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DUK Duke Energy

Filed: 10 May 21, 2:08pm
0001326160us-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel2Memberduk:ProgressEnergyMemberduk:NdtfMember2021-03-31

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2021
OR
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from _________to_________
Commission file numberRegistrant, State of Incorporation or Organization,
Address of Principal Executive Offices and Telephone Number
IRS Employer Identification Number
duk-20210331_g1.jpg
1-32853DUKE ENERGY CORPORATION20-2777218
(a Delaware corporation)
550 South Tryon Street
Charlotte, North Carolina 28202-1803
704-382-3853
1-4928DUKE ENERGY CAROLINAS, LLC56-0205520
(a North Carolina limited liability company)
526 South Church Street
Charlotte, North Carolina 28202-1803
704-382-3853
1-15929PROGRESS ENERGY, INC.56-2155481
(a North Carolina corporation)
410 South Wilmington Street
Raleigh, North Carolina 27601-1748
704-382-3853
1-3382DUKE ENERGY PROGRESS, LLC56-0165465
(a North Carolina limited liability company)
410 South Wilmington Street
Raleigh, North Carolina 27601-1748
704-382-3853
1-3274DUKE ENERGY FLORIDA, LLC59-0247770
(a Florida limited liability company)
299 First Avenue North
St. Petersburg, Florida 33701
704-382-3853
1-1232DUKE ENERGY OHIO, INC.31-0240030
(an Ohio corporation)
139 East Fourth Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
704-382-3853
1-3543DUKE ENERGY INDIANA, LLC35-0594457
(an Indiana limited liability company)
1000 East Main Street
Plainfield, Indiana 46168
704-382-3853
1-6196PIEDMONT NATURAL GAS COMPANY, INC.56-0556998
(a North Carolina corporation)
4720 Piedmont Row Drive
Charlotte, North Carolina 28210
704-364-3120





SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OF THE ACT:
Name of each exchange on
Registrant    Title of each class    Trading symbols        which registered
Duke Energy    Common Stock, $0.001 par value    DUK    New York Stock Exchange LLC

Duke Energy    5.125% Junior Subordinated Debentures due    DUKH    New York Stock Exchange LLC
January 15, 2073
Duke Energy    5.625% Junior Subordinated Debentures due    DUKB    New York Stock Exchange LLC
September 15, 2078
Duke Energy    Depositary Shares, each representing a 1/1,000th    DUK PR A    New York Stock Exchange LLC
interest in a share of 5.75% Series A Cumulative
Redeemable Perpetual Preferred Stock, par value
$0.001 per share
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
Duke Energy Corporation (Duke Energy)YesNoDuke Energy Florida, LLC (Duke Energy Florida)YesNo
Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC (Duke Energy Carolinas)YesNoDuke Energy Ohio, Inc. (Duke Energy Ohio)YesNo
Progress Energy, Inc. (Progress Energy)YesNoDuke Energy Indiana, LLC (Duke Energy Indiana)YesNo
Duke Energy Progress, LLC (Duke Energy Progress)YesNoPiedmont Natural Gas Company, Inc. (Piedmont)YesNo
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).
Duke EnergyYesNoDuke Energy FloridaYesNo
Duke Energy CarolinasYesNoDuke Energy OhioYesNo
Progress EnergyYesNoDuke Energy IndianaYesNo
Duke Energy ProgressYesNoPiedmontYesNo
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Duke EnergyLarge Accelerated FilerAccelerated filerNon-accelerated FilerSmaller reporting companyEmerging growth company
Duke Energy CarolinasLarge Accelerated FilerAccelerated filerNon-accelerated FilerSmaller reporting companyEmerging growth company
Progress EnergyLarge Accelerated FilerAccelerated filerNon-accelerated FilerSmaller reporting companyEmerging growth company
Duke Energy ProgressLarge Accelerated FilerAccelerated filerNon-accelerated FilerSmaller reporting companyEmerging growth company
Duke Energy FloridaLarge Accelerated FilerAccelerated filerNon-accelerated FilerSmaller reporting companyEmerging growth company
Duke Energy OhioLarge Accelerated FilerAccelerated filerNon-accelerated FilerSmaller reporting companyEmerging growth company
Duke Energy IndianaLarge Accelerated FilerAccelerated filerNon-accelerated FilerSmaller reporting companyEmerging growth company
PiedmontLarge Accelerated FilerAccelerated filerNon-accelerated FilerSmaller reporting companyEmerging growth company
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
Duke EnergyYesNoDuke Energy FloridaYesNo
Duke Energy CarolinasYesNoDuke Energy OhioYesNo
Progress EnergyYesNoDuke Energy IndianaYesNo
Duke Energy ProgressYesNoPiedmontYesNo



Number of shares of common stock outstanding at April 30, 2021:
RegistrantDescriptionShares
Duke EnergyCommon stock, $0.001 par value769,218,956
This combined Form 10-Q is filed separately by eight registrants: Duke Energy, Duke Energy Carolinas, Progress Energy, Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Florida, Duke Energy Ohio, Duke Energy Indiana and Piedmont (collectively the Duke Energy Registrants). Information contained herein relating to any individual registrant is filed by such registrant solely on its own behalf. Each registrant makes no representation as to information relating exclusively to the other registrants.
Duke Energy Carolinas, Progress Energy, Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Florida, Duke Energy Ohio, Duke Energy Indiana and Piedmont meet the conditions set forth in General Instructions H(1)(a) and (b) of Form 10-Q and are therefore filing this form with the reduced disclosure format specified in General Instructions H(2) of Form 10-Q.



TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Piedmont Natural Gas Company, Inc. Financial Statements
Note 1 – Organization and Basis of Presentation
Note 2 ��� Business Segments
Note 3 – Regulatory Matters
Note 4 – Commitments and Contingencies
Note 5 – Debt and Credit Facilities
Note 6 – Goodwill
Note 7 – Related Party Transactions
Note 8 – Derivatives and Hedging
Note 9 – Investments in Debt and Equity Securities
Note 10 – Fair Value Measurements
Note 11 – Variable Interest Entities
Note 12 – Revenue
Note 13 – Stockholders' Equity
Note 14 – Employee Benefit Plans
Note 15 – Income Taxes
Note 16 – Subsequent Events
PART II. OTHER INFORMATION



FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION
This document includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Forward-looking statements are based on management’s beliefs and assumptions and can often be identified by terms and phrases that include “anticipate,” “believe,” “intend,” “estimate,” “expect,” “continue,” “should,” “could,” “may,” “plan,” “project,” “predict,” “will,” “potential,” “forecast,” “target,” “guidance,” “outlook” or other similar terminology. Various factors may cause actual results to be materially different than the suggested outcomes within forward-looking statements; accordingly, there is no assurance that such results will be realized. These factors include, but are not limited to:
The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic;
State, federal and foreign legislative and regulatory initiatives, including costs of compliance with existing and future environmental requirements, including those related to climate change, as well as rulings that affect cost and investment recovery or have an impact on rate structures or market prices;
The extent and timing of costs and liabilities to comply with federal and state laws, regulations and legal requirements related to coal ash remediation, including amounts for required closure of certain ash impoundments, are uncertain and difficult to estimate;
The ability to recover eligible costs, including amounts associated with coal ash impoundment retirement obligations and costs related to significant weather events, and to earn an adequate return on investment through rate case proceedings and the regulatory process;
The costs of decommissioning nuclear facilities could prove to be more extensive than amounts estimated and all costs may not be fully recoverable through the regulatory process;
Costs and effects of legal and administrative proceedings, settlements, investigations and claims;
Industrial, commercial and residential growth or decline in service territories or customer bases resulting from sustained downturns of the economy and the economic health of our service territories or variations in customer usage patterns, including energy efficiency efforts and use of alternative energy sources, such as self-generation and distributed generation technologies;
Federal and state regulations, laws and other efforts designed to promote and expand the use of energy efficiency measures and distributed generation technologies, such as private solar and battery storage, in Duke Energy service territories could result in customers leaving the electric distribution system, excess generation resources as well as stranded costs;
Advancements in technology;
Additional competition in electric and natural gas markets and continued industry consolidation;
The influence of weather and other natural phenomena on operations, including the economic, operational and other effects of severe storms, hurricanes, droughts, earthquakes and tornadoes, including extreme weather associated with climate change;
Changing customer expectations and demands including heightened emphasis on environmental, social and governance concerns;
The ability to successfully operate electric generating facilities and deliver electricity to customers including direct or indirect effects to the company resulting from an incident that affects the United States electric grid or generating resources;
Operational interruptions to our natural gas distribution and transmission activities;
The availability of adequate interstate pipeline transportation capacity and natural gas supply;
The impact on facilities and business from a terrorist attack, cybersecurity threats, data security breaches, operational accidents, information technology failures or other catastrophic events, such as fires, explosions, pandemic health events or other similar occurrences;
The inherent risks associated with the operation of nuclear facilities, including environmental, health, safety, regulatory and financial risks, including the financial stability of third-party service providers;
The timing and extent of changes in commodity prices and interest rates and the ability to recover such costs through the regulatory process, where appropriate, and their impact on liquidity positions and the value of underlying assets;
The results of financing efforts, including the ability to obtain financing on favorable terms, which can be affected by various factors, including credit ratings, interest rate fluctuations, compliance with debt covenants and conditions and general market and economic conditions;
Credit ratings of the Duke Energy Registrants may be different from what is expected;
Declines in the market prices of equity and fixed-income securities and resultant cash funding requirements for defined benefit pension plans, other post-retirement benefit plans and nuclear decommissioning trust funds;
Construction and development risks associated with the completion of the Duke Energy Registrants’ capital investment projects, including risks related to financing, obtaining and complying with terms of permits, meeting construction budgets and schedules and satisfying operating and environmental performance standards, as well as the ability to recover costs from customers in a timely manner, or at all;
Changes in rules for regional transmission organizations, including changes in rate designs and new and evolving capacity markets, and risks related to obligations created by the default of other participants;
The ability to control operation and maintenance costs;
The level of creditworthiness of counterparties to transactions;
The ability to obtain adequate insurance at acceptable costs;
Employee workforce factors, including the potential inability to attract and retain key personnel;


FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

The ability of subsidiaries to pay dividends or distributions to Duke Energy Corporation holding company (the Parent);
The performance of projects undertaken by our nonregulated businesses and the success of efforts to invest in and develop new opportunities;
The effect of accounting pronouncements issued periodically by accounting standard-setting bodies;
The impact of United States tax legislation to our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows and our credit ratings;
The impacts from potential impairments of goodwill or equity method investment carrying values; and
The ability to implement our business strategy, including enhancing existing technology systems.
Additional risks and uncertainties are identified and discussed in the Duke Energy Registrants' reports filed with the SEC and available at the SEC's website at sec.gov. In light of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions, the events described in the forward-looking statements might not occur or might occur to a different extent or at a different time than described. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made and the Duke Energy Registrants expressly disclaim an obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.


GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Glossary of Terms 
The following terms or acronyms used in this Form 10-Q are defined below:
Term or AcronymDefinition
2013 SettlementRevised and Restated Stipulation and Settlement Agreement approved in November 2013 among Duke Energy Florida, the Florida Office of Public Counsel and other customer representatives
2017 SettlementSecond Revised and Restated Settlement Agreement in 2017 among Duke Energy Florida, the Florida Office of Public Counsel and other customer representatives, which replaces and supplants the 2013 Settlement
ACPAtlantic Coast Pipeline, LLC, a limited liability company owned by Dominion Energy, Inc. and Duke Energy
ACP pipelineThe approximately 600-mile canceled interstate natural gas pipeline
AFSAvailable for Sale
AFUDCAllowance for funds used during construction
AROAsset retirement obligations
BisonBison Insurance Company Limited
CCRCoal Combustion Residuals
Coal Ash ActNorth Carolina Coal Ash Management Act of 2014
the companyDuke Energy Corporation and its subsidiaries
COVID-19Coronavirus Disease 2019
CRCCinergy Receivables Company, LLC
Crystal River Unit 3Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Plant
DEFPFDuke Energy Florida Project Finance, LLC
DEFRDuke Energy Florida Receivables, LLC
DEPRDuke Energy Progress Receivables, LLC
DERFDuke Energy Receivables Finance Company, LLC
Duke EnergyDuke Energy Corporation (collectively with its subsidiaries)
Duke Energy OhioDuke Energy Ohio, Inc.
Duke Energy ProgressDuke Energy Progress, LLC
Duke Energy CarolinasDuke Energy Carolinas, LLC
Duke Energy FloridaDuke Energy Florida, LLC
Duke Energy IndianaDuke Energy Indiana, LLC
Duke Energy KentuckyDuke Energy Kentucky, Inc.
Duke Energy RegistrantsDuke Energy, Duke Energy Carolinas, Progress Energy, Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Florida, Duke Energy Ohio, Duke Energy Indiana and Piedmont
EDITExcess deferred income tax
EPAU.S. Environmental Protection Agency
EPSEarnings Per Share
ETREffective tax rate
Exchange ActSecurities Exchange Act of 1934
FERCFederal Energy Regulatory Commission
FPSCFlorida Public Service Commission
FTRFinancial transmission rights
GAAPGenerally accepted accounting principles in the U.S.
GAAP Reported EarningsNet Income Available to Duke Energy Corporation Common Stockholders
GAAP Reported EPSBasic Earnings Per Share Available to Duke Energy Corporation common stockholders


GLOSSARY OF TERMS

GICGIC Private Limited
GWhGigawatt-hours
IGCCIntegrated Gasification Combined Cycle
IMRIntegrity Management Rider
IRSInternal Revenue Service
Investment TrustsNDTF investments and grantor trusts of Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Florida and Duke Energy Indiana
IURCIndiana Utility Regulatory Commission
KPSCKentucky Public Service Commission
LLCLimited Liability Company
MGPManufactured gas plant
MWMegawatt
MWhMegawatt-hour
NCUCNorth Carolina Utilities Commission
NDTFNuclear decommissioning trust funds
NPNSNormal purchase/normal sale
OPEBOther Post-Retirement Benefit Obligations
OVECOhio Valley Electric Corporation
PiedmontPiedmont Natural Gas Company, Inc.
PJMPennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland Interconnection
PPAPurchase Power Agreement
Progress EnergyProgress Energy, Inc.
PSCSCPublic Service Commission of South Carolina
PUCOPublic Utilities Commission of Ohio
RTORegional Transmission Organization
Subsidiary RegistrantsDuke Energy Carolinas, Progress Energy, Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Florida, Duke Energy Ohio, Duke Energy Indiana and Piedmont
the Tax ActTax Cuts and Jobs Act
TPUCTennessee Public Utility Commission
U.S.United States
VIEVariable Interest Entity
WACCWeighted Average Cost of Capital



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DUKE ENERGY CORPORATION
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions, except per share amounts)20212020
Operating Revenues
Regulated electric$5,219 $5,124 
Regulated natural gas749 638 
Nonregulated electric and other182 187 
Total operating revenues6,150 5,949 
Operating Expenses
Fuel used in electric generation and purchased power1,443 1,447 
Cost of natural gas276 199 
Operation, maintenance and other1,402 1,339 
Depreciation and amortization1,226 1,130 
Property and other taxes353 345 
Impairment of assets and other charges 
Total operating expenses4,700 4,462 
Gains on Sales of Other Assets and Other, net 
Operating Income1,450 1,488 
Other Income and Expenses
Equity in (losses) earnings of unconsolidated affiliates(17)44 
Other income and expenses, net127 46 
Total other income and expenses110 90 
Interest Expense535 551 
Income Before Income Taxes1,025 1,027 
Income Tax Expense84 137 
Net Income941 890 
Add: Net Loss Attributable to Noncontrolling Interests51 48 
Net Income Attributable to Duke Energy Corporation992 938 
Less: Preferred Dividends39 39 
Net Income Available to Duke Energy Corporation Common Stockholders$953 $899 
Earnings Per Share – Basic and Diluted
Net income available to Duke Energy Corporation common stockholders
Basic and Diluted$1.25 $1.24 
Weighted Average Shares Outstanding
Basic769 734 
Diluted769 736 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
9

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY CORPORATION
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
Net Income$941 $890 
Other Comprehensive Income (Loss), net of tax(a)
Pension and OPEB adjustments2 
Net unrealized gains (losses) on cash flow hedges29 (81)
Reclassification into earnings from cash flow hedges3 
Unrealized (losses) gains on available-for-sale securities(8)
Other Comprehensive Income (Loss), net of tax26 (77)
Comprehensive Income967 813 
Add: Comprehensive Loss Attributable to Noncontrolling Interests44 62 
Comprehensive Income Attributable to Duke Energy1,011 875 
Less: Preferred Dividends39 39 
Comprehensive Income Available to Duke Energy Corporation Common Stockholders$972 $836 
(a)Net of income tax impacts of approximately $8 million and $23 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, and 2020, respectively.
See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
10

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY CORPORATION
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(Unaudited)
(in millions)March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents$379 $259 
Receivables (net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $31 at 2021 and $29 at 2020)950 1,009 
Receivables of VIEs (net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $116 at 2021 and $117 at 2020)1,834 2,144 
Inventory3,076 3,167 
Regulatory assets (includes $54 at 2021 and $53 at 2020 related to VIEs)1,650 1,641 
Other (includes $333 at 2021 and $296 at 2020 related to VIEs)619 462 
Total current assets8,508 8,682 
Property, Plant and Equipment
Cost157,372 155,580 
Accumulated depreciation and amortization(49,772)(48,827)
Generation facilities to be retired, net29 29 
Net property, plant and equipment107,629 106,782 
Other Noncurrent Assets
Goodwill19,303 19,303 
Regulatory assets (includes $927 at 2021 and $937 at 2020 related to VIEs)12,441 12,421 
Nuclear decommissioning trust funds9,410 9,114 
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net1,540 1,524 
Investments in equity method unconsolidated affiliates919 961 
Other (includes $82 at 2021 and $81 at 2020 related to VIEs)3,715 3,601 
Total other noncurrent assets47,328 46,924 
Total Assets$163,465 $162,388 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current Liabilities
Accounts payable$2,497 $3,144 
Notes payable and commercial paper4,064 2,873 
Taxes accrued574 482 
Interest accrued536 537 
Current maturities of long-term debt (includes $472 at 2021 and 2020 related to VIEs)5,586 4,238 
Asset retirement obligations709 718 
Regulatory liabilities1,509 1,377 
Other1,858 2,936 
Total current liabilities17,333 16,305 
Long-Term Debt (includes $3,686 at 2021 and $3,535 at 2020 related to VIEs)54,768 55,625 
Other Noncurrent Liabilities
Deferred income taxes9,459 9,244 
Asset retirement obligations12,299 12,286 
Regulatory liabilities15,070 15,029 
Operating lease liabilities1,352 1,340 
Accrued pension and other post-retirement benefit costs1,010 969 
Investment tax credits747 687 
Other (includes $331 at 2021 and $316 at 2020 related to VIEs)1,769 1,719 
Total other noncurrent liabilities41,706 41,274 
Commitments and Contingencies00
Equity
Preferred stock, Series A, $0.001 par value, 40 million depositary shares authorized and outstanding at 2021 and 2020973 973 
Preferred stock, Series B, $0.001 par value, 1 million shares authorized and outstanding at 2021 and 2020989 989 
Common stock, $0.001 par value, 2 billion shares authorized; 769 million shares outstanding at 2021 and 20201 
Additional paid-in capital43,761 43,767 
Retained earnings2,680 2,471 
Accumulated other comprehensive loss(218)(237)
Total Duke Energy Corporation stockholders' equity48,186 47,964 
Noncontrolling interests1,472 1,220 
Total equity49,658 49,184 
Total Liabilities and Equity$163,465 $162,388 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
11

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY CORPORATION
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income$941 $890 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Depreciation, amortization and accretion (including amortization of nuclear fuel)1,385 1,301 
Equity in losses (earnings) of unconsolidated affiliates17 (44)
Equity component of AFUDC(42)(40)
Deferred income taxes86 422 
Payments for asset retirement obligations(114)(132)
(Increase) decrease in
Receivables377 466 
Inventory91 (92)
Other current assets(47)(131)
Increase (decrease) in
Accounts payable(467)(657)
Taxes accrued104 113 
Other current liabilities(263)(455)
Other assets51 (37)
Other liabilities(31)(50)
Net cash provided by operating activities2,088 1,554 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Capital expenditures(2,215)(2,832)
Contributions to equity method investments (77)
Purchases of debt and equity securities(1,584)(1,392)
Proceeds from sales and maturities of debt and equity securities1,601 1,347 
Disbursements to canceled equity method investments(855)— 
Other(84)(68)
Net cash used in investing activities(3,137)(3,022)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Proceeds from the:
Issuance of long-term debt608 1,954 
Issuance of common stock5 40 
Payments for the redemption of long-term debt(76)(292)
Proceeds from the issuance of short-term debt with original maturities greater than 90 days50 1,784 
Payments for the redemption of short-term debt with original maturities greater than 90 days(909)(17)
Notes payable and commercial paper2,046 (198)
Contributions from noncontrolling interests303 103 
Dividends paid(783)(707)
Other(59)(74)
Net cash provided by financing activities1,185 2,593 
Net increase in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash136 1,125 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at beginning of period556 573 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at end of period$692 $1,698 
Supplemental Disclosures:
Significant non-cash transactions:
Accrued capital expenditures$921 $934 
Non-cash dividends 27 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
12

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS



DUKE ENERGY CORPORATION
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity
(Unaudited)
Accumulated Other Comprehensive
 (Loss) Income
Net UnrealizedTotal
Net GainsGains (Losses)Duke Energy
CommonAdditional(Losses) onon Available-Pension andCorporation
PreferredStockCommonPaid-inRetainedCash Flowfor-Sale-OPEBStockholders'NoncontrollingTotal
(in millions)StockSharesStockCapitalEarningsHedgesSecuritiesAdjustmentsEquityInterestsEquity
Balance at December 31, 2019$1,962 733 $$40,881 $4,108 $(51)$$(82)$46,822 $1,129 $47,951 
Net income (loss)— — — — 899 — — — 899 (48)851 
Other comprehensive (loss) income— — — — — (65)(63)(14)(77)
Common stock issuances, including dividend reinvestment and employee benefits— — 50 — — — — 50 — 50 
Common stock dividends— — — — (695)— — — (695)— (695)
Contributions from noncontrolling interests, net of transaction costs— — — — — — — — — 103 103 
Distributions to noncontrolling interest in subsidiaries— — — — — — — — — (7)(7)
Other(a)
— — — (1)(91)— — — (92)(1)(93)
Balance at March 31, 2020$1,962 735 $$40,930 $4,221 $(116)$$(81)$46,921 $1,162 $48,083 
Balance at December 31, 2020$1,962 769 $$43,767 $2,471 $(167)$$(76)$47,964 $1,220 $49,184 
Net income (loss)    953    953 (51)902 
Other comprehensive income (loss)     25 (8)2 19 7 26 
Common stock issuances, including dividend reinvestment and employee benefits   (3)    (3) (3)
Common stock dividends    (744)   (744) (744)
Contributions from noncontrolling interests, net of transaction costs   (3)    (3)303 300 
Distributions to noncontrolling interest in subsidiaries         (7)(7)
Balance at March 31, 2021$1,962 769 $1 $43,761 $2,680 $(142)$(2)$(74)$48,186 $1,472 $49,658 
(a)    Amounts in Retained earnings primarily represent impacts due to implementation of a new accounting standard related to Current Estimated Credit Losses. See Note 1 for additional discussion.
See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
13

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DUKE ENERGY CAROLINAS, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
Operating Revenues$1,716 $1,748 
Operating Expenses
Fuel used in electric generation and purchased power422 453 
Operation, maintenance and other441 386 
Depreciation and amortization359 343 
Property and other taxes83 81 
Impairment of assets and other charges 
Total operating expenses1,305 1,265 
Gains on Sales of Other Assets and Other, net 
Operating Income411 484 
Other Income and Expenses, net48 43 
Interest Expense124 123 
Income Before Income Taxes335 404 
Income Tax Expense23 65 
Net Income and Comprehensive Income$312 $339 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
14

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY CAROLINAS, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(Unaudited)
(in millions)March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents$12 $21 
Receivables (net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $2 at 2021 and $1 at 2020)171 247 
Receivables of VIEs (net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $32 at 2021 and $22 at 2020)613 696 
Receivables from affiliated companies119 124 
Inventory1,021 1,010 
Regulatory assets433 473 
Other90 20 
Total current assets2,459 2,591 
Property, Plant and Equipment
Cost51,027 50,640 
Accumulated depreciation and amortization(17,690)(17,453)
Net property, plant and equipment33,337 33,187 
Other Noncurrent Assets
Regulatory assets3,028 2,996 
Nuclear decommissioning trust funds5,147 4,977 
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net105 110 
Other1,185 1,187 
Total other noncurrent assets9,465 9,270 
Total Assets$45,261 $45,048 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current Liabilities
Accounts payable$643 $1,000 
Accounts payable to affiliated companies206 199 
Notes payable to affiliated companies508 506 
Taxes accrued138 76 
Interest accrued128 117 
Current maturities of long-term debt507 506 
Asset retirement obligations258 264 
Regulatory liabilities559 473 
Other440 546 
Total current liabilities3,387 3,687 
Long-Term Debt11,522 11,412 
Long-Term Debt Payable to Affiliated Companies300 300 
Other Noncurrent Liabilities
Deferred income taxes3,913 3,842 
Asset retirement obligations5,117 5,086 
Regulatory liabilities6,540 6,535 
Operating lease liabilities93 97 
Accrued pension and other post-retirement benefit costs72 73 
Investment tax credits235 236 
Other616 626 
Total other noncurrent liabilities16,586 16,495 
Commitments and Contingencies00
Equity
Member's equity13,473 13,161 
Accumulated other comprehensive loss(7)(7)
Total equity13,466 13,154 
Total Liabilities and Equity$45,261 $45,048 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
15

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY CAROLINAS, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income$312 $339 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization (including amortization of nuclear fuel)428 414 
Equity component of AFUDC(16)(14)
Deferred income taxes(8)22 
Payments for asset retirement obligations(35)(41)
(Increase) decrease in
Receivables156 156 
Receivables from affiliated companies5 27 
Inventory(11)(72)
Other current assets(48)96 
Increase (decrease) in
Accounts payable(255)(253)
Accounts payable to affiliated companies7 15 
Taxes accrued62 87 
Other current liabilities(77)(108)
Other assets43 (60)
Other liabilities(17)(10)
Net cash provided by operating activities546 598 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Capital expenditures(622)(724)
Purchases of debt and equity securities(1,128)(607)
Proceeds from sales and maturities of debt and equity securities1,128 607 
Notes receivable from affiliated companies (436)
Other(43)(18)
Net cash used in investing activities(665)(1,178)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Proceeds from the issuance of long-term debt142 910 
Payments for the redemption of long-term debt(33)(2)
Notes payable to affiliated companies2 (29)
Distributions to parent (300)
Other(1)(1)
Net cash provided by financing activities110 578 
Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents(9)(2)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period21 18 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period$12 $16 
Supplemental Disclosures:
Significant non-cash transactions:
Accrued capital expenditures$268 $254 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
16

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY CAROLINAS, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity
(Unaudited)
Accumulated Other
Comprehensive
Loss
Member'sNet Losses onTotal
(in millions)EquityCash Flow HedgesEquity
Balance at December 31, 2019$12,818 $(7)$12,811 
Net income339 — 339 
Distributions to parent(300)— (300)
Other(a)
(13)— (13)
Balance at March 31, 2020$12,844 $(7)$12,837 
Balance at December 31, 2020$13,161 $(7)$13,154 
Net income312  312 
Balance at March 31, 2021$13,473 $(7)$13,466 
(a)Amounts primarily represent impacts due to implementation of a new accounting standard related to Current Estimated Credit Losses. See Note 1 for additional discussion.
See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
17

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

PROGRESS ENERGY, INC.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
Operating Revenues$2,505 $2,422 
Operating Expenses
Fuel used in electric generation and purchased power795 763 
Operation, maintenance and other601 554 
Depreciation and amortization485 452 
Property and other taxes142 135 
Total operating expenses2,023 1,904 
Losses on Sales of Other Assets and Other, net (1)
Operating Income482 517 
Other Income and Expenses, net43 32 
Interest Expense192 206 
Income Before Income Taxes333 343 
Income Tax Expense43 60 
Net Income$290 $283 
Net Income$290 $283 
Other Comprehensive Income, net of tax
Net unrealized gains on cash flow hedges1 
Unrealized (losses) gains on available-for-sale securities(1)
Other Comprehensive Income, net of tax 
Comprehensive Income$290 $285 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
18

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
PROGRESS ENERGY, INC.
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(Unaudited)
(in millions)March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents$74 $59 
Receivables (net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $8 at 2021 and 2020)166 228 
Receivables of VIEs (net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $29 at 2021 and 2020)749 901 
Receivables from affiliated companies76 157 
Inventory1,336 1,375 
Regulatory assets (includes $54 at 2021 and $53 at 2020 related to VIEs)821 758 
Other (includes $14 at 2021 and $39 at 2020 related to VIEs)257 109 
Total current assets3,479 3,587 
Property, Plant and Equipment
Cost58,546 57,892 
Accumulated depreciation and amortization(18,718)(18,368)
Generation facilities to be retired, net29 29 
Net property, plant and equipment39,857 39,553 
Other Noncurrent Assets
Goodwill3,655 3,655 
Regulatory assets (includes $927 at 2021 and $937 at 2020 related to VIEs)5,749 5,775 
Nuclear decommissioning trust funds4,263 4,137 
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net720 690 
Other1,267 1,227 
Total other noncurrent assets15,654 15,484 
Total Assets$58,990 $58,624 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current Liabilities
Accounts payable$796 $919 
Accounts payable to affiliated companies321 289 
Notes payable to affiliated companies2,844 2,969 
Taxes accrued143 121 
Interest accrued187 202 
Current maturities of long-term debt (includes $305 at 2021 and 2020 related to VIEs)2,127 1,426 
Asset retirement obligations267 283 
Regulatory liabilities702 640 
Other744 793 
Total current liabilities8,131 7,642 
Long-Term Debt (includes $1,322 at 2021 and $1,252 at 2020 related to VIEs)17,056 17,688 
Long-Term Debt Payable to Affiliated Companies150 150 
Other Noncurrent Liabilities
Deferred income taxes4,489 4,396 
Asset retirement obligations5,859 5,866 
Regulatory liabilities5,126 5,051 
Operating lease liabilities648 623 
Accrued pension and other post-retirement benefit costs501 505 
Other500 462 
Total other noncurrent liabilities17,123 16,903 
Commitments and Contingencies00
Equity
Common Stock, $0.01 par value, 100 shares authorized and outstanding at 2021 and 2020 — 
Additional paid-in capital9,143 9,143 
Retained earnings7,400 7,109 
Accumulated other comprehensive loss(15)(15)
Total Progress Energy, Inc. stockholders' equity16,528 16,237 
Noncontrolling interests2 
Total equity16,530 16,241 
Total Liabilities and Equity$58,990 $58,624 
See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
19

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
PROGRESS ENERGY, INC.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income$290 $283 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Depreciation, amortization and accretion (including amortization of nuclear fuel)575 552 
Equity component of AFUDC(13)(14)
Deferred income taxes79 80 
Payments for asset retirement obligations(69)(79)
(Increase) decrease in
Net realized and unrealized mark-to-market and hedging transactions6 
Receivables214 149 
Receivables from affiliated companies81 27 
Inventory39 (40)
Other current assets(150)43 
Increase (decrease) in
Accounts payable(69)(211)
Accounts payable to affiliated companies32 19 
Taxes accrued23 71 
Other current liabilities(60)(128)
Other assets(27)(38)
Other liabilities(64)(56)
Net cash provided by operating activities887 659 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Capital expenditures(796)(972)
Purchases of debt and equity securities(517)(651)
Proceeds from sales and maturities of debt and equity securities537 643 
Notes receivable from affiliated companies 164 
Other(59)(39)
Net cash used in investing activities(835)(855)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Proceeds from the issuance of long-term debt98 — 
Payments for the redemption of long-term debt(34)(283)
Notes payable to affiliated companies(125)479 
Other(2)(1)
Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities(63)195 
Net decrease in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash(11)(1)
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at beginning of period200 126 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at end of period$189 $125 
Supplemental Disclosures:
Significant non-cash transactions:
Accrued capital expenditures$317 $310 
See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
20

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS



PROGRESS ENERGY, INC.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity
(Unaudited)
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Net GainsNet UnrealizedTotal Progress
Additional(Losses) onGains (Losses) onPension andEnergy, Inc.
Paid-inRetainedCash FlowAvailable-for-OPEBStockholders'NoncontrollingTotal
CapitalEarningsHedgesSale SecuritiesAdjustmentsEquityInterestsEquity
Balance at December 31, 2019$9,143 $6,465 $(10)$(1)$(7)$15,590 $$15,593 
Net income— 283 — — — 283 — 283 
Other comprehensive income— — — — 
Other— (1)— — — (1)— (1)
Balance at March 31, 2020$9,143 $6,747 $(9)$— $(7)$15,874 $$15,877 
Balance at December 31, 2020$9,143 $7,109 $(5)$(2)$(8)$16,237 $$16,241 
Net income 290    290  290 
Other comprehensive income (loss)  1 (1)    
Distributions to noncontrolling interests      (1)(1)
Other 1    1 (1) 
Balance at March 31, 2021$9,143 $7,400 $(4)$(3)$(8)$16,528 $2 $16,530 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
21

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DUKE ENERGY PROGRESS, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
Operating Revenues$1,401 $1,338 
Operating Expenses
Fuel used in electric generation and purchased power436 405 
Operation, maintenance and other357 305 
Depreciation and amortization285 287 
Property and other taxes49 47 
Total operating expenses1,127 1,044 
Losses on Sales of Other Assets and Other, net (1)
Operating Income274 293 
Other Income and Expenses, net24 22 
Interest Expense69 69 
Income Before Income Taxes229 246 
Income Tax Expense19 42 
Net Income and Comprehensive Income$210 $204 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
22

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY PROGRESS, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(Unaudited)
(in millions)March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents$46 $39 
Receivables (net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $4 at 2021 and 2020)80 132 
Receivables of VIEs (net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $19 at 2021 and 2020)422 500 
Receivables from affiliated companies70 50 
Inventory882 911 
Regulatory assets469 492 
Other138 60 
Total current assets2,107 2,184 
Property, Plant and Equipment
Cost36,077 35,759 
Accumulated depreciation and amortization(13,064)(12,801)
Generation facilities to be retired, net29 29 
Net property, plant and equipment23,042 22,987 
Other Noncurrent Assets
Regulatory assets4,033 3,976 
Nuclear decommissioning trust funds3,645 3,500 
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net386 346 
Other759 740 
Total other noncurrent assets8,823 8,562 
Total Assets$33,972 $33,733 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current Liabilities
Accounts payable$339 $454 
Accounts payable to affiliated companies225 215 
Notes payable to affiliated companies163 295 
Taxes accrued73 85 
Interest accrued71 99 
Current maturities of long-term debt1,302 603 
Asset retirement obligations267 283 
Regulatory liabilities618 530 
Other383 411 
Total current liabilities3,441 2,975 
Long-Term Debt7,904 8,505 
Long-Term Debt Payable to Affiliated Companies150 150 
Other Noncurrent Liabilities
Deferred income taxes2,374 2,298 
Asset retirement obligations5,366 5,352 
Regulatory liabilities4,454 4,394 
Operating lease liabilities356 323 
Accrued pension and other post-retirement benefit costs240 242 
Investment tax credits131 132 
Other86 102 
Total other noncurrent liabilities13,007 12,843 
Commitments and Contingencies00
Equity
Member's Equity9,470 9,260 
Total Liabilities and Equity$33,972 $33,733 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
23

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY PROGRESS, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income$210 $204 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization (including amortization of nuclear fuel)331 331 
Equity component of AFUDC(8)(10)
Deferred income taxes6 43 
Payments for asset retirement obligations(46)(75)
(Increase) decrease in
Net realized and unrealized mark-to-market and hedging transactions2 (2)
Receivables131 133 
Receivables from affiliated companies(20)
Inventory29 (22)
Other current assets(21)54 
Increase (decrease) in
Accounts payable(62)(220)
Accounts payable to affiliated companies10 
Taxes accrued(12)26 
Other current liabilities(25)(73)
Other assets(35)(48)
Other liabilities(15)(8)
Net cash provided by operating activities475 340 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Capital expenditures(400)(466)
Purchases of debt and equity securities(382)(550)
Proceeds from sales and maturities of debt and equity securities380 540 
Other(29)(16)
Net cash used in investing activities(431)(492)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Proceeds from the issuance of long-term debt98 — 
Payments for the redemption of long-term debt(2)(1)
Notes payable to affiliated companies(132)163 
Other(1)— 
Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities(37)162 
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents7 10 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period39 22 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period$46 $32 
Supplemental Disclosures:
Significant non-cash transactions:
Accrued capital expenditures$96 $87 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
24

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY PROGRESS, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity
(Unaudited)
Member's
(in millions)Equity
Balance at December 31, 2019$9,246 
Net income204 
Balance at March 31, 2020$9,450 
Balance at December 31, 2020$9,260 
Net income210 
Balance at March 31, 2021$9,470 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
25

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DUKE ENERGY FLORIDA, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
Operating Revenues$1,101 $1,080 
Operating Expenses
Fuel used in electric generation and purchased power359 358 
Operation, maintenance and other242 245 
Depreciation and amortization200 165 
Property and other taxes93 88 
Total operating expenses894 856 
Operating Income207 224 
Other Income and Expenses, net18 10 
Interest Expense80 84 
Income Before Income Taxes145 150 
Income Tax Expense28 30 
Net Income$117 $120 
Other Comprehensive Income, net of tax
Unrealized (losses) gains on available-for-sale securities(1)
Comprehensive Income$116 $121 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
26

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY FLORIDA, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(Unaudited)
(in millions)March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents$22 $11 
Receivables (net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $5 at 2021 and $4 at 2020)84 94 
Receivables of VIEs (net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $10 at 2021 and 2020)327 401 
Receivables from affiliated companies7 
Inventory455 464 
Regulatory assets (includes $54 at 2021 and $53 at 2020 related to VIEs)352 265 
Other (includes $14 at 2021 and $39 at 2020 related to VIEs)82 41 
Total current assets1,329 1,279 
Property, Plant and Equipment
Cost22,459 22,123 
Accumulated depreciation and amortization(5,646)(5,560)
Net property, plant and equipment16,813 16,563 
Other Noncurrent Assets
Regulatory assets (includes $927 at 2021 and $937 at 2020 related to VIEs)1,717 1,799 
Nuclear decommissioning trust funds617 637 
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net333 344 
Other355 335 
Total other noncurrent assets3,022 3,115 
Total Assets$21,164 $20,957 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current Liabilities
Accounts payable$457 $465 
Accounts payable to affiliated companies108 85 
Notes payable to affiliated companies279 196 
Taxes accrued84 82 
Interest accrued75 69 
Current maturities of long-term debt (includes $305 at 2021 and 2020 related to VIEs)824 823 
Regulatory liabilities84 110 
Other356 374 
Total current liabilities2,267 2,204 
Long-Term Debt (includes $972 at 2021 and $1,002 at 2020 related to VIEs)7,060 7,092 
Other Noncurrent Liabilities
Deferred income taxes2,209 2,191 
Asset retirement obligations493 514 
Regulatory liabilities672 658 
Operating lease liabilities292 300 
Accrued pension and other post-retirement benefit costs230 231 
Other267 209 
Total other noncurrent liabilities4,163 4,103 
Commitments and Contingencies00
Equity
Member's equity7,677 7,560 
Accumulated other comprehensive loss(3)(2)
Total equity7,674 7,558 
Total Liabilities and Equity$21,164 $20,957 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
27

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY FLORIDA, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income$117 $120 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Depreciation, amortization and accretion243 219 
Equity component of AFUDC(4)(4)
Deferred income taxes74 34 
Payments for asset retirement obligations(24)(5)
(Increase) decrease in
Net realized and unrealized mark-to-market and hedging transactions2 
Receivables83 15 
Receivables from affiliated companies(4)— 
Inventory10 (19)
Other current assets(101)
Increase (decrease) in
Accounts payable(7)11 
Accounts payable to affiliated companies23 (20)
Taxes accrued3 31 
Other current liabilities(41)(58)
Other assets12 13 
Other liabilities(48)(46)
Net cash provided by operating activities338 301 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Capital expenditures(396)(506)
Purchases of debt and equity securities(134)(101)
Proceeds from sales and maturities of debt and equity securities157 103 
Notes receivable from affiliated companies 173 
Other(30)(23)
Net cash used in investing activities(403)(354)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Payments for the redemption of long-term debt(33)(282)
Notes payable to affiliated companies83 305 
Other (1)
Net cash provided by financing activities50 22 
Net decrease in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash(15)(31)
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at beginning of period50 56 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at end of period$35 $25 
Supplemental Disclosures:
Significant non-cash transactions:
Accrued capital expenditures$222 $223 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
28

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY FLORIDA, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity
(Unaudited)
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
Net Unrealized
Gains (Losses) on
Member'sAvailable-for-SaleTotal
(in millions)EquitySecuritiesEquity
Balance at December 31, 2019$6,789 $(1)$6,788 
Net income120 — 120 
Other comprehensive income— 
Balance at March 31, 2020$6,909 $— $6,909 
Balance at December 31, 2020$7,560 $(2)$7,558 
Net income117  117 
Other comprehensive loss (1)(1)
Balance at March 31, 2021$7,677 $(3)$7,674 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
29

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DUKE ENERGY OHIO, INC.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
Operating Revenues
Regulated electric$363 $346 
Regulated natural gas169 152 
Total operating revenues532 498 
Operating Expenses
Fuel used in electric generation and purchased power82 87 
Cost of natural gas51 37 
Operation, maintenance and other108 123 
Depreciation and amortization74 68 
Property and other taxes92 83 
Total operating expenses407 398 
Operating Income125 100 
Other Income and Expenses, net5 
Interest Expense25 24 
Income Before Income Taxes105 79 
Income Tax Expense14 14 
Net Income and Comprehensive Income$91 $65 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
30

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY OHIO, INC.
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(Unaudited)
(in millions)March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents$18 $14 
Receivables (net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $4 at 2021 and 2020)98 98 
Receivables from affiliated companies60 102 
Inventory108 110 
Regulatory assets54 39 
Other18 31 
Total current assets356 394 
Property, Plant and Equipment
Cost11,199 11,022 
Accumulated depreciation and amortization(3,049)(3,013)
Net property, plant and equipment8,150 8,009 
Other Noncurrent Assets
Goodwill920 920 
Regulatory assets620 610 
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net20 20 
Other75 72 
Total other noncurrent assets1,635 1,622 
Total Assets$10,141 $10,025 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current Liabilities
Accounts payable$266 $279 
Accounts payable to affiliated companies56 68 
Notes payable to affiliated companies270 169 
Taxes accrued192 247 
Interest accrued32 31 
Current maturities of long-term debt50 50 
Asset retirement obligations8 
Regulatory liabilities59 65 
Other67 70 
Total current liabilities1,000 982 
Long-Term Debt3,015 3,014 
Long-Term Debt Payable to Affiliated Companies25 25 
Other Noncurrent Liabilities
Deferred income taxes1,001 981 
Asset retirement obligations104 108 
Regulatory liabilities739 748 
Operating lease liabilities20 20 
Accrued pension and other post-retirement benefit costs114 113 
Other97 99 
Total other noncurrent liabilities2,075 2,069 
Commitments and Contingencies00
Equity
Common Stock, $8.50 par value, 120 million shares authorized; 90 million shares outstanding at 2021 and 2020762 762 
Additional paid-in capital2,776 2,776 
Retained earnings488 397 
Total equity4,026 3,935 
Total Liabilities and Equity$10,141 $10,025 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
31

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY OHIO, INC.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income$91 $65 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization75 69 
Equity component of AFUDC(2)(1)
Deferred income taxes12 14 
(Increase) decrease in
Receivables 
Receivables from affiliated companies5 40 
Inventory2 14 
Other current assets(5)
Increase (decrease) in
Accounts payable8 (19)
Accounts payable to affiliated companies(12)— 
Taxes accrued(55)(49)
Other current liabilities(8)
Other assets(16)(2)
Other liabilities1 (5)
Net cash provided by operating activities96 137 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Capital expenditures(220)(217)
Notes receivable from affiliated companies37 — 
Other(10)(10)
Net cash used in investing activities(193)(227)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Notes payable to affiliated companies101 87 
Net cash provided by financing activities101 87 
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents4 (3)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period14 17 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period$18 $14 
Supplemental Disclosures:
Significant non-cash transactions:
Accrued capital expenditures$84 $66 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
32

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY OHIO, INC.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity
(Unaudited)
Additional
CommonPaid-inRetainedTotal
(in millions)StockCapitalEarningsEquity
Balance at December 31, 2019$762 $2,776 $145 $3,683 
Net income— — 65 65 
Balance at March 31, 2020$762 $2,776 $210 $3,748 
Balance at December 31, 2020$762 $2,776 $397 $3,935 
Net income  91 91 
Balance at March 31, 2021$762 $2,776 $488 $4,026 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
33

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DUKE ENERGY INDIANA, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
Operating Revenues$745 $692 
Operating Expenses
Fuel used in electric generation and purchased power217 194 
Operation, maintenance and other178 186 
Depreciation and amortization152 132 
Property and other taxes21 22 
Total operating expenses568 534 
Operating Income177 158 
Other Income and Expenses, net9 10 
Interest Expense50 43 
Income Before Income Taxes136 125 
Income Tax Expense24 26 
Net Income and Comprehensive Income$112 $99 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
34

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY INDIANA, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(Unaudited)
(in millions)March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents$17 $
Receivables (net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $3 at 2021 and 2020)63 55 
Receivables from affiliated companies62 112 
Notes receivable from affiliated companies51 — 
Inventory436 473 
Regulatory assets151 125 
Other34 37 
Total current assets814 809 
Property, Plant and Equipment
Cost17,548 17,382 
Accumulated depreciation and amortization(5,821)(5,661)
Net property, plant and equipment11,727 11,721 
Other Noncurrent Assets
Regulatory assets1,217 1,203 
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net54 55 
Other251 253 
Total other noncurrent assets1,522 1,511 
Total Assets$14,063 $14,041 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current Liabilities
Accounts payable$163 $188 
Accounts payable to affiliated companies72 88 
Notes payable to affiliated companies 131 
Taxes accrued122 62 
Interest accrued59 51 
Current maturities of long-term debt123 70 
Asset retirement obligations176 168 
Regulatory liabilities119 111 
Other82 83 
Total current liabilities916 952 
Long-Term Debt3,818 3,871 
Long-Term Debt Payable to Affiliated Companies150 150 
Other Noncurrent Liabilities
Deferred income taxes1,230 1,228 
Asset retirement obligations997 1,008 
Regulatory liabilities1,629 1,627 
Operating lease liabilities52 53 
Accrued pension and other post-retirement benefit costs172 171 
Investment tax credits168 168 
Other35 30 
Total other noncurrent liabilities4,283 4,285 
Commitments and Contingencies00
Equity
Member's Equity4,896 4,783 
Total Liabilities and Equity$14,063 $14,041 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
35

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY INDIANA, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income$112 $99 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Depreciation, amortization and accretion153 133 
Equity component of AFUDC(5)(6)
Deferred income taxes(12)16 
Payments for asset retirement obligations(10)(12)
(Increase) decrease in
Net realized and unrealized mark-to-market and hedging transactions1 — 
Receivables(9)15 
Receivables from affiliated companies 
Inventory38 (21)
Other current assets(23)25 
Increase (decrease) in
Accounts payable1 (13)
Accounts payable to affiliated companies(16)(21)
Taxes accrued71 43 
Other current liabilities20 (27)
Other assets3 (4)
Other liabilities12 
Net cash provided by operating activities336 238 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Capital expenditures(186)(210)
Purchases of debt and equity securities(5)(5)
Proceeds from sales and maturities of debt and equity securities4 
Notes receivable from affiliated companies(1)(543)
Other(7)(6)
Net cash used in investing activities(195)(762)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Proceeds from the issuance of long-term debt 544 
Notes payable to affiliated companies(131)(30)
Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities(131)514 
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents10 (10)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period7 25 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period$17 $15 
Supplemental Disclosures:
Significant non-cash transactions:
Accrued capital expenditures$74 $70 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
36

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
DUKE ENERGY INDIANA, LLC
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity
(Unaudited)
Member's
(in millions)Equity
Balance at December 31, 2019$4,575 
Net income99 
Balance at March 31, 2020$4,674 
Balance at December 31, 2020$4,783 
Net income112 
Other1 
Balance at March 31, 2021$4,896 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
37

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

PIEDMONT NATURAL GAS COMPANY, INC.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
Operating Revenues$606 $512 
Operating Expenses
Cost of natural gas225 162 
Operation, maintenance and other78 80 
Depreciation and amortization48 45 
Property and other taxes14 12 
Total operating expenses365 299 
Operating Income241 213 
Other Income and Expenses, net17 12 
Interest Expense29 27 
Income Before Income Taxes229 198 
Income Tax Expense26 20 
Net Income and Comprehensive Income$203 $178 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
38

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
PIEDMONT NATURAL GAS COMPANY, INC.
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(Unaudited)
(in millions)March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents$1 $
Receivables (net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $14 at 2021 and $12 at 2020)257 250 
Receivables from affiliated companies10 10 
Notes receivable from affiliated companies198 
Inventory37 68 
Regulatory assets100 153 
Other12 20 
Total current assets615 501 
Property, Plant and Equipment
Cost9,358 9,134 
Accumulated depreciation and amortization(1,809)(1,749)
Net property, plant and equipment7,549 7,385 
Other Noncurrent Assets
Goodwill49 49 
Regulatory assets324 302 
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net19 20 
Investments in equity method unconsolidated affiliates88 88 
Other274 270 
Total other noncurrent assets754 729 
Total Assets$8,918 $8,615 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current Liabilities
Accounts payable$166 $230 
Accounts payable to affiliated companies58 79 
Notes payable to affiliated companies 530 
Taxes accrued68 23 
Interest accrued37 34 
Current maturities of long-term debt160 160 
Regulatory liabilities70 88 
Other73 69 
Total current liabilities632 1,213 
Long-Term Debt2,967 2,620 
Other Noncurrent Liabilities
Deferred income taxes837 821 
Asset retirement obligations20 20 
Regulatory liabilities1,015 1,044 
Operating lease liabilities17 19 
Accrued pension and other post-retirement benefit costs8 
Other179 155 
Total other noncurrent liabilities2,076 2,067 
Commitments and Contingencies00
Equity
Common stock, no par value: 100 shares authorized and outstanding at 2021 and 20201,635 1,310 
Retained earnings1,608 1,405 
Total equity3,243 2,715 
Total Liabilities and Equity$8,918 $8,615 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
39

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
PIEDMONT NATURAL GAS COMPANY, INC.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(Unaudited)
Three Months Ended
March 31,
(in millions)20212020
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income$203 $178 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization48 46 
Equity component of AFUDC(6)(5)
Deferred income taxes(12)12 
Equity in earnings from unconsolidated affiliates(2)(2)
(Increase) decrease in
Receivables(8)65 
Receivables from affiliated companies (3)
Inventory31 33 
Other current assets66 (9)
Increase (decrease) in
Accounts payable(63)(76)
Accounts payable to affiliated companies(21)
Taxes accrued45 12 
Other current liabilities(16)(12)
Other assets2 
Other liabilities(2)(19)
Net cash provided by operating activities265 230 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Capital expenditures(200)(231)
Notes receivable from affiliated companies(198)— 
Other(8)(5)
Net cash used in investing activities(406)(236)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Proceeds from the issuance of long-term debt347 — 
Notes payable to affiliated companies(530)10 
Capital contributions from parent325 — 
Net cash provided by financing activities142 10 
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents1 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period — 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period$1 $
Supplemental Disclosures:
Significant non-cash transactions:
Accrued capital expenditures$106 $114 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
40

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
PIEDMONT NATURAL GAS COMPANY, INC.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity
(Unaudited)
CommonRetainedTotal
(in millions)StockEarningsEquity
Balance at December 31, 2019$1,310 $1,133 $2,443 
Net income— 178 178 
Other— (1)(1)
Balance at March 31, 2020$1,310 $1,310 $2,620 
Balance at December 31, 2020$1,310 $1,405 $2,715 
Net income 203 203 
Contribution from parent325  325 
Balance at March 31, 2021$1,635 $1,608 $3,243 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
41

FINANCIAL STATEMENTSORGANIZATION AND BASIS OF PRESENTATION

Index to Combined Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
The unaudited notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements that follow are a combined presentation. The following list indicates the registrants to which the footnotes apply.
Applicable Notes
Registrant12345678910111213141516
Duke Energy
Duke Energy Carolinas
Progress Energy
Duke Energy Progress
Duke Energy Florida
Duke Energy Ohio
Duke Energy Indiana
Piedmont
Tables within the notes may not sum across due to (i) Progress Energy's consolidation of Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Florida and other subsidiaries that are not registrants and (ii) subsidiaries that are not registrants but included in the consolidated Duke Energy balances.
1. ORGANIZATION AND BASIS OF PRESENTATION
BASIS OF PRESENTATION
These Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with GAAP for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Regulation S-X. Accordingly, these Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements do not include all information and notes required by GAAP for annual financial statements and should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements in the Duke Energy Registrants’ combined Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.
The information in these combined notes relates to each of the Duke Energy Registrants as noted in the Index to Combined Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements. However, none of the registrants make any representations as to information related solely to Duke Energy or the subsidiaries of Duke Energy other than itself.
These Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements, in the opinion of the respective companies’ management, reflect all normal recurring adjustments necessary to fairly present the financial position and results of operations of each of the Duke Energy Registrants. Amounts reported in Duke Energy’s interim Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and each of the Subsidiary Registrants’ interim Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income are not necessarily indicative of amounts expected for the respective annual periods due to effects of seasonal temperature variations on energy consumption, regulatory rulings, timing of maintenance on electric generating units, changes in mark-to-market valuations, changing commodity prices and other factors.
In preparing financial statements that conform to GAAP, management must make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the reported amounts of revenues and expenses and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements. Actual results could differ from those estimates.
BASIS OF CONSOLIDATION
These Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements include, after eliminating intercompany transactions and balances, the accounts of the Duke Energy Registrants and subsidiaries or VIEs where the respective Duke Energy Registrants have control. See Note 11 for additional information on VIEs. These Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements also reflect the Duke Energy Registrants’ proportionate share of certain jointly owned generation and transmission facilities.
OTHER CURRENT LIABILITIES
Included in Other within Current Liabilities on the Duke Energy Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet is a current liability of $46 million and $936 million as of March 31, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively. The current liability, initially recorded in 2020, primarily represented Duke Energy's share of ACP's obligations of outstanding debt and to satisfy ARO requirements to restore construction sites. See Notes 3 and 11 for further information.
NONCONTROLLING INTEREST
Duke Energy maintains a controlling financial interest in certain less than wholly owned nonregulated subsidiaries. As a result, Duke Energy consolidates these subsidiaries and presents the third-party investors' portion of Duke Energy's net income (loss), net assets and comprehensive income (loss) as noncontrolling interest. Noncontrolling interest is included as a component of equity on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet.
Several operating agreements of Duke Energy's subsidiaries with noncontrolling interest are subject to allocations of earnings, tax attributes and cash flows in accordance with contractual agreements that vary throughout the lives of the subsidiaries. Therefore, Duke Energy and the other investors' (the owners) interests in the subsidiaries are not fixed, and the subsidiaries apply the Hypothetical Liquidation at Book Value (HLBV) method in allocating income or loss and other comprehensive income or loss (all measured on a pretax basis) to the owners. The HLBV method measures the amounts that each owner would hypothetically claim at each balance sheet reporting date, including tax benefits realized by the owners over the IRS recapture period, upon a hypothetical liquidation of the subsidiary at the net book value of its underlying assets. The change in the amount that each owner would hypothetically receive at the reporting date compared to the amount it would have received on the previous reporting date represents the amount of income or loss allocated to each owner for the reporting period.
42

FINANCIAL STATEMENTSORGANIZATION AND BASIS OF PRESENTATION

Other operating agreements of Duke Energy's subsidiaries with noncontrolling interest allocate profit and loss based on their pro rata shares of the ownership interest in the respective subsidiary. Therefore, Duke Energy allocates net income or loss and other comprehensive income or loss of these subsidiaries to the owners based on their pro rata shares.
The following table presents cash received for the sale of noncontrolling interest and allocated losses to noncontrolling interest for the three months ended March 31, 2021, and 2020.
Three Months Ended March 31,
(in millions)20212020
Noncontrolling Interest Capital Contributions
Cash received for the sale of noncontrolling interest to tax equity members$303 $103 
Cash received for the sale of noncontrolling interest to pro rata share members0 
Total Noncontrolling Interest Capital Contributions303 103 
Noncontrolling Interest Allocation of Income
Allocated losses to noncontrolling tax equity members utilizing the HLBV method43 49 
Allocated losses (gains) to noncontrolling members based on pro rata shares of ownership8 (1)
Total Noncontrolling Interest Allocated Losses$51 $48 
CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS AND RESTRICTED CASH
Duke Energy, Progress Energy and Duke Energy Florida have restricted cash balances related primarily to collateral assets, escrow deposits and VIEs. See Notes 9 and 11 for additional information. Restricted cash amounts are included in Other within Current Assets and Other Noncurrent Assets on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. The following table presents the components of cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash included in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.
March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
DukeDuke
DukeProgressEnergyDukeProgressEnergy
EnergyEnergyFloridaEnergyEnergyFlorida
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents$379 $74 $22 $259 $59 $11 
Other210 13 13 194 39 39 
Other Noncurrent Assets
Other103 102  103 102 — 
Total cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash$692 $189 $35 $556 $200 $50 
INVENTORY
Provisions for inventory write-offs were not material at March 31, 2021, and December 31, 2020. The components of inventory are presented in the tables below.
 March 31, 2021
DukeDukeDukeDukeDuke
DukeEnergyProgressEnergyEnergyEnergyEnergy
(in millions)EnergyCarolinasEnergyProgressFloridaOhioIndianaPiedmont
Materials and supplies$2,365 $816 $1,011 $680 $332 $77 $313 $11 
Coal464 170 160 101 59 12 122  
Natural gas, oil and other fuel247 35 165 101 64 19 1 26 
Total inventory$3,076 $1,021 $1,336 $882 $455 $108 $436 $37 
 December 31, 2020
DukeDukeDukeDukeDuke
DukeEnergyProgressEnergyEnergyEnergyEnergy
(in millions)EnergyCarolinasEnergyProgressFloridaOhioIndianaPiedmont
Materials and supplies$2,312 $785 $999 $673 $325 $78 $307 $12 
Coal561 186 193 131 63 16 165 — 
Natural gas, oil and other fuel294 39 183 107 76 16 56 
Total inventory$3,167 $1,010 $1,375 $911 $464 $110 $473 $68 
43

FINANCIAL STATEMENTSORGANIZATION AND BASIS OF PRESENTATION

NEW ACCOUNTING STANDARDS
No new accounting standards were adopted by the Duke Energy Registrants in 2021, but the following accounting standard was adopted by the Duke Energy Registrants in 2020.
Current Expected Credit Losses. In June 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued new accounting guidance for credit losses. Duke Energy adopted the new accounting guidance for credit losses effective January 1, 2020, using the modified retrospective method of adoption, which does not require restatement of prior year results. Duke Energy did not adopt any practical expedients.
Duke Energy recognizes allowances for credit losses based on management's estimate of losses expected to be incurred over the lives of certain assets or guarantees. Management monitors credit quality, changes in expected credit losses and the appropriateness of the allowance for credit losses on a forward-looking basis. Management reviews the risk of loss periodically as part of the existing assessment of collectability of receivables.
Duke Energy reviews the credit quality of its counterparties as part of its regular risk management process and requires credit enhancements, such as deposits or letters of credit, as appropriate and as allowed by regulators.
Duke Energy recorded cumulative effects of changes in accounting principles related to the adoption of new credit loss standard, for allowances for credit losses of trade and other receivables, insurance receivables and financial guarantees. These amounts are included in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets in Receivables, Receivables of VIEs, Other Noncurrent Assets and Other Noncurrent Liabilities. See Notes 4 and 12 for more information.
Duke Energy recorded an adjustment for the cumulative effect of a change in accounting principle due to the adoption of this standard on January 1, 2020, as shown in the table below:
 January 1, 2020
DukeDukeDuke
DukeEnergyProgressEnergyEnergy
(in millions)EnergyCarolinasEnergyProgressFloridaPiedmont
Total pretax impact to Retained Earnings$120 $16 $2 $1 $1 $1 
The following new accounting standard has been issued but not yet adopted by the Duke Energy Registrants as of March 31, 2021.
Reference Rate Reform. In March 2020, the FASB issued new accounting guidance for reference rate reform. This guidance is elective and provides expedients to facilitate financial reporting for the anticipated transition away from the London Inter-bank Offered Rate (LIBOR) and other interbank reference rates by the end of 2021. The optional expedients are effective for modification of existing contracts or new arrangements executed between March 12, 2020, through December 31, 2022.
Duke Energy has variable-rate debt and manages interest rate risk by entering into financial contracts including interest rate swaps that are generally indexed to LIBOR. Impacted financial arrangements extending beyond 2021 may require contractual amendment or termination to fully adapt to a post-LIBOR environment. Duke Energy is assessing these financial arrangements and is evaluating the use of optional expedients outlined in the new accounting guidance. Alternative index provisions are also being assessed and incorporated into new financial arrangements that extend beyond 2021. The full outcome of the transition away from LIBOR cannot be determined at this time, but is not expected to have a material impact on the financial statements.
2. BUSINESS SEGMENTS
Duke Energy
Duke Energy's segment structure includes the following segments: Electric Utilities and Infrastructure, Gas Utilities and Infrastructure and Commercial Renewables. The Electric Utilities and Infrastructure segment primarily includes Duke Energy's regulated electric utilities in the Carolinas, Florida and the Midwest. The Gas Utilities and Infrastructure segment includes Piedmont, Duke Energy's natural gas local distribution companies in Ohio and Kentucky, and Duke Energy's natural gas storage and midstream pipeline investments.
The Commercial Renewables segment is primarily comprised of nonregulated utility-scale wind and solar generation assets located throughout the U.S. In 2021, Duke Energy continues to monitor recoverability of its renewable merchant plants located in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas West market and in the PJM West market due to declining market pricing and declining long-term forecasted energy prices, primarily driven by lower forecasted natural gas prices. The assets were not impaired as of March 31, 2021, because the carrying value of approximately $210 million continues to approximate the aggregate estimated future undiscounted cash flows. A continued decline in energy market pricing would likely result in a future impairment. Duke Energy retained 51% ownership interest in these facilities following the 2019 transaction to sell a minority interest in certain renewable assets.
The remainder of Duke Energy’s operations is presented as Other, which is primarily comprised of interest expense on holding company debt, unallocated corporate costs, Duke Energy’s wholly owned captive insurance company, Bison, and Duke Energy's ownership interest in National Methanol Company.
44

FINANCIAL STATEMENTSBUSINESS SEGMENTS

Business segment information is presented in the following tables. Segment assets presented exclude intercompany assets.
Three Months Ended March 31, 2021
ElectricGasTotal
Utilities andUtilities andCommercialReportable
(in millions)InfrastructureInfrastructureRenewablesSegmentsOtherEliminationsTotal
Unaffiliated revenues$5,273 $752 $119 $6,144 $6 $ $6,150 
Intersegment revenues8 23  31 20 (51) 
Total revenues$5,281 $775 $119 $6,175 $26 $(51)$6,150 
Segment income (loss)(a)
$820 $245 $27 $1,092 $(139)$ $953 
Less: Noncontrolling interests51 
Add: Preferred stock dividend39 
Net Income$941 
Segment assets$138,734 $14,139 $6,894 $159,767 $3,710 $(12)$163,465 
Three Months Ended March 31, 2020
ElectricGasTotal
Utilities andUtilities andCommercialReportable
(in millions)InfrastructureInfrastructureRenewablesSegmentsOtherEliminationsTotal
Unaffiliated revenues$5,174 $640 $129 $5,943 $$— $5,949 
Intersegment revenues24 — 33 17 (50)— 
Total revenues$5,183 $664 $129 $5,976 $23 $(50)$5,949 
Segment income (loss)(b)
$705 $249 $57 $1,011 $(112)$— $899 
Less: Noncontrolling interests48 
Add: Preferred stock dividend39 
Net Income$890 
(a)    Commercial Renewables includes a $35 million loss related to Texas Storm Uri, of which $8 million is recorded within Nonregulated electric and other revenues, $2 million within Operations, maintenance and other, $29 million within Equity in (losses) earnings of unconsolidated affiliates and $12 million within Loss Attributable to Noncontrolling Interests on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations. See Note 4 for additional information. Gas Utilities and Infrastructure includes $6 million, recorded within Equity in (losses) earnings of unconsolidated affiliates on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations, related to gas pipeline investments. See Note 3 for additional information.
(b)    Other includes a $98 million reversal, recorded within Operations, maintenance and other on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations, related to 2018 severance costs due to the partial settlement of the Duke Energy Carolinas 2019 North Carolina rate case. See Note 3 for additional information.
Duke Energy Ohio
Duke Energy Ohio has 2 reportable segments, Electric Utilities and Infrastructure and Gas Utilities and Infrastructure. The remainder of Duke Energy Ohio's operations is presented as Other.
Three Months Ended March 31, 2021
ElectricGasTotal
Utilities andUtilities andReportable
(in millions)InfrastructureInfrastructureSegmentsOtherEliminationsTotal
Total revenues$363 $169 $532 $ $ $532 
Segment income/Net income$50 $43 $93 $(2)$ $91 
Segment assets$6,544 $3,575 $10,119 $29 $(7)$10,141 
Three Months Ended March 31, 2020
ElectricGasTotal
Utilities andUtilities andReportable
(in millions)InfrastructureInfrastructureSegmentsOtherTotal
Total revenues$346 $152 $498 $— $498 
Segment income/Net income$30 $36 $66 $(1)$65 
45

FINANCIAL STATEMENTSREGULATORY MATTERS

3. REGULATORY MATTERS
RATE-RELATED INFORMATION
The NCUC, PSCSC, FPSC, IURC, PUCO, TPUC and KPSC approve rates for retail electric and natural gas services within their states. The FERC approves rates for electric sales to wholesale customers served under cost-based rates (excluding Ohio and Indiana), as well as sales of transmission service. The FERC also regulates certification and siting of new interstate natural gas pipeline projects.
Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress
2021 Coal Ash Settlement
On January 22, 2021, Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress entered into the Coal Combustion Residuals Settlement Agreement (the “CCR Settlement Agreement”) with the North Carolina Public Staff (Public Staff), the North Carolina Attorney General’s Office and the Sierra Club (collectively, the "Settling Parties"), which was filed with the NCUC on January 25, 2021. The CCR Settlement Agreement resolves all coal ash prudence and cost recovery issues in connection with 2019 rate cases filed by Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress with the NCUC, as well as the equitable sharing issue on remand from the 2017 Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress North Carolina rate cases as a result of the December 11, 2020, North Carolina Supreme Court opinion. The settlement also provides clarity on coal ash cost recovery in North Carolina for Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress through January 2030 and February 2030 (the "Term"), respectively.
Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress agreed not to seek recovery of approximately $1 billion of systemwide deferred coal ash expenditures, but will retain the ability to earn a debt and equity return during the amortization period, which shall be five years in the pending 2019 North Carolina rate cases and will be set by the NCUC in future rate case proceedings. The equity return and the amortization period on deferred coal ash costs under the 2017 Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress North Carolina rate cases will remain unaffected. The equity return on deferred coal ash costs under the 2019 North Carolina rate cases and future rate cases in North Carolina will be set at 150 basis points lower than the authorized return on equity (ROE) then in effect, with a capital structure composed of 48% debt and 52% equity. Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress retain the ability to earn a full WACC return during the deferral period, which is the period from when costs are incurred until they are recovered in rates.
The Settling Parties agreed that execution by Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress of a settlement agreement between themselves and the NCDEQ dated December 31, 2019, (the “DEQ Settlement”) and the coal ash management plans included therein or subsequently approved by DEQ are reasonable and prudent. The Settling Parties retain the right to challenge the reasonableness and prudence of actions taken by Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress and costs incurred to implement the scope of work agreed upon in the DEQ Settlement, after February 1, 2020, and March 1, 2020, for Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress, respectively. The Settling Parties further agreed to waive rights through the Term to challenge the reasonableness or prudence of Duke Energy Carolinas’ and Duke Energy Progress’ historical coal ash management practices, and to waive the right to assert any arguments that future coal ash costs, including financing costs, shall be shared between either company and customers through equitable sharing or any other rate base or return adjustment that shares the revenue requirement burden of coal ash costs not otherwise disallowed due to imprudence.
The Settling Parties agreed to a sharing arrangement for future coal ash insurance litigation proceeds between Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress and North Carolina customers, if achieved.
On January 29, 2021, Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress filed joint motions with the Settling Parties seeking approval of the CCR Settlement Agreement, along with supporting testimony and exhibits from Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress. On February 5, 2021, the Public Staff filed testimony and exhibits supporting the CCR Settlement Agreement.
As a result of the CCR Settlement Agreement, Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress recorded a pretax charge of approximately $454 million and $494 million, respectively, in the fourth quarter of 2020 to Impairment charges and a reversal of approximately $50 million and $102 million, respectively, to Regulated electric operating revenues on the respective Consolidated Statements of Operations.
The Coal Ash Settlement was approved without modification in the NCUC Orders in the 2019 rate cases on March 31, 2021, and April 16, 2021, for Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress, respectively.
2020 North Carolina Storm Securitization Filings
On October 26, 2020, Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress filed a joint petition with the NCUC, as agreed to in partial settlements reached in the 2019 North Carolina Rate Cases for Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress, seeking authorization for the financing of the costs of each utility's storm recovery activities required as a result of Hurricane Florence, Hurricane Michael, Hurricane Dorian and Winter Storm Diego. Specifically, Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress requested that the NCUC find that their storm recovery costs and related financing costs are appropriately financed by debt secured by storm recovery property, and that the commission issue financing orders by which each utility may accomplish such financing using a securitization structure. On January 27, 2021, Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress and the Public Staff filed an Agreement and Stipulation of Partial Settlement, which is subject to review and approval of the NCUC, resolving certain accounting issues, including agreement to support an 18- to 20-year bond period. The total revenue requirement over a proposed 20-year bond period for the storm recovery charges is approximately $287 million for Duke Energy Carolinas and $920 million for Duke Energy Progress. A remote evidentiary hearing ended on January 29, 2021, and on February 1, 2021, the NCUC granted a motion by Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress for a temporary 30-day waiver of the 135-day time frame for the NCUC to issue orders on the joint petition, extending the deadline for the NCUC to issue an order to May 10, 2021. In the NCUC Orders in the 2019 rate cases on March 31, 2021, and April 16, 2021, for Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress, respectively, the reasonableness and prudence of the deferred storm costs was approved. Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
46

FINANCIAL STATEMENTSREGULATORY MATTERS

COVID-19 Filings
North Carolina
Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress filed a joint petition on August 7, 2020, with the NCUC for deferral treatment of incremental costs and waived customer fees due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Comments on the joint petition were filed on November 5, 2020, and reply comments were filed on November 30, 2020. Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
South Carolina
Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress filed a report on June 30, 2020, as required by PSCSC order, reporting revenue impact, costs and savings related to COVID-19 to date. On August 14, 2020, Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress filed a joint petition with the PSCSC for approval of an accounting order to defer incremental COVID-19 related costs incurred through June 30, 2020, and for the ongoing months during the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic. The deferral request did not include lost revenues. Updates on cost impacts were filed on September 30, 2020, and included financial impacts through the end of August 2020. On October 16, 2020, the South Carolina Office of Regulatory Staff (ORS) requested the PSCSC delay taking formal action on the deferral request until the ORS and any intervenors complete discovery. The PSCSC issued an order on October 21, 2020, to grant additional time to complete discovery until January 20, 2021, and to establish a procedural schedule. Updates on cost impacts were filed on December 30, 2020, and included financial impacts through November 30, 2020. On January 15, 2021, the ORS requested the PSCSC suspend the dates for the ORS report and public hearing. The ORS conferred with the companies regarding the status of the docket, and the parties mutually agreed that recently enacted federal laws addressing COVID-19 aid and recovery should be studied before further action is taken in this docket. On January 27, 2021, the PSCSC voted to grant the ORS request to suspend the virtual public hearing. The ORS filed its report on April 16, 2021. Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
Duke Energy Carolinas
2017 North Carolina Rate Case
On August 25, 2017, Duke Energy Carolinas filed an application with the NCUC for a rate increase for retail customers of approximately $647 million. On February 28, 2018, Duke Energy Carolinas and the Public Staff filed an Agreement and Stipulation of Partial Settlement resolving certain portions of the proceeding. Terms of the settlement included an ROE of 9.9% and a capital structure of 52% equity and 48% debt. On June 22, 2018, the NCUC issued an order approving the Stipulation of Partial Settlement and requiring a revenue reduction.
The North Carolina Attorney General and other parties separately filed Notices of Appeal to the North Carolina Supreme Court. The North Carolina Supreme Court consolidated the Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress appeals. On December 11, 2020, the North Carolina Supreme Court issued an opinion, which affirmed, in part, and reversed and remanded, in part, the NCUC’s decisions. In the Opinion, the court upheld the NCUC's decision to include coal ash costs in the cost of service, as well as the NCUC’s discretion to allow a return on the unamortized balance of coal ash costs. The court also remanded to the NCUC a single issue to consider the assessment of support for the Public Staff’s equitable sharing argument. In response to a NCUC order seeking comments on the proposed procedure on remand, on January 11, 2021, Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress, the Public Staff, the North Carolina Attorney General, Sierra Club and Carolina Industrial Group for Fair Utility Rates II and III filed joint comments proposing that the NCUC not hold additional evidentiary hearings, but instead rely upon existing records in the 2017 North Carolina rate cases, or in the alternative the records in the 2019 North Carolina rate cases, in deciding the issue on remand. On January 22, 2021, Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress entered into the CCR Settlement Agreement with the Settling Parties, which was filed with the NCUC on January 25, 2021, and approved by the NCUC on March 31, 2021.
2019 North Carolina Rate Case
On September 30, 2019, Duke Energy Carolinas filed an application with the NCUC for a net rate increase for retail customers of approximately $291 million, which represented an approximate 6% increase in annual base revenues. The gross rate case revenue increase request was $445 million, which was offset by an EDIT rider of $154 million to return to customers North Carolina and federal EDIT resulting from recent reductions in corporate tax rates. The request for a rate increase was driven by major capital investments subsequent to the previous base rate case, coal ash pond closure costs, accelerated coal plant depreciation and deferred 2018 storm costs. Duke Energy Carolinas requested rates be effective no later than August 1, 2020. The NCUC established a procedural schedule with an evidentiary hearing to begin on March 23, 2020. On March 16, 2020, in consideration of public health and safety as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Duke Energy Carolinas filed a motion with the NCUC seeking a suspension of the procedural schedule in the rate case, including issuing discovery requests, and postponement of the evidentiary hearing for 60 days. Also on March 16, 2020, the NCUC issued an Order Postponing Hearing and Addressing Procedural Matters, which postponed the evidentiary hearing until further order by the commission.
On March 25, 2020, Duke Energy Carolinas and the Public Staff filed an Agreement and Stipulation of Partial Settlement, subject to review and approval of the NCUC, resolving certain issues in the base rate proceeding. On July 24, 2020, Duke Energy Carolinas filed its request for approval of its notice to customers required to implement temporary rates. On July 27, 2020, Duke Energy Carolinas filed a joint motion with Duke Energy Progress and the Public Staff notifying the commission that the parties reached a joint partial settlement with the Public Staff. Also on July 27, 2020, Duke Energy Carolinas filed a letter stating that it intended to update its temporary rates calculation to reflect the terms of the partial settlement. On July 31, 2020, Duke Energy Carolinas and the Public Staff filed a Second Agreement and Stipulation of Partial Settlement (Second Partial Settlement), subject to review and approval of the NCUC, resolving certain remaining issues in the base rate proceeding. The remaining items litigated at hearing included recovery of deferred coal ash compliance costs that are subject to asset retirement obligation accounting, implementation of new depreciation rates and the amortization period of the loss on the hydro station sale.
On August 4, 2020, Duke Energy Carolinas filed an amended motion for approval of its amended notice to customers, seeking to exercise its statutory right to implement temporary rates subject to refund on or after August 24, 2020. The revenue requirement to be recovered, subject to refund, through the temporary rates was based on and consistent with the base rate component of the Second Partial Settlement and excluded the items to be litigated noted above. The NCUC approved the August 4, 2020 amended temporary rates motion on August 6, 2020, and temporary rates went into effect on August 24, 2020.
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The Duke Energy Carolinas evidentiary hearing concluded on September 18, 2020, and post-hearing filings were made with the NCUC from all parties by November 4, 2020. On January 22, 2021, Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress entered into the CCR Settlement Agreement with the Settling Parties, which was filed with the NCUC on January 25, 2021.
On March 31, 2021, the NCUC issued an order approving the March 25, 2020, and July 31, 2020, partial settlements. The order includes approval of 1) an ROE of 9.6% based upon a capital structure of 52% equity and 48% debt; 2) deferral treatment of approximately $800 million of grid improvement projects with a return; 3) a flow back period of five years for unprotected federal EDIT; and 4) the reasonableness and prudence of $213 million of deferred storm costs, which were removed from the rate case and for which Duke Energy Carolinas filed a petition seeking securitization in October 2020. Additionally, the order approved without modification the CCR Settlement Agreement.
The order denied Duke Energy Carolinas' proposal to shorten the remaining depreciable lives of certain Duke Energy Carolinas coal-fired generating units, indicating the appropriate proceeding for the review of generating plant retirements is Duke Energy Carolinas' integrated resource planning (IRP) proceeding.
On April 12, 2021, Duke Energy Carolinas filed its final revenue requirement with the NCUC, which results in a net increase of approximately $33 million. Revised customer rates are expected to become effective in June 2021.
2018 South Carolina Rate Case
On November 8, 2018, Duke Energy Carolinas filed an application with the PSCSC for a rate increase for retail customers of approximately $168 million.
After hearings in March 2019, the PSCSC issued an order on May 21, 2019, which included an ROE of 9.5% and a capital structure of 53% equity and 47% debt. The order also included the following material components:
Approval of cancellation of the Lee Nuclear Project, with Duke Energy Carolinas maintaining the Combined Operating License;
Approval of recovery of $125 million (South Carolina retail portion) of Lee Nuclear Project development costs (including AFUDC through December 2017) over a 12-year period, but denial of a return on the deferred balance of costs;
Approval of recovery of $96 million of coal ash costs over a five-year period with a return at Duke Energy Carolinas' WACC;
Denial of recovery of $115 million of certain coal ash costs deemed to be related to the Coal Ash Act and incremental to the federal CCR rule;
Approval of a $66 million decrease to base rates to reflect the change in ongoing tax expense, primarily the reduction in the federal income tax rate from 35% to 21%;
Approval of a $45 million decrease through the EDIT Rider to return EDIT resulting from the federal tax rate change and deferred revenues since January 2018 related to the change, to be returned in accordance with the Average Rate Assumption Method (ARAM) for protected EDIT, over a 20-year period for unprotected EDIT associated with Property, Plant and Equipment, over a five-year period for unprotected EDIT not associated with Property, Plant and Equipment and over a five-year period for the deferred revenues; and
Approval of a $17 million decrease through the EDIT Rider related to reductions in the North Carolina state income tax rate from 6.9% to 2.5% to be returned over a five-year period.
As a result of the order, revised customer rates were effective June 1, 2019. On May 31, 2019, Duke Energy Carolinas filed a Petition for Rehearing or Reconsideration of that order contending substantial rights of Duke Energy Carolinas were prejudiced by unlawful, arbitrary and capricious rulings by the PSCSC on certain issues presented in the proceeding. On June 19, 2019, the PSCSC issued a Directive denying Duke Energy Carolinas' request to rehear or reconsider the commission's rulings on certain issues presented in the proceeding including coal ash remediation and disposal costs, ROE and the recovery of a return on deferred operation and maintenance expenses. An order detailing the commission's decision in the Directive was issued on October 18, 2019. Duke Energy Carolinas filed a notice of appeal on November 15, 2019, with the Supreme Court of South Carolina. On November 20, 2019, the South Carolina Energy Users Committee filed a Notice of Appeal with the Supreme Court of South Carolina. Initial briefs were filed on April 21, 2020, which included the South Carolina Energy User's Committee brief arguing that the PSCSC erred in allowing Duke Energy Carolinas' recovery of costs related to the Lee Nuclear Station. Response briefs were filed on July 6, 2020, and reply briefs were filed on August 11, 2020. Oral arguments before the Supreme Court of South Carolina have been scheduled to occur on May 26, 2021. Based on legal analysis and the filing of the appeal, Duke Energy Carolinas has not recorded an adjustment for its deferred coal ash costs in this matter. Duke Energy Carolinas cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
Duke Energy Progress
2017 North Carolina Rate Case
On June 1, 2017, Duke Energy Progress filed an application with the NCUC for a rate increase for retail customers of approximately $477 million, which was subsequently adjusted to $420 million. On November 22, 2017, Duke Energy Progress and the Public Staff filed an Agreement and Stipulation of Partial Settlement resolving certain portions of the proceeding. Terms of the settlement included an ROE of 9.9% and a capital structure of 52% equity and 48% debt. On February 23, 2018, the NCUC issued an order approving the stipulation. The Public Staff, the North Carolina Attorney General and the Sierra Club filed notices of appeal to the North Carolina Supreme Court.
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FINANCIAL STATEMENTSREGULATORY MATTERS

The North Carolina Supreme Court consolidated the Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress appeals. On December 11, 2020, the North Carolina Supreme Court issued an opinion, which affirmed, in part, and reversed and remanded, in part, the NCUC’s decisions. In the Opinion, the court upheld the NCUC's decision to include coal ash costs in the cost of service, as well as the NCUC’s discretion to allow a return on the unamortized balance of coal ash costs. The court also remanded to the NCUC a single issue to consider the assessment of support for the Public Staff’s equitable sharing argument. In response to a NCUC order seeking comments on the proposed procedure on remand, on January 11, 2021, Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress, the Public Staff, the North Carolina Attorney General, Sierra Club and Carolina Industrial Group for Fair Utility Rates II and III filed joint comments proposing that the NCUC not hold additional evidentiary hearings, but instead rely upon existing records in the 2017 North Carolina rate cases or in the alternative the records in the 2019 North Carolina rate cases, in deciding the issue on remand. On January 22, 2021, Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Carolinas entered into the CCR Settlement Agreement with the Settling Parties, which was filed with the NCUC on January 25, 2021, and approved by the NCUC on April 16, 2021.
2019 North Carolina Rate Case
On October 30, 2019, Duke Energy Progress filed an application with the NCUC for a net rate increase for retail customers of approximately $464 million, which represented an approximate 12.3% increase in annual base revenues. The gross rate case revenue increase request was $586 million, which was offset by riders of $122 million, primarily an EDIT rider of $120 million to return to customers North Carolina and federal EDIT resulting from recent reductions in corporate tax rates. The request for rate increase was driven by major capital investments subsequent to the previous base rate case, coal ash pond closure costs, accelerated coal plant depreciation and deferred 2018 storm costs. Duke Energy Progress sought to defer and recover incremental Hurricane Dorian storm costs in this proceeding and requested rates be effective no later than September 1, 2020. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, on March 24, 2020, the NCUC suspended the procedural schedule and postponed the previously scheduled evidentiary hearing on this matter indefinitely. On April 7, 2020, the NCUC issued an order partially resuming the procedural schedule requiring intervenors to file direct testimony on April 13, 2020. Public Staff filed supplemental direct testimony on April 23, 2020. Duke Energy Progress filed rebuttal testimony on May 4, 2020.
On June 2, 2020, Duke Energy Progress and the Public Staff filed an Agreement and Stipulation of Partial Settlement, subject to review and approval of the NCUC, resolving certain issues in the base rate proceeding. On July 27, 2020, Duke Energy Progress filed a joint motion with Duke Energy Carolinas and the Public Staff notifying the commission that the parties reached a joint partial settlement with the Public Staff. On July 31, 2020, Duke Energy Progress and the Public Staff filed a Second Agreement and Stipulation of Partial Settlement, subject to review and approval of the NCUC, resolving certain remaining issues in the base rate proceeding. The remaining items litigated at hearing included recovery of deferred coal ash compliance costs that are subject to asset retirement obligation accounting and implementation of new depreciation rates.
On August 7, 2020, Duke Energy Progress filed a motion for approval of notice required to implement temporary rates, seeking to exercise its statutory right to implement temporary rates subject to refund on or after September 1, 2020. The revenue requirement to be recovered subject to refund through the temporary rates was based on and consistent with the terms of the base rate component of the settlement agreements with the Public Staff and excluded items to be litigated noted above. Duke Energy Progress will not begin the amortization or implementation of these items until a final determination is issued in the rate case and new base rates are implemented. These items will also be excluded when determining whether a refund of amounts collected through these temporary rates is needed. In addition, Duke Energy Progress also sought authorization to place a temporary decrement EDIT Rider into effect, concurrent with the temporary base rate change. The temporary rate changes are not final rates and remain subject to the NCUC's determination of the just and reasonable rates to be charged by Duke Energy Progress on a permanent basis. The NCUC approved the August 7, 2020 temporary rates motion on August 11, 2020, and temporary rates went into effect on September 1, 2020.
The Duke Energy Progress evidentiary hearing concluded on October 6, 2020, and post-hearing filings were filed with the NCUC from all parties by December 4, 2020. On January 22, 2021, Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Carolinas entered into the CCR Settlement Agreement with the Settling Parties, which was filed with the NCUC on January 25, 2021.
On April 16, 2021, the NCUC issued an order approving the June 2, 2020, and July 31, 2020, partial settlements. The order includes approval of 1) an ROE of 9.6% based upon a capital structure of 52% equity and 48% debt; 2) deferral treatment of approximately $400 million of grid improvement projects with a return; 3) a flow back period of five years for unprotected federal EDIT; and 4) the reasonableness and prudence of approximately $714 million of deferred storm costs, which were removed from the rate case and for which Duke Energy Progress filed a petition seeking securitization in October 2020. Additionally, the order approved without modification the CCR Settlement Agreement.
The order denied Duke Energy Progress' proposal to shorten the remaining depreciable lives of certain Duke Energy Progress coal-fired generating units, indicating the appropriate proceeding for the review of generating plant retirements is Duke Energy Progress' IRP proceeding.
On April 26, 2021, Duke Energy Progress filed its final revenue requirement with the NCUC, which results in a net increase of approximately $178 million. Revised customer rates are expected to become effective in June 2021.
Hurricane Dorian
Hurricane Dorian reached the Carolinas in September 2019 as a Category 2 hurricane making landfall within Duke Energy Progress’ service territory. Total estimated incremental operation and maintenance expenses incurred to repair and restore the system are approximately $168 million with an additional $4 million in capital investments made for restoration efforts. Approximately $145 million of the operation and maintenance expenses are deferred in Regulatory assets within Other Noncurrent Assets on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2021, and December 31, 2020. A request for an accounting order to defer incremental storm costs associated with Hurricane Dorian was included in Duke Energy Progress' October 30, 2019, general rate case filing with the NCUC. Terms of the June 2, 2020, Agreement and Stipulation of Partial Settlement removed incremental storm costs from the general rate case. A petition seeking to securitize these costs, along with costs from Hurricane Florence, Hurricane Michael and Winter Storm Diego, was filed on October 26, 2020, with the NCUC. For information on the securitization filing, see "2020 North Carolina Storm Securitization Filings." Duke Energy Progress cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
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2018 South Carolina Rate Case
On November 8, 2018, Duke Energy Progress filed an application with the PSCSC for a rate increase for retail customers of approximately $59 million.
After hearings in April 2019, the PSCSC issued an order on May 21, 2019, which included an ROE of 9.5% and a capital structure of 53% equity and 47% debt. The order also included the following material components:
Approval of recovery of $4 million of coal ash costs over a five-year period with a return at Duke Energy Progress' WACC;
Denial of recovery of $65 million of certain coal ash costs deemed to be related to the Coal Ash Act and incremental to the federal CCR rule;
Approval of a $17 million decrease to base rates to reflect the change in ongoing tax expense, primarily the reduction in the federal income tax rate from 35% to 21%;
Approval of a $12 million decrease through the EDIT Tax Savings Rider resulting from the federal tax rate change and deferred revenues since January 2018 related to the change, to be returned in accordance with ARAM for protected EDIT, over a 20-year period for unprotected EDIT associated with Property, Plant and Equipment, over a five-year period for unprotected EDIT not associated with Property, Plant and Equipment and over a three-year period for the deferred revenues; and
Approval of a $12 million increase due to the expiration of EDIT related to reductions in the North Carolina state income tax rate from 6.9% to 2.5%.
As a result of the order, revised customer rates were effective June 1, 2019. On May 31, 2019, Duke Energy Progress filed a Petition for Rehearing or Reconsideration of that order contending substantial rights of Duke Energy Progress were prejudiced by unlawful, arbitrary and capricious rulings by the PSCSC on certain issues presented in the proceeding. On June 19, 2019, the PSCSC issued a Directive denying Duke Energy Progress' request to rehear or reconsider the commission's rulings on certain issues presented in the proceeding including coal ash remediation and disposal costs, ROE and the recovery of a return on deferred operation and maintenance expenses, but allowing additional litigation-related costs. As a result of the Directive allowing litigation-related costs, customer rates were revised effective July 1, 2019. An order detailing the commission's decision in the Directive was issued on October 18, 2019. Duke Energy Progress filed a notice of appeal on November 15, 2019, with the Supreme Court of South Carolina. Initial briefs were filed on April 21, 2020. Response briefs were filed on July 6, 2020, and reply briefs were filed on August 11, 2020. Oral arguments before the Supreme Court of South Carolina have been scheduled to occur on May 26, 2021. Based on legal analysis and the filing of the appeal, Duke Energy Progress has not recorded an adjustment for its deferred coal ash costs in this matter. Duke Energy Progress cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
Western Carolinas Modernization Plan
On October 8, 2018, Duke Energy Progress filed an application with the NCUC for a CPCN to construct the Hot Springs Microgrid Solar and Battery Storage Facility, which was approved with certain conditions on May 10, 2019. A hearing to update the NCUC on the status of the project was held on March 5, 2020. Construction began in May 2020 with commercial operation expected to begin in October 2021.
On July 27, 2020, Duke Energy Progress filed an application with the NCUC for a CPCN to construct the Woodfin Solar Facility, a 5-MW solar generating facility to be constructed on a closed landfill in Buncombe County. The expert hearing was held on November 18, 2020. The application was approved and a CPCN was granted by order of the NCUC on April 20, 2021.
FERC Return on Equity Complaints
On October 11, 2019, North Carolina Eastern Municipal Power Agency (NCEMPA) filed a complaint at the FERC against Duke Energy Progress pursuant to Section 206 of the Federal Power Act (FPA), alleging that the 11% stated ROE component contained in the demand formula rate in the Full Requirements Power Purchase Agreement (FRPPA) between NCEMPA and Duke Energy Progress is unjust and unreasonable. On July 16, 2020, the FERC set this matter for hearing and settlement judge procedures and established a refund effective date of October 11, 2019. In its order setting the matter for settlement, the FERC allowed for the consideration of variations to the base transmission-related ROE methodology developed in its Order No. 569-A, through the introduction of “specific facts and circumstances” involving issues specific to the case. The parties reached a settlement in principle at a settlement conference on January 7, 2021, and filed a settlement package on March 10, 2021. The FERC Trial Staff filed comments in support of the settlement. On April 19, 2021, the Settlement Judge certified the settlement to the FERC as an uncontested settlement and recommended approval by the FERC. Duke Energy Progress cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
On October 16, 2020, North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation (NCEMC) filed a complaint at the FERC against Duke Energy Progress pursuant to Section 206 of the FPA, alleging that the 11% stated ROE component in the demand formula rate in the Power Supply and Coordination Agreement between NCEMC and Duke Energy Progress is unjust and unreasonable. Under FPA Section 206, the earliest refund effective date that the FERC can establish is the date of the filing of the complaint. Duke Energy Progress responded to the complaint on November 20, 2020, seeking dismissal, demonstrating that the 11% ROE is just and reasonable for the service provided. The parties filed responsive pleadings and are awaiting an order from the FERC. Duke Energy Progress cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
Duke Energy Florida
2021 Settlement Agreement
On January 14, 2021, Duke Energy Florida filed a Settlement Agreement (the “Settlement”) with the FPSC. The parties to the Settlement include Duke Energy Florida, the Office of Public Counsel (OPC), the Florida Industrial Power Users Group, White Springs Agricultural Chemicals, Inc. d/b/a PCS Phosphate and NUCOR Steel Florida, Inc. (collectively, the “Parties”).
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FINANCIAL STATEMENTSREGULATORY MATTERS

Pursuant to the Settlement, the parties agreed to a base rate stay-out provision that expires year-end 2024; however, Duke Energy Florida is allowed an increase to its base rates of an incremental $67 million in 2022, $49 million in 2023 and $79 million in 2024, subject to adjustment in the event of tax reform during the years 2021, 2022 and 2023. The parties also agreed to a ROE band of 8.85% to 10.85% with a midpoint of 9.85% based on a capital structure of 53% equity and 47% debt. The ROE band can be increased by 25 basis points if the average 30-year U.S. Treasury rate increases 50 basis points or more over a six-month period in which case the midpoint ROE would rise from 9.85% to 10.10%. Duke Energy Florida will also be able to retain the DOE award of approximately $173 million for spent nuclear fuel, which is expected to be received in 2022, in order to mitigate customer rates over the term of the Settlement. In return, Duke Energy Florida will be able to recognize the $173 million into earnings from 2022 through 2024.
In addition to these terms, the Settlement contains provisions related to the accelerated depreciation of Crystal River Units 4-5, the approval of approximately $1 billion in future investments in new cost effective solar power, the implementation of a new Electric Vehicle Charging Station Program and the deferral and recovery of costs in connection with the implementation of Duke Energy Florida’s Vision Florida program, which explores various emerging non-carbon emitting generation technology, distributed technologies and resiliency projects, among other things. The Settlement also resolves remaining unrecovered storm costs for hurricanes Dorian and Michael.
The FPSC approved the Settlement on May 4, 2021. Revised customer rates will be effective January 1, 2022, with subsequent base rate increases effective January 1, 2023, and January 1, 2024.
Storm Restoration Cost Recovery
Duke Energy Florida filed a petition with the FPSC on April 30, 2019, to recover $223 million of estimated retail incremental storm restoration costs for Hurricane Michael, consistent with the provisions in the 2017 Settlement, and the FPSC approved the petition on June 11, 2019. The FPSC also approved allowing Duke Energy Florida to use the tax savings resulting from the Tax Act to recover these storm costs in lieu of implementing a storm surcharge. Approved storm costs are currently expected to be fully recovered by approximately year-end 2021. On November 22, 2019, Duke Energy Florida filed a petition for approval of actual retail recoverable storm restoration costs related to Hurricane Michael in the amount of $191 million plus interest. On May 19, 2020, Duke Energy Florida filed a supplemental true up reducing the actual retail recoverable storm restoration costs related to Hurricane Michael by approximately $3 million, resulting in a total request to recover $188 million actual retail recoverable storm restoration costs, plus interest. Approximately $42 million and $80 million of these costs are included in Regulatory assets within Current Assets and Other Noncurrent Assets on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively.
Duke Energy Florida filed a petition with the FPSC on December 19, 2019, to recover $169 million of estimated retail incremental storm restoration costs for Hurricane Dorian, consistent with the provisions in the 2017 Settlement and the FPSC approved the petition on February 24, 2020. The final actual amount of $145 million was filed on September 30, 2020. The Settlement was approved by the FPSC and all matters regarding storm cost recovery relating to Hurricane Michael and Hurricane Dorian are resolved.
Clean Energy Connection
On July 1, 2020, Duke Energy Florida petitioned the FPSC for approval of a voluntary solar program. The program consists of 10 new solar generating facilities with combined capacity of approximately 750 MW. The program allows participants to support cost-effective solar development in Florida by paying a subscription fee based on per kilowatt-subscriptions and receiving a credit on their bill based on the actual generation associated with their portion of the solar portfolio. The estimated cost of the 10 new solar generation facilities is approximately $1 billion over the next four years, and this investment will be included in base rates offset by the revenue from the subscription fees. The credits will be included for recovery in the fuel cost recovery clause. A remote hearing was held on November 17, 2020, and post-hearing briefs were filed with the FPSC from all parties by December 9, 2020. The FPSC voted to approve the program on January 5, 2021, and issued its written order on January 26, 2021.
On February 24, 2021, the League of United Latin American Citizens filed a notice of appeal of the FPSC’s Order approving the Clean Energy Connection to the Florida Supreme Court. The FPSC approval order remains in effect pending the outcome of the appeal. Duke Energy Florida cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
Duke Energy Ohio
Ohio House Bill 6
On July 23, 2019, House Bill 6 was signed into law that became effective January 1, 2020. Among other things, the bill allows for funding, through a rider mechanism referred to as the Clean Air Fund (Rider CAF), of 2 nuclear generating facilities located in Northern Ohio owned by Energy Harbor (f/k/a FirstEnergy Solutions), repeal of energy efficiency mandates and recovery of prudently incurred costs, net of any revenues, for Ohio investor-owned utilities that are participants under the OVEC power agreement. The recovery is through a non-bypassable rider that replaced any existing recovery mechanism approved by the PUCO and will remain in place through 2030. As such, Duke Energy Ohio created the Legacy Generation Rider (Rider LGR) that replaced Rider PSR effective January 1, 2020. The amounts recoverable from customers are subject to an annual cap, with incremental costs that exceed such cap eligible for deferral and recovery subject to review. See Note 11 for additional discussion of Duke Energy Ohio's ownership interest in OVEC. House Bill 128 was signed into law on March 31, 2021, which becomes effective June 30, 2021. The bill removes nuclear plant funding from Rider CAF and does not impact OVEC cost recovery.
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Energy Efficiency Cost Recovery
On February 26, 2020, the PUCO issued an order directing utilities to wind down their demand-side management programs by September 30, 2020, and to terminate the programs by December 31, 2020, in response to changes in Ohio law that eliminated Ohio's energy efficiency mandates. On March 27, 2020, Duke Energy Ohio filed an Application for Rehearing seeking clarification on the final true up and reconciliation process after 2020. On November 18, 2020, the PUCO issued two orders on the application for rehearing. The first order was a Third Entry on Rehearing on the Duke Energy Ohio portfolio holding the cost cap previously imposed was unlawful, a shared savings cap of $8 million pretax should be imposed and lost distribution revenues could not be recovered after December 31, 2020. The second order directs all utilities set the rider to zero effective January 1, 2021, and to file a separate application for final reconciliation of all energy efficiency costs prior to December 31, 2020. On December 18, 2020, Duke Energy Ohio filed an application for rehearing. On January 13, 2021, the application for rehearing was granted for further consideration. Duke Energy Ohio cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
On October 9, 2020, Duke Energy Ohio filed an application to implement a voluntary efficiency program portfolio to commence on January 1, 2021. The application proposes a mechanism for recovery of program costs and a benefit associated with avoided transmission and distribution costs. The application remains under review. As of January 1, 2021, Duke Energy Ohio suspended its energy efficiency programs due to changes in Ohio law. Duke Energy Ohio cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
Natural Gas Pipeline Extension
Duke Energy Ohio is installing a new natural gas pipeline (the Central Corridor Project) in its Ohio service territory to increase system reliability and enable the retirement of older infrastructure. Duke Energy Ohio currently estimates the pipeline development costs and construction activities will range from $163 million to $245 million in direct costs (excluding overheads and AFUDC) and that construction of the pipeline extension will be completed before the 2021/2022 winter season. An evidentiary hearing for a Certificate of Environmental Compatibility and Public Need concluded on April 11, 2019. On November 21, 2019, the Ohio Power Siting Board (OPSB) approved Duke Energy Ohio's application subject to 41 conditions on construction. Applications for rehearing were filed by several stakeholders on December 23, 2019, arguing that the OPSB approval was incorrect. On February 20, 2020, the OPSB denied the rehearing requests. On April 15, 2020, Joint Appellants filed a notice of appeal at the Supreme Court of Ohio of the OPSB’s decision approving Duke Energy Ohio’s Central Corridor application. The appeal was fully briefed and the Ohio Supreme Court oral argument was held on March 31, 2021. Duke Energy Ohio cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
On September 22, 2020, Duke Energy Ohio filed an application with the OPSB for approval to amend the certificated pipeline route due to changes in the route negotiated with property owners and municipalities. On January 21, 2021, the OPSB approved the amended filing with recommended conditions that reaffirm previous conditions and provide guidance regarding local permitting and construction supervision. Duke Energy Ohio cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
MGP Cost Recovery
In an order issued in 2013, the PUCO approved Duke Energy Ohio's deferral and recovery of costs related to environmental remediation at 2 sites (East End and West End) that housed former MGP operations. Duke Energy Ohio has collected approximately $55 million in environmental remediation costs incurred between 2009 through 2012 through Rider MGP, which is currently suspended. Duke Energy Ohio has made annual applications with the PUCO to recover its incremental remediation costs consistent with the PUCO’s directive in Duke Energy Ohio’s 2012 natural gas base rate case. To date, the PUCO has not ruled on Duke Energy Ohio’s annual applications for the calendar years 2013 through 2019. On September 28, 2018, the staff of the PUCO issued a report recommending a disallowance of approximately $12 million of the $26 million in MGP remediation costs incurred between 2013 through 2017 that staff believes are not eligible for recovery. Staff interprets the PUCO’s 2012 order granting Duke Energy Ohio recovery of MGP remediation as limiting the recovery to work directly on the East End and West End sites. On October 30, 2018, Duke Energy Ohio filed reply comments objecting to the staff’s recommendations and explaining, among other things, the obligation Duke Energy Ohio has under Ohio law to remediate all areas impacted by the former MGPs and not just physical property that housed the former plants and equipment. On March 29, 2019, Duke Energy Ohio filed its annual application to recover incremental remediation expense for the calendar year 2018 seeking recovery of approximately $20 million in remediation costs. On July 12, 2019, the staff recommended a disallowance of approximately $11 million for work that staff believes occurred in areas not authorized for recovery. Additionally, staff recommended that any discussion pertaining to Duke Energy Ohio's recovery of ongoing MGP costs should be directly tied to or netted against insurance proceeds collected by Duke Energy Ohio. An evidentiary hearing concluded on November 21, 2019. Initial briefs were filed on January 17, 2020, and reply briefs were filed on February 14, 2020. Duke Energy Ohio cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
On March 31, 2020, Duke Energy Ohio filed its annual application to recover incremental remediation expense for the calendar year 2019 seeking recovery of approximately $39 million in remediation costs incurred during 2019. On July 23, 2020, the staff recommended a disallowance of approximately $4 million for work the staff believes occurred in areas not authorized for recovery. Additionally, the staff recommended insurance proceeds, net of litigation costs and attorney fees, should be reimbursed to customers and not be held by Duke Energy Ohio until all investigation and remediation is complete. Duke Energy Ohio filed comments in response to the staff report on August 21, 2020, and intervenor comments were filed on November 9, 2020. Duke Energy Ohio cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
The 2012 PUCO order also contained conditional deadlines for completing the MGP environmental remediation and the deferral of remediation costs at the MGP sites. Subsequent to the order, the deadline was extended to December 31, 2019. On May 10, 2019, Duke Energy Ohio filed an application requesting a continuation of its existing deferral authority for MGP remediation that must occur after December 31, 2019. On July 12, 2019, staff recommended the commission deny the deferral authority request. On September 13, 2019, intervenor comments were filed opposing Duke Energy Ohio's request for continuation of existing deferral authority and on October 2, 2019, Duke Energy Ohio filed reply comments. Duke Energy Ohio cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
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FINANCIAL STATEMENTSREGULATORY MATTERS

Tax Act – Ohio
On December 21, 2018, Duke Energy Ohio filed an application to change its base rate tariffs and establish a new rider to implement the benefits of the Tax Act for natural gas customers. Duke Energy Ohio requested commission approval to implement the tariff changes and rider effective April 1, 2019. The new rider will flow through to customers the benefit of the lower statutory federal tax rate from 35% to 21% since January 1, 2018, all future benefits of the lower tax rates and a full refund of deferred income taxes collected at the higher tax rates in prior years. Deferred income taxes subject to normalization rules will be refunded consistent with federal law and deferred income taxes not subject to normalization rules will be refunded over a 10-year period. The PUCO established a procedural schedule and testimony was filed on July 31, 2019. An evidentiary hearing occurred on August 7, 2019. Initial briefs were filed on September 11, 2019. Reply briefs were filed on September 25, 2019. Duke Energy Ohio cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
Duke Energy Kentucky Natural Gas Base Rate Case
On April 30, 2021, Duke Energy Kentucky filed a Notice of Intent with the KPSC to file a general natural gas rate case no earlier than 30 days from the date of the notice.
Duke Energy Indiana
2019 Indiana Rate Case
On July 2, 2019, Duke Energy Indiana filed a general rate case with the IURC for a rate increase for retail customers of approximately $395 million. The rebuttal case, filed on December 4, 2019, updated the requested revenue requirement to result in a 15.6% or $396 million average retail rate increase, including the impacts of the Utility Receipts Tax. Hearings concluded on February 7, 2020. On June 29, 2020, the IURC issued the order in the rate case approving a revenue increase of $146 million before certain adjustments and ratemaking refinements. The order provided for an overall cost of capital of 5.7% based on an ROE of 9.7% and a 53% equity component of the capital structure, and approved Duke Energy Indiana’s requested forecasted rate base of $10.2 billion as of December 31, 2020, including the Edwardsport IGCC Plant. The IURC reduced Duke Energy Indiana’s request by slightly more than $200 million, when accounting for the utility receipts tax and other adjustments. Approximately 50% of the reduction is due to a prospective change in depreciation and use of regulatory asset for the end-of-life inventory at retired generating plants, approximately 20% is due to the approved ROE of 9.7%versus the requested ROE of 10.4% and approximately 20% is related to miscellaneous earnings neutral adjustments. Step one rates are estimated to be approximately 75% of the total and became effective on July 30, 2020. Step two rates are estimated to be the remaining 25% of the total rate increase and will be implemented in mid-2021. Several groups appealed the IURC order to the Indiana Court of Appeals. Appellate briefs were filed on October 14, 2020, focusing on three issues: wholesale sales allocations, coal ash basin cost recovery and the Edwardsport IGCC operating and maintenance expense level approved. The appeal was fully briefed in January 2021 and an oral argument was held on April 8, 2021. A decision is expected in the second or third quarter of 2021. Duke Energy Indiana cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
2020 Indiana Coal Ash Recovery Case
In Duke Energy Indiana’s 2019 rate case, the IURC approved coal ash basin closure costs expended through 2018 including financing costs as a regulatory asset and included in rate base. The IURC opened a subdocket to deal with the post-2018 coal ash related expenditures. Duke Energy Indiana filed testimony on April 15, 2020, in the coal ash subdocket requesting recovery for the post-2018 coal ash basin closure costs for plans that have been approved by the Indiana Department of Environmental Management as well as continuing deferral, with carrying costs, on the balance. An evidentiary hearing was held on September 14, 2020, and the parties have agreed on a delayed briefing schedule that allows for the Indiana Rate Case appeal to proceed. Briefing will be completed by mid-August 2021. Duke Energy Indiana cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
Piedmont
2020 Tennessee Rate Case
On July 2, 2020, Piedmont filed an application with the TPUC, its first general rate case in Tennessee in nine years, for a rate increase for retail customers of approximately $30 million, which represents an approximate 15% increase in annual revenues. The rate increase is driven by significant infrastructure upgrade investments since Piedmont's previous rate case. Approximately half of the plant additions being added to rate base are categories of capital investment not covered under the IMR mechanism, which was approved in 2013. Piedmont amended its requested increase to approximately $26 million in December 2020. As authorized under Tennessee law, Piedmont implemented interim rates on January 2, 2021, at the level requested in its adjusted request. A settlement reached with the Tennessee Consumer Advocate in mid-January was filed with the TPUC on February 2, 2021. The settlement results in an increase of revenues of approximately $16 million and a ROE of 9.8%. On May 6, 2021, the TPUC issued an order approving the settlement. Revised customer rates became effective January 2, 2021. Piedmont refunded customers the difference between bills previously rendered under interim rates and such bills if rendered under approved rates, plus interest, in April 2021.
2021 North Carolina Rate Case
On March 22, 2021, Piedmont filed an application with the NCUC for a rate increase for retail customers of approximately $109 million, which represents an approximate 10% increase in retail revenues. The rate increase is driven by customer growth and significant infrastructure upgrade investments (plant additions) since the last general rate case. Approximately 30% of the plant additions being rolled into rate base are categories of plant investment that are covered under the IMR mechanism, which was originally approved as part of the 2013 North Carolina Rate Case. A hearing date has not yet been established. Piedmont cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
53

FINANCIAL STATEMENTSREGULATORY MATTERS

OTHER REGULATORY MATTERS
Atlantic Coast Pipeline, LLC
Atlantic Coast Pipeline (ACP pipeline) was planned to be an approximately 600-mile interstate natural gas pipeline running from West Virginia to North Carolina. Duke Energy indirectly owns a 47% interest, which is accounted for as an equity method investment through its Gas Utilities and Infrastructure segment.
As a result of the uncertainty created by various legal rulings, the potential impact on the cost and schedule for the project, the ongoing legal challenges and the risk of additional legal challenges and delays through the construction period and Dominion’s decision to sell substantially all of its gas transmission and storage segment assets, Duke Energy's Board of Directors and management decided that it was not prudent to continue to invest in the project. On July 5, 2020, Duke Energy and Dominion announced the cancellation of the ACP pipeline project.
As part of the pretax charges to earnings of approximately $2.1 billion recorded in June 2020, within Equity in (losses) earnings of unconsolidated affiliates on the Duke Energy Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations, Duke Energy established liabilities related to the cancellation of the ACP pipeline project. In February 2021, Duke Energy paid approximately $855 million to fund ACP's outstanding debt, relieving Duke Energy of its guarantee. At March 31, 2021, there is $38 million and $48 million within Other Current Liabilities and Other Noncurrent Liabilities, respectively, in the Gas Utilities and Infrastructure segment. The liabilities represent Duke Energy's obligation of approximately $86 million to satisfy remaining ARO requirements to restore construction sites.
See Notes 1 and 11 for additional information regarding this transaction.
Potential Coal Plant Retirements
The Subsidiary Registrants periodically file integrated resource plans with their state regulatory commissions. The IRPs provide a view of forecasted energy needs over a long term (10 to 20 years) and options being considered to meet those needs. IRPs filed by the Subsidiary Registrants included planning assumptions to potentially retire certain coal-fired generating facilities in North Carolina and Indiana earlier than their current estimated useful lives. Duke Energy continues to evaluate the potential need to retire these coal-fired generating facilities earlier than the current estimated useful lives and plans to seek regulatory recovery for amounts that would not be otherwise recovered when any of these assets are retired.
The table below contains the net carrying value of generating facilities planned for retirement or included in recent integrated resource plans (IRPs) as evaluated for potential retirement. Dollar amounts in the table below are included in Net property, plant and equipment on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2021, and exclude capitalized asset retirement costs.
Remaining Net
CapacityBook Value
(in MW)(in millions)
Duke Energy Carolinas
Allen Steam Station Units 1-2(a)
334 $21 
Allen Steam Station Units 4-5(b)
526 388 
Cliffside Unit 5(b)
546 343 
Duke Energy Progress
Mayo Unit 1(b)
746 660 
Roxboro Units 3-4(b)
1,409 478 
Duke Energy Florida
Crystal River Units 4-5(c)
1,430 1,683 
Duke Energy Indiana
Gallagher Units 2 and 4(d)
280 91 
Gibson Units 1-5(e)
2,845 1,834 
Cayuga Units 1-2(e)
1,005 755 
Total Duke Energy9,121 $6,253 
54

FINANCIAL STATEMENTSREGULATORY MATTERS

(a)As part of the 2015 resolution of a lawsuit involving alleged New Source Review violations, Duke Energy Carolinas must retire Allen Steam Station Units 1 through 3 by December 31, 2024. The long-term energy options considered in the IRP could result in retirement of these units earlier than their current estimated useful lives. Unit 3 with a capacity of 270 MW and a net book value of $26 million at December 31, 2020, was retired in March 2021.
(b)These units are included in the IRP filed by Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress in North Carolina and South Carolina on September 1, 2020. The long-term energy options considered in the IRP could result in retirement of these units earlier than their current estimated useful lives. In 2019, Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress filed North Carolina rate cases that included depreciation studies that accelerate end-of-life dates for these plants. NCUC issued orders in the 2019 rate cases of Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress on March 31, 2021, and April 16, 2021, respectively, in which the proposals to shorten the remaining depreciable lives of these units were denied, while indicating the IRP proceeding was the appropriate proceeding for the review of generating plant retirements.
(c)On January 14, 2021, Duke Energy Florida filed a settlement agreement with the FPSC, which proposed depreciation rates reflecting retirement dates for Duke Energy Florida's last 2 coal-fired generating facilities, Crystal River Units 4-5, eight years ahead of schedule in 2034 rather than in 2042. The settlement was approved by the FPSC on May 4, 2021.
(d)Duke Energy Indiana committed to either retire or stop burning coal at Gallagher Units 2 and 4 by December 31, 2022, as part of the 2016 settlement of Edwardsport IGCC matters. In February 2021, upon approval by MISO of a new retirement date, Duke Energy Indiana determined it would modify the retirement date to June 1, 2021.
(e)On July 1, 2019, Duke Energy Indiana filed its 2018 IRP with the IURC. The 2018 IRP included scenarios evaluating the potential retirement of coal-fired generating units at Gibson and Cayuga. The rate case filed July 2, 2019, included proposed depreciation rates reflecting retirement dates from 2026 to 2038. The depreciation rates reflecting these updated retirement dates were approved by the IURC as part of the rate case order issued on June 29, 2020.
4. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
ENVIRONMENTAL
The Duke Energy Registrants are subject to federal, state and local regulations regarding air and water quality, hazardous and solid waste disposal, coal ash and other environmental matters. These regulations can be changed from time to time, imposing new obligations on the Duke Energy Registrants. The following environmental matters impact all Duke Energy Registrants.
Remediation Activities
In addition to AROs recorded as a result of various environmental regulations, the Duke Energy Registrants are responsible for environmental remediation at various sites. These include certain properties that are part of ongoing operations and sites formerly owned or used by Duke Energy entities. These sites are in various stages of investigation, remediation and monitoring. Managed in conjunction with relevant federal, state and local agencies, remediation activities vary based upon site conditions and location, remediation requirements, complexity and sharing of responsibility. If remediation activities involve joint and several liability provisions, strict liability, or cost recovery or contribution actions, the Duke Energy Registrants could potentially be held responsible for environmental impacts caused by other potentially responsible parties and may also benefit from insurance policies or contractual indemnities that cover some or all cleanup costs. Liabilities are recorded when losses become probable and are reasonably estimable. The total costs that may be incurred cannot be estimated because the extent of environmental impact, allocation among potentially responsible parties, remediation alternatives and/or regulatory decisions have not yet been determined at all sites. Additional costs associated with remediation activities are likely to be incurred in the future and could be significant. Costs are typically expensed as Operation, maintenance and other on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations unless regulatory recovery of the costs is deemed probable.
The following table contains information regarding reserves for probable and estimable costs related to the various environmental sites. These reserves are recorded in Accounts Payable within Current Liabilities and Other within Other Noncurrent Liabilities on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.
(in millions)March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
Reserves for Environmental Remediation
Duke Energy$74 $75 
Duke Energy Carolinas18 19 
Progress Energy18 19 
Duke Energy Progress6 
Duke Energy Florida12 12 
Duke Energy Ohio21 22 
Duke Energy Indiana5 
Piedmont11 10 
Additional losses in excess of recorded reserves that could be incurred for the stages of investigation, remediation and monitoring for environmental sites that have been evaluated at this time are not material except as presented in the table below.
(in millions)
Duke Energy$20 
Duke Energy Carolinas12 
Duke Energy Ohio
55

FINANCIAL STATEMENTSCOMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

LITIGATION
Duke Energy
Texas Storm Uri Tort Litigation
Duke Energy and several Duke Energy renewables project companies have been named in multiple lawsuits arising out of Texas Storm Uri in mid-February 2021, and particularly, in the deregulated market managed by the Electric Reliability Council of Texas.. Currently, 15 state court actions have been filed in counties across Texas and 1 case is pending in federal court in Texas. These lawsuits, filed by individuals, seek recovery for property damages, personal injury and for wrongful death allegedly incurred by the plaintiffs as a result of power losses, which the plaintiffs claim was the result of the defendants' failure to take appropriate precautions. Certain defendants have moved to transfer all related cases including those naming Duke Energy entities into a Texas state court multi-district litigation proceeding for coordination before a single judge. No ruling has yet been issued on this motion. Duke Energy cannot predict the outcomes of these state and federal litigation matters.
Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress
Coal Ash Insurance Coverage Litigation
In March 2017, Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress filed a civil action in the North Carolina Business Court against various insurance providers. The lawsuit seeks payment for coal ash-related liabilities covered by third-party liability insurance policies. The insurance policies were issued between 1971 and 1986 and provide third-party liability insurance for property damage. The civil action seeks damages for breach of contract and indemnification for costs arising from the Coal Ash Act and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency CCR rule at 15 coal-fired plants in North Carolina and South Carolina. Fact discovery has been completed. The parties' fully briefed and argued motions relating to key legal matters are pending before the court for rulings. Trial remains scheduled for January 24, 2022. Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
Duke Energy Carolinas
NTE Carolinas II, LLC Litigation
In November 2017, Duke Energy Carolinas entered into a standard FERC large generator interconnection agreement (LGIA) with NTE Carolinas II, LLC (NTE), a company that proposed to build a combined-cycle natural gas plant in Rockingham County, North Carolina. On September 6, 2019, Duke Energy Carolinas filed a lawsuit in Mecklenburg County Superior Court against NTE for breach of contract, alleging that NTE's failure to pay benchmark payments for Duke Energy Carolinas' transmission system upgrades required under the interconnection agreement constituted a termination of the interconnection agreement. Duke Energy Carolinas is seeking a monetary judgment against NTE because NTE failed to make multiple milestone payments. The lawsuit was moved to federal court in North Carolina. NTE filed a motion to dismiss Duke Energy Carolinas’ complaint and brought counterclaims alleging anti-competitive conduct and violations of state and federal statutes. Duke Energy Carolinas filed a motion to dismiss NTE's counterclaims.
On May 21, 2020, in response to a NTE petition challenging Duke Energy Carolinas' termination of the LGIA, FERC issued a ruling (i) that it has exclusive jurisdiction to determine whether a transmission provider may terminate a LGIA, (ii) FERC approval is required to terminate a conforming LGIA if objected to by the interconnection customer, and (iii) Duke Energy may not announce the termination of a conforming LGIA unless FERC has approved the termination. FERC's Office of Enforcement also initiated an investigation of Duke Energy Carolinas into matters pertaining to the LGIA. Duke Energy Carolinas is cooperating with the Office of Enforcement but cannot predict the outcome of this investigation.
On August 17, 2020, the court denied both NTE’s and Duke Energy Carolinas’ Motion to Dismiss. The parties are in active discovery and trial is scheduled for June 20, 2022. Duke Energy Carolinas cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
Asbestos-related Injuries and Damages Claims
Duke Energy Carolinas has experienced numerous claims for indemnification and medical cost reimbursement related to asbestos exposure. These claims relate to damages for bodily injuries alleged to have arisen from exposure to or use of asbestos in connection with construction and maintenance activities conducted on its electric generation plants prior to 1985. As of March 31, 2021, there were 126 asserted claims for non-malignant cases with cumulative relief sought of up to $31 million, and 47 asserted claims for malignant cases with cumulative relief sought of up to $17 million. Based on Duke Energy Carolinas’ experience, it is expected that the ultimate resolution of most of these claims likely will be less than the amount claimed.
Duke Energy Carolinas has recognized asbestos-related reserves of $564 million at March 31, 2021, and $572 million at December 31, 2020. These reserves are classified in Other within Other Noncurrent Liabilities and Other within Current Liabilities on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. These reserves are based upon Duke Energy Carolinas' best estimate for current and future asbestos claims through 2040 and are recorded on an undiscounted basis. In light of the uncertainties inherent in a longer-term forecast, management does not believe they can reasonably estimate the indemnity and medical costs that might be incurred after 2040 related to such potential claims. It is possible Duke Energy Carolinas may incur asbestos liabilities in excess of the recorded reserves.
Duke Energy Carolinas has third-party insurance to cover certain losses related to asbestos-related injuries and damages above an aggregate self-insured retention. Duke Energy Carolinas’ cumulative payments began to exceed the self-insured retention in 2008. Future payments up to the policy limit will be reimbursed by the third-party insurance carrier. The insurance policy limit for potential future insurance recoveries indemnification and medical cost claim payments is $714 million in excess of the self-insured retention. Receivables for insurance recoveries were $704 million at March 31, 2021, and December 31, 2020. These amounts are classified in Other within Other Noncurrent Assets and Receivables within Current Assets on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. Duke Energy Carolinas is not aware of any uncertainties regarding the legal sufficiency of insurance claims. Duke Energy Carolinas believes the insurance recovery asset is probable of recovery as the insurance carrier continues to have a strong financial strength rating.
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FINANCIAL STATEMENTSCOMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

As described in Note 1, Duke Energy adopted the new guidance for credit losses effective January 1, 2020, using the modified retrospective method of adoption, which does not require restatement of prior year reported results. The reserve for credit losses for insurance receivables based on adoption of the new standard is $15 million for Duke Energy and Duke Energy Carolinas as of March 31, 2021, and December 31, 2020. The insurance receivable is evaluated based on the risk of default and the historical losses, current conditions and expected conditions around collectability. Management evaluates the risk of default annually based on payment history, credit rating and changes in the risk of default from credit agencies.
Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida
Spent Nuclear Fuel Matters
On June 18, 2018, Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida sued the U.S. in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims for damages incurred for the period 2014 through 2018. The lawsuit claimed the Department of Energy breached a contract in failing to accept spent nuclear fuel under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and asserted damages for the cost of on-site storage in the amount of $100 million and $200 million for Duke Energy Progress and Duke Energy Florida, respectively. Discovery is ongoing and a trial is expected to occur in 2021.
Duke Energy Florida
Power Purchase Dispute Arbitration
Duke Energy Florida, on behalf of its customers, entered into a PPA for the purchase of firm capacity and energy from a qualifying facility under the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. Duke Energy Florida determined the qualifying facility did not perform in accordance with the PPA, and Duke Energy Florida terminated the PPA. The qualifying facility counterparty filed a confidential American Arbitration Association (AAA) arbitration demand, challenging the termination of the PPA and seeking damages.
The final arbitration hearing occurred during the week of December 7, 2020. An arbitral award was issued in March 2021, upholding Duke Energy Florida's positions on all issues and awarding the company termination costs.
Duke Energy Indiana
Coal Ash Basin Closure Plan Appeal
On January 27, 2020, Hoosier Environmental Council (HEC) filed a Petition for Administrative Review with the Indiana Office of Environmental Adjudication challenging the Indiana Department of Environmental Management’s December 10, 2019, partial approval of Duke Energy Indiana’s ash pond closure plan. On March 11, 2020, Duke Energy Indiana filed a Motion to Dismiss. On May 5, 2020, the court denied the motion. After hearing oral arguments in early April 2021 on Duke Energy Indiana's and HEC's competing Motions for Summary Judgment, on May 4, 2021, the administrative court rejected all of HEC’s claims and issued a ruling in favor of Duke Energy Indiana. HEC has until June 3, 2021, to seek judicial review of the order. Duke Energy Indiana cannot predict the outcome of this matter.
Other Litigation and Legal Proceedings
The Duke Energy Registrants are involved in other legal, tax and regulatory proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business, some of which involve significant amounts. The Duke Energy Registrants believe the final disposition of these proceedings will not have a material effect on their results of operations, cash flows or financial position.
The table below presents recorded reserves based on management’s best estimate of probable loss for legal matters, excluding asbestos-related reserves discussed above. Reserves are classified on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets in Other within Other Noncurrent Liabilities and Other within Current Liabilities. The reasonably possible range of loss in excess of recorded reserves is not material, other than as described above.
(in millions)March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
Reserves for Legal Matters
Duke Energy$65 $68 
Duke Energy Carolinas3 
Progress Energy57 61 
Duke Energy Progress11 13 
Duke Energy Florida26 28 
Piedmont1 
OTHER COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
General
As part of their normal business, the Duke Energy Registrants are party to various financial guarantees, performance guarantees and other contractual commitments to extend guarantees of credit and other assistance to various subsidiaries, investees and other third parties. These guarantees involve elements of performance and credit risk, which are not fully recognized on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets and have uncapped maximum potential payments. However, the Duke Energy Registrants do not believe these guarantees will have a material effect on their results of operations, cash flows or financial position.
57

FINANCIAL STATEMENTSCOMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

In addition, the Duke Energy Registrants enter into various fixed-price, noncancelable commitments to purchase or sell power or natural gas, take-or-pay arrangements, transportation, or throughput agreements and other contracts that may or may not be recognized on their respective Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. Some of these arrangements may be recognized at fair value on their respective Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets if such contracts meet the definition of a derivative and the NPNS exception does not apply. In most cases, the Duke Energy Registrants’ purchase obligation contracts contain provisions for price adjustments, minimum purchase levels and other financial commitments.
5. DEBT AND CREDIT FACILITIES
SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT DEBT ISSUANCES
The following table summarizes significant debt issuances (in millions).
Three Months Ended March 31, 2021
DukeDukeDukeDukeDukeDuke
MaturityInterestDukeEnergyEnergyEnergyEnergyEnergyEnergy
Issuance DateDateRateEnergy(Parent)CarolinasProgressFloridaOhioIndianaPiedmont
Unsecured Debt
March 2021(a)
Mar 20312.500 %$350 $0 $— $— $— $— $— $350 
Total issuances$350 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $350 
(a)Debt issued to repay at maturity $160 million senior unsecured notes due June 2021, pay down short-term debt and for general corporate purposes.
In March 2021, Duke Energy Carolinas priced $1 billion of First Mortgage Bonds. The issuance and sale of securities settled in April 2021, in 2 separate tranches. The first tranche was issued for $550 million at a fixed interest rate of 2.55% and mature in April 2031. The second tranche was issued for $450 million at a fixed interest rate of 3.45% and mature in April 2051. Proceeds from the issuance will be used to repay at maturity $500 million of 3.90% First Mortgage Bonds due June 2021, pay down intercompany short-term debt and for general company purposes.
CURRENT MATURITIES OF LONG-TERM DEBT
The following table shows the significant components of Current maturities of long-term debt on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. The Duke Energy Registrants currently anticipate satisfying these obligations with cash on hand and proceeds from additional borrowings.
(in millions)Maturity DateInterest RateMarch 31, 2021
Unsecured Debt
Duke Energy (Parent)May 20210.698 %(a)500 
PiedmontJune 20214.240 %160 
Duke Energy (Parent)September 20213.550 %500 
Duke Energy (Parent)September 20211.800 %750 
Duke Energy FloridaNovember 20210.441 %(a)200 
Duke Energy ProgressFebruary 20220.369 %(a)700 
Duke Energy (Parent)March 20223.227 %300 
Duke Energy (Parent)March 20220.827 %(a)300 
First Mortgage Bonds
Duke Energy CarolinasJune 20213.900 %500 
Duke Energy FloridaAugust 20213.100 %300 
Duke Energy ProgressSeptember 20213.000 %500 
Duke Energy ProgressSeptember 20218.625 %100 
Duke Energy IndianaJanuary 20228.850 %53 
Other(b)
723 
Current maturities of long-term debt$5,586 
(a)    Debt has a floating interest rate.
(b)    Includes finance lease obligations, amortizing debt, tax-exempt bonds with mandatory put options and small bullet maturities.
AVAILABLE CREDIT FACILITIES
Master Credit Facility
In March 2021, Duke Energy amended its existing $8 billion Master Credit Facility to extend the termination date to March 2026. The Duke Energy Registrants, excluding Progress Energy, have borrowing capacity under the Master Credit Facility up to a specified sublimit for each borrower. Duke Energy has the unilateral ability at any time to increase or decrease the borrowing sublimits of each borrower, subject to a maximum sublimit for each borrower. The amount available under the Master Credit Facility has been reduced to backstop issuances of commercial paper, certain letters of credit and variable-rate demand tax-exempt bonds that may be put to the Duke Energy Registrants at the option of the holder.
58

FINANCIAL STATEMENTSDEBT AND CREDIT FACILITIES

The table below includes the current borrowing sublimits and available capacity under these credit facilities.
March 31, 2021
DukeDukeDukeDukeDukeDuke
DukeEnergyEnergyEnergyEnergyEnergyEnergy
(in millions)Energy(Parent)CarolinasProgressFloridaOhioIndianaPiedmont
Facility size(a)
$8,000 $2,650 $1,475 $1,250 $700 $625 $600 $700 
Reduction to backstop issuances
Commercial paper(b)
(3,466)(1,781)(741)(292)(243)(259)(150) 
Outstanding letters of credit(31)(25)(4)(2)    
Tax-exempt bonds(81)     (81) 
Available capacity under the Master Credit Facility$4,422 $844 $730 $956 $457 $366 $369 $700 
(a)Represents the sublimit of each borrower.
(b)Duke Energy issued $625 million of commercial paper and loaned the proceeds through the money pool to Duke Energy Carolinas, Duke Energy Progress, Duke Energy Ohio and Duke Energy Indiana. The balances are classified as Long-Term Debt Payable to Affiliated Companies on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.
Other Credit Facilities
March 31, 2021
(in millions)Facility sizeAmount drawn
Duke Energy (Parent) Three-Year Revolving Credit Facility(a)
$1,000 $500 
(a)During March 2021, Duke Energy extended the maturity date of the Three-Year Revolving Credit Facility from May 2022, to May 2024.
6. GOODWILL
Duke Energy
The following table presents the goodwill by reportable segment included on Duke Energy's Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets at March 31, 2021, and December 31, 2020.
Electric UtilitiesGas UtilitiesCommercial
(in millions)and Infrastructureand InfrastructureRenewablesTotal
Goodwill balance$17,379 $1,924 $122 $19,425 
Accumulated impairment charges0 0 (122)(122)
Goodwill, adjusted for accumulated impairment charges$17,379 $1,924 $0 $19,303 
Duke Energy Ohio
Duke Energy Ohio's Goodwill balance of $920 million, allocated $596 million to Electric Utilities and Infrastructure and $324 million to Gas Utilities and Infrastructure, is presented net of accumulated impairment charges of $216 million on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets at March 31, 2021, and December 31, 2020.
Progress Energy
Progress Energy's Goodwill is included in the Electric Utilities and Infrastructure segment and there are 0 accumulated impairment charges.
Piedmont
Piedmont's Goodwill is included in the Gas Utilities and Infrastructure segment and there are 0 accumulated impairment charges.
59

FINANCIAL STATEMENTSRELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

7. RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS
The Subsidiary Registrants engage in related party transactions in accordance with applicable state and federal commission regulations. Refer to the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets of the Subsidiary Registrants for balances due to or due from related parties. Material amounts related to transactions with related parties included on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income are presented in the following table.
Three Months Ended March 31,
(in millions)20212020
Duke Energy Carolinas
Corporate governance and shared service expenses(a)
$203 $134 
Indemnification coverages(b)
6 
Joint Dispatch Agreement (JDA) revenue(c)
13 
JDA expense(c)
40 24 
Intercompany natural gas purchases(d)
14 
Progress Energy
Corporate governance and shared service expenses(a)
$181 $146 
Indemnification coverages(b)
10 
JDA revenue(c)
40 24 
JDA expense(c)
13 
Intercompany natural gas purchases(d)
19 19 
Duke Energy Progress
Corporate governance and shared service expenses(a)
$105 $75 
Indemnification coverages(b)
5 
JDA revenue(c)
40 24 
JDA expense(c)
13 
Intercompany natural gas purchases(d)
19 19 
Duke Energy Florida
Corporate governance and shared service expenses(a)
$76 $71 
Indemnification coverages(b)
5 
Duke Energy Ohio
Corporate governance and shared service expenses(a)
$79 $84 
Indemnification coverages(b)
1 
Duke Energy Indiana
Corporate governance and shared service expenses(a)
$113 $106 
Indemnification coverages(b)
2 
Piedmont
Corporate governance and shared service expenses(a)
$33 $34 
Indemnification coverages(b)
1 
Intercompany natural gas sales(d)
33 25 
Natural gas storage and transportation costs(e)
6 
(a)    The Subsidiary Registrants are charged their proportionate share of corporate governance and other shared services costs, primarily related to human resources, employee benefits, information technology, legal and accounting fees, as well as other third-party costs. These amounts are primarily recorded in Operation, maintenance and other on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income.
(b)    The Subsidiary Registrants incur expenses related to certain indemnification coverages through Bison, Duke Energy’s wholly owned captive insurance subsidiary. These expenses are recorded in Operation, maintenance and other on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income.
(c)    Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress participate in a JDA, which allows the collective dispatch of power plants between the service territories to reduce customer rates. Revenues from the sale of power and expenses from the purchase of power pursuant to the JDA are recorded in Operating Revenues and Fuel used in electric generation and purchased power, respectively, on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income.
(d)    Piedmont provides long-term natural gas delivery service to certain Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress natural gas-fired generation facilities. Piedmont records the sales in Operating revenues, and Duke Energy Carolinas and Duke Energy Progress record the related purchases as a component of Fuel used in electric generation and purchased power on their respective Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income.
(e)    Piedmont has related party transactions as a customer of its equity method investments in Pine Needle LNG Company, LLC, Hardy Storage Company, LLC and Cardinal Pipeline Company, LLC natural gas storage and transportation facilities. These expenses are included in Cost of natural gas on Piedmont's Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income.
60

FINANCIAL STATEMENTSRELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

In addition to the amounts presented above, the Subsidiary Registrants have other affiliate transactions, including rental of office space, participation in a money pool arrangement, other operational transactions, such as pipeline lease arrangements, and their proportionate share of certain charged expenses. These transactions of the Subsidiary Registrants are incurred in the ordinary course of business and are eliminated in consolidation.
As discussed in Note 11, certain trade receivables have been sold by Duke Energy Ohio and Duke Energy Indiana to CRC, an affiliate formed by a subsidiary of Duke Energy. The proceeds obtained from the sales of receivables are largely cash but do include a subordinated note from CRC for a portion of the purchase price.
Intercompany Income Taxes
Duke Energy and the Subsidiary Registrants file a consolidated federal income tax return and other state and jurisdictional returns. The Subsidiary Registrants have a tax sharing agreement with Duke Energy for the allocation of consolidated tax liabilities and benefits. Income taxes recorded represent amounts the Subsidiary Registrants would incur as separate C-Corporations. The following table includes the balance of intercompany income tax receivables and payables for the Subsidiary Registrants.
DukeDukeDukeDukeDuke
EnergyProgressEnergyEnergyEnergyEnergy
(in millions)CarolinasEnergyProgressFloridaOhioIndianaPiedmont
March 31, 2021
Intercompany income tax receivable$ $84 $ $46 $ $ $ 
Intercompany income tax payable31  12  2 36 39 
December 31, 2020
Intercompany income tax receivable$— $— $— $— $— $$10 
Intercompany income tax payable31 33 46 35 — — 
8. DERIVATIVES AND HEDGING
The Duke Energy Registrants use commodity and interest rate contracts to manage commodity price risk and interest rate risk. The primary use of commodity derivatives is to hedge the generation portfolio against changes in the prices of electricity and natural gas. Piedmont enters into natural gas supply contracts to provide diversification, reliability and natural gas cost benefits to its customers. Interest rate derivatives are used to manage interest rate risk associated with borrowings.
All derivative instruments not identified as NPNS are recorded at fair value as assets or liabilities on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. Cash collateral related to derivative instruments executed under master netting arrangements is offset against the collateralized derivatives on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. The cash impacts of settled derivatives are recorded as operating activities on the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows.
INTEREST RATE RISK
The Duke Energy Registrants are exposed to changes in interest rates as a result of their issuance or anticipated issuance of variable-rate and fixed-rate debt and commercial paper. Interest rate risk is managed by limiting variable-rate exposures to a percentage of total debt and by monitoring changes in interest rates. To manage risk associated with changes in interest rates, the Duke Energy Registrants may enter into interest rate swaps, U.S. Treasury lock agreements and other financial contracts. In anticipation of certain fixed-rate debt issuances, a series of forward-starting interest rate swaps or Treasury locks may be executed to lock in components of current market interest rates. These instruments are later terminated prior to or upon the issuance of the corresponding debt.
Cash Flow Hedges
For a derivative designated as hedging the exposure to variable cash flows of a future transaction, referred to as a cash flow hedge, the effective portion of the derivative's gain or loss is initially reported as a component of other comprehensive income and subsequently reclassified into earnings once the future transaction impacts earnings. Amounts for interest rate contracts are reclassified to earnings as interest expense over the term of the related debt. Gains and losses reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive loss for the three months ended March 31, 2021, and 2020, were not material. Duke Energy's interest rate derivatives designated as hedges include interest rate swaps used to hedge existing debt within the Commercial Renewables segment and forward-starting interest rate swaps not accounted for under regulatory accounting.
Undesignated Contracts
Undesignated contracts primarily include contracts not designated as a hedge because they are accounted for under regulatory accounting or contracts that do not qualify for hedge accounting.
Duke Energy’s interest rate swaps for its regulated operations employ regulatory accounting. With regulatory accounting, the mark-to-market gains or losses on the swaps are deferred as regulatory liabilities or regulatory assets, respectively. Regulatory assets and liabilities are amortized consistent with the treatment of the related costs in the ratemaking process. The accrual of interest on the swaps is recorded as Interest Expense on the Duke Energy Registrant's Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income.
61

FINANCIAL STATEMENTSDERIVATIVES AND HEDGING

The following table shows notional amounts of outstanding derivatives related to interest rate risk.
March 31, 2021
DukeDukeDukeDuke
DukeEnergyProgressEnergyEnergyEnergy
(in millions)EnergyCarolinasEnergyProgressFloridaOhio
Cash flow hedges$1,630 $ $ $ $ $ 
Undesignated contracts1,731 400 1,250 750 500 27 
Total notional amount(a)
$3,361 $400 $1,250 $750 $500 $27 
December 31, 2020
DukeDukeDukeDuke
DukeEnergyProgressEnergyEnergyEnergy
(in millions)EnergyCarolinasEnergyProgressFloridaOhio
Cash flow hedges$632 $— $— $— $— $— 
Undesignated contracts1,177 400 750 750 — 27 
Total notional amount(a)
$1,809 $400 $750 $750 $— $27 
(a)    Duke Energy includes amounts related to consolidated VIEs of $631 million in cash flow hedges and $54 million in undesignated contracts as of March 31, 2021, and $632 million in cash flow hedges as of December 31, 2020.
COMMODITY PRICE RISK
The Duke Energy Registrants are expose