding throughout the United States. As of January 30, 2021, we operated a total of 1,020 locations across 38 states. Our new store model assumes a store size of approximately 9,000 square feet and is typically located within power, community and lifestyle shopping centers across a variety of urban, suburban and semi-rural markets. We opened 120 net new stores in fiscal 2020 and we plan to open approximately 170 to 180 new stores in fiscal 2021. We believe that we have the opportunity to grow our store base to more than 2,500 locations over time.
In August 2016, we commenced selling merchandise on the internet, through our fivebelow.com e-commerce website. We launched our e-commerce operation as an additional channel to serve our customers. All e-commerce sales, which includes shipping and handling revenue, are included in net sales and beginning with the third fiscal quarter of 2016, are included in comparable sales. Our e-commerce expenses will have components classified as both cost of goods sold and selling, general and administrative expenses.
We believe that our business model has resulted in strong financial performance when considered in light of the economic environment:
Our comparable sales decreased by 5.5% in fiscal 2020, and increased by 0.6% in fiscal 2019, and 3.9% in fiscal 2018, based on the restated calendar.
We expanded our store base from 750 stores at the end of fiscal year 2018 to 1,020 stores at the end of fiscal year 2020, representing a compounded annual growth rate of 16.6%.
Between fiscal 2018 and 2020, our net sales increased from $1.6 billion to $2.0 billion, representing a compounded annual growth rate of 12.2%. Over the same period, our operating income decreased from $187.2 million to $154.8 million.

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Our Competitive Strengths
We believe the following strengths differentiate Five Below from competitors and are the key drivers of our success:

Unique Focus on the Tween and Teen Customer.    We target an attractive customer segment of tweens and teens with trend-right merchandise at differentiated price points. We have built our concept to appeal to this customer base, which we believe to be economically influential and resilient based on our industry knowledge and experience, as well as their parents and others who shop for them. Our brand concept, merchandising strategy and store ambience work in concert to create an upbeat and vibrant retail experience that is designed to appeal to our target audience, drive traffic to our stores and website, and keep our customers engaged throughout their visits. We monitor trends in the ever-changing tween and teen markets and are able to quickly identify and respond to trends that become mainstream. Our price points enable tweens and teens to shop independently, often using their own money to make frequent purchases of items geared primarily to them and to exercise self-expression through their independent retail purchases.

Broad Assortment of Trend-Right, High-Quality Merchandise with Universal Appeal.    We deliver an edited assortment of trend-right as well as everyday products within each of our category worlds that changes frequently to create a sense of anticipation and freshness, which we believe provides excitement for our customers. We have a broad range of vendors, most of which are domestically-based, which enables us to shorten response lead times, maximizes our speed to market and equips us to make more informed buying decisions. Our unique approach encourages frequent customer visits and limits the cyclical fluctuations experienced by many other specialty retailers. The breadth, depth and quality of our product mix and the diversity of our category worlds attract shoppers across a broad range of age and socio-economic demographics.

Exceptional Value Proposition for Customers.    We believe we offer a clear value proposition to our customers. Our price points, with most products priced at $5 and below, resonate with our target demographic and with other value-oriented customers. We are able to deliver on this value proposition through sourcing products in a manner that is designed to achieve low cost, fast response and high item velocity and sell-through. We maintain a dynamic and collaborative relationship with our vendor partners that provides us with favorable access to quality merchandise at attractive prices. We also employ an opportunistic buying strategy, capitalizing on select excess inventory opportunities with our vendors. This unique and flexible sourcing strategy allows us to offer high-quality products at exceptional value across all of our category worlds.

Differentiated Shopping Experience.    We believe we have created a unique and engaging in-store and online atmosphere that customers find fun and exciting. While we refresh our products frequently, we maintain a floor layout, designed with an easy-to-navigate flow and featuring sight-lines across the entire store enabling customers to easily identify our category worlds. All of our stores feature a sound system playing popular music throughout the shopping day. We employ novel and dynamic techniques to display our products, including distinctive merchandise fixtures and colorful and stimulating signage. This approach makes our stores a destination, encouraging hands-on interaction with our products and conveying our value pricing. We have developed a unique culture that emanates from our employees, many of whom frequently shop at Five Below, to our customers, thereby driving a higher level of connectivity and engagement. Additionally, we believe our price points, coupled with our dynamic merchandising approach, create an element of discovery, driving repeat visits and customer engagement.

Powerful and Consistent Store Economics.    We have a proven store model that generates strong cash flow, consistent store-level financial results and a high level return on investment. Our stores have been successful in varying geographic regions, population densities and real estate settings and our new stores have achieved average payback periods of less than one year. We believe our robust store model, reinforced by our rigorous site selection process and in-store execution, drives the strength and consistency of our comparable sales and financial results across all geographic regions and store-year classes.

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Highly Experienced and Passionate Senior Management Team with Proven Track Record.    Our senior management team, led by Joel Anderson, our President and Chief Executive Officer, has extensive retail experience across a broad range of disciplines, including merchandising, real estate, finance, store operations, digital, supply chain management and information technology. Our management team drives our operating philosophy, which is based on a relentless focus on providing high-quality merchandise at exceptional value and a superior shopping experience utilizing a disciplined, low-cost operating and sourcing structure. We believe our management team is integral to our success and has positioned us well for long-term growth.
Growth Strategy
We believe we can grow our net sales and earnings by executing on the following strategies:

Grow Our Store Base.    We believe there is significant opportunity to expand our store base throughout the United States from 1,020 locations as of January 30, 2021 to more than 2,500 locations within the United States over time. Based upon our strategy of store densification, we expect most of our near-term growth will occur within our existing markets, as well as new markets. This strategy allows us to benefit from enhanced brand awareness and achieve operational efficiencies. We opened 150 new stores in fiscal 2019 and 120 net new stores in fiscal 2020, and we plan to open approximately 170 to 180 new stores in fiscal 2021. Our new store model assumes approximately 9,000 square feet and is primarily in-line locations within power, community and lifestyle shopping centers across a variety of urban, suburban and semi-rural markets. We have a talented and disciplined real estate management team and a rigorous real estate site selection process. We analyze the demographics of the surrounding trade areas and the performance of adjacent retailers, as well as traffic and specific site characteristics and other variables. As of January 30, 2021, we have executed lease agreements for the opening of 96 new stores in fiscal 2021.

Drive Comparable Sales.    We expect to continue generating positive comparable sales growth by continuing to hone and refine our dynamic merchandising offering and differentiated in-store shopping experience. We intend to increase our brand awareness through cost-effective marketing efforts and enthusiastic customer engagement. We believe that executing on these strategies will increase the frequency of purchases by our existing customers and attract new customers to our stores.

Increase Brand Awareness.    We have a cost-effective marketing strategy designed to promote brand awareness and drive store and website traffic. Our strategy predominantly includes the use of digital marketing, streaming video, television, philanthropic and local community marketing to support existing and new market entries. We leverage our growing e-mail database, mobile website and social media presence to drive brand engagement and increased store visits within existing and new markets. We believe that our digital experience is an extension of our brand and retail stores, serving as a marketing and customer engagement tool for us. Our digital experience allows us to continue to build brand awareness, grow online sales and expand our customer base.

Enhance Operating Margins.    We believe we have further opportunities to drive margin improvement over time. A primary driver of our expected margin expansion will come from leveraging our cost structure as we continue to increase our store base and drive our average net sales per store. We intend to capitalize on opportunities across our supply chain as we grow our business and achieve further economies of scale.
Our History
The Company was incorporated in Pennsylvania in January 2002 under the name of Cheap Holdings, Inc. by David Schlessinger and Thomas Vellios, who recognized a market need for a fun and affordable shopping destination aimed at our target customer. We changed our name to Five Below, Inc. in August 2002. In July 2014, Joel Anderson joined the Five Below senior management team and he was appointed Chief Executive Officer effective February 1, 2015.
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Our Market Opportunity
As a result of our unique merchandise offering and value proposition, we believe we have effectively tapped the tween and teen markets. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there were over 63 million people in the United States between the ages of 5 and 19, which represented over 20% of the U.S. population as of April 1, 2010. Based on management’s experience and industry knowledge, we believe that this segment of the population has a significant amount of disposable income as the vast majority of this age group’s basic needs are already met.

Our Merchandise
Strategy
We offer a dynamic, edited assortment of trend-right, high-quality products, with most priced at $5 or below, including select brands and licensed merchandise, targeted at the tween and teen customer. We believe we are transforming the shopping experience of our target demographic with a unique merchandising strategy and high-energy retail concept that our customers consider fun and exciting. Based on management’s experience and industry knowledge, we believe our compelling value proposition and the dynamic nature of our merchandise offering has fostered universal appeal to customers across a variety of age groups beyond our target demographic.
Our typical store features in excess of 4,000 stock-keeping units, or SKUs, across a number of our category worlds including Style, Room, Sports, Tech, Create, Party, Candy and Now. We focus our merchandising strategy on maintaining core categories within our stores, but aim to generate high item velocity and sell-through to keep our assortment fresh and drive repeat visits. We monitor trends in our target demographic market, historical sales trends of current and prior products and the success of new product launches to ensure that our merchandise is relevant for our customers. We have a highly planned merchandise strategy focused on trend-right and everyday products supplemented by selected opportunistic purchases from our vendors to drive traffic and therefore offer our customers a consistently exciting shopping experience.
We believe we offer a compelling value proposition to our customers across all of our core product categories. The common element of our dynamic merchandise selection is the consistent delivery of exceptional value to the consumer, with most products offered at or below the $5 price point. Our pricing enables us to provide an extensive range of exciting products, while maintaining the attraction of a value retailer. Many of the products we sell can also be found in mall specialty stores, department stores, mass merchandisers and drug stores; however, we offer all of these products in an exciting and easy to shop retail environment at exceptional price points.
Product Mix
We organize the merchandise in our stores into the following category worlds:

Style: Consists primarily of accessories such as novelty socks, sunglasses, jewelry, scarves, gloves, hair accessories, athletic tops and bottoms and “attitude” t-shirts. Our style offering also includes products such as nail polish, lip gloss, fragrance, and branded cosmetics.

Room: Consists of items used to complete and personalize our customer’s living space, including glitter lamps, posters, frames, fleece blankets, plush items, pillows, candles, incense, lighting, novelty décor and related items. We also offer storage options for the customer’s room.

Sports: Consists of an assortment of sport balls, team sports merchandise and fitness accessories, including hand weights, jump ropes and gym balls. We also offer a variety of games, including name brand board games, puzzles, collectibles and toys including remote control. In the summer season, our sports offering also includes pool, beach and outdoor toys, games and accessories.

Tech: Consists of a selection of accessories for cell phones, tablets, audio and computers. The offering includes cases, chargers, headphones and other related items. We also carry a range of media products including books, video games and DVDs.

Create: We offer an assortment of craft activity kits, as well as arts and crafts supplies such as crayons, markers and stickers. We also offer trend-right items for school such as backpacks, fashion notebooks and journals, novelty pens and pencils, locker accessories as well as everyday name brand items.
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Party: Consists of party goods, decorations, gag gifts and greeting cards, as well as every day and special occasion merchandise.

Candy: Consists of branded items that appeal to tweens and teens. This category includes an assortment of classic and novelty candy bars and movie-size box candy, seasonal-related candy as well as gum and snack food. We also sell chilled drinks via coolers.

Now: Consists of seasonally-specific items used to celebrate and decorate for events such as Christmas, Easter, Halloween and St. Patrick’s Day. These products are most often placed at the front of the store.

Set forth below is data for the following groups of products – leisure, fashion and home, and party and snack. The percentage of net sales represented by each product group for each of the last three fiscal years was as follows:
Percentage of Net Sales
202020192018
Leisure47.3 %49.8 %50.9 %
Fashion and home35.8 %31.3 %30.9 %
Party and snack16.9 %18.9 %18.2 %
Total100.0 %100.0 %100.0 %
Leisure includes items such as sporting goods, games, toys, tech, books, electronic accessories, and arts and crafts. Fashion and home includes items such as personal accessories, “attitude” t-shirts, beauty offerings, home goods and storage options. Party and snack includes items such as party and seasonal goods, greeting cards, candy and other snacks, and beverages.
Our Stores
As of January 30, 2021, we operated 1,020 stores throughout the United States. Our new store model assumes a store size of approximately 9,000 square feet. Our stores are primarily located in power, community and lifestyle shopping centers; approximately 5% of our stores are located in malls. The following map shows the number of stores in each of the states in which we operated and the locations of our distribution centers as of January 30, 2021.
five-20210130_g1.jpg
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Store Design and Layout
We present our products in a unique and engaging in-store atmosphere. We maintain a floor layout designed with an easy-to-navigate flow and featuring sight-lines across the entire store enabling customers to easily identify our category worlds. All of our stores feature a sound system playing popular music throughout the shopping day. We employ novel and dynamic techniques to display our products, including distinctive merchandise fixtures and colorful and stimulating signage, which attract customers, encourage hands-on interaction with our products and convey our value pricing. In addition to traditional perimeter and gondola shelving, racks and tables, we utilize innovative approaches such as wheelbarrows, oil drums and bins strategically placed throughout our stores. These techniques foster customer interaction with products, supporting the strong relationship we strive to develop with our customers and enhance our upbeat and vibrant shopping environment.
Each of our category worlds is strategically located within our stores in an effort to enhance the customer’s shopping experience. For example, our Now offerings are located in the front of the store with the goal of catching customers’ attention and being “top of mind,” and specially featured value items and other key items are positioned along the center aisle. Impulse items and “dollar value” items surround the checkout areas to capture add-on purchases.
Expansion Opportunities and Site Selection
Our unique focus on the tween and teen customer is supported by our real estate strategy to locate stores in high-visibility locations. We seek to operate stores in high-visibility, high-traffic retail venues, which reinforce our brand message, heighten brand awareness and drive customer traffic.
Our strategy is to densify markets with clusters of stores because of the considerable benefit that stores derive from market concentration. Our store model is profitable across a variety of urban, suburban and semi-rural markets and in multiple real estate venues including power, community and lifestyle shopping centers. Our retail concept works well with a large and varied group of national co-tenants that drive customer traffic.
We select store sites for new store openings based upon certain criteria including minimum population density requirements, availability of attractive lease terms, sufficient space and strong positioning within a center. Employees on our real estate team spend considerable time evaluating prospective sites before bringing a proposal to our real estate committee. Our real estate committee, which is composed of senior management including our executive officers, approves all of our locations before a lease is signed.
We believe there is a significant opportunity to expand our store base in the United States. We opened 120 net new stores in fiscal 2020 and we intend to open approximately 170 to 180 new stores in fiscal 2021 through expansion in existing markets and by entering new markets. We maintain a pipeline of real estate sites that have been approved by our real estate committee and have executed 96 leases as of January 30, 2021 for new stores in fiscal 2021. The actual number, location and timing of new store openings in 2021 will depend on a number of factors, such as retail trends, competition, the general economic environment and our ability to hire and retain new store managers and employees. Our recent store growth is summarized in the following table:
PeriodStores at
Start of
Period
Stores
Opened
Stores
Closed
Net
Store
Increase
Stores at
End of
Period
Fiscal 2018625 126 125 750 
Fiscal 2019750 150 — 150 900 
Fiscal 2020900 122 120 1,020 
Opening stores within existing markets enables Five Below to benefit from enhanced brand awareness and to achieve advertising, operating and distribution efficiencies. Our targeted new store openings include additional locations in existing markets as well as expansion into new markets. In existing markets, we use a store densification strategy that promotes brand awareness and leverages marketing, operating and distribution costs. When entering new markets, we employ a store clustering strategy, opening multiple stores in a single market on the same day, enabling us to leverage marketing and pre-opening expenses and generate initial new market brand awareness.
Our store growth is supported by our new store economics, which we believe to be compelling. Our new store model assumes a store size of approximately 9,000 square feet that achieves sales of approximately $2.0 million in the first full year of operation and an average new store cash investment of approximately $0.4 million, including our store build-out (net of tenant allowances), inventory (net of payables) and cash pre-opening expenses. Our new store model targets an average payback period of less than one year on our initial investment.
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Store Operations
Each of our stores is managed by a store manager and one or two assistant managers who oversee full-time and part-time employees within each store. Each store manager is responsible for the day-to-day operations of his or her store, including the unit’s operating results, maintaining a clean and appealing store environment and the hiring, training and development of employees. We also employ district managers who are responsible for overseeing the operations of 10 to 15 stores, on average, and regional directors who are responsible for overseeing the operations of our district managers.
We are guided by a philosophy that recognizes strong sales performance and customer service, allowing us to identify and reward employees who meet our high performance standards. Store managers participate in a rewarding bonus incentive program. We also recognize individual performance through internal promotions and provide extensive opportunities for advancement.
Our employees are critical to achieving our goals, and we strive to hire talented people with high energy levels and motivation. We have well-established store operating policies and procedures and an in-store training program for new store managers, assistant managers and store associates. In addition, we have a dedicated group of training and new store opening managers who are focused on ensuring a consistent new store opening and remodel process and who leverage their extensive experience and knowledge of Five Below to train new store managers. Our customer service and store procedure training programs are designed to enable employees to assist customers in a friendly manner and to help create a positive sales-driven environment as well as teach successful operating practices and procedures.
Merchandising, Sourcing and Distribution
We have developed a disciplined approach to buying and a dynamic inventory planning and allocation process to support our merchandising strategy.
Merchandising
Our merchandising team consists of a Chief Merchandising Officer, who reports directly to our Chief Executive Officer, and is supported by general merchandising managers and an extensive team of merchandising employees. Our merchandising team works directly with our product development team and our central planning and allocation group to ensure a consistent delivery of products across our store base. Our Chief Merchandising Officer has over 30 years of experience within the retail sector. Our product development team works directly with our merchandising group to identify new and improved products through international sourcing and has significant experience within the retail sector.
Sourcing
We believe we have strong sourcing capabilities developed through a dynamic and collaborative relationship with our vendor partners that provide us with favorable access to quality merchandise at attractive prices. We regularly purchase core merchandise in accordance with our key categories. We also employ an opportunistic buying strategy, capitalizing on selected excess inventory opportunities, to purchase complementary merchandise based on consumer trends, product availability and favorable economic terms.
We work with approximately 1,000 vendors, with no single vendor representing more than 5% of our purchases in fiscal 2020. We sourced approximately 60% of our purchases from domestic vendors in fiscal 2020. We typically have no long-term supply agreements or exclusive arrangements with our vendors.
Distribution and Fulfillment
We distribute over 85% of our merchandise for our retail stores from our approximately 1,000,000 square foot distribution center in Pedricktown, New Jersey, our approximately 860,000 square foot distribution center in Conroe, Texas, our approximately 700,000 square foot distribution center in Forsyth, Georgia and our approximately 600,000 square foot distribution center in Olive Branch, Mississippi, with the remaining merchandise shipped directly from the vendor to our stores. We realize cost savings by working with our vendors to streamline and reduce packaging to diminish shipping costs.
For our direct-to-customer e-commerce business, we commenced fulfillment operations in Pedricktown, New Jersey in fiscal 2018 and in Cincinnati, Ohio in fiscal 2019.
We generally ship merchandise from our distribution centers to our stores between two and four times a week, depending on the season and the volume of a specific store. We use contract carriers to ship merchandise to our stores. From time to time, we augment our distribution facilities with third-party warehousing.
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We continuously assess ways to maximize the productivity and efficiency of our existing distribution facilities and evaluate opportunities for additional distribution centers. In March 2019, we completed the purchase of an approximately 700,000 square foot distribution center in Forsyth, Georgia. We began operating the distribution center in April 2019.
In August 2019, we acquired land in Conroe, Texas, to build an approximately 860,000 square foot distribution center. The total amount paid for the land and building was approximately $56 million. We began operating the distribution center in July 2020.
In July 2020, we acquired land in Buckeye, Arizona, to build an approximately 860,000 square foot distribution center. The total cost of the land and building is expected to be approximately $65 million, of which approximately $36 million has been paid through January 30, 2021. We expect to occupy the distribution center in Buckeye, Arizona in the second half of 2021. We are planning to lease or build new distribution centers over the next few years to support our growth objectives.
Marketing and Advertising
Our cost-effective marketing strategy is designed to promote brand awareness and drive store and website traffic with our target demographic, as well as other value-oriented customers. Our strategy includes highlighting our brand and exceptional value proposition predominantly through the use of digital advertising, commercials (on television and through streaming), and local marketing, with a focus on peak selling seasons. Additionally, we rely on the strong visibility and the presence of our store locations, email messaging and community fundraising to promote and further our brand image and drive traffic. Our digital experience, anchored by our mobile e-commerce website and social media presence is growing rapidly as we utilize Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Snapchat to engage our customers with compelling digital content on a daily basis.
Our marketing team works with our merchandising team to develop novel and dynamic techniques to display our products, including distinctive merchandise fixtures and colorful and stimulating signage, which attract customers, encourage hands-on interaction with our products and convey our value pricing.
For new store openings, we seek to create community awareness and consumer excitement predominantly through digital advertising, public relations and community outreach promoting the grand opening and by creating an engaging grand opening event that includes contests, giveaways and signature “Five Cent” hot dogs. We also aim to execute multiple store openings in a given new market on the same day in order to leverage marketing efforts to produce maximum impact.
In addition to our marketing and advertising efforts described above, we also maintain an e-commerce website (www.fivebelow.com) and, over the last few years, our online following has grown substantially. We use both our website and social media channels to highlight our featured products, value proposition, store locations, employment opportunities, and grand openings.
Competition
We compete with a broad range of retailers including discount, mass merchandise, grocery, drug, convenience, variety and other specialty stores with both physical locations and online stores. Many of these retail companies operate stores in many of the areas where we operate, and many of them engage in extensive advertising and marketing efforts. We also compete with online retailers who do not have traditional brick and mortar locations.
The principal basis upon which we compete is by offering a dynamic, edited assortment of trend-right products, with most priced at $5 and below, and including select brands and licensed merchandise, targeted at the tween and teen customer. We believe we are transforming the shopping experience of our target demographic with a unique merchandising strategy and high-energy retail concept that our customers consider fun and exciting. Our success also depends in substantial part on our ability to respond quickly to trends so that we can meet the changing demands of our customers. We believe that we compare favorably relative to many of our competitors based on our merchandising strategy, edited product assortment targeted at tweens and teens, store environment, flexible real estate strategy and company culture. Nonetheless, certain of our competitors have greater financial, distribution, marketing and other resources than we do.

Trademarks and Other Intellectual Property
We own several trademarks that have been registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, including Five Below® and Five Below Hot Stuff. Cool Prices®. We also own domain names, including www.fivebelow.com, and unregistered copyrights in our website content. We attempt to obtain registration of our trademarks whenever practicable and pursue any infringement of those marks. Solely for convenience, trademarks and trade names referred to in this document may appear without the ® or ™ symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate, in any way, that we will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights or the rights of the applicable licensor to these trademarks and trade names. We also refer to product names, trademarks, trade names and service marks that are the property of other companies.
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Management Information Systems
Our management information systems provide a full range of business process assistance and timely information to support our merchandising strategy, warehouse management, stores and operating and financial teams. We believe our current systems provide us with operational efficiencies, scalability, management control and timely reporting that allow us to identify and respond to merchandising and operating trends in our business. We use a combination of internal and external resources to support store point-of-sale, merchandise planning and buying, inventory management, financial reporting, real estate, human resource and administrative functions. We continuously assess ways to maximize productivity and efficiency, and evaluate opportunities to further enhance our existing systems.

Government Regulation
We are subject to labor and employment laws, laws governing advertising, privacy laws, safety regulations and other laws, including consumer protection regulations that regulate retailers and/or govern the promotion and sale of merchandise and the operation of stores and warehouse facilities. We monitor changes in these laws and believe that we are in material compliance with applicable laws.
As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, federal, state and local governments and private entities mandated various restrictions, including travel restrictions, restrictions on public gatherings, stay at home orders and advisories, and quarantining of people who may have been exposed to the virus. Such mandates required reduction of operating hours and forced temporary closures of certain retailers and other businesses. As a result of these restrictions and out of concern for our customers and employees, we temporarily closed all of our stores as of March 20, 2020. We began reopening our stores at the end of April and continued in operation throughout fiscal 2020 in compliance with federal, state and local requirements.
While we were able to quickly reopen our stores and maintain operational throughout the remainder of fiscal 2020, there can be no guarantee that federal, state and local governments will not adopt restrictions that further serve to restrict our ability to operate.

Insurance
We maintain third-party insurance for a number of risk management activities including but not limited to workers’ compensation, cyber, directors & officers, general liability, property and employee-related health care benefits. We evaluate our insurance requirements on an ongoing basis to ensure we maintain adequate levels of coverage.

Human Capital
Our Purpose, Beliefs and Core Values
The success and growth of Five Below is the direct result of our employees (whom we call "crew members") who embrace our purpose, our beliefs and our core values.
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Why We Exist
- Our Purpose -
What We Believe
- The Five Below Way -
How We Behave
- Our Five Core Values -
Five Below knows life is way better when you're free to Let Go and Have Fun in an amazing experience filled with unlimited possibilities priced so low we make it easy to say YES! to the newest, coolest stuff!
We are an Adopted Family. One who actively participates and leans in to support each other and our business.
In this family, we value every individual for their uniqueness and potential. We know Five Below is strongest when our teams reflect the diversity of the communities we serve and our crew members can bring their whole authentic self to work, do what they do best, feel that they truly belong and grow every single day.
We live our purpose through five core values. These values guide all of our decisions and actions.

Wow Our Customers
Unleash your Passion
Hold the Penny Hostage
Achieve the Impossible
Work Hard, Have Fun and Build a Career

Employees
As of January 30, 2021, we employed approximately 5,100 full-time and 13,900 part-time employees. Of our total employees, approximately 500 were corporate, approximately 900 were based at our distribution centers in Pedricktown, New Jersey, Olive Branch, Mississippi, Forsyth, Georgia, Conroe, Texas and Cincinnati, Ohio and approximately 17,600 were store employees located in 38 states throughout the United States. The number of part-time employees fluctuates depending on seasonal needs. None of our employees belong to a union or are party to any collective bargaining or similar agreement.
COVID-19 Response
As a result of the Covid-19 pandemic, we responded quickly to put the safety of our employees first. For the health and safety of our corporate employees, we implemented a work from home policy in March 2020, which has continued ever since. In our distribution centers, we remained operational as we quickly adopted safety protocols. As for the stores, as a result of federal, state and local restrictions and out of concern for our customers and employees, we temporarily closed all of our stores as of March 20, 2020. We began reopening our stores at the end of April only after extensive safety protocols were introduced. We established robust safety protocols at all of our workplaces, including offices, stores, and distribution centers, summarized below (all in accordance with applicable federal, state and local standards):

Mitigation MeasureCorporateStoresDistribution Centers
Mandatory face coverings for all employees and, where required by law, customersXXX
Daily health checks (with temperature checks when warranted)XXX
Additional signage, floor decals and reminder messaging regarding social distancingXXX
Increased sanitization of high touch surfacesXXX
Established policies for COVID-19 exposure, contact tracing and remediationXXX
Implemented COVID-19 sick pay policy for impacted employeesXXX
Restricted non-essential employee travelXXX
Implemented work from home policy and limited mandatory in-person meetingsX
Installation of plexiglass barriers at workstations / point-of-saleXX
Adopted occupancy limitations (employees and customers as applicable)XX
Further roll out of employee self-assisted check-out in storesX
Established COVID-19 hotline for employeesXXX
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Total Rewards
We provide a comprehensive suite of benefits designed to help employees and their families stay healthy, meet their financial goals, protect their income and help them balance their work and personal lives. We provide competitive pay and significant career growth opportunities all within a culture that values diverse viewpoints and contributions at every level. Our available benefits also include the following:

Health and WellnessMedical (with a choice of two high deductible plans and a traditional plan)
Prescription drug coverage included with every medical plan
Dental (with a choice of two plans)
Vision plan
Health savings account with Company match
Pre-tax flexible spending account for qualified medical and dependent care expenses
Mental health support with medical benefits coverage
Employee assistance program
Fertility program
Life and DisabilityNo cost life and disability coverage provided for all employees
Supplemental life plan at option and cost of employees
401(k)401(k) retirement savings option with safe harbor Company match
OtherIn-store employee discount
Employee Stock Purchase Plan
Paid time off provided to all full-time employees
Paid parental leave
Identification theft, pet insurance, legal services access, as well as supplemental accident, hospital indemnity, and critical illness coverage
Employment Practices
We aim to provide challenging, meaningful and rewarding opportunities for personal and professional growth of all employees, and encourages all employees to bring their unique backgrounds and experiences to the table to work together. In order to promote the desired work environment, we have adopted policies which describe the standards of respect, inclusivity and professionalism expected of all employees.

As an equal opportunity employer, we comply with all federal, state and local laws. This means that we make all employment decisions (such as who to recruit, hire, train, promote, transfer, and terminate, as well as compensation decisions) without considering an employee’s or applicant’s sex, race, religion, color, gender (including gender identity and gender expression), national origin, ancestry, physical or mental disability, medical condition, genetic information, marital status, registered domestic partner status, age, sexual orientation, military and veteran status or any other characteristic protected by federal, state or local law.

We do not and will not tolerate harassment, discrimination, retaliation, and disrespectful or other unprofessional conduct against employees or any other covered persons based on any protected characteristic. We also prohibit discrimination, harassment, disrespectful or unprofessional conduct based on the perception that anyone has any of those characteristics, or is associated with a person who has or is perceived as having any of those characteristics. In addition, we will not retaliate against individuals who raise complaints of discrimination or harassment or who participate in workplace investigations or other protected activities. Furthermore, we are committed to maintaining a workplace free from sexual harassment and unwelcome conduct, and recognizes sexual harassment as a form of workplace discrimination.

We promote and strive to maintain a safe and healthy work environment, and conduct our business in ways that protect our employees’ safety and are sensitive to the environment. We are committed to maintaining a drug-free work place and prohibit the manufacture, distribution, sale, purchase, transfer, possession, or use of illegal substances in the workplace, while representing us outside the workplace or if such activity affects work performance or the work environment of the Company.

We encourage open, timely communications that help us achieve organizational goals, share information, increase understanding, participate in the decision-making process, enhance our pride in the organization and provide recognition for our work-related successes. We believe our policies and practices are in compliance with all applicable laws, and have been designed with significant inputs from the employees themselves.
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Seasonality
Our business is seasonal in nature with the highest level of net sales and net income generated in the fourth fiscal quarter due to the year-end holiday season and, therefore, operating results for any fiscal quarter are not necessarily indicative of results for the full fiscal year. To prepare for the holiday season, we must order and keep in stock more merchandise than we carry during other parts of the year. We expect inventory levels, along with an increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses, generally to reach their highest levels in the third and fourth fiscal quarters in anticipation of the increased net sales during the year-end holiday season. As a result of this seasonality, and generally because of variation in consumer spending habits, we experience fluctuations in net sales, net income and working capital requirements during the year.

Available Information

For more information about us, visit our website at www.fivebelow.com. The contents of our website are not part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Our electronic filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (including all annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, and current reports on Form 8-K, and any amendments to these reports), including the exhibits, are available, free of charge, through our website as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file them with, or furnish them to, the Securities and Exchange Commission.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
You should consider carefully the following risks and uncertainties when reading this Annual Report. If any of the following risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. In that event, the trading price of our common stock could decline. Although we believe that we have identified and discussed below the key risk factors affecting our business, there may be additional risks and uncertainties that are not presently known or that are not currently believed to be significant that may adversely affect our performance or financial condition.
Risks Relating to Our Business and Industry
The COVID-19 global pandemic and measures intended to prevent its spread present material uncertainty and risk and have had, and are expected to continue to have, a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations, financial condition, and cash flows.
The COVID-19 global pandemic that began in the first quarter of 2020 has both ebbed and surged multiple times since in many parts of the United States, with a resultant cycle of the imposition, lapsing and re-imposition of federal, state and local restrictions on our ability to operate. These restrictions included restrictions on business operations, freedom of travel, border closings, shelter in place orders, and quarantines. The pandemic and the related preventative and protective actions have adversely impacted the global economy, resulted in unprecedented levels of unemployment, reduced consumer confidence and discretionary consumer spending, disrupted global supply chains, and created significant volatility in financial markets.
The pandemic and the related actions have materially adversely impacted our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows, including through the temporary store closures that began in March 2020, as well as reductions in operating hours and decreases in store traffic which continued through the balance of fiscal 2020.
As a result of the temporary store closures due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we withheld store rent for the closure period. With respect to virtually all of our lease portfolio, we have resumed rent payments, and in most cases, agreed to rent deferrals and/or abatements related to this closure period with landlords. If, in response to additional store closures, we were to decide to withhold rent, all or some of our landlords could claim that our failure to pay rent is a default under our leases and seek remedies such as damages, acceleration of lease payments and/or termination of the subject leases. A successful assertion by the landlords of a breach of a significant number of our leases could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, profitability and cash flows.
If the pandemic were to worsen or continue for a longer period than currently anticipated, business and consumer responses to the pandemic could adversely affect, among other aspects of our business:
• our ability to maintain and increase sales and margins and to execute effectively on our business plans;
• our ability to identify and respond effectively to changes in consumer preferences and behavior, including decreased consumer discretionary spending;
• our ability to implement and maintain safety measures to keep our employees and customers safe;
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• our ability to generate increased sales through our e-commerce website and curbside pickup (in the event any store is required to be closed to the public);
• our ability to receive products from our vendors and to distribute such products to our store locations;
• our vendors’ ability to manufacture and distribute products to us;
• our business partners’ ability to operate or manage increases in their operating costs and other supply chain effects that may have an adverse effect on our ability to meet consumer demand and achieve cost targets;
• our ability to comply with financial covenants in credit agreements and with credit terms in agreements with our suppliers; and
• our ability to restructure our lease obligations.
Any of the negative impacts of the pandemic, including those described above, alone or in combination with others, may exacerbate many of the risk factors discussed otherwise herein. The full extent to which the pandemic will negatively affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows will depend on future developments that are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted, including the scope and duration of the pandemic and actions taken by governmental authorities businesses and customers in response to the pandemic.
We may not be able to successfully implement our growth strategy on a timely basis or at all, which could harm our growth and results of operations.
Our growth is dependent on our ability to open profitable new stores. We believe we have an opportunity to continue to grow our store base from 1,020 stores in 38 states as of January 30, 2021 to more than 2,500 locations over time.
Our ability to open profitable new stores depends on many factors, including our ability to:
identify suitable markets and sites for new stores;
negotiate leases with acceptable terms;
achieve brand awareness in the new markets;
efficiently source and distribute additional merchandise;
expand our distribution capacity by successfully opening and operating new distribution centers;
maintain adequate distribution capacity, information systems and other operational system capabilities;
hire, train and retain store management and other qualified employees; and
achieve sufficient levels of cash flow and financing to support our expansion.
Unavailability of attractive store locations, delays in the acquisition or opening of new stores, delays or costs resulting from a decrease in commercial development due to capital constraints, difficulties in staffing and operating new store locations or lack of customer acceptance of stores in new market areas may negatively impact our new store growth and the costs or the profitability associated with new stores.
Additionally, some of our new stores may be located in areas where we have little experience or a lack of brand recognition. Those markets may have different competitive conditions, market conditions, consumer tastes and discretionary spending patterns than our existing markets, which may cause these new stores to be less successful than stores in our existing markets. Other new stores may be located in areas where we have existing stores. Although we have experience in these markets, increasing the number of locations in these markets may result in inadvertent over-saturation of markets and temporarily or permanently divert customers and sales from our existing stores, thereby adversely affecting our overall financial performance.
Accordingly, we cannot guarantee that we will achieve our planned growth or, even if we are able to grow our store base as planned, that any new stores will perform as planned. If we fail to successfully implement our growth strategy, we will not be able to sustain the rapid growth in sales and profits that we expect, which would likely have an adverse impact on the price of our common stock.
Any disruption in our ability to select, obtain, distribute and market merchandise attractive to customers at prices that allow us to profitably sell such merchandise could impact our business negatively.
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We generally have been able to select and obtain sufficient quantities of attractive merchandise at prices that allow us to be profitable. If we are unable to continue to select products that are attractive to our customers, to obtain such products at costs that allow us to sell such products at a profit, or to market such products effectively to consumers, our sales or profitability could be affected adversely. In addition, the success of our business depends in part on our ability to anticipate, identify and respond promptly to evolving trends in demographics and consumer preferences, expectations and needs. If we are unable to quickly respond to developing trends or if the spending patterns or demographics of these markets change, and we do not timely and appropriately respond to such changes, then the demand for our products, which are discretionary, and our market share could be adversely affected. Failure to maintain attractive stores and to timely identify or effectively respond to changing consumer needs, preferences and spending patterns could adversely affect our relationship with customers, the demand for our products and our market share.
Any disruption in the supply or increase in pricing of our merchandise could negatively impact our ability to achieve anticipated operating results. The products we sell are sourced from a wide variety of domestic and international vendors. We have not experienced any difficulty in obtaining sufficient quantities of core merchandise and believe that, if one or more of our current sources of supply become unavailable, we would generally be able to obtain alternative sources without experiencing a substantial disruption of our business. However, such alternative sources could increase our merchandise costs and reduce the quality of our merchandise, and an inability to obtain alternative sources could affect our sales.
Our reliance on merchandise manufactured outside of the United States subjects us to legal, regulatory, political and economic risks. In particular, tariffs imposed by the U.S. government could increase the cost to us of certain products, lower our margins, increase our import related expenses, cause us to increase our prices to consumers, and reduce consumer spending on discretionary items, each of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of future operations.
A significant majority of our merchandise is manufactured outside of the United States, and changes in the prices and flow of these goods for any reason could have an adverse impact on our operations. The United States and other countries have occasionally proposed and enacted protectionist trade policies, which may result in changes in tariff structures and trade policies and restrictions that could increase the cost or reduce the availability of certain merchandise. For example, in 2018 and 2019 the United States imposed increased tariffs on certain imports from China (up to 30%), and the then-President of the United States, at one point, directed United States companies to immediately begin to look for alternatives to China and suggested he had the authority to order United States companies to cease production in, and importation from, China. Although a partial trade deal has been reached between the United States and China, the trade issues between these countries are not fully resolved. The trade issues between the United States and China may continue to be volatile and difficult to predict or forecast.
Increased tariffs as well as any newly imposed tariffs on items imported from China or elsewhere would likely result in lower gross margins on impacted products, unless we are able to successfully take any one or more of the following mitigating actions: negotiate lower product costs with our vendors, purchase products produced in countries with no or lower tariffs or transition away from domestic vendors who source from China or other tariff impacted countries, increase our prices, or alter or cease offering certain products. Any increase in pricing, alteration of products or reduced product offering could reduce the competitiveness of our products. Furthermore, any retaliatory counter-measures imposed by countries subject to such tariffs, such as China, could increase our, or our vendors’, import expenses. Additionally, even if the products we import are not directly impacted by additional tariffs, the imposition of such additional tariffs on goods imported into the United States could cause increased prices for consumer goods in general, which could have a negative impact on consumer spending for discretionary items reducing demand for our products. These direct and indirect impacts of increased tariffs or trade restrictions implemented by the United States, both individually and cumulatively, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of future operations.
It has also been suggested that the United States may materially modify or withdraw from some of its existing trade agreements. Any of these or other measures, if ultimately enacted, or events relating to the manufacturers of our merchandise and the countries in which they are located, some or all of which are beyond our control, could adversely affect our ability to access suitable merchandise on acceptable terms, negatively impact our operations, increase costs and lower our margins. Such events or circumstances include, but are not limited to:
political and economic instability;
the financial instability and labor problems of the manufacturers of our merchandise;
the availability and cost of raw materials;
merchandise quality or safety issues;
changes in currency exchange rates;
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the regulatory environment in the countries in which the manufacturers of our merchandise are located;
work stoppages or other employee rights issues;
inflation or deflation; and
transportation availability, costs and disruptions.
Moreover, negative press or reports about products manufactured outside the United States may sway public opinion, and thus customer confidence, away from the products sold in our stores. These and other factors affecting the manufacturers of our merchandise who are located outside of the United States and our access to our products could adversely affect our financial performance.
We have implemented price increases in an effort to mitigate current and future cost increases. These or future price increases could reduce our unit sales, damage our reputation with our customers as an extreme value retailer, or cause us to become less competitive in the marketplace, each of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of future operations.
We, like many retailers, are and may in the future be subject to increasing operational costs, including escalating product costs, the imposition of tariffs on imported goods, and higher wage and benefits costs in response to legislative requirements and competitive pressures. In fiscal 2019 we implemented price increases (including beyond $5 per item) in an effort to mitigate some or all of the risks of such operational cost increases. We can offer no assurances that price increases will be accepted by our customers, or that price increases will be sufficient to offset the impact of future cost increases. In addition, any increase in our prices may cause our unit sales to decline, and could undermine our positioning as an extreme value retailer making us less attractive to our customers and less competitive in the marketplace. Accordingly, such factors could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of future operations.
Our sales depend on a volume of traffic to our stores, and a reduction in traffic to, or the closing of, anchor tenants and other destination retailers in the shopping centers in which our stores are located could significantly reduce our sales and leave us with excess inventory.
Most of our stores are located in power, community and lifestyle shopping centers that benefit from the ability of “anchor” retail tenants, generally big box stores, and other destination retailers and attractions to generate sufficient levels of consumer traffic in the vicinity of our stores. Any decline in the volume of consumer traffic at shopping centers, whether because of consumer preferences to shop on the internet or at large warehouse stores, an economic slowdown, a decline in the popularity of shopping centers, the closing of anchor stores or other destination retailers or otherwise, could result in reduced sales at our stores and leave us with excess inventory, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial results or business. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, our business operations and results of operations, including our net sales, earnings and cash flows, were materially impacted in fiscal 2020 due to, in part, decreased customer traffic in stores, including, without limitation, on account of limitations on the number of persons permitted in stores at one time by certain local and state regulations. If the pandemic were to worsen again, our business operations and results of operations may again be materially impacted by a number of factors including a decrease in customer traffic.
Our new store growth is dependent upon our ability to successfully expand our distribution network capacity, and failure to achieve or sustain these plans could affect our performance adversely.
We maintain distribution centers in Pedricktown, New Jersey, Olive Branch, Mississippi, Forsyth, Georgia, Conroe, Texas and Cincinnati, Ohio. We continuously assess ways to maximize the productivity and efficiency of our existing distribution facilities and evaluate opportunities for additional distribution centers. In August 2019, we acquired land in Conroe, Texas, to build an approximately 860,000 square foot distribution center, which we began operating in July 2020. In July 2020, we acquired land in Buckeye, Arizona, to build an approximately 860,000 square foot distribution center, which we expect to occupy in the second half of 2021. In addition, we are planning to lease or build new distribution centers over the next few years to support our growth. Delays in opening the planned new distribution centers could adversely affect our future operations by slowing store growth, which could in turn reduce sales growth. In addition, any distribution-related construction or expansion projects entail risks which could cause delays and cost overruns, such as: shortages of materials; shortages of skilled labor or work stoppages; unforeseen construction, scheduling, engineering, environmental or geological problems; weather interference; fires or other casualty losses; and unanticipated cost increases. The completion date and ultimate cost of future projects, including opening the planned new distribution centers could differ significantly from initial expectations due to construction-related or other reasons. We cannot guarantee that any project will be completed on time or within established budgets.
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In addition, the fixed costs associated with owning, operating and maintaining our distribution centers during a period of economic weakness or declining sales can result in lower operating efficiencies, financial deleverage and potential impairment in the recorded value of distribution assets. This fixed cost structure may adversely affect profitability if sales volumes decline for an extended period of time and could have material adverse effects on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flow.
Furthermore, our distribution centers in Forsyth, Georgia, Conroe, Texas and Buckeye, Arizona subject us to the risks of owning real property, which include, but are not limited to:
the possibility of environmental contamination and the costs associated with remediating any environmental problems;
adverse changes in the value of this property, and any future properties we may own, due to interest rate changes, changes in the neighborhood in which the property is located, or other factors;
the possible need for structural improvements in order to comply with zoning, seismic and other legal or regulatory requirements;
the potential disruption of our business and operations arising from or connected with a relocation due to moving to or renovating the facility;
increased cash commitments for improvements to the building or the property, or both;
increased operating expenses for the buildings or the property, or both; and
the risk of financial loss in excess of amounts covered by insurance, or uninsured risks, such as the loss caused by damage to the buildings as a result of earthquakes, floods and/or other natural disasters.
A significant disruption to our distribution network or to the timely receipt of inventory could adversely impact sales or increase our transportation costs, which would decrease our profits.
Because most of our products are distributed from our distribution centers, the unexpected loss of any one of our distribution centers, due to natural disaster or otherwise, would materially affect our operations. We also rely upon independent third-party transportation to provide goods to our stores in a timely and cost-effective manner, through deliveries to our distribution centers from vendors and then from the distribution centers or direct ship vendors to our stores. Our use of outside delivery services for shipments is subject to risks outside of our control and any disruption, unanticipated expense or operational failure related to this process could affect store operations negatively. In fiscal 2020 the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted our supply chain. Although we were able to mitigate the impact to our business from such disruptions there can be no guaranty that we would be able to mitigate future COVID-19 related disruptions. For example, unexpected delivery delays or increases in transportation costs (including through increased fuel costs or a decrease in transportation capacity for overseas shipments or resulting from labor shortages or work stoppages) could significantly decrease our ability to generate sales and earn profits. If we change shipping companies, we could face logistical difficulties that could adversely impact deliveries and we would incur costs and expend resources in connection with such change. Moreover, we may not be able to obtain terms as favorable as those received from the independent third-party transportation providers we currently use, which would increase our costs. Additionally, long-term disruptions to the United States and international transportation infrastructure from wars, political unrest, terrorism, natural disasters, governmental budget constraints and other significant events that could lead to delays or interruptions of service could adversely affect our business. As we seek to expand our operation through the implementation of our online retail capabilities, we may face increased or unexpected demands on distribution center operations, as well as new demands on our distribution network.
Extreme weather conditions common to areas in which many of our stores are located could negatively affect our business and results of operations, particularly as such extreme conditions occur during what is typically our most profitable quarter.
Extreme weather conditions in the areas in which our stores are located could negatively affect our business and results of operations. We have a significant number of stores in the Northeastern and Midwestern regions of the United States, which are prone to inclement weather conditions, as well as severe storms. Such inclement weather could have a significant impact on consumer behavior, travel and store traffic patterns, as well as our ability to operate our stores. For example, frequent or unusually heavy snowfall, ice storms, rainstorms or other extreme weather conditions over a prolonged period could make it difficult for our customers to travel to our stores and thereby reduce our sales and profitability. In addition, we typically generate higher revenues and gross margins during our fourth fiscal quarter, which includes the year-end holiday season. If weather conditions are not favorable during these periods, our operating results and cash flow from operations could be adversely affected.
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If we are unable to secure our customers’ confidential or credit card information, or other private data relating to our employees or our Company, we could be subject to negative publicity, costly government enforcement actions or private litigation, which could damage our business reputation and adversely affect our financial results.
As with other companies, we are periodically subject to cyberattacks. Cyberattacks and other cyber incidents are occurring more frequently, are constantly evolving in nature, are becoming more sophisticated and are being made by groups and individuals (including criminal hackers, hacktivists, state-sponsored institutions, terrorist organizations and individuals or groups participating in organized crime) with a wide range of expertise and motives (including monetization of corporate, payment or other internal or personal data, theft of trade secrets and intellectual property for competitive advantage and leverage for political, social, economic and environmental reasons). Such cyberattacks and cyber incidents can take many forms including cyber extortion, denial of service, social engineering, such as impersonation attempts to fraudulently induce employees or others to disclose information or unwittingly provide access to systems or data, introduction of viruses or malware, such as ransomware through phishing emails, website defacement or theft of passwords and other credentials. Although we may incur significant costs in protecting against or remediating cyberattacks or other cyber incidents, no cyberattack or other cyber incident has, to our knowledge, had a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations to date.
The protection of our customer, employee and company data is critical to us. The regulatory environment surrounding information security and privacy is increasingly demanding, with the frequent imposition of new and constantly changing requirements that affect our business. In addition, customers have a high expectation that we will adequately protect their personal information from cyberattack or other security breaches. We have procedures and technology in place designed to safeguard our customers’ debit and credit card and other personal information, our employees’ private data and company records, intellectual property and other confidential information, and we continue to devote significant resources to network security, backup and disaster recovery, and other security measures, including training, to protect our systems and data. Nevertheless, these security measures cannot provide absolute security or guarantee that we will be successful in preventing or responding to every such breach or disruption, including through the intentional or negligent actions of our employees, business associates or third parties. As a result, unauthorized parties may obtain access to our data systems and misappropriate customer data and company confidential information.
There can be no assurance that advances in computer capabilities, new discoveries in the field of cryptography or other developments will prevent the compromise of our customer transaction processing capabilities and personal data. Furthermore, because the techniques used to obtain unauthorized access, disable or degrade service, or sabotage systems change frequently and often are not recognized until launched against a target, we may be unable to anticipate these techniques or to implement adequate preventative measures. If any such compromise of our security or the security of information residing with our business associates or third parties were to occur, we could be exposed to negative publicity, government enforcement actions, card issuer fines and/or penalties, private litigation or costly response measures. In addition, our reputation within the business community and with our customers may be affected, which could result in our customers discontinuing the use of debit or credit cards in our stores, or not shopping in our stores altogether. This could cause us to lose market share to our competitors and could have an adverse effect on our financial results.
We are subject to customer payment-related risks that could increase operating costs or exposure to fraud or theft, subject us to potential liability and potentially disrupt our business.
We accept payments using a variety of methods, including cash, credit and debit cards and gift cards. Acceptance of these payment options subjects us to rules, regulations, contractual obligations and compliance requirements, including payment network rules and operating guidelines, data security standards and certification requirements, and rules governing electronic funds transfers. Any inability to comply with such requirements may subject us to increased risk of liability for fraudulent transactions and may adversely affect our business and operating results.
For certain payment methods, including credit and debit cards, we pay interchange and other fees, which may increase over time and raise our operating costs. We rely on third parties to provide payment processing services, including the processing of credit cards, debit cards, and other forms of electronic payment. If these companies become unable to provide these services to us, or if their systems are compromised, it could potentially disrupt our business. The payment methods that we offer also subject us to potential fraud and theft by criminals, who are becoming increasingly more sophisticated, seeking to obtain unauthorized access to or exploit weaknesses that may exist in the payment systems. If we fail to comply with applicable rules or requirements for the payment methods we accept, or if payment-related data is compromised due to a breach or misuse of data, we may be liable for costs incurred by payment card issuing banks and other third parties or subject to fines and higher transaction fees, or our ability to accept or facilitate certain types of payments may be impaired. In addition, our customers could lose confidence in certain payment types, which may result in a shift to other payment types or potential changes to our payment systems that may result in higher costs. As a result, our business and operating results could be adversely affected.
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Our growth from existing stores is dependent upon our ability to increase sales and improve the efficiencies, costs and effectiveness of our operations, and failure to achieve or sustain these plans could affect our performance adversely.
Increases in sales in existing stores are dependent on factors such as competition, including from online retailers, merchandise selection, store operations and customer satisfaction. If we fail to realize our goals of successfully managing our store operations and increasing our customer retention and recruitment levels, our sales may not increase and our growth may be impacted adversely.
Our success depends on our executive officers, senior management, district, store, and distribution center managers, and other key personnel. If we lose our executive officers, senior management, district, store, and distribution center managers, or any other key personnel, or are unable to hire additional qualified personnel, our business could be harmed.
Our future success depends to a significant degree on the skills, experience and efforts of our executive officers, senior management, district, store, and distribution center managers, and other key personnel, including Joel Anderson, our President and Chief Executive Officer. The loss of the services of any of our executive officers, senior management, district, store, and distribution center managers, or other key personnel could have an adverse effect on our operations. Competition for skilled and experienced management in the retail industry is intense, and our future success will also depend on our ability to attract, retain and motivate qualified personnel, as a failure to attract these key personnel could have an adverse effect on our operations. We do not currently maintain key person life insurance policies with respect to our executive officers or key personnel.
Our profitability and cash flows from operations may be negatively affected if we are not successful in managing our inventory balances and inventory shrinkage.
Our inventory balance represented approximately 12% of our total assets as of January 30, 2021. Efficient inventory management is a key component of our business success and profitability. To be successful, we must maintain sufficient inventory levels and an appropriate product mix to meet our customers’ demands without allowing those levels to increase to such an extent that the costs to store and hold the goods unduly impacts our financial results. If our buying decisions do not accurately predict customer trends or purchasing actions, or if our expectations about customer spending levels are inaccurate, we may have to take unanticipated markdowns to dispose of excess inventory, which also can adversely impact our financial results. We also experience inventory shrinkage, and we cannot assure you that incidences of inventory loss and theft will stay at acceptable levels or decrease in the future, or that the measures we are taking will effectively address the problem of inventory shrinkage. We continue to focus on ways to reduce these risks, but we cannot assure you that we will be successful in our inventory management. If we are not successful in managing our inventory balances, our profitability and cash flows from operations may be negatively affected.
Our business requires that we lease substantial amounts of space and there can be no assurance that we will be able to continue to lease space on terms as favorable as the leases negotiated in the past.
Currently, we lease all of our store locations, as well as our corporate headquarters and distribution facilities in Pedricktown, New Jersey, Olive Branch, Mississippi and Cincinnati, Ohio (and own our distribution centers in Forsyth, Georgia, Conroe, Texas and land in Buckeye, Arizona, where we expect to build a distribution center). Our stores are leased from third parties, with typical initial lease terms of ten years. Many of our lease agreements also have additional five-year renewal options. Historically, we have been able to negotiate terms that fit within our economic model and that we believe are favorable; however, there is no guarantee that we will be able to continue to negotiate such terms. Consolidation in the commercial retail real estate market could affect our ability to successfully negotiate favorable rental terms for our stores in the future. Should significant consolidation occur, a large proportion of our store base could be concentrated with one or a few landlords that would then be in a position to dictate unfavorable terms to us due to their significant negotiating leverage. Many of our lease agreements have defined escalating rent provisions over the initial term and any extensions. Increases in our occupancy costs and difficulty in identifying economically suitable new store locations could have significant negative consequences, which include:
requiring that a greater portion of our available cash be applied to pay our rental obligations, thus reducing cash available for other purposes and reducing our profitability;
increasing our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions; and
limiting our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to changes in, our business or in the industry in which we compete.
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We depend on cash flow from operations to pay our lease expenses and to fulfill our other cash needs. If our business does not generate sufficient cash flow from operating activities to fund these expenses and needs and sufficient funds are not otherwise available to us, we may not be able to service our lease expenses, grow our business, respond to competitive challenges or fund our other liquidity and capital needs, which could harm our business. If an existing or future store is not profitable, and we decide to close it, we may nonetheless be committed to perform our obligations under the applicable lease including, among other things, paying the base rent for the balance of the lease term. Moreover, even if a lease has an early cancellation clause, we may not satisfy the contractual requirements for early cancellation under that lease. In addition, if we are not able to enter into new leases or renew existing leases on terms acceptable to us, this could have an adverse effect on our results of operations.
Operational difficulties, including those associated with our ability to either lease or build and operate our distribution centers, could adversely impact our business.
We maintain a network of distribution centers and are planning to lease or build new distribution centers over the next few years to support our growth objectives. Delays in opening these new distribution centers could adversely affect our future financial performance by slowing store growth, which may in turn reduce revenue growth, or by increasing transportation costs. In addition, distribution center-related construction entails risks that could cause delays and cost overruns, such as: shortages of materials or skilled labor; work stoppages; unforeseen construction, scheduling, engineering, environmental or geological problems; weather interference; fires or other casualty losses; and unanticipated cost increases. The completion date and ultimate cost of these projects could differ significantly from initial expectations due to construction-related or other reasons. We cannot guarantee that these distribution centers or any future operational projects will be completed on time or within established budgets. Additionally, potential ownership of these facilities and of additional facilities which we may lease, acquire, build and own in the future, entails risks of our ability to comply with regulations restricting the construction and operation of these facilities, as well as local community actions opposed to the location of our facilities at specific sites and the adoption of local laws restricting our operations and environmental regulations, which may impact our ability to find suitable locations, and increase the cost of sites and of constructing, leasing and operating our facilities. We also may have difficulty negotiating real estate purchase agreements or leases on acceptable terms. Failure to manage these and other similar factors effectively may affect our ability to timely build or lease new facilities, which could have a material adverse effect on our future growth and profitability.

We operate in a competitive environment and, as a result, we may not be able to compete effectively or maintain or increase our sales, market shares or margins.
We operate in a highly competitive retail environment with numerous competitors, including online retailers, some of which have greater resources or better brand recognition than we do. We compete with respect to customers, price, store location, merchandise quality and supply, assortment and presentation, in-stock consistency, customer service and employees. This competitive environment subjects us to various risks, including the ability to provide quality, trend-right merchandise to our customers at competitive prices that allow us to maintain our profitability. Because of our low price model, we may have limited ability to increase prices in response to increased costs without losing competitive position which may adversely affect our margins and financial performance. In addition, price reductions by our competitors may result in the reduction of our prices and a corresponding reduction in our profitability. Accordingly, we may face periods of intense competition in the future, which could have a material adverse effect on our profitability and results of operations.
Consolidation among retailers, changes in pricing of merchandise or offerings of other services by competitors could have a negative impact on the relative attractiveness of our stores to consumers. We do not possess exclusive rights to many of the elements that comprise our in-store experience and product offerings. Our competitors may seek to copy our business strategy and in-store experience, which could result in a reduction of any competitive advantage or special appeal that we might possess. In addition, most of our products are sold to us on a non-exclusive basis. As a result, our current and future competitors may be able to duplicate or improve on some or all of our in-store experience or product offerings that we believe are important in differentiating our stores and our customers’ shopping experience. If our competitors were to duplicate or improve on some or all of our in-store experience or product offerings, our competitive position and our business could suffer. Our ability to provide quality, trend-right products at attractive, competitive prices could be impacted by various actions of our competitors that are beyond our control.
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Our business is seasonal, and adverse events during the holiday season could have a substantial negative impact on our operating results.
Our business is seasonal, with the highest percentage of sales (approximately 40% of total annual sales over the last two fiscal years) occurring during the fourth fiscal quarter (November, December and January), which includes the year-end holiday season. This increased percentage of net sales has historically resulted in the highest percentages of net income during the fourth fiscal quarter. We purchase substantial amounts of inventory in the end of the third fiscal quarter (October) and beginning of the fourth fiscal quarter (November and December) and incur higher shipping costs and higher payroll costs in anticipation of the increased sales activity during these time periods. Adverse events, such as inclement or unusual weather, deteriorating economic conditions, higher unemployment, increased wage rates, higher gas prices or public transportation disruptions could result in lower-than-planned sales during the holiday season which may lead to unanticipated markdowns. Since we rely on third parties for transportation and use third-party warehouses when we build up inventory, a number of these factors are outside of our control. An unsuccessful fourth quarter, or holiday season, will have a substantial negative impact on our financial condition and results of operations for the entire fiscal year.
We may not be successful in our continued expansion into online retail and if we are successful, we will face new risks and challenges, which could adversely affect our results of operations.
We sell merchandise on the internet, through our fivebelow.com e-commerce website. Our ability to successfully execute a further expansion of our e-commerce strategy may suffer if we are unable to sell and fulfill our products in a cost-efficient manner.
In addition, if we are successful, we will encounter risks and difficulties frequently experienced by internet-based businesses, including risks related to our ability to attract and retain customers on a cost-effective basis and our ability to operate, support, expand and develop our internet operations, website and software and other related operational systems. Although we believe that our participation in both e-commerce and physical store sales will be a distinct advantage for us due to synergies, the potential for new customers and increased brand recognition nationwide in markets where we do not yet have stores, supporting product offerings through both of these channels could create issues that have the potential to adversely affect our results of operations. For example, if our e-commerce business successfully grows, it may do so in part by attracting existing customers, rather than new customers, who choose to purchase products from us online rather than from our physical stores, thereby reducing the financial performance of our stores. In addition, selling products through the internet exposes us to the potential for fraud associated with “card-not-present” credit card transactions that does not exist for physical store sales. Criminals are using increasingly sophisticated methods to engage in illegal activities such as unauthorized use of credit or debit cards and bank account information. Requirements relating to consumer authentication and fraud detection are more complex for online sales than for physical store sales. We may be denied the revenues associated with orders resulting from the unauthorized use of a cardholder’s card number in an illegal activity even if the associated financial institution approved payment of the orders.
Our inability to upgrade or expand, our technology systems as a result of external factors, staffing shortages or difficulties in updating our existing technology or developing or implementing new technology could have a material adverse effect on our business or results of operations.
We are continuing to expand, upgrade and develop our information technology capabilities, including, most recently, our core-enterprise resource planning system (or "ERP") which we implemented through Oracle software in fiscal 2020, and the re-launch of our e-commerce website on the Hollar platform in fiscal 2020. In addition, in fiscal 2021, we are planning to adopt a new enterprise wide human capital management system. If we are unable to successfully continue upgrading or expanding our technological capabilities to support our growth we may not be able to take advantage of market opportunities, manage our costs and transactional data effectively, satisfy customer requirements, execute our business plan or respond to competitive pressures. In addition, costs and potential problems and interruptions associated with the implementation of new or upgraded systems and technology, or with maintenance or adequate support of existing systems, could also disrupt or reduce the efficiency of our operations.
Some of our information technology systems are currently outsourced to, or using cloud-based services provided by, third parties. If these third parties are unable, unwilling, or otherwise experience interruptions in their ability to provide services to us or to provide us access to the systems on which we rely, this would disrupt or reduce the efficiency of our operations if we are unable to convert to alternate systems in an efficient and timely manner. Furthermore, if these third parties are unable to secure our private data from cyberattacks and other cyber incidents, it may disrupt or reduce the efficiency of our operations or otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or reputation.
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We also rely heavily on our information technology staff. Failure to meet these staffing needs may negatively affect our ability to fulfill our technology initiatives while continuing to provide maintenance on existing systems. We rely on certain vendors to maintain and periodically upgrade many of these systems so that they can continue to support our business. The software programs supporting many of our systems were licensed to us by independent software developers. The inability of these developers or us to continue to maintain and upgrade these information systems and software programs would disrupt or reduce the efficiency of our operations if we are unable to convert to alternate systems in an efficient and timely manner.
We are exposed to the risk of natural disasters, adverse weather conditions, pandemic outbreaks, global political events, war and terrorism that could disrupt business and result in lower sales, increased operating costs and capital expenditures.
Our headquarters, store locations and distribution centers, as well as certain of our vendors and customers, are located in areas which have been and could be subject to natural disasters such as floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, fires or earthquakes. Adverse weather conditions or other extreme changes in the weather, including resulting electrical and technological failures, may disrupt our business and may adversely affect our ability to sell and distribute products. In addition, we operate in markets that are susceptible to pandemic outbreaks, including COVID-19, or terrorist acts, and our operations may be affected by disruptive political events, both global and domestic, such as civil unrest in countries in which our vendors are located or products are manufactured, and in the US, where protests and other disturbances have affected, and may continue to affect, our ability to operate our stores.
Our business may be harmed if our ability to sell and distribute products is impacted by any such events, any of which could influence customer trends and purchases and may negatively impact our net sales, properties or operations. Such events could result in physical damage to one or more of our properties, the temporary closure of some or all of our stores or distribution centers, the temporary lack of an adequate work force in a market, temporary or long-term disruption in the transport of goods, decreases in transportation capacity, increases in transportation costs, delay in the delivery of goods to our distribution centers or stores, disruption of our technology support or information systems, or fuel shortages or dramatic increases in fuel prices, which increase the cost of doing business. These events also can have indirect consequences such as increases in the costs of insurance if they result in significant loss of property or other insurable damage. Any of these factors, or combination thereof, could adversely affect our operations.
Changes to federal, state or provincial income tax legislation could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
From time to time, new tax legislation is adopted by the federal government and various states or other regulatory bodies. Significant changes in tax legislation could adversely affect our business or results of operations in a material way. On December 22, 2017, the U.S. government enacted comprehensive tax legislation commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the "TCJA"). The changes included in the TCJA are broad and complex. The final transition impacts of the TCJA may differ from the estimates provided elsewhere in this report, possibly materially, due to, among other things, changes in interpretations of the TCJA, any legislative action to address questions that arise because of the TCJA, any changes in accounting standards for income taxes or related interpretations in response to the TCJA, or any updates or changes to estimates we have utilized to calculate the transition impacts, including impacts from changes to current year earnings estimates. As these and other tax laws and related regulations change, our financial results could be materially impacted. Given the unpredictability of possible changes and their potential interdependency, it is very difficult to assess whether the overall effect of such potential tax changes would be cumulatively positive or negative for our earnings and cash flow, but such changes could adversely impact our financial results.
Our current insurance programs may expose us to unexpected costs and negatively affect our financial performance.
Our insurance coverage is subject to deductibles, limits of liability and similar provisions that we believe are prudent based on our overall operations. We may incur certain types of losses that we cannot insure or which we believe are not economically reasonable to insure, such as losses due to acts of war, employee and certain other crime, and some natural disasters. If we incur these losses and they are material, our business could suffer. Certain material events may result in sizable losses for the insurance industry and adversely impact the availability of adequate insurance coverage or result in excessive premium increases. To offset negative cost trends in the insurance market, we may elect to self-insure, accept higher deductibles or reduce the amount of coverage in response to these market changes. In addition, because of ongoing changes in healthcare law, among other things, we may experience an increase in participation in our group health insurance programs, which may lead to a greater number of medical claims. If we experience a greater number of these losses than we anticipate, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
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If we are unable to enforce our intellectual property rights, if we are accused of infringing a third party’s intellectual property rights, or if the merchandise we purchase from brand partners is alleged to have infringed a third party’s intellectual property rights, our business or results of operations may be adversely affected.
Our future success and competitive position depend in part on our ability to maintain and protect our brand. We currently own various intellectual property rights in the United States that differentiate us from our competitors, including our trademarks, such as the “Five Below®,” “Ten Below®” and “Five Below Hot Stuff. Cool Prices®” marks. We also own domain names, including www.fivebelow.com, and unregistered copyrights in our website content. We currently rely on a combination of copyright, trademark, trade dress and unfair competition laws to establish and protect our intellectual property and other proprietary rights, but the steps we take to protect such rights may be inadequate to prevent infringement of our trademarks and proprietary rights by others. Such unauthorized use of our trademarks, trade secrets, or other proprietary rights may cause significant damage to our brands and have an adverse effect on our business. The loss or reduction of any of our significant intellectual property or proprietary rights could have an adverse effect on our business.
Additionally, third parties may assert claims against us alleging infringement, misappropriation or other violations of their intellectual property or other proprietary rights, whether or not the claims have merit. Such claims could be time consuming and expensive to defend, may divert management’s attention and resources, and could harm our brand image. Defending against any such claims could have an adverse effect on our business or results of operations and cause us to incur significant litigation costs and expenses. In addition, resolution of such claims may require us to pay substantial damages with respect to past sales and to cease using the relevant intellectual property or other rights and to cease selling the allegedly infringing products, which in turn would result in our loss of the revenues and profits associated with the ongoing sale of such products, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial results. Alternatively, with respect to any third party intellectual property that we use or wish to use in our business (whether or not asserted against us in litigation), we could be required to license the applicable intellectual property rights from third parties, and we may not be able to enter into licensing or other arrangements with the owner of such intellectual property at a reasonable cost or on reasonable terms.
We purchase merchandise from vendors that may be subject to copyrights or patents, or that may otherwise incorporate protected intellectual property. We do not manufacture any of the merchandise we purchase from our vendors for sale to our customers and we do not routinely independently investigate whether our manufacturing partners hold intellectual property rights to merchandise that they are manufacturing or distributing. As a result, we rely upon the vendors’ representations and indemnifications set forth in our purchase orders and supplier agreements concerning their right to sell us the products that we purchase from them. If a third party claims to have rights with respect to merchandise we purchased from a vendor, or if we acquire unlicensed merchandise, we could be required to remove such merchandise from our stores, resulting in our loss of the revenues and profits associated with the ongoing sale of such products. In addition, we could incur costs associated with destruction of such merchandise if the vendor is unwilling or unable to reimburse us, and be subject to liability under various civil and criminal causes of action, including actions to recover unpaid royalties and other damages and injunctions. Although our purchase orders and agreements with vendors generally require the vendor to indemnify us against such claims, a vendor may not have the financial resources to defend itself or us against such claims, in which case we may have to pay the costs and expenses associated with defending such claims. Any of these results could harm our brand image and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, cash flows and results of operations as well as our growth.
Product and food safety claims and the effects of legislation and regulations on product safety and quality and food safety and quality could affect our sales and results of operations adversely.
We may be subject to product liability claims from customers or actions brought or penalties assessed by government agencies relating to products, including food products that are recalled, defective or otherwise alleged to be harmful. Such claims may result from tampering by unauthorized third parties, product contamination or spoilage, including the presence of foreign objects, substances, chemicals, other agents, or residues introduced during the growing, storage, handling and transportation phases. All of our vendors and their products are contractually required to comply with applicable product and food safety laws. We generally seek contractual indemnification and insurance coverage from our vendors. However, if we do not have adequate contractual indemnification and/or insurance available, such claims could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Our ability to obtain indemnification from foreign vendors may be hindered by the manufacturers’ lack of understanding of U.S., state-specific or local product liability or other laws, which may make it more likely that we be required to respond to claims or complaints from customers as if we were the manufacturer of the products. Even with adequate insurance and indemnification, such claims could significantly damage our reputation and consumer confidence in our products. Our litigation expenses could increase as well, which also could have a materially negative impact on our results of operations even if a product liability claim is unsuccessful or is not fully pursued. Furthermore, if our vendors are unable or unwilling to recall products failing to meet standards, we may be required to recall those products at a substantial cost to us.
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We purchase a portion of our products on a closeout basis. Some of these products are obtained through brokers or intermediaries rather than through manufacturers. The closeout nature of a portion of our products sometimes makes it more difficult for us to investigate all aspects of these products. We attempt to assure compliance and to test products when appropriate, and we seek to obtain indemnification through our vendors or to be listed as an additional insured, but there is no assurance that these efforts will be successful.
The terms of our revolving credit facility may restrict our current and future operations, which could adversely affect our ability to respond to changes in our business and to manage our operations.
Our revolving credit facility contains, and any additional debt financing we may incur would likely contain, covenants requiring us to maintain or adhere to certain financial ratios or limits and covenants that restrict our operations, which may include limitations on our ability to, among other things:
incur additional indebtedness;
pay dividends and make certain distributions, investments and other restricted payments;
create certain liens or encumbrances;
enter into transactions with our affiliates;
redeem our common stock; and
engage in certain merger, consolidation or asset sale transactions.
Complying with these covenants could adversely affect our ability to respond to changes in our business and manage our operations. In addition, these covenants could affect our ability to invest capital in our new stores and fund capital expenditures for existing stores. Our ability to comply with these covenants and other provisions in the revolving credit facility and any future debt instruments may be affected by changes in our operating and financial performance, changes in general business and economic conditions, adverse regulatory developments, or other events beyond our control. A failure by us to comply with the financial ratios and restrictive covenants contained in our revolving credit facility and any future debt instruments could result in an event of default. Upon the occurrence of an event of default, the lenders could elect to declare all amounts outstanding to be due and payable and exercise other remedies as set forth in our revolving credit facility and any future debt instruments. In addition, if we are in default, we may be unable to borrow additional amounts under any such facilities to the extent that they would otherwise be available and our ability to obtain future financing may also be impacted negatively. If the indebtedness under our revolving credit facility and any future debt instruments were to be accelerated, our future financial condition could be materially adversely affected.
Risks Related to Ownership of Our Common Stock
Our stock price may be volatile or may decline regardless of our operating performance.
An active, liquid and orderly market for our common stock may not be sustained, which could depress the trading price of our common stock. In addition, broad market and industry factors, most of which we cannot control, may harm the price of our common stock, regardless of our actual operating performance. Factors that could cause fluctuation in the price of our common stock may include, among other things:  
actual or anticipated fluctuations in quarterly operating results or other operating metrics, such as comparable sales, that may be used by the investment community;
changes in financial estimates by us or by any securities analysts who might cover our stock;
speculation about our business in the press or the investment community;
conditions or trends affecting our industry or the economy generally;
stock market price and volume fluctuations of other publicly traded companies and, in particular, those that are in the retail industry;
announcements by us or our competitors of new product offerings, significant acquisitions, strategic partnerships or divestitures;
our entry into new markets;
timing of new store openings;
percentage of sales from new stores versus established stores;
additions or departures of key personnel;
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actual or anticipated sales of our common stock, including sales by our directors, officers or significant shareholders;
significant developments relating to our relationships with business partners, vendors and distributors;
customer purchases of new products from us and our competitors;
investor perceptions of the retail industry in general and our Company in particular;
major catastrophic events;
volatility in our stock price, which may lead to higher share-based compensation expense under applicable accounting standards; and
changes in accounting standards, policies, guidance, interpretation or principles, for example, the adoption of Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) ASU 2016-09, "Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting," which involves employee share-based payment accounting and the volatility of the effective tax rate.
In the past, securities class action litigation has often been instituted against companies following periods of volatility in their stock price. For example, we and certain of our current and former senior officers had been parties to a securities class action lawsuit filed against us, which was dismissed. This type of litigation, even if it does not result in liability for us, could result in substantial costs to us and divert management's attention and resources.
Your percentage ownership in us may be diluted by future equity issuances, which could reduce your influence over matters on which shareholders vote.
Our Board of Directors has the authority, without action or vote of our shareholders, to issue all or any part of our authorized but unissued shares of common stock, including shares issuable upon the exercise of options, shares issuable upon the vesting of restricted stock units or performance-based restricted stock units, shares that may be issued to satisfy our obligations under our equity incentive plan or shares of our authorized but unissued preferred stock. As of January 30, 2021, 2.8 million stock options, restricted shares, or restricted stock units were available for grant under our equity incentive plan, and 0.6 million shares of our common stock are issuable upon the exercise of options outstanding, the vesting of restricted stock units and the vesting of performance-based restricted stock units under that plan. Exercises of these options or issuances of common stock or preferred stock could reduce your influence over matters on which our shareholders vote and, in the case of issuances of preferred stock, likely could result in your interest in us being subject to the prior rights of holders of that preferred stock.
We do not expect to pay any cash dividends for the foreseeable future.
For the foreseeable future, we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends on our common stock. Any determination to pay dividends in the future will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend upon results of operations, financial condition, contractual restrictions, including under agreements for indebtedness we may incur, restrictions imposed by applicable law and other factors our Board of Directors deems relevant. Accordingly, if you purchase shares, realization of a gain on your investment will depend on the appreciation of the price of our common stock, which may never occur. Investors seeking cash dividends in the foreseeable future should not purchase our common stock.
Anti-takeover provisions could delay and discourage takeover attempts that shareholders may consider to be favorable.
Certain provisions of our amended and restated articles of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws and applicable provisions of Pennsylvania law may make it more difficult or impossible for a third party to acquire control of us or effect a change in our Board of Directors and management.
In particular, these provisions, among other things:
provide that only the chairman of the Board of Directors, the chief executive officer or a majority of the Board of Directors may call special meetings of the shareholders;
classify our Board of Directors into three separate classes with staggered terms;
provide for supermajority approval requirements for amending or repealing provisions in our amended and restated articles of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws;
establish certain advance notice procedures for nominations of candidates for election as directors and for shareholder proposals to be considered at shareholders’ meetings; and
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permit the Board of Directors, without further action of the shareholders, to issue and fix the terms of preferred stock, which may have rights senior to those of the common stock.
In addition, anti-takeover provisions in Pennsylvania law could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire control of us. These provisions could adversely affect the market price of our common stock and could reduce the amount that shareholders might receive if we are sold. For example, Pennsylvania law may restrict a third party's ability to obtain control of us and may prevent shareholders from receiving a premium for their shares of our common stock. Pennsylvania law also provides that our shareholders are not entitled by statute to propose amendments to our amended and restated articles of incorporation.
These and other provisions of Pennsylvania law and our amended and restated articles of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws could delay, defer or prevent us from experiencing a change of control or changes in our Board of Directors and management and may adversely affect our shareholders' voting and other rights. Any delay or prevention of a change of control transaction or changes in our Board of Directors and management could deter potential acquirers or prevent the completion of a transaction in which our shareholders could receive a substantial premium over the then current market price for their shares of our common stock.

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

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ITEM 2. PROPERTIES
In September 2016, we signed a fifteen-year lease for a new corporate headquarters location in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to accommodate our current and anticipated future growth. We currently occupy approximately 190,000 square feet of office space with multiple options to expand in the future. The lease agreement expires in early 2033 with three successive options to renew for additional terms of up to approximately fifteen years.
In fiscal 2013, we opened a distribution center in Olive Branch, Mississippi. We currently occupy approximately 600,000 square feet at this distribution center and it is leased under a lease agreement expiring in 2022 with options to renew for three successive five-year periods. In fiscal 2015, we opened a distribution center in Pedricktown, New Jersey. We currently occupy approximately 1,000,000 square feet at this distribution center, having expanded from 800,000 square feet in September 2018 and it is leased under a lease agreement expiring in 2025 with options to renew for three successive five-year periods. In March 2019, we completed the purchase of an approximately 700,000 square foot distribution center in Forsyth, Georgia for approximately $42 million, for the land and building. We began operating the distribution center in April 2019. In August 2019, we acquired land in Conroe, Texas, to build an approximately 860,000 square foot distribution center for approximately $56 million, for the land and building. We began operating the distribution center in July 2020. In July 2020, we acquired land in Buckeye, Arizona, to build an approximately 860,000 square foot distribution center to support the Company's anticipated growth. The total cost of the land and building is expected to be approximately $65 million, which we expect to occupy in the second half of 2021.We are planning to lease or build new distribution centers over the next few years to support our growth objectives.
At the end of fiscal 2020, there were 1,020 Five Below store locations in 38 states. All of our stores are leased from third parties. These leases typically have ten-year terms with additional five-year renewal options, and many provide us with the option to terminate early under specified conditions. In addition to future minimum lease payments, some of our store leases provide for additional rental payments based on a percentage of net sales if sales at the respective stores exceed specified levels, as well as the payment of common area maintenance charges, real property insurance and real estate taxes. Many of our lease agreements have defined escalating rent provisions over the initial term and any extensions.

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
We are subject to various proceedings, lawsuits, disputes, and claims arising in the ordinary course of our business. Many of these actions raise complex factual and legal issues and are subject to uncertainties. Actions filed against us from time to time include commercial, intellectual property, customer, and employment actions, including class action lawsuits. The plaintiffs in some actions seek unspecified damages or injunctive relief, or both. Actions are in various procedural stages, and some are covered in part by insurance. We cannot predict with assurance the outcome of actions brought against us. Accordingly, adverse developments, settlements, or resolutions may occur and negatively impact income in the quarter of such development, settlement or resolution. If a potential loss arising from these lawsuits, claims and pending actions is probable and reasonably estimable, we record the estimated liability based on circumstances and assumptions existing at the time. Although the outcome of these and other claims cannot be predicted with certainty, management does not believe that the ultimate resolution of these matters will have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

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PART II


ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
Our common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “FIVE.” On January 29, 2021 (the last trading day of fiscal 2020), the last reported sale price on the NASDAQ Global Select Market of our common stock was $175.73 per share. As of March 5, 2021, we had approximately 117,103 holders of record of our common stock.

Performance Graph
This performance graph and related information shall not be deemed “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the Securities and Exchange Commission for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the "Exchange Act"), or otherwise subject to the liabilities under that Section, and shall not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Exchange Act, except to the extent that we specifically incorporate it by reference into such filing.
The following graph compares the cumulative total shareholder return on our common stock from July 19, 2012 (the date our common stock commenced trading on the NASDAQ Global Select Market) through January 30, 2021, with the return on (i) the NASDAQ Global Market Composite Index and (ii) the NASDAQ US Benchmark Retail Index over the same period. This graph assumes an initial investment of $100 and assumes the reinvestment of dividends, if any. Such returns are based on historical results and are not intended to suggest future performance.
five-20210130_g2.jpg
7/19/20122/1/20131/31/20141/30/20151/29/20161/27/20172/2/20182/1/20191/31/20201/29/2021
FIVE BELOW, INC.$100.00 $140.00 $138.30 $125.70 $132.90 $141.90 $237.50 $470.70 $427.20 $663.13 
NASDAQ GLOBAL MARKET COMPOSITE INDEX$100.00 $107.20 $138.40 $156.30 $155.60 $190.90 $244.10 $244.90 $308.50 $440.70 
NASDAQ US BENCHMARK RETAIL INDEX$100.00 $111.00 $132.70 $161.50 $168.00 $182.50 $242.80 $251.70 $295.90 $457.96 
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Dividends
During the past five fiscal years, we have not declared, and currently do not plan to declare in the foreseeable future, dividends on shares of our common stock. Any further determination to pay dividends on our capital stock will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors, subject to applicable laws, and will depend on our financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements, general business conditions and other factors that our Board of Directors considers relevant. In addition, the terms of our revolving credit facility contain restrictions on our ability to pay dividends.
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
The table below sets forth information regarding repurchases of our common stock during the fourth fiscal quarter of 2020:
PeriodTotal Number of Shares PurchasedAverage Price Paid Per Share
Total Number of Shares Purchased As Part of a Publicly Announced Program (1)
Maximum Dollar Value of Shares that May Yet be Purchased Under the Program
Third Quarter 2020�� — — 48,465,158 
November 1, 2020 - November 28, 2020— $— — 48,465,158 
November 29, 2020 - January 2, 2021— $— — 48,465,158 
January 3, 2021 - January 30, 2021— $— — 48,465,158 
Fourth Quarter 2020 $  48,465,158 

(1) On March 21, 2018, we announced that our Board of Directors approved a share repurchase program authorizing the repurchase of up to $100 million of our common stock through March 31, 2021. On March 9, 2021, our Board of Directors approved a new share repurchase program for up to $100 million of our common shares through March 31, 2024. This repurchase program does not include a specific timetable or price targets and may be suspended or terminated at any time. Shares may be repurchased through open market or privately negotiated transactions at the discretion of management based on its evaluation of market conditions and other factors.

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
The following table presents selected financial and other data as of and for the periods indicated. The selected financial data for fiscal 2020, 2019 and 2018 and selected consolidated balance sheet data as of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020 have been derived from our consolidated financial statements audited by KPMG LLP, our independent registered public accounting firm, included elsewhere in this Annual Report. The selected financial data for fiscal 2017 and fiscal 2016, and the selected balance sheet data as of February 2, 2019, February 3, 2018, and January 30, 2017, have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements that have not been included in this Annual Report. The historical results presented below are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for any future period. You should read this selected financial data in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes and the information under Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” appearing elsewhere in this Annual Report.
We operate on a fiscal calendar that results in a given fiscal year consisting of a 52- or 53-week period ending on the Saturday closest to January 31st of the following year. The reporting periods contained in the following table consist of 53 weeks of operations in fiscal 2017 and 52 weeks of operations in each of fiscal 2020, 2019, 2018, and 2016, respectively.
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 Fiscal Year
20202019201820172016
(in millions, except share and per share data)
Consolidated Statements of Operations Data (1):
Net sales$1,962.1 $1,846.7 $1,559.6 $1,278.2 $1,000.4 
Cost of goods sold1,309.8 1,172.8 994.5 814.8 643.4 
Gross profit652.3 674.0 565.1 463.4 357.0 
Selling, general and administrative expenses497.5 456.7 377.9 306.0 243.1 
Operating income154.8 217.3 187.2 157.4 114.0 
Interest (expense) income and other, net(1.7)4.3 4.6 1.5 0.3 
 Income before income taxes153.1 221.6 191.8 158.8 114.3 
Income tax expense29.7 46.5 42.2 56.4 42.4 
Net income$123.4 $175.1 $149.6 $102.5 $71.8 
Per Share Data:
Basic income per common share (2)
$2.21 $3.14 $2.68 $1.86 $1.31 
Diluted income per common share (2)
$2.20 $3.12 $2.66 $1.84 $1.30 
Weighted average shares outstanding:
Basic shares55,816,508 55,823,535 55,763,034 55,208,246 54,845,708 
Diluted shares56,060,039 56,166,167 56,220,864 55,561,472 55,128,870 
Fiscal Year
20202019201820172016
(in millions, except total stores data)
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows Data (1):
Net cash provided by (used in):
Operating activities$366.0 $187.0 $184.1 $167.4 $106.6 
Investing activities$(286.9)$(193.6)$(39.5)$(139.2)$(86.8)
Financing activities$(12.8)$(42.7)$(5.6)$8.4 $3.1 
Other Operating and Financial Data (1):
Total stores at end of period1,020 900 750 625 522 
Comparable sales (decrease) increase(5.5)%0.6 %3.9 %6.5 %2.0 %
Average net sales per store (3)
$2.0 $2.2 $2.2 $2.2 $2.0 
Capital expenditures$200.2 $212.3 $113.7 $67.8 $44.8 
Consolidated Balance Sheet Data (1) (4):
Cash and cash equivalents$268.8 $202.5 $251.7 $112.7 $76.1 
Short-term investment securities140.9 59.2 85.4 132.0 77.8 
Total current assets755.4 665.7 642.3 479.4 339.8 
Total assets2,314.8 1,958.7 952.3 695.7 500.5 
Total current liabilities435.7 351.3 253.1 164.5 116.6 
Total liabilities1,432.9 1,198.9 337.2 237.2 169.1 
Total shareholders’ equity$881.9 $759.8 $615.1 $458.6 $331.4 
(1)Components may not add to total due to rounding.
(2)Please see Note 4 in our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report for an explanation of per share calculations.
(3)Only includes stores open before the beginning of the fiscal year.
(4)Fiscal 2019 Consolidated Balance Sheet data includes adoption of ASU 2016-02 "Leases" based on the modified retrospective method.




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ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
You should read the following discussion together with “Selected Financial Data,” and the consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report. The statements in this discussion regarding expectations of our future performance, liquidity and capital resources and other non-historical statements are forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, including, but not limited to, the risks and uncertainties described in Part I, Item 1A “Risk Factors” and “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements.” Our actual results may differ materially from those contained in or implied by any forward-looking statements.
We operate on a fiscal calendar widely used by the retail industry that results in a given fiscal year consisting of a 52- or 53-week period ending on the Saturday closest to January 31 of the following year. References to "fiscal year 2021" or "fiscal 2021" refer to the period from January 31, 2021 to January 29, 2022, which consists of a 52-week fiscal year. References to "fiscal year 2020" or "fiscal 2020" refer to the period from February 2, 2020 to January 30, 2021, which consists of a 52-week fiscal year. References to "fiscal year 2019" or "fiscal 2019" refer to the period from February 3, 2019 to February 1, 2020, which consists of a 52-week fiscal year. References to "fiscal year 2018" or "fiscal 2018" refer to the period from February 4, 2018 to February 2, 2019, which consists of a 52-week fiscal year. References to “fiscal year 2017” or “fiscal 2017” refer to the period from January 29, 2017 to February 3, 2018, which consists of a 53-week fiscal year. References to “fiscal year 2016” or “fiscal 2016” refer to the period from January 31, 2016 to January 28, 2017, which consists of a 52-week fiscal year. Historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for any future period and results for any interim period may not necessarily be indicative of the results that may be expected for a full year.
Overview
Five Below is a rapidly growing specialty value retailer offering a broad range of trend-right, high-quality merchandise targeted at the tween and teen customer. We offer a dynamic, edited assortment of exciting products, with most priced at $5 and below, including select brands and licensed merchandise across our category worlds. As of January 30, 2021, we operated 1,020 stores in 38 states. In August 2016, we commenced selling merchandise on the internet through our fivebelow.com e-commerce website. We launched our e-commerce operation as an additional channel to service our customers. All e-commerce sales, which includes shipping and handling revenue, are included in net sales and beginning with the third fiscal quarter of 2016, are included in comparable sales. Our e-commerce expenses will have components classified as both cost of goods sold and selling, general and administrative expenses.
We believe that our business model has resulted in strong financial performance when considered in light of the economic environment. Our comparable sales decreased by 5.5% in fiscal 2020, and increased by 0.6% in fiscal 2019 and 3.9% in fiscal 2018, based on the restated calendar. Between fiscal 2018 and fiscal 2020, our net sales increased from $1,559.6 million to $1,962.1 million, representing a compounded annual growth rate of 12.2%. Over the same period, our operating income decreased from $187.2 million to $154.8 million. In addition, we expanded our store base from 750 stores at the end of fiscal 2018 to 1,020 stores at the end of fiscal 2020 and we plan to open approximately 170 to 180 new stores in fiscal 2021.
We expect to continue our strong growth in the future. By offering trend-right merchandise at a differentiated price points, our stores have been successful in varying geographic regions, population densities and real estate settings. As of January 30, 2021, we operated stores in 38 states throughout the United States. We are primarily located in power, community and lifestyle shopping centers across a variety of urban, suburban and semi-rural markets with trade areas including at least 100,000 people in the specified market. We continue believe we have the opportunity to expand our store base in the United States from 1,020 locations as of January 30, 2021 to more than 2,500 locations over time. Our ability to open profitable new stores depends on many factors, including our ability to identify suitable markets and sites; negotiate leases with acceptable terms; achieve brand awareness in the new markets; efficiently source and distribute additional merchandise; and achieve sufficient levels of cash flow and financing to support our expansion. Our store expansion plans for fiscal 2020 were adjusted downward as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, we were still able to open over 120 stores in fiscal 2020 and expect to remain aggressive on our store opening plan.
We have a proven and highly profitable store model that has produced consistent financial results and returns, and our new stores have achieved average payback periods of less than one year. Our new store model assumes a store size of approximately 9,000 square feet that achieves annual sales of approximately $2.0 million in the first full year of operation. Our new store model also assumes an average new store investment of approximately $0.4 million. Our new store investment includes our store build-out (net of tenant allowances), inventory (net of payables) and cash pre-opening expenses.
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Our planned store expansion will place increased demands on our operational, managerial, administrative and other resources. Managing our growth effectively will require us to continue to maintain adequate distribution capacity, enhance our store management systems, financial and management controls, information systems and other operational system capabilities. In addition, we will be required to hire, train and retain store management and other qualified personnel. For further information, see Part I, Item 1A “Risk Factors-Risk Relating to our Business and Industry.”
Over the past five years, we have invested a significant amount of capital in infrastructure and systems necessary to support our future growth and we expect to incur additional capital expenditures related to expansion of our infrastructure and systems in future periods. In fiscal 2015, we invested in a new ERP and began the multi-year implementation of the ERP, which is designed to enhance functionality and provide timely information to the Company's management team related to the operation of the business. In fiscal 2020, we invested in a new Retail Merchandising System and began the multi-year implementation of the Retail Merchandising System, which is designed to manage, control, and perform seamless execution of day-to-day merchandising activities, including purchasing, distribution, order fulfillment, and financial close. In fiscal 2015, we opened a distribution center in Pedricktown, New Jersey. We occupy approximately 1,000,000 square feet at this distribution center, having expanded from 800,000 square feet in September 2018. In fiscal 2016, we signed a 15-year lease for a new corporate headquarters location in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. We currently occupy approximately 190,000 square feet of office space with multiple options to expand in the future. In March 2019, we completed the purchase of an approximately 700,000 square foot distribution center in Forsyth, Georgia. We began operating the distribution center in April 2019. In August 2019, we acquired land in Conroe, Texas, to build an approximately 860,000 square foot distribution center for approximately $56 million. We began operating the distribution center in July 2020. In July 2020, we acquired land in Buckeye, Arizona, to build an approximately 860,000 square foot distribution center for approximately $65 million. We expect to occupy the distribution center in Buckeye, Arizona in the second half of 2021. We are planning to lease or build new distribution centers over the next few years to support our growth objectives.
We continuously assess ways to maximize the productivity and efficiency of our existing facilities, infrastructure and systems. The timing and amount of investments in our facilities, infrastructure and systems could affect the comparability of our results of operations in future periods. The completion date and ultimate cost of future projects could differ significantly from initial expectations due to construction-related or other reasons.
We believe our business strategy will continue to offer significant opportunity, but it also presents risks and challenges. These risks and challenges include, but are not limited to, that we may not be able to effectively identify and respond to changing trends and customer preferences, that we may not be able to find desirable locations for new stores and that we may not be able to effectively manage our future growth. In addition, our financial results can be expected to be directly impacted by substantial increases in product costs due to commodity cost increases or general inflation which could lead to a reduction in our sales as well as greater margin pressure as costs may not be able to be passed on to consumers. To date, changes in commodity prices and general inflation have not materially impacted our business. In response to increasing commodity prices or general inflation, we seek to minimize the impact of such events by sourcing our merchandise from different vendors and changing our product mix. See Part I, Item 1A “Risk Factors” for a description of these and other important factors that could adversely impact us and our results of operations.
How We Assess the Performance of Our Business
In assessing the performance of our business, we consider a variety of performance and financial measures. These key measures include net sales, comparable sales, cost of goods sold and gross profit, selling, general and administrative expenses and operating income.
Net Sales
Net sales constitute gross sales net of merchandise returns for damaged or defective goods. Net sales consist of sales from comparable stores, non-comparable stores, and e-commerce, which includes shipping and handling revenue. Revenue from the sale of gift cards is deferred and not included in net sales until the gift cards are redeemed to purchase merchandise or as breakage revenue in proportion to the pattern of redemption of the gift cards by the customer.
Our business is seasonal and as a result, our net sales fluctuate from quarter to quarter. Net sales are usually highest in the fourth fiscal quarter due to the year-end holiday season.
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Comparable Sales
Comparable sales include net sales from stores that have been open for at least 15 full months from their opening date, and e-commerce sales. Comparable stores include the following:
Stores that have been remodeled while remaining open;
Stores that have been relocated within the same trade area, to a location that is not significantly different in size, in which the new store opens at about the same time as the old store closes; and
Stores that have expanded, but are not significantly different in size, within their current locations.

For stores that are relocated or expanded, the following periods are excluded when calculating comparable sales:
The period beginning when the closing store receives its last merchandise delivery from one of our distribution centers through:
the last day of the fiscal year in which the store was relocated or expanded (for stores that increased significantly in size); or
the last day of the fiscal month in which the store re-opens (for all other stores); and
The period beginning on the first anniversary of the date the store received its last merchandise delivery from one of our distribution centers through the first anniversary of the date the store re-opened.
Comparable sales exclude the 53rd week of sales for 53-week fiscal years. In the 52-week fiscal year subsequent to a 53-week fiscal year, we exclude the sales in the non-comparable week from the same-store sales calculation. Due to the 53rd week in fiscal 2017, all comparable sales related to any reporting period during the year ended February 2, 2019 are reported on a restated calendar basis using the National Retail Federation's restated calendar comparing similar weeks.
There may be variations in the way in which some of our competitors and other retailers calculate comparable or “same store” sales. As a result, data in this Annual Report regarding our comparable sales may not be comparable to similar data made available by other retailers. Non-comparable sales are comprised of new store sales, sales for stores not open for a full 15 months, and sales from existing store relocation and expansion projects that were temporarily closed (or not receiving deliveries) and not included in comparable sales.
Measuring the change in fiscal year-over-year comparable sales allows us to evaluate how we are performing. Various factors affect comparable sales, including:
consumer preferences, buying trends and overall economic trends;
our ability to identify and respond effectively to customer preferences and trends;
our ability to provide an assortment of high-quality, trend-right and everyday product offerings that generate new and repeat visits to our stores;
the customer experience we provide in our stores and online;
the level of traffic near our locations in the power, community and lifestyle centers in which we operate;
competition;
changes in our merchandise mix;
pricing;
our ability to source and distribute products efficiently;
the timing of promotional events and holidays;
the timing of introduction of new merchandise and customer acceptance of new merchandise;
our opening of new stores in the vicinity of existing stores;
the number of items purchased per store visit; and
weather conditions; and
the impacts associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, including closures of our stores, adverse impacts on our operations, and consumer sentiment regarding discretionary spending.
Opening new stores is an important part of our growth strategy. As we continue to pursue our growth strategy, we expect that a significant percentage of our net sales will continue to come from new stores not included in comparable sales. Accordingly, comparable sales is only one measure we use to assess the success of our growth strategy.
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Cost of Goods Sold and Gross Profit
Gross profit is equal to our net sales less our cost of goods sold. Gross margin is gross profit as a percentage of our net sales. Cost of goods sold reflects the direct costs of purchased merchandise and inbound freight, as well as shipping and handling costs, store occupancy, distribution and buying expenses. Shipping and handling costs include internal fulfillment and shipping costs related to our e-commerce operations. Store occupancy costs include rent, common area maintenance, utilities and property taxes for all store locations. Distribution costs include costs for receiving, processing, warehousing and shipping of merchandise to or from our distribution centers and between store locations. Buying costs include compensation expense and other costs for our internal buying organization, including our merchandising and product development team and our planning and allocation group. These costs are significant and can be expected to continue to increase as our Company grows.
The components of our cost of goods sold may not be comparable to the components of cost of goods sold or similar measures of our competitors and other retailers. As a result, data in this Annual Report regarding our gross profit and gross margin may not be comparable to similar data made available by our competitors and other retailers.
The variable component of our cost of goods sold is higher in higher volume quarters because the variable component of our cost of goods sold generally increases as net sales increase. We regularly analyze the components of gross profit as well as gross margin. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns, and a significant increase in inventory shrinkage or inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on the store occupancy, distribution and buying components of cost of goods sold could have an adverse impact on our gross profit and results of operations. Changes in the mix of our products may also impact our overall cost of goods sold.
Selling, General and Administrative Expenses
Selling, general and administrative, or SG&A, expenses are composed of payroll and other compensation, marketing and advertising expense, depreciation and amortization expense and other selling and administrative expenses. SG&A expenses as a percentage of net sales are usually higher in lower sales volume quarters and lower in higher sales volume quarters.
The components of our SG&A expenses may not be comparable to those of other retailers. We expect that our SG&A expenses will increase in future periods due to our continuing store growth. In addition, any increase in future share-based grants or modifications will increase our share-based compensation expense included in SG&A expenses.
Operating Income
Operating income equals gross profit less SG&A expenses. Operating income excludes interest expense or income and other, and income tax expense or benefit. We use operating income as an indicator of the productivity of our business and our ability to manage SG&A expenses. Operating income percentage measures operating income as a percentage of our net sales.
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Results of Consolidated Operations
The following tables summarize key components of our results of consolidated operations for the periods indicated, both in dollars and as a percentage of our net sales. Refer to Item 7. "Results of Consolidated Operations" in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended February 1, 2020 for a comparison of fiscal years 2019 and 2018.
 Fiscal Year
20202019
(in millions, except total stores)
Consolidated Statements of Operations Data (1):
Net sales$1,962.1 $1,846.7 
Cost of goods sold1,309.8 1,172.8 
Gross profit652.3 674.0 
Selling, general and administrative expenses497.5 456.7 
Operating income154.8 217.3 
Interest (expense) income and other, net(1.7)4.3 
Income before income taxes153.1 221.6 
Income tax expense29.7 46.5 
Net income$123.4 $175.1 
Percentage of Net Sales (1):
Net sales100.0 %100.0 %
Cost of goods sold66.8 %63.5 %
Gross profit33.2 %36.5 %
Selling, general and administrative expenses25.4 %24.7 %
Operating income7.9 %11.8 %
Interest (expense) income and other, net(0.1)%0.2 %
Income before income taxes7.8 %12.0 %
Income tax expense1.5 %2.5 %
Net income6.3 %9.5 %
Operational Data:
Total stores at end of period1,020 900 
Comparable sales (decrease) increase(5.5)%0.6 %
Average net sales per store (2)
$2.0 $2.2 
(1)Components may not add to total due to rounding.
(2)Only includes stores open before the beginning of the fiscal year.

Fiscal Year 2020 Compared to Fiscal Year 2019
Net Sales
Net sales increased to $1,962.1 million in fiscal year 2020 from $1,846.7 million in fiscal year 2019, an increase of $115.4 million, or 6.2%. The increase was the result of a non-comparable sales increase of $209.9 million, partially offset by comparable sales decrease of $94.5 million. In fiscal year 2020, we opened 120 net new stores compared to 150 new stores in fiscal year 2019. The increase in non-comparable sales was primarily driven by new stores that opened in fiscal 2020 and the number of stores that opened in fiscal 2019 but have not been open for 15 full months.
Comparable sales decreased 5.5%. The decrease was primarily the result of the impact of COVID-19 as we temporarily closed all of our stores as of March 20, 2020. We began reopening our stores at the end of April in compliance with federal, state and local requirements, and as of the end of June, the Company had reopened substantially all of its stores to the general public.

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Cost of Goods Sold and Gross Profit
Cost of goods sold increased to $1,309.8 million in fiscal year 2020 from $1,172.8 million in fiscal year 2019, an increase of $137.0 million, or 11.7%. The increase in cost of goods sold was primarily the result of an increase in the merchandise costs of goods resulting from an increase in sales. Also contributing to the increase in cost of goods sold was an increase in store occupancy costs resulting from new store openings.
Gross profit decreased to $652.3 million in fiscal year 2020 from $674.0 million in fiscal year 2019, a decrease of $21.7 million, or 3.2%. Gross margin decreased to 33.2% in fiscal year 2020 from 36.5% in fiscal year 2019, a decrease of approximately 330 basis points. The decrease in gross margin was primarily the result of an increase as a percentage of sales in merchandise cost of goods sold and an increase as a percentage of sales in store occupancy costs due to the impact of COVID-19 as we temporarily closed all of our stores while still incurring rent expense.
Selling, General and Administrative Expenses
Selling, general and administrative expenses increased to $497.5 million in fiscal year 2020 from $456.7 million in fiscal year 2019, an increase of $40.8 million, or 8.9%. As a percentage of net sales, selling, general and administrative expenses increased approximately 70 basis points to 25.4% in fiscal year 2020 compared to 24.7% in fiscal year 2019. The increase in selling, general and administrative expenses was the result of an increase of $30.7 million of corporate-related expenses, which is net of the benefit related to the CARES Act. The increase was also driven by an increase of $10.1 million in store-related expenses to support new store growth, which is net of the expense savings from the temporary closure of all of our stores, furloughing of employees, and other non-payroll expense reductions due to the impact of COVID-19.
Income Tax Expense
Income tax expense decreased to $29.7 million in fiscal year 2020 from $46.5 million in fiscal year 2019, a decrease of $16.8 million, or approximately 36.1%. This decrease in income tax expense was primarily due to a $68.5 million decrease in pre-tax net income and discrete items, which includes the impact of the CARES Act, partially offset by a reduction of the benefit of ASU 2016-09, "Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting," with respect to the requirements to recognize excess income tax benefits or deficiencies as income tax benefit or expense in the consolidated statements of operations rather than as additional paid-in capital in the consolidated balance sheets.
Our effective tax rate for fiscal year 2020 was 19.4% compared to 21.0% in fiscal year 2019. The decrease in our effective tax rate was primarily driven by discrete items, which includes the impact of the CARES Act, partially offset by a reduction of the benefit of ASU 2016-09, "Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting."
Net Income
As a result of the foregoing, net income decreased to $123.4 million in fiscal year 2020 from $175.1 million in fiscal year 2019, a decrease of approximately $51.7 million, or 29.5%.
Impact of Inflation
Our results of operations and financial condition are presented based on historical cost. While it is difficult to accurately measure the impact of inflation due to the imprecise nature of the estimates required, we believe the effects of inflation, if any, on our historical results of operations and financial condition have been immaterial. We cannot assure you, however, that our results of operations and financial condition will not be materially impacted by inflation in the future.
Seasonality
Our business is seasonal in nature with the highest level of net sales and net income generated in the fourth fiscal quarter due to the year-end holiday season and, therefore, operating results for any fiscal quarter are not necessarily indicative of results for the full fiscal year. To prepare for the holiday season, we must order and keep in stock more merchandise than we carry during other parts of the year. We expect inventory levels, along with an increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses, generally to reach their highest levels in the third and fourth fiscal quarters in anticipation of the increased net sales during the year-end holiday season. As a result of this seasonality, and generally because of variation in consumer spending habits, we experience fluctuations in net sales, net income and working capital requirements during the year.


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Liquidity and Capital Resources
Overview
Cash capital expenditures typically vary depending on the timing of new store openings and infrastructure-related investments. We plan to make cash capital expenditures of approximately $315 million in fiscal 2021, which exclude the impact of tenant allowances, and which we expect to fund from cash generated from operations, cash on-hand, short-term investments and, as needed, borrowings under our Revolving Credit Facility. We expect to incur approximately $95 million of our cash capital expenditure budget in fiscal 2021 to construct and open approximately 170 to 180 new stores, with the remainder projected to be spent on our distribution facilities (existing and new), store relocations and remodels, and our corporate infrastructure.
Our primary working capital requirements are for the purchase of store inventory and payment of payroll, rent, other store operating costs and distribution costs. Our working capital requirements fluctuate during the year, rising in the third and fourth fiscal quarters as we take title to increasing quantities of inventory in anticipation of our peak, year-end holiday shopping season in the fourth fiscal quarter. Fluctuations in working capital are also driven by the timing of new store openings.
Historically, we have funded our capital expenditures and working capital requirements during the fiscal year with cash on hand, net cash provided by operating activities and borrowings under our Revolving Credit Facility, as needed, and we expect that funding to continue. When we have used our Revolving Credit Facility, the amount of indebtedness outstanding under it has tended to be the highest in the beginning of the fourth quarter of each fiscal year. To the extent that we have drawn on the facility, we have paid down the borrowings before the end of the fiscal year with cash generated during our peak selling season in the fourth quarter. Although it is not possible to reliably estimate the duration or severity of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting financial impact on our results of operations, financial position and liquidity, we have the ability to draw down on our Revolving Credit Facility if and as needed. During the thirteen weeks ended May 2, 2020, we borrowed and repaid approximately $50 million from our Revolving Credit Facility. As of January 30, 2021, we did not have any direct borrowings under our Revolving Credit Facility. As of January 30, 2021, we had approximately $191 million available on the line of credit.
On March 20, 2018, our Board of Directors approved a share repurchase program authorizing the repurchase of up to $100 million of our common stock through March 31, 2021, on the open market, in privately negotiated transactions, or otherwise. In fiscal 2018, we repurchased 21,810 shares under this program at an aggregate cost of approximately $2.0 million. In fiscal 2019, we repurchased 337,552 shares under this program at an aggregate cost of approximately $36.9 million. In fiscal 2020, we repurchased 137,023 shares under this program at an aggregate cost of approximately $12.7 million. Since approval of the share repurchase program in March 2018, we have purchased approximately 500,000 shares for an aggregate cost of approximately $50 million. On March 9, 2021, our Board of Directors approved a new share repurchase program for up to $100 million of our common shares through March 31, 2024. There can be no assurances that any additional repurchases will be completed, or as to the timing or amount of any repurchases. The share repurchase program may be modified or discontinued at any time.
Based on our growth plans, we believe that our cash position which includes our cash equivalents and short-term investments, net cash provided by operating activities and availability under our Revolving Credit Facility will be adequate to finance our planned capital expenditures, authorized share repurchases and working capital requirements over the next 12 months and for the foreseeable future thereafter. If cash flows from operations and borrowings under our Revolving Credit Facility are not sufficient or available to meet our requirements, then we will be required to obtain additional equity or debt financing in the future. There can be no assurance that equity or debt financing will be available to us when we need it or, if available, that the terms will be satisfactory to us and not dilutive to our then-current shareholders.
Although, we began reopening stores at the end of April where permitted in compliance with federal, state, and local requirements, any significant reduction in consumer willingness to visit malls and shopping centers or purchase merchandise using curbside pickup where available, levels of consumer spending at our stores or employee willingness to staff our stores or the temporary closure of our stores or distribution centers relating to the pandemic or its impact on the economy, disruptions in the supply chains related to our products or consumer sentiment or health concerns would result in a further loss of sales and profits and other material adverse effects. In order to mitigate the negative impact on our liquidity, management took several short term and long term actions, which included the following:
• we cancelled certain vendor orders and delayed receipts on others in order to manage inventory levels, and extended payment terms for product and non-product vendors, although we have since returned to more normalized payment terms;
• we amended our Credit Agreement and increased our Revolving Credit Facility from $50 million to $225 million;
• we implemented significant non-payroll expense reductions, including advertising, occupancy and other store operating expenses (including rent abatements and deferrals for a significant part of our lease portfolio), distribution and corporate office operating expenses, as well as professional and consulting fees;
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• we significantly reduced our 2020 capital expenditure budget, including reducing the number of new stores to be opened in 2020 and delaying purchase and construction of a new Midwest distribution center; and
• as permitted by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security ("CARES") Act, we have applied for and received payroll tax credits with the IRS, and elected to defer the payment of the employer's portion of FICA taxes.
The extent to which COVID-19 continues to impact our results, financial position and liquidity will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted, including new federal, state and local governmental restrictions that may be taken to contain COVID-19 or treat its impact, and any new mitigation measures we may determine to take in response to any such restrictions.

Cash Flows
A summary of our cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities is presented in the following table (in millions):
 
 Fiscal Year
20202019
Net cash provided by operating activities$366.0 $187.0 
Net cash used in investing activities(286.9)(193.6)
Net cash used in financing activities(12.8)(42.7)
Net increase (decrease) during period in cash and cash equivalents (1)
$66.3 $(49.3)
(1) Components may not add to total due to rounding.

Cash Provided by Operating Activities
Net cash provided by operating activities for fiscal 2020 was $366.0 million, an increase of $179.0 million compared to fiscal 2019. The increase was primarily due to changes in working capital and a decrease in income taxes paid, partially offset by a decrease in operating cash flows from store performance due to the impact of COVID-19 as we temporarily closed all of our stores in March and had reopened substantially all of our stores as of the end of June. During fiscal 2020, we added 120 net new stores.
Cash Used in Investing Activities
Net cash used in investing activities for fiscal 2020 was $286.9 million, an increase of $93.3 million compared to fiscal 2019. The increase was primarily due to an increase in net purchases of investment securities and other investments, partially offset by a decrease in capital expenditures.
Cash Used in Financing Activities
Net cash used in financing activities for fiscal year 2020 was $12.8 million, a decrease of $29.9 million compared to fiscal 2019. The decrease was primarily the result of decreases in the repurchase and retirement of common stock and in common shares withheld for taxes.
Line of Credit
On May 10, 2017, the Company entered into a Fourth Amendment and Restated Loan and Security Agreement (the "Prior Credit Agreement"), among the Company, 1616 Holdings, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company ("1616 Holdings"), and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, which includes a secured asset-based revolving line of credit in the amount of up to $20 million (the "Revolving Credit Facility"). On March 20, 2020, the Company exercised its right under the Prior Credit Agreement to increase the aggregate commitments under the Revolving Credit Facility from $20 million to $50 million.
On April 24, 2020, the Company entered into a Fifth Amended and Restated Credit Agreement (the “Credit Agreement”), among the Company, 1616 Holdings, Inc. (together with the Company, the "Loan Parties"), Wells Fargo Bank, National Association as administrative agent (the “Agent”), and other lenders party thereto (the "Lenders"). The Credit Agreement amends and restates the Prior Credit Agreement.
The Credit Agreement increased the Revolving Credit Facility to $225.0 million. Pursuant to the Credit Agreement, advances under the Revolving Credit Facility are tied to a borrowing base consisting of eligible credit card receivables and inventory, as reduced by certain reserves in effect from time to time. The Revolving Credit Facility expires on the earliest to occur of (i) April 24, 2023 or (ii) an event of default. The Revolving Credit Facility may be increased by up to $150.0 million, subject to certain conditions, including obtaining commitments from one or more Lenders. The entire amount of the Revolving Credit Facility is available for the issuance of letters of credit and allows for swingline loans.
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The Credit Agreement provides that the interest rate payable on borrowings shall be, at the Company’s option, a per annum rate equal to (a) a base rate plus an applicable margin ranging from 1.00% to 1.25% or (b) a LIBOR rate plus a margin ranging from 2.00% to 2.25%. Letter of credit fees will range from 2.00% to 2.25%. The interest rate and letter of credit fees under the Credit Agreement are subject to an increase of 2.00% per annum upon an event of default.
The Credit Agreement contains customary covenants that limit, absent lender approval, the ability of Company and certain of its affiliates to, among other things, pay cash dividends, incur debt, create liens and encumbrances, redeem or repurchase stock, enter into certain acquisition transactions or transactions with affiliates, merge, dissolve, repay certain indebtedness, change the nature of Company’s business, enter sale or leaseback transactions, make investments or dispose of assets. In some cases, these restrictions are subject to certain negotiated exceptions or permit Company to undertake otherwise restricted activities if it satisfies certain required conditions. In addition, the Company will be required to maintain availability of not less than (i) 15% of the lesser of (x) aggregate commitments under the Revolving Credit Facility and (y) the borrowing base (the "loan cap") prior to a stepdown date (as described below) and (ii) 10% of the loan cap after the stepdown date. The stepdown date is the first date occurring after both (i) the date that 75% of the number of stores as of the closing date of the Revolving Credit Facility have reopened ("store opening date") and (ii) the date occurring at least six months after the store reopening date on which the fixed charge coverage ratio is at least 1.00 to 1.00.
If there exists an event of default or availability under the Revolving Credit Facility is less than 15% of the loan cap, amounts in any of the Loan Parties’ or subsidiary guarantors' designated deposit accounts will be transferred daily into a blocked account held by the Agent and applied to reduce outstanding amounts under the Revolving Credit Facility (the “Cash Dominion Event”), so long as (i) such event of default has not been waived and/or (ii) until availability has exceeded 15% of the loan cap for sixty (60) consecutive calendar days (provided that such ability to discontinue the Cash Dominion Event shall be limited to two times during the term of the Agreement).
The Credit Agreement also contains a provision stating that the Company cannot borrow in excess of $50 million under the Revolving Credit Facility at any time the amount of the consolidated cash and cash equivalents of the Loan Parties (excluding certain long-term investments and certain other items) exceeds $50 million.
The Credit Agreement contains customary events of default including, among other things, failure to pay obligations when due, initiation of bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings, defaults on certain other indebtedness, change of control, incurrence of certain material judgments that are not stayed, satisfied, bonded or discharged within 30 days, certain ERISA events, invalidity of the credit documents, and violation of affirmative and negative covenants or breach of representations and warranties set forth in the Credit Agreement. Amounts under the Revolving Credit Facility may become due upon events of default (subject to any applicable grace or cure periods).
Under the Credit Agreement, all obligations under the Revolving Credit Facility are guaranteed by 1616 Holdings and are secured by substantially all of the assets of the Company and 1616 Holdings.
On January 27, 2021, the Company entered into a First Amendment to Credit Agreement (the “First Amendment”) among the Loan Parties, the Lenders and Agent, which amended the Credit Agreement.
Pursuant to the First Amendment, the Company obtained commitments from the Lenders that would allow the Company at its election (subject only to satisfaction of certain customary conditions such as the absence of any Event of Default), to increase the amount of the Revolving Credit Facility by an aggregate principal amount up to $50,000,000 (the “Committed Increase”). The First Amendment preserves the existing provisions of the Credit Agreement allowing for further increases to the total commitment under the Revolving Credit Facility, subject to certain conditions including obtaining commitments from one or more Lenders (“Uncommitted Incremental Capacity”), provided that the total amount of the facility, as increased pursuant to a Committed Increase or Uncommitted Incremental Capacity, cannot exceed $375,000,000. The current amount of the Revolving Credit Facility is maintained at $225,000,000.
Pursuant to the First Amendment, availability under the Revolving Credit Facility will continue to be based upon quarterly (or monthly or weekly, in certain cases) borrowing base certifications valuing the loan parties’ eligible credit card receivables and inventory, as reduced by certain reserves in effect from time to time. The First Amendment provides for the deferral of inventory appraisals and certain other diligence items, with reduced advance rates applicable during the period that such appraisals have not been delivered.
The First Amendment also reduced the pricing under the Revolving Credit Facility. Giving effect to the First Amendment, outstanding borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facility would accrue interest at floating rates plus an applicable margin ranging from 1.25% to 1.75% for LIBOR loans and 0.25% to 0.75% for base rate loans, and letter of credit fees range from 1.25% to 1.75%., in each case based on the average availability under the Revolving Credit Facility.
The First Amendment makes a number of other revisions to the covenants in the Credit Agreement, including a revision to the minimum availability covenant to require availability of 12.5% during the diligence deferral period referenced above and 10.0% at all other times.
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As of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, we had approximately $191 million and $20 million, respectively, available in the Revolving Credit Facility.
All obligations under the First Amendment are secured by substantially all of our assets and are guaranteed by 1616 Holdings. As of January 30, 2021, we were in compliance with the covenants applicable to us under the First Amendment.
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
We have identified the policies below as critical to our business operations and understanding of our consolidated results of operations. The impact and any associated risks related to these policies on our business operations are discussed throughout “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” where such policies affect our reported and expected financial results. Our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, require us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses and related disclosures. We base our estimates on historical experience and various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results may differ from these estimates. For a detailed discussion on the application of these and other accounting policies, see Note 1 in our annual consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report.
Inventories
Inventories consist of finished goods purchased for resale, including freight and tariffs, and are stated at the lower of cost and net realizable value, at the individual product level. Cost is determined on a weighted average cost method. The market value used in the lower of cost or market analysis is subject to the effects of consumer demands, customer preferences and the broader economy. The effects of the previously listed criteria are not controllable by management. Our management reviews inventory levels in order to identify obsolete and slow-moving merchandise as these factors can indicate a decline in the market value of inventory on hand. Inventory cost is reduced when the selling price less costs of disposal is below cost. We accrue an estimate for inventory shrink for the period between the last physical count and the balance sheet date. The shrink estimate can be affected by changes in merchandise mix and changes in actual shrink trends. These estimates are derived using available data and our historical experience. Our estimates may be impacted by changes in certain underlying assumptions and may not be indicative of future activity.
Impairment of Long-Lived Assets
Long-lived assets, such as property and equipment, are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. Assets are grouped and evaluated for impairment at the lowest level of which there are identifiable cash flows, which is generally at a store level. Assets are reviewed for impairment using factors including, but not limited to, our future operating plans and projected cash flows. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to be generated by the asset. If the carrying amount of the asset exceeds its estimated undiscounted future cash flows, then an impairment charge is recognized as the amount by which the carrying amount of the assets exceeds the fair value of the assets. Fair value is based on discounted future cash flows of the asset using a discount rate commensurate with the risk. In the event of a store closure, we will record an impairment charge, if appropriate, or accelerate depreciation over the revised useful life of the asset. Based on the analysis performed, our management believes that there was no impairment of long-lived assets for each of the 2020, 2019 and 2018 fiscal years. The impairment loss analysis requires management to apply judgment and make estimates.
Leases
Effective February 3, 2019, we adopted ASU 2016-02, “Leases" (Topic 842). We are required to recognize an operating lease asset and an operating lease liability for all of our leases (other than leases that meet the definition of a short-term lease). The liability is equal to the present value of lease payments using an estimated incremental borrowing rate, on a collateralized basis over a similar term, that we would have incurred to borrow the funds necessary to purchase the leased asset. The asset is based on the liability, subject to certain adjustments, such as for initial direct costs. For income statement purposes, a dual model was retained, requiring leases to be classified as either operating or finance leases. Operating leases result in straight-line expense (similar to operating leases under the prior accounting standard) while finance leases result in a front-loaded expense pattern (similar to capital leases under the prior accounting standard). See the Recently Issued Accounting Standards section of Note 1 ‘‘Summary of Significant Accounting Policies’’ to the consolidated financial statements for a detailed discussion of the adoption of this new lease standard.
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Income Taxes
Income taxes are accounted for under the asset-and-liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. We recognize the effect of income tax positions only if those positions are more likely than not of being sustained. Recognized income tax positions are measured at the largest amount that is greater than 50% likely of being realized. Changes in recognition or measurement are reflected in the period in which the change in judgment occurs.
We record a valuation allowance to reduce our deferred tax assets when uncertainty regarding their realizability exists. In assessing the realizability of deferred tax assets, our management considers whether it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income during periods in which those temporary differences become deductible. Our management considers the scheduled reversal of deferred tax liabilities, projected future taxable income, and tax planning strategies in making this assessment.
Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements
See "Note 1 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies" to the consolidated financial statements included in "Item 8. Consolidated Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" of this Form 10-K, for a detailed description of recently issued accounting pronouncements.

Contractual Obligations
The following table summarizes, as of January 30, 2021, our minimum rental commitments under operating lease agreements including assumed extensions, minimum payments for long-term debt and other obligations in future periods:
 
(In millions)Payments Due By Period
TotalLess than
1 year
1-3 years3-5 yearsMore than
5 years
Operating lease obligations (1)
$1,394.5 $204.2 $369.7 $325.8 $494.8 
Purchase obligations (2)
5.9 5.9 — — — 
Total$1,400.4 $210.1 $369.7 $325.8 $494.8 

(1)Our store leases generally have initial lease terms of 10 years and include renewal options on substantially the same terms and conditions as the original lease. Also included in operating leases are our leases for the corporate office, distribution centers and other.
(2)Purchase obligations are primarily for materials that will be used in the construction of new stores and purchase commitments for infrastructure and systems that will be used by the corporate office and distribution centers.
From January 31, 2021 to March 18, 2021, we committed to 23 new leases with terms of 10 years that have future minimum lease payments of approximately $46.0 million.
Off Balance Sheet Arrangements
For the fiscal year ended January 30, 2021, we were not party to any material off-balance sheet arrangements that are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, net sales, expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources.
ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
Interest Rate Risk
Our principal market risk relates to interest rate sensitivity, which is the risk that future changes in interest rates will reduce our net income or net assets. We have short-term investment securities that are interest-bearing securities and if there are changes in interest rates, those changes would affect the interest income we earn on these investments and, therefore, impact our cash flows and results of operations. However, due to the short term nature of our investment portfolio, we do not believe an immediate 100 basis point increase or decrease in interest rates would have a material effect on the fair market value of our portfolio, and accordingly we do not expect our operating results or cash flows to be materially affected by a sudden change in market interest rates.
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We also have an Revolving Credit Facility which includes a revolving line of credit, which bears interest at a variable rate. Because our Revolving Credit Facility bears interest at a variable rate, we will be exposed to market risks relating to changes in interest rates.
As of January 30, 2021, we had approximately $191 million available on the line of credit. The Revolving Credit Facility reduces the interest rate payable on borrowings to be, at our option, a per annum rate equal to (a) a prime rate or (b) a LIBOR-based rate plus a margin of 1.00%. Letter of credit fees are equal to the interest rate payable on LIBOR-based loans. The interest rate and letter of credit fees under the Revolving Credit Facility are subject to an increase of 2.00% per annum upon an event of default. We do not use derivative financial instruments for speculative or trading purposes, but this does not preclude our adoption of specific hedging strategies in the future.
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ITEM 8. CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

FIVE BELOW, INC.
Index to Consolidated Financial Statements

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
To the Shareholders and Board of Directors
Five Below, Inc.:
Opinion on the Consolidated Financial Statements
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Five Below, Inc. and subsidiary (the Company) as of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in shareholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the fiscal years in the three-year period ended January 30, 2021, and the related notes (collectively, the consolidated financial statements). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the fiscal years in the three-year period ended January 30, 2021, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB), the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of January 30, 2021, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission, and our report dated March 18, 2021 expressed an unqualified opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.
Change in Accounting Principle
As discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has changed its method of accounting for leases as of February 3, 2019 due to the adoption of Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) and the related amendments.
Basis for Opinion
These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
Critical Audit Matter
The critical audit matter communicated below is a matter arising from the current period audit of the consolidated financial statements that was communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relates to accounts or disclosures that are material to the consolidated financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgments. The communication of a critical audit matter does not alter in any way our opinion on the consolidated financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit matter below, providing a separate opinion on the critical audit matter or on the accounts or disclosures to which it relates.
Slow-moving and obsolete inventories at net realizable value
As discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company monitors inventory levels in order to identify slow-moving or obsolete merchandise as these factors can indicate a decline in the market value of the inventory on hand. The Company’s inventory balance was $281 million as of January 30, 2021. Inventory cost is reduced to net realizable value when cost exceeds the selling price less the cost of disposal. The market value is subject to the effects of consumer demands, customer preferences, and the broader economy.
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We identified the evaluation of slow-moving and obsolete inventories at net realizable value as a critical audit matter because a high degree of auditor judgment was required to evaluate the Company’s ability to sell certain products.
The following are the primary procedures we performed to address this critical audit matter. We evaluated the design and tested the operating effectiveness of certain internal controls related to the critical audit matter. This included controls related to the review of historical product sales and inventory quantities on hand, and the estimate of net realizable value of slow-moving and obsolete inventories and adjustments of inventory cost to net realizable value. We evaluated the Company’s methodology for determining slow-moving and obsolete merchandise. We selected certain products determined to be slow-moving or obsolete and considered current market trends or seasonal impacts by assessing the nature of the slow-moving and obsolete merchandise. We assessed the Company’s adjustments of inventory costs to net realizable value for certain slow-moving and obsolete inventories by (1) comparing the historical estimate for net realizable value adjustments to actual adjustments of inventory costs, and (2) analyzing sales subsequent to the measurement date.


/s/ KPMG LLP

We have served as the Company's auditor since 2002.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
March 18, 2021
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FIVE BELOW, INC.
Consolidated Balance Sheets
(in thousands, except share and per share data) 
January 30, 2021February 1, 2020
Assets
Current assets:
Cash and cash equivalents$268,783 $202,490 
Short-term investment securities140,928 59,229 
Inventories281,267 324,028 
Prepaid income taxes6,350 4,063 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets58,085 75,903 
Total current assets755,413 665,713 
Property and equipment, net565,351 439,086 
Operating lease assets975,862 842,988 
Other assets18,144 10,874 
$2,314,770 $1,958,661 
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
Current liabilities:
Line of credit$$
Accounts payable138,622 130,242 
Income taxes payable2,025 9,505 
Accrued salaries and wages43,445 19,873 
Other accrued expenses108,504 81,255 
Operating lease liabilities143,074 110,470 
Total current liabilities435,670 351,345 
Other long-term liabilities1,048 1,199 
Deferred income taxes28,911 8,716 
Long-term operating lease liabilities967,255 837,623 
Total liabilities1,432,884 1,198,883 
Commitments and contingencies (note 6)00
Shareholders’ equity:
Common stock, $0.01 par value. Authorized 120,000,000 shares; issued and outstanding 55,935,237 and 55,712,067 shares, respectively.559 557 
Additional paid-in capital321,075 322,330 
Retained earnings560,252 436,891 
Total shareholders’ equity881,886 759,778 
$2,314,770 $1,958,661 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

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FIVE BELOW, INC.
Consolidated Statements of Operations
(in thousands, except share and per share data) 
 Fiscal Year
202020192018
Net sales$1,962,137 $1,846,730 $1,559,563 
Cost of goods sold1,309,807 1,172,764 994,478 
Gross profit652,330 673,966 565,085 
Selling, general and administrative expenses497,527 456,682 377,901 
Operating income154,803 217,284 187,184 
Interest (expense) income and other, net(1,736)4,285 4,623 
Income before income taxes153,067 221,569 191,807 
Income tax expense29,706 46,513 42,162 
Net income$123,361 $175,056 $149,645 
Basic income per common share$2.21 $3.14 $2.68 
Diluted income per common share$2.20 $3.12 $2.66 
Weighted average shares outstanding:
Basic shares55,816,508 55,823,535 55,763,034 
Diluted shares56,060,039 56,166,167 56,220,864 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

52


FIVE BELOW, INC.
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity
(in thousands, except share and per share data)
Common stockAdditional
paid-in capital
Retained
earnings
Total
shareholders’ equity
SharesAmount
Balance, February 3, 201855,438,089 $554 $346,300 $111,704 $458,558 
Cumulative effect of ASC 606 adoption— — — 486 486 
Share-based compensation expense— — 11,807 11,807 
Issuance of unrestricted stock awards
2,056 — 180 — 180 
Exercise of options to purchase common stock
145,157 4,026 — 4,027 
Vesting of restricted stock units and performance-based restricted stock units305,201 — — 
Common shares withheld for taxes(113,058)(1)(7,989)— (7,990)
Repurchase and retirement of common stock(21,810)— (1,987)— (1,987)
Issuance of common stock to employees under employee stock purchase plan3,413 — 365 — 365 
Net income— — — 149,645 149,645 
Balance, February 2, 201955,759,048 557 352,702 261,835 615,094 
Share-based compensation expense— — 12,136 — 12,136 
Issuance of unrestricted stock awards
1,634 — 198 — 198 
Exercise of options to purchase common stock
141,582 4,107 — 4,109 
Vesting of restricted stock units and performance-based restricted stock units227,020 — — 
Common shares withheld for taxes(83,121)(1)(10,366)— (10,367)
Repurchase and retirement of common stock(337,552)(3)(36,882)— (36,885)
Issuance of common stock to employees under employee stock purchase plan3,456 — 435 — 435 
Net income— — — 175,056 175,056 
Balance, February 1, 202055,712,067 557 322,330 436,891 759,778 
Share-based compensation expense— — 9,294 — 9,294 
Issuance of unrestricted stock awards
1,518 — 208 — 208 
Exercise of options to purchase common stock176,846 5,344 — 5,346 
Vesting of restricted stock units and performance-based restricted stock units230,002 — — 
Common shares withheld for taxes(51,734)(1)(3,916)— (3,917)
Repurchase and retirement of common stock
(137,023)(1)(12,662)— (12,663)
Issuance of common stock to employees under employee stock purchase plan3,561 — 477 — 477 
Net income— — — 123,361 123,361 
Balance, January 30, 202155,935,237 $559 $321,075 $560,252 $881,886 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.
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FIVE BELOW, INC.
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(in thousands)
 Fiscal Year
202020192018
Operating activities:
Net income$123,361 $175,056 $149,645 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization69,345 54,979 41,451 
Share-based compensation expense9,551 12,383 12,018 
Deferred income tax expense20,195 14,842 550 
Other non-cash expenses2,572 117 44 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
Inventories42,761 (80,392)(56,599)
Prepaid income taxes(2,287)(2,726)927 
Prepaid expenses and other assets17,141 (16,603)(15,655)
Accounts payable11,146 20,742 32,866 
Income taxes payable(7,480)(11,121)(4,649)
Accrued salaries and wages23,572 (4,713)1,680 
Operating leases29,362 13,922 12,143 
Other accrued expenses26,727 10,543 9,712 
Net cash provided by operating activities365,966 187,029 184,133 
Investing activities:
Purchases of investment securities and other investments(192,612)(136,148)(117,371)
Sales, maturities, and redemptions of investment securities105,912 154,865 191,619 
Capital expenditures(200,189)(212,297)(113,720)
Net cash used in investing activities(286,889)(193,580)(39,472)
Financing activities:
Borrowing on note payable under Revolving Credit Facility50,000 
Repayment of note payable under Revolving Credit Facility(50,000)
Cash paid for Revolving Credit Facility financing costs(2,029)
Net proceeds from issuance of common stock477 435 365 
Repurchase and retirement of common stock(12,663)(36,885)(1,987)
Proceeds from exercise of options to purchase common stock and vesting of restricted and performance-based restricted stock units5,348 4,110 4,030 
Common shares withheld for taxes(3,917)(10,367)(7,990)
Net cash used in financing activities(12,784)(42,707)(5,582)
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents66,293 (49,258)139,079 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year202,490 251,748 112,669 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of year$268,783 $202,490 $251,748 
Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information:
Interest paid$757 $$
Income taxes paid$19,264 $45,518 $45,589 
Non-cash investing activities
(Decrease) increase in accounts payable and accrued purchases of property and equipment$(2,445)$(19,411)$48,723 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.
54

FIVE BELOW, INC.
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

(1) Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
(a)Description of Business
Five Below, Inc. (collectively referred to herein with its wholly owned subsidiary as the "Company") is a specialty value retailer offering merchandise targeted at the tween and teen demographic. The Company offers an edited assortment of products, with most priced at $5 and below. The Company’s edited assortment of products includes select brands and licensed merchandise. The Company believes its merchandise is readily available and that there are a number of potential vendors that could be utilized, if necessary, under approximately the same terms the Company is currently receiving; thus, it is not dependent on a single vendor or a group of vendors.
The Company is incorporated in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and, as of January 30, 2021, operated in 38 states that include Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, West Virginia, North Carolina, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, Georgia, Texas, Tennessee, Maine, Alabama, Kentucky, Kansas, Florida, South Carolina, Mississippi, Louisiana, Wisconsin, Oklahoma, Minnesota, California, Arkansas, Iowa, Nebraska, Arizona, Nevada and Colorado. As of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, the Company operated 1,020 stores and 900 stores, respectively, each operating under the name “Five Below”, and sells merchandise on the internet, through the Company's fivebelow.com e-commerce website.
The Company's consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Five Below, Inc. and its subsidiary (1616 Holdings, Inc., formerly known as Five Below Merchandising, Inc.). All intercompany transactions and accounts are eliminated in the consolidation of the Company's and subsidiary's financial statements.
(b) Impact of COVID-19
As a result of the coronavirus (or COVID-19) pandemic in 2020, federal, state and local governments and private entities mandated various restrictions. Such mandates required reduction of operating hours and forced temporary closures of certain retailers and other businesses. As a result of these restrictions and out of concern for its customers and employees, the Company temporarily closed all of its stores as of March 20, 2020, with stores beginning to reopen at the end of April in compliance with federal, state and local requirements. To seek to mitigate the effects of the pandemic and to create financial flexibility, the Company took a number of actions to preserve liquidity (some of which were temporary in nature such as temporary pay reductions or furloughs, and some of which were more permanent, such as the amendment of the Company’s credit facility). The Company also took certain actions designed to ensure, as much as possible, a safe working environment for employees and a safe shopping environment for its customers. Depending on future developments with respect to the COVID-19 pandemic, including any new federal, state and local governmental restrictions that may be imposed, the Company may determine to reinstate any of the foregoing temporary mitigation measures or take any additional steps that the Company considers necessary. If the pandemic were to worsen, the Company's business operations and results of operations, including its net sales, earnings and cash flows, may be materially impacted.
(c) Fiscal Year
The Company operates on a 52/53-week fiscal year ending on the Saturday closest to January 31. References to "fiscal year 2020" or "fiscal 2020" refer to the period from February 2, 2020 to January 30, 2021, which consists of a 52-week fiscal year. References to "fiscal year 2019" or "fiscal 2019" refer to the period from February 3, 2019 to February 1, 2020, which consists of a 52-week fiscal year. References to "fiscal year 2018" or "fiscal 2018" refer to the period from February 4, 2018 to February 2, 2019, which consists of a 52-week fiscal year.
(d) Cash and Cash Equivalents
The Company considers all highly liquid investments purchased with a maturity date of three months or less when purchased to be cash equivalents. Our cash equivalents consist of credit and debit card receivables, money market funds, corporate bonds and municipal bonds with original maturities of 90 days or less, which are classified as cash and cash equivalents in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. The majority of payments due from banks for third-party credit card and debit card transactions resulting from customer purchases at the Company’s retail stores process within 24 to 48 hours, except for transactions occurring on a Friday, which are generally processed the following Monday. Amounts due from banks for these transactions classified as cash equivalents totaled $12.8 million and $8.9 million as of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, respectively. Book overdrafts, which are outstanding checks in excess of funds on deposit, are recorded within accounts payable in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and within operating activities in the accompanying consolidated statements of cash flows. As of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, the Company had cash equivalents of $250.7 million and $200.1 million, respectively.
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(e)Fair Value of Financial Instruments
Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Assets and liabilities measured at fair value are classified using the following hierarchy, which is based upon the transparency of inputs to the valuation at the measurement date:
Level 1: Quoted market prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.
Level 2: Inputs, other than Level 1, that are either directly or indirectly observable.
Level 3: Unobservable inputs developed using the Company’s estimates and assumptions which reflect those that market participants would use.
The classification of fair value measurements within the hierarchy is based upon the lowest level of input that is significant to the measurement.
The Company’s financial instruments consist primarily of cash equivalents, short-term investment securities, accounts payable, and borrowings, if any, under a line of credit (as defined in note 5). The Company believes that: (1) the carrying value of cash equivalents and accounts payable are representative of their respective fair value due to the short-term nature of these instruments; and (2) the carrying value of any current or future borrowings under the line of credit approximates their fair value because the line of credit’s interest rates vary with market interest rates. Under the fair value hierarchy, the fair market values of cash equivalents and the investments in corporate bonds are level 1 while the investments in municipal bonds are level 2. The fair market values of level 2 investments are determined by management with the assistance of a third party pricing service. Since quoted prices in active markets for identical assets are not available, these prices are determined by the third party pricing service using observable market information such as quotes from less active markets and quoted prices of similar securities.
As of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, the Company's short-term investment securities are classified as held-to-maturity since the Company has the intent and ability to hold the investments to maturity. Such securities are carried at amortized cost plus accrued interest and consist of the following (in thousands):
As of January 30, 2021
Amortized CostGross Unrealized GainsGross Unrealized LossesFair Market Value
Short-term:
Corporate bonds$95,530 $$53 $95,477 
Municipal bonds45,398 45,391 
Total$140,928 $$60 $140,868 
As of February 1, 2020
Amortized CostGross Unrealized GainsGross Unrealized LossesFair Market Value
Short-term:
Corporate bonds$58,625 $$$58,621 
Municipal bonds604 604 
Total$59,229 $$$59,225 
Short-term investment securities as of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020 all mature in one year or less.
(f)Inventories
Inventories consist of finished goods purchased for resale, including freight and tariffs, and are stated at the lower of cost and net realizable value, at the individual product level. Cost is determined on a weighted average cost method. Management of the Company reviews inventory levels in order to identify slow-moving merchandise and uses markdowns to clear merchandise. Inventory cost is reduced when the selling price less costs of disposal is below cost. The Company accrues an estimate for inventory shrink for the period between the last physical count and the balance sheet date. The shrink estimate can be affected by changes in merchandise mix and changes in actual shrink trends.
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(g)Prepaid Expenses and Other Current Assets
Prepaid expenses in fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2019 were $19.0 million and $17.2 million, respectively. Other current assets in fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2019 were $39.1 million and $58.7 million, respectively.
(h)Property and Equipment
Property and equipment are stated at cost. Additions and improvements are capitalized, while repairs and maintenance are charged to expense as incurred.
Depreciation and amortization is recorded using the straight-line method over the shorter of the estimated useful lives of the assets or the terms of the respective leases, if applicable. The estimated useful lives are three to ten years for furniture and fixtures and computers and equipment. Store leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the useful life or the lease term plus assumed extensions, which is generally ten years. Leasehold improvements located in the distribution centers and the corporate headquarters are amortized over the shorter of the useful life or the lease term. Depreciation and amortization expense for property and equipment, which is included in selling, general and administrative expenses in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations, was $69.3 million, $55.0 million and $41.5 million in fiscal 2020, fiscal 2019 and fiscal 2018, respectively.
Property and equipment, net, consists of the following (in thousands):
January 30, 2021February 1, 2020
Land$23,541 $14,773 
Furniture and fixtures261,324 202,340 
Leasehold improvements319,353 240,664 
Computers and equipment164,765 117,803 
Construction in process74,387 78,577 
Property and equipment, gross843,370 654,157 
Less: Accumulated depreciation and amortization(278,019)(215,071)
Property and equipment, net$565,351 $439,086 
(i)Impairment of Long-Lived Assets
Long-lived assets, such as property and equipment, are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. Assets are grouped and evaluated for impairment at the lowest level of which there are identifiable cash flows, which is generally at a store level. Assets are reviewed for impairment using factors including, but not limited to, the Company's future operating plans and projected cash flows. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to be generated by the asset. If the carrying amount of the asset exceeds its estimated undiscounted future cash flows, then an impairment charge is recognized by the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset. Fair value is based on discounted future cash flows of the asset using a discount rate commensurate with the risk. In the event of a store closure, the Company will record an impairment charge, if appropriate, or accelerate depreciation over the revised useful life of the asset. Based on its Company's most recent analysis, management believes that no impairment of long-lived assets exists for the period ended January 30, 2021.
(j)Deferred Financing Costs
Deferred financing costs are amortized to interest expense over the term of the related credit agreement. As of January 30, 2021, the Company had $1.6 million remaining on the balance sheet within Other Assets. As of February 1, 2020, the Company had an immaterial balance remaining on the balance sheet.
(k) Operating Leases
The Company leases store locations, distribution centers, the corporate headquarters and equipment used in its operations and evaluates and classifies its leases as operating or capital leases for financial reporting purposes. Any assets held under a finance lease are included in property and equipment, net.
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Operating lease expense is recorded on a straight-line basis over the lease term. At the inception of a lease, the Company determines the lease term, which includes periods under the exercise of renewal options that are reasonably assured. Renewal options are exercised at the Company's sole discretion. In September 2016, the Company signed a 15 year lease for a new corporate headquarters location in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Company currently occupies approximately 190,000 square feet of office space with multiple options to expand in the future. The lease agreement expires in early 2033 with three successive options to renew for additional terms up to approximately fifteen years. The distribution center in Olive Branch, Mississippi is leased under a lease agreement expiring in 2022 with options to renew for three successive five-year periods. The distribution center in Pedricktown, New Jersey is leased under a lease agreement expiring in 2025 with options to renew for three successive five-year periods. Generally, the Company’s store leases have expected lease terms of ten years, which are comprised of an initial term of ten years or an initial term of five years and 1 assumed five-year extension, resulting in a ten-year life. The expected lease term is used to determine whether a lease is finance or operating and to calculate straight-line rent expense.
Substantially all of the Company's leases include options that allow the Company to renew or extend the lease term beyond the initial lease period, subject to terms and conditions agreed upon at the inception of the lease. Such terms and conditions include rental rates agreed upon at the inception of the lease that could represent below or above market rental rates later in the life of the lease, depending upon market conditions at the time of such renewal or extension. In addition, the Company's leases may include early termination options.
(l) Finance Leases
The Company establishes assets and liabilities for the estimated construction costs incurred under lease arrangements where the Company is considered the owner for accounting purposes only, or build-to-suit leases, to the extent the Company is involved in the construction of structural improvements or takes construction risk prior to commencement of a lease. Upon occupancy of facilities under build-to-suit leases, the Company assesses whether these arrangements qualify for sales recognition under the sale-leaseback accounting guidance. If the transaction does not qualify for sales recognition under the sale-leaseback accounting guidance, the Company continues to be the deemed accounting owner. There were 0 material finance leases as of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, respectively.
(m)Other Accrued Expenses
Other accrued expenses include accrued capital expenditures of $29.2 million and $28.9 million in fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2019, respectively.
(n) Equity Method Investments
The Company uses the equity method to account for its investments in which the Company is deemed to have the ability to exercise significant influence over an investee’s operating and financial policies or in which the Company holds a significant partnership or limited liability company interest. Equity method investments are initially recorded at cost in other assets in the consolidated balance sheets. The cost is adjusted to recognize the Company's proportionate share of the investee’s net income or loss after the date of investment and is also adjusted for any impairments resulting from other-than-temporary declines in fair value. These adjustments are recorded in interest (expense) income and other, net in the consolidated statements of operations. Additional adjustments to cost may include any additional contributions made and dividends received and both are recorded in other assets in the consolidated balance sheets.
(o) Share-Based Compensation
The Company measures the cost of employee services received in exchange for share-based compensation based on the grant date fair value of the employee stock award. The Company recognizes compensation expense generally on a straight-line basis over the employee's requisite service period (generally the vesting period of the equity grant) based on the estimated grant date fair value of restricted stock units ("RSUs") and performance-based restricted stock units ("PSUs") except for PSUs that have a market condition based on our total shareholder return relative to a pre-defined peer group which are subject to multi-year performance objectives with a vesting date in 2023 (if the applicable performance objectives are achieved). The fair value of these PSUs are determined using a Monte Carlo valuation model. The Company uses the Black-Scholes option-pricing model for grants of stock options.
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The fair value of restricted stock awards are based on the closing price of the Company's common stock on the grant date and the fair value of stock options are based on the Black-Scholes option-pricing model utilizing the closing price of the Company's common stock on the grant date as the fair value of common stock in the model. Future share-based compensation cost will increase when the Company grants additional equity awards. Modifications, cancellations or repurchases of awards after the grant date may require the Company to accelerate any remaining unearned share-based compensation cost or incur incremental compensation costs. Share-based compensation cost recognized and included in expenses for fiscal 2020, fiscal 2019 and fiscal 2018, was $9.6 million, $12.4 million and $12.0 million, respectively.
(p) Revenue Recognition
Revenue from store operations is recognized at the point of sale when control of the product is transferred to the customer at such time. Internet sales, through the Company's fivebelow.com e-commerce website, are recognized when the consumer receives the product as control transfers upon delivery. Returns subsequent to the period end are immaterial; accordingly, no significant reserve has been recorded. Gift card sales to customers are initially recorded as liabilities and recognized as sales upon redemption for merchandise or as breakage revenue in proportion to the pattern of redemption of the gift cards by the customer in net sales. Sales tax collected from customers and remitted to governmental authorities are accounted for on a net basis and, therefore, excluded from sales in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations.
The transaction price for the Company’s sales is based on the item’s stated price. To the extent that the Company charges customers for shipping and handling on e-commerce sales, the Company records such amounts in net sales. Shipping and handling costs, which include fulfillment and shipping costs related to the Company's e-commerce operations, are included in costs of goods sold. The Company has chosen ASU 2014-09's policy election which allows it to exclude all sales taxes from net sales in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations.
(q) Shipping and Handling Revenues and Costs
The Company includes all shipping and handling revenue from e-commerce sales in net sales. Shipping and handling costs, which are included in cost of goods sold in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations, include fulfillment and shipping costs related to the Company's e-commerce operations.
(r) Cost of Goods Sold
Cost of goods sold reflects the direct costs of purchased merchandise and inbound freight, as well as store occupancy, distribution and buying expenses. Store occupancy costs include rent, common area maintenance, utilities and property taxes for all store locations. Distribution costs include costs for receiving, processing, warehousing and shipping of merchandise to or from the Company's distribution centers and between store locations. Buying costs include compensation expense for the Company's internal buying organization.
(s) Selling, General and Administrative Expenses
Selling, general and administrative expenses include payroll and other compensation, marketing and advertising expense, depreciation and amortization expense, and other selling and administrative expenses.
(t) Vendor Allowances
The Company receives various incentives in the form of allowances, free product and promotional funds from its vendors based on product purchases and advertising activities. The amounts received are subject to changes in market conditions, vendor marketing strategies and changes in the profitability or sell-through of the related merchandise for the Company. Merchandise allowances are recognized in the period the related merchandise is sold within cost of goods sold. Marketing allowances are recorded in selling, general and administrative expenses and are recognized in the period the related advertising occurs to the extent the allowance is a reimbursement that is specific and incremental, and identifiable costs have been incurred by the Company to sell the vendor’s products. To the extent these conditions are not met, these allowances are recorded as merchandise allowances.
(u) Store Pre-Opening Costs
Costs incurred between completion of a new store location’s construction and its opening (pre-opening costs) are charged to expense as incurred. Pre-opening costs were $9.0 million, $9.3 million and $6.5 million in fiscal 2020, fiscal 2019, and fiscal 2018, respectively, and are recorded in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations based on the nature of the expense.
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(v) Advertising Costs
Advertising costs are charged to expense the first time the advertising takes place. Advertising expenses were $31.6 million, $48.1 million and $42.2 million in fiscal 2020, fiscal 2019 and fiscal 2018, respectively, and are included in selling, general and administrative expenses in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations.
(w) Income Taxes
Income taxes are accounted for under the asset-and-liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. The Company recognizes the effect of income tax positions only if those positions are more likely than not of being sustained. Recognized income tax positions are measured at the largest amount that is greater than 50% likely of being realized. Changes in recognition or measurement are reflected in the period in which the change in judgment occurs.
The Company records a valuation allowance to reduce its deferred tax assets when uncertainty regarding their realizability exists. In assessing the realizability of deferred tax assets, management considers whether it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income during periods in which those temporary differences become deductible. Management considers the scheduled reversal of deferred tax liabilities, projected future taxable income, and tax planning strategies in making this assessment.
(x) Commitments and Contingencies
Liabilities for loss contingencies arising from claims, assessments, litigation, fines and penalties, and other sources are recorded when it is probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the assessment can be reasonably estimated. Legal costs incurred in connection with loss contingencies are expensed as incurred.
(y) Use of Estimates
The preparation of consolidated financial statements requires management of the Company to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amount of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Significant items subject to such estimates and assumptions include the carrying amount of property and equipment, adjustments to net realizable value for inventories, income taxes, share-based compensation expense and the incremental borrowing rate utilized in operating lease liabilities.
(z)Recently Issued Accounting Standards
In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, “Leases.” ASU 2016-02 requires lessees to record assets and liabilities on the balance sheet for all leases with terms longer than 12 months. The updated guidance is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and early adoption is permitted. On February 3, 2019, the Company adopted this pronouncement on a modified retrospective basis and applied the new standard to all leases. As a result, comparative financial information has not been restated and continues to be reported under the accounting standards in effect for those periods. The Company elected the package of practical expedients permitted under the transition guidance within the new standard, which includes, among other things, the ability to carry forward the existing lease classification. The Company also elected the practical expedient related to land easements, allowing the Company to carry forward its accounting treatment for land easements on existing agreements. At adoption, the new standard had a material impact on the Company's balance sheets resulting in an increase in net assets and liabilities of approximately $618 million, as the Company has a significant number of leases for its stores. Although the standard impacts the treatment of certain initial direct leases costs that were previously capitalizable, it did not materially impact the Company's consolidated statements of operations and had no impact on the Company's cash flows.
See Note 3 ‘‘Leases’’ for additional information.

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In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15, "Customer's Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement that is a Service Contract." ASU 2018-15 requires implementation costs incurred by customers in cloud computing arrangements to be deferred over the noncancelable term of the cloud computing arrangements plus any optional renewal periods (1) that are reasonably certain to be exercised by the customer or (2) for which exercise of the renewal option is controlled by the cloud service provider. The effective date of this pronouncement is for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years, and early adoption is permitted. The standard can be adopted either using the prospective or retrospective transition approach. During the thirteen weeks ended November 3, 2018, the Company adopted the pronouncement using the prospective transition method and it did not have a significant impact to the Company's financial statements.
In April 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-04, "Codification Improvements to Topic 326, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses," which addresses certain fair value disclosure requirements, the measurement basis under the measurement alternative and which equity securities have to be remeasured at historical exchange rates. In May 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-05, "Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326), Targeted Transition Relief," which gives entities the ability to irrevocably elect the fair value option in Subtopic 825-10 for certain existing financial assets upon transition to ASU 2016-13. The effective date of the standards will be for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2019 and early adoption is permitted for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018. The new standard will be applied using a modified retrospective approach through a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings as of the effective date to align the Company's credit loss methodology with the new standard. The Company adopted the standard on February 2, 2020. The adoption did not impact the Company's financial statements.
In March 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-04, "Reference Rate Reform (Topic 848): Facilitation of the Effects of Reference Rate Reform on Financial Reporting" ("ASU 2020-04"). The pronouncement provides temporary optional expedients and exceptions to the current guidance on contract modifications and hedge accounting to ease the financial reporting burdens related to the expected market transition from the London Interbank Offered Rate ("LIBOR") and other interbank offered rates to alternative reference rates. The guidance was effective upon issuance and may be applied prospectively to contract modifications made and hedging relationships entered into or evaluated on or before December 31, 2022. The Company is currently evaluating the impact the adoption of ASU 2020-04 will have on its consolidated financial statements.
(2)Revenue from Contracts with Customers
Disaggregation of Revenue
The following table provides information about disaggregated revenue by groups of products: leisure, fashion and home, and party and snack (in thousands):
Fiscal YearFiscal YearFiscal Year
202020192018
AmountPercentage of Net SalesAmountPercentage of Net SalesAmountPercentage of Net Sales
Leisure$928,342 47.3 %$919,627 49.8 %$793,180 50.9 %
Fashion and home701,461 35.8 %577,458 31.3 %482,424 30.9 %
Party and snack332,334 16.9 %349,645 18.9 %283,959 18.2 %
Total$1,962,137 100.0 %$1,846,730 100.0 %$1,559,563 100.0 %

(3)Leases
The Company determines if an arrangement contains a lease at the inception of a contract. Operating lease assets represent the Company’s right to use an underlying asset for the lease term and operating lease liabilities represent the Company’s obligation to make lease payments arising from the lease. Operating lease assets and operating lease liabilities are recognized at the commencement date based on the present value of the remaining future minimum lease payments. As the rate implicit in the lease is not readily determinable for the Company's leases, the Company utilizes its incremental borrowing rate to determine the present value of future lease payments. The incremental borrowing rate represents a significant judgment and is determined based on an analysis of the Company's synthetic credit rating, prevailing financial market conditions, corporate bond yields, treasury bond yields, and the effect of collateralization. The operating lease assets also include lease payments made before commencement and exclude lease incentives.
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The Company’s real estate leases typically contain options that permit renewals for additional periods of up to five years. For real estate leases, except for renewals that generally take the lease to a ten-year term, the options to renew are not considered reasonably certain at lease commencement because the Company reevaluates each lease on a regular basis to consider the economic and strategic benefits of exercising the renewal options, and regularly opens, relocates or closes stores to align with its operating strategy. Therefore, generally, except for renewals that take the lease to a ten-year term, the renewal option periods are not included within the lease term and the associated payments are not included in the measurement of the operating lease asset and operating lease liability as the exercise of such options is not reasonably certain. The Company’s operating lease agreements, including assumed renewals, which are generally those that take the lease to a ten-year term, expire through fiscal 2034. Similarly, renewal options are not included in the lease term for non-real estate leases because they are not considered reasonably certain of being exercised at lease commencement. Leases with an initial term of 12 months or less are not recorded on the balance sheets and lease expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the term of the short-term lease.
For certain real estate leases, the Company accounts for lease components and nonlease components as a single lease component. Certain real estate leases require additional payments for reimbursement of real estate taxes, common area maintenance and insurance as well as payments based on sales volume, all of which are expensed as incurred as variable lease costs. Other real estate leases contain one fixed lease payment that includes real estate taxes, common area maintenance and insurance. These fixed payments are considered part of the lease payment and included in the operating lease assets and operating lease liabilities.
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, certain of the Company's landlords agreed to temporary rent concessions. These rent concessions generally related to abatements and deferrals of certain rent payments due between April through October into future periods.
In accordance with the Financial Accounting Standards Board's recent staff guidance regarding rent concessions related to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Company has elected to account for the concessions agreed to by landlords that do not result in a substantial increase in the obligations of the lessee as if the enforceable rights and obligations for those concessions existed in the original lease agreements and the Company has elected to not remeasure the related lease liabilities and right-of-use assets. For qualifying rent abatement concessions, the Company has recorded negative variable lease expense for the amount of the concession during the period of relief, and for qualifying deferrals of rental payments, the Company has recognized a non-interest bearing payable in lieu of recognizing a decrease in cash for the lease payment that would have been made based on the original terms of the lease agreement, which will be reduced when the deferred payment is made in the future.
All of the Company's leases are classified as operating leases and the associated assets and liabilities are presented as separate captions in the consolidated balance sheets. As of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, the weighted average remaining lease term for the Company's operating leases was 7.9 years and 8.1 years respectively, and the weighted average discount rate is 6.2% and 6.6%, respectively.
The following table is a summary of the Company's components for net lease costs as of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020 (in thousands):
Fifty-Two Weeks Ended
Lease CostJanuary 30, 2021February 1, 2020
Operating lease cost$171,390 $144,971 
Variable lease cost46,638 40,379 
Net lease cost*$218,028 $185,350 
* Excludes short-term lease cost, which is immaterial
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The following table summarizes the maturity of lease liabilities under operating leases as of January 30, 2021 (in thousands):
Maturity of Lease LiabilitiesOperating Leases
2021$204,238 
2022188,402 
2023181,274 
2024170,271 
2025155,514 
After 2025494,814 
Total lease payments1,394,513 
Less: imputed interest284,184 
Present value of lease liabilities$1,110,329 

The following table summarizes the supplemental cash flow disclosures related to leases as of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020 (in thousands):
Fifty-Two Weeks Ended
January 30, 2021February 1, 2020
Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities:
Cash payments arising from operating lease liabilities (1)
$134,130 $129,670 
Supplemental non-cash information:
Operating lease liabilities arising from obtaining right-of-use assets$233,174 $273,832 
(1) Included within operating activities in the Company's Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows.

As of January 30, 2021, the Company has entered into commitments for new stores for which the leases have not yet commenced that have future minimum lease payments of approximately $174.5 million.
During the fifty-two weeks ended January 30, 2021, the Company committed to 138 new store leases with average terms of approximately ten years that have future minimum lease payments of approximately $286.8 million.
The following disclosures for the year ended February 2, 2019 were made in accordance with the accounting guidance for operating leases in effect at that time.
The Company’s minimum rental commitments under operating lease agreements, including assumed extensions, as of February 2, 2019, are as follows (in thousands):
Fiscal YearRetail storesCorporate office, distribution centers and otherTotal
2019$136,858 $10,529 $147,387 
2020139,892 11,885 151,777 
2021133,356 11,834 145,190 
2022123,858 11,441 135,299 
2023115,229 9,897 125,126 
Thereafter379,150 55,071 434,221 
$1,028,343 $110,657 $1,139,000 
Rent expense, including base and contingent rent under operating leases, was $119.0 million in fiscal 2018. Contingent rents was $0.6 million in fiscal 2018.
From January 31, 2021 to March 18, 2021, the Company committed to 23 new leases with terms of ten years that have future minimum lease payments of approximately $46.0 million.
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(4) Income Per Common Share
Basic income per common share amounts are calculated using the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted income per common share amounts are calculated using the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding for the period and include the dilutive impact of exercise of stock options as well as assumed vesting of restricted stock awards and shares currently available for purchase under the Company's Employee Stock Purchase Plan, using the treasury stock method. Performance-based restricted stock units are considered contingently issuable shares for diluted income per common share purposes and the dilutive impact, if any, is not included in the weighted-average shares until the performance conditions are met. The dilutive impact, if any, for performance-based restricted stock units, which are subject to market conditions based on our total shareholder return relative to a pre-defined peer group, are included in the weighted average shares.
The following table reconciles net income and the weighted average common shares outstanding used in the computations of basic and diluted income per common share (in thousands, except for share and per share data):
 
Fiscal Year
 202020192018
Numerator:
Net income$123,361 $175,056 $149,645 
Denominator:
Weighted average common shares outstanding - basic55,816,508 55,823,535 55,763,034 
Dilutive impact of options, restricted stock units, and employee stock purchase plan243,531 342,632 457,830 
Weighted average common shares outstanding - diluted56,060,039 56,166,167 56,220,864 
Per common share:
Basic income per common share$2.21 $3.14 $2.68 
Diluted income per common share$2.20 $3.12 $2.66 

The effects of restricted stock units outstanding as of January 30, 2021, February 1, 2020 and February 2, 2019 for 20,425, 576 and 2,315 shares of common stock, respectively, were excluded from the fiscal 2020, fiscal 2019 and fiscal 2018 calculation of diluted income per common share as their impact would have been anti-dilutive.
The aforementioned excluded shares do not reflect the impact of any incremental repurchases under the treasury stock method.
(5)Line of Credit
On May 10, 2017, the Company entered into a Fourth Amended and Restated Loan and Security Agreement (the “Prior Credit Agreement”), among the Company, 1616 Holdings, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company ("1616 Holdings"), and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, which includes a secured asset-based revolving line of credit in the amount of up to $20.0 million (the "Revolving Credit Facility”). On March 20, 2020, the Company exercised its right under the Prior Credit Agreement to increase the aggregate commitments under the Revolving Credit Facility from $20 million to $50 million.
On April 24, 2020, the Company entered into a Fifth Amended and Restated Credit Agreement (the “Credit Agreement”), among the Company, 1616 Holdings, Inc. (together with the Company, the "Loan Parties), Wells Fargo Bank, National Association as administrative agent (the “Agent”), and other lenders party thereto (the "Lenders"). The Credit Agreement amends and restates the Prior Credit Agreement.
The Credit Agreement increased the Revolving Credit Facility to $225.0 million. Pursuant to the Credit Agreement, advances under the Revolving Credit Facility are tied to a borrowing base consisting of eligible credit card receivables and inventory, as reduced by certain reserves in effect from time to time. The Revolving Credit Facility expires on the earliest to occur of (i) April 24, 2023 or (ii) an event of default. The Revolving Credit Facility may be increased by up to $150.0 million, subject to certain conditions, including obtaining commitments from one or more Lenders. The entire amount of the Revolving Credit Facility is available for the issuance of letters of credit and allows for swingline loans.
The Credit Agreement provides that the interest rate payable on borrowings shall be, at the Company’s option, a per annum rate equal to (a) a base rate plus an applicable margin ranging from 1.00% to 1.25% or (b) a LIBOR rate plus a margin ranging from 2.00% to 2.25%. Letter of credit fees will range from 2.00% to 2.25%. The interest rate and letter of credit fees under the Credit Agreement are subject to an increase of 2.00% per annum upon an event of default.
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The Credit Agreement contains customary covenants that limit, absent lender approval, the ability of Company and certain of its affiliates to, among other things, pay cash dividends, incur debt, create liens and encumbrances, redeem or repurchase stock, enter into certain acquisition transactions or transactions with affiliates, merge, dissolve, repay certain indebtedness, change the nature of Company’s business, enter sale or leaseback transactions, make investments or dispose of assets. In some cases, these restrictions are subject to certain negotiated exceptions or permit Company to undertake otherwise restricted activities if it satisfies certain required conditions. In addition, the Company will be required to maintain availability of not less than (i) 15% of the lesser of (x) aggregate commitments under the Revolving Credit Facility and (y) the borrowing base (the "loan cap") prior to a stepdown date (as described below) and (ii) 10% of the loan cap after the stepdown date. The stepdown date is the first date occurring after both (i) the date that 75% of the number of stores as of the closing date of the Revolving Credit Facility have reopened ("store opening date") and (ii) the date occurring at least six months after the store reopening date on which the fixed charge coverage ratio is at least 1.00 to 1.00.
If there exists an event of default or availability under the Revolving Credit Facility is less than 15% of the loan cap, amounts in any of the Loan Parties’ or subsidiary guarantors' designated deposit accounts will be transferred daily into a blocked account held by the Agent and applied to reduce outstanding amounts under the Revolving Credit Facility (the “Cash Dominion Event”), so long as (i) such event of default has not been waived and/or (ii) until availability has exceeded 15% of the loan cap for sixty (60) consecutive calendar days (provided that such ability to discontinue the Cash Dominion Event shall be limited to two times during the term of the Credit Agreement).
The Credit Agreement also contains a provision stating that the Company cannot borrow in excess of $50 million under the Revolving Credit Facility at any time the amount of the consolidated cash and cash equivalents of the Loan Parties (excluding certain long-term investments and certain other items) exceeds $50 million.
The Credit Agreement contains customary events of default including, among other things, failure to pay obligations when due, initiation of bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings, defaults on certain other indebtedness, change of control, incurrence of certain material judgments that are not stayed, satisfied, bonded or discharged within 30 days, certain ERISA events, invalidity of the credit documents, and violation of affirmative and negative covenants or breach of representations and warranties set forth in the Credit Agreement. Amounts under the Revolving Credit Facility may become due upon events of default (subject to any applicable grace or cure periods).
Under the Credit Agreement, all obligations under the Revolving Credit Facility are guaranteed by 1616 Holdings and are secured by substantially all of the assets of the Company and 1616 Holdings.
On January 27, 2021, the Company entered into a First Amendment to Credit Agreement (the “First Amendment”) among the Loan Parties, the Lenders and Agent, which amended Credit Agreement.
Pursuant to the First Amendment, the Company obtained commitments from the Lenders that would allow the Company at its election (subject only to satisfaction of certain customary conditions such as the absence of any Event of Default), to increase the amount of the Revolving Credit Facility by an aggregate principal amount up to $50,000,000 (the “Committed Increase”). The First Amendment preserves the existing provisions of the Credit Agreement allowing for further increases to the total commitment under the Revolving Credit Facility, subject to certain conditions including obtaining commitments from one or more Lenders (“Uncommitted Incremental Capacity”), provided that the total amount of the facility, as increased pursuant to a Committed Increase or Uncommitted Incremental Capacity, cannot exceed $375,000,000. The current amount of the Revolving Credit Facility is maintained at $225,000,000.
Pursuant to the First Amendment, availability under the Revolving Credit Facility will continue to be based upon quarterly (or monthly or weekly, in certain cases) borrowing base certifications valuing the Loan Parties’ eligible credit card receivables and inventory, as reduced by certain reserves in effect from time to time. The First Amendment provides for the deferral of inventory appraisals and certain other diligence items, with reduced advance rates applicable during the period that such appraisals have not been delivered.
The First Amendment also reduced the pricing under the Revolving Credit Facility. Giving effect to the First Amendment, outstanding borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facility would accrue interest at floating rates plus an applicable margin ranging from 1.25% to 1.75% for LIBOR loans and 0.25% to 0.75% for base rate loans, and letter of credit fees range from 1.25% to 1.75%., in each case based on the average availability under the Revolving Credit Facility.
The First Amendment makes a number of other revisions to the covenants in the Credit Agreement, including a revision to the minimum availability covenant to require availability of 12.5% during the diligence deferral period referenced above and 10.0% at all other times.
During fiscal 2020, the Company borrowed and repaid approximately $50 million from its Revolving Credit Facility. During fiscal 2019 and fiscal 2018, the Company had 0 borrowings or interest expense under the Revolving Credit Facility.
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As of January 30, 2021, the Company had approximately $191 million available on the Revolving Credit Facility. As of February 1, 2020 and February 2, 2019, the Company had approximately $20 million available on the Revolving Credit Facility.
All obligations under the First Amendment are secured by substantially all of the Company's assets and are guaranteed by 1616 Holdings. As of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, the Company was in compliance with the covenants applicable to it under the First Amendment and the Revolving Credit Facility.
(6)Commitments and Contingencies
Commitments
Other Contractual Commitments
The Company has an executive severance plan that is applicable to certain key employees that provide for, among other things, salary, bonus, severance, and change-in-control provisions.
As of January 30, 2021, the Company had other purchase commitments of approximately $5.9 million consisting of purchase agreements for materials that will be used in the construction of new stores.
In July 2020, the Company acquired land in Buckeye, Arizona, to build an approximately 860,000 square foot distribution center to support the Company's anticipated growth. The total cost of the land and building is expected to be approximately $65 million, of which approximately $36 million has been paid through January 30, 2021. The Company expects to occupy the distribution center in Buckeye, Arizona in the second half of 2021.
Contingencies
Legal Matters
From time to time, the Company is involved in certain legal actions arising in the ordinary course of business. In management’s opinion, the outcome of such actions will not have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition or results of operations.
(7)Shareholders’ Equity
As of January 30, 2021, the Company is authorized to issue 120,000,000 shares of $0.01 par value common stock and 5,000,000 shares of $0.01 par value preferred stock. The holders of the common stock are entitled to 1 vote per share of common stock and are entitled to receive dividends if declared by the Board of Directors. The preferred stock may be issued from time to time in series as designated by the Board of Directors. The designations, powers, preferences, voting rights, privileges, options, conversion rights, and other special rights of the shares of each such series and the qualifications, limitations and restrictions thereof shall be designated by the Board of Directors.
Common Stock
The Five Below, Inc. 2012 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (the “ESPP”) is intended to be qualified as an “employee stock purchase plan” within the meaning of Section 423 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. The number of shares of common stock reserved for issuance, which is subject to other limitations, is 500,000 shares. The ESPP allows eligible employees the opportunity to purchase, subject to limitations, shares of the Company’s common stock through payroll deductions at a discount of 10% of the fair market value of such shares on the purchase date. In fiscal 2020, the Company issued 3,561 shares of common stock under the ESPP resulting in proceeds of $0.5 million and recorded share-based compensation expense of $50 thousand in connection with the ESPP related to the amount of the discount. In fiscal 2019, the Company issued 3,456 shares of common stock under the ESPP resulting in proceeds of $0.4 million and recorded share-based compensation expense of $48 thousand in connection with the ESPP related to the amount of the discount. In fiscal 2018, the Company issued 3,413 shares of common stock under the ESPP resulting in proceeds of $0.4 million and recorded share-based compensation expense of $32 thousand in connection with the ESPP related to the amount of the discount.
(8)Share-Based Compensation
Equity Incentive Plan
Pursuant to the Company's 2002 Equity Incentive Plan (the “Plan”), the Company’s Board of Directors may grant stock options, restricted shares and restricted stock units to officers, directors, key employees and professional service providers. The Plan, as amended, allows for the issuance of up to a total of 7.6 million shares under the Plan. As of January 30, 2021, 2.8 million stock options, restricted shares, or restricted stock units were available for grant.
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Common Stock Options
All stock options have a term not greater than ten years. Stock options vest and become exercisable in whole or in part, in accordance with vesting conditions set by the Company’s Board of Directors. Options granted to date generally vest over four years from the date of grant.
Stock option activity under the Plan was as follows:
 
Options
outstanding
Weighted
average
exercise
price
Weighted
average
remaining
contractual
term
Balance as of February 3, 2018519,485 $29.53 5.9
Granted
Forfeited(71)4.95 
Exercised(145,157)27.73 
Balance as of February 2, 2019374,257 30.23 5.1
Granted
Forfeited(1,150)39.47 
Exercised(141,582)29.02 
Balance as of February 1, 2020231,525 30.92 4.1
Granted0
Forfeited(1,650)31.49 
Exercised(176,846)30.23 
Balance as of January 30, 202153,029 33.22 3.2
Exercisable as of January 30, 202153,029 $33.22 3.2
The fair value of each option award granted to employees, including outside directors, is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. The Company did not grant any stock options in fiscal 2020, fiscal 2019 and fiscal 2018.
The Company uses the simplified method to estimate the expected term of the option. The expected volatility incorporates historical and implied volatility of similar entities whose share prices are publicly available. The risk-free rate for the expected term of the option is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant.
The total intrinsic value of stock options exercised during fiscal 2020, fiscal 2019 and fiscal 2018 was $17.6 million, $14.0 million and $9.9 million, respectively. The aggregate intrinsic value of stock options outstanding and exercisable was $7.5 million as of January 30, 2021. In fiscal 2020, fiscal 2019 and fiscal 2018, the Company received cash from the exercise of options of $5.3 million, $4.1 million and $4.0 million, respectively. Upon option exercise, the Company issued new shares of common stock.
Restricted Stock Units and Performance-Based Restricted Stock Units
All restricted stock units ("RSU") and performance-based restricted stock units ("PSU") vest in accordance with vesting conditions set by the compensation committee of the Company’s Board of Directors. RSUs granted to date have vesting periods ranging from less than one year to five years from the date of grant and the fair value of RSUs is the market price of the underlying common stock on the date of grant. PSUs granted to date have vesting periods ranging from less than one year to five years from the date of grant.
PSUs that have a performance condition are subject to satisfaction of the applicable performance goals established for the respective grant. The Company periodically assesses the probability of achievement of the performance criteria and adjusts the amount of compensation expense accordingly. The fair value of these PSUs is the market price of the underlying common stock on the date of grant. Compensation is recognized over the vesting period and adjusted for the probability of achievement of the performance criteria.
PSUs that have a market condition based on our total shareholder return relative to a pre-defined peer group are subject to multi-year performance objectives with a vesting date in 2023 (if the applicable performance objectives are achieved). The fair value of these PSUs are determined using a Monte Carlo valuation model.
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RSU and PSU activity under the Plan was as follows:
Restricted Stock UnitsPerformance-Based Restricted Stock Units
NumberWeighted-Average Grant Date Fair ValueNumberWeighted-Average Grant Date Fair Value
Non-vested balance as of February 3, 2018309,554 $38.48 495,659 $37.43 
Granted115,411 77.28 121,333 69.59 
Vested(107,695)37.98 (197,534)35.69 
Forfeited(24,382)43.75 (3,258)69.03 
Non-vested balance as of February 2, 2019292,888 53.52 416,200 47.38 
Granted89,337 119.28 85,939 116.92 
Vested(109,924)44.70 (117,137)39.21 
Forfeited(21,949)70.48 (27,836)45.23 
Non-vested balance as of February 1, 2020250,352 79.37 357,166 66.96 
Granted179,947 107.82 370,613 134.73 
Vested(102,382)66.33 (127,622)39.89 
Forfeited(23,519)87.54 (340,381)89.54 
Non-vested balance as of January 30, 2021304,398 $99.94 259,776 $151.73 
In connection with the vesting of RSUs and PSUs during fiscal 2020, the Company withheld 51,734 shares with an aggregate value of $3.9 million in satisfaction of minimum tax withholding obligations due upon vesting. In connection with the vesting of RSUs and PSUs during fiscal 2019, the Company withheld 83,121 shares with an aggregate value of $10.4 million in satisfaction of minimum tax withholding obligations due upon vesting. In connection with the vesting of RSUs during fiscal 2018, the Company withheld 113,058 shares with an aggregate value of $8.0 million in satisfaction of minimum tax withholding obligations due upon vesting.
As of January 30, 2021, there was $35.9 million of total unrecognized compensation costs related to non-vested share-based compensation arrangements (including stock options, RSUs and PSUs) granted under the Plan. The cost is expected to be recognized over a weighted average vesting period of 2.7 years.
Share Repurchase Program
On March 20, 2018, the Company's Board of Directors approved a share repurchase program authorizing the repurchase of up to $100 million of the Company's common stock through March 31, 2021, on the open market, in privately negotiated transactions, or otherwise. On March 9, 2021, our Board of Directors approved a new share repurchase program for up to $100 million of its common shares through March 31, 2024. In fiscal 2018, the Company repurchased 21,810 shares under this program at an aggregate cost of approximately $2.0 million, or an average price of $91.07 per share. In fiscal 2019, the Company repurchased 337,552 shares under this program at an aggregate cost of approximately $36.9 million, or an average price of $109.27 per share. In fiscal 2020, the Company repurchased 137,023 shares under this program at an aggregate cost of approximately $12.7 million, or an average price of $92.42 per share. There can be no assurances that any additional repurchases will be completed, or as to the timing or amount of any repurchases. The share repurchase program may be modified or discontinued at any time.
(9)Income Taxes
Deferred income taxes reflect the net tax effects of temporary differences between carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts used for income tax purposes. In assessing the realizability of deferred tax assets, management considers whether it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon generation of future taxable income during the periods in which temporary differences representing net future deductible amounts become deductible.
As of January 30, 2021, no valuation allowance has been provided for net deferred tax assets as management believes that it is more likely than not that the Company will realize all deferred tax assets as of January 30, 2021.
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The components of the income tax expense are as follows (in thousands): 
 Fiscal Year
202020192018
Current:
Federal$2,276 $25,069 $33,297 
State7,235 6,602 8,315 
9,511 31,671 41,612 
Deferred:
Federal21,954 13,487 2,000 
State(1,759)1,355 (1,450)
20,195 14,842 550 
Income tax expense$29,706 $46,513 $42,162 
The reconciliation of the statutory federal income tax rate to the Company’s effective income tax rate is as follows:
 Fiscal Year
202020192018
Statutory federal tax rate21.0 %21.0 %21.0 %
State taxes, net of federal benefit2.8 2.8 2.8 
Other (1)
(4.4)(2.8)(1.8)
19.4 %21.0 %22.0 %
(1)Other line includes excess tax benefits relating to share-based payment accounting.

 The effective tax rate for fiscal 2020 compared to fiscal 2019 was primarily driven by discrete items, which includes the impact of the CARES Act, partially offset by a reduction of the benefit of ASU 2016-09, "Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting" with respect to the requirements to recognize excess income tax benefits or deficiencies as income tax benefit or expense in the consolidated statements of operations rather than as additional paid-in capital in the consolidated balance sheets. The effective tax rate for fiscal 2019 compared to fiscal 2018 was primarily driven by discrete items, which includes the impact of ASU 2016-09, "Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting."
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The tax effects of temporary differences that give rise to deferred tax assets and liabilities are (in thousands):
January 30, 2021February 1, 2020
Deferred tax assets:
Net operating loss carryforwards$1,139 $
Inventories10,626 13,182 
Deferred revenue851 1,255 
Accrued bonus1,128 1,007 
Deferred rent
Operating lease liabilities287,351 242,432 
Other4,662 5,208 
Deferred tax assets305,757 263,084 
Deferred tax liabilities:
Property and equipment(81,129)(55,953)
Operating lease assets(252,541)(214,935)
Other(998)(912)
Deferred tax liabilities(334,668)(271,800)
$(28,911)$(8,716)
The Company had 0 material accrual for uncertain tax positions or interest or penalties related to income taxes on the Company’s balance sheets as of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, and has not recognized any material uncertain tax positions or interest and/or penalties related to income taxes in the consolidated statements of operations for fiscal 2020, fiscal 2019, or fiscal 2018.
The Company files a federal income tax return as well as state tax returns. The Company’s U.S. federal income tax returns for the fiscal years ended February 3, 2018 and thereafter remain subject to examination by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. State returns are filed in various state jurisdictions, as appropriate, with varying statutes of limitation and remain subject to examination for varying periods up to three years to four years depending on the state.
(10) Employee Benefit Plan
The Company has a 401(k) Retirement Savings Plan and employees can contribute up to the maximum amount allowed under law. The Company may make discretionary matching and profit sharing contributions, which vest over a period of five years from each employee’s commencement of employment with the Company. During fiscal 2020, fiscal 2019 and fiscal 2018, the Company made matching contributions of $2.8 million, $2.9 million and $1.2 million, respectively.
(11) Segment Reporting
The Company evaluates performance internally and manages the business on the basis of 1 operating segment; therefore, it has only 1 reportable segment. All of the Company’s identifiable assets are located in the United States.
Set forth below is data for the following groups of products: leisure, fashion and home, and party and snack. The percentage of net sales represented by each product group for each of the last three fiscal years was as follows:
Percentage of Net Sales
Fiscal Year
202020192018
Leisure47.3 %49.8 %50.9 %
Fashion and home35.8 %31.3 %30.9 %
Party and snack16.9 %18.9 %18.2 %
Total100.0 %100.0 %100.0 %
Leisure includes items such as sporting goods, games, toys, tech, books, electronic accessories, and arts and crafts. Fashion and home includes items such as personal accessories, “attitude” t-shirts, beauty offerings, home goods and storage options. Party and snack includes items such as party and seasonal goods, greeting cards, candy and other snacks, and beverages.
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(12) Quarterly Results of Operations and Seasonality (Unaudited)
Quarterly financial results for fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2019 were as follows: (in thousands except for per share data). 
 
Fiscal Year 2020 (1)
Fiscal Year 2019 (1)
Fourth
Quarter
Third
Quarter
Second
Quarter
First
Quarter
Fourth
Quarter
Third
Quarter
Second
Quarter
First
Quarter
Net sales$858,514 $476,614 $426,110 $200,899 $687,130 $377,438 $417,400 $364,762 
Gross profit$340,930 $151,100 $139,839 $20,461 $289,128 $118,682 $146,171 $119,985 
Net income (loss)$123,937 $20,425 $29,581 $(50,582)$110,374 $10,189 $28,831 $25,662 
Basic income (loss) per common share$2.22 $0.37 $0.53 $(0.91)$1.98 $0.18 $0.52 $0.46 
Diluted income (loss) per common share$2.20 $0.36 $0.53 $(0.91)$1.97 $0.18 $0.51 $0.46 
(1)The sum of the quarterly per share amounts may not equal per share amounts reported for the fiscal year due to rounding.

The Company's business is seasonal in nature and demand is generally the highest in the fourth fiscal quarter due to the fourth quarter holiday season and, therefore, operating results for any fiscal quarter are not necessarily indicative of results for the full fiscal year. To prepare for the holiday season, the Company must order and keep in stock more merchandise than it carries during other parts of the year. The Company expects inventory levels, along with an increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses, generally to reach their highest levels in the third and fourth fiscal quarters in anticipation of the increased net sales during the year-end holiday season. As a result of this seasonality, and generally because of variation in consumer spending habits, the Company experiences fluctuations in net sales and working capital requirements during the fiscal year.
ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

Not applicable.
ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
Our management has evaluated, under the supervision and with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rule 13a-15(e), as of the end of the period covered by this Annual Report on Form 10-K pursuant to Rule 13a-15(b) of the Exchange Act. Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this Annual Report on Form 10-K are effective at a reasonable assurance level in ensuring that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act reports is (1) recorded, processed, summarized and reported in a timely manner and (2) accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures will prevent or detect all errors and all fraud. While our disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance of their effectiveness, because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected.

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
There were no changes to our internal control over financial reporting during the thirteen weeks ended January 30, 2021, as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f), that have materially affected, or that are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

Management's Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act. The company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
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Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with policies or procedures may deteriorate.
Management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, assessed the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting as of January 30, 2021. Management based this assessment on criteria for effective internal control over financial reporting described in “Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013)” issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on this assessment, management determined that, as of January 30, 2021, the company maintained effective internal control over financial reporting at a reasonable assurance level.
The effectiveness of the company’s internal control over financial reporting as of January 30, 2021 has been audited by KPMG LLP, our independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their report dated March 18, 2021 that appears below.
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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Shareholders and Board of Directors
Five Below, Inc.:
Opinion on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
We have audited Five Below, Inc. and subsidiary's (the Company) internal control over financial reporting as of January 30, 2021, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. In our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of January 30, 2021, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB), the consolidated balance sheets of the Company as of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020, the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in shareholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the fiscal years in the three-year period ended January 30, 2021, and the related notes (collectively, the consolidated financial statements), and our report dated March 18, 2021 expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated financial statements.
Basis for Opinion
The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audit also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
Definition and Limitations of Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

/s/ KPMG LLP

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
March 18, 2021
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ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION
None.

PART III

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
The information required by this Item 10 is included in the “Board of Directors-Nominees for Election to the Board of Directors for a Three-Year Term Expiring at the 2024 Annual Meeting,” “Board of Directors-Members of the Board of Directors Continuing in Office for a Term Expiring at the 2022 Annual Meeting,” “Board of Directors-Members of the Board of Directors Continuing in Office for a Term Expiring at the 2023 Annual Meeting,” “Executive Officers,” “Board of Directors-Code of Business Conduct and Ethics,” “Board of Directors-Committees of the Board of Directors,” and “Board of Directors-Director Nomination Process” sections of our proxy statement for the 2021 annual meeting of shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and is incorporated by reference herein.
ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
The information required by this Item 11 is included in the “Compensation Discussion and Analysis,” “Executive Compensation,” “Board of Directors–Director Compensation,” “Board of Directors–Board Leadership Structure and Board’s Role in Risk Oversight,” “Board of Directors–Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation” and “Compensation Committee Report” sections of our proxy statement for the 2021 annual meeting of shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and is incorporated by reference herein.
ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS
The information required by this Item 12 is included in the “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management” and “Equity Compensation Plan Information” sections of our proxy statement for the 2021 annual meeting of shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and is incorporated by reference herein.
ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

The information required by this Item 13 is included in the “Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions” and “Board of Directors–Director Independence” sections of our proxy statement for the 2021 annual meeting of shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and is incorporated by reference herein.
ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

The information required by this Item 14 is included in the “Proposal 2, Ratification of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm” section of our proxy statement for the 2021 annual meeting of shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and is incorporated by reference herein.
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PART IV
ITEM 15. EXHIBITS AND CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS SCHEDULES

(a)    1. Consolidated Financial Statements
The consolidated financial statements of the Company filed as part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K are included in Part II, Item 8 beginning on page 48.
2. Consolidated Financial Statements Schedules
All schedules are omitted because they are not applicable or because the required information is either not material or is included in the Consolidated Financial Statements or Notes thereto.

3. Exhibits


Exhibit
Number        Description                                 

3.1    Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation of Five Below, Inc., as currently in effect (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 of the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 3, 2015)
    
3.2    Amended and Restated Bylaws of Five Below, Inc., as currently in effect (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 5, 2018)
    
4.1    Form of Specimen Stock Certificate (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 of Amendment No. 3 to the Registration Statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-180780) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 9, 2012)

4.2    Description of Five Below's Securities (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 of the Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 5, 2018)
    
10.1†    Five Below, Inc. 2012 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 29, 2012)
    
10.2†    Five Below, Inc. Amended and Restated Equity Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 1, 2016)
    
10.3a†    Form of Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement (Employees) (used for options granted prior to May 21, 2013) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.10 of the Registration Statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-180780) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 18, 2012)
    
10.3b†    Form of Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement (Employees) (used for options granted after May 21, 2013 and prior to June 30, 2014) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 10, 2013)
    
10.3c†    Form of Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement for Employees (used for options granted after June 30, 2014) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 30, 2014)
    
10.4a†    Form of Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement (Executives) (used for options granted prior to May 21, 2013) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.11 of the Registration Statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-180780) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 18, 2012)
    
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10.4b†    Form of Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement (Executives) (used for options granted after May 21, 2013 and prior to June 30, 2014) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 of the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 10, 2013)
    
10.4c†    Form of Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement for Executives (used for options granted after June 30, 2014) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 30, 2014)
    
10.5†    Form of Award Agreement for Restricted Shares under the Five Below, Inc. Equity Incentive Plan (Employees) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.14 of Amendment No. 2 to the Registration Statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-180780) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 12, 2012)
    
10.6†    Form of Award Agreement for Restricted Shares under the Five Below, Inc. Amended and Restated Equity Incentive Plan (Directors) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 11, 2013)
    
10.7†    Form of Award Agreement for Restricted Stock Units (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 30, 2014)
    
10.8†    Form of Award Agreement for Restricted Stock Units (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on December 5, 2014)

10.9†    Form of Award Agreement for Restricted Stock Units (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.14 of the Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 24, 2016)

10.10†    Form of Award Agreement for Restricted Stock Units (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 5, 2018)

10.11†    Form of Award Agreement for Performance-Based Restricted Stock Units (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 5, 2018)
    
10.12†    Form of Director and Officer Indemnification Agreement (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.17 of Amendment No. 1 to the Registration Statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-180780) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on May 24, 2012)
    
10.13†    Letter Employment Agreement, dated October 14, 2010, by and between Thomas Vellios and Five Below, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.19 of the Registration Statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-180780) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 18, 2012)
    
10.14†    Amendment to Employment Agreement, dated September 28, 2011, by and between Thomas Vellios and Five Below, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.20 of the Registration Statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-180780) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 18, 2012)
    
10.15†    Amendment, dated February 18, 2015, to Employment Letter, dated October 14, 2010, as amended, by and between Thomas Vellios and Five Below, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 23, 2015)
    
10.16†    Letter Employment Agreement, dated April 16, 2012, by and between Kenneth R. Bull and Five Below, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.21 of the Registration Statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-180780) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 18, 2012)
    
10.17†    Letter Employment Agreement, dated December 10, 2014, by and between Michael Romanko and Five Below, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.23 of the Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 26, 2015)
    
10.18†    Employment Letter and Non-Disclosure Agreement, each dated June 8, 2014, by and between Joel D. Anderson and Five Below, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 12, 2014)
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10.19†    Amendment to Employment Letter, dated December 4, 2014, by and between Joel D. Anderson and Five Below, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on December 4, 2014)

10.20†    Second Amendment to Employment Letter, dated July 20, 2015, by and between Joel D. Anderson and Five Below, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 3, 2015)
    
10.21†    Employment Letter and Non-Disclosure Agreement, each dated May 21, 2014, by and between Eric M. Specter and Five Below, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 12, 2014)
    
10.22†    Amendment to Employment Letter, dated March 11, 2016, by and between Eric M. Specter and Five Below, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 17, 2016)
    
10.23    Fifth Amended and Restated Credit Agreement, dated April 24, 2020, among Five Below, Inc., 1616 Holdings, Inc., and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, and the lenders party thereto (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 29, 2020)

10.24    Facility Guarantee, dated April 24, 2020, between 1616 Holdings, Inc., and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 29, 2020)

10.25    Security Agreement, dated April 24, 2020, among Five Below, Inc., 1616 Holdings, Inc., and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 29, 2020)

10.26        First Amendment to Credit Agreement, dated January 27, 2021, among Five Below, Inc., 1616 Holdings, Inc., and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, and the lenders party thereto (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 29, 2020)

10.27†    Employment Letter, dated April 6, 2017, by and between George S. Hill and Five Below, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 2, 2017)

10.28†    Five Below, Inc. Executive Severance Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 2, 2017)

10.29†    Employment Letter, dated October 29, 2017, by and between David Makuen and Five Below, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on December 1, 2017)
    
10.30†    Employment Letter, dated February 19, 2019, and Non-Solicitation, Non-Disclosure, Non-Compete and Proprietary Information Agreement by and between Judy Werthauser and Five Below, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.29 of the Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 28, 2019)

10.31†    Form of Award Agreement for Restricted Stock Units under the Five Below, Inc. Amended and Restated Equity Incentive Plan (Directors) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.30 of the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on August 29, 2019)

10.32†    Five Below, Inc. 2020 Performance Bonus Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 16, 2020)

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10.33†    Compensation Policy for Non-Employee Directors (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.32 of the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on December 3, 2020)

10.34†    Form of Award Agreement for Performance-Based Restricted Stock Units under the Five Below, Inc. Amended and Restated Equity Incentive Plan (Directors) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.33 of the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on December 3, 2020)

10.35    First Amendment to Credit Agreement, dated January 27, 2021, among the Company, 1616 Holdings, Inc., Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, and the lenders party thereto (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 29, 2021)

21.1    List of Subsidiaries of the Company (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 21.1 of the Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 19, 2020)
    
    




101*    The following financial information from this Annual Report on Form 10-K, formatted in Inline XBRL (Extensible Business Reporting Language) and furnished electronically herewith: (i) the Consolidated Balance Sheets as of January 30, 2021 and February 1, 2020; (ii) the Consolidated Statements of Operations for Fiscal Years 2020, 2019, and 2018; (iii) the Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity for Fiscal Years 2020, 2019, and 2018; (iv) the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for Fiscal Years 2020, 2019, and 2018 and (v) the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, in each case, tagged in detail.

104*     Cover Page to this Annual Report on Form 10-K formatted in Inline XBRL and contained in Exhibit 101.


† Management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement.

* Pursuant to applicable securities laws and regulations, this interactive data file is deemed not filed or part of a registration statement or prospectus for purposes of sections 11 or 12 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, is deemed not filed for purposes of section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and otherwise is not subject to liability under those sections.
ITEM 16. FORM 10-K SUMMARY
Optional disclosure not included in this report.

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SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 18th day of March 2021.
        
                                
FIVE BELOW, INC.
By: /s/ Joel D. Anderson
Name: Joel D. Anderson
Title: President and Chief Executive Officer

            
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.
SignatureTitleDate
/s/ Thomas G. Vellios
Thomas G. Vellios
Non-Executive Chairman of the BoardMarch 18, 2021
/s/ Joel D. Anderson
Joel D. Anderson
President, Chief Executive Officer and Director (Principal Executive Officer)March 18, 2021
/s/ Kenneth R. Bull
Kenneth R. Bull
Chief Financial Officer (Principal Financial Officer and Principal Accounting Officer)March 18, 2021
/s/ Kathleen S. Barclay
Kathleen S. Barclay
DirectorMarch 18, 2021
/s/ Catherine E. Buggeln
Catherine E. Buggeln
DirectorMarch 18, 2021
/s/ Michael F. Devine III
Michael F. Devine III
DirectorMarch 18, 2021
/s/ Dinesh Lathi
Dinesh Lathi
DirectorMarch 18, 2021
/s/ Richard L. Markee
Richard L. Markee
DirectorMarch 18, 2021
/s/ Thomas M. Ryan
Thomas M. Ryan
DirectorMarch 18, 2021
/s/ Ronald L. Sargent
Ronald L. Sargent
DirectorMarch 18, 2021
/s/ Zuhairah S. Washington
Zuhairah S. Washington
DirectorMarch 18, 2021

79