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Commonwealth Income & Growth Fund V (CIGF5)

Filed: 16 Nov 20, 4:16pm

 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-Q
 
☒ QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
FOR THE QUARTERLY PERIOD ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2020 or
 
☐ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 or 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
Commission File Number: 333-108057
 
COMMONWEALTH INCOME & GROWTH FUND V
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Pennsylvania65-1189593
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)(I.R.S. Employer Identification Number)
 
4532 US Highway 19
Suite 200
New Port Richey, FL 34652
(Address, including zip code, of principal executive offices)
 
(877) 654-1500
 (Registrant’s telephone number including area code)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (i) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months, and (ii) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days:
YES ☒ NO ☐
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).YES ☒ NO ☐
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definition of "accelerated filer, “large accelerated filer" and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
 
Large accelerated filer ☐Accelerated filer ☐
Non-accelerated filer ☐Smaller reporting company ☒
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company.)Emerging growth company ☐
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is an emerging growth company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). YES ☐ NO ☒
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). YES ☐ NO ☒
 

 
1
 
 
FORM 10-Q
SEPTEMBER 30, 2020
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
PART I
Item 1.Financial Statements 3
Item 2.Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 14
Item 3.Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 20
Item 4.Controls and Procedures 20
PART II
Item 1.Legal Proceedings 21
Item 1A.Risk Factors 21
Item 2.Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 23
Item 3.Defaults Upon Senior Securities 23
Item 4.Mine Safety Disclosures 23
Item 5.Other Information 23
Item 6.Exhibits 23
 
 
2
 
Part I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1. Financial Statements
 
Commonwealth Income & Growth Fund V
Condensed Balance Sheets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
September 30,
 
 
December 31,
 
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
 
(unaudited)
 
 
 
 
ASSETS
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
 $177,034 
 $5,211 
Lease income receivable, net of reserve of approximately $9,000 and $76,000 at September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively
  47,185 
  160,346 
Accounts receivable, Commonwealth Capital Corp
  - 
  19,053 
Other receivables
  341 
  1,054 
Prepaid expenses
  4,779 
  1,323 
 
  229,339 
  186,987 
 
    
    
Net investment in finance leases
  - 
  8,262 
 
    
    
Equipment, at cost
  3,759,447 
  4,480,679 
Accumulated depreciation
  (3,644,017)
  (4,214,492)
 
  115,430 
  266,187 
 
    
    
Total Assets
 $344,769 
 $461,436 
 
    
    
LIABILITIES AND PARTNERS' (DEFICIT) CAPITAL
    
    
LIABILITIES
    
    
Accounts payable
 $130,452 
 $134,153 
Accounts payable, CIGF, Inc., net
  82,996 
  57,925 
Accounts payable, Commonwealth Capital Corp, net of accounts receivable of approximately $5,000 and $28,000 at September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively
  123,520 
  115,504 
Other accrued expenses
  - 
  2,977 
Unearned lease income
  5,452 
  19,730 
Notes payable
  17,477 
  87,215 
Total Liabilities
  359,897 
  417,504 
 
    
    
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
    
    
PARTNERS' (DEFICIT) CAPITAL
    
    
General Partner
  1,000 
  1,000 
Limited Partners
  (16,128)
  42,932 
Total Partners' (Deficit) Capital
  (15,128)
  43,932 
 
    
    
Total Liabilities and Partners' (Deficit) Capital
 $344,769 
 $461,436 
 
    
    
see accompanying notes to condensed financial statements
 
 
3
 
Commonwealth Income & Growth Fund V
Condensed Statements of Operations
(unaudited)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Three Months Ended
 
 
Nine Months Ended
 
 
 
September 30,
 
 
September 30,
 
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
Revenue
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lease
 $66,090 
 $123,869 
 $235,734 
 $378,752 
Interest and other
  73 
  691 
  5,324 
  1,255 
Sales and property taxes
  3,424 
  7,002 
  22,738 
  21,870 
Gain on sale of equipment
  1,238 
  2,459 
  19,026 
  2,834 
Total revenue and gain on sale of equipment
  70,825 
  134,021 
  282,822 
  404,711 
 
    
    
    
    
Expenses
    
    
    
    
Operating, excluding depreciation and amortization
  50,610 
  2,770 
  219,970 
  67,686 
Interest
  395 
  2,407 
  2,107 
  9,265 
Depreciation
  40,547 
  63,550 
  130,892 
  218,305 
Sales and property taxes
  3,424 
  7,002 
  22,738 
  21,870 
Bad debt recovery
  - 
  - 
  (33,825)
  - 
Total expenses
  94,976 
  75,729 
  341,882 
  317,126 
 
    
    
    
    
Net (loss) income
 $(24,151)
 $58,292 
 $(59,060)
 $87,585 
 
    
    
    
    
Net (loss) income allocated to Limited Partners
 $(24,151)
 $58,292 
 $(59,060)
 $87,585 
 
    
    
    
    
Net (loss) income per equivalent Limited Partnership unit
 $(0.02)
 $0.05 
 $(0.05)
 $0.07 
 
    
    
    
    
Weighted average number of equivalent Limited Partnership units outstanding during the period
  1,235,581 
  1,236,148 
  1,235,761 
  1,236,148 
 
    
    
    
    
see accompanying notes to condensed financial statements
 
 
4
 
Commonwealth Income & Growth Fund V
Condensed Statement of Partners' (Deficit) Capital
For the three, six and nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019
(unaudited)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
General
 
 
Limited
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Partner
 
 
Partner
 
 
General
 
 
Limited
 
 
 
 
 
 
Units
 
 
Units
 
 
Partner
 
 
Partners
 
 
Total
 
Balance, January 1, 2020
  50 
  1,236,148 
 $1,000 
 $42,932 
 $43,932 
Net loss
  - 
  - 
  - 
  (1,551)
  (1,551)
Redemption
  - 
  (567)
  - 
  - 
  - 
Balance, March 31, 2020
  50 
  1,235,581 
 $1,000 
 $41,381 
 $42,381 
Net loss
  - 
  - 
  - 
  (33,358)
  (33,358)
Balance, June 30, 2020
  50 
  1,235,581 
 $1,000 
 $8,023 
 $9,023 
Net loss
  - 
  - 
  - 
  (24,151)
  (24,151)
Balance, September 30, 2020
  50 
  1,235,581 
 $1,000 
 $(16,128)
 $(15,128)
 
    
    
    
    
    
 
    
    
    
    
    
 
 
General
 
 
Limited
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Partner
 
 
Partner
 
 
General
 
 
Limited
 
 
 
 
 
 
Units
 
 
Units
 
 
Partner
 
 
Partners
 
 
Total
 
Balance, January 1, 2019
  50 
  1,236,148 
  1,000 
  (14,179)
  (13,179)
Net income
  - 
  - 
  - 
  2,080 
  2,080 
Balance, March 31, 2019
  50 
  1,236,148 
  1,000 
  (12,099)
  (11,099)
Net income
  - 
  - 
  - 
  27,213 
  27,213 
Balance, June 30, 2019
  50 
  1,236,148 
  1,000 
  15,114 
  16,114 
Net income
  - 
  - 
  - 
  58,292 
  58,292
Balance, September 30, 2019  
  50 
  1,236,148 
 $1,000 
 73,406 
  74,406 
 
see accompanying notes to condensed financial statements
 
 
5
 
Commonwealth Income & Growth Fund V
Condensed Statements of Cash Flow
(unaudited)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Nine months ended
 
 
 
September 30,
 
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
 $130,080 
 $(31,261)
 
    
    
Cash flows from investing activities
    
    
Capital expenditures
  (19,590)
  - 
Net proceeds from the sale of equipment
  61,333 
  15,136 
 
    
    
Net cash provided by investing activities
  41,743 
  15,136 
 
    
    
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
  171,823 
  (16,125)
 
    
    
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period
  5,211 
  19,695 
 
    
    
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period
 $177,034 
 $3,570 
 
    
    
see accompanying notes to condensed financial statements
 
 
6
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
1. Business
 
Commonwealth Income & Growth Fund V (the “Partnership”) is a limited partnership organized in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in May 2003. The Partnership offered for sale up to 1,250,000 units of the limited partnership at the purchase price of $20 per unit (the “offering”). The Partnership reached the minimum amount in escrow and commenced operations on March 14, 2005. As of February 24, 2006, the Partnership was fully subscribed.
 
The Partnership used the proceeds of the offering to acquire, own and lease various types of information technology, medical technology, telecommunications technology, inventory management equipment and other similar capital equipment, which is leased primarily to U.S. corporations and institutions.
 
Commonwealth Capital Corp. (“CCC”), on behalf of the Partnership and other affiliated partnerships, acquires equipment subject to associated debt obligations and lease agreements and allocates a participation in the cost, debt and lease revenue to the various partnerships that it manages based on certain risk factors.
 
The Partnership’s investment objective is to acquire primarily high technology equipment. Information technology has developed rapidly in recent years and is expected to continue to do so. Technological advances have permitted reductions in the cost of information technology processing capacity, speed, and utility. In the future, the rate and nature of equipment development may cause equipment to become obsolete more rapidly. The Partnership also acquires high technology medical, telecommunications and inventory management equipment. The Partnership’s general partner will seek to maintain an appropriate balance and diversity in the types of equipment acquired. The market for high technology medical equipment is growing each year. Generally, this type of equipment will have a longer useful life than other types of technology equipment. This allows for increased re-marketability, if it is returned before its economic or announcement cycle is depleted.
 
The Partnership’s General Partner is Commonwealth Income & Growth Fund, Inc. (the “General Partner”), a Pennsylvania corporation which is an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of CCC. Approximately ten years after the commencement of operations (the “operational phase”), the Partnership intended to sell or otherwise dispose of all of its equipment; make final distributions to partners, and to dissolve. The Partnership was originally scheduled to end its operational phase on February 4, 2017. During the year ended December 31, 2015, the operational phase was officially extended to December 31, 2020 through an investor proxy vote. The Partnership is expected to terminate on December 31, 2022.
 
Liquidity and Going Concern
 
For the nine months ended September 30, 2020, the Partnership incurred positive cash flow. However, historically the Partnership has reported recurring negative cash flows. At September 30, 2020, the Partnership has a working capital deficit of approximately $125,000. Such factors raise substantial doubt about the Partnership’s ability to continue as a going concern.
 
The General Partner agreed to forgo distributions and allocations of net income owed to it, and suspended limited partner distributions. The General Partner will continue to waive certain fees and may defer certain related party payables owed to the Partnership in an effort to further increase the Partnership’s cash flow. Additionally, the Partnership will seek to enhance portfolio returns and maximize cash flow through the use of leveraged lease transactions: the acquisition of lease equipment through financing. The Partnership may also attempt to obtain additional funds by disposing of or refinancing equipment, or by borrowing within its permissible limits. However, at this time, it is uncertain as to whether the General Partner’s plans will be successful.
 
7
 
2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
 
Basis of Presentation
 
The financial information presented as of any date other than December 31, 2019 has been prepared from the books and records without audit. The following unaudited condensed financial statements have been prepared pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission. Financial information as of December 31, 2019 has been derived from the audited financial statements of the Partnership, but does not include all disclosures required by generally accepted accounting principles to be included in audited financial statements. In the opinion of management, all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair presentation of the financial information for the periods indicated, have been included. Operating results for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 are not necessarily indicative of financial results that may be expected for the full year ended December 31, 2020.
 
Adjustment to Prior Financial Statements
 
The Partnership has determined that there had been an immaterial error in its accounting for Other LP expenses in its financial statements of the Commonwealth Income & Growth Fund V for the year ended December 31, 2019 and the quarter ended March 31, 2020. The Partnership determined that Other LP expenses should have been presented in the Statement of Operations as an increase of expense under Operating expenses, excluding depreciation and amortization. An adjustment was made to correct the error in the prior period ending December 31, 2019 by reporting as an increase of expense of approximately $5,000 and an increase in Accounts Payable, CIGF, Inc. by the same amount. An adjustment was also made to correct the error in the prior period ending March 31, 2020 by reporting an increase in Accounts Payable, CIGF, Inc. of approximately $5,000 and the cumulative decreasing effect on the Partners’ Capital by the same amount.
 
Disclosure of Fair Value of Financial Instruments
 
Estimated fair value was determined by management using available market information and appropriate valuation methodologies. However, judgment was necessary to interpret market data and develop estimated fair value. Cash and cash equivalents, receivables, accounts payable and accrued expenses and other liabilities are carried at amounts which reasonably approximate their fair values as of September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 due to the short-term nature of these financial instruments.
 
The Partnership’s long-term debt consists of notes payable, which are secured by specific equipment and are nonrecourse liabilities of the Partnership. The estimated fair value of this debt at September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 approximates the carrying value of these instruments, due to the interest rates on the debt approximating current market interest rates. The Partnership classifies the fair value of its notes payable within Level 2 of the valuation hierarchy based on the observable inputs used to estimate fair value.
 
Cash and cash equivalents
 
We consider cash equivalents to be highly liquid investments with the original maturity dates of 90 days or less.
 
At September 30, 2020, cash and cash equivalents was held in one account maintained at one financial institution with an aggregate balance of approximately $178,000. Bank accounts are federally insured up to $250,000 by the FDIC. At September 30, 2020, the total cash bank balance was as follows:
 
At September 30, 2020
 
Balance
 
Total bank balance
 $178,000 
FDIC insured
  (178,000)
Uninsured amount
 $- 
 
The Partnership believes it mitigates the risk of holding uninsured deposits by only depositing funds with major financial institutions. The Partnership has not experienced any losses in our accounts, and believes it is not exposed to any significant credit risk. The amounts in such accounts will fluctuate throughout 2020 due to many factors, including cash receipts, equipment acquisitions, interest rates and distributions to limited partners.
 
8
 
Recent Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted
 
FASB issued guidance, Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-13, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments, as clarified and amended by ASU 2018-19, Codification Improvements to Topic 326, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses and ASU 2019-05, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326): Targeted Transition Relief, Accounting Standards Update No. 2020-02, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326) . The guidance is effective for fiscal years, within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2020 and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021. The guidance requires an allowance for credit losses based on the expectation of lifetime credit losses on financial receivables carried at amortized cost, including, but not limited to, mortgage loans, premium receivables, reinsurance receivables and certain leases. The current expected credit loss (“CECL”) impairment model for financial assets reported at amortized cost will be applicable to receivables associated with sales-type and direct financing leases but not to operating lease receivables.
 
The FASB developed the guidance in response to concerns that credit losses were identified and recorded “too little, too late” in the period leading up to the global financial crisis of 2008. More recently, the impact of the COVID -19 pandemic may bring new challenges to identifying credit losses. While the new standard is expected to have a significant effect on entities in the financial services industry, particularly banks and others with lending operations, the guidance affects all entities in all industries and applies to a wide variety of financial instruments, including trade receivables.
 
On November 15, 2019, the FASB delayed the effective date of FASB ASC Topic 326 for certain small public companies and other private companies. As amended, the effective date of ASC Topic 326 was delayed until fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022 for SEC filers that are eligible to be smaller reporting companies under the SEC’s definition, as well as private companies and not-for-profit entities. The Partnership continues to evaluate the impact of the new guidance on its condensed financial statements.
 
3. Information Technology, Medical Technology, Telecommunications Technology, Inventory Management Equipment and other Business-Essential Capital Equipment (“Equipment”)
 
The Partnership is the lessor of equipment under operating leases with periods that generally will range from 12 to 48 months. In general, associated costs such as repairs and maintenance, insurance and property taxes are paid by the lessee.
 
Gains from the sale of equipment resulting from early buyouts are recognized when the lease is modified and terminated concurrently. Gains from the sale of equipment included in revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019 were approximately $19,000 and $3,000, respectively.
 
CCC, on behalf of the Partnership and on behalf of other affiliated companies and partnerships (“partnerships”), acquires equipment subject to associated debt obligations and lease agreements and allocates a participation in the cost, debt and lease revenue to the various companies based on certain risk factors.
 
The Partnership’s share of the cost of the equipment in which it participates with other partnerships at September 30, 2020 was approximately $2,014,000 and is included in the Partnership’s equipment on its balance sheet. The total cost of the equipment shared by the Partnership with other partnerships at September 30, 2020 was approximately $8,475,000. The Partnership’s share of the outstanding debt associated with this equipment at September 30, 2020 was approximately $9,000 and is included in the Partnership’s notes payable on its balance sheet. The total outstanding debt related to the equipment shared by the Partnership at September 30, 2020 was approximately $302,000.
 
The Partnership’s share of the cost of the equipment in which it participates with other partnerships at December 31, 2019 was approximately $2,213,000 and is included in the Partnership’s equipment on its balance sheet. The total cost of the equipment shared by the Partnership with other partnerships at December 31, 2019 was approximately $8,873,000. The Partnership’s share of the outstanding debt associated with this equipment at December 31, 2019 was approximately $51,000 and is included in the Partnership’s notes payable on its balance sheet. The total outstanding debt related to the equipment shared by the Partnership at December 31, 2019 was approximately $798,000.
 
The following is a schedule of approximate future minimum rentals on non-cancellable operating leases at September 30, 2020:
 
For the period ended December
 
Amount
 
Three months ended December 31, 2020
 $67,000 
Year Ended December 31, 2021
  20,000 
Year Ended December 31, 2022
  2,000 
 
 $89,000 

9
 
Finance Leases:
 
The following lists the approximate components of the net investment in finance leases:
 
 
 
September 30, 2020
 
 
December 31, 2019
 
Carrying value of lease receivable
 $- 
 $6,000 
Estimated residual value of leased equipment (unguaranteed)
  - 
  2,000 
Initial direct costs finance leases
  - 
  - 
Net investment in finance leases
 $- 
 $8,000 
 
We assess credit risk for all of our customers, including those that lease under finance leases. This credit risk is assessed using an internally developed model which incorporates credit scores from third party providers and our own customer risk ratings and is periodically reviewed. Our internal ratings are weighted based on the industry that the customer operates in. Factors taken into consideration when assessing risk include both general and industry specific qualitative and quantitative metrics. We separately take into consideration payment history, open lawsuits, liens and judgments. Typically, we will not extend credit to a company that has been in business for less than 5 years or that has filed for bankruptcy within the same period. Our internally based model may classify a company as high risk based on our analysis of their audited financial statements. Additional considerations of high risk may include history of late payments, open lawsuits and liens or judgments. In an effort to mitigate risk, we typically require deposits from those in this category.
 
A reserve for credit losses is deemed necessary when payment has not been received for one or more months of receivables due on the equipment held under finance leases. At the end of each period, management evaluates the open receivables due on this equipment and determines the need for a reserve based on payment history and any current factors that would have an impact on payments.
 
4. Related Party Transactions
 
Receivables/Payables
 
As of September 30, 2020, and December 31, 2019, the Company’s related party receivables and payables are short term, unsecured and non-interest bearing. Effective April 2, 2020, CCC agreed to convert approximately $169,000 of the December 31, 2019 related party payables from due on demand to long term. Such payables won't be due until sometime after April 15, 2021. The purpose of this was to help the Partnership with preserving liquidity.
 
10
 
Nine months ended September 30,
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
Reimbursable Expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
The General Partner and its affiliates are entitled to reimbursement by the Partnership for the cost of goods, supplies or services obtained and used by the General Partner in connection with the administration and operation of the Partnership from third parties unaffiliated with the General Partner. In addition, the General Partner and its affiliates are entitled to reimbursement of certain expenses incurred by the General Partner and its affiliates in connection with the administration and operation of the Partnership. For the three months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, the General Partner waived certain reimbursable expenses due to it by the Partnership. For the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, the Partnership was charged approximately $100,000 and $0 in Other LP expense, respectively.
 $210,000 
 $59,000 
 
    
    
Equipment Acquisition Fee
    
    
The General Partner earned an equipment acquisition fee of 4% of the purchase price of each item of equipment purchased as compensation for the negotiation of the acquisition of the equipment and lease thereof or sale under a conditional sales contract. For the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, approximately $800 and $0 of acquisition fees were waived by the General Partner, respectively.
 $- 
 $- 
 
    
    
Equipment Management Fee
    
    
The General Partner is entitled to be paid for managing the equipment portfolio a monthly fee equal to the lesser of (i) the fees which would be charged by an independent third party for similar services for similar equipment or (ii) the sum of (a) two percent of (1) the gross lease revenues attributable to equipment which is subject to full payout net leases which contain net lease provisions plus (2) the purchase price paid on conditional sales contracts as received by the Partnership and (b) 5% of the gross lease revenues attributable to equipment which is subject to operating leases. In an effort to increase future cash flow for the fund our General Partner has elected to waive equipment management fees. For the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, equipment management fees of approximately $11,000 and $10,000 were earned but waived by the General Partner, respectively.
 $- 
 $- 
 
    
    
Equipment liquidation Fee
    
    
With respect to each item of equipment sold by the General Partner (other than in connection with a conditional sales contract), a fee equal to the lesser of (i) 50% of the competitive equipment sale commission or (ii) three percent of the sales price for such equipment is payable to the General Partner. The payment of such fee is subordinated to the receipt by the limited partners of (i) a return of their net capital contributions and a 10% per annum cumulative return, compounded daily, on adjusted capital contributions and (ii) the net disposition proceeds from such sale in accordance with the Partnership Agreement. Such fee will be reduced to the extent any liquidation or resale fees are paid to unaffiliated parties. During the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, the General Partner waived approximately $5,000 and $500 of equipment liquidation fees, respectively.
 $- 
 $- 
 
 
11
 
5. Notes Payable
 
Notes payable consisted of the following approximate amounts:
 
 
September 30,
 
 
December 31,
 
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
Installment note payable to bank; interest at 4.87% due in quarterly installments of $11,897, including interest, with final payment in January 2020
  - 
  12,000 
Installment note payable to bank; interest at 5.56% due in monthly installments of $2,925, including interest, with final payment in June 2020
  - 
  17,000 
Installment note payable to bank; interest at 4.87% due in monthly installments of $1,902, including interest, with final payment in July 2020
  - 
  6,000 
Installment note payable to bank; interest at 6.28% due in quarterly installments of $722, including interest, with final payment in September 2020
  - 
  3,000 
Installment note payable to bank; interest at 5.75% due in monthly installments of $857, including interest, with final payment in November 2020
  1,500 
  9,000 
Installment note payable to bank; interest at 5.31% due in quarterly installments of $4,618, including interest, with final payment in January 2021
  9,000 
  22,000 
Installment note payable to bank; interest at 4.70% due in monthly installments of $1,360, including interest, with final payment in February 2021
  6,500 
  18,000 
 
 $17,000 
 $87,000 
 
These notes are secured by specific equipment with a carrying value of approximately $35,000 and are nonrecourse liabilities of the Partnership. As such, the notes do not contain any financial debt covenants with which we must comply on either an annual or quarterly basis. Aggregate approximate maturities of notes payable for each of the periods subsequent to September 30, 2020 are as follows:
 
 
Amount
 
Three months ended December 31, 2020
 $10,000 
Year ended December 31, 2021
  7,000 
 
 $17,000 
 
6. Supplemental Cash Flow Information
 
No interest or principal on notes payable was paid by the Partnership during 2020 and 2019 because direct payment was made by lessee to the bank in lieu of collection of lease income and payment of interest and principal by the Partnership.
 
Other noncash activities included in the determination of net loss are as follows:
 
Nine months ended September 30,
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
Lease revenue net of interest expense on notes payable realized as a result of direct payment of principal by lessee to bank
 $70,000 
 $161,000 
 
12
 
7. Commitments and Contingencies
 
COVID-19 Pandemic
 
The amount of revenue recognized and the pattern of revenue recognition may be impacted by COVID-19. Some of the business sectors that we service such as education centers, medical facilities, payroll administrators, manufacturing and transportation, we may need to account for returns and refund liabilities. The pattern of revenue recognition may change for delays in rendering services.
 
In periods ended subsequent to the outbreak of COVID-19, the impact on expected credit losses and future cash flow projections used in impairment testing will need to be considered.
 
The Company continues to evaluate whether adjustments to the financial statements are required or whether additional disclosures are necessary. In our leasing business, the Company is always subject to credit losses as it relates to a customer’s ability to make timely rental payments. The impact of COVID-19 may contribute to risk of non-performance, where a customer may experience financial difficulty and may delay in making timely payments.
 
The Company recognizes impairment of receivables and loans when losses are incurred, which is when it is probable that an entity will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the arrangement. Impairment is measured based on the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the receivable’s or loans effective interest rate, except that, as a practical expedient, impairment can be measured based on a receivable’s or loans’ observable market price or the fair value of the underlying collateral.
 
The Company believes its estimate of expected losses have been recognized based on historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable forecasts. The impacts of COVID-19 may necessitate additional adjustments in future forecasts of expected losses.
 
Although the Partnership cannot estimate the length or gravity of the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak at this time, if the pandemic continues, it may have a material adverse effect on the Partnership results of future operations, financial position, and liquidity in fiscal year 2020 and beyond.
 
FINRA
 
On May 3, 2013, the FINRA Department of Enforcement filed a complaint naming Commonwealth Capital Securities Corp. (“CCSC”) and the owner of the firm, Kimberly Springsteen-Abbott, as respondents; however, on October 22, 2013, FINRA filed an amended complaint that dropped the allegations against CCSC and reduced the scope of the allegations against Ms. Springsteen-Abbott.  The sole remaining charge was that Ms. Springsteen-Abbott had approved the misallocation of some expenses to certain Funds.  Management believes that the expenses at issue include amounts that were proper and that were properly allocated to Funds, and also identified a smaller number of expenses that had been allocated in error, but were adjusted and repaid to the affected Funds when they were identified in 2012.  During the period in question, Commonwealth Capital Corp. (“CCC”) and Ms. Springsteen-Abbott provided important financial support to the Funds, voluntarily absorbed expenses and voluntarily waived fees in amounts aggregating in excess of any questioned allocations.  A Hearing Panel ruled on March 30, 2015, that Ms. Springsteen-Abbott should be barred from the securities industry because the Panel concluded that she allegedly misallocated approximately $208,000 of expenses involving certain Funds over the course of three years.  As such, management had already reallocated back approximately $151,225 of the $208,000 (in allegedly misallocated expenses) to the affected funds, which was fully documented, as good faith payments for the benefit of those Income Funds.
 
The decision of the Hearing Panel was stayed when it was appealed to FINRA's National Adjudicatory Council (the “NAC”) pursuant to FINRA Rule 9311.  The NAC issued a decision that upheld the lower panel’s ruling and the bar took effect on August 23, 2016.  Ms. Springsteen-Abbott appealed the NAC’s decision to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”).  On March 31, 2017, the SEC criticized that decision as so flawed that the SEC could not even review it, and remanded the matter back to FINRA for further consideration consistent with the SEC’s remand, but did not suggest any view as to a particular outcome.
 
13
 
On July 21, 2017, FINRA reduced the list of 1,840 items totaling $208,000 to a remaining list of 87 items totaling $36,226 (which includes approximately $30,000 of continuing education expenses for personnel providing services to the Funds), and reduced the proposed fine from $100,000 to $50,000, but reaffirmed its position on the bar from the securities industry.  Respondents promptly appealed FINRA’s revised ruling to the SEC.  All the requested or allowed briefs have been filed with the SEC.  The SEC upheld FINRA’s order on February 7, 2020 to bar, but eliminated FINRA’s proposed fine.  Ms. Springsteen-Abbott has filed a Petition for Review in the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to review a final order entered against her by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.  As the SEC eliminated FINRA’s fine completely, Management is even more confident that regardless of final resolution, it will not result in any material adverse financial impact to the Funds, although a final assurance cannot be provided until the legal matter is resolved.  That appeal is pending as of November 16, 2020.
 
Item 2: Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
 
FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS
 
This section, as well as other portions of this document, includes certain forward-looking statements about our business and our prospects, tax treatment of certain transactions and accounting matters, sales of securities, expenses, cash flows, distributions, investments and operating and capital requirements. Such forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to: acquisition policies of our general partner; the nature of present and future leases; provisions for uncollectible accounts; the strength and sustainability of the U.S. economy; the continued difficulties in the credit markets and their impact on the economy in general; and the level of future cash flow, debt levels, revenues, operating expenses, amortization and depreciation expenses. You can identify those statements by the use of words such as “could,” “should,” “would,” “may,” “will,” “project,” “believe,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “plan,” “estimate,” “forecast,” “potential,” “intend,” “continue” and “contemplate,” as well as similar words and expressions.
 
Actual results may differ materially from those in any forward-looking statements because any such statements involve risks and uncertainties and are subject to change based upon various important factors, including, but not limited to, nationwide economic, financial, political and regulatory conditions; the health of debt and equity markets, including interest rates and credit quality; the level and nature of spending in the information, medical and telecommunications technologies markets; and the effect of competitive financing alternatives and lease pricing.
 
Readers are also directed to other risks and uncertainties discussed in other documents we file with the SEC, including, without limitation, those discussed in Item 1A. “Risk Factors” of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019 filed with the SEC. We undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking information, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.
 
INDUSTRY OVERVIEW
 
ELFA President and CEO Ralph Petta said, “Despite the drop in September year-over-year new business, a look at the data beginning with the advent of the pandemic in February shows that the industry, in general is holding its own. In fact, anecdotal evidence from some ELFA member companies indicates they are enjoying a very strong year. Tempering this positive data point; however, is a spike in losses – not surprising, given that the losses in all likelihood reflect customers in distressed industry sectors significantly impacted by the economic downturn resulting from the COVID pandemic.”
 
“The pandemic continues to have a negative impact on the overall economy, and this data demonstrates that our industry is not immune. However, the 24% growth in month-to-month volume in September 2020 MLFI-25 is promising,” said Anthony Sasso, Head of TD Equipment Finance. “Within any disruption, there is opportunity. Here at TDEF, we have seen our customers find innovative ways to continue to grow, and we ourselves have been able to increase our portfolio. The low interest rate environment, combined with rising spot rates within trucking, presents a good opportunity for those companies who are in a position to expand.”
 
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CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES
 
Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our financial statements which have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses. We base these estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.
 
We believe that our critical accounting policies affect our more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our financial statements. See Note 2 to our condensed financial statements included herein for a discussion related to recent accounting pronouncements.
 
LEASE INCOME RECEIVABLE
 
Lease income receivable includes current lease income receivable net of allowances for uncollectible amounts, if any. The Partnership monitors lease income receivable to ensure timely and accurate payment by lessees. The Partnership’s Lease Relations department is responsible for monitoring lease income receivable and, as necessary, resolving outstanding invoices.
 
The Partnership reviews a customer’s credit history before extending credit. When the analysis indicates that the probability of full collection is unlikely, the Partnership may establish an allowance for uncollectible lease income receivable based upon the credit risk of specific customers, historical trends and other information. The Partnership writes off its lease income receivable when it determines that it is uncollectible and all economically sensible means of recovery have been exhausted.
 
REVENUE RECOGNITION
 
The Partnership is principally engaged in the business of leasing equipment. Ancillary to the Partnership’s principal equipment leasing business, the Partnership also sells certain equipment and may offer certain services to support its customers.
 
The Partnership’s lease transactions are principally accounted for under Topic 842 on January 1, 2019. Prior to Topic 842, the Partnership accounted for these transactions under Topic 840, Leases (“Topic 840”). Lease revenue includes revenue generated from leasing equipment to customers, including re-rent revenue, and is recognized either on a straight-line basis or using the effective interest method over the length of the lease contract, if such lease is either an operating lease or finance lease, respectively.
 
The Partnership’s sale of equipment along with certain services provided to customers is recognized under ASC Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, (“Topic 606”), which was adopted on January 1, 2018. The Partnership recognizes revenue when it satisfies a performance obligation by transferring control over a product or service to a customer. The amount of revenue recognized reflects the consideration the Partnership expects to be entitled to in exchange for such products or services.
 
Through September 30, 2020, the Partnership’s lease portfolio consisted of operating leases and finance leases. For operating leases, lease revenue is recognized on a straight-line basis in accordance with the terms of the lease agreement. Finance lease interest income is recorded over the term of the lease using the effective interest method.
 
Upon the end of the lease term, if the lessee has not met the return conditions as set out in the lease, the Partnership is entitled in certain cases to additional compensation from the lessee. The Partnership’s accounting policy for recording such payments is to treat them as revenue.
 
Gains or losses from sales of leased and off-lease equipment are recorded on a net basis in the Partnership’s Statement of Operations. Gains from the sale of equipment resulting from early buyouts are recognized when the lease is modified and terminated concurrently. Our leases do not contain any step-rent provisions or escalation clauses nor are lease revenues adjusted based on any index.
 
Partnership’s accounting policy for sales and property taxes collected from the lessees are recorded in the current period as gross revenues and expenses.
 
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LONG-LIVED ASSETS
 
Depreciation on equipment for financial statement purposes is based on the straight-line method estimated generally over useful lives of two to five years. Once an asset comes off lease or is re-leased, the Partnership reassesses the useful life of an asset.
 
The Partnership evaluates its long-lived assets when events or circumstances indicate that the value of the asset may not be recoverable. The Partnership determines whether impairment exists by estimating the undiscounted cash flows to be generated by each asset. If the estimated undiscounted cash flows are less than the carrying value of the asset then impairment exists. The amount of the impairment is determined based on the difference between the carrying value and the fair value. Fair value is determined based on estimated discounted cash flows to be generated by the asset, third party appraisals or comparable sales of similar assets, as applicable, based on asset type. Residual values are determined by management and are calculated using information from both internal and external sources, as well as other economic indicators.
 
LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
 
Sources and Uses of Cash
 
Our primary sources of cash for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 were cash provided by operating activities of approximately $130,000 and net proceeds from the sale of equipment of approximately $61,000. This compares to the nine months ended September 30, 2019 where our primary source of cash was net proceeds from the sale of equipment of approximately $15,000.
 
Our primary use of cash for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 was capital expenditures in investing activities of approximately $20,000. Our primary use of cash for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 was cash used in operating activities of approximately $31,000. For the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, the Partnership had no financing activities.
 
Cash was provided by operating activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 of approximately $130,000, which includes net loss of approximately $59,000 and depreciation and amortization expenses of approximately $131,000. Other non-cash activities included in the determination of net loss include direct payments of lease income by lessees to banks of approximately $70,000. Cash was used in operating activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 of approximately $31,000, which includes net income of approximately $88,000 and depreciation and amortization expenses of approximately $218,000. Other non-cash activities included in the determination of net loss include direct payments of lease income by lessees to banks of approximately $161,000.
 
We consider cash equivalents to be highly liquid investments with the original maturity dates of 90 days or less.
 
At September 30, 2020, cash and cash equivalents was held in one account maintained at one financial institution with an aggregate balance of approximately $178,000. Bank accounts are federally insured up to $250,000 by the FDIC. At September 30, 2020, the total cash bank balance was as follows:
 
At September 30, 2020
 
Balance
 
Total bank balance
 $178,000 
FDIC insured
  (178,000)
Uninsured amount
 $- 
 
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The Partnership’s bank balances are fully insured by the FDIC. The Partnership deposits its funds with a Moody's Aaa-Rated banking institution which is one of only three Aaa-Rated banks listed on the New York Stock Exchange. The Partnership has not experienced any losses in such accounts, and believes it is not exposed to any significant credit risk. The amount in such accounts will fluctuate throughout 2020 due to many factors, including cash receipts, equipment acquisitions, interest rates, and distributions to limited partners.
 
Our investment strategy of acquiring equipment and generally leasing it under triple-net leases to operators who generally meet specified financial standards minimizes our operating expenses. As of September 30, 2020, we had future minimum rentals on non-cancelable operating leases of approximately $67,000 for the balance of the year ending December 31, 2020 and approximately $22,000 thereafter.  As of September 30, 2019, we had future minimum rentals on non-cancelable finance leases of approximately $90,000 for the balance of the year ending December 31, 2019 and approximately $109,000 thereafter.
 
As of September 30, 2020, our non-recourse debt was approximately $17,000, with interest rates ranging from 4.70% to 5.75%, and will be payable through February 2021.
 
The Partnership was originally scheduled to end its operational phase on February 4, 2017.  During the year ended December 31, 2015, the operational phase was officially extended to December 31, 2020 through an investor proxy vote. The Partnership is expected to terminate on December 31, 2022. As such, the Partnership will continue to report its financial statements on a going concern basis until a formal plan of liquidation is approved by the General Partner.
 
As the Partnership and the other programs managed by the General Partner increase their overall portfolio size, opportunities for shared participation are expected to continue. Sharing in the acquisition of a lease portfolio gives the fund an opportunity to acquire additional assets and revenue streams, while allowing the fund to remain diversified and reducing its overall risk with respect to one portfolio.
 
For the nine months ended September 30, 2020, the Partnership incurred positive cash flow. However, historically the Partnership has reported recurring negative cash flows. At September 30, 2020, the Partnership has a working capital deficit of approximately $125,000. Such factors raise substantial doubt about the Partnership’s ability to continue as a going concern.
 
The General Partner elected to forgo distributions and allocations of net income owed to it, and suspended limited partner distributions. The General Partner will continue to waive certain fees and may defer certain related party payables owed to the Partnership in an effort to further increase the Partnership’s cash flow. Additionally, the Partnership will seek to enhance portfolio returns and maximize cash flow through the use of leveraged lease transactions: the acquisition of lease equipment through financing. The Partnership may also attempt to obtain additional funds by disposing of or refinancing equipment, or by borrowing within its permissible limits.
 
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
Three months ended September 30, 2020 compared to three months ended September 30, 2019
 
Lease Revenue
 
Our lease revenue decreased to approximately $66,000 for the three months ended September 30, 2020, from approximately $124,000 for the three months ended September 30, 2019. This revenue decrease is primarily due to a decrease in active lease agreements as described below.
 
The Partnership had 25 and 61 operating leases during the three months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The decline in number of active leases is consistent with the overall decrease in lease revenue. Management expects to add new leases to our portfolio throughout the remainder of 2020, funded primarily through debt financing. As the operational phase of the Partnership has been extended to December 31, 2020, management will continue to seek lease opportunities to enhance portfolio returns and cash flow.
 
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Sale of Equipment
 
For the three months ended September 30, 2020, the Partnership sold equipment with a net book value of approximately $0 for a net gain of approximately $1,000. For the three months ended September 30, 2019, the Partnership sold equipment with a net book value of approximately $5,000 for a net gain of approximately $2,000.
 
Operating Expenses
 
Our operating expenses, excluding depreciation, primarily consist of accounting and legal fees, outside service fees and reimbursement of expenses to CCC for administration and operation of the Partnership. These expenses increased to approximately $51,000 for the three months ended September 30, 2020, from approximately $3,000 for the three months ended September 30, 2019. This increase is primarily attributable to the reestablishment of previously waived other LP expenses of approximately $33,000, an increase in legal fees associated with the FINRA matter (see Item 1. Legal Proceedings) of approximately $6,000, an increase in outside office services-investor services of approximately $3,000 and an increase in IT expenses of approximately $2,000.
 
Equipment Management Fees
 
We pay an equipment management fee to our general partner for managing our equipment portfolio. The equipment management fee is approximately 5% of the gross lease revenue attributable to equipment that is subject to operating leases and 2% of the gross lease revenue attributable to equipment that is subject to finance leases. An equipment management fee of approximately $3,000 and $3,000 was earned but waived by the General Partner for both the three months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
 
Depreciation and Amortization Expenses
 
Depreciation expenses consist of depreciation on equipment. This expense decreased to approximately $41,000 for the three months ended September 30, 2020, from $64,000 for the three months ended September 30, 2019. This decrease was due to the higher frequency in the termination of leases and equipment being fully depreciated as compared to the acquisition of new leases for the three months ended June 30, 2020.
 
Net (Loss) Income
 
For the three months ended September 30, 2020, we recognized revenue of approximately $71,000 and expenses of approximately $95,000, resulting in net loss of approximately $24,000. For the three months ended September 30, 2019, we recognized revenue of approximately $134,000 and expenses of approximately $76,000, resulting in net income of approximately $58,000. This change to a net loss is due to the changes in revenue and expenses as described above.
 
Nine months ended September 30, 2020 compared to nine months ended September 30, 2019
 
Lease Revenue
 
Our lease revenue decreased to approximately $236,000 for the nine months ended September 30, 2020, from approximately $379,000 for the nine months ended September 30, 2019. The Partnership had 54 and 63 operating leases during the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The decline in number of active leases is consistent with the overall decrease in lease revenue. As the operational phase of the Partnership has been extended to December 31, 2020, Management will continue to seek lease opportunities to enhance portfolio returns and cash flow.
 
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Sale of Equipment
 
On January 31, 2020, the Partnership entered into a Purchase and Sale Agreement, (the “Purchase Agreement”) with Cummins, Inc. (the “Buyer”) to sell for the Buyer approximately 1,475 items of equipment that the Buyer previously leased from the Company. The General Partner allocated to the Partnership its share of approximately $55,000, for the sale price of primarily, Small IBM Servers and High Volume & Spec Printers and recorded a gain on sale of equipment of approximately $12,000. The Partnership disposed of and sold other equipment to various customers during 2020. For the nine months ended September 30, 2020, the Partnership sold equipment to other customers besides Cummins with a total net book value of $0 and net gain of approximately $7,000. This compared to the nine months ended September 30, 2019, the Partnership sold equipment with net book value of approximately $12,000 for a net gain of approximately $3,000.
 
Operating Expenses
 
Our operating expenses, excluding depreciation, primarily consist of accounting and legal fees, outside service fees and reimbursement of expenses to CCC for administration and operation of the Partnership. These expenses increased to approximately $220,000 for the nine months ended September 30, 2020, from approximately $68,000 for the nine months ended September 30, 2019. This increase is primarily attributable to the reestablishment of previously waived other LP expenses of approximately $100,000, an increase in accounting fees related to changes in tax reporting of approximately $11,000, an increase in legal fees associated with the FINRA matter (see Item 1. Legal Proceedings) of approximately $9,000, an increase in IT expenses of approximately $7,000, an increase in outside services-investor services of approximately $6,000, an increase in expenses related to the corporate office relocation of approximately $4,000, an increase in recruiting fees of approximately $4,000 and an increase in partnership taxes of approximately $3,000.
 
Equipment Management Fees
 
We pay an equipment management fee to our general partner for managing our equipment portfolio. The equipment management fee is approximately 5% of the gross lease revenue attributable to equipment that is subject to operating leases and 2% of the gross lease revenue attributable to equipment that is subject to finance leases. For the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, total equipment management fees of approximately $11,000 and $10,000 were earned but waived by the General Partner, respectively.
 
Depreciation and Amortization Expenses
 
Depreciation and amortization expenses consist of depreciation on equipment and amortization of equipment acquisition fees. These expenses decreased to approximately $131,000 for the nine months ended September 30, 2020, from $218,000 for the nine months ended September, 2019. This decrease was due to the higher frequency in the termination of leases and equipment being fully depreciated as compared to the acquisition of new leases for the nine months ended September 30, 2020
 
Net (Loss) Income
 
For the nine months ended September 30, 2020, we recognized revenue of approximately $283,000 and expenses of approximately $342,000, resulting in net loss of approximately $59,000. For the nine months ended September 30, 2019, we recognized revenue of approximately $405,000 and expenses of approximately $317,000, resulting in net income of approximately $88,000. This change to a net loss is due to the changes in revenue and expenses as described above.
 
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Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
 
N/A
 
Item 4. Controls and Procedures
 
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
 
Our management, under the supervision and with the participation of the General Partner’s Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer, has evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures related to our reporting and disclosure obligations as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Based on such evaluation, the General Partner’s Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer have concluded that, as of September 30, 2020, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective due to the presence of a material weakness in internal control over financial reporting.
 
A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. In evaluating the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting, our management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”) in Internal Control – Integrated Framework (2013) and SEC guidance on conducting such assessments. Management’s assessment included an evaluation of the design of our internal control over financial reporting and testing of the operational effectiveness of these controls. Based on this assessment, management has concluded that as of September 30, 2020, our internal control over financial reporting was not effective to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. The matters involving internal controls and procedures that our management considered to be material weaknesses under the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board were: (i) ineffective controls over period end financial disclosure and reporting processes. The aforementioned material weaknesses were identified by our principal financial officer and principal accounting officer, in connection with the review of our financial statements as of June 30, 2020.
 
Remediation of Material Weakness
 
In an effort to remediate the identified material weaknesses and other deficiencies and enhance our internal controls, we have implemented the following measure:
 
            1.     We have incorporated a procedure within our written policies and procedures to require for nonrecurring journal entries, referenced as “one-off” journal entries to be reviewed and signed-off by both the accounting manager and a senior staff accountant to ensure appropriate transactions are recorded as intended to be reported for financial reporting                     and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.     
 
The material weakness will not be considered remediated, however, until the applicable controls operate for a sufficient period of time and management has concluded, through testing, that these controls are operating effectively. We expect that the remediation of this material weakness will be completed by the end of fiscal year 2020.
 
Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting:
 
There were no other changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ending September 30, 2020, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
 
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Part II: OTHER INFORMATION
 
Item 1. Legal Proceedings
 
FINRA
 
On May 3, 2013, the FINRA Department of Enforcement filed a complaint naming Commonwealth Capital Securities Corp. (“CCSC”) and the owner of the firm, Kimberly Springsteen-Abbott, as respondents; however, on October 22, 2013, FINRA filed an amended complaint that dropped the allegations against CCSC and reduced the scope of the allegations against Ms. Springsteen-Abbott.  The sole remaining charge was that Ms. Springsteen-Abbott had approved the misallocation of some expenses to certain Funds.  Management believes that the expenses at issue include amounts that were proper and that were properly allocated to Funds, and also identified a smaller number of expenses that had been allocated in error, but were adjusted and repaid to the affected Funds when they were identified in 2012.  During the period in question, Commonwealth Capital Corp. (“CCC”) and Ms. Springsteen-Abbott provided important financial support to the Funds, voluntarily absorbed expenses and voluntarily waived fees in amounts aggregating in excess of any questioned allocations.  A Hearing Panel ruled on March 30, 2015, that Ms. Springsteen-Abbott should be barred from the securities industry because the Panel concluded that she allegedly misallocated approximately $208,000 of expenses involving certain Funds over the course of three years.  As such, management had already reallocated back approximately $151,225 of the $208,000 (in allegedly misallocated expenses) to the affected funds, which was fully documented, as good faith payments for the benefit of those Income Funds.
 
The decision of the Hearing Panel was stayed when it was appealed to FINRA's National Adjudicatory Council (the “NAC”) pursuant to FINRA Rule 9311.  The NAC issued a decision that upheld the lower panel’s ruling and the bar took effect on August 23, 2016.  Ms. Springsteen-Abbott appealed the NAC’s decision to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”).  On March 31, 2017, the SEC criticized that decision as so flawed that the SEC could not even review it, and remanded the matter back to FINRA for further consideration consistent with the SEC’s remand, but did not suggest any view as to a particular outcome.
 
On July 21, 2017, FINRA reduced the list of 1,840 items totaling $208,000 to a remaining list of 87 items totaling $36,226 (which includes approximately $30,000 of continuing education expenses for personnel providing services to the Funds), and reduced the proposed fine from $100,000 to $50,000, but reaffirmed its position on the bar from the securities industry.  Respondents promptly appealed FINRA’s revised ruling to the SEC.  All the requested or allowed briefs have been filed with the SEC.  The SEC upheld FINRA’s order on February 7, 2020 to bar, but eliminated FINRA’s proposed fine.  Ms. Springsteen-Abbott has filed a Petition for Review in the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to review a final order entered against her by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.  As the SEC eliminated FINRA’s fine completely, Management is even more confident that regardless of final resolution, it will not result in any material adverse financial impact to the Funds, although a final assurance cannot be provided until the legal matter is resolved.  That appeal is pending as of November 16, 2020.
 
Item 1A. Risk Factors
 
Going Concern
 
For the nine months ended September 30, 2020, the Partnership incurred positive cash flow. However, historically the Partnership has reported recurring negative cash flows. At September 30, 2020, the Partnership has a working capital deficit of approximately $125,000. Such factors raise substantial doubt about the Partnership’s ability to continue as a going concern.
 
The General Partner has evaluated that significant improvement in the Partner’s cash flow would be required to avoid substantial doubt about the entity’s ability to continue as a going concern.
 
The General Partner agreed to forgo distributions and allocations of net income owed to it, and suspended limited partner distributions. The General Partner will continue to waive certain fees and may defer certain related party payables owed to the Partnership in an effort to further increase the Partnership’s cash flow. Additionally, the Partnership will seek to enhance portfolio returns and maximize cash flow through the use of leveraged lease transactions: the acquisition of lease equipment through financing. The Partnership may also attempt to obtain additional funds by disposing of or refinancing equipment, or by borrowing within its permissible limits.
 
If it is not probable that the General Partner will be able to effectively implement its plan or if it is not probable that the plan will mitigate the relevant conditions that gave rise to the substantial doubt, the Partnership may begin its liquidation process through the sale of its assets and payment of its obligations as per the Partnership agreement. If liquidation ever becomes imminent, the entity will prepare its financial statements under the liquidation basis of accounting.
 
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COVID-19 Pandemic
 
The amount of revenue recognized and the pattern of revenue recognition may be impacted by COVID-19. Some of the business sectors that we service such as education centers, medical facilities, payroll administrators, manufacturing and transportation, we may need to account for returns and refund liabilities. The pattern of revenue recognition may change for delays in rendering services.
 
In periods ended subsequent to the outbreak of COVID-19, the impact on expected credit losses and future cash flow projections used in impairment testing will need to be considered.
 
The Company continues to evaluate whether adjustments to the financial statements are required or whether additional disclosures are necessary. In our leasing business, the Company is always subject to credit losses as it relates to a customer’s ability to make timely rental payments. The impact of COVID-19 may contribute to risk of non-performance, where a customer may experience financial difficulty and may delay in making timely payments.
 
The Company recognizes impairment of receivables and loans when losses are incurred, which is when it is probable that an entity will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the arrangement. Impairment is measured based on the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the receivable’s or loans effective interest rate, except that, as a practical expedient, impairment can be measured based on a receivable’s or loans’ observable market price or the fair value of the underlying collateral.
 
The Company believes its estimate of expected losses have been recognized based on historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable forecasts. The impacts of COVID-19 may necessitate additional adjustments in future forecasts of expected losses.
 
Although the Partnership cannot estimate the length or gravity of the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak at this time, if the pandemic continues, it may have a material adverse effect on the Partnership results of future operations, financial position, and liquidity in fiscal year 2020 and beyond.
 
Material Weakness
 
Failure to maintain effective systems of internal control over financial reporting and disclosure controls and procedures could result in additional costs being incurred for remediation and cause a loss of confidence in our financial reporting.
 
Effective internal control over financial reporting is necessary for us to provide accurate financial information. We
previously identified a material weakness in our internal controls over financial reporting as of June 30, 2020. We have concluded that our internal controls over financial reporting were not effective as of September 30, 2020 due to the existence of material weaknesses in our monthly close for not properly reviewing certain journal entries that had an impact on the internal controls over financial reporting.
 
The material weakness will not be considered remediated, however, until the applicable controls operate for a sufficient period of time and management has concluded, through testing, that these controls are operating effectively. We expect that the remediation of this material weakness will be completed by the end of fiscal year 2020.
 
If our remediation measures are insufficient to address the identified deficiencies, or if additional deficiencies in our
internal control over financial reporting are discovered or occur in the future, our financial statements may contain material misstatements and we could be required to restate our financial results. Moreover, because of the inherent limitations of any control system, material misstatements due to error or fraud may not be prevented or detected on a timely basis, or at all. If we are unable to provide reliable and timely financial reports in the future, our business and reputation may be further harmed. Failures in internal controls may negatively affect investor confidence in our management and the accuracy of our financial statements and disclosures, or result in adverse publicity and concerns from investors, any of which could have a negative effect, subject us to regulatory investigations and penalties and/or shareholder litigation, and materially adversely impact our business and financial condition.
 
22
 
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
N/A
 
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities
N/A
 
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
N/A
 
Item 5. Other Information
NONE
 
Item 6. Exhibits
 
 
23
 
SIGNATURES
 
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
 
 COMMONWEALTH INCOME & GROWTH FUND V
 BY: COMMONWEALTH INCOME & GROWTH FUND, INC., General Partner
  
  
November 16, 2020By: /s/ Kimberly A. Springsteen-Abbott
DateKimberly A. Springsteen-Abbott
 
Chief Executive Officer And Principal Financial Officer
Commonwealth Income & Growth Fund, Inc.
  
  
November 16, 2020
By: /s/ Theodore Cavaliere
DateTheodore Cavaliere
 Vice President, Financial Operations Principal
 
 
24