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VEII Value Exchange International

Filed: 31 Mar 21, 10:51am

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

 

[X] ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended: December 31, 2020

 

[   ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from _____________ to _____________

 

Commission File No. 000-53537

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada

 

20-2819367

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation

or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

Unit 02-03, 6/F. Block B,

Shatin Industrial Centre, 5-7 Yuen Shun Circuit,

Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong

(Address of Principal Executive Offices; Zip Code)

 

(852) 2950 4288

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

N/A

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act: None

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act: Common Stock

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [   ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.

Yes [   ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X] No [   ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [X] No [   ]

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class

Trading Symbol

Exchange on which registered

NONE

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Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or “emerging growth company”. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

[   ]

 

Accelerated filer

[   ]

Non-accelerated filer

[   ]

 

Smaller reporting company

[X]

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

 

Emerging Growth Company

[   ]

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [   ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report. [   ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes [   ] No [X]

 

As of December 31, 2020, (the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed fiscal year), the aggregate market value of the shares of the registrant’s common stock held by non-affiliates was approximately $712,803. Shares of the registrant’s common stock held by each executive officer and director and by each person who owns 10% or more of the outstanding common stock have been excluded from the calculation in that such persons may be deemed to be “affiliates” of the registrant. This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily a conclusive determination for other purposes.

 

As of March 31, 2021, there were 29,656,130 shares of common stock issued and outstanding. The trading symbol of the common stock is VEII.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

None.


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Annual Report on Form 10-K

For the Year Ended December 31, 2020

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I

 

Page No.

 

 

 

Item 1.

Business

6

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

12

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

20

Item 2.

Properties

21

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

21

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

21

 

 

 

PART II

 

 

 

 

 

Item 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

22

Item 6.

Selected Financial Data

22

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

23

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

33

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

33

Item 9.

Changes In and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.

34

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures

34

Item 9B.

Other Information

35

 

 

 

PART III

 

 

 

 

 

Item 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

36

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

40

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

42

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

43

Item 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

45

 

 

 

PART IV

 

 

 

 

 

Item 15.

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules

46

 

SIGNATURES

47


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Special Note Regarding Forward Looking Statements

 

As used below, “you” refers to any person reading this Annual Report on Form 10-K (“Form 10-K”), which Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements that are contained principally in the sections entitled “Business,” “Risk Factors,” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” These statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performances or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the factors described in the section captioned “Risk Factors” below. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as “anticipates,” “believes,” “hopes,” “could,” “estimates,” “expects,” “intends,” “may,” “hopes,” “plans,” “potential,” “predicts,” “projects,” “should,” “would” and similar expressions and variants thereof that are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements reflect Value Exchange International, Inc.’s (also referred to as “Company,” “VEII,” “we,” “us” and “our”) current views with respect to future events and are based on assumptions and subject to risks and uncertainties. Given these uncertainties, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements include, among other things, statements relating to:

 

·our expectations regarding growth in the information technologies industries in China, Hong Kong SAR and Philippines or any other markets; 

 

·our expectation regarding increasing demand for our products and services in China, Hong Kong SAR, Philippines and any new markets; 

 

·any belief that we will be able to effectively compete with our competitors and increase our market share in the face of possible technological advances or superior resources and market share by competitors, or aggressive pricing by competitors; 

 

·our expectations with respect to increased revenue growth and our ability to achieve and sustain profitability resulting from any increases in our productivity;  

 

·our ability to fund operations and business and product growth and the availability of sufficient, affordable funding when required;  

 

·our ability to integrate and manage the operations of TapServices, Inc., a Philippines corporation and a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company, and operate successfully in a market outside of our traditional market of China and Hong Kong  

SAR;

 

·our ability to determine appropriate new products or services and then expand and fund our offerings of products and services to new geographical markets and operate profitably in such new markets;  

 

·the success and cost of new product or service initiatives in existing and/or new markets; 

 

·the disruption or failure of our or those of our customers’ computer systems, networks, information systems or technologies that we install, service or maintain as a result of computer hacking, computer viruses, malware, “cyber-attacks,” misappropriation of data, outages, natural disasters and other material events;  

 

·continuation of key strategic relationships, which can be essential for a small reporting company like us; and  

 

·our future business development, results of operations and financial condition. 

 

Certain numerical figures included in this Form 10-K may be subject to rounding adjustments. Accordingly, such numerical figures shown as totals in various tables may not be arithmetic aggregations of the figures that precede them. Also, forward-looking statements represent our estimates and assumptions only as of the date of this Form 10-K. You should read this Form 10-K and the documents that we reference and filed as exhibits to the Form 10-K completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from what we expect. Except as required by law, we assume no obligation to update any forward-looking statements publicly, or to update the reasons actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in any forward-looking statements, even if new information becomes available in the future.


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Use of Certain Defined Terms

 

Except as otherwise indicated by the context, references in this Form 10-K to:

 

“We,” “us,” “our company,” “Company,” “our” and “VEII” refer to Value Exchange International, Inc., a Nevada corporation and the Reporting Company of this Form 10-K.

 

“China” or “PRC” or “Chinese” refers to the People’s Republic of China, excluding Taiwan, but including the Special Administrative Regions (“SARs”) of Hong Kong and Macau.

 

“VEI CHN” refers to Value Exchange Int’l (China) Limited, and its consolidated subsidiaries, namely Value Exchange Int’l (Hong Kong) Limited (“VEI HKG”) and Cucumbuy.com Limited (“CUCUMBUY”), formerly known as Ke Dao Solutions Limited, both are companies incorporated in Hong Kong as limited liability companies, and Value Exchange Int’l (Shanghai) Limited (“VEI SHG”), a wholly Foreign Owned Enterprise (“WFOE”) registered in Shanghai, PRC. VEI HKG, CUCUMBUY, all of which Hong Kong SAR subsidiaries are collectively referred to as “HKG subsidiaries” and VEI SHG is referred to as “PRC Subsidiary” (collectively PRC Subsidiary and HKG subsidiaries may be referred to as “VEI CHN Group”). WFOE is a form of company owned by foreign investors recognized under Chinese laws.

 

References to “OTC” means The OTC Markets Group, Inc.’s QB Venture Market Tier, a national quotation system with web site at www.otcmarkets.com.

 

References to the “Bulletin Board” and the “OTC Bulletin Board” are to the Over-the-Counter Bulletin Board, a securities quotation service, which is accessible at the website http://www.finra.org/industry/otcbb/otc-bulletin-board-otcbb.

 

References to PRC Subsidiary’s “registered capital” are to the equity securities of PRC Subsidiary, which under PRC law is measured not in terms of shares owned but in terms of the amount of capital that has been contributed to a company by a particular shareholder or all shareholders. The portion of a limited liability company’s total capital contributed by a particular shareholder represents that shareholder’s ownership of the company, and the total amount of capital contributed by all shareholders is the company’s total equity. Capital contributions are made to a company by deposits into a dedicated account in the company’s name, which the company may access in order to meet its financial needs. When a company’s accountant certifies to PRC authorities that a capital contribution has been made and the company has received the necessary government permission to increase its contributed capital, the capital contribution is registered with regulatory authorities and becomes a part of the company’s “registered capital.”

 

“IT Business” means select services and solutions in computer software programming and integration, and computer systems, Internet and information technology systems engineering, consulting, administration and maintenance, including e-commerce and payment processing to the Retail Sector.

 

“IT” means information technologies, which includes software programs and applications, computer and network hardware and systems, telecommunications systems and automation technologies used in business, financial, commercial or information processing/database transactions, applications and purposes. “IT” services consist of software programming, hardware and network configuration, software and hardware maintenance/repair and upgrades, design and engineering consulting, business and customer need analysis, administration of systems (including database management), repair and maintenance and testing.

 

“POS” means point of sale computer programs and systems used to record retail or Internet sales, process payments and make corresponding inventory record adjustments. POS systems can include cybersecurity or systems security technologies as well.

 

“Retail Sector” means commercial concerns selling products and/or services to the general public through brick and mortar stores and/or e-commerce web sites.

 

All references to “Renminbi” or “RMB” are to the legal currency of China.

 

All references to “Hong Kong dollars” or “HK$” are to the legal currency of the Special Administrative Region of Hong Kong.

 

All references to “U.S. dollars,” “dollars,” or “$” are to the legal currency of the United States of America.

 

“Exchange Act” means the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.

 

“Securities Act” means the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

 

“SEC” or “Commission” means the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.


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PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS.

 

Overview

 

History of Value Exchange International, Inc.

 

History. We were incorporated in the State of Nevada on June 26, 2007. We changed to our current corporate name, “Value Exchange International, Inc.”, on December 5, 2017.

 

Current Business Focus. We are a provider of customer-centric technology solutions for the retail industry in Hong Kong SAR and certain regions of China and Philippines. Due to impact of Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic and lack of adequate funding, our strategic plan to expand our business into Southeast Asia made no progress in fiscal year 2020.

 

By integrating market-leading Point-of-Sale/Point-of-Interaction (“POS/POI”), Merchandising, Customer Relations Management or “CRM” and related rewards, Locational Based (GPS & Indoor Positioning System (“IPS”)) Marketing, Customer Analytics, Business Intelligence solutions, our products and services are intended to provide retailers with the capability to offer a consistent shopping experience across all channels, enabling them to easily and effectively manage the customer lifecycle on a one-to-one basis. We promote ourselves as a single IT source for retailers who want to extend existing traditional transaction processing to multiple points of interaction, including the Internet, kiosks and wireless devices. Our products and services are focused on helping retailers realize the full benefits of Customer Chain Management with its suite of solutions that focus on the customer, on employees, and the infrastructure that supports the selling channel. Company is headquartered in Hong Kong and with offices in Shenzhen, Guangzhou, Shanghai, Beijing, China; Manila, Philippines; and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

 

We believe that the IT Business often presents opportunities to expand a provider’s market reach or customer base by acquisitions of existing businesses or operating assets. The Company’s business strategy includes reviewing possible acquisitions of existing businesses or operating assets in existing or adjacent markets and to do so when and if such an acquisition appears to be compatible and an enhancement of our core business lines and can be consummated with available cash and other resources. Our ability to pursue and consummate acquisitions may be limited by available cash and other resources and the perceived cost and burdens of acquiring and integrating in our operations the target business or new operating assets. The availability of funding and cash flow are the most significant limitations on our ability to expand through acquisitions of businesses and assets – both in terms of money on hand and ability to finance acquisitions.

 

Initial Business Focus. Our initial intended, primary business was to operate a credit card processing and merchant-acquiring services company that provide credit card clearing services to merchants and financial institutions in PRC. From inception, we strove unsuccessfully to create and establish a proposed Global Processing Platform concept to support the credit card processing services (“SinoPay GPP”). Specifically, the Company’s IP business was to be a provider of Internet Protocol (“IP”) processing services in Asia to bank card-accepting merchants (“IP Business”). We market our services to local merchants with regional retail locations in our existing markets of China, Hong Kong and Philippines while seeking business from retailers with market presence across Asia Pacific (as potential customers of their IP and related credit card and debit card processing systems). The prior Company efforts to establish an IP Business failed despite years of effort.

 

With the acquisition of VEI CHN in 2014 shifted the primary business focus on our IT Business because IT Business provided a revenue generating business line and because of our strategic decision that IT Business presented a greater growth and profit potential than IP Business. Further, we believe that the SinoGPP system will require ongoing and potentially expensive marketing and sales effort due to the highly competitive market for Point Of Sale (“POS”) systems and longer sales cycle for POS systems than IT Business project and consulting sales.

 

Since the Company has been unable to develop a revenue generating business for the IP Business, and the Company is focusing its resources on the more lucrative IT Business, the Company has decided to explore an alternative approach to the effort to develop a revenue generating IP Business. The Company believes that the emphasis on the IT Business and Company’s limited cash flow and funding resources requires any future promotion and development of the IP Business must be conducted as a joint venture with a third party willing to raise the capital necessary to produce a commercially viable e-commerce system for the IP Business. The Company lacks the strategic focus and current, available capital (as well as funding sources) to engage in the development of a viable modern e-commerce system for a commercially viable IP Business.


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Efforts to Establish a New E-Pay Platform. The Company has suspended its efforts to develop a standalone IP Business in KTSI due to resignation of Matthew Mecke as a director of the Company and impact of Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic. Mr. Mecke was the key person in leading the effort to develop KTSI as a standalone IP Business. With the impact of the Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic in late 2019 and into 2020 in China and Hong Kong and in Philippines in 2020, the position of the Company in respect of developing any new IP Business is that the full attention and resources of the Company needs to be devoted to its revenue generating and primary business line, being the IT Business. Once the full impact of Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic on the Company IT Business and economies of China, Hong Kong and Philippines are better understood and have subsided, then the Company will re-evaluate the IP Business proposal and make a final determination on whether to pursue the proposal to pursue developing an IP Business and based on a new e-pay platform to be developed with outside investor funding. Company believes that protecting and maintaining the core IT Business is critical to maintaining the Company as a going concern and new business lines that do not support or promote the core business line would be ill advised until the impact of Coronavirus/COVID-19 has abated in the key markets for the IT Business.

 

Smart Baggage Tags. Through a cooperative effort with another company, Company has the ability to market a smart baggage tag that allows consumers to track the location of their baggage through a smart phone or device using the smart baggage tag and related application. Efforts to promote the smart baggage tag were suspended in 2020 due to impact of COVID-19 pandemic on air travel. Company will re-evaluate promotion of the smart baggage tag to airports when air travel returns to pre-COVID-19 pandemic levels, if ever.

 

History of Value Exchange Int’l (China) Limited. VEI CHN was first established on November 16, 2001 in Hong Kong SAR as a limited liability company.

 

VEI CHN is a holding company with two subsidiaries established in Hong Kong SAR, namely TAP Services (HK) Limited which was incorporated on August 25, 2003 and acquired by VEI CHN on September 25, 2008, and subsequently changed to its current name as Value Exchange Int’l (Hong Kong) Limited (“VEI HKG”) on May 13, 2013, and Cucumbuy.com Limited (“CUCUMBUY”), which was incorporated on May 14, 2013 and disposed on May 21, 2018 with consideration of HK$1. VEI CHN also set up a Wholly-owned Foreign Enterprise (WOFE) in Shanghai, PRC, in September 2, 2008 in the name of Value Exchange Int’l (Shanghai) Limited (“VEI SHG”). In January 2017, VEI CHN acquired TapServices, Inc., a corporation organized under the laws of the Republic of the Philippines (the “TSI”). Prior to acquisition of TSI, the Company provided extensive consulting services to TSI and, from such relationship, the Company was familiar with TSI operations. In January 2019, VEI SHG completed the setup procedures of a subsidiary with 51% ownership in Hunan, PRC, in the name of Value Exchange Int’l (Hunan) Limited (“VEI HN”). In February 2020, VEI SHG completed the setup procedures of a subsidiary with 51% ownership in Shanghai, PRC, in the name of Shanghai Zhaonan Hengan Information Technology Co., Limited (“SZH”).

 

Principal business of VEI and its Subsidiaries

 

VEII is a holding company for its operating subsidiaries. VEI CHN operations are the primary operations of the Company. The principal business of VEI CHN for more than 15 years is to provide the IT Business (consisting of select services and solutions in computer software programming and integration, and computer systems, Internet and information technology systems engineering, consulting, administration and maintenance, including e-commerce and payment processing) to the Retail Sector, primarily to leading retailers in Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR and PRC and as more fully described below. As is customary in the industry, such services and solutions are provided by both company employees, contractors and consultants. The primary services and products of the IT Business are:

 

(a)Systems maintenance and related service 

 

VEI CHN Group provides development, customization of software and hardware, enhancements thereto and maintenance services for installed POS system. VEI CHN Group markets, sells and maintains its own brand POS software – edgePOS as well as third party brands (e.g. NCR/Retalix), which is one of the leading POS software programs in the market. These software enhancements and programming can integrate with different IP systems.

 

Systems maintenance services consist of: i) software maintenance service, including software patches and software code revisions; ii) installing, testing and implementing software; iii) training of customer personnel for the use of software; and iv) technical support for software systems.

 

Other services include system installation and implementation, including i) project planning; ii) analysis of customer information and business needs from a IT perspective (“System Analysis”); iii) design of the entire system; iv) hardware and consumables selection advice and sales; and v) system hardware maintenance. These services typically consist of customer projects for New Store Opening (“NSO”) and Install, Move, Add and Change (“IMAC”) for retail, and ad-hoc custom system projects for other business sectors. Our primary focus is the retail sector in Hong Kong SAR, PRC and Philippine.


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(b)Systems development and integration  

 

VEI CHN Group provides value-added software, which integrates with customer owned or licensed software, and ad-hoc software development projects for other business sectors. Besides use of proprietary, custom software code, our services may from time to time license standard third party software programs.

 

Business partner and customers

 

The main business partner of the IT Business group is the Chinese and Hong Kong subsidiary operations (“WN”) of Diebold Nixdorf Inc. (formerly, “Wincor Nixdorf AG”, a German public company), a U.S.-German public company subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, (“DN”). Since 1990’s, VEI CHN Group served the AS Watson Group, a retail conglomerate including Watsons, Parknshop and Fortress, directly and through a sub-contracting arrangement with WN in the China-Hong Kong region. This contributes almost half of the gross sales revenue each year to VEI CHN.

 

In recent years, VEI CHN has striven to broaden its clientele in retail sector and to other business sectors. VEI CHN Group secured a number of service contracts for leading retail groups, Robinson Retails Group in Philippines and Dairy Farm in Hong Kong. PCCW, a leading telecommunication company in Hong Kong, and Inland Revenue Department of the Hong Kong SAR Government have also become major customers of the VEI CHN Group. The focus on expanding clientele in the retail sector is a current priority of Company’s growth strategy.

 

The annual sales of VEI CHN Group have been increasing over the past few years in its IT Business by expanding its customer base and its scope of services. VEI CHN Group solution now runs in over 10,000 POS in the region and provides a solid foundation to VEII’s IP system. Also, VEI CHN Group is seeking to leverage its existing POS solution customer base to expand into the mobile Customer Relationship Management and Rewards market. MasterCard’ 2016 Survey Reveals showed two in five Hong Kong consumers shop on smartphones in Hong Kong. The importance of the mobile market in commerce is globally recognized. Even through the Mobile Customer Relationship Management and Rewards programs has not produced any significant revenues to the Group, the programs seek to exploit the increasing use of mobile devices to shop and purchase products and services, to sustain consumer loyalty by rewards for repeat purchases by mobile devices and to permit companies to develop consumer profile databases used to fashion targeted marketing to the consumers based on purchasing habits.

 

We will evaluate the merits of this business and growth strategy from time to time and may elect in the future to continue to pursue an IP Business, IT Business or focus more on one segment than the other, including seek business opportunities in the applications of digital technology which can raise our customers’ competitive edge leading to increase in market share and profitability in their business sectors. Any change in business focus will be based on current economic conditions, competitive environment, our available cash and infrastructure resources, current customer demand trends and financial results of each segment of our post-Share Exchange business plan As of the date of the filing of this Form 10-K, we are pursuing our emphasis on IT Business in our core Hong Kong SAR and PRC market while also exploring expansion opportunities in adjacent Asia Pacific markets. Our ability to exploit adjacent market opportunities for expansion will be limited and governed by available, affordable funding and cash flow.

 

Health and Cosmetic Retailer Agreement. On February 16, 2018, VEI SHG, signed a January 24, 2018 stores equipment support agreement (“Agreement”) with the largest health care and beauty retailer (“Retailer”) in China. Under the Agreement, the Retailer has contracted for site and preventive maintenance and support for computer and point of sale systems (“Systems”) as well as new store and store renovation install and migration services for Systems from the VEI SHG. The Agreement is non-exclusive, covers Retailer’s stores in the northern and eastern region of China and runs through December 2019 and 2020. In March 2020, a renewal agreement signed with the Retailer, and related service extended to 31 March 2023.

 

In fiscal year 2020, VEI SHG realized $3,298,210 in gross revenues from the work under the Agreement.


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CORPORATE STRUCTURE

 

Our corporate organizational chart, as of December 31, 2020, is as follows:

 

 

 

Value Exchange International, Inc.

- a Nevada Company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Value Exchange Int’l (China) Limited

- a Hong Kong Company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100%

 

100%

 

100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Value Exchange Int’l (Shanghai) Limited

- a PRC Company

 

Value Exchange Int’l (Hong Kong) Limited

- a Hong Kong Company

 

TapServices, Inc.

- a Philippines Company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

51%

 

51%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Value Exchange Int’l (Hunan) Limited

- a PRC Company

 

Shanghai Zhaonan Hengan Information Technology Co., Limited

- a PRC Company

 

 

 

Marketing

 

Marketing activities are designed to inform potential clients about the benefits of using our services and include and will include the following: face-to-face sales and marketing; development and distribution of marketing literature; direct mail and email; advertising; promotion of our web site; attendance at trade shows or product seminars; and industry analyst relations campaign.

 

Sales are managed at the subsidiary level by each subsidiary. The Company has a Sales and Marketing team in each regional office of its existing China/Hong Kong and Manilla markets to promote and maintain good business relationships with our customers. We strive to provide high quality and fast response services to our customers in our Help Centre, Maintenance Support Team and Professional IT Engineer to help customers solve their problems and satisfy their IT needs.

 

VEI CHN Group has been serving in IT Business sectors for over 15 years, focusing on POS maintenance and support to retail sector. The VEI CHN Group will continue its key business and seek to expand its client base to gain more market share in PRC, Hong Kong SAR, and certain other areas of Asia Pacific. VEII may consider acquiring companies in the Asia Pacific region with similar business, subject to financial wherewithal to do so and subject to a suitable and affordable acquisition opportunity. The perceived cost of market penetration will also be a factor in deciding whether to pursue any acquisition opportunities. The Company and its subsidiaries do not currently have ready access to funding for acquisitions and would have to locate sufficient, affordable funding to pursue any acquisition or merger with a significant cash consideration requirement. The Company and its subsidiaries may be unable to locate the funding needed to consummate a merger or acquisition, especially since the Company is a small reporting company with a penny stock common stock.

 

We use strategic partnerships as another way of marketing and selling our IT Business. The operating subsidiaries will also cooperate with strategic partners in the local markets to secure and provide maintenance services to major retail customers and as a basis for attempting to expand our business in our markets. In fiscal year 2020, we had over 10 strategic partner arrangements engaged in providing our services to customers in our China/Hong Kong markets.

 

Competition

 

We operate in a highly competitive, customer-driven industry and we compete against a variety of local and regional competitors of varying operational sizes, product/service offerings and resources. In some instances, our competitors have fewer regulatory burdens, easier access to financing, greater resources, greater operating capabilities and efficiencies of scale, stronger brand-name recognition, longstanding relationships with regulatory authorities and customers, more customers, and more flexibility to offer discounted services and/or products.


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We face significant competition from large multinational service providers, such as DN, NCR, Fujitsu IBM, Toppan Forms and large national companies, such as Octopus card, an electronic payment in online or offline system in Hong Kong SAR. Though VEI CHN Group faces keen competition in the maintenance service market, it believes that it has a well-trained technical team that offers services to the satisfaction of our customers, and, as is the case with many smaller companies in the IT segment, we believe we can offer more customized and cost effective services to certain customers than larger competitors. Without extensive teaming with strategic partners, we lack the capabilities to compete directly with larger competitors in projects or work requiring capabilities of a large company. This can from time to time limit the number and nature projects that we can pursue or handle. VEII may also experience a competitive disadvantage in bids or prospective work where extensive and broad prior projects in certain areas of IT are required to bid and to win bids. An instance of such a competitive disadvantage would be technical work in which we do not have extensive prior experience or we do not have a prior relationship with the customer in question.

 

We also face competition from companies that are of comparable size and resources. In such competition, price and scope of services or qualification of personnel often determines the winning provider. Competition for qualified personnel is a challenge faced by all companies in the IT Business industry.

 

Preservation and growth of our business depends on maintaining sufficient, competent staff and attractive pricing.

 

Some of our competitors in our industry have substantially greater capital and technical resources than we have and, operate as subsidiaries of financial institutions or bank holding companies, which may allow them on a consolidated basis to own and conduct depository and other banking activities that we do not have the regulatory authority to own or conduct. Since they are affiliated with financial institutions or banks, these competitors do not incur the costs associated with being sponsored by a bank for registration with card networks and they can settle transactions quickly for their own merchants. We do not, however, currently contemplate pursuing an acquisition or strategic relationship with a financial institution in order to increase our competitiveness and such an acquisition or strategic relationship is not prominent in our current business and growth strategy. Our current operational focus is to improve the efficiency and profitability of existing IT Business.

 

Cybersecurity and Security of Computer Networks

 

We maintain certain computer networks, computer systems and databases in connection with our business operations and services. We use readily available third party security programs to protect these systems and databases and we periodically review security measures. Any security system or program may be vulnerable to hacking or security breaches, especially since hacking and malicious programs are constantly evolving to overcome new security measures. Like any company’s computer and network systems and databases, our systems and databases could be vulnerable to security hacking or malicious programs. We may also be vulnerable to security leaks and violations by employees and contractors, which is a threat faced by all IT Business companies. We have not experienced any significant security breaches or problems as of the date of filing of this Form 10-K. VEII technical staff typically evaluates cybersecurity and security measures from time to time as new threats become known to us.

 

There can be no assurance that our efforts to protect our computer systems, networks and other information systems will prevent any of the problems identified as cyber security attacks or problems. The problem of this type might be caused by events such as computer hacking, computer viruses, worms and other destructive or disruptive software, "cyber-attacks" and other malicious activity, defects in the hardware and software comprising our network and information systems, as well as natural disasters, power outages, terrorist attacks and similar events. Such events could have an adverse impact on us and our customers, including degradation of service, service disruption, excessive call volume to help centers and damage to our or customers’ equipment and data. Operational or business delays for our operations or customer operations may result from the disruption of computer systems, network or information systems and the subsequent remediation activities. These events may create negative publicity resulting in reputation or brand damage with customers and our results of operations could suffer. Since we provide computer, software and system services and products to customers, cyber security attacks on our computer systems, networks and other information systems may affect our customers’ computer systems, networks and other information systems and produce liabilities on our part to such customers.

 

Key Personnel

 

The following personnel are considered critical to our operations: Kenneth Tan and Benny Lee, who provide executive management services and strategic direction. Mr. Lee serves as a director of VEI SHG. We do not have key man insurance to fund replacement of any key personnel. We also frequently use third party consultants acting as independent contractors to assist in the completion of various projects, which consultants are usually hired on a project-by-project basis. Third parties are instrumental to keep the development of projects on time and on budget. Reliance on independent contractors is common in technology services businesses. We do not anticipate and have not experienced any significant problem in securing needed technical expertise, but the inability to secure needed technical expertise is a risk faced by IT service companies like our company.


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The Company has not developed a succession plan in the event of the retirement, disability or death of key personnel. In the event of the loss of the services of any key personnel, the Company would in all likelihood be forced to recruit an outside person to fill a key personnel position. The Company may lack sufficient cash and benefits to attract qualified personnel for key personnel positions.

 

A common problem in our industry is key or important contractors and employees being lured to more attractive or lucrative work opportunities. VEII cannot typically match the level and scope of financial incentives offered by larger competitors to workers. VEII has to rely on active recruitment coupled with offering projects that match workers’ skills and interests as well as providing an appealing work environment and competitive base compensation in order to maintain or create an adequate work force on a project-by-project basis.

 

Insurance

 

Except the Company’s subsidiaries in (i) PRC are required to cover its employees with medical, retirement and unemployment insurance programs, and (ii) Hong Kong are required to cover its employees with labor insurance programs under the prevailing laws and regulations of the PRC and in Hong Kong, we do not maintain other insurance. Because we may not have sufficient insurance, if we are made a party to a liability legal action, we may not have sufficient funds to defend the litigation or may suffer another liability. If that occurs a judgment or liability that is not covered by any insurance or covered by available cash or funding, could cause us to cease or reduce operations. We did not experience any significant claims against our insurance in fiscal year 2020.

 

Government Regulation

 

We are not currently subject to direct Chinese, United States federal, state or local regulation other than regulations applicable to businesses generally or directly applicable to our IT Business and the U.S. securities laws applicable to the Company. However, the Internet is increasingly popular and essential on a global basis. As a result, it is possible that a number of international and local laws and regulations may be adopted with respect to the Internet applications and transactions, including ones used in or serviced by our service. These laws may cover issues such as user privacy, freedom of expression, pricing, content and quality of products and services, taxation, advertising, intellectual property rights and information security. Furthermore, the growth of electronic commerce may prompt calls for more stringent consumer protection laws. Existing and future laws and regulations governing the privacy of end users or their customers’ information is or may become part of the regulatory burden of conducting our business lines. We do not provide our services in the U.S. as of the date of this Form 10-K, but the global nature of the Internet and e-commerce and financial transactions means that any company may become subject from time to time to U.S. or foreign laws on privacy, financial regulation, business regulation or tax law.

 

We are not certain how our existing business may be affected by the application of existing, evolving laws, or extension of foreign laws to our operations and, governing issues such as property ownership, copyrights, encryption and other intellectual property issues, taxation, libel, obscenity and export or import matters. The vast majority of such laws were adopted prior to the advent of the Internet. As a result, they do not contemplate or address the unique issues of the Internet and related technologies. Changes in laws intended to address such issues could create uncertainty in the Internet market place, including areas affecting our business lines. Such uncertainty could reduce demand for services or increase the cost of doing business as a result of litigation or regulatory costs or increased service delivery costs. In addition, because our services could be available over the Internet in multiple states and foreign countries, other jurisdictions may claim that we are required to qualify to do business in each such state or foreign country. Our failure to qualify a business in a jurisdiction where it is required to do so could subject it to taxes and penalties. It could also hamper our ability to enforce contracts in such jurisdictions. The application of laws or regulations from jurisdictions whose laws do not currently apply to our business could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Like many companies, and from time to time, the Company may review the economic and tax advantages of various jurisdictions for businesses like the Company business in order to determine if there are any significant long-term advantages in relocating or expanding the Company operations to another jurisdiction, whether in whole or in part. Any such review is part of the customary strategic planning of the Company.

 

We are subject to the Foreign Corrupt Practice Act, or “FCPA,” and other laws that prohibit improper payments or offers of payments to foreign governments and their officials and political parties by U.S. persons and issuers as defined by the statute for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Our activities in Asia create the risk of unauthorized payments or offers of payments by consultants or agents of our company, because these parties are not always subject to our control. It is our policy to implement safeguards to discourage these practices by our employees. Also, our existing safeguards and any future improvements may prove to be less than effective, and consultants, sales agents of our Company may engage in conduct for which we might be held responsible. Violations of the FCPA may result in severe criminal or civil sanctions, and we may be subject to other liabilities, which could negatively affect our business, operating results and financial condition. The U.S. government may seek to hold our Company liable for successor liability for any FCPA violations committed by companies in which we invest or that we acquire.


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Employees

 

We have more than 300 full time employees as of December 31, 2020, including officers of the Company and including employees and officers of VEI CHN and its subsidiaries. There is no labor dispute affecting our operations and Company believes it has good relationship with its work force.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

An investment in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. Any investor should carefully consider the risks described below, together with all of the other information included in this Form 10-K, before making an investment decision. If any of the following risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition or results of operations could suffer or be undermined. In that case, the trading price of our common stock could decline, and any investor may lose all or part of the investor’s investment. You should read the section entitled “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” above for a discussion of what types of statements are forward-looking statements, as well as the significance of such statements in the context of this Form 10-K.

 

Risks Related to Our Business

 

A substantial amount of our sales revenue is derived from sales to a limited number of customers, and our business will suffer if sales to these customers decline.

 

We have derived a significant portion of our revenue from a limited number of customers. For the year ended December 31, 2020, our revenue was concentrated in our largest customer that accounted for approximately 52.4% of annual revenues. As of December 31, 2020, $224,019 or 37.1% of our accounts receivable, was due from our largest customer. We do not have long term contractual arrangements or regular negotiation with most of these customers. The loss of one or more of these customers could damage our business, financial condition and results of operations. We are endeavoring but may not succeed expanding our customer base in order to reduce reliance on major customers.

 

Impact of Coronavirus/COVID-19. By late December 2019, China advised the World Health Organization (“WHO”) of a new strain of the coronavirus had arisen in Wuhan, China and spread throughout China. From China, Coronavirus/COVID-19 has spread by March 2020 to almost all other parts of the developed world, including Hong Kong SAR, the Philippines and the United States. On January 30, 2020, WHO declared the outbreak of Coronavirus/COVID-19 a “Public Health Emergency of International Concern,” and then, on March 11, 2020, declared the Coronavirus/COVID-19 outbreak as a “pandemic”. 

 

As of the date of the filing of this Form 10-K, it is uncertain what the full short-term and long-term impact of COVID-19 on the future business of the Company and the impact on the demand for IT services in the Company’s key markets of Hong Kong, China and Philippines. Even with mass vaccination in Hong Kong SAR and certain parts of China and to a lesser extent in Manila, the threat of mutations of the Coronavirus/COVID-19 that are not effectively controlled by current vaccines raises the specter of a new pandemic that devastates the economies of our markets. Until the current pandemic is controlled by mass vaccination in our market areas and the vaccines prove effective against the growing number of mutations of Coronavirus/COVID-19, there can no certainty about the impact of Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic on our future operations and future business and financial performance. The uncertainty of the impact of Coronavirus/COVID-19 on the Company and the economies of Company’s key markets is a significant risk factor for the Company.

 

While we have not experienced a significant loss of personnel from Coronavirus/Covid-19 as of the date of the filing of this Form 10-K, this pandemic, which may impact areas in waves and not in a single occurrence, or may mutate into a vaccine resistant strain, may cause a shortage of qualified personnel. Adequacy of qualified staffing is key to maintenance and growth of our IT Business and our IT Business is key to our financial condition and performance. While performing work by staffs in parts of the world outside of our key markets is a possible solution to any shortages of qualified staff in our key markets, we have not yet developed a contingency plan for remote personnel support of our IT Business or devoted resources to that endeavor.


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Our success depends on certain key personnel. We rely on highly skilled and qualified personnel, and if we are unable to continue to attract and retain such qualified personnel it will adversely affect our business.

 

Our performance to date has been and will continue to be largely dependent on the talents, efforts and performance of our senior management and key technical personnel, who generally have, in our opinion, significant experience with our company and substantial relationships and reputations within the industry of our services. Certain of our executive officers and top technical personnel may enter into employment and noncompetition agreements. However, while it is customary in the industry to use employment agreements as a method of retaining the services of key executive personnel, these agreements do not guarantee us the continued services of such employees. We do not currently have an employment agreement with our key personnel, or with most of our key technical and engineering personnel. The loss of our executive officers or our other key personnel, particularly with little or no notice, could cause delays on business developments and projects and could have an adverse impact on our customers and industry relationships, our business, operating results or financial condition. While we may rely on independent contractors or consultants for technical needs, we may also experience an inability to hire such expertise in the future. The job market for experienced IT personnel is competitive in PRC and Hong Kong SAR, our primary markets, as well as globally. We also lack the resources or funding to match more established competitors’ compensation packages for the kind of personnel that is critical to our company’s survival and success.

 

Our success depends to a significant extent on our ability to identify, attract, hire, train and retain qualified creative, technical and managerial personnel or to contract with such personnel as independent contractors. We expect competition for personnel with the specialized technical skills needed to create our products and provide our services will continue to intensify in our business because commerce’s reliance on technology increases in order to meet the competitive need for operational efficiencies and related automation and connectivity. We plan to hire individuals on a project-by-project basis, and individuals who work on one or more projects for us may not be available to work on future projects. If we have difficulty identifying, attracting, hiring, training and retaining such qualified personnel, or incur significant costs in order to do so, our business and financial results could be negatively impacted.

 

The Company has not developed a succession plan for key personnel and does not have key man life insurance.

 

Our successful pursuit of profitable business faces various risks and challenges, including:

 

·A lessening of the impact on Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic on China, Hong Kong and Philippines economies and mitigation of any possible loss of or shortage of qualified personnel due to illness from Coronavirus/COVID-19 is a key factor; 

 

·the success of our business will be primarily dependent on customer acceptance of our services and products, which is extremely difficult to predict, and our ability to obtain affordable, adequate funding to support efforts to promote our services and products and fund any expansion of business. As a microcap with a lightly traded stock, we have to rely on private placements of stock or debt funding to acquire working capital for expansion of business; 

 

·achieving sustainable operating revenues in our core IT Business that is sufficient to support our business without investor or debt funding; 

 

·the business can be capital-intensive in terms of labor costs and our capacity to generate cash from our operations may be insufficient to meet our anticipated capital requirements, especially the capital needs of penetrating new markets and developing our services to meet customer demands; 

 

·technological developments could render obsolete our technologies, services and products and undermine our services and products in the industry; 

 

·the need to access expertise and technical resources in each market in which we may operate presents high capital costs that may be beyond our ability to fund – as such, we may be unable to bid for highly profitable, but high labor cost, projects or contract opportunities, which inability can limit our growth and profitability potential; 

 

·we may be unable to compete for or afford key personnel in our industry that pays a premium for talent, especially since our common stock has a limited market price and limited liquidity; 

 

·a shortage of qualified personnel, could delay or halt our business operations; 

 

·technologies and customer tastes and demands can shift or change unexpectedly in the rapidly evolving IT industry and IP industry and we may lack the wherewithal to respond to such changes; and 


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·acquisitions we pursue in our industry and related industries could result in operating difficulties, dilution to our shareholders and other consequences harmful to our business. Integration of new acquisitions can undermine an acquiring company’s business strengths by diluting resources and manpower and imposing operational losses.  

 

As part of our growth strategy, and if we attain funding, stability and profitability in our core business, we may selectively pursue strategic acquisitions in our industry and related industries. We may not be able to consummate such acquisitions, or efficiently integrate new businesses into our existing business, which could adversely impact our growth. The “penny stock” status of our common stock does allow our company ready access to public capital markets for funding. If we do consummate acquisitions, integrating an acquired company, business or technology may result in unforeseen operating difficulties and expenditures, including:

 

·increased expenses due to transaction and integration costs; 

 

·potential liabilities of the acquired businesses; 

 

·potential adverse tax and accounting effects of the acquisitions; 

 

·diversion of capital and other resources from our existing business; 

 

·diversion of our management’s attention during the acquisition process and any transition periods; 

 

·loss of key employees of the acquired businesses following the acquisition or inability of existing management to manage newly acquired businesses; and 

 

·inaccurate budgets and projected financial statements due to inaccurate valuation assessments of the acquired businesses. 

 

There can be no assurance that we can successfully achieve any or all of the above initiatives in the manner or time period that we expect. Furthermore, achieving these objectives will require investments which may result in short-term costs without generating any current revenues and therefore may be dilutive to our earnings. We cannot provide any assurance that we will realize, in full or in part, the anticipated benefits we expect our strategy will achieve. The failure to realize those benefits could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We operate primarily in Hong Kong SAR and China are subject to significant political and economic uncertainties if Chinese government significantly alters the laws governing Hong Kong SAR.

 

Significant changes in PRC laws and regulations, or their interpretation, or the imposition of confiscatory taxation, restrictions on currency conversion, imports and sources of supply, devaluations of currency or the nationalization or other expropriation of private enterprises could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Under its current leadership, the Chinese government has generally been pursuing economic reform policies that encourage private economic activity and greater economic decentralization. There is no assurance, however, that the Chinese government will continue to pursue these policies, or that it will not significantly alter these policies from time to time without notice and in respect of Hong Kong SAR.

 

We may need additional and ongoing financing to fund our operations or to find new operations or business lines, which we may not be able to obtain on acceptable terms or at all, especially as a microcap, smaller company. Additional capital raising efforts in future periods will be dilutive to our then current stockholders or result in increased interest expense and debt load in future periods.

 

We may need to raise additional and ongoing working capital to fund our plans to invest in current business development, sustain current operations or marketing initiatives and possible future acquisition of the operating assets. Our future capital requirements depend on a number of factors, including our ability to manage any growth of our business and our ability to control our expenses. Also, if we raise additional capital through the issuance of debt, this will result in increased interest expense. If we raise additional capital through the issuance of equity or convertible debt securities, the percentage ownership of our company held by existing shareholders will be reduced and those shareholders will probably experience significant dilution due to the “penny stock” status of the VEII Common Stock.

 

New securities issued by us may contain certain rights, preferences or privileges that are senior to those of our Common Stock or other securities. Such seniority may adversely impact the rights and any possible financial return for our holders of the VEII Common Stock.

 

We cannot assure investors that we will be able to raise the working capital as needed in the future on terms acceptable to us, if at all. If we do not raise capital as needed, we will be unable to operate our business or fully implement our business development and acquisition expansion strategy.


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We may not be able to adequately finance the significant costs associated with the development of new product lines and new services.

 

Any technology business is subject to a demand to have the newest product and services to match changes in technology and customer purchasing habits. This technological cycle will require us to purchase new products and develop or license new services to match changes in the technologies used by our customers.

 

We could be required to expend substantial funds for and commit significant resources to the following:

 

·training our personnel on new products and services; 

 

·purchasing new products for resell; 

 

·marketing and promotional costs for new products and services; and 

 

·our future operating results will depend to a significant extent on our ability to continue to provide new and competitive products that compare favorably on the basis of cost and performance with the design and manufacturing capabilities of competitive third-party technologies. We will need to sufficiently increase our net sales to offset these increased costs, the failure of which would negatively affect our operating results.  

 

Risks Related to Our Common Stock

 

While our common stock is quoted on The OTC Markets Group, Inc. QB Venture Market Tier, there is not now, and there may not ever be, a sustained active, liquid public market for our common stock and we cannot assure you that the Common Stock will become liquid or that it will be listed on a national securities exchange (other than OTC). There currently is only a minimal public market for our Common Stock. Failure to develop or maintain a liquid public trading market could negatively affect the value of our Common Stock and make it difficult or impossible for stockholders to sell their shares.

 

Effective December 5, 2016, the Common Stock of VEII started quotation on The OTC Markets Group, Inc. QB Tier (“OTCQB”) under the current trading symbol “VEII.” Due to a lack of a significant public float and primary market makers, VEII Common Stock is less liquid, receives less or no coverage by security analysts and news media, and generates lower prices than might otherwise be obtained if they were listed on a national securities exchange or NASDAQ, had active primary market makers and had analysts’ coverage.

 

Some, but not all, of the factors which may delay or prevent the listing of our Common Stock on a more widely-traded and liquid market than the OTCQB include the following: our stockholders’ equity may be insufficient; the market value of our outstanding securities may be too low; our net income from operations may be too low; our Common Stock may not be sufficiently widely held; we may not be able to secure market makers for our Common Stock; and we may fail to meet the rules and requirements mandated by, any of the several exchanges and markets to have our Common Stock listed.

 

Our issued Common Stock is held by a relatively small number of shareholders. We would have to increase the public float considerably as part of any effort to enhance the liquidity of our Common Stock.

 

The penny stock status of the Company makes very difficult to attract institutional investor or market maker support.


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The market price for our Common Stock can be volatile given our status as a relatively unknown company with a small and thinly traded public float, limited operating history of our services and lack of sustained profits which could lead to wide fluctuations in our share price.

 

The market for our Common Stock can be characterized by significant price volatility when compared to seasoned issuers, and we expect that our share price will continue to be potentially more volatile than a seasoned issuer for the indefinite future. The volatility in our share price is attributable to a number of factors. First, as noted above, our Common Stock are sporadically and thinly traded. As a consequence of this lack of liquidity, the trading of relatively small quantities of shares by our shareholders may disproportionately influence the price of those shares in either direction. The price for our shares could, for example, decline precipitously in the event that a large number of shares of our Common Stock are sold on the market without commensurate demand, as compared to a seasoned issuer which could better absorb those sales without adverse impact on its share price. Secondly, we are a speculative or “risky” investment due to our limited operations and lack of sustained profits to date, and uncertainty of future market acceptance for our existing and potential products and services. As a consequence of this enhanced risk, more risk-adverse investors may, under the fear of losing all or most of their investment in the event of negative news or lack of progress, be more inclined to sell their shares on the market more quickly and at greater discounts than would be the case with the stock of a seasoned issuer. Many of these factors are beyond our control and may decrease the market price of our Common Stock, regardless of our operating performance. We cannot make any predictions or projections as to what the prevailing market price for our Common Stock will be at any time, including as to whether our common stock will sustain their current market prices, or as to what effect that the sale of shares or the availability of common stock for sale at any time will have on the prevailing market price.

 

The application of the “penny stock” rules could adversely affect the market price of our Common Stock and increase your transaction costs to sell those shares.

 

The SEC has adopted Rule 3a51-1 (17 CFR §240.3a51-1) under the Exchange Act, which establishes the definition of a “penny stock,” for the purposes relevant to us, as any equity security that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share or with an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. For any transaction involving a penny stock, unless exempt, Rule 15g-9 of Exchange Act requires:

 

·that a broker or dealer approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks, and 

 

·the broker or dealer receives from the investor a written agreement to the transaction, setting forth the identity and  

 

·quantity of the penny stock to be purchased. 

 

In order to approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks, the broker or dealer must:

 

·obtain financial information and investment experience objectives of the person, and 

 

·make a reasonable determination that the transactions in penny stocks are suitable for that person and the person has sufficient knowledge and experience in financial matters to be capable of evaluating the risks of transactions in penny stocks. 

 

The broker or dealer must also deliver, prior to any transaction in a penny stock, a disclosure schedule prescribed by the SEC relating to the penny stock market, which, in highlight form:

 

·sets forth the basis on which the broker or dealer made the suitability determination, and 

 

·that the broker or dealer received a signed, written agreement from the investor prior to the transaction. 

 

Generally, brokers may be less willing to execute transactions in securities subject to the “penny stock” rules. This may make it more difficult for investors to dispose of our common stock and cause a decline in the market value of our stock. Brokers may also have internal rules against trading, supporting as a market maker or otherwise handling “penny stock” in general.

 


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A limited number of our shareholders own a large percentage of our Common Stock, which will allow them to exercise significant influence over matters subject to shareholder approval.

 

Our executive officers, directors and their affiliated entities will beneficially own or control approximately 41.38% if the outstanding shares of our Common Stock. Accordingly, these executive officers, directors and their affiliated entities, acting as a group, will have substantial influence over the outcome of corporate actions requiring shareholder approval, including the election of directors, any merger, consolidation or sale of all or substantially all of our assets, dissolution, or any other significant corporate transaction. These shareholders may also delay or prevent a change of control or otherwise discourage a potential acquirer from attempting to obtain control of us, even if such a change of control would benefit our other shareholders. This significant concentration of Common Stock ownership may adversely affect the trading price of our Common Stock due to investors’ perception that conflicts of interest may exist or arise.

 

General Risk Factors

 

Interruption or failure of our ability to timely provide our services and products, which could damage our reputation and have an adverse impact on our operating results.

 

Our future success is significantly dependent on our ability to provide services and deliverables that consistently meet our customers’ needs. We may rely on contractors and their software applications, hardware and other information technology and communications systems for the development and provision of our services and deliverables to customers. This reliance may present problems in effectively performing services in a profitable manner.

 

Our services, deliverables and products may be vulnerable to damage or interruption from earthquakes, hurricanes, terrorist attacks, floods, fires, power loss, telecommunications failures, cyber-attacks or computer viruses or other attempts to harm our systems, and similar events. Like all companies in the industry, we are also vulnerable to hackers and destructive computer programs. The expertise of hackers is constantly evolving and no system is absolutely secure from hackers or malicious software programs.

 

Changes in PRC, regional or global economic conditions could adversely affect our profitability.

 

A decline in Hong Kong or PRC, or regional or global, economic conditions could lead to a decrease in customer discretionary spending, which in turn could adversely affect demand for our services. In addition, an increase in price levels generally, or in price levels in a particular sector such as the energy sector, could result in a shift in customers’ demand away from our services and products or make competitors’ services and products more attractive and more affordable. Such events could cause a decrease in the demand for our services and products, which would have an adverse effect on our profitability and operating results.

 

Political unrest in any of our markets could produce economic uncertainties that could adversely impact our future business and financial condition and performance.

 

We are dependent on Hong Kong SAR and, to a lesser extent, PRC for our customers and revenues. We lack extensive diversification into new geographical markets, which is a goal of our company, but we also believe there is sufficient business in Hong Kong SAR and PRC to support our short-term business and financial goals and to support our foreseeable operating overhead. The acquisition of TapServices, Inc. is an effort to expand the reach of geographical markets beyond PRC and Hong Kong SAR, but we remain committed to expanding our business in PRC and Hong Kong SAR as our core geographical market. TapServices, Inc. will need to be self-supporting in terms of revenues and meeting working capital needs in order to allow the other operating subsidiaries to dedicate funds to developing and supporting operations in the key China and Hong Kong markets.

 

Since we do not have revenue generating operations in North or South America, we do not anticipate any direct, immediate adverse consequences from any trade disputes between U.S. and China (other than any impact on China and Hong Kong economic conditions).

 

We may be exposed to potential risks relating to our internal controls over financial reporting and our ability to have those controls attested to by our independent auditors.

 

As directed by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or SOX 404, the SEC adopted rules requiring public companies to include a report of management on the company's internal controls over financial reporting in their annual reports, including Form 10-K. We can provide no assurance that we will comply with all of the requirements imposed thereby in the coming years. In the event that we ever identify significant deficiencies or material weaknesses in our internal controls that we cannot remediate in a timely manner, investors and others may lose confidence in the reliability of our financial statements.


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Our operation in non-U.S. markets may expose us to foreign exchange risk and currency fluctuations affect our operating profits.

 

We may be exposed to foreign currency exchange risk as our revenues and consolidated results of operations may be affected by fluctuations in foreign currency as we translate these currencies into U.S. dollars when we consolidate our financial results. Operating outside of the United States further exposes us to foreign exchange risk, which we monitor. We have not entered into any hedging transactions in an effort to reduce our exposure to foreign exchange risk.

 

We may not be able to successfully implement our strategies of expanding in our industry, effectively or at all.

 

A key feature of our growth strategy is to expand our existing services in PRC and Hong Kong SAR. This strategy requires us to leverage the talents of our key personnel, their experience and developing and protecting any market share or any proprietary rights. As a company, however, we have limited financial resources to accomplish these goals. Entry into these businesses or into new markets presents significant challenges and subjects our business lines to significant risks, including those risks set forth in these Risk Factors. The inability to successfully manage these challenges could adversely affect our potential success in these businesses. Such failure would significantly limit our ability to grow our business and could deplete our working capital and limit our ability to operate or pursue new businesses or new markets. We may lack the revenues and funding to pursue our business, which could doom our business to failure or a restructuring to a more limited business.

 

The Company has made a minor effort at marketing its smart baggage tag in the United States to the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, but the Company has not developed any significant resources to further marketing in the U.S. The Company has no revenues from or operations in the U.S. The Company may devote resources to more marketing efforts in the U.S. Such efforts may divert marketing resources from IT Business in key markets.

 

The inability to successfully manage any growth of our business, whether through acquisitions or expansion of existing businesses, may have an adverse effect on our operating results.

 

If we experience growth in the number of employees and the scope of our operations, then such growth will result in increased responsibilities for our management. The risk is heightened by our reliance on a relatively small group of executives. If our management is unable to successfully manage expenses in a manner that allows us to both improve operations and at the same time pursue potential market opportunities, the growth of our business could be adversely impacted, which may, in turn, negatively affect our operating results or financial condition. In addition, we believe that a critical contributor to any success will be a creative culture. As we attempt to grow and alter our business to focus increasingly on the creation, production and marketing of services and products, and as we experience change in response to the requirements of being a public company, we may find it difficult to maintain important aspects of our corporate culture, which could negatively affect our future success.

 

We face an inherent business risk of exposure to product or service liability claims that could have a material adverse effect on our operating results.

 

Because of the nature of our products and services, we face an inherent business risk of exposure to product or service related liability claims arising from the claimed failure of our products or services, whether proprietary or licensed, to perform as intended and the resulting damages or harm to customer’s business, computers, network, e-pay or information systems, including cybersecurity breach claims and end user privacy claim liabilities. We do not have insurance coverage for product and service liabilities, but we intend to obtain such insurance coverage upon receipt of sufficient funding or revenues from operations to afford such insurance coverage. The absence of product and service liability insurance could impose significant liabilities on our company and result in its failure.

 

The Company is or could become subject to laws and regulations worldwide, changes to which could increase the Company’s costs and individually or in the aggregate adversely affect the Company’s business.

 

The Company is or could become subject to general business and securities laws and regulations under the laws of PRC and U.S. These laws and other foreign laws and regulations could affect the Company’s activities including, but not limited to, in areas of labor, advertising, digital content, consumer protection, real estate, billing, e-commerce, promotions, quality of services, telecommunications, mobile communications and media, television, intellectual property ownership and infringement, tax, import and export requirements, anti-corruption, foreign exchange controls and cash repatriation restrictions, data privacy requirements, anti-competition, environmental, health and safety.


18


 

 

We operate in Hong Kong SAR and PRC. The control of the Communist Party over the government of PRC and Hong Kong SAR injects potential risk exposure from sudden, unexpected changes in laws or regulations or trade regulations that could be adverse to the Company. Any changes in PRC laws and regulations, or their interpretation, or the imposition of new taxation, restrictions on currency conversion, imports and sources of supply, devaluations of currency or the nationalization or other expropriation of private enterprises could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Under its current leadership, the PRC government has been pursuing economic reform policies that encourage private economic activity and greater economic decentralization. There is no assurance, however, that the PRC government will continue to pursue these policies, or that it will not significantly alter these policies from time to time without notice.

 

Our industry is highly competitive and if we are unable to compete successfully, our business will be harmed or fail.

 

The industry of our services in the IT Business is global as well as local and with numerous competitors in every market and region. Further, many customers have or may develop or acquire the capability to provide our services and products in house, especially with the development of software and other technologies that eliminate or reduce the need for customers to use outside services like our company. Moreover, we believe foreign competitors and competitors with operations or subcontractors in countries such as South Korea and India may become an increasing source of competition, due largely to their access to low-cost, high-skilled labor and low cost software and technological development resources. If we are unable to compete successfully against current or future competitors in the industry, our expected revenues, margins and market share could be adversely affected, any of which could significantly harm our business or even our survival. We do not possess the resources to withstand any sustained downturn in business or extensive competition aimed at our customer base.

 

We may not be able to successfully manage our business or achieve profitability.

 

Our operating income and assets are not significant, especially in light of the numerous competitors in our industry and the fact that many of those competitors have substantially greater technical and financial resources, market share, broader geographical market reach, brand recognition, customer loyalty and strategic alliances than our company. We are vulnerable to larger competitors targeting our services, and the ability of our competitors to undercut our pricing for sustained periods. With limited resources and funding, our company cannot afford to engage in any pricing competition because we require profits in order to sustain our business. The likelihood of our success must be considered in light of the expenses, complications and delays frequently encountered in connection with the establishment and expansion of our services and the extremely competitive environment in which we will operate. Our performance must be considered in light of the risks, expenses and difficulties frequently encountered in establishing profitability in the evolving, highly competitive IT industries. If we cannot successfully manage our business, we may not be able to generate future profits and may not be able to support our operations. We have the added burden of managing the recently acquired IT Business and our traditional IP Business and seeking to integrate them.

 

If we do not maintain a stable, competent management team in our service, our company may fail or fail to achieve profitability. Our management team has been stable for fiscal year 2020. The age of our senior management members makes them especially vulnerable to the Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic. The Company is assessing possible key personnel to provide senior management in the event any of senior management members are incapacitated by Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic.

 

We cannot predict the effect that rapid technological change may have on our business or industry.

 

Our industry is rapidly evolving, primarily due to technological developments. The rapid growth of technology may prevent us from being able to accurately predict the overall effect that technological growth may have on our potential revenue and profitability. This requires us to either develop these capabilities by acquiring or developing our own intellectual property rights, which can result in substantial research and development costs and substantial capital expenditures or to purchase third-party licenses, which can result in significant expenditures. In the event we seek to obtain third-party licenses, we cannot guarantee that they will be available or, once obtained, will continue to be available on commercially reasonable terms, or at all. If we are unable to develop and effectively market new technologies that adequately or competitively address the needs of changes in our industry, it could have an adverse effect on our business and growth prospects.

 

Our revenue may be adversely affected if we fail to protect any essential proprietary rights or fail to enhance or develop new technology.

 

If we are unable to license third party technologies or develop our own proprietary technologies in response to the demands of our services, we may be unable to compete in the industry and we may fail. With our limited financial resources, we may be unable to attain or develop needed technologies required to be profitable or competitive.

 

We may enter into contracts to protect any licensed or developed technologies, but such agreements may be ineffective to protect technologies that are critical to our business.


19


 

 

In addition, we may be required to litigate in the future to enforce any technologies or any intellectual property rights, to protect our trade secrets, to determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others or to defend against claims of infringement or invalidity. Any such litigation could result in substantial costs and diversion of resources and could have an adverse effect on our business and/or our operating results. We do not have reserves for litigation and may be unable to afford to litigate, which could mean the loss of the value of any intellectual property rights.

 

Third-party technology licenses may not be available to us in the future.

 

We may rely on certain technology that we license from third parties, including software. These third-party technology licenses may not in the future be available to us on commercially reasonable terms, or at all. The loss of any of these technology licenses could result in delays in performance of work until we identify, license and integrate equivalent technology, and we may not be able to identify, or license any such equivalent technology in a timely manner or at all. Any resulting delays in a performance could damage our reputation and result in a decrease in our revenues during the period of delay, either of which could materially adversely affect our business, operating results and/or financial condition.

 

If we incur additional indebtedness, such indebtedness could further exacerbate the risks associated with our substantial indebtedness.

 

If we incur additional indebtedness, such indebtedness will be added to our current debt levels and the related risks we currently face could be magnified. Any decrease in our revenues or an increase in operating costs (and corresponding reduction in our cash flows) would also adversely affect our ability to pay our indebtedness as it comes due.

 

Regulations

 

Inapplicability of the 2012 JOBS Act

 

We have determined that we are not eligible for classification as an “Emerging Growth Company” under the Jumpstart our Business Start-ups Act of 2012 (“JOBS Act”) due to the fact that shares were issued by us under the Form SB-2 Registration Statement (Commission File Number #333-147493; filed on November 17, 2007) by China Soaring, Inc., the former name of the Company. We do not qualify as an “Emerging Growth Company” and do not qualify for any of the reduced or delayed disclosure options available to an Emerging Growth Company and as summarized below.

 

The JOBS Act provides scaled disclosure provisions for an eligible Emerging Growth Company, including, among other things: (a) permitting an Emerging Growth Company to include only two years of audited financial statements in a registration statement filed under the Securities Act for an initial public offering of common equity securities; (b) allowing an Emerging Growth Company to comply with the smaller reporting company version of Item 402 of Regulation S-K (Executive Compensation); and (c) removing the requirement that our independent registered public accounting firm attest to the effectiveness of Emerging Growth Company’s internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. The JOBS Act also exempts an Emerging Growth Company from the following additional compensation-related disclosure provisions that were imposed on U.S. public companies pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Act: the advisory “say-on-pay” vote on executive compensation required under Section 14A(a) of the Exchange Act; the Section 14A(b) requirements relating to shareholder advisory votes on golden parachute compensation; the Section 14(i) requirements for disclosure relating to the relationship between executive compensation and financial performance of the issuer; and the requirement of Dodd-Frank Act Section 953(b)(1), which will require disclosure as to the relationship between Chief Executive Officer and median employee pay. Under Section 102(b)(1) of the JOBS Act, "Emerging Growth Companies" can also delay adopting new or revised accounting standards until such time as those standards apply to private companies.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.

 

None.


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ITEM 2. PROPERTIES.

 

We own no real property. Our company and subsidiary operations leases the following office spaces:

 

(1)Unit 02-03, 6/F. Block B, Shatin Industrial Centre, 5-7 Yuen Shun Circuit, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong 

 

(2)Room 04&06-07, 23/F, Newpoly Tower, No. 2 Zhong Shan Liu Road, Guangzhou, China 510180 

 

(3)Room 2665, 26/F, Oriental Plaza, Jianshe Road, Luohu District, Shenzhen , China 

 

(4)Unit 1, 2/F, Building A7, 700 Yishan Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai, China 

 

(5)Room 1107, 2/F, No.15 West Majiapu Road, Fengtai District, Beijing, China 100068 

 

(6)Unit 902, The Orient Square, Emerald Ave, Ortigas Center, Pasig City, Metro Manila 1605 

 

(7)Room T1-806, Greenland Center, No. 319, Section 1, Furong Middle Road, Kaifu District, Changsha, China 

 

We believe that the above space is sufficient for our current operations. We paid $375,836 in aggregate lease payments in fiscal year 2020 for the above spaces.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

There is no known material, existing or pending legal proceedings against our company, nor are we involved as a plaintiff in any material proceeding or pending litigation. There are no proceedings in which our director, officer or any affiliates, or any registered or beneficial shareholder, is an adverse party or has a material interest adverse to our interest.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES.

 

Not Applicable.


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PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES.

 

Market Information

 

The Common Stock of VEII is quoted on OTCQB under the trading symbol “VEII.”. The CUSIP number for our common stock is 829348200. Because we are quoted on OTCQB and is lightly. traded, our securities may be less liquid, receive less coverage by security analysts and news media, and generate lower prices than might otherwise be obtained if they were listed on a national securities exchange. We are not aware of any stock analysts who cover our common stock or publish reports on our company or our common stock.

 

Holders

 

As of December 31, 2020, there were approximately 76 stockholders of record of our Common Stock. The number of record holders does not include persons who held our Common Stock in nominee or “street name” accounts through brokers.

 

Dividend Policy

 

We have not paid any cash dividends on our Common Stock for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019. While we have declared and paid dividends in the past, and we intend to do so in the future, our financial condition may require us to retain future earnings for overhead and business development costs. As such, investors should not invest in our Common Stock on the assumption that it will pay a regular or periodic dividend.

 

Our Board of Directors has complete discretion on whether to pay dividends, subject to legal requirements and possible shareholder consent. Even if our board of directors decides to pay dividends, the form, frequency and amount will depend upon our future operations and earnings, capital requirements and surplus, general financial condition, contractual restrictions and other factors that the board of directors may deem relevant.

 

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

 

The Company does not have a current equity compensation plan.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

We have not sold any equity securities during 2020 that went undisclosed in a quarterly report on this Form 10-K, Form 10-Q or a current report on Form 8-K that was filed during the period.

 

Purchases of Equity Securities

 

No repurchases of our Common Stock were made during the fiscal year 2020.

 

ITEM 6. FINANCIAL DATA.

 

Not Applicable. The Company, as a “smaller reporting company” (as defined by 17 C.F.R. §229.10(f) (1)), is not required to provide the information required by this Item 6.


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ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

 

You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations together with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes and the other financial information included elsewhere in this Form 10-K. Some of the information contained in this discussion and analysis or set forth elsewhere in this Form 10-K, including information with respect to our plans and strategy for our business and related financing, includes forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. As a result of many factors, including those factors set forth in the “Risk Factors” section of this Form 10-K, our actual results could differ materially from the results described in or implied by these forward-looking statements. See “Special Note Regarding Forward Looking Statements” above for certain information concerning those forward-looking statements. Our financial statements are prepared in U.S. dollars and in accordance with U.S. GAAP.

 

Overview of our Business

 

Value Exchange International, Inc.

 

Our initial proposed business was to operate a credit card processing and merchant-acquiring services company that provides POS - credit card clearing services to merchants and financial institutions in PRC and Hong Kong SAR. Since inception, we have strived to implement our business plan, including the key step of creating our Global Processing Platform (“SinoPay GPP”) and establishing our website, www.sinopayments.com.

 

Specifically and currently, one of the Company’s business lines, which is secondary or supplementary to our IT Business, is to be a provider of IP processing services in Asia to bank card-accepting merchants. We market our services to local merchants with regional retail locations across Asia Pacific as potential customers of their IP and related credit card and debit card processing systems. We offer interoperability through what is envisioned as a highly efficient infrastructure and perceived exceptional knowledge of the IP processing market through our SinoPay GPP platform. The SinoPay GPP system facilitates the processing of all major credit card types (Visa/MC/AMEX/Diners/Discover/JCB) and will be integrated with China UnionPay to provide processing of UnionPay Debit cards in China. VEII intends to deploy the SinoPay GPP platform throughout Asia with a focus on China, Hong Kong, Thailand, Philippines, Malaysia, Korea, and Japan.

 

As of the date of this Form 10-K, we still have not sold or implemented any IP Business to any customer. Our current focus is on growing the IT Business because of our judgment that IT Business presents a more promising segment for growing our revenues and attaining sustained profitability. Until the Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic abates in our key markets and until we have sufficient funds or revenues to aggressively develop, market and sell IP Business products and services, we have suspended efforts to develop a new IP Business excepting IP Business that is integral or a component of our existing IT Business. Since we are focused on the retail sector, the offering of IT Business with an IP Business complementary offering makes sense in terms of fully leveraging all of our capabilities. Eventually, and assuming we are able to revive our interest in developing a viable IP Business, our hope is that the dual business lines may prove complementary in that each may lead to business opportunities for the other. IT Business and IP Business are presented as separate customer offerings and we made no progress in integrating IT Business and IP Business beyond offering them as menu of available services and products. Under current circumstances in the key markets for our IT Business, we do not view the standalone IP Business as essential to our future operations.

 

One factor affecting any future development of a standalone IP Business is that POS customers tend to be sensitive to whether a POS provider is a long term provider of systems, services and maintenance. In light of our lack of any presence or financial performance in the IP Business, and the public availability of our financial information, as well as our lack of a prominent brand presence in our markets, we will probably have to significantly improve our financial and business performance to reassure prospective IP Business customers of our staying power as a provider of POS products, systems, and services and to fund the sort of sustained marketing and sales campaigns to increase the end users’ awareness of IP Business brand and capabilities. Such campaigns have been beyond our financial wherewithal and may not be possible in fiscal year 2021.

 

Industry Trends and Economic Conditions.

 

The IT Business in Hong Kong and China is large and fragmented, comprised of thousands of competitors as well as being a highly competitive industry. A general trend affecting our IT Business is the trend of increasing competition for skilled labor. With a global economy and foreign competitors seeking to penetrate Hong Kong and China as markets as well as to tap into new pools of skilled workers in IT Business, we will undoubtedly face increasing competition for skilled workers in IT Business in the Hong Kong and China markets. We may be unable to afford or effectively compete for necessary skilled workers in Hong Kong and China and, if we are unable to afford or effectively compete for necessary skilled workers, our growth and ability to attain and sustain profit operations in the IT Business may fail. We have not experienced any significant problems in recruiting necessary skilled workers in fiscal years 2019 or 2020.


23


 

 

A common problem in the IT Business is retaining skilled workers throughout the duration of a project. Due to the global nature of the IT Business and the growing demand for skilled IT Business workers, a skilled IT business worker can often readily find higher paying positions with competitors, whether local or foreign. While we have not experienced retention problems due primarily to our focus on smaller, shorter term IT business projects, we may experience retention of skilled worker problems if we grow our IT Business and undertake longer term, more complex IT business projects for customers.

 

IT Business is often affected by general economic conditions in our markets and any decline in those conditions could adversely impact our business and financial performance. During periods of economic growth, customers general spend more for IT Business products and services. During periods of economic contraction or uncertainty, such spending generally decreases or is deferred. As such, the prospective business for our IT Business is generally greater during periods of economic growth or stability in Hong Kong or China and decreases during periods of economic decline or uncertainty in Hong Kong and China. In our global economy, and with PRC being still a principal export economy, adverse economic conditions globally or in other regions can adversely impact economic conditions in Hong Kong SAR and PRC. PRC has experienced a less dynamic growth in gross national product in the past year and this may reduce the willingness of customers to spend on IT Business The impact of Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic in late 2019 and into 2020 has introduced a risk factor that cannot be fully evaluated as of the date of the filing of this Form 10-K due to a number of uncertainties about reoccurrence of the pandemic in the near future in our key markets and the time frame for developing a vaccine and viral remedial medicines that will allow the economies in our key markets to return to normal state of operation and function. The assumption by Company is that Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic will depress performance of Company operations in 2021 and possibly into 2022.

 

The IT Business is global and, with the growth of cloud computing, there is a growing capability and infrastructure for companies in a foreign nation to provide IT Business to customers around the globe as a complement to cloud computing. We have not seen any significant impact of cloud computing on our IT Business in fiscal years 2019 or fiscal year 2020, but we perceive that the expansion of cloud computing could allow foreign customers to provide IT Business products and services to its cloud computing customers in our Hong Kong and China core market. We may find it more difficult to compete for IT Business in Hong Kong and China if customers of IT Business elect to have cloud computing companies manage, repair and enhance IT Business products, software and systems. The growth of cloud computing coupled with IT Business products and services as an ancillary component of the cloud computing menu of products and services could adversely impact our IT Business in Hong Kong and China markets.

 

We are examining if our operations could enter into a strategic relationship with a cloud computing company as part of a response to possible future competition from cloud computing companies, but have not taken any steps to pursuing or attaining such a relationship.

 

The nature of our IT Business is such that our most significant current asset is accounts receivable. Our most significant current liabilities are payroll related costs, which are generally paid either every two weeks or monthly. If the demand for our IT Business products and services increases, we may generally see an increase in our working capital needs, as we continue to pay our workers on a weekly or monthly basis while the related accounts receivable are outstanding for much longer than normal payment cycle, which may result in a decline in operating cash flows. Conversely, as the demand for our IT Business products and services declines, we may generally see a decrease in our working capital needs, as the existing accounts receivable are collected and not replaced at the same level, resulting in a decline of our accounts receivable balance, with less of an effect on current liabilities due to the shorter cycle time of the payroll related items. This may result in an increase in our operating cash flows; however, any such increase would not be sustainable in the event that a local or global economic downturn continued for an extended period.

 

In order for us to attain sustained success in the near term, we must continue to maintain and grow our customer base, provide high-quality service and satisfaction to our existing clients. In the current economic environment, we must provide our customers with service offerings that are appropriately priced, satisfy their needs, and provide them with measurable business benefits. While we have recently experienced a more demand for our IT Business products and services, we believe that it is too early to determine if developments will translate into sustainable improvements in our pricing or margins in fiscal year 2020 or over the longer term.

 

The increasing need for cybersecurity products and technologies may be a future weakness of our business plan. We do not have a current cybersecurity product and service line beyond consultants engaged to provide cybersecurity services. Cybersecurity companies may have an advantage over our business model in the future in that cybersecurity companies could leverage their cybersecurity offerings to also sell IT Business services and products that compete with our IT Business products and services. While we may explore enhanced cybersecurity offerings, but we have not identified or commenced launch of any new cybersecurity products as of the date of the filing of this Form 10-K.


24


 

 

Principal business

 

The principal business of VEI CHN for more than 15 years is to provide the IT Business, primarily to leading retailers in Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR and PRC. The primary services and products of the IT Business are:

 

(a)Systems maintenance and related service 

 

VEI CHN Group provides development, customization of software and hardware, enhancements thereto and maintenance services for installed POS system. VEI CHN Group market, sell and maintain its own brand POS software – edgePOS as well as third party brands (e.g. NCR / Retalix, which is one of the leading POS software in the market). These software programs can often integrate with different IP systems.

 

Systems maintenance services consist of: i) software maintenance service, including software patches, software code revisions; ii) installing, testing and implementing software; iii) training of customer personnel for the use of software; and iv) technical support and administration for software systems.

 

Other services include system installation and implementation including i) project planning; ii) System Analysis; iii) design of the entire system; iv) hardware and consumables selection advice and sales; and v) system hardware maintenance. These services typically consist of customer projects for NSO and IMAC for retail, and ad-hoc custom system projects for other business sectors. Our primary focus is the retail sector in Hong Kong SAR and PRC.

 

(b)Systems development and integration  

 

VEI CHN Group provides value-added software, which integrate with customer owned or licensed software, and ad-hoc software development projects for other business sectors. Besides use of proprietary, custom software code, our services may from time to time license standard third party software programs.

 

During January 2017, VEI CHN acquired 100% common stock of TapServices, Inc. (“TSI”) for total consideration being $202,636. TSI is a limited liability corporation organized under the laws of the Philippines on March 24, 2009. TSI operations have been managed by Mr. Benny Lee, a director of VEI SHG. TSI commenced revenue generating operations in 2010 and focused on software and computer hardware maintenance on point of sale or “POS” systems for local Manila, Philippines businesses. Recent years, TSI business model has been to engage in the business of providing information, data, and communications technology services, to supply and deal in all related products, including computer hardware, software and application products, and to own, design, install, maintain, operate, integrate, sell, lease or otherwise deal in such systems, facilities, gateways, equipment, devices and POS terminals in the retail business. TSI’s business line is essentially similar to the business line of VEI CHN Group in information technology and computer system consulting services and related products’ sales. The customer base of TSI includes Robinson Retails Group (“RRG”), Ministop Convenience Stores, and Watson’s Personal Health and Care (Phil.) Inc. in the Philippines. In 2020, TSI achieved of $1.3 million in gross revenues. TSI customarily combines maintenance contracts with hardware sales. TSI geographical market is the greater Manila, Philippines region and adjacent areas.

 

Throughout fiscal year 2020, we are focusing and will focus its business in IT Business, and seek to expand its services to commercial customers in PRC and Asia Pacific Region when general economic conditions are favorable for expansion, which requires an end or substantial diminution of the Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic, and adequate, affordable funding are available. Such expansion may not be feasible until 2021 or 2022. This strategy is based upon our subjective business judgment that the IT Business presents more opportunities for potential customer order in our core markets of Hong Kong SAR and China than the IP Business as a standalone business based on a new e-pay platform. This judgment was a factor in deciding to pursue the new strategic focus described in “New Development” section of this Form 10-K.


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Financial Performance Highlights

 

The following are some financial highlights for the 2020:

 

·Net revenue: Our net revenues were $20,551,471 for the year ended December 31, 2020, as compared to $8,309,129 for the year ended December 31, 2019, an increase of $12,242,342 or 147.3%. 

 

·Gross profit: Gross profit for the year ended December 31, 2020 was $2,054,062 or 10.0% of net revenues, as compared to $1,766,722 or 21.3% of net revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2019, an increase of $287,340 or 16.3%.  

 

·Income (loss) from operations: Our profit from operations totaled $126,326 for the year ended December 31, 2020, as compared to loss from operations totaled $119,313 for year ended December 31, 2019, a change of $245,639. The change was mainly attributable to the increase in our gross profit. 

 

·Net income: Our net income of $105,504 for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to $53,435 for the year ended December 31, 2019, an increase of $52,069 or 97.4%.  

 

·Basic and diluted net income per share was $0.00 for the year ended December 31, 2020. 

 

Results of Operations

 

Year Ended December 31, 2020 compared to the year ended December 31, 2019

 

The following table summarizes the results of our operations during the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 and provides information regarding the dollar and percentage increase or (decrease) from the 2019 year to the 2020 year.

 

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Comparison of Year Ended December 31, 2020 and 2019

 

The following tables set forth key components of our results of operations for the periods indicated, both in dollars and as a percentage of net revenues.

 

(All amounts, other than percentages, in U.S. dollars)

 

 

2020

 

2019

 

Change

 

US$

 

US$

 

US$

 

%

NET REVENUES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Service income

20,551,471

 

8,309,129

 

12,242,342

 

147.3

COST OF SERVICES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of service income

(18,497,409)

 

(6,542,407)

 

(11,955,002)

 

182.7

GROSS PROFIT

2,054,062

 

1,766,722

 

287,340

 

16.3

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General and administrative expenses

(1,869,455)

 

(1,894,419)

 

24,964

 

(1.3)

Foreign exchange gain (loss)

(58,281)

 

8,384

 

(66,665)

 

(795.1)

PROFIT (LOSS) FROM OPERATIONS

126,326

 

(119,313)

 

245,639

 

(205.9)

OTHER INCOME (EXPENSES)

(95)

 

184,164

 

(184,259)

 

(100.1)

INCOME BEFORE PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES

126,231

 

64,851

 

61,380

 

94.6

INCOME TAXES EXPENSES

(20,727)

 

(11,416)

 

(9,311)

 

81.6

NET INCOME

105,504

 

53,435

 

52,069

 

97.4

 

Net revenues. Net revenues were $20,551,471 for the year ended December 31, 2020, as compared to $8,309,129 for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019, an increase of $12,242,342 or 147.3%. This increase was primarily attributable to the increase in our revenue from 1) systems maintenance with revenue increasing from $5,856,729 for the year ended December 31, 2019 to $7,379,350 for the year ended December 31, 2020 and 2) systems development and integration with revenue increasing from $72,062 for the year ended December 31, 2019 to $11,268,268 for the year ended December 31, 2020; offset by the decrease in our revenue from 3) sales of hardware and consumables with revenue decreasing from $2,380,338 for the year ended December 31, 2019 to $1,903,853 for the year ended December 31, 2020.


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Cost of services. Our cost of services is primarily comprised of our costs of technical staff and general overhead. Our cost of services increased to $18,497,409 or 90.0% of net revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2020, as compared to $6,542,407 or 78.7% of net revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2019, an increase of $11,955,002 or 182.7%. The increase in cost of services was mainly attributable to the increase in our contracting fees to suppliers for the growing demand of our service.

 

Gross profit. Gross profit for the year ended December 31, 2020 was $2,054,062 or 10.0% of net revenues, as compared to $1,766,722 or 21.3% of net revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2019. The decrease of gross profit was largely due to increase in net revenues; and off-set by increase in cost of services in 2020, as compared with 2019.

 

General and administrative expenses. General and administrative expenses include the costs associated with staff and support personnel who manage our business activities, office rental expenses, depreciation charge for fixed assets, and professional fees paid to third parties. General and administrative expenses slightly decreased to $1,869,455 or 9.1% of net revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2020, as compared to $1,894,419 or 22.8% of net revenues, for the year ended December 31, 2019, a decrease of $24,964 or 1.3%. The primary reason for the decrease was attributable to a decrease in consultancy and professional fee and business travelling, since we incurred less in these area in 2020, as compared with 2019.

 

Profit (loss) from operations. As a result of the above analysis, our profit from operations totaled $126,326 for the year ended December 31, 2020, as compared to loss from operations totaled $119,313 for year ended December 31, 2019, a change of $245,639 or 205.9%. The change was mainly attributable to the increase in our gross profit.

 

Income taxes. The Company is subject to United States federal income tax at a tax rate of 21% in 2020 (2019: 21%) on any revenues subject to U.S. taxation. No provision for income taxes in the United States has been made as the Company had no U.S. source income taxable in the United States for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019.

 

VEI CHN and VEI HKG were formed in Hong Kong and subject to Hong Kong income tax at a tax rate of 16.5% for the year ended December 31, 2020. TSI was formed in Philippines and subject to an income tax rate of 30% for the year ended December 31, 2020. Our VEI SHG, VEI HN and SZH was formed in China and subject to national and local income taxes within China at the applicable tax rate on the taxable income as reported in its PRC statutory financial statements in accordance with relevant income tax laws. China passed a new Enterprise Income Tax Law, or the “New EIT Law,” and its implementing regulations, both of which became effective on January 1, 2008. VEI SHG subject to an income tax rate of 25% for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

Income taxes expenses amounted to $20,727 or 0.1% of net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020, as compared to $11,416 or 0.1% of net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2019. The increase was primarily attributable to the factors described above concerning higher revenue.

 

Net income. As a result of the foregoing, we had a net income of $105,504 for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to net income $53,435 for the year ended December 31, 2019, as a result of the factors described above concerning higher revenue.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of December 31, 2020, we had cash and cash equivalents of $523,337. The following table provides detailed information about our net cash flow for all financial years presented in this report.

 

Cash Flows

 

(All amounts in U.S. dollars)

 

 

 

Year Ended

 

 

December 31,

 

 

2020

 

2019

 

 

US$

 

US$

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities

 

724,422

 

(505,764)

Net cash used in investing activities

 

(145,345)

 

(89,241)

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

 

(311,549)

 

17,892

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

 

21,720

 

82,133

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

 

289,248

 

(494,980)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of year

 

234,089

 

729,069

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of year

 

523,337

 

234,089


27


 

 

Operating Activities

 

Net cash provided by operating activities was $724,435 for the year ended December 31, 2020, which was a change of $1,230,199 from net cash used in operating activities of $505,764 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The change was primarily attributable to the following:

 

1)Net income of $105,504 for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to $53,435 for the year ended December 31, 2019; and  

 

2)A change of Accounts payable, Other payables and accrued liabilities, and amounts due to related parties increased our operating cash balances by $353,368, $278,558 and $230,154 respectively; offset by 

 

3)A change of Amounts due from related parties decreased our operating cash balances by $808,660. 

 

Contractual Obligations and Commitments

 

The following table summarizes our contractual obligations as of December 31, 2020 and the effects that such obligations are expected to have on our liquidity and cash flows in future periods:

 

 

Obligations

 

Total Due

 

Due in

Less than

1 year

 

Due in

1-3 Years

 

Due in

4-5 years

 

Due in

more than

5 years

Operating lease obligations,

including imputed interest

 

463,834

 

311,979

 

151,855

 

-

 

-

 

Investing Activities

 

Net cash used in investing activities increased to $145,345 in the year ended December 31, 2020, which was a increase of $56,104 or 62.9% from $89,241 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The increase in net cash used in investing activities was attributable to the purchase of plant and equipment by $150,862; offset by cash provided by the Interest received by $5,517 for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

Financing Activities

 

Net cash used in financing activities was $311,549 in the year ended December 31, 2020, which was a change of $329,441 from Net cash provided by financing activities $17,892 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The change was attributable to the Repayment of bank loan, Interest paid, and Principal payments on finance leases to $32,102, $15,162 and $410,020 respectively; offset by cash provided by Proceeds from non-controlling interests, and Process from bank loan to $25,497 and $120,238 respectively for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

Future Financings

 

We believe that our cash on hand and cash flow from operations will meet our expected capital expenditure and working capital requirements for our current IT Business for the next 12 months. However, we may in the future require additional cash resources due to changed business conditions, implementation of our strategy to expand our production capacity, sales, marketing and branding activities or other investments or acquisitions we may decide to pursue. If our own financial resources are insufficient to satisfy our capital requirements, we may seek to sell additional equity or debt securities or obtain credit facilities. The sale of additional equity securities could result in dilution to our stockholders. The incurrence of indebtedness would result in increased debt service obligations and could require us to agree to operating and financial covenants that would restrict our operations. Financing may not be available in amounts or on terms acceptable to us, if at all. Any failure by us to raise additional funds on terms favorable to us, or at all, could limit our ability to expand our business operations and could harm our overall business prospects. 


28


 

 

On February 16, 2018, VEI SHG signed a January 24, 2018 stores equipment support agreement (“Agreement”) with the largest health care and beauty retailer (“Retailer”) in People’s Republic of China (“China”). Under the Agreement, the Retailer has contracted for site and preventive maintenance and support for computer and point of sale systems (“Systems”) as well as new store and store renovation install and migration services for Systems from the VEI SHG. The Agreement is non-exclusive, covers Retailer’s stores in the northern and eastern region of China and runs through December 2019. Gross revenue and net profit potential, if any, as well as the full extent of services by VEI SHG under the Agreement are uncertain at this time due to lack of sufficient operational experience as a service provider under the Agreement. The Agreement may require the Company to seek additional equity and/or debt funding to provide the capital needed to staff and purchase product under the Agreement. In March 2020, a renewal agreement signed with the Retailer, and related service extended to 31 March 2023. The amount and availability of such funding is not certain as of the date of this Form 10-K Adequate and affordable funding, required by, if any, the Agreement is essential to the ability of VEI SHG to perform its obligations under the Agreement. While the Company does not currently anticipate any problems in obtaining the necessary funding, if any is required, and has not experienced in funding this contract in fiscal year 2020, the Company makes no assurances about its ability to timely, affordably obtain the necessary funding for the Agreement.

 

During fiscal year 2020, VEI SHG had $3,298,210 in gross revenues from the work under the Agreement.

 

Since part of the Company’s strategic plan is to seek to expand its revenue generating operations by expanding into new markets and/or acquiring new businesses, as well as developing new services and products, all of which shall be as permitted by the limited resources of the Company and available, affordable funding, the Company may require funding in the future for such expansion. The ability of the Company to fund such expansion is not certain and the impact of any such funding on the Company’s liabilities and cash flow is uncertain until an expansion opportunity is identified and pursued. Expansion efforts of the Company, which the Company views as critical to sustained profitability, may be undermined by the Company’s limited cash flow from operations and from the lack of affordable, adequate funding from outside sources. The ability of the Company to raise funding is also severely hampered by its penny stock status and lack of an active public stock market in its Common Stock. The Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic will probably reduce the amount of traditional private working capital funding sources and further hamper funding of any growth initiatives of the Company. That said, governmental authorities may offer business funding and grants to compensate for Coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on business, but the extent of any government funding and the ability of the Company to receive that financial assistance is uncertain as of the date of the filing of this Form 10-K.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes have been prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles applied on a consistent basis. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting years.

 

We regularly evaluate the accounting policies and estimates that we use to prepare our financial statements. A complete summary of these policies is included in note 2 of the notes to our financial statements. In general, management's estimates are based on historical experience, on information from third party professionals, and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates made by management.

 

Basis of presentation and principle of consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include all of the assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses and cash flows of entities in which the Company has a controlling interest (“subsidiaries”). Intercompany accounts and transactions between consolidated companies have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Consolidated financial statements prepared following a reverse acquisition are issued under the name of the legal parent (accounting acquiree) (i.e. the Company) but as a continuation of the financial statements of the legal subsidiary (accounting acquirer) (i.e. VEI CHN), with one adjustment, which is to retroactively adjust the accounting acquirer’s legal capital to reflect the legal capital of the accounting acquiree. That adjustment is required to reflect the capital of the legal parent (the accounting acquiree). Comparative information presented in those consolidated financial statements also is retroactively adjusted to reflect the legal capital of the legal parent (accounting acquiree).


29


 

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Value Exchange International, Inc. and the following subsidiaries:

 

1.Value Exchange Int’l (China) Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company incorporated in Hong Kong as a private company on November 16, 2001; 

 

2.Value Exchange Int’l (Shanghai) Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company incorporated in Shanghai as a private company on September 2, 2008; 

 

3.Value Exchange Int’l (Hong Kong) Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company incorporated in Hong Kong as a private company on August 25, 2003 and acquired by VEI CHN on September 25, 2008; 

 

4.TapServices, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company incorporated under the laws of the Republic of the Philippines as a private company on March 24, 2009 and acquired by VEI CHN on January 23, 2017; and 

 

5.Value Exchange Int’l (Hunan) Limited, a subsidiary of the Company with 51% ownership incorporated in Hunan as a private company on November 15, 2018. 

 

6.Shanghai Zhaonan Hengan Information Technology Co., Limited, a subsidiary of the Company with 51% ownership incorporated in Hunan as a private company on February 10, 2020. 

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”), and include the financial statements of the Company and all its wholly-owned subsidiaries that require consolidation. All material intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated in the consolidation. The following entities were consolidated as of December 31, 2020:

 

 

 

Place of

incorporation

 

Ownership percentage

2020

 

2019

Value Exchange International, Inc.

 

USA

 

Parent Company

 

Parent Company

Value Exchange Int’l (China) Limited

 

Hong Kong

 

100%

 

100%

Value Exchange Int’l (Shanghai) Limited

 

PRC

 

100%

 

100%

Value Exchange Int’l (Hong Kong) Limited

 

Hong Kong

 

100%

 

100%

TapServices, Inc.

 

Philippines

 

100%

 

100%

Value Exchange Int’l (Hunan) Limited

 

PRC

 

51%

 

51%

Koinon Technology Services, Inc.

 

USA Virgin Islands

 

-

 

51%

Shanghai Zhaonan Hengan Information Technology Co., Limited

 

PRC

 

51%

 

-

 

Use of estimates

 

Preparing consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions affecting the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. The more significant areas requiring using management’s estimates and assumptions relate to the collectability of its receivables, the fair value and accounting treatment of financial instruments, the valuation of long-lived assets and valuation of deferred tax liabilities. Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Accordingly, actual results may differ significantly from these estimates. In addition, different assumptions or circumstances could reasonably be expected to yield different results.

 

Accounts receivable and other receivables

 

Receivables include trade accounts due from customers and other receivables such as cash advances to employees, utility deposits paid and advance to suppliers. Management reviews the composition of accounts receivable and analyzes historical bad debts, customer concentration, customer credit worthiness, current economic trends and changes in customer payment patterns to determine if the allowance for doubtful accounts is adequate. An estimate for doubtful accounts is made when collection of the full amount is no longer probable. Delinquent account balances are written-off after management has determined that the likelihood of collection is not probable and known bad debts are written off against the allowance for doubtful accounts when identified. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, there was no allowance for uncollectible accounts receivable, respectively. Management believes that the remaining accounts receivable are collectable.


30


 

 

Plant and equipment

 

Plant and equipment is stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses, if any. Expenditures for maintenance and repairs are charged to earnings as incurred. Major additions are capitalized. When assets are retired or otherwise disposed of, the related cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the respective accounts, and any gain or loss is included in operations. Depreciation of plant and equipment is provided using the straight-line method for substantially all assets with estimated lives as follows:

 

 

 

Estimated Useful Life

Leasehold improvements

 

Lesser of lease term or the estimated useful lives of

5 years

Computer equipment

 

5 years

Computer software

 

5 years

Office furniture and equipment

 

5 years

Motor Vehicle

 

3 years

Building

 

5 years

 

Goodwill and intangibles

 

Intangibles with a definite life, including customer relationships and goodwill were recorded in connection with the acquisition of TSI. Intangible assets are amortized based on their estimated economic lives using the straight-line method with estimated lives as follows:

 

 

 

Estimated Economic Life

Customer relationship

 

3 years

 

Goodwill represents the excess of the cost of acquisition over the fair value of net assets acquired. Goodwill is not amortized, but is instead tested for impairment annually.

 

Revenue recognition

 

Sales revenue is recognized when all of the following have occurred: (i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (ii) delivery has occurred or services have been rendered, (iii) the price is fixed or determinable, and (iv) the ability to collect is reasonably assured.

 

The Company’s revenue is derived from three primary sources: (i) professional services for systems development and integration, including procurement of related hardware and software licenses on behalf of customers, if required; (ii) professional services for system maintenance normally for a period of one year; and (iii) sale of hardware and consumables during the service performed as stated above.

 

Multiple-deliverable arrangements

 

The Company derives revenue from fixed-price sale contracts with customers that may provide for the Company to procure hardware and software licenses with varied performance specifications specific to each customer and provide the technical services for systems development and integration of the hardware and software licenses. In instances where the contract price is inclusive of the technical services, the sale contracts include multiple deliverables. A multiple-element arrangement is separated into more than one unit of accounting if all of the following criteria are met:

 

·The delivered item(s) has value to the customer on a stand-alone basis; 

 

·There is objective and reliable evidence of the fair value of the undelivered item(s); and 

 

·If the arrangement includes a general right of return relative to the delivered item(s), delivery or performance of the undelivered item(s) is considered probable and substantially in the control of the Company. 


31


 

 

The Company’s multiple-element contracts generally include customer-acceptance provisions which provide for the Company to carry out installation, test runs and performance tests at the Company’s cost until the systems as a whole can meet the performance specifications stated in the contracts. The delivered equipment and software licenses have no standalone value to the customer until they are installed, integrated and tested at the customer’s site by the Company in accordance with the performance specifications specific to each customer. In addition, under these multiple-element contracts, the Company has not sold the equipment and software licenses separately from the installation, integration and testing services, and hence there is no objective and reliable evidence of the fair value for each deliverable included in the arrangement. As a result, the equipment and the technical services for installation, integration and testing of the equipment are considered a single unit of accounting pursuant to ASC Subtopic 605-25, Revenue Recognition — Multiple-Element Arrangements. In addition, the arrangement generally includes customer acceptance criteria that cannot be tested before installation and integration at the customer’s site. Accordingly, revenue recognition is deferred until customer acceptance, indicated by an acceptance certificate signed off by the customer.

 

Revenues of maintenance services are recognized when the services are performed in accordance with the contract term.

 

Revenues of sale of software, if not bundled with other arrangements, are recognized when shipped and customer acceptance obtained, if all other revenue recognition criteria are met. Costs associated with revenues are recognized when incurred.

 

Revenues are recorded net of value-added taxes, sales discounts and returns. There were no sales returns during the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019.

 

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

NET REVENUES

 

 

 

Service income

 

 

 

- systems development and integration

11,268,268

 

72,062

- systems maintenance

7,379,350

 

5,856,729

- sales of hardware and consumables

1,903,853

 

2,380,338

 

20,551,471

 

8,309,129

 

Billings in excess of revenues recognized are recorded as deferred revenue.

 

Income taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes in accordance with the accounting standard issued by the Financial Accounting Standard Board (“FASB”) for income taxes. Under the asset and liability method as required by this accounting standard, deferred income taxes are recognized for the tax consequences of temporary differences by applying enacted statutory tax rates applicable to future years to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts and the tax bases of existing assets and liabilities. The charge for taxation is based on the results for the reporting period as adjusted for items which are non-assessable or disallowed. It is calculated using tax rates that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the balance sheet date. The effect on deferred income taxes of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. A valuation allowance is recognized if it is more likely than not that some portion, or all of, a deferred tax asset will not be realized.

 

Under the accounting standard regarding accounting for uncertainty in income taxes, a tax position is recognized as a benefit only if it is “more likely than not” that the tax position would be sustained in a tax examination, with a tax examination being presumed to occur. The amount recognized is the largest amount of tax benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized on examination. For tax positions not meeting the “more likely than not” test, no tax benefit is recorded. Penalties and interest incurred related to underpayment of income tax are classified as income tax expense in the year incurred.


32


 

 

Foreign currency translation

 

The functional currency and reporting currency of the Company is the U.S. Dollar. (“US$” or “$”). The functional currency of the Hong Kong subsidiaries is the Hong Kong Dollar. The functional currency of the PRC subsidiary is RMB. Results of operations and cash flow are translated at average exchange rates during the period, and assets and liabilities are translated at the exchange rate as quoted by the Hong Kong Monetary Authority (“HKMA”) at the end of the period. Capital accounts are translated at their historical exchange rates when the capital transaction occurred. Translation adjustments resulting from this process are included in accumulated other comprehensive income. Transaction gains and losses that arise from exchange rate fluctuations on transactions denominated in a currency other than the functional currency are included in the results of operations as incurred.

 

Year ended

 

December 31,

2020

 

December 31,

2019

RMB : USD exchange rate

 

6.9348

 

6.8829

Average period ended

 

 

 

 

HKD : USD exchange rate

 

7.800

 

7.800

Average period ended

 

 

 

 

PESO : USD exchange rate

 

49.6473

 

51.0424

Average period ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year ended

 

December 31,

2020

 

December 31,

2019

RMB : USD exchange rate

 

6.5442

 

6.9799

HKD : USD exchange rate

 

7.800

 

7.800

PESO : USD exchange rate

 

47.7064

 

51.1475

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

See Note 2, "Summary of Significant Accounting Policies" in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for a full description of recent accounting pronouncements, including the respective dates of adoption, or expected adoption and effects of our consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

 

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK.

 

The Company, as a “smaller reporting company” (as defined by §229.10(f) (1)), is not required to provide the information required by this Item.

 

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA.

 

The full text of our audited consolidated financial statements as of December 31, 2020 and 2019 begins on page F-1 of this Form 10-K.


33


 

 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE.

 

On July 20, 2018, the Board of Directors of the Company approved a resolution to appoint ZHEN HUI Certified Public Accountants (“ZHEN HUI”), with current address Flat A, 13/F., Shun Pont Commercial Building, 5-11 Thomson Road, Wanchai,, Hong Kong, to replace its certifying public auditor, David Yueng, ECOVIS Hong Kong (“ECOVIS”), of Room 1905, 19/Fl., West Tower, Shun Tak Centre, 168-200 Connaught Road Central, Hong Kong. The engagement of was consummated by July 20, 2018. The Board decided to change certifying public auditor because ECOVIS advised the Board that ECOVIS did not wish to handle future VEII audit work due to the cost and resource demands of auditing the Company.

 

ZHEN HUI has provided the Company with the required independent letter under Rule 3526 of Public Company Accounting Oversight Board rules.

 

ZHEN HUI’s report on the financial statements for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020, 2019, 2018 and 2017, contained no adverse opinion or disclaimer of opinion and was not qualified or modified as to audit scope or accounting.

 

During the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020, (i) there were no disagreements with ZHEN HUI on any matters of accounting principles or practices, financial statement disclosure or auditing scope or procedure, which, if not resolved to the satisfaction of ZHEN HUI , would have caused ZHEN HUI to make reference to the subject matter of the disagreement in their reports on the Company’s financial statements for such years, and (ii) there were no “reportable events” as that term is defined in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K.

 

ECOVIS’s report on the financial statements for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015, 2016 and 2017, contained no adverse opinion or disclaimer of opinion and was not qualified or modified as to audit scope or accounting, except that the report contained an explanatory paragraph stating that there was substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern.

 

During the years ended December 31, 2015, 2016 and 2017 and through July 20, 2018, (i) there were no disagreements with ECOVIS on any matters of accounting principles or practices, financial statement disclosure or auditing scope or procedure, which, if not resolved to the satisfaction of ECOVIS, would have caused ECOVIS to make reference to the subject matter of the disagreement in their reports on the Company’s financial statements for such years, and (ii) there were no “reportable events” as that term is defined in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K.

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.

 

Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Exchange Act) that are designed to ensure that information that would be required to be disclosed in Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time period specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including to our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. 

 

As required by Rule 13a-15 under the Exchange Act, our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of December 31, 2020. Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer determined that, as of December 31, 2020, and as of the date that the evaluation was completed, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective.


34


 

 

Internal Controls over Financial Reporting

 

Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(f). The Company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with U.S. GAAP.

 

Internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the Company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit the preparation of financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, and that receipts and expenditures of the Company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the Company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the Company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 

Under the supervision of the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer and Board of Directors, the Company conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on the framework in “Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013 framework)” issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission in 2013. Based on this assessment, management has concluded that the internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2020.

 

Changes in Internal Controls over Financial Reporting

 

During the fourth quarter ended December 31, 2020, there were no changes in the Company's internal control over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company's internal control over financial reporting.

 

This Form 10-K does not include an attestation report of the Company’s registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management’s report was not subject to attestation by the Company’s registered public accounting firm pursuant to rules of the SEC that permit the Company to provide only management’s report in this Form 10-K.

 

The Company monitors the impact of Coronavirus/COVID 19 pandemic on operations in order to determine any adjustments of internal controls and financial reporting.

 

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION.

 

None.


35


 

 

PART III

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE.

 

The Company has adopted a code of ethics that applies to the Company’s directors, officers and employees, including the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer and any other persons performing similar functions. The text of our code of ethics, “Code of Ethics,” has been posted on our website at https://www.value-exch.com. The Company will provide a copy of the code of ethics without charge upon request to Corporate Secretary, Value Exchange International, Inc., Unit 02-03, 6/F. Block B, Shatin Industrial Centre, 5-7 Yuen Shun Circuit, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong SAR. Contents of URL’s referenced in this Form 10-K are not incorporated in this Form 10-K.

 

Directors, Executive Officers, Promoters and Control Persons

 

The following sets forth the name and position of each of our executive officers, directors and significant employees and their ages and titles as of the date of the filing of this Form 10-K.

 

Name

 

Age

 

Position with the Company

 

Director Since

Kenneth Tan

 

56

 

Chief Executive Officer, President and Director

 

08/26/13

Bella Tsang

 

56

 

Secretary, Treasurer, Principal financial officer and Director

 

08/26/13

Johan Pehrson

 

63

 

Director

 

07/07/14

Edmund Yeung

 

51

 

Director

 

06/25/15

Calinda Lee

 

53

 

Director

 

02/21/20

Channing Au

 

42

 

Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

 

Not applicable

 

The business experience during the past five years of the person presently listed above as an Officer or Director of the Company is as follows:

 

Kenneth Tan. Prior to his appointment as Chief Executive Officer and President of VEII, Mr. Tan was the President, Sales for Value Exchange International Limited (“VEI”), a related company of VEI CHN, and was responsible to sales for the Asia Pacific region. Before taking up the appointment in VEI, Mr. Tan was the Vice President, Sales of PCCW Solutions since 2003. He has more than 25 years of experience in the IT industries and had held key sales management positions in IBM, Oracle and EDS. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from the University of Hong Kong.

 

Bella Tsang. Prior to her appointment as Secretary and Director of VEII, Ms. Tsang had been working as Marketing Manager of VEI HKG since 2003 and was responsible for marketing of its solutions to various retailers in the Greater China and the Asia Pacific markets. Ms. Tsang holds a Diploma of Marketing from the Institute of Marketing. She was responsible for organizing training to all level of professional staff in Ernst & Whinney (now Ernst & Young, an international accountancy, auditing and consulting firm) in 1987.

 

Johan Pehrson. Johan Pehrson is one of the two founders of ER-Konsult, a business consultancy firm since 1999 in Sweden. Mr. Pehrson graduated at the University of Umea (Sweden) with a degree in Business Marketing. He has performed more than 1,000 workshops to various organizations to facilitate the development of management, markets and sales. On July 7, 2014, Mr. Pehrson was appointed as a member of the VEII Board of Directors.

 

Edmund Yeung. For the past ten years, Mr. Yeung has been a Managing Director for Whole Glory Investments Ltd., a property investment company. Previously, he also served as the executive director of Combined Chemicals Co., an adhesive product manufacturer, for 15 years. On June 25, 2015, Mr. Yeung was appointed as a member of the VEII Board of Directors.

 

Calinda Lee joined the Company in 2018 as Group Chief Executive Officer of Company’s operating subsidiaries. She is now in charge of the overall operations and financial management of the Group. Prior to the joining the Company, she worked in a manufacturing company for over 6 years in the position of chief operating officer. Before that, she worked for TAP Investments Group Limited companies (“TAP Group”) for over 15 years before they were acquired by the Company. She held various management positions in TAP Group and possesses over 20 years of experience in the IT industry with in-depth knowledge in Frontend and Backend Retail Solution. Before joining the Company and the TAP Group, she started her career in International/Local certified public accounting firms in the aspect of Auditing, Company Secretarial and Taxation Consultancy. She holds an MBA in Finance and she is an associate member of CPA Australia, a professional association.


36


 

 

Channing AU. Channing Au joined Value Exchange Int’l (China) Limited, a subsidiary of the Company, as the Chief Financial Officer in August 2015. On November 5, 2015, Mr. Au was appointed as Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer of VEII. Prior to joining the Company, Mr. Au served as an Audit Manager at Crowe Horwath (HK) CPA Limited since 2010. Prior to that, he worked for CPA firms including KPMG Hong Kong and BDO Limited. Mr. Au has over 10 years extensive experience in provision of audit and consultancy services with clientele varies from unlisted entrepreneurs to companies listed in the United States and Hong Kong. Mr. Au is a member of CPA Australia, and obtained his Master’s Degree in Finance and Bachelor’s Degree in Accountancy from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

 

Qualifications, Attributes, Skills and Experience Represented on the Board

 

The Board of Directors has identified particular qualifications, attributes, skills and experience that are important to be represented on the board as a whole, in light of our current needs and business priorities. The Board of Directors believes that each director is a recognized person of high integrity with a proven record of success in his or her field. Each director demonstrates innovative thinking, familiarity with and respect for corporate governance requirements and practices, an appreciation of multiple cultures and a commitment to the business and operations of the Company. The Board of Directors has assessed the intangible qualities including the director's ability to ask difficult questions and, simultaneously, to work collegially. The Board of Directors also considers diversity of age, cultural background and professional experiences in evaluating candidates for Board of Director membership. Diversity is important because a variety of points of view contribute to a more effective decision-making process.

 

Set forth below is a tabular disclosure summarizing some of the specific qualifications, attributes, skills and experiences of our directors.

 

Name of Director

Title

Qualifications

Johan Pehrson

Director

He is an experienced businessman operating in Sweden and brings a diversity in business perspective to board deliberations. He has performed more than 1,000 workshops to various organizations to facilitate the development of management, markets and sales and brings that experience to board deliberations.

 

Kenneth Tan

Director and Chief

Executive Officer

He has more than 25 years of experience in the IT industries and had held key sales management positions in IBM, Oracle and EDS. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical and Electronics Engineering from the University of Hong Kong.

 

Calinda Lee

Director

She possesses over 20 years of experience in the IT industry with in-depth knowledge in Frontend and Backend Retail Solution. Before joining the Company and the TAP Group, she started her career in International/Local certified public accounting firms in the aspect of Auditing, Company Secretarial and Taxation Consultancy. She holds an MBA in Finance and she is an associate member of CPA Australia, a professional association.

 

Bella Tsang

Director

She has Diploma of Marketing from the Institute of Marketing. She was responsible for organizing training to all level of professional staff in Ernst & Whinney (now Ernst & Young, an international accountancy, auditing and consulting firm) in 1987 and, as such, as extensive experience in personnel matters.

 

Edmund Yeung

Director

He brings extensive business experience, outside of IT business and Company, to board deliberations and brings perspective of an independent businessman to board deliberations.

 

 

Significant Employees. Mr. Tan and Mr. Au as senior officers are deemed key personnel. Benny Lee, a director of VEI SHG, has extensive experience in the IT Business and is important to Company’s strategic knowledge base and planning as well as the Board of Director’s understanding of the IT industry in China and Hong Kong and business development in those markets.

 

Former Directors. Matthew Mecke resigned as a director of the Company on February 18, 2020. Mr. Mecke also resigned from the Audit Committee on the same date. His profile is below.


37


 

 

Matthew Mecke, Age 50. Prior to his appointment as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of VEII, Matthew Mecke was a member of the board of directors of Sino Fibre Communications, Inc. (OTCBB: SFBE) based in China and Hong Kong starting in January 2006. Mr. Mecke also served as president, principal executive officer of Sino Fibre Communications from January 2006 to October 2007 and as chairman of board of directors from January 2006 to December 2007. From October 2003 to January 2006, Mr. Mecke was a founder, vice chairman, president, and Chief Executive Officer of Asia Payment Systems (OTCBB: APYM). From October 1998 to July 1999, Mr. Mecke was a co-founder and served as Senior Vice President, Systems and Product Development for First Ecom.com (NASD: FECC), an international e-commerce payment gateway pioneer based in Hong Kong which linked e-commerce merchants with offshore back-end transaction processing systems. From April 1994 to July 1998, Mr. Mecke was an employee of First Data Corp. (formerly NYSE: FDC) in the United States and Hong Kong. Mr. Mecke was responsible for middle management of retail card system operations. In the late 1990’s, Mr. Mecke was a management executive of First Data Asia in Hong Kong, where his responsibilities included strategic planning, new business development, e-commerce applications and pricing. On August 26, 2013, Mr. Mecke resigned his position as Chief Executive Officer and President of the Company, which resignation did not involve any dispute with the Company. On February 17, 2020, Mr. Mecke resigned from the Board of Directors of the Company effective February 18, 2020.

 

Audit Committee and Other Board Committees. The VEII Board of Directors had no nominating or compensation committee in fiscal year 2020. The Company relies on the Board of Directors to perform the functions typically performed by a compensation and nominating committee. The VEII Board of Directors established an Audit Committee on October 29, 2015 and appointed the following as the Audit Committee’s initial members: Matthew Mecke, Johan Pehrson and Edmund Yeung. As of the date of the filing of this Form 10-K with the SEC, the Audit Committee member is Johan Pehrson. Company is seeking an independent, qualified director to serve on the Audit Committee, but has not identified a suitable, willing candidate as of the date of the filing of this Form 10-K.

 

Audit Committee Duties. The Audit Committee duties are: (1) determine the independent registered public accounting firm to be employed by the Company; (2) discuss the scope of the independent registered public accounting firm’s audit of the Company and any reports or recommendations from that firm; (3) review the Company’s financial statements and the independent registered public accounting firm’s reports and recommendations; (4) reviews conflict of interest issues concerning the Company and its management; (5) makes recommendations to the Company’s Board of Directors about audit, accounting, internal control and related matters.

 

Compensation and Nominating Duties. The Company’s Board of Directors handles the duties of a compensation and nominating committee. Those duties include: (1) analysis of personnel needs of the Company and its subsidiaries; (2) develops recommendations about compensation, cash and non-cash, for members of Company management; (3) review of job performance of members of Company management; (4) review and vote on employment agreements for senior officers of the Company; and (4) tasks related to the foregoing duties.

 

The Company’s Board of Directors intends to conduct a bench marking analysis of the following companies in April 2020 as part of determining appropriate compensation for members of Company management. Companies to be used in that benchmarking are: (1) PCM, Inc.; (2) JetPay Corporation (based on 2020 information); (3) USA Technologies, Inc.; (4) Purebase Corporation; and (5) Net Element, Inc.

 

Company has not conducted a 2021 benchmarking.

 

The Company has not engaged a consultant for benchmarking compensation or advising the Company on compensation issues.

 

Family Relationships

 

There are no family relationships between any of our directors and our executive officers.


38


 

 

Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings

 

To the best of our knowledge, none of our directors or executive officers has, during the past ten years:

 

·been convicted in a criminal proceeding or been subject to a pending criminal proceeding (excluding traffic violations and other minor offences); 

 

·had any bankruptcy petition filed by or against the business or property of the person, or of any partnership, corporation or business association of which he was a general partner or executive officer, either at the time of the bankruptcy filing or within two years prior to that time;  

 

·been subject to any order, judgment, or decree, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any court of competent jurisdiction or federal or state authority, permanently or temporarily enjoining, barring, suspending or otherwise limiting, his involvement in any type of business, securities, futures, commodities, investment, banking, savings and loan, or insurance activities, or to be associated with persons engaged in any such activity;  

 

·been found by a court of competent jurisdiction in a civil action or by the SEC or the Commodity Futures Trading Commission to have violated a federal or state securities or commodities law, and the judgment has not been reversed, suspended, or vacated;  

 

·been the subject of, or a party to, any federal or state judicial or administrative order, judgment, decree, or finding, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated (not including any settlement of a civil proceeding among private litigants), relating to an alleged violation of any federal or state securities or commodities law or regulation, any law or regulation respecting financial institutions or insurance companies including, but not limited to, a temporary or permanent injunction, order of disgorgement or restitution, civil money penalty or temporary or permanent cease-and-desist order, or removal or prohibition order, or any law or regulation prohibiting mail or wire fraud or fraud in connection with any business entity; or  

 

·been the subject of, or a party to, any sanction or order, not subsequently reversed, suspended or vacated, of any self-regulatory organization (as defined in Section 3(a)(26) of the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78c(a)(26), any registered entity (as defined in Section 1(a)(29) of the Commodity Exchange Act (7 U.S.C. 1(a)(29), or any equivalent exchange, association, entity or organization that has disciplinary authority over its members or persons associated with a member.  

 

Except as set forth in our discussion below in “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence–Transactions with Related Persons,” none of our directors, director nominees or executive officers has been involved in any transactions with us or any of our directors, executive officers, affiliates or associates which are required to be disclosed pursuant to the rules and regulations of the SEC.

 

Stockholder Communication with the Board of Directors

 

Stockholders may communicate with the Board of Directors of VEII by sending a letter to our Board of Directors, c/o Corporate Secretary, Unit 02-03, 6/F. Block B, Shatin Industrial Centre, 5-7 Yuen Shun Circuit, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong (for submission to the board or committee or to any specific director to whom the correspondence is directed.) Stockholders communicating through this means should include with the correspondence evidence, such as documentation from a brokerage firm, that the sender is a current record or beneficial stockholder of the Company. All communications received as set forth above will be opened by the Corporate Secretary or his designee for the sole purpose of determining whether the contents contain a message to one or more of our directors.

 

Any contents that are not advertising materials, promotions of a product or service, patently offensive materials or matters deemed, using reasonable judgment, inappropriate for the Board of Directors will be forwarded promptly to the chairman of the Board, the appropriate committee or the specific director, as applicable.


39


 

 

Audit Committee and Audit Committee Financial Expert

 

The Company formed an Audit Committee on October 29, 2015. The Company has been unable to locate a prospective independent director who meets the requirements of a financial expert and is willing to serve as a director of the Company. None of the current directors qualify as financial experts.

 

As formed, the Audit Committee’s duties will be to recommend to the Company’s board of directors the engagement of an independent registered public accounting firm to audit the Company’s financial statements and to review the Company’s accounting and auditing principles. The Audit Committee will review the scope, timing and fees for the annual audit and the results of audit examinations performed by the internal auditors and independent registered public accounting firm, including their recommendations to improve the system of accounting and internal controls. The Audit Committee will at all times be composed exclusively of directors who are, in the opinion of the Company’s Board of Directors, free from any relationship which would interfere with the exercise of independent judgment as a committee member and who possess an understanding of financial statements and generally accepted accounting principles.

 

All audit and audit-related services performed by our principal accountant during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 were approved by our audit committee.

 

Code of Ethics

 

We have adopted a written code of ethics that applies to all of our officers, directors and employees, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, or persons performing similar functions, a copy of which is attached as Exhibit 14 to the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q as filed with the SEC on July 20, 2009.

 

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

The following table sets forth the compensation paid to our executive officers during the twelve month periods ended, December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018. No other executive officer received compensation greater than $100,000 during any fiscal year.

 

Summary Compensation Table

 

Name

and

Principal

Position

Fiscal

Year

Ended

12/31

Salary

($)

Bonus

($)

Stock

Awards

($)

Option

Awards

($)

Non-Equity

Incentive

Plan

Compensation

($)

Nonqualified

Deferred

Compensation

Earnings

($)

All Other

Compensation

($)

Total

($)

Kenneth Tan (1)

2020

60,929

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

60,929

 

2019

76,084

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

76,084

 

2018

33,333

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

33,333

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bella Tsang (2)

2020

61,538

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

61,538

 

2019

46,154

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

46,154

 

2018

46,154

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

46,154

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Channing Au (3)

2020

41,303

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

41,303

 

2019

46,154

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

46,154

 

2018

46,154

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

-0-

46,154

 

Footnotes:

 

(1)Mr. Kenneth Tan was appointed as Chief Executive Officer and a Director of the Company as of August 26, 2013. 

 

(2)Ms. Bella Tsang was appointed as Secretary and Director of the Company as of August 26, 2013, and was appointed as Treasurer and principal financial officer of the Company as of June 25, 2015; and on October 29, 2015, she resigned as a Treasurer and principal financial officer of the Company. 

 

(3)Channing Au was appointed as Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer of the Company as of November 5, 2015. 


40


 

 

There are no other compensatory plans or arrangements in use except as disclosed, including payments to be received from the Company with respect to any executive officer, that would result in payments to such person because of his or her resignation, retirement or other termination of employment with the Company, or its subsidiaries, any change in control, or a change in the person’s responsibilities following a change in control of the Company.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End

 

No executive officer received any equity awards, or holds exercisable or non-exercisable options, as of the years ended December 31, 2020.

 

Long-Term Incentive Plans

 

There are no arrangements or plans currently used and in which we provide pension, retirement or similar benefits for directors or executive officers.

 

Compensation Committee

 

We currently do not have a compensation committee of the Board of Directors. The Board of Directors as a whole determines executive compensation.

 

Director Compensation

 

None of the directors received compensation for director services during the fiscal year ending December 31, 2020.

 

Pension Benefits

 

No named executive officers received or held pension benefits and the Company does not maintain a pension benefit plan during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020.

 

Nonqualified Deferred Compensation

 

No nonqualified deferred compensation was offered or issued to any named executive officer during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020.


41


 

 

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management

 

The following table sets forth certain information regarding beneficial ownership of our Common Stock as of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 (i) by each of our directors; (ii) by each of our named executive officers; (iii) by all of our executive officers and directors as a group; and (iv) by each person or entity known by us to beneficially own more than five percent (5%) of any class of our outstanding shares. As of March 31, 2021, there were 29,656,130 shares of our common stock outstanding:

 

 

 

December 31, 2020

Name and Address of

Beneficial Owner

Title of Class

Amount and Nature

of Beneficial

Ownership (1)

(#)

 

Percent of

Class (2)

(%)

Matthew Mecke (3)

Unit T25, GF

Bangkok Bank Building

18 Bonham Strand West

Sheung Wan, Hong Kong

Common

-

-

Kenneth Tan (4)

Block A1 35h Fl

The Beverly Hills

6 Broadwood

Hong Kong

Common

3,063,725

10.33%

Bella Tsang (5)

Unit 02-03, 6/F. Block B,

Shatin Industrial Centre,

5-7 Yuen Shun Circuit,

Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong

Common

6,905,461

23.29%

Johan Pehrson (6)

3 Westerbergs Gata

Halmstad, Sweden 30226

Common

277,101

0.93%

Edmund Yeung (7)

Flat C, 7/F Phase I

Kingsford Ind. Bldg

26-32 Kwai Hei St

Kwai Chun, N.T.

Hong Kong

Common

2,024,400

6.83%

Calinda Lee

Unit 02-03, 6/F. Block B,

Shatin Industrial Centre,

5-7 Yuen Shun Circuit,

Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong

Common

-

-

Channing Au (8)

Unit 02-03, 6/F. Block B,

Shatin Industrial Centre,

5-7 Yuen Shun Circuit,

Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong

Common

-

-

All Officers and

Directors as a Group

Common

12,270,687

41.38%


42


 

 

(1)The number and percentage of shares beneficially owned is determined under rules of the SEC and the information is not necessarily indicative of beneficial ownership for any other purpose. Under such rules, beneficial ownership includes any shares as to which the individual has sole or shared voting power or investment power and also any shares which the individual has the right to acquire within 60 days through the exercise of any stock option or other right. The persons named in the table have sole voting and investment power with respect to all shares of Common Stock shown as beneficially owned by them, subject to community property laws where applicable and the information contained in the footnotes to this table.  

 

(2)Based on 29,656,130 issued and outstanding shares of VEII Common Stock as of December 31, 2020. 

 

(3)Matthew Mecke was a Director of the Company. He resigned from the Board of Directors of the Company effective February 18, 2020. His beneficial ownership includes 0 common shares as of December 31, 2020. 

 

(4)Kenneth Tan is the Company's Chief Executive Officer, President and a Director. His beneficial ownership includes 3,063,725 common shares as of December 31, 2020. 

 

(5)Bella Tsang is the Company's Secretary, and a Director of the Company. Her beneficial ownership includes 6,905,461 common shares as of December 31, 2020. 

 

(6)Johan Pehrson is a Director of the Company appointed on July 7, 2014. His beneficial ownership includes 277,101 common shares as of December 31, 2020. 

 

(7)Edmund Yeung is a Director of the Company appointed on June 25, 2015. His beneficial ownership includes 2,024,400 common shares as of December 31, 2020. 

 

(8)Calinda Lee is a Director of the Company and was appointed on February 21, 2020. Her beneficial ownership includes 0 common shares as of December 31, 2020. 

 

(9)Channing Au is the Company's Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer appointed on November 5, 2015. His beneficial ownership includes 0 common shares as of December 31, 2020. 

 

Changes in Control

 

The Company has elected not to be governed by the control share provisions or interested shareholder provisions of the laws of State of Nevada, specifically in Nevada Revised Statutes §§78.378 to 78.3793, inclusive, and §§78.411 to 78.444, inclusive.

 

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE.

 

Transactions with Related Persons

 

Our executive officers, directors and their affiliated entities will beneficially own or control approximately 41.38% of the outstanding shares of our Common Stock. Accordingly, these executive officers, directors and their affiliated entities, acting as a group, will have substantial influence over the outcome of corporate actions requiring shareholder approval, including the election of directors, any merger, consolidation or sale of all or substantially all of our assets, dissolution, or any other significant corporate transaction. Except as set forth in the footnotes of the attached financial statements, and except for the Share Exchange, none of the directors or executive officers of the Company, nor any person who owned of record or was known to own beneficially more than 5% of the Company’s outstanding shares of its Common Stock, nor any associate or affiliate of such persons or companies, has any material interest, direct or indirect, in any transaction that has occurred during the past fiscal year, or in any proposed transaction, which has materially affected or will affect the Company.

 

Policies and Procedures for Review, Approval or Ratification of Transactions with Related Persons

 

The Company has a code of ethics (“policy”). For purposes of our policy only, a “related-person transaction” will be a transaction, arrangement or relationship (or any series of similar transactions, arrangements or relationships) in which we and any “related person” are participants involving an amount that exceeds $120,000. Transactions involving compensation for services provided to us as an employee, director, consultant or similar capacity by a related person will not be covered by this policy. A related person will be any executive officer, director or a holder of more than five percent of our common stock, including any of their immediate family members and any entity owned or controlled by such persons.


43


 

 

We anticipate that, where a transaction has been identified as a related-person transaction, the policy will require management to present information regarding the proposed related-person transaction to our audit committee (or, where approval by our audit committee would be inappropriate, to another independent body of our board of directors) for consideration and approval or ratification. Management’s presentation will be expected to include a description of, among other things, the material facts, the direct and indirect interests of the related persons, the benefits of the transaction to us and whether any alternative transactions are available.

 

To identify related-person transactions in advance, we are expected to rely on information supplied by our executive officers, directors and certain significant stockholders. In considering related-person transactions, our board of directors will take into account the relevant available facts and circumstances including, but not limited to:

 

·the risks, costs and benefits to us; 

 

·the impact on a director’s independence in the event the related person is a director, immediate family member of a director or an entity with which a director is affiliated; 

 

·the terms of the transaction; 

 

·the availability of other sources for comparable services or products; and 

 

·the terms available to or from, as the case may be, unrelated third parties or to or from our employees generally. 

 

We also expect that the policy will require any interested director to excuse himself from deliberations and approval of the transaction in which the interested director is involved.

 

Promoters and Certain Control Persons

 

Except as previously disclosed in our Exchange Act filings with Commission, we did not have any promoters at any time during the past five fiscal years.

 

Director Independence

 

For purposes of determining director independence in fiscal year 2020, we have applied the definitions set out in NASDAQ Rule 5605(a)(2). Mr. Johan Pehrson and Mr. Edmund Yeung are deemed independent directors (as defined under in NASDAQ Rule 5605(a)(2)) by the Company. Mr., Mecke was deemed an. Independent director prior to development of the now suspended IP Business venture with KTSI.

 

Additional Information About VEII

 

SEC Reports and Additional Information about the Company

 

VEII is subject to the informational and reporting requirements of the Exchange Act and, in accordance with this law, files annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC. One can read and copy the VEII’s SEC filings, including its financial statements, at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, D.C. 20549. Information on the operation of the Public Reference Room can be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC maintains an Internet site known as “EDGAR” and that contains our SEC reports, proxy and information statements, and other information at www.sec.gov.


44


 

 

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES.

 

Independent Auditors’ Fees

 

The following is a summary of the fees billed to the Company for professional services rendered for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

2020

 

2019

Audit Fees

$

46,000

$

46,000

Audit-Related Fees

 

-

 

-

Tax Fees

 

-

 

-

All Other Fees

 

-

 

-

TOTAL

$

46,000

$

46,000

 

“Audit Fees” consisted of fees billed for professional services rendered by the principal accountant for the audit of our annual financial statements and review of the financial statements included in our Form 10-K and 10-Qs or services that are normally provided by the accountant in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements.

 

“Audit-Related Fees” consisted of fees billed for assurance and related services by the principal accountant that were reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of our financial statements and are not reported under the paragraph captioned “Audit Fees” above.

 

“Tax Fees” consisted of fees billed for professional services rendered by the principal accountant for tax returns preparation.

 

“All Other Fees” consisted of fees billed for products and services provided by the principal accountant, other than the services reported above under other captions of this Item 14.

 

Pre-Approval Policies and Procedures

 

Under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, all audit and non-audit services performed by our auditors must be approved in advance by our board of directors to assure that such services do not impair the auditors’ independence from us. In accordance with its policies and procedures, our board of directors pre-approved the audit and non-audit services performed by ZHEN HUI Certified Public Accountants for our financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2020.


45


 

 

PART IV

 

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES.

 

Financial Statements and Schedules

 

The financial statements are set forth under Item 8 of this Form 10-K. Financial statement schedules have been omitted since they are either not required, not applicable, or the information is otherwise included.

 

ITEM 16. FORM 10-K SUMMARY.

 

None

 

Exhibit List

 

The list of exhibits included in the attached Exhibit Index is hereby incorporated herein by reference.

 

Exhibit

Number

 

Exhibit Title

3.1.

 

Certificate of Amendment to the Articles of Incorporation of Value Exchange International, Inc.,

dated Sept. 8, 2016. (1)

 

 

 

10.1

 

Stock Purchase Agreement, dated 23 January 2017, by and among Value Exchange International, Inc.,

Value Exchange International (China) Ltd., TapServices, Inc., and the sole shareholder of TSI. (2)

 

 

 

14**

 

Code of Ethics, dated April 16, 2018

 

 

 

31.1*

 

Certifications of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

 

 

 

31.2*

 

Certifications of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

 

 

 

32.1*

 

Certifications of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

 

 

 

32.2*

 

Certifications of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

 

 

 

101.INS

 

XBRL Instance Document

101.SCH

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema

101.CAL

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase

101.LAB

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase

101.PRE

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase

101.DEF

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase

 

*Filed herewith 

 

**Filed with the SEC on July 20, 2009 as Ex. 14.1 to Value Exchange International, Inc.’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for fiscal quarter ended May 31, 2009. 

 

(1)Incorporated by reference to Exhibit One to the Information Statement, dated October 18, 2016, and filed by Value Exchange International, Inc. with the Commission on October 25, 2016. 

 

(2)Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.1 to the Form 8-K, dated January 25, 2017, filed by Value Exchange International, Inc. with the Commission on January 27, 2017. 

 

The material contained in Exhibit 32.1 and Exhibit 32.2 is not deemed “filed” with the SEC and is not to be incorporated by reference into any filing of the Company under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, whether made before or after the date hereof and irrespective of any general incorporation language contained in such filing, except to the extent that the Company specifically incorporates it by reference.


46


 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned hereunto duly authorized.

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

 

Dated: March 31, 2021

 

s/ Kenneth Tan

By: Kenneth Tan

Its: President, CEO

(Principal executive officer)

 

/s/ Channing Au

By: Channing Au

Its: Chief Financial Officer

(Principal financial and accounting officer)

 

POWER OF ATTORNEY

 

KNOW ALL PERSONS BY THESE PRESENTS, that each person whose signature appears below hereby constitutes and appoints Kenneth Tan and Channing Au and each of them, as his true and lawful attorney-in-fact and agent with full power of substitution, for him in any and all capacities, to sign any and all amendments to this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and to file the same, with all exhibits thereto and other documents in connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange Commission, granting unto said attorney-in-fact and agent the full power and authority to do and perform each and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done in connection therewith, as fully for all intents and purposes as he might or could do in person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may lawfully do or cause to be done by virtue thereof.

 

 

In accordance with the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

 

Signature

 

 

Title

 

 

Date

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ Kenneth Tan

 

President, Chief Executive Officer, and Director

(Principal Executive Officer)

 

March 31, 2021

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ Channing Au

 

Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

(Principal financial and accounting officer)

 

March 31, 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ Bella Tsang

 

Director and Secretary

 

March 31, 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ Calinda Lee

 

Director

 

March 31, 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ Johan Pehrson

 

Director

 

March 31, 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ Edmund Yeung

 

Director

 

March 31, 2021

 


47


 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Contents

 

Pages

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

Zhen Hui Certified Public Accountants

 

F-2

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

F-3

Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income

 

F-4

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity

 

F-5

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

F-6

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements

 

F-7


F-1


 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To: The board of directors and stockholders of

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Value Exchange International, Inc. (“the Company”) and its subsidiaries (collectively referred to as the “Group”) as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, the related consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income, consolidated statement of stockholders’ equity and consolidated statement of cash flows for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “consolidated financial statements”). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the two years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2018.

 

/s/ Zhen Hui Certified Public Accountants

 

Zhen Hui Certified Public Accountants

Hong Kong, China

March 31, 2021


F-2


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

ASSETS

 

 

 

CURRENT ASSETS

 

 

 

Cash

523,337

 

234,089

Accounts receivable, less allowance for doubtful accounts

599,436

 

773,560

Amounts due from related parties

1,343,466

 

534,806

Other receivables and prepayments

414,342

 

257,173

Inventories

238,147

 

219,592

Total current assets

3,118,728

 

2,019,220

 

 

 

 

NON-CURRENT ASSETS

 

 

 

Plant and equipment, net

357,021

 

353,826

Deferred tax assets

71,681

 

56,045

Goodwill

206,812

 

206,812

Operating lease right-of-use assets, net

585,057

 

824,230

Intangible assets

-

 

-

Total non-current assets

1,220,571

 

1,440,913

 

 

 

 

Total assets

4,339,299

 

3,460,133

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT LIABILITIES

 

 

 

Accounts payable

1,038,518

 

685,150

Other payables and accrued liabilities

831,817

 

553,259

Deferred income

254,937

 

255,749

Amounts due to related parties

263,063

 

32,909

Operating lease liabilities, current

303,687

 

356,960

Current portion of long term bank loan and short term bank loan

38,874

 

13,686

Total current liabilities

2,730,896

 

1,897,713

 

 

 

 

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

 

 

 

Long term bank loan

62,949

 

-

Operating lease liabilities, non-current

277,111

 

478,641

Total non-current liabilities

340,060

 

478,641

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities

3,070,956

 

2,376,354

 

 

 

 

SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

Preferred stock, 100,000,000 shares authorized, $0.00001 par value;

no shares issued and outstanding

-

 

-

Common stock, 100,000,000 shares authorized, $0.00001 par value;

29,656,130 and 29,656,130 shares issued and outstanding, respectively

297

 

297

Additional paid-in capital

690,589

 

690,589

Statutory reserves

11,835

 

11,925

Retained earnings

414,225

 

308,813

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

97,944

 

60,742

 

1,214,890

 

1,072,366

Non-controlling interest

53,453

 

11,413

Total shareholders’ equity

1,268,343

 

1,083,779

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

4,339,299

 

3,460,133

 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.


F-3


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

NET REVENUES

 

 

 

Service income

20,551,471

 

8,309,129

 

 

 

 

COST OF SERVICES

 

 

 

Cost of service income

(18,497,409)

 

(6,542,407)

GROSS PROFIT

2,054,062

 

1,766,722

 

 

 

 

OPERATING EXPENSES:

 

 

 

General and administrative expenses

(1,869,455)

 

(1,894,419)

Foreign exchange (loss) gain

(58,281)

 

8,384

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES

(1,927,736)

 

(1,886,035)

 

 

 

 

PROFIT (LOSS) FROM OPERATIONS

126,326

 

(119,313)

 

 

 

 

OTHER INCOME (EXPENSES):

 

 

 

Interest income

5,517

 

505

Interest expense

(15,162)

 

(10,410)

Finance cost

(15,502)

 

(11,371)

VAT refund

111,559

 

20,508

Management fee income

154,315

 

154,870

Redundancy cost

(285,601)

 

-

Others

44,779

 

30,062

Total other income (expenses), net

(95)

 

184,164

 

 

 

 

INCOME BEFORE PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES

126,231

 

64,851

 

 

 

 

INCOME TAXES EXPENSES

(20,727)

 

(11,416)

NET INCOME

105,504

 

53,435

 

 

 

 

OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME:

 

 

 

Foreign currency translation adjustment

37,202

 

78,553

 

 

 

 

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

142,706

 

131,988

 

 

 

 

ATTRIBUTABLE TO:

 

 

 

Equity holders of the Company

142,614

 

154,727

Non-controlling interests

92

 

(22,739)

 

142,706

 

131,988

 

 

 

 

Net profit per share, basic and diluted

0.00

 

0.00

 

 

 

 

Weighted average number of shares outstanding

29,656,130

 

29,656,130

 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.


F-4


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

 

 

Additional

paid-in

capital

Retained 

earnings

(accumulated 

deficit)

Statutory

reserves

Non-

controlling

Interest

Accumulated

other

comprehensive

income

Total

Common stock

 

Share

 

Amount

January 1, 2019

29,656,130

 

297

690,589

232,639

12,476

-

(17,811)

918,190

Net income

-

 

-

-

76,174

-

(22,739)

-

53,435

Change in

noncontrolling

Interests

-

 

-

-

-

-

34,851

-

34,851

Foreign currency

translation

adjustment

-

 

-

-

-

(551)

(699)

78,553

77,303

December 31, 2019

29,656,130

 

297

690,589

308,813

11,925

11,413

60,742

1,083,779

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 1, 2020

29,656,130

 

297

690,589

308,813

11,925

11,413

60,742

1,083,779

Net income

-

 

-

-

105,412

-

92

-

105,504

Change in

noncontrolling

Interests

-

 

-

-

-

-

25,497

-

25,497

Foreign currency

translation

adjustment

-

 

-

-

-

(90)

16,451

37,202

53,563

December 31, 2020

29,656,130

 

297

690,589

414,225

11,835

53,453

97,944

1,268,343

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.


F-5


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

Net income

105,504

 

53,435

Adjustments to reconcile net income to cash

provided by (used in) operating activities:

 

 

 

Depreciation

193,390

 

156,563

Amortization

361,796

 

66,880

Interest income

(5,517)

 

(505)

Loss on disposal of plant and equipment

3,213

 

800

Loan interest expenses

15,162

 

10,410

Finance costs on Right-of-use assets

15,502

 

-

Deferred income taxes

(15,636)

 

(35,682)

Changes in operating assets and liabilities

 

 

 

Accounts receivable

174,124

 

(198,520)

Other receivables, deposit and prepayments

(157,169)

 

(108,390)

Amounts due from related parties

(808,660)

 

72,320

Inventories

(18,555)

 

(78,988)

Accounts payable

353,368

 

(19,758)

Other payables and accrued liabilities

278,558

 

(84,305)

Deferred income

(812)

 

(315,792)

Amounts due to related parties

230,154

 

(24,232)

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities

724,422

 

(505,764)

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

Interest received

5,517

 

505

Purchase of plant and equipment

(150,862)

 

(89,746)

Net cash used in investing activities

(145,345)

 

(89,241)

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

Interest paid

(15,162)

 

(8,039)

Principal payments on finance leases

(410,020)

 

11,371

Proceeds from non-controlling interests

25,497

 

34,851

Proceeds from bank loan

120,238

 

13,686

Repayment of loan from a director

-

 

(32,051)

Repayment of bank loan

(32,102)

 

(1,926)

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

(311,549)

 

17,892

 

 

 

 

EFFECT OF EXCHANGE RATE ON CASH

21,720

 

82,133

INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH

289,248

 

(494,980)

CASH, beginning of year

234,089

 

729,069

CASH, end of year

523,337

 

234,089

 

 

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH FLOW

INFORMATION

 

 

 

Cash paid for income taxes

(7,468)

 

(33,620)


F-6


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

(In U.S. dollars, except for shares and per share data)

 

Note 1 - Organization and description of business

 

Value Exchange International, Inc. (“VEII” or the “Company”), formerly known as Sino Payments Inc., was incorporated in the State of Nevada on June 26, 2007. The Company’s principal business is to provide credit and debit card processing services to multinational retailers in Asia and the systems development and information technology business of Value Exchange Int’l (China) Limited (collectively, the “IT Business”).

 

On January 1, 2014, VEII received 100% of the issued and outstanding shares of in Value Exchange Int’l (China) Limited (“VEI CHN”) in exchange for i) newly issued 12,000,000 shares of VEII’s common stock to the majority stockholder of VEI CHN; and ii) 166,667 shares of our common stock held by VEI CHN to be transferred to the majority stockholder of VEI CHN (“Share Exchange”). This transaction resulted in the owners of VEI CHN obtaining a majority voting interest in VEII. The merger of VEI CHN into VEII, which has nominal net assets, resulted in VEI CHN having control of the combined entities.

 

For financial reporting purposes, the transaction represents a "reverse merger" rather than a business combination and VEII is deemed to be the accounting acquiree in the transaction. The transaction is being accounted for as a reverse merger and recapitalization. VEII is the legal acquirer but accounting acquiree for financial reporting purposes and VEI CHN is the acquired company but accounting acquirer. Consequently, the assets and liabilities and the operations that will be reflected in the historical financial statements prior to the transaction will be those of VEI CHN and will be recorded at the historical cost basis of VEI CHN, and no goodwill will be recognized in this transaction. The consolidated financial statements after completion of the transaction will include the assets and liabilities of VEI CHN and VEII, and the historical operations of VEII and the combined operations of VEI CHN from the initial closing date of the transaction.

 

VEI CHN, formerly known as TAP Investments Group Limited, was incorporated on November 16, 2001 under the laws of Hong Kong SAR and changed its name to Value Exchange Int’l (China) Limited on May 13, 2013. VEI CHN is an investment holding company. The Company provides IT Business’ services and solutions to the retail sector through three operating subsidiaries located in Hong Kong SAR and the People’s Republic of China (“PRC”).

 

On September 2, 2008 VEI CHN established its first operating subsidiary, Value Exchange Int’l (Shanghai) Limited (“VEI SHG”) in Shanghai, PRC, under the laws of the PRC. VEI SHG engages in software development, trading and servicing of computer hardware and software activities.

 

On September 25, 2008, VEI CHN acquired its second operating subsidiary, TAP Services (HK) Limited in Hong Kong which subsequently changed its name to Value Exchange Int’l (Hong Kong) Limited (“VEI HKG”) on May 14, 2013. VEI HKG engages in software development, trading and servicing of computer hardware and software activities.

 

On May 14, 2013, VEI CHN further established another operating subsidiary, Ke Dao Solutions Limited in Hong Kong, which subsequently changed its name to Cucumbuy.com Limited (“CUCUMBUY”) on May 26, 2017. CUCUMBUY conducts consultancy services for IT Services and Solutions activities. On May 21, 2018, VEI CHN disposed of CUCUMBUY with consideration of HK$1.

 

In January 2017, VEI CHN acquired 100% of the capital stock of TapServices, Inc., a corporation organized under the laws of the Republic of the Philippines (the “TSI”). TSI engages in software development, trading and servicing of computer hardware and software activities in Philippines. TSI is operated as a subsidiary of VEI CHN. Prior to and continuing after the acquisition, TSI relied on VEI CHN for provision of IT services.

 

In January 2019, VEI SHG established an operating subsidiary, Value Exchange Int’l (Hunan) Limited (“VEI HN”) in Hunan, PRC, under the laws of the PRC. VEI HN engages in IT service call-center activities.

 

In February 2020, VEI SHG established an operating subsidiary, Shanghai Zhaonan Hengan Information Technology Co., Limited (“SZH”) in Shanghai, PRC, under the laws of the PRC. SZH engages in IT services.

 

As of December 31, 2020, the Company have four wholly owned subsidiaries.


F-7


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 2 - Accounting policies

 

Basis of presentation and principle of consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include all of the assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses and cash flows of entities in which the Company has a controlling interest (“subsidiaries”). Intercompany accounts and transactions between consolidated companies have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Consolidated financial statements prepared following a reverse acquisition are issued under the name of the legal parent (accounting acquiree) (i.e. VEII) but as a continuation of the financial statements of the legal subsidiary (accounting acquirer) (i.e VEI CHN), with one adjustment, which is to retroactively adjust the accounting acquirer’s legal capital to reflect the legal capital of the accounting acquiree. That adjustment is required to reflect the capital of the legal parent (the accounting acquiree). Comparative information presented in those consolidated financial statements also is retroactively adjusted to reflect the legal capital of the legal parent (accounting acquiree).

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Value Exchange International, Inc., and the following subsidiaries:

 

1.Value Exchange Int’l (China) Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company incorporated in Hong Kong as a private company on November 16, 2001; 

 

2.Value Exchange Int’l (Shanghai) Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company incorporated in Shanghai as a private company on September 2, 2008; 

 

3.Value Exchange Int’l (Hong Kong) Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company incorporated in Hong Kong as a private company on August 25, 2003 and acquired by VEI CHN on September 25, 2008; 

 

4.TapServices, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company incorporated in Philippines as a private company on March 24, 2009 and acquired by VEI CHN on January 23, 2017. 

 

5.Value Exchange Int’l (Hunan) Limited, a subsidiary of the Company with 51% ownership incorporated in Hunan as a private company on November 15, 2018; 

 

6.Shanghai Zhaonan Hengan Information Technology Co., Limited, a subsidiary of the Company with 51% ownership incorporated in Hunan as a private company on February 10, 2020. 


F-8


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 2 - Accounting policies (Continued)

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”), and include the financial statements of the Company and all its wholly-owned subsidiaries that require consolidation. All material intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated in the consolidation. The following entities were consolidated as of December 31, 2020:

 

 

 

 

 

Ownership percentage

 

 

Place of incorporation

 

2020

2019

Value Exchange International, Inc.

 

USA

 

Parent Company

Parent Company

Value Exchange Int’l (China) Limited

 

Hong Kong

 

100%

100%

Value Exchange Int’l (Shanghai) Limited

 

PRC

 

100%

100%

Value Exchange Int’l (Hong Kong) Limited

 

Hong Kong

 

100%

100%

Koinon Technology Services, Inc.

 

US Virgin Islands, US

 

-

51%

TapServices, Inc.

 

Philippines

 

100%

100%

Value Exchange Int’l (Hunan) Limited

 

PRC

 

51%

51%

Shanghai Zhaonan Hengan Information Technology Co., Limited

 

PRC

 

51%

-

 

 

 

Value Exchange International, Inc.

- a Nevada Company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Value Exchange Int’l (China) Limited

- a Hong Kong Company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

100%

 

100%

 

100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Value Exchange Int’l (Shanghai) Limited

- a PRC Company

 

Value Exchange Int’l (Hong Kong) Limited

- a Hong Kong Company

 

TapServices, Inc.

- a Philippines Company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

51%

 

51%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Value Exchange Int’l (Hunan) Limited

- a PRC Company

 

Shanghai Zhaonan Hengan Information Technology Co., Limited

- a PRC Company

 

 

 

Use of estimates

 

Preparing consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions affecting the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. The more significant areas requiring using management’s estimates and assumptions relate to the collectability of its receivables, the fair value and accounting treatment of financial instruments, the valuation of long-lived assets and valuation of deferred tax liabilities. Management bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Accordingly, actual results may differ significantly from these estimates. In addition, different assumptions or circumstances could reasonably be expected to yield different results.

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

For purposes of the cash flow statements, the Company considers all highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less at the time of purchase to be cash equivalents. Cash includes cash on hand and demand deposits in accounts maintained with financial institutions or state owned banks within the PRC and Hong Kong.


F-9


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 2 - Accounting policies (Continued)

 

Accounts receivable and other receivables

 

Receivables include trade accounts due from customers and other receivables such as cash advances to employees, utility deposits paid and advance to suppliers. Management reviews the composition of accounts receivable and analyzes historical bad debts, customer concentration, customer credit worthiness, current economic trends and changes in customer payment patterns to determine if the allowance for doubtful accounts is adequate. An estimate for doubtful accounts is made when collection of the full amount is no longer probable. Delinquent account balances are written-off after management has determined that the likelihood of collection is not probable and known bad debts are written off against the allowance for doubtful accounts when identified. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, there was no allowance for uncollectible accounts receivable, respectively. Management believes that the remaining accounts receivable are collectable.

 

Plant and equipment

 

Plant and equipment is stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses, if any. Expenditures for maintenance and repairs are charged to earnings as incurred. Major additions are capitalized. When assets are retired or otherwise disposed of, the related cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the respective accounts, and any gain or loss is included in operations. Depreciation of plant and equipment is provided using the straight-line method for substantially all assets with estimated lives as follows:

 

 

Estimated Useful Life

Leasehold improvements

Lesser of lease term or the estimated useful lives of

5 years

Computer equipment

5 years

Computer software

5 years

Office furniture and equipment

5 years

Motor Vehicle

3 years

Building

5 years

 

Impairment of long-lived assets

 

The Company evaluates long lived assets, including equipment, for impairment at least once per year and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable from its estimated future cash flows. Based on the existence of one or more indicators of impairment, the Company measures any impairment of long-lived assets by comparing the asset's estimated fair value with its carrying value, based on cash flow methodology. If the net book value of the asset exceeds the related undiscounted cash flows, the asset is considered impaired and an impairment loss equal to an amount by which the carrying value exceeds the fair value of the asset is recognized.

 

Fair value of financial instruments

 

The Company values its financial instruments as required by FASB ASC 320-12-65. The estimated fair value amounts have been determined by the Company, using available market information or other appropriate valuation methodologies. However, considerable judgment is required in interpreting market data to develop estimates of fair value. Consequently, the estimates are not necessarily indicative of the amounts that could be realized or would be paid in a current market exchange.


F-10


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 2 - Accounting policies (Continued)

 

ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurement and Disclosures, defines fair value as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. This topic also establishes a fair value hierarchy which requires classification based on observable and unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The fair value hierarchy distinguishes between assumptions based on market data (observable inputs) and an entity’s own assumptions (unobservable inputs). The hierarchy consists of three levels:

 

Level one —Quoted market prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities; 

 

Level two —Inputs other than level one inputs that are either directly or indirectly observable; and 

 

Level three —Unobservable inputs developed using estimates and assumptions, which are developed by the reporting entity and reflect those assumptions that a market participant would use. 

 

Determining which category an asset or liability falls within the hierarchy requires significant judgment. The Company evaluates its hierarchy disclosures each quarter. The carrying values of the Company’s financial instruments; consisting of cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable, other receivables and prepayments, other payables and accrued liabilities, balances with a related party, balances with related companies and amounts due to director approximate their fair values due to the short maturities of these instruments.

 

As of December 31, 2020, the Company’s financial instruments consist principally of cash, and amounts due to related parties. Pursuant to ASC 820, the fair value of our cash is determined based on “Level 1” inputs, which consist of quoted prices in active markets for identical assets. We believe that the recorded values of all of our other financial instruments approximate their current fair values because of their nature and respective maturity dates or durations.

 

There was no asset or liability measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis as of December 31, 2020.

 

Comprehensive income

 

U.S. GAAP generally requires that recognized revenue, expenses, gains and losses be included in net income or loss. Although certain changes in assets and liabilities are reported as separate components of the equity section of the consolidated balance sheet, such items, along with net income, are components of comprehensive income or loss. The components of other comprehensive income or loss consist of foreign currency translation adjustments.

 

Earnings per share

 

The Company reports earnings per share in accordance with ASC 260, Earnings per Share. ASC 260 requires presentation of both basic and diluted earnings per share (“EPS”) on the face of the income statement. Basic EPS is computed by dividing net income available to common shareholders (numerator) by the weighted average number of shares outstanding (denominator) during the period. Diluted EPS gives effect to all dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period using the treasury stock method and convertible preferred stock using the if-converted method. In computing diluted EPS, the average stock price for the period is used in determining the number of shares assumed to be purchased from the exercise of stock options or warrants. Diluted EPS excludes all dilutive potential shares if their effect is anti-dilutive.

 

Revenue recognition

 

Sales revenue is recognized when all of the following have occurred: (i) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (ii) delivery has occurred or services have been rendered, (iii) the price is fixed or determinable, and (iv) the ability to collect is reasonably assured.

 

The Company’s revenue is derived from three primary sources: (i) professional services for systems development and integration, including procurement of related hardware and software licenses on behalf of customers, if required; (ii) professional services for system maintenance normally for a period of one year; and (iii) sale of hardware and consumables during the service performed as stated above.


F-11


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 2 - Accounting policies (Continued)

 

Multiple-deliverable arrangements

 

The Company derives revenue from fixed-price sale contracts with customers that may provide for the Company to procure hardware and software licenses with varied performance specifications specific to each customer and provide the technical services for systems development and integration of the hardware and software licenses. In instances where the contract price is inclusive of the technical services, the sale contracts include multiple deliverables. A multiple-element arrangement is separated into more than one unit of accounting if all of the following criteria are met:

 

·The delivered item(s) has value to the customer on a stand-alone basis; 

 

·There is objective and reliable evidence of the fair value of the undelivered item(s); and 

 

·If the arrangement includes a general right of return relative to the delivered item(s), delivery or performance of the undelivered item(s) is considered probable and substantially in the control of the Company. 

 

The Company’s multiple-element contracts generally include customer-acceptance provisions which provide for the Company to carry out installation, test runs and performance tests at the Company’s cost until the systems as a whole can meet the performance specifications stated in the contracts. The delivered equipment and software licenses have no standalone value to the customer until they are installed, integrated and tested at the customer’s site by the Company in accordance with the performance specifications specific to each customer. In addition, under these multiple-element contracts, the Company has not sold the equipment and software licenses separately from the installation, integration and testing services, and hence there is no objective and reliable evidence of the fair value for each deliverable included in the arrangement. As a result, the equipment and the technical services for installation, integration and testing of the equipment are considered a single unit of accounting pursuant to ASC Subtopic 605-25, Revenue Recognition — Multiple-Element Arrangements. In addition, the arrangement generally includes customer acceptance criteria that cannot be tested before installation and integration at the customer’s site. Accordingly, revenue recognition is deferred until customer acceptance, indicated by an acceptance certificate signed off by the customer.

 

Revenues of maintenance services are recognized when the services are performed in accordance with the contract term.

 

Revenues of sale of software, if not bundled with other arrangements, are recognized when shipped and customer acceptance obtained, if all other revenue recognition criteria are met. Costs associated with revenues are recognized when incurred.

 

Revenues are recorded net of value-added taxes, sales discounts and returns. There were no sales returns during the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019.

 

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

NET REVENUES

 

 

 

Service income

 

 

 

- systems development and integration

11,268,268

 

72,062

- systems maintenance

7,379,350

 

5,856,729

- sales of hardware and consumables

1,903,853

 

2,380,338

 

20,551,471

 

8,309,129

 

Billings in excess of revenues recognized are recorded as deferred revenue.


F-12


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 2 - Accounting policies (Continued)

 

Income taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes in accordance with the accounting standard issued by the Financial Accounting Standard Board (“FASB”) for income taxes. Under the asset and liability method as required by this accounting standard, deferred income taxes are recognized for the tax consequences of temporary differences by applying enacted statutory tax rates applicable to future years to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts and the tax bases of existing assets and liabilities. The charge for taxation is based on the results for the reporting period as adjusted for items which are non-assessable or disallowed. It is calculated using tax rates that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the balance sheet date. The effect on deferred income taxes of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. A valuation allowance is recognized if it is more likely than not that some portion, or all of, a deferred tax asset will not be realized.

 

Under the accounting standard regarding accounting for uncertainty in income taxes, a tax position is recognized as a benefit only if it is “more likely than not” that the tax position would be sustained in a tax examination, with a tax examination being presumed to occur. The amount recognized is the largest amount of tax benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized on examination. For tax positions not meeting the “more likely than not” test, no tax benefit is recorded. Penalties and interest incurred related to underpayment of income tax are classified as income tax expense in the year incurred.

 

Refer to Note 13 to the consolidated financial statements for further information regarding the components of the Company’s income tax.

 

Operating leases

 

Leases where substantially all the rewards and risks of ownership of assets remain with the leasing company are accounted for as operating leases. Payments made under operating leases are charged to the statements of income on a straight-line basis over the lease periods.

 

Advertising costs

 

The Company expenses the cost of advertising as incurred in the period in which the advertisements and marketing activities are first run or over the life of the endorsement contract. Advertising and marketing expense for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 were approximately $575 and $3,690, respectively.

 

Shipping and handling

 

Shipping and handling cost incurred to ship computer products to customers are included in selling expenses. Shipping and handling expenses for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 were insignificant.

 

Research and development costs

 

Research and development costs are expensed as incurred and are included in general and administrative expenses. Research and development costs for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 were insignificant.

 


F-13


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 2 - Accounting policies (Continued)

 

Foreign currency translation

 

The functional currency and reporting currency of the Company is the U.S. Dollar. (“US$” or “$”). The functional currency of the Hong Kong subsidiaries is the Hong Kong Dollar. The functional currency of the PRC subsidiary is RMB. Results of operations and cash flow are translated at average exchange rates during the period, and assets and liabilities are translated at the exchange rate as quoted by the Hong Kong Monetary Authority (“HKMA”) at the end of the period. Capital accounts are translated at their historical exchange rates when the capital transaction occurred. Translation adjustments resulting from this process are included in accumulated other comprehensive income. Transaction gains and losses that arise from exchange rate fluctuations on transactions denominated in a currency other than the functional currency are included in the results of operations as incurred.

 

Year ended

 

December 31, 2020

 

December 31, 2019

RMB : USD exchange rate

 

6.9348

 

6.8829

Average period ended

 

 

 

 

HKD : USD exchange rate

 

7.800

 

7.800

Average period ended

 

 

 

 

PESO : USD exchange rate

 

49.6473

 

51.0424

Average period ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year ended

 

December 31, 2020

 

December 31, 2019

RMB : USD exchange rate

 

6.5442

 

6.9799

HKD : USD exchange rate

 

7.800

 

7.800

PESO : USD exchange rate

 

47.7064

 

51.1475

 

Commitments and contingencies

 

The Company follows FASB ASC Subtopic 450-20, “Loss Contingencies” in determining its accruals and disclosures with respect to loss contingencies. Accordingly, estimated losses from loss contingencies are accrued by a charge to income when information available prior to issuance of the financial statements indicates that it is probable that a liability could be incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. Legal expenses associated with the contingency are expensed as incurred. If a loss contingency is not probable or reasonably estimable, disclosure of the loss contingency is made in the financial statements when it is at least reasonably possible that a material loss could be incurred.

 

Segment Reporting

 

The Company uses the “management approach” in determining reportable operating segments. The management approach considers the internal organization and reporting used by the Company’s chief operating decision maker for making operating decisions and assessing performance as the source for determining the Company’s reportable segments. Management, including the chief operating decision maker, reviews operating results solely by monthly revenue from software development and maintenance services (but not by sub-services/product type or geographic area) and operating results of the Company and, as such, the Company has determined that the Company has one operating segment as defined by ASC Topic 280 “Segment Reporting”.

 

Recent accounting pronouncements

 

In June 2016, FASB amended guidance related to impairment of financial instruments as part of ASU 2016-13 Financial Instruments—Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments, which will be effective on January 1, 2020. The guidance replaces the incurred loss impairment methodology with an expected credit loss model for which a group is required to recognize an allowance based on its estimate of expected credit loss. We are currently evaluating the impact of this new guidance on our consolidated financial statements.


F-14


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 2 - Accounting policies (Continued)

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-04, Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment. The guidance removes Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test, which requires a hypothetical purchase price allocation. A goodwill impairment will now be the amount by which a reporting unit’s carrying value exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the carrying amount of goodwill. The guidance should be adopted on a prospective basis for the annual or any interim goodwill impairment tests beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. The Company currently intends to adopt this guidance for the fiscal year beginning January 1, 2020, and does not anticipate that the adoption of this guidance will have a material impact on its financial statements or disclosures because the Company does not currently have any recorded goodwill.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued Accounting Standard Update No. 2018-13, Changes to Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurements (Topic 820) (ASU 2018-13), which improved the effectiveness of disclosure requirements for recurring and nonrecurring fair value measurements. The standard removes, modifies, and adds certain disclosure requirements. This guidance will be effective for us in the first quarter of 2020 on a prospective basis, with early adoption permitted. We do not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In December 2019, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standard Update No. 2019-12, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes (ASU 2019-12), which simplifies the accounting for income taxes. This guidance will be effective for us in the first quarter of 2021 on a prospective basis, with early adoption permitted. We do not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In January 2020, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update No. 2020-01, Investments—Equity Securities (Topic 321), Investments—Equity Method and Joint Ventures (Topic 323), and Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815) (ASU 2020-01), which clarifies the interaction of the accounting for equity securities under Topic 321, the accounting for equity method investments in Topic 323, and the accounting for certain forward contracts and purchased options in Topic 815. This guidance will be effective for us in the first quarter of 2021 on a prospective basis, with early adoption permitted. We do not expect the adoption of this guidance to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

Other accounting standards that have been issued or proposed by the FASB or other standards-setting bodies that do not require adoption until a future date are not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements upon adoption.

 

Note 3 - Accounts receivable

 

Accounts receivable as of December 31, 2020 and 2019 consisted of the following: 

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Accounts receivable

603,689

 

777,348

Allowance for doubtful accounts

(4,253)

 

(3,788)

 

599,436

 

773,560

 

During the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, the Company did not have delinquent accounts receivable to write-off. 

 

All of the Company’s customers are located in the PRC, Hong Kong and Philippines. The Company provides credit in the normal course of business. The Company performs ongoing credit evaluations of its customers and maintains allowances for doubtful accounts based on factors surrounding the credit risk of specific customers, historical trends, and other information. 


F-15


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 4 - Other receivables and prepayments

 

Other receivables and prepayments as of December 31, 2020 and 2019 consisted of the following:

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Prepaid expense

201,435

 

140,635

Rental deposits

98,355

 

74,506

Others

114,552

 

42,032

 

414,342

 

257,173

 

Note 5 - Inventories

 

Inventories as of December 31, 2020 and 2019 consisted of the following:

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Finished goods

238,147

 

219,592

 

Note 6 – Plant and equipment, net

 

Plant and equipment consisted of the following as of December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Leasehold improvements

78,224

 

73,322

Office furniture and equipment

254,681

 

145,002

Computer equipment

334,237

 

315,332

Computer software

43,319

 

39,548

Motor Vehicle

119,806

 

154,434

Building

68,904

 

64,673

Total

899,171

 

792,311

Less: accumulated depreciation

(542,150)

 

(438,485)

Plant and equipment, net

357,021

 

353,826

 

Depreciation expense for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 amounted to $193,390 and $156,563, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, no interest expense was capitalized into plant and equipment.

 

As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, the Company's motor vehicle was under finance lease arrangement with a net carrying amount $44,533 and nil respectively. 

 

Note 7 – Goodwill

 

Goodwill consisted of the following as of December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Goodwill arising from acquisition of TSI

206,812

 

206,812

 

 

 

 


F-16


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 8 – Leases

 

We have entered into various non-cancelable operating lease agreements for certain of our offices. Our leases have original lease periods expiring between the remainder of 2021 and 2025. Many leases include option to renew. We do not assume renewals in our determination of the lease term unless the renewals are deemed to be reasonably assured. Our lease agreements generally do not contain any material residual value guarantees or material restrictive covenants.

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Operating lease right-of-use assets, net

585,057

 

824,230

 

 

 

 

The components of lease liabilities are as follows:

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Lease liabilities, current

303,687

 

356,960

Lease liabilities, non-current

277,111

 

478,641

Present value of lease liabilities

580,798

 

835,601

 

Total lease cost for the year ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 amounted to $15,502 and $11,371. Weighted-average remaining lease term is 1.6 years, and weighted-average discount rate is 3%.

 

The following is a schedule, by years, of maturities of lease liabilities as of December 31, 2020:

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Year one

316,880

 

367,669

Year two

187,971

 

344,461

Year three

95,772

 

137,839

Year four

-

 

31,302

Thereafter

-

 

-

Total undiscounted cash flows

600,623

 

881,271

Less: Imputed interest

(19,826)

 

(45,670)

Present value of lease liabilities

580,798

 

835,601

 

Note 9 – Intangible Assets

 

Intangible Assets consisted of the following as of December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Customer relationship

200,641

 

200,641

Less: accumulated amortization

(200,641)

 

(200,641)

 

-

 

-

 

Amortization expense for the year ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 amounted to nil and $66,881, respectively. The amortization expense was included in general and administrative expenses.


F-17


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 10 – Bank loan

 

Bank loan and accruals consisted of the following as of December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Long term bank loan

101,823

 

-

Less: Current portion of long term bank loan

(38,874)

 

-

 

62,949

 

-

 

 

 

 

Short term bank loan

-

 

13,686

Current portion of long term bank loan

38,874

 

-

 

38,874

 

13,686

 

As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, the above bank loan secured by property and equipment with net carrying amount of $44,533 and nil respectively.

 

Note 11 – Other payables and accrued liabilities

 

Other payables and accruals consisted of the following as of December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Accrual

737,141

 

519,853

Income taxes payable

94,675

 

33,406

 

831,816

 

553,259

 

Accrual mainly represents salary payables and fringe and social security accruals. According to the prevailing laws and regulations of the PRC, all eligible employees of the Company’s subsidiary are entitled to staff welfare benefits including medical care, welfare subsidies, unemployment insurance and pension benefits through a PRC government-mandated multi-employer defined contribution plan. The Company’s subsidiary is required to accrue for these benefits based on certain percentages of the qualified employees’ salaries. The Company’s subsidiary is required to make contributions to the plans out of the amounts accrued.

 

The Company’s subsidiaries incorporated in Hong Kong manage a defined contribution Mandatory Provident Fund (the “MPF Scheme”) under the Mandatory Provident Fund Schemes Ordinance, for all of its employees in Hong Kong. The Company is required to contribute 5% of the monthly salaries for all Hong Kong based employees to the MPF Scheme up to a maximum statutory limit.

 

Note 12 – Deferred income

 

Deferred income consisted of the following as of December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Service fees received in advance

254,937

 

255,749

 

 

 

 


F-18


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 13 - Income taxes

 

Income is subject to tax in the various countries in which the company operates.

 

The Company is subject to United States tax at a tax rate of 21%. No provision for income taxes in the United States has been made as the Company had no income taxable in the United States.

 

The Company’s Hong Kong subsidiaries are subject to Hong Kong Profits Tax at 16.5% of the estimated assessable profit. The Income Tax Laws in Hong Kong exempts income tax for dividends distributed to its shareholders. Accordingly, no deferred tax liability was recognized for the undistributed earnings of the Company and its Hong Kong subsidiaries.

 

The Company’s Philippine subsidiary is subject to Philippine Statutory Corporate Income Tax at 30%.

 

The Company’s PRC subsidiary in the PRC is subject to PRC Enterprise Income Tax at 25%.

 

The Income Tax Laws in PRC also imposes a 10% withholding income tax for dividends distributed by a foreign invested enterprise to its immediate holding company outside PRC for distribution of earnings generated after January 1, 2008. Under the Income Tax Laws, the distribution of earnings generated prior to January 1, 2008 is exempt from the withholding tax. As the Company’s subsidiary located in the PRC that are available for distribution to the Company of approximately $0 at December 31, 2019 are considered to be indefinitely reinvested, and accordingly, no provision has been made for the Chinese dividend withholding taxes that would be payable upon the distribution of those amounts to the Company. As of December 31, 2020, the Company’s subsidiary located in the PRC that are available for distribution to the Company of approximately $0.

 

The Company’s income tax expense consisted of:

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Current income tax

20,727

 

33,621

Deferred income tax

-

 

(22,205)

Income tax expenses

20,727

 

11,416

 

A reconciliation of the income tax expense / (credit) applicable to income before tax using the applicable statutory rates for the jurisdictions in which the Company and its subsidiaries operated to the tax expense / (credit) at the effective tax rates are as follows:

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Pre-tax income

126,231

 

64,851

 

 

 

 

U.S. federal corporate income tax rate

21%

 

35%

Philippine corporate income tax rate

30%

 

30%

P.R.C. corporate income tax rate

25%

 

25%

Hong Kong corporate income tax rate

16.5%

 

16.5%

 

 

 

 

Current tax computed at various jurisdiction rate

20,727

 

33,621

Deferred tax computed at various jurisdiction rate

-

 

(22,205)

Effective income taxes

20,727

 

11,416


F-19


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 13 - Income taxes (Continued)

 

Deferred income taxes reflect the net tax effects of temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts used for income tax purposes. Significant components of deferred income tax assets and liabilities are as follows: 

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Deferred income tax assets:

 

 

 

Tax losses

71,681

 

56,045

 

Note 14 – Statutory reserves

 

Statutory reserves

 

The laws and regulations of the PRC require that before an enterprise distributes profits to its owners, it must first satisfy all tax liabilities, provide for losses in previous years, and make allocations in proportions determined at the discretion of the Board of Directors after the statutory reserves.

 

As stipulated by the Company Law of the PRC, as applicable to Chinese companies with foreign ownership, net income after taxation can only be distributed as dividends after appropriation has been made for the following:

 

1.Making up cumulative prior years’ losses, if any; 

 

2.Allocations to the “Statutory surplus reserve” of at least 10% of income after tax, as determined under PRC accounting rules and regulations, until the fund amounts to 50% of the company’s registered capital; and; 

 

3.Allocations to the discretionary surplus reserve, if approved in the shareholders’ general meeting. 

 

The statutory reserve fund is non-distributable other than during liquidation and can be used to fund previous years’ losses, if any. It may be utilized for business expansion or converted into share capital by issuing new shares to existing shareholders in proportion to their shareholding or by increasing the par value of the shares currently held by them, provided that the remaining reserve balance after such issue is not less than 25% of the registered capital.

 


F-20


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 15 – Related party and shareholder transactions

 

Other than disclosed elsewhere in these financial statements, the Company also had the following related party balances and transactions:

 

Related party balances

 

 

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

Due from related parties

US$

 

US$

Value Exchange International Limited (i)

1,269,620

 

534,806

Cucumbuy.com Limited (ii)

30,769

 

 

SmartMyWays Co., Limited (iii)

30,769

 

-

Retail Intelligent Unit Limited (iv)

12,308

 

-

 

1,343,466

 

534,806

 

 

 

 

Due to related parties

 

 

 

AppMyWays Co., Limited (v)

253,063

 

-

Mr. Edmund Yeung (vi)

-

 

32,909

Mr. Johan Pehrson (vii)

10,000

 

-

 

263,063

 

32,909

 

Related party transactions:

 

 

Year end December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

 

US$

 

US$

Subcontracting fees paid to

 

 

 

Value Exchange International Limited (i)

-

 

(16,910)

AppMyWays Co., Limited (v)

(771,538)

 

-

ValueX International Pte. Ltd. (viii)

-

 

(1,769)

 

 

 

 

Service income received from

 

 

 

Value Exchange International Limited (i)

1,117

 

351,903

AppMyWays Co., Limited (v)

788,987

 

-

ValueX International Pte. Ltd. (viii)

159,581

 

3,035

Value E Consultant International (M) Sdn. Bhd (ix)

18,069

 

80,483

TAP Technology (HK) Limited (x)

262,821

 

-

 

 

 

 

Service income paid to

 

 

 

Cucumbuy.com Limited (ii)

(41,216)

 

(30,769)

TAP Technology (HK) Limited (x)

-

 

(155,696)

 

 

 

 

Interest expenses payable to

 

 

 

Mr. Edmund Yeung (vi)

-

 

(2,371)

 

 

 

 

Management fees received from

 

 

 

Value Exchange International Limited (i)

49,700

 

154,870

Cucumbuy.com Limited (ii)

30,769

 

-

SmartMyWays Co., Limited (iii)

30,769

 

-

Retail Intelligent Unit Limited (vi)

12,308

 

-

TAP Technology (HK) Limited (x)

30,769

 

-


F-21


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 15 – Related party and shareholder transactions (Continued)

 

(i)Mr. Kenneth Tan and Ms. Bella Tsang, directors of the Company, are shareholders and a directors of Value Exchange International Limited, a company incorporated in Hong Kong. The balance is unsecured, interest free and repayable on demand. 

 

(ii)Ms. Bella Tsang, a director of the Company, is a shareholder and a director of Cucumbuy.com Limited, a company incorporated in Hong Kong. The balance is unsecured, interest free and repayable on demand. 

 

(iii)Ms. Bella Tsang, a director of the Company, is a shareholder and a director of SmartMyWays Co., Limited, a company incorporated in Hong Kong. Mr. Kenneth Tan, a director of the Company, is a director of SmartMyWays Co., Limited. The balance is unsecured, interest free and repayable on demand. 

 

(iv)Ms. Bella Tsang, a director of the Company, is a shareholder and a director of Retail Intelligent Unit Limited, a company incorporated in Hong Kong. Mr. Kenneth Tan, a director of the Company, is a director of Retail Intelligent Unit Limited. The balance is unsecured, interest free and repayable on demand. 

 

(v)Ms. Bella Tsang, a director of the Company, is a shareholder and a director of AppMyWays Co., Limited, a company incorporated in Hong Kong. The balance is unsecured, interest free and repayable on demand. 

 

(vi)Mr. Edmund Yeung is a director of the Company. The balance included a loan from a director is unsecured, interest bearing at 12% per annum, and repayable on February 7, 2016 amount to nil as of December 31, 2020 (2019: US$ 32,051).  

 

(vii)Mr. Johan Pehrson is a director of the Company. The balance is unsecured, interest free and repayable on demand. 

 

(viii)Ms. Bella Tsang, a director of the Company, is a shareholder and a director of ValueX International Pte. Ltd., a company incorporated in Singapore. The balance is unsecured, interest free and repayable on demand. 

 

(ix)Ms. Bella Tsang, a director of the Company, is a shareholder of Value E Consultant International (M) Sdn. Bhd, a company incorporated in Malaysia. The balance is unsecured, interest free and repayable on demand. 

 

(x)Ms. Bella Tsang, a director of the Company, is a shareholder and a director of TAP Technology (HK) Limited, a company incorporated in Hong Kong. The balance is unsecured, interest free and repayable on demand. 


F-22


 

 

VALUE EXCHANGE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND 2019

 

Note 16 - Concentration of risks

 

The Company’s operations are carried out in the PRC and in Hong Kong through the Company’s operating subsidiaries located in PRC and Hong Kong SAR. Its operations in the PRC and Hong Kong SAR are subject to specific considerations and significant risks not typically associated with companies in North America and Western Europe. These include risks associated with, among others, the political, economic and legal environments and foreign currency exchange. The Company’s results may be adversely affected by changes in government policies regarding laws and regulations, anti-inflationary measures, currency conversion and remittance abroad, and rates and methods of taxation, among other things.

 

The Company provides unsecured credit terms for sales to certain customers. As a result, there are credit risks with the accounts receivable balances. The Company constantly re-evaluates the credit worthiness of customers buying on credit and maintains an allowance for doubtful accounts.

 

The following individual customer accounted for 10% or more of the Company’s revenues for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

 

2020

 

2019

DXC Technology Enterprise Services (Hong Kong) Limited

52.4%

 

-

Wuhan Watson's Personal Care Stores Co., Limited

8.1%

 

29.1 %

Aisino Wincor Nixdorf Retail & Banking Systems

(Shanghai) Co., Ltd. Company

9.9%

 

28.8 %

Fujitsu Hong Kong Limited

4.6%

 

11.9%

 

Individual customer accounts receivable that represented 10% or more of total accounts receivable as of December 31, 2020 and 2019 were as follows:

 

 

Percentage of accounts

receivable as of

December 31,

 

2020

 

2019

Wuhan Watson's Personal Care Stores Co., Limited

0.1%

 

20.0%

Aisino Wincor Nixdorf Retail & Banking

Systems (Shanghai) Co., Ltd. Company

10.6%

 

19.0%

Wincor Nixdorf (Hong Kong) Limited

13.5%

 

14.8%

Robinsons Retail Group

37.1%

 

14.0%


F-23