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SBRA Sabra Healthcare REIT

Filed: 4 Aug 21, 4:08pm
0001492298sbra:MeasurementInputHoldingPeriodus-gaap:FairValueInputsLevel3Memberus-gaap:ValuationTechniqueDiscountedCashFlowMembersbra:EnlivantJointVentureMember2021-04-012021-06-30
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 FORM 10-Q  
(Mark One)
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2021
OR 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from to
Commission file number 001-34950
SABRA HEALTH CARE REIT, INC.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter) 
Maryland 27-2560479
(State of Incorporation) (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
18500 Von Karman Avenue, Suite 550
Irvine, CA 92612
(888) 393-8248
(Address, zip code and telephone number of Registrant)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each classTrading symbol(s)Name of each exchange on which registered
Common stock, $.01 par valueSBRAThe Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes      No  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filerAccelerated filer
Non-accelerated filerSmaller reporting company
Emerging growth company
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes      No  
As of July 30, 2021, there were 220,824,104 shares of the registrant’s $0.01 par value Common Stock outstanding.


SABRA HEALTH CARE REIT, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
Index
 
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References throughout this document to “Sabra,” “we,” “our,” “ours” and “us” refer to Sabra Health Care REIT, Inc. and its direct and indirect consolidated subsidiaries and not any other person.
STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
Certain statements in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (this “10-Q”) contain “forward-looking” information as that term is defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Any statements that do not relate to historical or current facts or matters are forward-looking statements. Examples of forward-looking statements include all statements regarding our expected future financial position, results of operations, cash flows, liquidity, financing plans, business strategy, tenants, the expected amounts and timing of dividends and other distributions, projected expenses and capital expenditures, competitive position, growth opportunities, potential investments, potential dispositions, plans and objectives for future operations, and compliance with and changes in governmental regulations. You can identify some of the forward-looking statements by the use of forward-looking words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “plan,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “should,” “may” and other similar expressions, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words.
Our actual results may differ materially from those projected or contemplated by our forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including, among others, the following:
the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, including the risk of additional surges of COVID-19 infections due to the rate of public acceptance and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines or to new and more contagious and/or vaccine resistant variants, and measures intended to prevent its spread, and the related impact on our tenants, operators and Senior Housing - Managed communities (as defined below);
our dependence on the operating success of our tenants;
the potential variability of our reported rental and related revenues following the adoption of Topic 842 (as defined below) on January 1, 2019;
operational risks with respect to our Senior Housing - Managed communities;
the effect of our tenants declaring bankruptcy or becoming insolvent;
our ability to find replacement tenants and the impact of unforeseen costs in acquiring new properties;
the impact of litigation and rising insurance costs on the business of our tenants;
changes in healthcare regulation and political or economic conditions;
the impact of required regulatory approvals of transfers of healthcare properties;
competitive conditions in our industry;
our concentration in the healthcare property sector, particularly in skilled nursing/transitional care facilities and senior housing communities, which makes our profitability more vulnerable to a downturn in a specific sector than if we were investing in multiple industries;
•    the significant amount of and our ability to service our indebtedness;
covenants in our debt agreements that may restrict our ability to pay dividends, make investments, incur additional indebtedness and refinance indebtedness on favorable terms;
increases in market interest rates;
the phasing out of the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) benchmark beginning after 2021;
our ability to raise capital through equity and debt financings;
risks associated with our investment in the Enlivant Joint Venture (as defined below);
changes in foreign currency exchange rates;
the relatively illiquid nature of real estate investments;
the loss of key management personnel;
uninsured or underinsured losses affecting our properties and the possibility of environmental compliance costs and liabilities;
the impact of a failure or security breach of information technology in our operations;
our ability to maintain our status as a real estate investment trust (“REIT”) under the federal tax laws;
changes in tax laws and regulations affecting REITs (including the potential effects of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act);
compliance with REIT requirements and certain tax and tax regulatory matters related to our status as a REIT; and
the ownership limits and takeover defenses in our governing documents and under Maryland law, which may restrict change of control or business combination opportunities.
We urge you to carefully consider these risks and review the additional disclosures we make concerning risks and other factors that may materially affect the outcome of our forward-looking statements and our future business and operating results, including those made in Part I, Item 1A, “Risk Factors” of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020 (our “2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K”), as such risk factors may be amended, supplemented or superseded from time to time by other reports we file with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), including subsequent Annual
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Reports on Form 10-K and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. We caution you that any forward-looking statements made in this 10-Q are not guarantees of future performance, events or results, and you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this report. We do not intend, and we undertake no obligation, to update any forward-looking information to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this 10-Q or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events, unless required by law to do so.

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PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
ITEM 1.FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
SABRA HEALTH CARE REIT, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(dollars in thousands, except per share data)  
 
June 30, 2021December 31, 2020
 (unaudited) 
Assets
Real estate investments, net of accumulated depreciation of $763,830 and $681,657 as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively$5,269,447 $5,285,038 
Loans receivable and other investments, net105,228 102,839 
Investment in unconsolidated joint venture113,962 288,761 
Cash and cash equivalents69,347 59,076 
Restricted cash4,588 6,447 
Lease intangible assets, net79,654 82,796 
Accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other assets, net179,915 160,646 
Total assets$5,822,141 $5,985,603 
Liabilities
Secured debt, net$78,094 $79,065 
Term loans, net939,692 1,044,916 
Senior unsecured notes, net1,248,525 1,248,393 
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities119,419 146,276 
Lease intangible liabilities, net53,348 57,725 
Total liabilities2,439,078 2,576,375 
Commitments and contingencies (Note 12)00
Equity
Preferred stock, $0.01 par value; 10,000,000 shares authorized, 0 shares issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020
Common stock, $0.01 par value; 500,000,000 shares authorized, 220,824,104 and 210,560,815 shares issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively2,208 2,106 
Additional paid-in capital4,341,533 4,163,228 
Cumulative distributions in excess of net income(944,504)(716,195)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss(16,174)(39,911)
Total equity3,383,063 3,409,228 
Total liabilities and equity$5,822,141 $5,985,603 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.
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SABRA HEALTH CARE REIT, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF (LOSS) INCOME
(dollars in thousands, except per share data)  
(unaudited)
 
Three Months Ended June 30,Six Months Ended June 30,
 2021202020212020
Revenues:
Rental and related revenues$110,783 $112,727 $224,166 $219,239 
Interest and other income3,031 2,606 5,972 5,457 
Resident fees and services39,118 38,584 75,159 78,567 
   
Total revenues152,932 153,917 305,297 303,263 
  
Expenses:
Depreciation and amortization44,491 44,202 88,866 88,370 
Interest24,270 25,292 48,713 50,996 
Triple-net portfolio operating expenses5,000 5,331 10,135 10,232 
Senior housing - managed portfolio operating expenses28,901 27,970 57,846 55,231 
General and administrative8,811 8,673 17,749 17,434 
(Recovery of) provision for loan losses and other reserves(109)129 1,916 796 
   
Total expenses111,364 111,597 225,225 223,059 
  
Other income (expense):
Loss on extinguishment of debt(54)(392)(847)(392)
Other (expense) income(24)(66)109 2,193 
Net (loss) gain on sales of real estate(3,752)330 (2,439)113 
Total other (expense) income(3,830)(128)(3,177)1,914 
Income before loss from unconsolidated joint venture and income tax expense37,738 42,192 76,895 82,118 
Loss from unconsolidated joint venture(169,789)(12,136)(174,799)(15,803)
Income tax expense(522)(433)(1,222)(1,475)
Net (loss) income$(132,573)$29,623 $(99,126)$64,840 
  
Net (loss) income, per:
Basic common share$(0.61)$0.14 $(0.46)$0.32 
    
Diluted common share$(0.61)$0.14 $(0.46)$0.31 
    
Weighted-average number of common shares outstanding, basic216,264,207 205,593,653 213,870,329 205,493,829 
 
Weighted-average number of common shares outstanding, diluted216,264,207 206,219,162 213,870,329 206,194,282 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.
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SABRA HEALTH CARE REIT, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE (LOSS) INCOME
(in thousands)
(unaudited)
Three Months Ended June 30,Six Months Ended June 30,
2021202020212020
Net (loss) income$(132,573)$29,623 $(99,126)$64,840 
Other comprehensive income (loss):
Unrealized (loss) gain, net of tax:
Foreign currency translation (loss) gain(218)(534)(469)1,173 
Unrealized (loss) gain on cash flow hedges(9,583)(3,734)24,206 (44,426)
Total other comprehensive (loss) income(9,801)(4,268)23,737 (43,253)
Comprehensive (loss) income$(142,374)$25,355 $(75,389)$21,587 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

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SABRA HEALTH CARE REIT, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EQUITY
(dollars in thousands, except per share data)  
(unaudited)
 
Three Months Ended June 30, 2020
 Common StockAdditional
Paid-in Capital
Cumulative Distributions in Excess of Net IncomeAccumulated Other Comprehensive LossTotal Equity
 SharesAmounts
Balance, March 31, 2020205,559,356 $2,056 $4,075,781 $(631,251)$(51,373)$3,395,213 
Net income— — — 29,623 — 29,623 
Other comprehensive loss— — — — (4,268)(4,268)
Amortization of stock-based compensation— — 2,969 — — 2,969 
Common stock issuance, net1,324 (13)— — (13)
Common dividends ($0.30 per share)— — — (62,273)— (62,273)
Balance, June 30, 2020205,560,680 $2,056 $4,078,737 $(663,901)$(55,641)$3,361,251 
Three Months Ended June 30, 2021
 Common StockAdditional
Paid-in Capital
Cumulative Distributions in Excess of Net IncomeAccumulated Other Comprehensive LossTotal Equity
SharesAmounts
Balance, March 31, 2021215,930,202 $2,159 $4,254,134 $(746,516)$(6,373)$3,503,404 
Net loss— — — (132,573)— (132,573)
Other comprehensive loss— — — — (9,801)(9,801)
Amortization of stock-based compensation— — 2,857 — — 2,857 
Common stock issuance, net4,893,902 49 84,542 — — 84,591 
Common dividends ($0.30 per share)— — — (65,415)— (65,415)
Balance, June 30, 2021220,824,104 $2,208 $4,341,533 $(944,504)$(16,174)$3,383,063 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

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SABRA HEALTH CARE REIT, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EQUITY (CONTINUED)
(dollars in thousands, except per share data)  
(unaudited)
 
Six Months Ended June 30, 2020
 Common StockAdditional
Paid-in Capital
Cumulative Distributions in Excess of Net IncomeAccumulated Other Comprehensive LossTotal Equity
 SharesAmounts
Balance, December 31, 2019205,208,018 $2,052 $4,072,079 $(573,283)$(12,388)$3,488,460 
Cumulative effect of Topic 326 adoption— — — (167)— (167)
Net income— — — 64,840 — 64,840 
Other comprehensive loss— — — — (43,253)(43,253)
Amortization of stock-based compensation— — 5,957 — — 5,957 
Common stock issuance, net352,662 701 — — 705 
Common dividends ($0.75 per share)— — — (155,291)— (155,291)
Balance, June 30, 2020205,560,680 $2,056 $4,078,737 $(663,901)$(55,641)$3,361,251 
Six Months Ended June 30, 2021
 Common StockAdditional
Paid-in Capital
Cumulative Distributions in Excess of Net IncomeAccumulated Other Comprehensive (Loss) IncomeTotal Equity
SharesAmounts
Balance, December 31, 2020210,560,815 $2,106 $4,163,228 $(716,195)$(39,911)$3,409,228 
Net loss— — — (99,126)— (99,126)
Other comprehensive income— — — — 23,737 23,737 
Amortization of stock-based compensation— — 5,692 — — 5,692 
Common stock issuance, net10,263,289 102 172,613 — — 172,715 
Common dividends ($0.60 per share)— — — (129,183)— (129,183)
Balance, June 30, 2021220,824,104 $2,208 $4,341,533 $(944,504)$(16,174)$3,383,063 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.
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SABRA HEALTH CARE REIT, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(in thousands)
(unaudited)
 Six Months Ended June 30,
20212020
Cash flows from operating activities:
Net (loss) income$(99,126)$64,840 
Adjustments to reconcile net (loss) income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization88,866 88,370 
Non-cash rental and related revenues(10,627)(6,567)
Non-cash interest income(914)(1,135)
Non-cash interest expense3,645 4,458 
Stock-based compensation expense4,559 4,735 
Loss on extinguishment of debt847 392 
Provision for loan losses and other reserves1,916 796 
Net loss (gain) on sales of real estate2,439 (113)
Other-than-temporary impairment of unconsolidated joint venture164,126 
Loss from unconsolidated joint venture10,673 15,803 
Distributions of earnings from unconsolidated joint venture7,083 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
Accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other assets, net(2,361)(1,377)
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities(11,777)(8,680)
Net cash provided by operating activities152,266 168,605 
Cash flows from investing activities:
Acquisition of real estate(62,107)(92,945)
Origination and fundings of loans receivable(1,651)
Origination and fundings of preferred equity investments(3,394)
Additions to real estate(21,736)(19,867)
Repayments of loans receivable1,135 1,610 
Repayments of preferred equity investments513 3,064 
Net proceeds from the sales of real estate8,381 9,516 
Distributions in excess of earnings from unconsolidated joint venture1,305 
Net cash used in investing activities(77,208)(98,968)
Cash flows from financing activities:
Net borrowings from revolving credit facility73,000 
Principal payments on term loans(110,000)
Principal payments on secured debt(1,446)(1,669)
Payments of deferred financing costs(7)(722)
Issuance of common stock, net172,698 1,860 
Dividends paid on common stock(128,050)(154,068)
Net cash used in financing activities(66,805)(81,599)
Net increase (decrease) in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash8,253 (11,962)
Effect of foreign currency translation on cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash159 (376)
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash, beginning of period65,523 49,143 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash, end of period$73,935 $36,805 
Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:
Interest paid$45,658 $47,667 
Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing activities:
Decrease in loans receivable and other investments due to acquisition of real estate$$20,731 
Secured debt assumed by buyer in connection with sale of real estate$$14,219 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.
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SABRA HEALTH CARE REIT, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(unaudited)
 
1.     BUSINESS
Overview
Sabra Health Care REIT, Inc. (“Sabra” or the “Company”) was incorporated on May 10, 2010 as a wholly owned subsidiary of Sun Healthcare Group, Inc. (“Sun”) and commenced operations on November 15, 2010 following Sabra’s separation from Sun. Sabra elected to be treated as a real estate investment trust (“REIT”) with the filing of its United States (“U.S.”) federal income tax return for the taxable year beginning January 1, 2011. Sabra believes that it has been organized and operated, and it intends to continue to operate, in a manner to qualify as a REIT. Sabra’s primary business consists of acquiring, financing and owning real estate property to be leased to third-party tenants in the healthcare sector. Sabra primarily generates revenues by leasing properties to tenants and operators throughout the U.S. and Canada. Sabra owns substantially all of its assets and properties and conducts its operations through Sabra Health Care Limited Partnership, a Delaware limited partnership (the “Operating Partnership”), of which Sabra is the sole general partner and a wholly owned subsidiary of Sabra is currently the only limited partner, or by subsidiaries of the Operating Partnership. The Company’s investment portfolio is primarily comprised of skilled nursing/transitional care facilities, senior housing communities (“Senior Housing - Leased”) and specialty hospitals and other facilities, in each case leased to third-party operators; senior housing communities operated by third-party property managers pursuant to property management agreements (“Senior Housing - Managed”); investments in loans receivable; and preferred equity investments.
COVID-19
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and measures intended to prevent its spread have negatively impacted and are expected to continue to negatively impact the Company and its operations in a number of ways, including but not limited to:
Decreased occupancy and increased operating costs for the Company’s tenants and borrowers, which have negatively impacted their operating results and may adversely impact their ability to make full and timely rental payments and debt service payments, respectively, to the Company. In some cases, the Company may have to restructure tenants’ long-term rent obligations and may not be able to do so on terms that are as favorable to the Company as those currently in place. Reduced or modified rental and debt service amounts could result in the determination that the full amounts of the Company’s investments are not recoverable, which could result in an impairment charge. To date, the impact of COVID-19 on the Company’s skilled nursing/transitional care facility operators has been significantly mitigated by the assistance they have received or expect to receive from state and federal assistance programs, including through the CARES Act (as defined and further described below under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Skilled Nursing Facility Reimbursement Rates” in Part I, Item 2), although these benefits on an individual operator basis vary and may not provide enough relief to meet their rental obligations to the Company. As of September 1, 2020, eligible assisted living facility operators may apply for funding through the CARES Act, and the assistance received or expected to be received will partially mitigate the negative impact of COVID-19 on the Company’s eligible assisted living facility operators. As of June 30, 2021, the Company’s tenants and borrowers have continued to pay expected cash rents and debt service obligations consistent with past practice. However, the longer the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic, the more likely that the Company’s tenants and borrowers will begin to default on these obligations. Such defaults could materially and adversely affect the Company’s results of operations and liquidity, in addition to resulting in potential impairment charges.
Decreased occupancy and increased operating costs within the Company’s Senior Housing - Managed portfolio, which have negatively impacted and are expected to continue to negatively impact the operating results of these investments. As noted above, as of September 1, 2020, eligible assisted living facility operators may apply for funding through the CARES Act, and the assistance received or expected to be received will partially mitigate the negative impact of COVID-19 on the Company’s Senior Housing - Managed portfolio. In addition, on October 1, 2020, the Department of Health and Human Services announced $20 billion of new funding for assisted living facility operators that have already received funds and to those who were previously ineligible. During each of the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company recognized government grants of $0.5 million in resident fees and services. Prolonged deterioration in the operating results for the Company’s investments in its Senior Housing - Managed portfolio could result in the determination that the full amounts of the Company’s investments are not recoverable, which could result in an impairment charge.
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See Note 4, “Investment in Real Estate Properties,” for discussion of the impact on the Company’s investment in unconsolidated joint venture.
The Company’s financial results as of and for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 reflect the results of the Company’s evaluation of the impact of COVID-19 on its business including, but not limited to, its evaluation of potential impairments of long-lived or other assets, measurement of credit losses on financial instruments, evaluation of any lease modifications, evaluation of lease accounting impact, estimates of fair value and the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern.

2.     SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Principles of Consolidation and Basis of Presentation
The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Sabra and its wholly owned subsidiaries as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 and for the three and six month periods ended June 30, 2021 and 2020. All significant intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated in consolidation.
The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) for interim financial information as contained within the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification and the rules and regulations of the SEC, including the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements do not include all of the information and footnotes required by GAAP for financial statements. In the opinion of management, the financial statements for the unaudited interim periods presented include all adjustments, which are of a normal and recurring nature, necessary for a fair statement of the results for such periods. Operating results for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2021. For further information, refer to the Company’s consolidated financial statements and notes thereto for the year ended December 31, 2020 included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020 filed with the SEC.
GAAP requires the Company to identify entities for which control is achieved through voting rights or other means and to determine which business enterprise is the primary beneficiary of variable interest entities (“VIEs”). A VIE is broadly defined as an entity with one or more of the following characteristics: (a) the total equity investment at risk is insufficient to finance the entity’s activities without additional subordinated financial support; (b) as a group, the holders of the equity investment at risk lack (i) the ability to make decisions about the entity’s activities through voting or similar rights, (ii) the obligation to absorb the expected losses of the entity, or (iii) the right to receive the expected residual returns of the entity; or (c) the equity investors have voting rights that are not proportional to their economic interests, and substantially all of the entity’s activities either involve, or are conducted on behalf of, an investor that has disproportionately few voting rights. If the Company were determined to be the primary beneficiary of the VIE, the Company would consolidate investments in the VIE. The Company may change its original assessment of a VIE due to events such as modifications of contractual arrangements that affect the characteristics or adequacy of the entity’s equity investments at risk and the disposal of all or a portion of an interest held by the primary beneficiary.
The Company identifies the primary beneficiary of a VIE as the enterprise that has both: (i) the power to direct the activities of the VIE that most significantly impact the entity’s economic performance; and (ii) the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive benefits of the VIE that could be significant to the entity. The Company performs this analysis on an ongoing basis. As of June 30, 2021, the Company determined that it was 0t the primary beneficiary of any VIEs.
As it relates to investments in loans, in addition to the Company’s assessment of VIEs and whether the Company is the primary beneficiary of those VIEs, the Company evaluates the loan terms and other pertinent facts to determine whether the loan investment should be accounted for as a loan or as a real estate joint venture. If an investment has the characteristics of a real estate joint venture, including if the Company participates in the majority of the borrower’s expected residual profit, the Company would account for the investment as an investment in a real estate joint venture and not as a loan investment. Expected residual profit is defined as the amount of profit, whether called interest or another name, such as an equity kicker, above a reasonable amount of interest and fees expected to be earned by a lender. At June 30, 2021, NaN of the Company’s investments in loans were accounted for as real estate joint ventures.
As it relates to investments in joint ventures, the Company assesses any limited partners’ rights and their impact on the presumption of control of the limited partnership by any single partner. The Company also applies this guidance to managing member interests in limited liability companies. The Company reassesses its determination of which entity controls the joint
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venture if: there is a change to the terms or in the exercisability of the rights of any partners or members, the sole general partner or managing member increases or decreases its ownership interests, or there is an increase or decrease in the number of outstanding ownership interests. As of June 30, 2021, the Company’s determination of which entity controls its investments in joint ventures has not changed as a result of any reassessment.
Use of Estimates
The preparation of the condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could materially differ from those estimates.
Recently Issued Accounting Standards Update
Issued but Not Yet Adopted
In March 2020, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2020-04, Reference Rate Reform (Topic 848): Facilitation of the Effects of Reference Rate Reform on Financial Reporting (“ASU 2020-04”). ASU 2020-04 provides temporary optional guidance that provides transition relief for reference rate reform, including optional expedients and exceptions for applying GAAP to contract modifications, hedging relationships and other transactions that reference LIBOR or a reference rate that is expected to be discontinued as a result of reference rate reform if certain criteria are met. ASU 2020-04 is effective upon issuance, and the provisions generally can be applied prospectively as of January 1, 2020 through December 31, 2022. During the first quarter of 2020, the Company elected to apply the hedge accounting expedients related to probability and the assessments of effectiveness for future LIBOR-indexed cash flows to assume that the index upon which future hedged transactions will be based matches the index on the corresponding derivatives. Application of these expedients preserves the presentation of derivatives consistent with past presentation. In January 2021, the FASB issued ASU 2021-01, Reference Rate Reform (Topic 848): Scope, which refines the scope of Topic 848 and clarifies some of its guidance. The Company continues to evaluate the impact of the guidance and may apply other elections as applicable as additional changes in the market occur.

3.     RECENT REAL ESTATE ACQUISITIONS
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company acquired 2 Senior Housing - Managed communities, 1 addiction treatment center and 1 skilled nursing/transitional care facility. During the six months ended June 30, 2020, the Company acquired 3 Senior Housing - Leased communities and 1 Senior Housing - Managed community that were part of the Company’s proprietary development pipeline, and $20.7 million was previously funded through its preferred equity investments in these developments. The consideration was allocated as follows (in thousands):
Six Months Ended June 30,
20212020
Land$3,610 $5,800 
Building and improvements55,962 104,952 
Tenant origination and absorption costs intangible assets2,525 2,578 
Tenant relationship intangible assets10 347 
Total consideration$62,107 $113,677 
The tenant origination and absorption costs intangible assets and tenant relationship intangible assets had weighted-average amortization periods as of the respective dates of acquisition of two years and 26 years, respectively, for acquisitions completed during the six months ended June 30, 2021, and seven years and 25 years, respectively, for acquisitions completed during the six months ended June 30, 2020.
For the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company recognized $2.3 million and $2.7 million of total revenues, respectively, and $0.2 million and $0.3 million of net income, respectively, from the facilities acquired during the six months ended June 30, 2021. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, the Company recognized $3.4 million and $5.8 million of total revenues, respectively, and $1.4 million and $2.2 million of net income, respectively, from the facilities acquired during the six months ended June 30, 2020.

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4.    INVESTMENT IN REAL ESTATE PROPERTIES
The Company’s real estate properties held for investment consisted of the following (dollars in thousands):
As of June 30, 2021
Property TypeNumber of
Properties
Number of
Beds/Units
Total
Real Estate
at Cost
Accumulated
Depreciation
Total
Real Estate
Investments, Net
Skilled Nursing/Transitional Care283 31,321 $3,631,838 $(431,976)$3,199,862 
Senior Housing - Leased62 4,147 705,048 (97,319)607,729 
Senior Housing - Managed49 5,140 1,008,080 (158,946)849,134 
Specialty Hospitals and Other29 1,228 687,494 (75,149)612,345 
423 41,836 6,032,460 (763,390)5,269,070 
Corporate Level817 (440)377 
$6,033,277 $(763,830)$5,269,447 
As of December 31, 2020
Property TypeNumber of
Properties
Number of
Beds/Units
Total
Real Estate
at Cost
Accumulated
Depreciation
Total
Real Estate
Investments, Net
Skilled Nursing/Transitional Care287 31,761 $3,644,470 $(385,094)$3,259,376 
Senior Housing - Leased65 4,282 707,634 (87,600)620,034 
Senior Housing - Managed47 4,924 942,996 (142,538)800,458 
Specialty Hospitals and Other27 1,092 670,793 (66,021)604,772 
426 42,059 5,965,893 (681,253)5,284,640 
Corporate Level802 (404)398 
$5,966,695 $(681,657)$5,285,038 
June 30, 2021December 31, 2020
Building and improvements$5,178,684 $5,120,598 
Furniture and equipment255,018 249,034 
Land improvements2,940 2,220 
Land596,635 594,843 
Total real estate at cost6,033,277 5,966,695 
Accumulated depreciation(763,830)(681,657)
Total real estate investments, net$5,269,447 $5,285,038 
Operating Leases
As of June 30, 2021, the substantial majority of the Company’s real estate properties (excluding 49 Senior Housing - Managed communities) were leased under triple-net operating leases with expirations ranging from less than one year to 16 years. As of June 30, 2021, the leases had a weighted-average remaining term of seven years. The leases generally include provisions to extend the lease terms and other negotiated terms and conditions. The Company, through its subsidiaries, retains substantially all of the risks and benefits of ownership of the real estate assets leased to the tenants. The Company may receive additional security under these operating leases in the form of letters of credit and security deposits from the lessee or guarantees from the parent of the lessee. Security deposits received in cash related to tenant leases are included in accounts payable and accrued liabilities on the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets and totaled $11.3 million and $17.5 million as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively, and letters of credit deposited with the Company totaled approximately $92 million and $85 million as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. In addition, the Company’s tenants have deposited with the Company $16.8 million and $16.9 million as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively, for future real estate taxes, insurance expenditures and tenant improvements related to the Company’s properties and their operations, and these amounts are included in accounts payable and accrued liabilities on the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.
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Lessor costs that are paid by the lessor and reimbursed by the lessee are included in the measurement of variable lease revenue and the associated expense. As a result, the Company recognized variable lease revenue and the associated expense of $4.8 million and $9.6 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, respectively, and $5.5 million and $10.7 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, respectively.
The Company monitors the creditworthiness of its tenants by reviewing credit ratings (if available) and evaluating the ability of the tenants to meet their lease obligations to the Company based on the tenants’ financial performance, including the evaluation of any parent guarantees (or the guarantees of other related parties) of tenant lease obligations. As formal credit ratings may not be available for most of the Company’s tenants, the primary basis for the Company’s evaluation of the credit quality of its tenants (and more specifically the tenant’s ability to pay their rent obligations to the Company) is the tenant’s lease coverage ratio or the parent’s fixed charge coverage ratio for those entities with a parent guarantee. These coverage ratios include earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization and rent (“EBITDAR”) to rent and earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization, rent and management fees (“EBITDARM”) to rent at the lease level and consolidated EBITDAR to total fixed charges at the parent guarantor level when such a guarantee exists. The Company obtains various financial and operational information from its tenants each month and reviews this information in conjunction with the above-described coverage metrics to identify financial and operational trends, evaluate the impact of the industry’s operational and financial environment (including the impact of government reimbursement), and evaluate the management of the tenant’s operations. These metrics help the Company identify potential areas of concern relative to its tenants’ credit quality and ultimately the tenant’s ability to generate sufficient liquidity to meet its obligations, including its obligation to continue to pay the rent due to the Company.
For the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, no tenant relationship represented 10% or more of the Company’s total revenues.
As of June 30, 2021, the future minimum rental payments from the Company’s properties held for investment under non-cancelable operating leases were as follows and may materially differ from actual future rental payments received (in thousands):
July 1 through December 31, 2021$217,032 
2022417,624 
2023407,733 
2024408,704 
2025400,077 
Thereafter1,576,771 
$3,427,941 
Senior Housing - Managed Communities
The Company’s Senior Housing - Managed communities offer residents certain ancillary services that are not contemplated in the lease with each resident (i.e., housekeeping, laundry, guest meals, etc.). These services are provided and paid for in addition to the standard services included in each resident lease (i.e., room and board, standard meals, etc.). The Company bills residents for ancillary services one month in arrears and recognizes revenue as the services are provided, as the Company has no continuing performance obligation related to those services. Resident fees and services include ancillary service revenue of $0.3 million and $0.6 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, respectively, and $0.2 million and $0.4 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, respectively.
Investment in Unconsolidated Joint Venture
The Company has a 49% equity interest in a joint venture (the “Enlivant Joint Venture”) with affiliates of TPG Real Estate, the real estate platform of TPG. TPG also owns Enlivant, the senior housing management platform that manages the portfolio owned by the Enlivant Joint Venture. As of June 30, 2021, the Enlivant Joint Venture owned 158 senior housing communities.
During the second quarter of 2021, TPG reached out to Sabra to explore the Company acquiring TPG’s 51% interest in the Enlivant Joint Venture. The parties were not able to reach mutually acceptable terms for a transaction, in part due to modifications requested by TPG in the Enlivant management fee structure. At that time, TPG informed the Company of its intent to re-evaluate its plans with respect to the management company. Furthermore, decreased occupancy and revenues and increased operating costs during the COVID-19 pandemic have had a significant negative impact on the financial performance of the Enlivant Joint Venture. As a result, the Company re-evaluated its plans with respect to the Enlivant Joint Venture and determined that it would no longer seek to acquire TPG’s majority interest in the Enlivant Joint Venture and that it expects to
14

sell its 49% equity interest should TPG secure a buyer for the portfolio sometime in the future. In connection with this re-evaluation and the Company’s eventual intent to exit its 49% stake, the Company revisited its estimate of the fair value of its investment in the Enlivant Joint Venture and believes that it has declined below its investment basis. The Company also believes that, given the Company’s intent to sell the portfolio, it is unlikely that the Company will hold its investment for an adequate period of time to recover this estimated decline in value. As such, this decline was deemed to be other-than-temporary and the Company recorded an impairment charge for the amount that the carrying value exceeds the estimated fair value of the investment totaling $164.1 million during the three months ended June 30, 2021. This impairment is included in loss from unconsolidated joint venture on the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of (loss) income. As of June 30, 2021 and including the impact of the impairment charge, the book value of the Company’s investment in the Enlivant Joint Venture was $114.0 million.
Determining the estimated fair value of the Company’s investment is based on significant unobservable assumptions. The Company estimated the current fair value based on a discounted cash flow analysis, management fee ranging from 6.0% to 7.0% and using a holding period of three years, terminal capitalization rates ranging from 6.75% to 7.25% and discount rates ranging from 11.0% to 11.5%. The assumptions to determine fair value under the income approach are Level 3 inputs in accordance with the fair value hierarchy established by Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 820, “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures.” The ongoing operating performance of the Enlivant Joint Venture, as well as whether TPG is able to secure a buyer on favorable terms or at all, will impact the ultimate amounts realized from the Enlivant Joint Venture and may require the Company to recognize an additional impairment charge in the future with respect to this investment. Accordingly, the amount ultimately realized by the Company for its investment in the Enlivant Joint Venture could materially differ from its estimated fair value as reflected in the condensed consolidated balance sheets as of June 30, 2021.
Net Investment in Sales-Type Lease
As of June 30, 2021, the Company had a $25.1 million net investment in 1 skilled nursing/transitional care facility leased to an operator under a sales-type lease, as the tenant is obligated to purchase the property at the end of the lease term. The net investment in sales-type lease is recorded in accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other assets, net on the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets and represents the present value of total rental payments of $4.0 million, plus the estimated purchase price of $25.6 million, less the unearned lease income of $4.2 million and allowance for credit losses of $0.3 million as of June 30, 2021. Unearned lease income represents the excess of the minimum lease payments and residual value over the cost of the investment. Unearned lease income is deferred and amortized to income over the lease term to provide a constant yield when collectability of the lease payments is reasonably assured. Income from the Company’s net investment in sales-type lease was $0.6 million and $1.2 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, respectively, and $0.7 million and $1.3 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, respectively, and is reflected in interest and other income on the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of (loss) income. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company reduced its allowance for credit losses by $21,000 and increased its allowance for credit losses by $0.1 million, respectively. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, the Company reduced its allowance for credit losses by $21,000 and $37,000, respectively. During the six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company was required to recognize a $1.0 million gain on sale of real estate prior to the sale to the tenant as a result of a lease modification and reassessing the classification of the lease and determining it should be accounted for as a sales-type lease. Future minimum lease payments contractually due under the sales-type lease at June 30, 2021 were as follows: $1.2 million for the remainder of 2021, $2.4 million for 2022 and $0.8 million for 2023.

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5.    ASSETS HELD FOR SALE AND DISPOSITIONS
2021
Assets Held for Sale
As of June 30, 2021, the Company determined that 3 senior housing communities with an aggregate net book value of $2.7 million met the criteria to be classified as assets held for sale, and these balances are included in accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other assets, net on the condensed consolidated balance sheets. Subsequent to June 30, 2021, the Company completed the sale of the facilities for an aggregate gross sales price of $4.0 million.
Dispositions
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company completed the sale of 4 skilled nursing/transitional care facilities for aggregate consideration, net of closing costs, of $11.3 million. The net carrying value of the assets and liabilities of the facilities was $14.7 million, which resulted in an aggregate $3.4 million net loss on sale.
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company recognized $3.3 million of net loss, which includes the $3.4 million net loss on sale, and during the six months ended June 30, 2020, recognized $47,000 of net income, in each case from these facilities. The sale of these facilities does not represent a strategic shift that has or will have a major effect on the Company’s operations and financial results, and therefore the results of operations attributable to these facilities have remained in continuing operations.
2020
Dispositions
During the six months ended June 30, 2020, the Company completed the sale of 6 skilled nursing/transitional care facilities for aggregate consideration, net of closing costs, of $24.3 million. The net carrying value of the assets and liabilities of these facilities was $24.2 million, which resulted in an aggregate $0.1 million net gain on sale.
During the six months ended June 30, 2020, the Company recognized $0.4 million of net income, which includes the $0.1 million net gain on sale, from these facilities. The sale of these facilities does not represent a strategic shift that has or will have a major effect on the Company’s operations and financial results, and therefore the results of operations attributable to these facilities have remained in continuing operations.

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6.    LOANS RECEIVABLE AND OTHER INVESTMENTS
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Company’s loans receivable and other investments consisted of the following (dollars in thousands):
June 30, 2021
InvestmentQuantity
as of
June 30,
2021
Property Type
Principal Balance
as of
June 30,
2021 (1)
Book Value
as of
June 30,
2021
Book Value
as of
December 31, 2020
Weighted Average Contractual Interest Rate / Rate of ReturnWeighted Average Annualized Effective Interest Rate / Rate of ReturnMaturity Date
as of
June 30,
2021
Loans Receivable:
MortgageSpecialty Hospital$19,000 $19,000 $19,000 10.0 %10.0 %01/31/27
ConstructionSenior Housing3,343 3,349 3,352 8.0 %7.8 %09/30/22
Other16 Multiple41,843 37,851 39,005 6.8 %6.9 %12/03/21- 08/31/28
18 64,186 60,200 61,357 7.8 %7.9 %
Allowance for loan losses— (4,269)(2,458)
$64,186 $55,931 $58,899 
Other Investments:
Preferred EquitySkilled Nursing / Senior Housing49,064 49,297 43,940 11.2 %11.2 %N/A
Total25 $113,250 $105,228 $102,839 9.3 %9.4 %
(1)    Principal balance includes amounts funded and accrued but unpaid interest / preferred return and excludes capitalizable fees.
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Company had 4 loans receivable investments, with an aggregate principal balance of $1.9 million and $2.1 million, respectively, that were considered to have deteriorated credit quality. As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the book value of the outstanding loans with deteriorated credit quality was $0.3 million and $0.5 million, respectively.
During the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company reduced its allowance for loan losses by $0.1 million and increased its allowance for loan losses by $1.8 million, respectively. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, the Company increased its allowance for loan losses by $0.1 million and $0.8 million, respectively.
As of June 30, 2021, the Company had a $4.3 million allowance for loan losses and 3 loans receivable investments with 0 book value were on nonaccrual status. As of June 30, 2021, the Company did not consider any preferred equity investments to be impaired, and no preferred equity investments were on nonaccrual status.
As of December 31, 2020, the Company had a $2.5 million allowance for loan losses and 2 loans receivable investments with 0 book value were on nonaccrual status. As of December 31, 2020, the Company did not consider any preferred equity investments to be impaired, and no preferred equity investments were on nonaccrual status.

7.    DEBT
Secured Indebtedness
The Company’s secured debt consists of the following (dollars in thousands):
Interest Rate Type
Principal Balance as of
June 30, 2021
(1)
Principal Balance as of
December 31, 2020
(1)
Weighted Average
Interest Rate at
June 30, 2021
(2)
Maturity
Date
Fixed Rate$79,200 $80,199 3.40 %December 2021 - 
August 2051
(1)     Principal balance does not include deferred financing costs, net of $1.1 million as of each of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020.
(2)     Weighted average interest rate includes private mortgage insurance.
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Senior Unsecured Notes
The Company’s senior unsecured notes consist of the following (dollars in thousands):
Principal Balance as of
TitleMaturity Date
June 30, 2021 (1)
December 31, 2020 (1)
4.80% senior unsecured notes due 2024 (“2024 Notes”)June 1, 2024$300,000 $300,000 
5.125% senior unsecured notes due 2026 (“2026 Notes”)August 15, 2026500,000 500,000 
5.88% senior unsecured notes due 2027 (“2027 Notes”)May 17, 2027100,000 100,000 
3.90% senior unsecured notes due 2029 (“2029 Notes”)October 15, 2029350,000 350,000 
$1,250,000 $1,250,000 
(1)    Principal balance does not include premium, net of $5.8 million and deferred financing costs, net of $7.3 million as of June 30, 2021 and does not include premium, net of $6.4 million and deferred financing costs, net of $8.0 million as of December 31, 2020.
The 2024 Notes and the 2029 Notes were issued by the Operating Partnership and Sabra Capital Corporation, wholly owned subsidiaries of the Company, and accrue interest at a rate of 4.80% and 3.90%, respectively, per annum. Interest is payable semiannually on June 1 and December 1 of each year for the 2024 Notes and on April 15 and October 15 of each year for the 2029 Notes.
The 2026 Notes and the 2027 Notes were assumed as a result of the Company’s merger with Care Capital Properties, Inc. in 2017 and accrue interest at a rate of 5.125% and 5.88%, respectively, per annum. Interest is payable semiannually on February 15 and August 15 of each year for the 2026 Notes and on May 17 and November 17 of each year for the 2027 Notes.
The obligations under the 2024 Notes and 2027 Notes are fully and unconditionally guaranteed, jointly and severally, on an unsecured basis, by Sabra and one of its non-operating subsidiaries, subject to release under certain customary circumstances. The obligations under the 2026 Notes and 2029 Notes are fully and unconditionally guaranteed, on an unsecured basis, by Sabra; provided, however, that such guarantee is subject to release under certain customary circumstances.
The indentures and agreements (the “Senior Notes Indentures”) governing the 2024 Notes, 2026 Notes, 2027 Notes and 2029 Notes (collectively, the “Senior Notes”) include customary events of default and require the Company to comply with specified restrictive covenants. As of June 30, 2021, the Company was in compliance with all applicable financial covenants under the Senior Notes Indentures.
Credit Agreement
On September 9, 2019, the Operating Partnership and Sabra Canadian Holdings, LLC (together, the “Borrowers”), Sabra and the other parties thereto entered into a fifth amended and restated unsecured credit agreement (the “Credit Agreement”).
The Credit Agreement includes a $1.0 billion revolving credit facility (the “Revolving Credit Facility”), $845.0 million in U.S. dollar term loans and a CAD $125.0 million Canadian dollar term loan (collectively, the “Term Loans”). Further, up to $175.0 million of the Revolving Credit Facility may be used for borrowings in certain foreign currencies. The Credit Agreement also contains an accordion feature that can increase the total available borrowings to $2.75 billion, subject to terms and conditions.
The Revolving Credit Facility has a maturity date of September 9, 2023, and includes 2 six-month extension options. $345.0 million of the U.S. dollar Term Loans has a maturity date of September 9, 2023, and the other Term Loans have a maturity date of September 9, 2024.
During the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company recognized $0.1 million and $0.8 million of loss on extinguishment of debt, respectively, related to write-offs of deferred financing costs in connection with the partial pay down of the U.S. dollar Term Loans.
As of June 30, 2021, there were 0 amounts outstanding under the Revolving Credit Facility and $1.0 billion available for borrowing.
Borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facility bear interest on the outstanding principal amount at a rate equal to a ratings-based applicable interest margin plus, at the Operating Partnership’s option, either (a) LIBOR or (b) a base rate determined as the greater of (i) the federal funds rate plus 0.5%, (ii) the prime rate, and (iii) one-month LIBOR plus 1.0% (the “Base Rate”). The ratings-based applicable interest margin for borrowings will vary based on the Debt Ratings, as defined in the Credit Agreement, and will range from 0.775% to 1.45% per annum for LIBOR based borrowings and 0.00% to 0.45% per
18

annum for borrowings at the Base Rate. As of June 30, 2021, the interest rate on the Revolving Credit Facility was 1.20%. In addition, the Operating Partnership pays a facility fee ranging between 0.125% and 0.300% per annum based on the aggregate amount of commitments under the Revolving Credit Facility regardless of amounts outstanding thereunder.
The U.S. dollar Term Loans bear interest on the outstanding principal amount at a rate equal to a ratings-based applicable interest margin plus, at the Operating Partnership’s option, either (a) LIBOR or (b) the Base Rate. The ratings-based applicable interest margin for borrowings will vary based on the Debt Ratings and will range from 0.85% to 1.65% per annum for LIBOR based borrowings and 0.00% to 0.65% per annum for borrowings at the Base Rate. As of June 30, 2021, the interest rate on the U.S. dollar Term Loans was 1.35%. The Canadian dollar Term Loan bears interest on the outstanding principal amount at a rate equal to the Canadian Dollar Offered Rate (“CDOR”) plus an interest margin that ranges from 0.85% to 1.65% depending on the Debt Ratings. As of June 30, 2021, the interest rate on the Canadian dollar Term Loan was 1.66%.
The Company has interest rate swaps that fix the LIBOR portion of the interest rate for $845.0 million of LIBOR-based borrowings under its U.S. dollar Term Loans at a weighted average rate of 1.37% and interest rate swaps that fix the CDOR portion of the interest rate for CAD $125.0 million of CDOR-based borrowings under its Canadian dollar Term Loan at a rate of 1.10%. In addition, CAD $125.0 million of the Canadian dollar Term Loan is designated as a net investment hedge. See Note 8, “Derivative and Hedging Instruments,” for further information.
The obligations of the Borrowers under the Credit Agreement are fully and unconditionally guaranteed, jointly and severally, on an unsecured basis, by Sabra and one of its non-operating subsidiaries, subject to release under certain customary circumstances.
The Credit Agreement contains customary covenants that include restrictions or limitations on the ability to pay dividends, incur additional indebtedness, engage in non-healthcare related business activities, enter into transactions with affiliates and sell or otherwise transfer certain assets as well as customary events of default. The Credit Agreement also requires Sabra, through the Operating Partnership, to comply with specified financial covenants, which include a maximum total leverage ratio, a minimum secured debt leverage ratio, a minimum fixed charge coverage ratio, a maximum unsecured leverage ratio, a minimum tangible net worth requirement and a minimum unsecured interest coverage ratio. As of June 30, 2021, the Company was in compliance with all applicable financial covenants under the Credit Agreement.
Interest Expense
The Company incurred interest expense of $24.3 million and $48.7 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, respectively, and $25.3 million and $51.0 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, respectively. Interest expense includes non-cash interest expense of $1.7 million and $3.6 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, respectively, and $2.2 million and $4.5 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, respectively. As of each of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Company had $16.1 million of accrued interest included in accounts payable and accrued liabilities on the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.
Maturities
The following is a schedule of maturities for the Company’s outstanding debt as of June 30, 2021 (in thousands): 
Secured
Indebtedness
Term LoansSenior NotesTotal
July 1 through December 31, 2021$17,420 $$$17,420 
20222,412 2,412 
20232,478 345,000 347,478 
20242,545 600,837 300,000 903,382 
20252,615 2,615 
Thereafter51,730 950,000 1,001,730 
Total Debt79,200 945,837 1,250,000 2,275,037 
Premium, net5,834 5,834 
Deferred financing costs, net(1,106)(6,145)(7,309)(14,560)
Total Debt, Net$78,094 $939,692 $1,248,525 $2,266,311 
    
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8.    DERIVATIVE AND HEDGING INSTRUMENTS
The Company is exposed to various market risks, including the potential loss arising from adverse changes in interest rates and foreign exchange rates. The Company enters into derivative financial instruments to manage exposures that arise from business activities that result in the receipt or payment of future known and uncertain cash amounts, the value of which are determined by interest rates and foreign exchange rates. The Company’s derivative financial instruments are used to manage differences in the amount of the Company’s known or expected cash receipts and its known or expected cash payments principally related to the Company’s investments and borrowings.
Certain of the Company’s foreign operations expose the Company to fluctuations of foreign interest rates and exchange rates. These fluctuations may impact the value in the Company’s functional currency, the U.S. dollar, of the Company’s investment in foreign operations, the cash receipts and payments related to these foreign operations and payments of interest and principal under Canadian dollar denominated debt. The Company enters into derivative financial instruments to protect the value of its foreign investments and fix a portion of the interest payments for certain debt obligations. The Company does not enter into derivatives for speculative purposes.
Cash Flow Hedges
The Company’s objectives in using interest rate derivatives are to add stability to interest expense and to manage its exposure to interest rate movements. To accomplish these objectives, the Company primarily uses interest rate swaps and collars as part of its interest rate risk management strategy. In May 2019, the Company terminated 3 forward starting interest rate swaps, resulting in a payment to counterparties totaling $12.6 million. The balance of the loss in other comprehensive income will be reclassified to earnings through 2029. As of June 30, 2021, approximately $13.0 million of losses, which are included in accumulated other comprehensive income, are expected to be reclassified into earnings in the next 12 months.
Net Investment Hedges
The Company is exposed to fluctuations in foreign exchange rates on investments it holds in Canada. The Company uses cross currency interest rate swaps to hedge its exposure to changes in foreign exchange rates on these foreign investments.
The following presents the notional amount of derivative instruments as of the dates indicated (in thousands):
June 30, 2021December 31, 2020
Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges:
Denominated in U.S. Dollars (1)
$1,095,000 $1,340,000 
Denominated in Canadian Dollars (2)
$125,000 $250,000 
Derivatives designated as net investment hedges:
Denominated in Canadian Dollars$51,846 $52,778 
Financial instrument designated as net investment hedge:
Denominated in Canadian Dollars$125,000 $125,000 
Derivatives not designated as net investment hedges:
Denominated in Canadian Dollars$4,454 $3,522 
(1) Balance includes swaps with an aggregate notional amount of $400.0 million, which accretes to $600.0 million in January 2023, and 6 forward starting interest rate swaps with an effective date of May 2024 and an aggregate notional amount of $250.0 million. Balance as of December 31, 2020 also includes 2 forward starting interest rate swaps and 1 forward starting interest rate collar with an effective date of January 2021 and an aggregate notional amount of $245.0 million.
(2)    Balance as of December 31, 2020 includes 2 forward starting interest rate swaps with an effective date of January 2021 and an aggregate notional amount of CAD $125.0 million.
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Derivative and Financial Instruments Designated as Hedging Instruments
The following is a summary of the derivative and financial instruments designated as hedging instruments held by the Company at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 (dollars in thousands):    
Count as of June 30,2021Fair ValueMaturity Dates
TypeDesignationJune 30, 2021December 31, 2020Balance Sheet Location
Assets:
Interest rate swapsCash flow$106 $2024Accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other assets, net
Forward starting interest rate swapsCash flow20,666 10,652 2034Accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other assets, net
Cross currency interest rate swapsNet investment864 2,150 2025Accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other assets, net
$21,636 $12,802 
Liabilities:
Interest rate swapsCash flow$22,592 $23,849 2023- 2024Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
Interest rate collarCash flow1,174 1,626 2024Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
Forward starting interest rate swapsCash flow10,723 2024Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
Forward starting interest rate collarsCash flow820 2024Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
CAD term loanNet investment100,838 98,100 2024Term loans, net
$124,604 $135,118 
The following presents the effect of the Company’s derivative and financial instruments designated as hedging instruments on the condensed consolidated statements of (loss) income and the condensed consolidated statements of equity for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 (in thousands):
Gain (Loss) Recognized in Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Three Months Ended June 30,Six Months Ended June 30,
2021202020212020
Cash Flow Hedges:
Interest rate products$(12,840)$(6,182)$17,777 $(46,647)
Net Investment Hedges:
Foreign currency products(636)(1,599)(1,191)2,588 
CAD term loan(1,563)(3,413)(2,738)4,400 
$(15,039)$(11,194)$13,848 $(39,659)

Loss Reclassified from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) into Income
Three Months Ended June 30,Six Months Ended June 30,
2021202020212020Income Statement Location
Cash Flow Hedges:
Interest rate products$(3,341)$(2,398)$(6,543)$(2,165)Interest expense
During the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, 0 cash flow hedges were determined to be ineffective.
Derivatives Not Designated as Hedging Instruments
As of June 30, 2021, the Company had 1 outstanding cross currency interest rate swap, of which a portion was not designated as a hedging instrument, in an asset position with a fair value of $0.1 million and included this amount in accounts receivable, prepaid expenses and other assets, net on the condensed consolidated balance sheets. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company recorded $56,000 and $0.1 million of other expense, respectively, related to the
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portion of derivatives not designated as hedging instruments. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, the Company recorded $0.1 million of other expense and $0.1 million of other income, respectively, related to the portion of derivatives not designated as hedging instruments.
Offsetting Derivatives
The Company enters into master netting arrangements, which reduce credit risk by permitting net settlement of transactions with the same counterparty. The table below presents a gross presentation, the effects of offsetting, and a net presentation of the Company’s derivatives as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 (in thousands):
As of June 30, 2021
Gross Amounts of Recognized Assets / LiabilitiesGross Amounts Offset in the Balance SheetNet Amounts of Assets / Liabilities presented in the Balance SheetGross Amounts Not Offset in the Balance Sheet
Financial InstrumentsCash Collateral ReceivedNet Amount
Offsetting Assets:
Derivatives$21,636 $$21,636 $(8,273)$$13,363 
Offsetting Liabilities:
Derivatives$23,766 $$23,766 $(8,273)$$15,493 
As of December 31, 2020
Gross Amounts of Recognized Assets / LiabilitiesGross Amounts Offset in the Balance SheetNet Amounts of Assets / Liabilities presented in the Balance SheetGross Amounts Not Offset in the Balance Sheet
Financial InstrumentsCash Collateral ReceivedNet Amount
Offsetting Assets:
Derivatives$12,802 $$12,802 $(7,420)$$5,382 
Offsetting Liabilities:
Derivatives$37,018 $$37,018 $(7,420)$$29,598 
Credit Risk-related Contingent Features
The Company has agreements with each of its derivative counterparties that contain a provision pursuant to which the Company could be declared in default on the derivative obligation if the Company defaults on any of its indebtedness, including a default where repayment of the indebtedness has not been accelerated by the lender. As of June 30, 2021, the fair value of derivatives in a net liability position, which includes accrued interest but excludes any adjustment for nonperformance risk, related to these agreements was $15.8 million. As of June 30, 2021, the Company has not posted any collateral related to these agreements. If the Company had breached any of these provisions at June 30, 2021, it could have been required to settle its obligations under the agreements at their termination value of $15.4 million.

9.    FAIR VALUE DISCLOSURES
Under GAAP, the Company is required to measure certain financial instruments at fair value on a recurring basis. In addition, the Company is required to measure other financial instruments and balances at fair value on a non-recurring basis (e.g., carrying value of impaired loans receivable and long-lived assets). Fair value is defined as the price that would be received upon the sale of an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. The GAAP fair value framework uses a three-tiered approach. Fair value measurements are classified and disclosed in one of the following three categories:
Level 1: unadjusted quoted prices in active markets that are accessible at the measurement date for identical assets or liabilities;
Level 2: quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active, and model-derived valuations in which significant inputs and significant value drivers are observable in active markets; and
Level 3: prices or valuation techniques where little or no market data is available that requires inputs that are both significant to the fair value measurement and unobservable.
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Financial Instruments
The fair value for certain financial instruments is derived using a combination of market quotes, pricing models and other valuation techniques that involve significant management judgment. The price transparency of financial instruments is a key determinant of the degree of judgment involved in determining the fair value of the Company’s financial instruments.
Financial instruments for which actively quoted prices or pricing parameters are available and whose markets contain orderly transactions will generally have a higher degree of price transparency than financial instruments whose markets are inactive or consist of non-orderly trades. The Company evaluates several factors when determining if a market is inactive or when market transactions are not orderly. The carrying values of cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash, accounts payable, accrued liabilities and the Credit Agreement are reasonable estimates of fair value because of the short-term maturities of these instruments. Fair values for other financial instruments are derived as follows:
Loans receivable: These instruments are presented on the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets at their amortized cost and not at fair value. The fair values of the loans receivable were estimated using an internal valuation model that considered the expected cash flows for the loans receivable, as well as the underlying collateral value and other credit enhancements as applicable. The Company utilized discount rates ranging from 6% to 10% with a weighted average rate of 9% in its fair value calculation. As such, the Company classifies these instruments as Level 3.
Preferred equity investments: These instruments are presented on the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets at their cost and not at fair value. The fair values of the preferred equity investments were estimated using an internal valuation model that considered the expected future cash flows for the preferred equity investments, the underlying collateral value and other credit enhancements. The Company utilized discount rates ranging from 10% to 15% with a weighted average rate of 11% in its fair value calculation. As such, the Company classifies these instruments as Level 3.
Derivative instruments: The Company’s derivative instruments are presented at fair value on the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets. The Company estimates the fair value of derivative instruments, including its interest rate swaps and cross currency swaps, using the assistance of a third party using inputs that are observable in the market, which include forward yield curves and other relevant information. Although the Company has determined that the majority of the inputs used to value its derivative financial instruments fall within Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy, the credit valuation adjustments associated with its derivative financial instruments utilize Level 3 inputs, such as estimates of current credit spreads, to evaluate the likelihood of default by itself and its counterparties. The Company has assessed the significance of the impact of the credit valuation adjustments on the overall valuation of its derivative positions and has determined that the credit valuation adjustments are not significant to the overall valuation of its derivative financial instruments. As a result, the Company has determined that its derivative financial instruments valuations in their entirety are classified in Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy.
Senior Notes: These instruments are presented on the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets at their outstanding principal balance, net of unamortized deferred financing costs and premiums/discounts and not at fair value. The fair values of the Senior Notes were determined using third-party market quotes derived from orderly trades. As such, the Company classifies these instruments as Level 2.
Secured indebtedness: These instruments are presented on the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets at their outstanding principal balance, net of unamortized deferred financing costs and premiums/discounts and not at fair value. The fair values of the Company’s secured debt were estimated using a discounted cash flow analysis based on management’s estimates of current market interest rates for instruments with similar characteristics, including remaining loan term, loan-to-value ratio, type of collateral and other credit enhancements. The Company utilized interest rates ranging from 2% to 3% with a weighted average interest rate of 3% in its fair value calculation. As such, the Company classifies these instruments as Level 3.
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The following are the face values, carrying amounts and fair values of the Company’s financial instruments as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 whose carrying amounts do not approximate their fair value (in thousands):
 June 30, 2021December 31, 2020
 
Face
Value
(1)
Carrying
Amount (2)
Fair
Value
Face
Value
(1)
Carrying
Amount
(2)
Fair
Value
Financial assets:
Loans receivable$64,186 $55,931 $56,886 $65,320 $58,899 $60,421 
Preferred equity investments49,064 49,297 49,973 43,724 43,940 44,597 
Financial liabilities:
Senior Notes1,250,000 1,248,525 1,372,081 1,250,000 1,248,393 1,362,678 
Secured indebtedness79,200 78,094 77,949 80,199 79,065 79,326 
(1)    Face value represents amounts contractually due under the terms of the respective agreements.
(2)    Carrying amount represents the book value of financial instruments, including unamortized premiums/discounts and deferred financing costs.
The Company determined the fair value of financial instruments as of June 30, 2021 whose carrying amounts do not approximate their fair value with valuation methods utilizing the following types of inputs (in thousands):
Fair Value Measurements Using
Quoted Prices in Active Markets for Identical Assets
(Level 1)
Significant Other Observable Inputs
(Level 2)
Significant Unobservable Inputs
(Level 3)
Total
Financial assets:
Loans receivable$56,886 $$$56,886 
Preferred equity investments49,973 49,973 
Financial liabilities:
Senior Notes1,372,081 1,372,081 
Secured indebtedness77,949 77,949 
Disclosure of the fair value of financial instruments is based on pertinent information available to the Company at the applicable dates and requires a significant amount of judgment. Transaction volume for certain of the Company’s financial instruments remains relatively low, which has made the estimation of fair values difficult. Therefore, both the actual results and the Company’s estimate of fair value at a future date could be materially different.
Items Measured at Fair Value on a Recurring Basis
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company recorded the following amounts measured at fair value (in thousands):
Fair Value Measurements Using
Quoted Prices in Active Markets for Identical Assets
(Level 1)
Significant Other Observable Inputs
(Level 2)
Significant Unobservable Inputs
(Level 3)
Total
Recurring Basis:
Financial assets:
Interest rate swaps$106 $$106 $
Forward starting interest rate swaps20,666 20,666 
Cross currency interest rate swaps864 864 
Financial liabilities:
Interest rate swaps22,592 22,592 
Interest rate collars1,174 1,174 

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10.    EQUITY
Common Stock
On December 11, 2019, the Company established an at-the-market equity offering program (the “ATM Program”) pursuant to which shares of its common stock having an aggregate gross sales price of up to $400.0 million may be sold from time to time (i) by the Company through a consortium of banks acting as sales agents or directly to the banks acting as principals or (ii) by a consortium of banks acting as forward sellers on behalf of any forward purchasers pursuant to a forward sale agreement. The use of a forward sale agreement would allow the Company to lock in a share price on the sale of shares at the time the agreement is effective, but defer receiving the proceeds from the sale of the shares until a later date. The Company may also elect to cash settle or net share settle all or a portion of its obligations under any forward sale agreement. The forward sale agreements have a one year term during which time the Company may settle the forward sales by delivery of physical shares of common stock to the forward purchasers or, at the Company’s election, in cash or net shares. The forward sale price that the Company expects to receive upon settlement will be the initial forward price established upon the effective date, subject to adjustments for (i) the forward purchasers’ stock borrowing costs and (ii) certain fixed price reductions during the term of the agreement.
During the three months ended June 30, 2021, the Company sold 1.0 million shares under the ATM Program at an average price of $17.93 per share, generating gross proceeds of $18.5 million, before $0.3 million of commissions (excluding sales utilizing the forward feature of the ATM Program, as described below). During the six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company sold 2.2 million shares under the ATM Program at an average price of $17.78 per share, generating gross proceeds of $38.8 million, before $0.6 million of commissions (excluding sales utilizing the forward feature of the ATM Program, as described below).
Additionally, during the three months ended June 30, 2021, the Company utilized the forward feature of the ATM Program to allow for the sale of up to 2.6 million shares of the Company’s common stock at an initial weighted average price of $17.20 per share, net of commissions, and settled 3.9 million shares at a weighted average net price of $17.29 per share, after commissions and fees, resulting in net proceeds of $66.8 million. During the six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company utilized the forward feature of the ATM Program to allow for the sale of up to 6.8 million shares of the Company’s common stock at an initial weighted average price of $17.49 per share, net of commissions, and settled 7.9 million shares at a weighted average net price of $17.36 per share, after commissions and fees, resulting in net proceeds of $137.0 million. As of June 30, 2021, 0 shares remained outstanding under the forward sale agreements.
As of June 30, 2021, the Company had $75.8 million available under the ATM Program.
The following table lists the cash dividends on common stock declared and paid by the Company during the six months ended June 30, 2021:
Declaration Date Record Date Amount Per Share Dividend Payable Date
February 2, 2021 February 12, 2021 $0.30  February 26, 2021
May 5, 2021May 17, 2021$0.30 May 28, 2021
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, the Company issued 0.2 million shares of common stock as a result of restricted stock unit vestings.
Upon any payment of shares to team members as a result of restricted stock unit vestings, the team members’ related tax withholding obligation will generally be satisfied by the Company reducing the number of shares to be delivered by a number of shares necessary to satisfy the related applicable tax withholding obligation. During the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, the Company incurred $1.9 million and $0.9 million, respectively, in tax withholding obligations on behalf of its team members that were satisfied through a reduction in the number of shares delivered to those participants.
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss
The following is a summary of the Company’s accumulated other comprehensive loss (in thousands):
June 30, 2021December 31, 2020
Foreign currency translation loss$(2,300)$(1,831)
Unrealized loss on cash flow hedges(13,874)(38,080)
Total accumulated other comprehensive loss$(16,174)$(39,911)
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11.    EARNINGS PER COMMON SHARE
The following table illustrates the computation of basic and diluted earnings per share for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 (in thousands, except share and per share amounts):
Three Months Ended June 30,Six Months Ended June 30,
2021202020212020
Numerator
Net (loss) income$(132,573)$29,623 $(99,126)$64,840 
Denominator
Basic weighted average common shares and common equivalents216,264,207 205,593,653 213,870,329 205,493,829 
Dilutive restricted stock units625,509 700,453 
Diluted weighted average common shares216,264,207 206,219,162 213,870,329 206,194,282 
Net (loss) income, per:
Basic common share$(0.61)$0.14 $(0.46)$0.32 
Diluted common share$(0.61)$0.14 $(0.46)$0.31 
During the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, approximately 4,600 and 1,800 restricted stock units, respectively, and 0 shares and 300 shares, respectively, related to forward equity sale agreements were not included in computing diluted earnings per share because they were considered anti-dilutive. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, approximately 88,400 and 35,800 restricted stock units, respectively, were not included in computing diluted earnings per share because they were considered anti-dilutive.

12.    COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
Environmental
As an owner of real estate, the Company is subject to various environmental laws of federal, state and local governments. The Company is not aware of any environmental liability that could have a material adverse effect on its financial condition or results of operations. However, changes in applicable environmental laws and regulations, the uses and conditions of properties in the vicinity of the Company’s properties, the activities of its tenants and other environmental conditions of which the Company is unaware with respect to the properties could result in future environmental liabilities. As of June 30, 2021, the Company does not expect that compliance with existing environmental laws will have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.
Legal Matters
From time to time, the Company is party to legal proceedings that arise in the ordinary course of its business. Management is not aware of any legal proceedings where the likelihood of a loss contingency is reasonably possible and the amount or range of reasonably possible losses is material to the Company’s results of operations, financial condition or cash flows.

13.    SUBSEQUENT EVENTS
The Company evaluates subsequent events up until the date the condensed consolidated financial statements are issued.
Dividend Declaration
On August 4, 2021, the Company’s board of directors declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.30 per share of common stock. The dividend will be paid on August 31, 2021 to common stockholders of record as of the close of business on August 17, 2021.
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ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
The discussion below contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including those which are discussed in the “Risk Factors” section in Part I, Item 1A of our 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K. Also see “Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” preceding Part I.
The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with our accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto.
Our Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations is organized as follows:
Overview
Critical Accounting Policies
Recently Issued Accounting Standards Update
Results of Operations
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Concentration of Credit Risk
Skilled Nursing Facility Reimbursement Rates
Obligations and Commitments
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
Overview
We operate as a self-administered, self-managed REIT that, through our subsidiaries, owns and invests in real estate serving the healthcare industry.
Our primary business consists of acquiring, financing and owning real estate property to be leased to third party tenants in the healthcare sector. We primarily generate revenues by leasing properties to tenants and owning properties operated by third-party property managers throughout the United States (“U.S.”) and Canada.
Our investment portfolio is primarily comprised of skilled nursing/transitional care facilities, senior housing communities (“Senior Housing - Leased”) and specialty hospitals and other facilities, in each case leased to third-party operators; senior housing communities operated by third-party property managers pursuant to property management agreements (“Senior Housing - Managed”); investments in loans receivable; and preferred equity investments.
We expect to grow our investment portfolio while diversifying our portfolio by tenant, facility type and geography within the healthcare sector. We plan to achieve these objectives primarily through making investments directly or indirectly in healthcare real estate, including the development of purpose-built healthcare facilities with select developers. We also intend to achieve our objective of diversifying our portfolio by tenant and facility type through select asset sales and other arrangements with our tenants.
We expect to continue to grow our portfolio primarily through the acquisition of assisted living, independent living and memory care communities in the U.S. and Canada and through the acquisition of skilled nursing/transitional care and behavioral health facilities in the U.S. We have and expect to continue to opportunistically acquire other types of healthcare real estate, originate financing secured directly or indirectly by healthcare facilities and invest in the development of senior housing communities and skilled nursing/transitional care facilities. We also expect to expand our portfolio through the development of purpose-built healthcare facilities through pipeline agreements and other arrangements with select developers. We further expect to work with existing operators to identify strategic development opportunities. These opportunities may involve replacing, renovating or expanding facilities in our portfolio that may have become less competitive and new development opportunities that present attractive risk-adjusted returns. In addition to pursuing acquisitions with triple-net leases, we expect to continue to pursue other forms of investment, including investments in Senior Housing - Managed communities, mezzanine and secured debt investments, and joint ventures for senior housing communities and skilled nursing/transitional care facilities. We also expect to continue to enhance the strength of our investment portfolio by selectively disposing of underperforming facilities or working with new or existing operators to transfer underperforming but promising properties to new operators.
With respect to our debt and preferred equity investments, in general, we originate loans and make preferred equity investments when an attractive investment opportunity is presented and (a) the property is in or near the development phase, (b) the development of the property is completed but the operations of the facility are not yet stabilized or (c) the loan investment
27

will provide capital to existing relationships. A key component of our development strategy related to loan originations and preferred equity investments is having the option to purchase the underlying real estate that is owned by our borrowers (and that directly or indirectly secures our loan investments) or by the entity in which we have an investment. These options become exercisable upon the occurrence of various criteria, such as the passage of time or the achievement of certain operating goals, and the method to determine the purchase price upon exercise of the option is set in advance based on the same valuation methods we use to value our investments in healthcare real estate. This proprietary development pipeline strategy allows us to diversify our revenue streams and build relationships with operators and developers, and provides us with the option to add new properties to our existing real estate portfolio if we determine that those properties enhance our investment portfolio and stockholder value at the time the options are exercisable.
We employ a disciplined, opportunistic approach in our healthcare real estate investment strategy by investing in assets that provide attractive opportunities for dividend growth and appreciation of asset values, while maintaining balance sheet strength and liquidity, thereby creating long-term stockholder value.
We elected to be treated as a REIT with the filing of our U.S. federal income tax return for the taxable year beginning January 1, 2011. We believe that we have been organized and have operated, and we intend to continue to operate, in a manner to qualify as a REIT. We operate through an umbrella partnership, commonly referred to as an UPREIT structure, in which substantially all of our properties and assets are held by Sabra Health Care Limited Partnership, a Delaware limited partnership (the “Operating Partnership”), of which we are the sole general partner and a wholly owned subsidiary of ours is currently the only limited partner, or by subsidiaries of the Operating Partnership.
COVID-19
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and measures intended to prevent its spread have negatively impacted and are expected to continue to negatively impact us and our operations in a number of ways, including but not limited to:
Decreased occupancy and increased operating costs for our tenants and borrowers, which have negatively impacted their operating results and may adversely impact their ability to make full and timely rental payments and debt service payments, respectively, to us. In some cases, we may have to restructure tenants’ long-term rent obligations and may not be able to do so on terms that are as favorable to us as those currently in place. Reduced or modified rental and debt service amounts could result in the determination that the full amounts of our investments are not recoverable, which could result in an impairment charge. To date, the impact of COVID-19 on our skilled nursing/transitional care facility operators has been significantly mitigated by the assistance they have received or expect to receive from state and federal assistance programs, including through the CARES Act (as defined and further described below under “—Skilled Nursing Facility Reimbursement Rates”), although these benefits on an individual operator basis vary and may not provide enough relief to meet their rental obligations to us. As of September 1, 2020, eligible assisted living facility operators may apply for funding through the CARES Act, and the assistance received or expected to be received will partially mitigate the negative impact of COVID-19 on our eligible assisted living facility operators. As of June 30, 2021, our tenants and borrowers have continued to pay expected cash rents and debt service obligations consistent with past practice. However, the longer the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic, the more likely that our tenants and borrowers will begin to default on these obligations. Such defaults could materially and adversely affect our results of operations and liquidity, in addition to resulting in potential impairment charges.
Decreased occupancy and increased operating costs within our Senior Housing - Managed portfolio which have negatively impacted and are expected to continue to negatively impact the operating results of these investments. As noted above, as of September 1, 2020, eligible assisted living facility operators may apply for funding through the CARES Act, and the assistance received or expected to be received will partially mitigate the negative impact of COVID-19 on our Senior Housing - Managed portfolio. In addition, on October 1, 2020, the Department of Health and Human Services announced $20 billion of new funding for assisted living facility operators that have already received funds and to those who were previously ineligible. During each of the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized government grants of $0.5 million in resident fees and services. Prolonged deterioration in the operating results for our investments in our Senior Housing - Managed portfolio could result in the determination that the full amounts of our investments are not recoverable, which could result in an impairment charge.
Our financial results as of and for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 reflect the results of our evaluation of the impact of COVID-19 on our business including, but not limited to, our evaluation of potential impairments of long-lived or other assets, measurement of credit losses on financial instruments, evaluation of any lease modifications, evaluation of lease accounting impact, estimates of fair value and our ability to continue as a going concern.
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Impairment of Investment in Unconsolidated Joint Venture
We have a 49% equity interest in a joint venture (the “Enlivant Joint Venture”) with affiliates of TPG Real Estate, the real estate platform of TPG. TPG also owns Enlivant, the senior housing management platform that manages the portfolio owned by the Enlivant Joint Venture. During the second quarter of 2021, TPG reached out to Sabra to explore our acquiring TPG’s 51% interest in the Enlivant Joint Venture. The parties were not able to reach mutually acceptable terms for a transaction, in part due to modifications requested by TPG in the Enlivant management fee structure. At that time, TPG informed Sabra of its intent to re-evaluate its plans with respect to the management company. Furthermore, decreased occupancy and revenues and increased operating costs during the COVID-19 pandemic have had a significant negative impact on the financial performance of the Enlivant Joint Venture. As a result, we re-evaluated our plans with respect to the Enlivant Joint Venture and determined that we would no longer seek to acquire TPG’s majority interest in the Enlivant Joint Venture and that we expect to sell our 49% equity interest should TPG secure a buyer for the portfolio sometime in the future. In connection with this re-evaluation and our eventual intent to exit our 49% stake, we revisited our estimate of the fair value of our investment in the Enlivant Joint Venture and believe that it has declined below our investment basis. We also believe that, given our intent to sell the portfolio, it is unlikely that we will hold our investment for an adequate period of time to recover this estimated decline in value. As such, this decline was deemed to be other-than-temporary and we recorded an impairment charge for the amount that the carrying value exceeds the estimated fair value of the investment totaling $164.1 million during the three months ended June 30, 2021. This impairment is included in loss from unconsolidated joint venture on the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of (loss) income. The ongoing operating performance of the Enlivant Joint Venture, as well as whether TPG is able to secure a buyer on favorable terms or at all, will impact the ultimate amounts realized from the Enlivant Joint Venture and may require us to recognize an additional impairment charge in the future with respect to this investment. See Note 4, “Investment in Real Estate Properties,” in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information regarding this impairment.
Acquisitions
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we acquired two Senior Housing - Managed communities, one addiction treatment center and one skilled nursing/transitional care facility for an aggregate purchase price of $62.1 million. See Note 3, “Recent Real Estate Acquisitions,” in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information regarding these acquisitions.
Dispositions
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we completed the sale of four skilled nursing/transitional care facilities for aggregate consideration, net of closing costs, of $11.3 million. The net carrying value of the assets and liabilities of these facilities was $14.7 million, which resulted in an aggregate $3.4 million net loss on sale.
Critical Accounting Policies
Our condensed consolidated interim financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) and in conjunction with the rules and regulations of the SEC. The preparation of our financial statements requires significant management judgments, assumptions and estimates about matters that are inherently uncertain. These judgments affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and our disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the dates of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting periods. With different estimates or assumptions, materially different amounts could be reported in our financial statements. Additionally, other companies may utilize different estimates that may impact the comparability of our results of operations to those of companies in similar businesses. A discussion of the accounting policies that management considers critical in that they involve significant management judgments and assumptions, require estimates about matters that are inherently uncertain and because they are important for understanding and evaluating our reported financial results is included in Part II, Item 7 of our 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC. There have been no significant changes to our critical accounting policies during the six months ended June 30, 2021.
Recently Issued Accounting Standards Update
See Note 2, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies,” in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for information concerning recently issued accounting standards updates.
Results of Operations
As of June 30, 2021, our investment portfolio consisted of 423 real estate properties held for investment, three assets held for sale, one investment in a sales-type lease, 18 investments in loans receivable, seven preferred equity investments and one
29

investment in an unconsolidated joint venture. As of June 30, 2020, our investment portfolio consisted of 427 real estate properties held for investment, one investment in a direct financing lease, 19 investments in loans receivable, five preferred equity investments and one investment in an unconsolidated joint venture. In general, we expect that income and expenses related to our portfolio will fluctuate in future periods in comparison to the corresponding prior periods as a result of investment and disposition activity and anticipated future changes in our portfolio. The results of operations presented are not directly comparable due to ongoing acquisition and disposition activity.
Comparison of results of operations for the three months ended June 30, 2021 versus the three months ended June 30, 2020 (dollars in thousands):
Three Months Ended June 30,Increase / (Decrease)Percentage
Difference
Variance due to Acquisitions, Originations and Dispositions (1)
Remaining Variance (2)
20212020
Revenues:
Rental and related revenues$110,783 $112,727 $(1,944)(2)%$(1,179)$(765)
Interest and other income3,031 2,606 425 16 %519 (94)
Resident fees and services39,118 38,584 534 %2,530 (1,996)
Expenses:
Depreciation and amortization44,491 44,202 289 %271 18 
Interest24,270 25,292 (1,022)(4)%(131)(891)
Triple-net portfolio operating expenses5,000 5,331 (331)(6)%(8)(323)
Senior housing - managed portfolio operating expenses28,901 27,970 931 %1,423 (492)
General and administrative8,811 8,673 138 %— 138 
(Recovery of) provision for loan losses and other reserves(109)129 (238)(184)%— (238)
Other income (expense):
Loss on extinguishment of debt(54)(392)338 (86)%392 (54)
Other expense(24)(66)42 (64)%— 42 
Net (loss) gain on sales of real estate(3,752)330 (4,082)(1,237)%(4,082)— 
Loss from unconsolidated joint venture(169,789)(12,136)(157,653)1,299 %9,454 (167,107)
Income tax expense(522)(433)(89)21 %— (89)
(1)    Represents the dollar amount increase (decrease) for the three months ended June 30, 2021 compared to the three months ended June 30, 2020 as a result of investments/dispositions made after April 1, 2020.
(2)    Represents the dollar amount increase (decrease) for the three months ended June 30, 2021 compared to the three months ended June 30, 2020 that is not a direct result of investments/dispositions made after April 1, 2020.
Rental and Related Revenues
During the three months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized $110.8 million of rental income compared to $112.7 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020. The $1.9 million net decrease in rental income is related to (i) a $1.2 million decrease from properties disposed of after April 1, 2020, (ii) a $1.0 million decrease related to lease intangibles that have been fully amortized and (iii) a $0.5 million decrease due to transitioning four facilities to new operators. The decreases are offset by a $0.9 million net decrease in write-offs related to leases we concluded should no longer be accounted for on an accrual basis during the three months ended June 30, 2020.
Our reported rental and related revenues may be subject to increased variability in the future as a result of adopting Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), as amended by subsequent ASUs (“Topic 842”). However, there can be no assurances regarding the timing and amount of these revenues. Amounts due under the terms of all of our lease agreements are subject to contractual increases, and contingent rental income may be derived from certain lease agreements. No material contingent rental income was derived during the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020.
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Interest and Other Income
Interest and other income primarily consists of income earned on our loans receivable investments, preferred returns earned on our preferred equity investments and income on the sales-type lease. During the three months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized $3.0 million of interest and other income compared to $2.6 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020. The net increase of $0.4 million is due to a $0.5 million increase in income from investments made after April 1, 2020.
Resident Fees and Services
During the three months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized $39.1 million of resident fees and services compared to $38.6 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020. The $0.5 million net increase is due to a $2.5 million increase from three Senior Housing - Managed communities acquired after April 1, 2020, partially offset by the impact of decreased occupancy as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Depreciation and Amortization
During each of the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, we incurred $44.5 million of depreciation and amortization expense compared to $44.2 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020. Depreciation and amortization expense increased by $0.7 million from properties acquired after April 1, 2020. The increase was offset by a $0.4 million decrease from properties disposed of after April 1, 2020.
Interest Expense
We incur interest expense comprised of costs of borrowings plus the amortization of deferred financing costs related to our indebtedness. During the three months ended June 30, 2021, we incurred $24.3 million of interest expense compared to $25.3 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020. The $1.0 million net decrease is related to (i) a $0.5 million decrease in interest expense related to a reduction in the borrowings outstanding under the Credit Agreement (as defined below) and decrease in interest rates, (ii) a $0.1 million decrease in interest expense related to one mortgage note assumed during 2020 by the buyer of the facility securing the debt and (iii) a $0.3 million decrease in non-cash interest expense related to our interest rate hedges.
Triple-Net Portfolio Operating Expenses
During the three months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized $5.0 million of triple-net portfolio operating expenses compared to $5.3 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020. The $0.3 million net decrease is related to a $0.1 million decrease related to property taxes paid during the three months ended June 30, 2020 on facilities that have since been transitioned to new operators who are now paying the property taxes directly, and the remaining decrease is due to adjusting our estimates related to property taxes.
Senior Housing - Managed Portfolio Operating Expenses
During the three months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized $28.9 million of Senior Housing - Managed portfolio operating expenses compared to $28.0 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020. The $0.9 million net increase is due to (i) a $1.4 million increase related to three Senior Housing - Managed communities acquired after April 1, 2020, (ii) a $0.4 million increase related to marketing expenses due to increased activity and (iii) a $0.3 million increase in insurance expenses due to a higher number of claims and increased premiums. The increases are partially offset by a $1.3 million decrease in supplies and labor needs related to the COVID-19 pandemic.
General and Administrative Expenses
General and administrative expenses include compensation-related expenses as well as professional services, office costs, other costs associated with asset management, and merger and acquisition costs. During the three months ended June 30, 2021, general and administrative expenses were $8.8 million compared to $8.7 million during the three months ended June 30, 2020. The $0.1 million net increase is related to a $0.2 million increase in insurance expense due to increased premiums.
(Recovery of) Provision for Loan Losses and Other Reserves
During the three months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized a $0.1 million recovery of loan losses and other reserves associated with loan loss reserves. During the three months ended June 30, 2020, we recognized a $0.1 million provision for loan losses and other reserves associated with loan loss reserves.
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Loss on Extinguishment of Debt
During the three months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized a $0.1 million loss on extinguishment of debt related to write-offs of deferred financing costs in connection with the partial pay down of the U.S. dollar Term Loans (as defined below). During the three months ended June 30, 2020, we recognized a $0.4 million loss on extinguishment of debt related to write-offs of deferred financing costs in connection with the sale of two facilities that secured two mortgage notes.
Net (Loss) Gain on Sales of Real Estate
During the three months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized an aggregate net loss on the sales of real estate of $3.8 million related to the disposition of two skilled nursing/transitional care facilities. During the three months ended June 30, 2020, we recognized an aggregate net gain on the sales of real estate of $0.3 million related to the disposition of three skilled nursing/transitional care facilities.
Loss from Unconsolidated Joint Venture
During the three months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized $169.8 million of loss from the Enlivant Joint Venture compared to $12.1 million of loss for the three months ended June 30, 2020. The $157.7 million net increase in loss is related to (i) a $164.1 million other-than-temporary impairment recorded during the three months ended June 30, 2021 (See Note 4, “Investments in Real Estate Properties” in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information regarding the impairment), (ii) a $2.4 million decrease in revenue from the facilities owned by the Enlivant Joint Venture as of June 30, 2021, primarily due to the impact of decreased occupancy as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and (iii) a $1.9 million increase in operating expenses from the facilities owned by the Enlivant Joint Venture as of June 30, 2021. The $1.9 million increase in operating expenses consists of (i) a $2.5 million support payment paid to the manager of the Enlivant Joint Venture during the current year, partially offset by a $1.0 million decrease in supplies and labor needs related to the COVID-19 pandemic and a $0.4 million decrease in dining related expenses due to decreased occupancy. The decreases are partially offset by (i) a $9.1 million decrease in loss on sale related to the disposition of nine senior housing communities during the three months ended June 30, 2020, (ii) a $1.0 million decrease in deferred income tax due to lower taxable income and (iii) a $0.5 million decrease in interest expense due to a decrease in interest rates.
Income Tax Expense
During the three months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized $0.5 million of income tax expense compared to $0.4 million for the three months ended June 30, 2020. The increase is due to higher taxable income from our Senior Housing – Managed portfolio.
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Comparison of results of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2021 versus the six months ended June 30, 2020 (dollars in thousands):
Six Months Ended June 30,Increase / (Decrease)Percentage
Difference
Variance due to Acquisitions, Originations and Dispositions (1)
Remaining Variance (2)
20212020
Revenues:
Rental and related revenues$224,166 $219,239 $4,927 %$(739)$5,666 
Interest and other income5,972 5,457 515 %805 (290)
Resident fees and services75,159 78,567 (3,408)(4)%2,910 (6,318)
Expenses:
Depreciation and amortization88,866 88,370 496 %(720)1,216 
Interest48,713 50,996 (2,283)(4)%(434)(1,849)
Triple-net portfolio operating expenses10,135 10,232 (97)(1)%(53)(44)
Senior housing - managed portfolio operating expenses57,846 55,231 2,615 %1,868 747 
General and administrative17,749 17,434 315 %— 315 
Provision for loan losses and other reserves1,916 796 1,120 141 %— 1,120 
Other income (expense):
Loss on extinguishment of debt(847)(392)(455)116 %392 (847)
Other income109 2,193 (2,084)(95)%— (2,084)
Net (loss) gain on sales of real estate(2,439)113 (2,552)(2,258)%(2,552)— 
Loss from unconsolidated joint venture(174,799)(15,803)(158,996)1,006 %11,441 (170,437)
Income tax expense(1,222)(1,475)253 (17)%— 253 
(1)    Represents the dollar amount increase (decrease) for the six months ended June 30, 2021 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2020 as a result of investments/dispositions made after January 1, 2020.
(2)    Represents the dollar amount increase (decrease) for the six months ended June 30, 2021 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2020 that is not a direct result of investments/dispositions made after January 1, 2020.
Rental and Related Revenues
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized $224.2 million of rental income compared to $219.2 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020. The $4.9 million net increase in rental income is related to (i) a $7.5 million net decrease in write-offs related to leases we concluded should no longer be accounted for on an accrual basis during the six months ended June 30, 2020 and (ii) a $0.9 million increase from properties acquired after January 1, 2020. These increases are partially offset by (i) a $1.6 million decrease from properties disposed of after January 1, 2020, (ii) $1.5 million decrease related to lease intangibles that have been fully amortized and (iii) a $1.2 million decrease in property tax recoveries.
Our reported rental and related revenues may be subject to increased variability in the future as a result of adopting Topic 842. However, there can be no assurances regarding the timing and amount of these revenues. Amounts due under the terms of all of our lease agreements are subject to contractual increases, and contingent rental income may be derived from certain lease agreements. No material contingent rental income was derived during the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020.
Interest and Other Income
Interest and other income primarily consists of income earned on our loans receivable investments, preferred returns earned on our preferred equity investments and income on the sales-type lease. During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized $6.0 million of interest and other income compared to $5.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020. The net increase of $0.5 million is due to a $1.0 million increase in income from investments made after January 1, 2020, partially offset by a $0.2 million decrease in income from investments repaid after January 1, 2020.
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Resident Fees and Services
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized $75.2 million of resident fees and services compared to $78.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020. The $3.4 million net decrease is due to the impact of decreased occupancy as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, partially offset by a $2.9 million increase from three Senior Housing - Managed communities acquired after January 1, 2020.
Depreciation and Amortization
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we incurred $88.9 million of depreciation and amortization expense compared to $88.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020. The $0.5 million net increase is due to (i) a $2.1 million increase from additions to real estate and (ii) a $0.3 million increase from properties acquired after January 1, 2020. The increases are partially offset by (i) a $1.0 million decrease from properties disposed of after January 1, 2020 and (ii) a $1.1 million decrease related to assets that have been fully depreciated.
Interest Expense
We incur interest expense comprised of costs of borrowings plus the amortization of deferred financing costs related to our indebtedness. During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we incurred $48.7 million of interest expense compared to $51.0 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020. The $2.3 million net decrease is related to (i) a $1.0 million decrease in interest expense related to a reduction in the borrowings outstanding under the Credit Agreement and decrease in interest rates, (ii) a $0.4 million decrease in interest expense related to three mortgage notes assumed during 2020 by the buyers of the facilities securing the debt and (iii) a $0.6 million decrease in non-cash interest expense related to our interest rate hedges.
Triple-Net Portfolio Operating Expenses
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized $10.1 million of triple-net portfolio operating expenses compared to $10.2 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020. The $0.1 million net decrease is primarily due to facilities disposed of after January 1, 2020.
Senior Housing - Managed Portfolio Operating Expenses
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized $57.8 million of operating expenses compared to $55.2 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020. The $2.6 million net increase is due to (i) a $1.9 million increase related to three Senior Housing - Managed communities acquired after January 1, 2020, (ii) a $0.9 million increase in insurance expense due to a higher number of claims and an increase in premiums and (iii) a $0.6 million increase in marketing expenses due to increased activity, partially offset by a $0.7 million decrease in supplies and labor needs related to the COVID-19 pandemic.
General and Administrative Expenses
General and administrative expenses include compensation-related expenses as well as professional services, office costs, other costs associated with asset management, and merger and acquisition costs. During the six months ended June 30, 2021, general and administrative expenses were $17.7 million compared to $17.4 million during the six months ended June 30, 2020. The $0.3 million net increase is related to (i) a $0.5 million increase in insurance expense due to an increase in premiums and (ii) a $0.4 million increase in compensation for our team members as a result of increased staffing, partially offset by a $0.7 million decrease in professional and legal fees due to a decrease in transaction activity.
Provision for Loan Losses and Other Reserves
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized a $1.9 million provision for loan losses and other reserves associated with loan loss reserves. During the six months ended June 30, 2020, we recognized a $0.8 million provision for loan losses and other reserves associated with loan loss reserves. The $1.1 million increase is due to one loan deemed uncollectible during the six months ended June 30, 2021.
Loss on Extinguishment of Debt
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized a $0.8 million loss on extinguishment of debt related to write-offs of deferred financing costs in connection with the partial pay down of the U.S. dollar Term Loans. During the six months ended June 30, 2020, we recognized a $0.4 million loss on extinguishment of debt related to write-offs of deferred financing costs in connection with the sale of two facilities that secured two mortgage notes.
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Other Income
During the six months ended June 30, 2021 and June 30, 2020, we recognized $0.1 million and $2.2 million, respectively, of other income primarily related to settlement payments received related to legacy Care Capital Properties (“CCP”) investments.
Net (Loss) Gain on Sales of Real Estate
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized a net loss on the sales of real estate of $2.4 million. The $2.4 million includes an aggregate $3.4 million loss on sales of real estate related to the disposition of four skilled nursing/transitional care facilities, partially offset by a $1.0 million gain on sale of real estate due to reassessing the classification of a lease and determining the lease, which requires the tenant to purchase the property at the maturity of the lease, should be accounted for as a sales-type lease, which required us to recognize the gain on sale prior to the actual sale to our tenant. During the six months ended June 30, 2020, we recognized an aggregate net gain on the sales of real estate of $0.1 million related to the disposition of six skilled nursing/transitional care facilities.
Loss from Unconsolidated Joint Venture
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized $174.8 million of loss from the Enlivant Joint Venture compared to $15.8 million of loss for the six months ended June 30, 2020. The $159.0 million net increase in loss is related to (i) a $164.1 million other-than-temporary impairment recorded during the three months ended June 30, 2021 (See Note 4, “Investments in Real Estate Properties” in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information regarding the impairment), (ii) a $7.5 million decrease in revenue from the facilities owned by the Enlivant Joint Venture as of June 30, 2021, primarily due to the impact of decreased occupancy as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and (iii) a $2.2 million increase in operating expenses from the facilities owned by the Enlivant Joint Venture as of June 30, 2021. The $2.2 million increase in operating expenses consists of (i) a $2.5 million support payment paid to the manager of the Enlivant Joint Venture during the current year and (ii) a $0.3 million increase in supplies and labor needs related to the COVID-19 pandemic, partially offset by (i) a $0.7 million decrease in dining related expenses and (ii) a $0.5 million decrease in employee compensation, both due to decreased occupancy. The decreases are partially offset by (i) a $10.8 million decrease in loss on sale related to the disposition of 11 senior housing communities in the prior year, (ii) a $2.0 million decrease in deferred income tax due to lower taxable income and (iii) a $2.1 million decrease in interest expense due to a decrease in interest rates.
Income Tax Expense
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we recognized $1.2 million of income tax expense compared to $1.5 million of income tax expense recognized during the six months ended June 30, 2020. The decrease is due to lower taxable income from our Senior Housing – Managed portfolio and the tax impact of changes in fair value for certain derivative instruments.

Funds from Operations and Adjusted Funds from Operations
We believe that net income as defined by GAAP is the most appropriate earnings measure. We also believe that funds from operations (“FFO”), as defined in accordance with the definition used by the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts (“Nareit”), and adjusted funds from operations (“AFFO”) (and related per share amounts) are important non-GAAP supplemental measures of our operating performance. Because the historical cost accounting convention used for real estate assets requires straight-line depreciation (except on land), such accounting presentation implies that the value of real estate assets diminishes predictably over time. However, since real estate values have historically risen or fallen with market and other conditions, presentations of operating results for a REIT that uses historical cost accounting for depreciation could be less informative. Thus, Nareit created FFO as a supplemental measure of operating performance for REITs that excludes historical cost depreciation and amortization, among other items, from net income, as defined by GAAP. FFO is defined as net income, computed in accordance with GAAP, excluding gains or losses from real estate dispositions and our share of gains or losses from real estate dispositions related to our unconsolidated joint venture, plus real estate depreciation and amortization, net of amounts related to noncontrolling interests, plus our share of depreciation and amortization related to our unconsolidated joint venture, and real estate impairment charges of both consolidated and unconsolidated entities when the impairment is directly attributable to decreases in the value of the depreciable real estate held by the entity. AFFO is defined as FFO excluding merger and acquisition costs, stock-based compensation expense, non-cash rental and related revenues, non-cash interest income, non-cash interest expense, non-cash portion of loss on extinguishment of debt, provision for loan losses and other reserves, non-cash lease termination income and deferred income taxes, as well as other non-cash revenue and expense items (including ineffectiveness gain/loss on derivative instruments, and non-cash revenue and expense amounts related to noncontrolling interests) and our share of non-cash adjustments related to our unconsolidated joint venture. We believe that the use of FFO and AFFO (and the related per share amounts), combined with the required GAAP presentations, improves the
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understanding of our operating results among investors and makes comparisons of operating results among REITs more meaningful. We consider FFO and AFFO to be useful measures for reviewing comparative operating and financial performance because, by excluding the applicable items listed above, FFO and AFFO can help investors compare our operating performance between periods or as compared to other companies. While FFO and AFFO are relevant and widely used measures of operating performance of REITs, they do not represent cash flows from operations or net income as defined by GAAP and should not be considered an alternative to those measures in evaluating our liquidity or operating performance. FFO and AFFO also do not consider the costs associated with capital expenditures related to our real estate assets nor do they purport to be indicative of cash available to fund our future cash requirements. Further, our computation of FFO and AFFO may not be comparable to FFO and AFFO reported by other REITs that do not define FFO in accordance with the current Nareit definition or that interpret the current Nareit definition or define AFFO differently than we do.
The following table reconciles our calculations of FFO and AFFO for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, to net (loss) income, the most directly comparable GAAP financial measure, for the same periods (in thousands, except share and per share amounts):
Three Months Ended June 30,Six Months Ended June 30,
2021202020212020
Net (loss) income$(132,573)$29,623 $(99,126)$64,840 
Depreciation and amortization of real estate assets44,491 44,202 88,866 88,370 
Depreciation and amortization of real estate assets related to unconsolidated joint venture5,879 5,549 11,723 11,134 
Net loss (gain) on sales of real estate3,752 (330)2,439 (113)
Net (gain) loss on sales of real estate related to unconsolidated joint venture(18)9,079 15 10,808 
Other-than-temporary impairment of unconsolidated joint venture164,126 — 164,126 — 
 
FFO85,657 88,123 168,043 175,039 
Stock-based compensation expense2,271 2,375 4,559 4,735 
Non-cash rental and related revenues(4,914)(6,202)(10,627)(6,567)
Non-cash interest income(502)(574)(914)(1,135)
Non-cash interest expense1,749 2,225 3,645 4,458 
Non-cash portion of loss on extinguishment of debt54 392 847 392 
(Recovery of) provision for loan losses and other reserves(109)129 1,916 796 
Other non-cash adjustments related to unconsolidated joint venture(618)404 (1,214)943 
Other non-cash adjustments361 402 533 455 
 
AFFO$83,949 $87,274 $166,788 $179,116 
 
FFO per diluted common share
$0.39 $0.43 $0.78 $0.85 
  
AFFO per diluted common share$0.39 $0.42 $0.77 $0.87 
 
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding, diluted:
FFO217,462,704 206,219,162 215,015,226 206,194,282 
 
AFFO217,946,731 207,003,252 215,550,317 206,933,563 
 
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The following table sets forth additional information related to certain other items included in net (loss) income above, and the portions of each that are included in FFO and AFFO, which may be helpful in assessing our operating results. Please refer to “—Results of Operations” above for additional information regarding these items (in millions):
Three Months Ended June 30,Six Months Ended June 30,
202120202021202020212020202120202021202020212020
Net (Loss) IncomeFFOAFFONet (Loss) IncomeFFOAFFO
Rental and related revenues:
Reduction of revenues related to non-cash receivable balances / lease intangible write-offs$— $0.4 $— $0.4 $— $— $— $6.5 $— $6.5 $— $— 
Resident fess and services:
Grant income under government programs (1)
0.5 — 0.5 — 0.5 — 0.5 — 0.5 — 0.5 — 
Senior housing - managed portfolio operating expenses:
COVID-19 pandemic related expenses (2)
0.4 1.7 0.4 1.7 0.4 1.7 1.3 2.0 1.3 2.0 1.3 2.0 
General and administrative expense:
Merger and acquisition costs0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 — — 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.4 — — 
(Recovery of) provision for loan losses and other reserves(0.1)0.1 (0.1)0.1 — — 1.9 0.8 1.9 0.8 — — 
Loss on extinguishment of debt(0.1)(0.4)(0.1)(0.4)— — (0.8)(0.4)(0.8)(0.4)— — 
Other (expense) income— (0.1)— (0.1)— — 0.1 2.2 0.1 2.2 0.2 2.1 
Loss from unconsolidated joint venture:
Deferred income tax (benefit) expense(0.9)0.1 (0.9)0.1 — — (1.6)0.4 (1.6)0.4 — — 
COVID-19 pandemic related expenses (2)
1.1 2.3 1.1 2.3 1.1 2.3 3.0 2.7 3.0 2.7 3.0 2.7 
Support payment paid to joint venture manager2.5 — 2.5 — 2.5 — 2.5 — 2.5 — 2.5 — 
Other-than-temporary impairment of unconsolidated joint venture164.1 — — — — — 164.1 — — — — — 
(1)    Consists of funds specifically paid to communities in our Senior Housing - Managed portfolio from state or federal governments related to the pandemic and were incremental to the amounts that would have otherwise been received for providing care to residents.
(2)    Consists primarily of (i) personal protective equipment (“PPE”) costs, (ii) incremental labor costs (including bonuses, hero pay and additional labor needed to implement new health and safety protocols) and (iii) incremental supply costs required to implement new health and safety protocols (e.g., disposable food containers and stronger disinfectants), in each case incurred by communities in our Senior Housing - Managed portfolio specifically as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
As of June 30, 2021, we had approximately $1.1 billion in liquidity, consisting of unrestricted cash and cash equivalents of $69.3 million and available borrowings under our Revolving Credit Facility of $1.0 billion. The Credit Agreement also contains an accordion feature that can increase the total available borrowings to $2.75 billion (from U.S. $2.0 billion plus CAD $125.0 million), subject to terms and conditions.
We have filed a shelf registration statement with the SEC that expires in December 2022, which allows us to offer and sell shares of common stock, preferred stock, warrants, rights, units, and certain of our subsidiaries to offer and sell debt securities, through underwriters, dealers or agents or directly to purchasers, on a continuous or delayed basis, in amounts, at prices and on terms we determine at the time of the offering, subject to market conditions.
On December 11, 2019, we established an at-the-market equity offering program (the “ATM Program”) pursuant to which shares of our common stock having an aggregate gross sales price of up to $400.0 million may be sold from time to time (i) by us through a consortium of banks acting as sales agents or directly to the banks acting as principals or (ii) by a consortium of banks acting as forward sellers on behalf of any forward purchasers pursuant to a forward sale agreement. During the three
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months ended June 30, 2021, we sold 1.0 million shares under the ATM Program at an average price of $17.93 per share, generating gross proceeds of $18.5 million, before $0.3 million of commissions (excluding sales utilizing the forward feature of the ATM Program, as described below). During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we sold 2.2 million shares under the ATM Program at an average price of $17.78 per share, generating gross proceeds of $38.8 million, before $0.6 million of commissions (excluding sales utilizing the forward feature of the ATM Program, as described below).
Additionally, during the three months ended June 30, 2021, we utilized the forward feature of the ATM Program to allow for the sale of up to 2.6 million shares of our common stock at an initial weighted average price of $17.20 per share, net of commissions, and settled 3.9 million shares at a weighted average net price of $17.29 per share, after commissions and fees, resulting in net proceeds of $66.8 million. During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we utilized the forward feature of the ATM Program to allow for the sale of up to 6.8 million shares of our common stock at an initial weighted average price of $17.49 per share, net of commissions, and settled 7.9 million shares at a weighted average net price of $17.36 per share, after commissions and fees, resulting in net proceeds of $137.0 million. As of June 30, 2021, no shares remained outstanding under the forward sale agreements.
As of June 30, 2021, we had $75.8 million available under the ATM Program. Subject to market conditions, we expect to use proceeds from our ATM Program to finance future investments in properties.
Based on our current assessment of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our Company, we believe that our available cash, operating cash flows and borrowings available to us under our Revolving Credit Facility provide sufficient funds for our operations, scheduled debt service payments and dividend requirements for the next twelve months. In addition, we do not believe that the restrictions under our Senior Notes Indentures (as defined below) or Credit Agreement significantly limit our ability to use our available liquidity for these purposes.
We expect that future investments in properties, including any improvements or renovations of current or newly-acquired properties, will depend on and will be financed, in whole or in part, by our existing cash, borrowings available to us under our Revolving Credit Facility and the proceeds from issuances of common stock (including through our ATM Program), preferred stock, debt or other securities. In addition, we may seek financing from U.S. government agencies, including through Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, in appropriate circumstances in connection with acquisitions. We also use derivative instruments in the normal course of business to mitigate interest rate and foreign currency risk.
Cash Flows from Operating Activities
Net cash provided by operating activities was $152.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2021. Operating cash inflows were derived primarily from the rental payments received under our lease agreements, resident fees and services net of the corresponding operating expenses and payments from borrowers under our loan and preferred equity investments. Operating cash outflows consisted primarily of interest payments on borrowings and payment of general and administrative expenses, including corporate overhead. We expect our annualized cash flows provided by operating activities to fluctuate as a result of completed investment and disposition activity, anticipated future changes in our portfolio, fluctuations in collections from tenants and borrowers, and fluctuations in the operating results of our Senior Housing - Managed communities.
Cash Flows from Investing Activities
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, net cash used in investing activities was $77.2 million and included $62.1 million used for the acquisition of four facilities, $21.7 million used for additions to real estate and $3.4 million used to provide funding for a preferred equity investment, partially offset by $8.4 million in net sales proceeds related to dispositions, $1.1 million in repayments of loans receivable and $0.5 million in repayments of preferred equity investments.
Cash Flows from Financing Activities
During the six months ended June 30, 2021, net cash used in financing activities was $66.8 million and included $110.0 million of principal repayments on term loans, $128.1 million of dividends paid to stockholders and $1.4 million of principal repayments on secured debt, partially offset by $172.7 million of net proceeds from shares sold through our ATM Program, net of payroll tax payments related to the issuance of common stock pursuant to equity compensation arrangements.
Please see the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of cash flows for details of our operating, investing and financing cash activities.
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Loan Agreements
2024 Notes. On May 29, 2019, the Operating Partnership and Sabra Capital Corporation, wholly owned subsidiaries of Sabra (together, the “Issuers”), issued $300.0 million aggregate principal amount of 4.80% senior notes due 2024 (the “2024 Notes”), providing net proceeds of approximately $295.3 million after deducting underwriting discounts and other offering expenses. In connection with the October 2019 redemption of other senior notes of the Issuers, Sabra Capital Corporation’s obligations as a co-issuer were automatically released and discharged.
2026 and 2027 Notes. In connection with our merger with CCP, on August 17, 2017, Sabra assumed $500 million aggregate principal amount of 5.125% senior notes due 2026 (the “2026 Notes”) and $100 million aggregate principal amount of 5.88% senior notes due 2027 (the “2027 Notes”).
2029 Notes. On October 7, 2019, the Issuers issued $350.0 million aggregate principal amount of 3.90% senior notes due 2029 (the “2029 Notes” and, together with the 2024 Notes, the 2026 Notes and the 2027 Notes, the “Senior Notes”), providing net proceeds of $340.5 million after deducting underwriting discounts and other offering expenses. In connection with the October 2019 redemption of other senior notes of the Issuers, Sabra Capital Corporation’s obligations as a co-issuer were automatically released and discharged.
See Note 7, “Debt,” in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information concerning the Senior Notes, including information regarding the indentures and agreements governing the Senior Notes (the “Senior Notes Indentures”). As of June 30, 2021, we were in compliance with all applicable covenants under the Senior Notes Indentures.
Subsidiary Issuer and Guarantor Financial Information. The 2024 Notes are issued by the Operating Partnership and fully and unconditionally guaranteed, jointly and severally, by us and one of our non-operating subsidiaries, subject to release under certain customary circumstances as described below. In connection with the Operating Partnership’s assumption of the 2026 Notes, we have fully and unconditionally guaranteed the 2026 Notes, subject to release under certain circumstances as described below. The 2029 Notes are issued by the Operating Partnership and guaranteed, fully and unconditionally, by us.
These guarantees are subordinated to all existing and future senior debt and senior guarantees of the applicable guarantors and are unsecured. We conduct all of our business through and derive virtually all of our income from our subsidiaries. Therefore, our ability to make required payments with respect to our indebtedness (including the Senior Notes) and other obligations depends on the financial results and condition of our subsidiaries and our ability to receive funds from our subsidiaries.
A guarantor will be automatically and unconditionally released from its obligations under the guarantee with respect to the 2024 Notes in the event of:
Any sale of the subsidiary guarantor or of all or substantially all of its assets;
A merger or consolidation of the subsidiary guarantor with the Operating Partnership or Sabra, provided that the surviving entity remains a guarantor;
The requirements for legal defeasance or covenant defeasance or to discharge the indentures governing the 2024 Notes have been satisfied;
A liquidation or dissolution, to the extent permitted under the indenture governing the 2024 Notes, of the subsidiary guarantor;
The release or discharge of the guaranty that resulted in the creation of the subsidiary guaranty, except a discharge or release by or as a result of payment under such guaranty; or
If the subsidiary guarantor is not a guarantor or is not otherwise liable in respect of any obligations under any credit facility (as defined in the indenture governing the 2024 Notes) of us or any of our subsidiaries.
We will be automatically and unconditionally released from our obligations under the guarantee with respect to the 2026 Notes in the event of:
A liquidation or dissolution, to the extent permitted under the indenture governing the 2026 Notes;
A merger or consolidation, provided that the surviving entity remains a guarantor; or
The requirements for legal defeasance or covenant defeasance or to discharge the indenture governing the 2026 Notes have been satisfied.
Pursuant to amendments to Regulation S-X, the following aggregate summarized financial information is provided for Sabra, the Operating Partnership and Sabra Health Care, L.L.C. (the guarantor subsidiary of the 2024 Notes). This aggregate summarized financial information has been prepared from the books and records maintained by us, the Operating Partnership and Sabra Health Care, L.L.C. The aggregate summarized financial information does not include the investments in non-
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guarantor subsidiaries nor the earnings from non-guarantor subsidiaries and therefore is not necessarily indicative of the results of operations or financial position had the Operating Partnership and Sabra Health Care, L.L.C. operated as independent entities. Intercompany transactions have been eliminated. The aggregate summarized balance sheet information as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 and aggregate summarized statement of loss information for the six months ended June 30, 2021 is as follows (in thousands):
June 30, 2021December 31, 2020
Total assets$94,889 $77,825 
Total liabilities2,147,730 2,276,418 
Six Months Ended June 30, 2021
Total revenues$25 
Total expenses59,319 
Net loss(61,117)
Credit Agreement. Effective on September 9, 2019, the Operating Partnership and Sabra Canadian Holdings, LLC (together, the “Borrowers”), Sabra and the other parties thereto entered into a fifth amended and restated unsecured credit agreement (the “Credit Agreement”).
The Credit Agreement includes a $1.0 billion revolving credit facility (the “Revolving Credit Facility”), $845.0 million in U.S. dollar term loans and a CAD $125.0 million Canadian dollar term loan (collectively, the “Term Loans”). Further, up to $175.0 million of the Revolving Credit Facility may be used for borrowings in certain foreign currencies. The Credit Agreement also contains an accordion feature that can increase the total available borrowings to $2.75 billion, subject to terms and conditions.
The Revolving Credit Facility has a maturity date of September 9, 2023, and includes two six-month extension options. $345.0 million of the U.S. dollar Term Loans has a maturity date of September 9, 2023, and the other Term Loans have a maturity date of September 9, 2024.
The obligations of the Borrowers under the Credit Agreement are fully and unconditionally guaranteed, jointly and severally, on an unsecured basis, by us and one of our non-operating subsidiaries, subject to release under certain customary circumstances.
See Note 7, “Debt,” in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information concerning the Credit Agreement, including information regarding covenants contained in the Credit Agreement. As of June 30, 2021, we were in compliance with all applicable covenants under the Credit Agreement.
Secured Indebtedness
As of each of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, 13 of our properties held for investment were subject to secured indebtedness to third parties. As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, our secured debt consisted of the following (dollars in thousands):
Interest Rate Type
Principal Balance as of
June 30, 2021
(1)
Principal Balance as of
December 31, 2020
(1)
Weighted Average
Interest Rate at
June 30, 2021
(2)
Maturity
Date
Fixed Rate$79,200 $80,199 3.40 %December 2021 - 
August 2051
(1)    Principal balance does not include deferred financing costs, net of $1.1 million as of each of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020.
(2)    Weighted average interest rate includes private mortgage insurance.
Capital Expenditures
For the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, our aggregate capital expenditures were $21.7 million and $19.9 million, respectively. We anticipate that our aggregate capital expenditure requirements for the next 12 months will principally be for improvements to our facilities and will be approximately $78 million, of which $38 million is expected to directly result in incremental rental income.
Dividends
We paid dividends of $128.1 million on our common stock during the six months ended June 30, 2021. On August 4,
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2021, our board of directors declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.30 per share of common stock. The dividend will be paid on August 31, 2021 to common stockholders of record as of August 17, 2021.
Concentration of Credit Risk
Concentrations of credit risk arise when a number of operators, tenants or obligors related to our investments are engaged in similar business activities, or activities in the same geographic region, or have similar economic features that would cause their ability to meet contractual obligations, including those to us, to be similarly affected by changes in economic conditions. We regularly monitor our portfolio to assess potential concentrations of risks.
Management believes our current portfolio is reasonably diversified across healthcare related real estate and geographical location and does not contain any other significant concentration of credit risks. Our portfolio of 423 real estate properties held for investment as of June 30, 2021 is diversified by location across the United States and Canada.
For the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, no tenant relationship represented 10% or more of our total revenues.
Skilled Nursing Facility Reimbursement Rates
For the six months ended June 30, 2021, 54.7% of our revenues was derived directly or indirectly from skilled nursing/transitional care facilities. Medicare reimburses skilled nursing facilities for Medicare Part A services under the Prospective Payment System (“PPS”), as implemented pursuant to the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 and modified pursuant to subsequent laws, most recently the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. PPS regulations predetermine a payment amount per patient, per day, based on a market basket index calculated for all covered costs.
Prior to October 1, 2019, the amount to be paid was determined by classifying each patient into one of 66 Resource Utilization Group (“RUG”) categories that represented the level of services required to treat different conditions and levels of acuity. The system of 66 RUG categories, or Resource Utilization Group, version IV (“RUG IV”), became effective as of October 1, 2010. RUG IV resulted from research performed by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) and was part of CMS’s continuing effort to increase the correlation of the cost of services to the condition of individual patients.
On July 31, 2018, CMS issued a final rule, CMS-1696-F, which includes changes to the case-mix classification system used under the PPS and fiscal year 2019 Medicare payment updates.
CMS-1696-F includes a new case-mix classification system called the skilled nursing facility Patient-Driven Payment Model (“PDPM”) that became effective on October 1, 2019. PDPM reflects significant changes to the Resident Classification System, Version I (“RCS-I”) that was being considered to replace RUG IV as outlined in an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking released by CMS in May 2017.
PDPM focuses on clinically relevant factors, rather than volume-based service, for determining Medicare payment. PDPM adjusts Medicare payments based on each aspect of a resident’s care, most notably for non-therapy ancillaries, which are items and services not related to the provision of therapy such as drugs and medical supplies, thereby more accurately addressing costs associated with medically complex patients. It further adjusts the skilled nursing facility per diem payments to reflect varying costs throughout the stay and incorporates safeguards against potential financial incentives to ensure that beneficiaries receive care consistent with their unique needs and goals.
On July 31, 2020, CMS released final fiscal year 2021 Medicare rates for skilled nursing facilities providing an estimated net increase of 2.2% over fiscal year 2020 payments (comprised of a market basket increase of 2.2% and no productivity adjustment). The new payment rates became effective on October 1, 2020.
On July 29, 2021, CMS released a final rule updating fiscal year 2022 Medicare rates for skilled nursing facilities providing an estimated net increase of 1.2% over fiscal year 2021 (comprised of a market basket increase of 2.7% less a forecast error adjustment of 0.8% and a productivity adjustment of 0.7%). These figures do not incorporate the value-based purchasing reductions that are estimated to be $184.3 million in fiscal year 2022. No adjustments were made to the PDPM rate methodology in this year’s final rule. The new payment rates become effective on October 1, 2021.
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, several federal relief packages were approved that have benefitted and may continue to benefit our tenants, especially our tenants that operate skilled nursing/transitional care facilities.
On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed into law the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“Families First Act”). Under the Families First Act, a temporary 6.2% increase in Federal Medical Assistance Percentages (“FMAP”) was approved retroactive to January 1, 2020, and several states have directed FMAP funds to skilled nursing/transitional care facilities.
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On March 27, 2020, President Trump signed into law The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”). The CARES Act provides for a $175 billion fund for eligible health care providers, which includes skilled nursing/transitional care operators, and as of September 1, 2020 also includes assisted living facility operators. The CARES Act also includes (i) a temporary suspension of 2% Medicare sequestration cut beginning May 1, 2020 through December 31, 2020, (ii) a deferral of the employer’s Social Security remittances through December 31, 2020, (iii) the establishment of the Paycheck Protection Program, a Small Business Administration loan to businesses with fewer than 500 employees that may be partially forgivable, and (iv) accelerated and advance Medicare payments for certain providers, with deferred repayment obligations that are interest-free for up to 29 months.
In addition to the above, there have been other actions taken that benefit skilled nursing/transitional care operators, including the waiver of the requirement for skilled nursing/transitional care patients to have stayed in a hospital for three days in order for services rendered in a skilled nursing/transitional care facility to qualify for Medicare Part A, the acceleration and advance of three months of Medicare billing, and relaxation of certification requirements for employees performing non-clinical services in these facilities.
The Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) most recently extended the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency for another 90 days, effective July 20, 2021, which allows HHS to continue providing temporary regulatory waivers, including the waiver of the three-day hospital stay requirement, and new rules to equip skilled nursing facilities and some assisted living operators with flexibility to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. Lastly, both the FMAP funding increase and suspension of the Medicare sequestration were extended through December 31, 2021.
Obligations and Commitments
The following table summarizes our contractual obligations and commitments in future years, including our secured indebtedness to third parties on certain of our properties, our Revolving Credit Facility, our Term Loans, our Senior Notes and our operating leases. The following table is presented as of June 30, 2021 (in thousands):
  July 1 through December 31, 2021 Year Ending December 31,  
 Total2022202320242025After 2025
Secured indebtedness (1)
$103,147 $18,617 $4,161 $4,161 $4,161 $4,161 $67,886 
Revolving Credit Facility (2)
5,563 1,278 2,535 1,750 — — — 
Term Loans (3)
1,015,772 12,523 24,842 366,813 611,594 — — 
Senior Notes (4)
1,589,643 29,528 59,055 59,055 359,055 44,655 1,038,295 
Operating leases2,231 224 467 507 529 504 — 
Total$2,716,356 $62,170 $91,060 $432,286 $975,339 $49,320 $1,106,181 
(1)Secured indebtedness includes principal payments and interest payments through the applicable maturity dates. Total interest on secured indebtedness, based on contractual rates, is $23.9 million, which is attributable to fixed rate debt.
(2)Revolving Credit Facility consists of payments related to the facility fee due to the lenders based on the amount of commitments under the Revolving Credit Facility through the maturity date (assuming no exercise of our two six-month extension options) totaling $5.6 million.
(3)Term Loans includes interest payments through the applicable maturity dates totaling $69.9 million, which reflects the impact of interest rate swaps.
(4)Senior Notes includes interest payments through the applicable maturity dates totaling $339.6 million.
In addition to the above, as of June 30, 2021, we have committed to provide up to $9.8 million of future funding related to one preferred equity investment and four loans receivable investments with maturity dates ranging from December 2021 to December 2022.
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
We have a 49% interest in the Enlivant Joint Venture. See Note 4, “Investment in Real Estate Properties—Investment in Unconsolidated Joint Venture,” in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information. We have no other off-balance sheet arrangements that we expect would materially affect our liquidity and capital resources.

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
We are exposed to various market risks, primarily related to adverse changes in interest rates and the exchange rate for Canadian dollars. We use derivative instruments in the normal course of business to mitigate interest rate and foreign currency
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risk. We do not use derivative financial instruments for speculative or trading purposes. See Note 8, “Derivative and Hedging Instruments,” in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion of our derivative instruments.
Interest rate risk. As of June 30, 2021, our indebtedness included $1.3 billion aggregate principal amount of Senior Notes outstanding, $0.9 billion in Term Loans and $79.2 million of secured indebtedness to third parties on certain of the properties that our subsidiaries own. As of June 30, 2021, we had $0.9 billion of outstanding variable rate indebtedness and $1.0 billion available for borrowing under our Revolving Credit Facility.
We expect to manage our exposure to interest rate risk by maintaining a mix of fixed and variable rates for our indebtedness. We also may manage, or hedge, interest rate risks related to our borrowings through interest rate swap and collar agreements. As of June 30, 2021, we had interest rate swaps and an interest rate collar that fix the LIBOR portion of the interest rate for $845.0 million of LIBOR-based borrowings under the U.S. dollar Term Loans at a weighted average rate of 1.37% and interest rate swaps that fix the Canadian Dollar Offered Rate (“CDOR”) portion of the interest rate for CAD $125.0 million of CDOR-based borrowings under the Canadian dollar Term Loan at 1.10%. Additionally, as of June 30, 2021, we had forward starting swaps related to the anticipated future issuance of $250.0 million of debt with an effective date of May 2024. The forward starting swaps have a weighted average rate of 0.97% and were entered into to hedge our exposure to the benchmark rate for the anticipated future debt issuance.
From time to time, we may borrow under the Revolving Credit Facility to finance future investments in properties, including any improvements or renovations of current or newly acquired properties, or for other purposes. Because borrowings under the Revolving Credit Facility bear interest on the outstanding principal amount at a rate equal to an applicable interest margin plus, at our option, either (a) LIBOR or (b) a base rate determined as the greater of (i) the federal funds rate plus 0.5%, (ii) the prime rate, and (iii) one-month LIBOR plus 1.0%, the interest rate we will be required to pay on any such borrowings will depend on then applicable rates and may vary. An increase in interest rates could make the financing of any investment by us more costly. Rising interest rates could also limit our ability to refinance our debt when it matures or cause us to pay higher interest rates upon refinancing and increase interest expense on refinanced indebtedness.
As of June 30, 2021, the index underlying our variable rate debt was below 100 basis points. For the twelve months following June 30, 2021, and after giving effect to the impact of interest rate derivative instruments, a 100 basis point increase in the index would increase interest expense by $0.9 million, and a reduction of this index to zero would have no impact on interest expense.
Foreign currency risk. We are exposed to changes in foreign exchange rates as a result of our investments in Canadian real estate. Our foreign currency exposure is partially mitigated through the use of Canadian dollar denominated debt totaling CAD $145.1 million and cross currency swap instruments. Based on our operating results for the three months ended June 30, 2021, if the value of the Canadian dollar relative to the U.S. dollar were to increase or decrease by 10% compared to the average exchange rate during the three months ended June 30, 2021, our cash flows would have decreased or increased, as applicable, by $0.1 million.

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
Disclosure Controls and Procedures
As of the end of the period covered by this report, management, including our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures. Based upon, and as of the date of, the evaluation, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of June 30, 2021 to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the reports we file or submit under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our chief executive officer and our chief financial officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.
Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended June 30, 2021 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
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PART II. OTHER INFORMATION
ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
None of the Company or any of its subsidiaries is a party to, and none of their respective property is the subject of, any material legal proceeding, although we are from time to time party to legal proceedings that arise in the ordinary course of our business.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
There have been no material changes in our assessment of our risk factors from those set forth in Part I, Item 1A of our 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

ITEM 6. EXHIBITS
Ex.Description
3.1
3.1.1
3.1.2
3.2
22.1
31.1*
31.2*
32.1**
32.2**
101.INS*XBRL Instance Document - the instance document does not appear in the Interactive Data File because its XBRL tags are embedded within the Inline XBRL document.
101.SCH*XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document.
101.CAL*XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document.
101.DEF*XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document.
101.LAB*XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document.
101.PRE*XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document.
104*Cover Page Interactive Data File - the cover page interactive data file does not appear in the Interactive Data File because its XBRL tags are embedded within the Inline XBRL document.
 
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*Filed herewith.
**Furnished herewith.
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SIGNATURES
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
 
SABRA HEALTH CARE REIT, INC.
Date: August 4, 2021By:/S/    RICHARD K. MATROS
Richard K. Matros
Chairman, President and
Chief Executive Officer
(Principal Executive Officer)
Date: August 4, 2021By:/S/    HAROLD W. ANDREWS, JR.
Harold W. Andrews, Jr.
Executive Vice President,
Chief Financial Officer and Secretary
(Principal Financial Officer)
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