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RBB RBB Bancorp

Filed: 6 May 21, 8:00pm
 

  

Table of Contents



 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D. C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2021 or

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from ______ to ______

 

Commission File Number: 001-38149

 

RBB BANCORP

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

California

27-2776416

(State or other jurisdiction of

Incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

1055 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1200,

 

Los Angeles, California

90017

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)

 

(213) 627-9888

(Registrants telephone number, including area code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12 (b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Trading Symbol(s)

 

Name of exchange on which registered

Common Stock, No Par Value

 

RBB

 

NASDAQ Global Select Market

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (Section 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company”, and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

 

Accelerated filer

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

 

Smaller reporting company

 

Emerging growth company

 

    

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ☐    No  ☒

 

Number of shares of common stock of the registrant: 19,572,224 outstanding as of May 3, 2021.

 



 

 

    

 
 

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION (UNAUDITED)

 

ITEM 1.

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

 

RBB BANCORP AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

MARCH 31, 2021 (UNAUDITED) AND DECEMBER 31, 2020 (AUDITED)

(In thousands, except share amounts)

 

  March 31,  December 31, 
  

2021

  

2020

 

Assets

        

Cash and due from banks

 $362,930  $137,654 

Federal funds sold and other cash equivalents

  57,000   57,000 

Cash and cash equivalents

  419,930   194,654 

Interest-earning deposits in other financial institutions

  600   600 

Securities:

        

Available for sale

  281,582   210,867 

Held to maturity (fair value of $7,020 and $7,603 at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively)

  6,668   7,174 

Mortgage loans held for sale

  37,675   49,963 

Loans held for investment:

        

Real estate

  2,318,916   2,320,216 

Commercial and other

  401,566   392,066 

Total loans

  2,720,482   2,712,282 

Unaccreted discount on acquired loans

  (2,392)  (2,872)

Deferred loan costs (fees), net

  (2,885)  (2,644)

Total loans, net of deferred loan fees

  2,715,205   2,706,766 

Allowance for loan losses

  (30,795)  (29,337)

Net loans

  2,684,410   2,677,429 
         

Premises and equipment

  27,093   27,103 

Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) stock

  15,641   15,641 

Net deferred tax assets

  3,427   2,547 

Other real estate owned (OREO)

  293   293 

Cash surrender value of life insurance (BOLI)

  35,308   35,121 

Goodwill

  69,243   69,243 

Servicing assets

  13,264   13,965 

Core deposit intangibles

  4,895   5,196 

Right-of-use assets- operating leases

  25,500   0 

Accrued interest and other assets

  38,770   40,276 

Total assets

 $3,664,299  $3,350,072 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

 

RBB BANCORP AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

MARCH 31, 2021 (UNAUDITED) AND DECEMBER 31, 2020 (AUDITED) (CONTINUED)

(In thousands, except share amounts)

 

  

March 31,

  

December 31,

 
  

2021

  

2020

 

Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity

        

Deposits:

        

Noninterest-bearing demand

 $787,439  $617,206 

Savings, NOW and money market accounts

  791,486   731,084 

Time deposits $250,000 and under

  649,190   688,875 

Time deposits over $250,000

  593,178   597,963 

Total deposits

  2,821,293   2,635,128 
         

Reserve for unfunded commitments

  1,320   1,383 

FHLB advances

  150,000   150,000 

Long-term debt, net of debt issuance costs

  172,581   104,391 

Subordinated debentures

  14,338   14,283 
Lease liabilities - operating leases  26,199   0 

Accrued interest and other liabilities

  42,900   16,399 

Total liabilities

  3,228,631   2,921,584 
         

Commitments and contingencies - Note 13

      
         

Shareholders' equity:

        

Preferred Stock - 100,000,000 shares authorized, no par value; none outstanding

  0   0 

Common Stock - 100,000,000 shares authorized, no par value; 19,528,249 shares issued and outstanding at March 31, 2021 and 19,565,921 shares at December 31, 2020

  282,845   284,261 

Additional paid-in capital

  5,095   4,932 

Retained earnings

  147,806   138,094 

Non-controlling interest

  72   72 

Accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income, net

  (150)  1,129 

Total shareholders’ equity

  435,668   428,488 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

 $3,664,299  $3,350,072 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

RBB BANCORP AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME (UNAUDITED)

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2021 AND 2020

(In thousands, except per share amounts)

 

  

Three Months Ended

 
  

March 31,

 
  

2021

  

2020

 

Interest and dividend income:

        

Interest and fees on loans

 $34,516  $32,276 

Interest on interest-earning deposits

  48   451 

Interest on investment securities

  627   821 

Dividend income on FHLB stock

  192   2 

Interest on federal funds sold and other

  157   478 

Total interest income

  35,540   34,028 

Interest expense:

        

Interest on savings deposits, now and money market accounts

  698   1,243 

Interest on time deposits

  2,964   7,086 

Interest on subordinated debentures and long-term debt

  1,958   1,956 

Interest on other borrowed funds

  435   150 

Total interest expense

  6,055   10,435 

Net interest income

  29,485   23,593 

Provision for credit losses

  1,500   1,945 
         

Net interest income after provision for credit losses

  27,985   21,648 

Noninterest income:

        

Service charges, fees and other

  1,410   1,079 

Gain on sale of loans

  3,841   2,711 

Loan servicing fees, net of amortization

  246   592 

Recoveries on loans acquired in business combinations

  5   42 

Unrealized loss on equity investments

  (20)  0 

Gain on derivatives

  225   0 

Increase in cash surrender value of life insurance

  187   191 
   5,894   4,615 

Noninterest expense:

        

Salaries and employee benefits

  9,242   9,505 

Occupancy and equipment expenses

  2,242   2,404 

Data processing

  1,440   1,142 

Legal and professional

  805   604 

Office expenses

  255   323 

Marketing and business promotion

  184   214 

Insurance and regulatory assessments

  348   177 

Core deposit premium

  301   357 

OREO expenses

  5   14 

Merger expenses

  42   403 

Other expenses

  928   1,120 
   15,792   16,263 

Income before income taxes

  18,087   10,000 

Income tax expense

  5,631   3,252 

Net income

 $12,456  $6,748 
         

Net income per share

        
Basic $0.64  $0.34 
Diluted  0.63   0.33 

Cash dividends declared per common share

  0.12   0.12 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

RBB BANCORP AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (UNAUDITED)

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2021 AND 2020

(In thousands)

 

  

Three Months Ended

 
  

March 31,

 
  

2021

  

2020

 
         
         

Net income

 $12,456  $6,748 
         

Other comprehensive income (loss):

        

Unrealized (losses) gains on securities available for sale:

        

Change in unrealized (losses) gains

  (1,816)  498 
   (1,816)  498 

Related income tax effect:

        

Change in unrealized losses (gains)

  537   (148)
   537   (148)
         

Total other comprehensive (loss) income

  (1,279)  350 
         

Total comprehensive income

 $11,177  $7,098 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

RBB BANCORP AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS EQUITY (UNAUDITED)

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2021 AND 2020

(In thousands, except share amounts)

 

  

Common Stock

              

Accumulated

     
  

Shares

  

Amount

  

Additional Paid-in Capital

  

Retained Earnings

  

Non- Controlling Interest

  

Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)

  

Total

 

Balance at December 31, 2020

  19,565,921  $284,261  $4,932  $138,094  $72  $1,129  $428,488 

Net income

     0   0   12,456   0   0   12,456 

Stock-based compensation

     0   287   0   0   0   287 

Restricted stock granted

  60,000   0   0   0   0   0   0 

Cash dividend

     0   0   (2,347)  0   0   (2,347)

Stock options exercised, net of expense recognized

  32,289   464   (124)  0   0   0   340 
Repurchase of common stock  (129,961)  (1,880)  0   (397)        (2,277)

Other comprehensive loss, net of taxes

           0   0   (1,279)  (1,279)

Balance at March 31, 2021

  19,528,249  $282,845  $5,095  $147,806  $72  $(150) $435,668 
                             

Balance at December 31, 2019

  20,030,866  $290,395  $4,938  $112,046  $72  $239  $407,690 

Net income

     0   0   6,748   0   0   6,748 

Stock-based compensation

     0   161   0   0   0   161 

Cash dividend

     0   0   (2,414)  0   0   (2,414)

Stock options exercised, net of expense recognized

  56,498   978   (266)  0   0   0   712 

Repurchase of common stock

  (348,084)  (5,023)  0   (231)  0   0   (5,254)

Other comprehensive income, net of taxes

     0   0   0   0   350   350 

Balance at March 31, 2020

  19,739,280  $286,350  $4,833  $116,149  $72  $589  $407,993 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

RBB BANCORP AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (UNAUDITED)

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2021 AND 2020

(In thousands)

   Three Months Ended 
   March 31, 
  

2021

  

2020

 

Operating activities

        

Net income

 $12,456  $6,748 

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash from Operating activities:

        

Depreciation and amortization of premises and equipment

  500   522 

Net accretion of securities, loans, deposits, and other

  (391)  (873)

Unrealized loss on equity securities

  20   0 

Amortization of investment in affordable housing tax credits

  259   247 

Amortization of intangible assets

  1,707   1,441 

Amortization of right-of-use asset

  1,314   0 

Change in operating lease liabilities

  (1,257)  0 

Provision for loan losses

  1,500   1,945 

Stock-based compensation

  287   161 

Deferred tax expense (benefit)

  (880)  1,503 

Gain on sale of loans

  (3,841)  (2,711)

Increase in cash surrender value of life insurance

  (187)  (191)

Loans originated and purchased for sale, net

  (68,236)  (30,423)

Proceeds from loans sold

  136,866   104,273 

Other items

  29,129   (4,442)

Net cash provided by operating activities

  109,246   78,200 

Investing activities

        

Securities available for sale:

        

Purchases

  (176,164)  (151,163)

Maturities, prepayments and calls

  103,620   151,707 

Securities held to maturity:

        

Maturities, prepayments and calls

  500   500 

Sale (purchase) of Federal Home Loan Bank stock and other equity securities, net

  12   (621)

Net increase of investment in qualified affordable housing projects

  (309)  (2,004)

Net increase in loans

  (61,207)  (45,668)

Net cash received in connection with acquisition

  0   6,634 

Purchases of premises and equipment

  (478)  (135)

Net cash used in investing activities

  (134,026)  (40,750)

Financing activities

        

Net increase (decrease) in demand deposits and savings accounts

  230,636   (108,420)

Net increase (decrease) in time deposits

  (44,407)  107,130 
Advances on long-term FHLB advances  0   150,000 

Cash dividends paid

  (2,347)  (2,414)
Redemption of subordinated debentures  (50,000)  0 

Issuance of subordinated debentures, net of issuance costs

  118,111   0 

Common stock repurchased, net of repurchased costs

  (2,277)  (5,254)

Exercise of stock options

  340   712 

Net cash provided by financing activities

  250,056   141,754 

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents

  225,276   179,204 

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

  194,654   181,763 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

 $419,930  $360,967 

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information

        

Cash paid during the period:

        

Interest paid

 $5,298  $8,643 

Non-cash investing and financing activities:

        

Transfer of loans to held for sale, net

  52,771   15,041 

Loan to facilitate OREO

  0   1,025 

Additions to servicing assets

  705   827 

Net change in unrealized holding (loss) gain on securities available for sale

  1,279   350 
Recognition of operating lease right-of-use assets  (26,814)  0 
Recognition of operating lease liabilities  26,814   0 

Acquisition:

        

Assets acquired, net of cash received

  0   182,895 

Liabilities assumed

  0   200,209 

Cash considerations

  0   32,885 

Goodwill

  0   10,680 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited consolidated financial statements.

 

 

RBB BANCORP AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

 

 

 

NOTE 1 - BUSINESS DESCRIPTION

 

RBB Bancorp (“RBB”) is a financial holding company registered under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended. RBB Bancorp’s principal business is to serve as the holding company for its wholly-owned banking subsidiaries, Royal Business Bank ("Bank") and RBB Asset Management Company ("RAM"), collectively referred to herein as "the Company". RAM was formed to hold and manage problem assets acquired in business combinations.

 

At March 31, 2021, the Company had total consolidated assets of $3.7 billion, gross consolidated loans (held for investment and held for sale) of $2.8 billion, total consolidated deposits of $2.8 billion and total consolidated stockholders' equity of $435.7 million. RBB’s common stock trades on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol “RBB”.

 

The Bank provides business-banking services to the Chinese-American communities in Los Angeles County, Orange County and Ventura County in California, in Las Vegas, Nevada, the New York City, New York metropolitan area, including Edison, New Jersey, and Chicago, Illinois. Specific services include remote deposit, E-banking, mobile banking, commercial and investor real estate loans, business loans and lines of credit, Small Business Administration (“SBA”) 7A and 504 loans, mortgage loans, trade finance and a full range of depository accounts.

 

The Company operates full-service banking offices in Arcadia, Cerritos, Diamond Bar, Irvine, Los Angeles, Monterey Park, Oxnard, Rowland Heights, San Gabriel, Silver Lake, Torrance, and Westlake Village, California; Las Vegas, Nevada; Manhattan, Brooklyn, Flushing, and Elmhurst, New York; the Chinatown and Bridgeport neighborhoods of Chicago, Illinois; and Edison, New Jersey. The Company’s primary source of revenue is providing loans to customers, who are predominantly small and middle-market businesses and individuals.

 

The Company generates its revenue primarily from interest received on loans and leases and, to a lesser extent, from interest received on investment securities. The Company also derives income from noninterest sources, such as fees received in connection with various lending and deposit services, loan servicing, gain on sales of loans and wealth management services. The Company’s principle expenses include interest expense on deposits and subordinated debentures, and operating expenses, such as salaries and employee benefits, occupancy and equipment, data processing, and income tax expense.

 

The Company has completed 6 acquisitions from July 2011 through January 2020, including the acquisition of Pacific Global Bank Holdings, Inc. (“PGBH”) and its wholly-owned subsidiary, Pacific Global Bank (“PGB”), in which the PGBH acquisition closed on January 10, 2020. PGB operated branches in the Chicago neighborhoods of Chinatown and Bridgeport. See Note 3 – Acquisition, for more information about the PGBH acquisition transaction. All of the Company’s acquisitions have been accounted for using the acquisition method of accounting and, accordingly, the operating results of the acquired entities have been included in the consolidated financial statements from their respective acquisition dates.

 

 

 

NOTE 2 - BASIS OF PRESENTATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto of the Company have been prepared in accordance with the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) for Form 10-Q and conform to practices within the banking industry and include all of the information and disclosures required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) for interim financial reporting. The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements reflect all adjustments (consisting only of normal recurring adjustments), which are necessary for a fair presentation of financial results for the interim periods presented. The results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2021 are not necessarily indicative of the results for the full year. These interim unaudited financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto as of and for the year ended December 31, 2020, included in our Annual Report filed on Form 10-K/A for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 (our “2020 Annual Report”).

 

Use of Estimates in the Preparation of Financial Statements

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. It is reasonably possible our estimate of the allowance for loan losses and the fair value of mortgage servicing rights could change as actual results could differ from those estimates. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

9

 

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements were compiled in accordance with the accounting policies set forth in Note 2 – Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Policies in our Consolidated Financial Statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2020, included in our 2020 Annual Report.  The Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issues Accounting Standards Updates ("ASU" or “Update”) and Accounting Standards Codifications (“ASC”), which are the primary source of GAAP.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

When RBB conducted its initial public offering (“IPO”) in 2017, we qualified as an emerging growth company (“EGC”). We will remain an EGC until the earliest of (i) the end of the fiscal year during which we have total annual gross revenues of $1.0 billion or more, (ii) the end of the fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of the completion of our IPO, (iii) the date on which we have, during the previous three-year period, issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt and (iv) the date on which we are deemed to be a “large accelerated filer” under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). We anticipate no longer qualifying as an EGC on December 31, 2022. EGCs are entitled to reduced regulatory and reporting requirements under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), and the Exchange Act, as compared to public business entities ("PBE").

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). The most significant change for lessees is the requirement under the new guidance to recognize right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for all leases not considered short-term leases, which is generally defined as a lease term of less than 12 months. This change will result in lessees recognizing right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for most leases currently accounted for as operating leases under current lease accounting guidance. The amendments in this Update are effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2020 and for interim periods beginning after December 15, 2021, for an EGC as the effective date was deferred by the FASB. The Company has several lease agreements which are currently considered operating leases and are therefore not included on the Company’s Consolidated Balance Sheets. Under the new guidance the Company recognized on the Consolidated Balance Sheets right-of-use assets with a corresponding lease liability.  The Company adopted this ASU on January 1, 2021 and recorded the right-of-use asset and lease liability of approximately $26.8 million as of the January 1, 2021 adoption date.

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instrument (Topic 326), including subsequent amending ASUs. This ASU significantly changes how entities will measure credit losses for most financial assets and certain other instruments that aren't measured at fair value through net income. The standard will replace today's "incurred loss" approach with an "expected loss" model. The new model, referred to as the current expected credit loss ("CECL") model, will apply to: (1) financial assets subject to credit losses and measured at amortized cost, and (2) certain off-balance sheet credit exposures. This includes, but is not limited to, loans, leases, held to maturity securities, loan commitments, and financial guarantees. For available for sale (“AFS”) debt securities with unrealized losses, entities will measure credit losses in a manner similar to what they do today, except that the losses will be recognized as allowances rather than reductions in the amortized cost of the securities. ASU 2016-13 also expands the disclosure requirements regarding an entity's assumptions, models, and methods for estimating the allowance for loan and lease losses.  In addition, public business entities will need to disclose the amortized cost balance for each class of financial asset by credit quality indicator, disaggregated by the year of origination. ASU 2016-13 was originally proposed to be effective for interim and annual reporting periods for an emerging growth company beginning after December 15, 2020, but was subsequently extended until December 31, 2022. Entities will apply the standard's provisions as a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings as of the beginning of the first reporting period in which the guidance is effective (i.e., modified retrospective approach). The Company has begun its evaluation of the impact of the implementation of ASU 2016-13. The implementation of the provisions of ASU 2016-13 will most likely impact the Company’s consolidated financial statements as to the level of reserves that will be required for credit losses. The Company will continue to assess the potential impact that this Update will have on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.  The Company will adopt CECL (ASU 2016-13) on December 31, 2022.

 

10

 

In February 2019, the U.S. federal bank regulatory agencies approved a final rule modifying their regulatory capital rules and providing an option to phase in over a three year period the day-one adverse regulatory capital effects of ASU 2016-13. Additionally, in March 2020, the U.S. federal bank regulatory agencies issued an interim final rule that provides banking organizations an option to delay the estimated CECL impact on regulatory capital for an additional two years for a total transition period of up to five years to provide regulatory relief to banking organizations to better focus on supporting lending to creditworthy households and businesses in light of recent strains on the U.S. economy as a result of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 ("COVID-19") pandemic. As a result, entities will have the option to gradually phase in the full effect of CECL on regulatory capital over a five-year transition period.

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, IntangiblesGoodwill and Other (Topic 350). This Update simplifies how an entity is required to test goodwill for impairment by eliminating Step 2 from the goodwill impairment test. Step 2 measures a goodwill impairment loss by comparing the implied fair value of a reporting unit’s goodwill with the carrying amount of that goodwill. The amendments in this Update are required for public business entities and other entities that have goodwill reported in their financial statements and have not elected the private company alternative for the subsequent measurement of goodwill. As a result, under this Update, “an entity should perform its annual, or interim, goodwill impairment test by comparing the fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying amount and should recognize an impairment charge for the amount by which the carrying amount exceeds the reporting unit’s fair value; however, the loss recognized should not exceed the total amount of goodwill allocated to that reporting unit.” For PBE's, ASU 2017-04 is effective for annual and any interim impairment tests performed in periods beginning after December 15, 2019. As an EGC, the Company will adopt this ASU on December 31, 2022. Adoption of ASU 2017-04 is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07, CompensationStock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting. The amendments in this Update expand the scope of Topic 718 to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from nonemployees. An entity should apply the requirements of Topic 718 to nonemployee awards except for specific guidance on inputs to an option pricing model and the attribution of cost (that is, the period of time over which share-based payment awards vest and the pattern of cost recognition over that period). The amendments specify that Topic 718 applies to all share-based payment transactions in which a grantor acquires goods or services to be used or consumed in a grantor’s own operations by issuing share-based payment awards. The amendments also clarify that Topic 718 does not apply to share-based payments used to effectively provide (1) financing to the issuer or (2) awards granted in conjunction with selling goods or services to customers as part of a contract accounted for under Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. For EGCs, the amendments are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020. This Update has the potential to only impact share-based payments to members of the Company’s non-employees. The Company adopted this ASU on January 1, 2020 and this ASU did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement. The amendments in this Update modify the disclosure requirements on fair value measurements in Topic 820, Fair Value Measurement, based on the concepts in the Concepts Statement, including the consideration of costs and benefits. These disclosure requirements were removed from the topic: (1) The amount of and reasons for transfers between Level 1 and Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy, (2) the policy for timing of transfers between levels, and (3) the valuation processes for Level 3 fair value measurements. These disclosure requirements were modified: (1) For investments in certain entities that calculate net asset value, an entity is required to disclose the timing of liquidation of an investee’s assets and the date when restrictions from redemption might lapse only if the investee has communicated the timing to the entity or announced the timing publicly, and (2) the amendments clarify that the measurement uncertainty disclosure is to communicate information about the uncertainty in measurement as of the reporting date. The following disclosure requirements were added: (1) The changes in unrealized gains and losses for the period included in other comprehensive income for recurring Level 3 fair value measurements held at the end of the reporting period, (2) the range and weighted average of significant unobservable inputs used to develop Level 3 fair value measurements. For certain unobservable inputs, an entity may disclose other quantitative information (such as the median or arithmetic average) in lieu of the weighted average if the entity determines that other quantitative information would be a more reasonable and rational method to reflect the distribution of unobservable inputs used to develop Level 3 fair value measurements. In addition, the amendments eliminate “at a minimum” from the phrase “an entity shall disclose at a minimum to promote the appropriate exercise of discretion by entities when considering fair value measurement disclosures and to clarify that materiality is an appropriate consideration of entities and their auditors when evaluating disclosure requirements”. The amendments in this Update are effective for EGCs for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2019. The amendments on changes in unrealized gains and losses, the range and weighted average of significant unobservable inputs used to develop Level 3 fair value measurements, and the narrative description of measurement uncertainty should be applied prospectively for only the most recent interim or annual period presented in the initial fiscal year of adoption. All other amendments should be applied retrospectively to all periods presented upon their effective date. As an EGC, the Company adopted this Update on January 1, 2020 and it did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

11

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15, IntangiblesGoodwill and OtherInternal-Use Software (Subtopic 350-40): Customers Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That Is a Service Contract. This Update provides additional guidance to ASU 2015-05, “Intangibles—Goodwill and Other—Internal-Use Software (Subtopic 350-40): Customer’s Accounting for Fees Paid in a Cloud Computing Arrangement” (CCA), on the accounting for implementation, setup, and other upfront costs (collectively referred to as implementation costs) apply to entities that are a customer in a hosting arrangement. This Update applies to entities that are a customer in a hosting arrangement that is a service contract. Costs for implementation activities in the application development stage are capitalized depending on the nature of the costs, while costs incurred during the preliminary project and post-implementation stages are expensed as the activities are performed. This Update also requires the customer to expense the capitalized implementation costs of a hosting arrangement that is a service contract over the term of the hosting arrangement. This Update is effective for an EGC for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2020, and interim periods within annual periods beginning after December 15, 2021. Early adoption of the amendments in this Update is permitted, including adoption in any interim period, for all entities. The amendments in this Update should be applied either retrospectively or prospectively to all implementation costs incurred after the date of adoption. This Update will most likely not have a material impact unless the Company incurs implementation costs for a CCA that is a service contract.

 

In January 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-01, “Investments—Equity Securities (Topic 321), Investments—Equity Method and Joint Ventures (Topic 323), and Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815)”. This ASU is for equity securities accounted for by the equity method. The amendment clarifies that an entity should consider observable transactions that require it to either apply or discontinue the equity method of accounting for the purposes of applying the measurement alternative in accordance with Topic 321 immediately before applying or upon discontinuing the equity method.  The Company has equity securities on our balance sheet but are not material to be considered for the equity method. For an EGC, this ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, and interim periods within those fiscal years.

 

In February 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-02, “Financial Instruments—Credit Losses (Topic 326) and Leases (Topic 842)—Amendments to SEC Paragraphs Pursuant to SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 119 and Update to SEC Section on Effective Date Related to Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) (SEC Update)”. This is an amendment to add the SEC Staff guidance on CECL) to the FASB codification. It contains guidance on what the SEC would expect the Company to perform and document when measuring and recording its allowance for credit losses for financial assets recorded at amortized cost. As an EGC, the Company will implement CECL on December 31, 2022.

 

In March 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-03, “Codification Improvements to Financial Instruments”. The ASU clarifies the accounting and disclosure guidance in various codification topics for financial instruments. In particular, the amendments (1) clarify certain disclosure requirements, including fair value option disclosures, (2) add cross-references in U.S. GAAP to clarify certain guidance, (3) make clear the applicability of the portfolio exception in ASC 820, Fair Value Measurement, to nonfinancial items, (4) clarify the determination of the contractual life of a net investment in leases in estimating expected credit losses under ASC 326, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses, and (5) explain the interaction between the guidance in ASC 860-20, Transfers and Servicing: Sales of Financial Assets, and ASC 326. For RBB as an EGC, issues 1, 2, 4 and 5 were adopted January 1, 2020. The amendment related to Issue 3 is a conforming amendment that affects the guidance in the amendments in ASU 2019-04. We determined the financial impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements was not material.

 

In March 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-04, "Reference Rate Reform (Topic 848), Facilitation of the Effects of Reference Rate Reform on Financial Reporting," which provides temporary optional expedients to ease the financial reporting burdens of the expected market transition from London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) to an alternative reference rate such as Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”). This pronouncement is applicable to all companies with contracts or hedging relationships that reference an interest rate that is expected to be discontinued. The ASU provides companies with optional guidance to ease the potential accounting burden associated with transitioning away from reference rates that are expected to be discontinued. Companies can apply the ASU immediately. However, the guidance will only be available for a limited time (generally through December 31, 2022). For contract modifications, companies can account for the modification as a continuation of the existing contract without additional analysis. For held-to-maturity (“HTM”) debt securities, one-time sale and/or transfer to available-for-sale or trading may be made for HTM debt securities that both reference an eligible reference rate and were classified as HTM before January 1, 2020. Regarding the effective date and transition: (1) companies can apply the ASU as of the beginning of the interim period that includes March 12, 2020 (e.g. January 1, 2020 for calendar year-end companies) or any date thereafter, (2) the ASU applies prospectively to contract modifications and hedging relationships, and (3) the one-time election to sell and/or transfer debt securities classified as HTM may be made at any time after March 12, 2020. The optional relief generally does not apply to contract modifications made, sales and transfers of HTM debt securities, and hedging relationships entered into or evaluated after December 31, 2022. The guidance was effective upon issuance and generally can be applied through December 31, 2022. Of the Company’s $2.8 billion in total gross loans as of March 31, 2021, approximately 12% have a LIBOR based reference rate. The Company has several issuances of LIBOR based long-term debt and subordinated debentures. Refer to Notes 9 and 10 of the Company’s consolidated financial statements included in this Form 10-Q. We are currently evaluating this guidance to determine the financial impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In June 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-05, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) and Leases (Topic 842): Effective Dates for Certain Entities”. This ASU allows for the deferral of the effective dates of ASC 606 and ASC 842 (including amendments issued after the issuance of the original Update) to provide immediate, near-term relief for certain entities for whom these Updates are either currently effective or imminently effective.  The Company has already implemented this ASU for Topic 606 and Topic 842.

 

12

 
 

NOTE 3 ACQUISITION

 

PGB Holdings, Inc. Acquisition:

 

On January 10, 2020, the Company acquired all the assets and assumed all the liabilities of PGBH and its wholly owned bank subsidiary, in exchange for cash of $32.9 million. PGBH operated 3 branches in the Chicago, Illinois metropolitan area. The Company acquired PGBH to strategically establish a presence in the Chicago area. Goodwill in the amount of $10.7 million was recognized in this acquisition. Goodwill represents the future economic benefits arising from net assets acquired that are not individually identified and separately recognized and is attributable to synergies expected to be derived from the combination of the two entities. Goodwill is not deductible for income tax purposes.

 

The following table represents the assets acquired and liabilities assumed of PGBH as of January 10, 2020 and the fair value adjustments and amounts recorded by the Company in 2020 under the acquisition method of accounting:

 

  

PGBH

  

Fair Value

  

Fair

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Book Value

  

Adjustments

  

Value

 

Assets acquired

            

Cash and cash equivalents

 $17,033  $0  $17,033 

Fed funds sold

  8,300   0   8,300 

Interest-bearing deposits in other financial Institutions

  14,186   0   14,186 

Loans, gross

  172,443   666   173,109 

Allowance for loan losses

  (2,265)  2,265   0 

Bank premises and equipment

  6,394   1,639   8,033 

Core deposit premium

  0   491   491 

Investment in trust

  155   0   155 

Other assets

  1,687   (580)  1,107 

Total assets acquired

 $217,933  $4,481  $222,414 
             

Liabilities assumed

            

Deposits

 $187,393  $969  $188,362 

Escrow Payable

  4,277   0   4,277 

Subordinated debentures

  5,155   (763)  4,392 

Deferred income taxes

  1,016   1,335   2,351 

Other liabilities

  1,211   (384)  827 

Total liabilities assumed

  199,052   1,157   200,209 

Excess of assets acquired over liabilities assumed

  18,881   3,324   22,205 
  $217,933  $4,481     

Cash paid

          32,885 

Goodwill recognized

         $10,680 

 

The fair values are estimates and were subject to adjustment for up to one year after the merger date. 

 

The Company accounted for these transactions under the acquisition method of accounting in accordance with ASC 805, Business Combinations, which requires purchased assets and liabilities assumed to be recorded at their respective fair values at the date of acquisition.

 

The loan portfolio of PGBH was recorded at fair value at the date of acquisition with the assistance of a third-party valuation. A valuation of PGBH’s loan portfolio was performed as of the acquisition date to assess the fair value of the loan portfolio. The loan portfolio was segmented into two groups; loans with credit deterioration and loans without credit deterioration, and then split further by loan type. The fair value was calculated on an individual loan basis using a discounted cash flow analysis. The discount rate utilized was based on a weighted average cost of capital, considering the cost of equity and cost of debt. Also factored into the fair value estimates were loss rates, recovery period and prepayment rates based on industry standards.

 

The Company also determined the fair value of the core deposit intangible, securities, premises and equipment, deposits and debt with the assistance of third-party valuations.

 

The core deposit intangible on non-maturing deposits was determined by evaluating the underlying characteristics of the deposit relationships, including customer attrition, deposit interest rates, service charge income, overhead expense and costs of alternative funding. Since the fair value of intangible assets are calculated as if they were stand-alone assets, the presumption is that a hypothetical buyer of the intangible asset would be able to take advantage of potential tax benefits resulting from the asset purchase. The value of the benefit is the present value over the period of the tax benefit, using the discount rate applicable to the asset.

 

13

 

In determining the fair value of certificates of deposit, a discounted cash flow analysis was used, which involved present valuing the contractual payments over the remaining life of the certificates of deposit at market-based interest rates.

 

For loans acquired from PGBH, the contractual amounts due, expected cash flows to be collected, interest component and fair value as of the respective acquisition dates were as follows:

 

(dollars in thousands)  PGBH Acquired Loans 

Contractual amounts due

 $195,227 

Cash flows not expected to be collected

  5,176 

Expected cash flows

  190,051 

Interest component of expected cash flows

  16,942 

Fair value of acquired loans

 $173,109 

 

The operating results of the Company for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively include the operating results of PGBH since its acquisition date. The following table presents the net interest and other income, net income and earnings per share as if the acquisition of PGBH was effective as of January 1, 2020. There were no material, nonrecurring adjustments to the pro forma net interest and other income, net income and earnings per share presented below:

 

  

Three Months Ended

 
(dollars in thousands)  March 31, 2021   March 31, 2020 

Net interest and other income

 $35,379  $28,442 

Net income

  12,456   5,582 

Basic earnings per share

  0.64   0.28 

Diluted earnings per share

  0.63   0.28 

 

Third-party acquisition related expenses are recognized as incurred and continue until the acquired system is converted and operational functions become fully integrated. The Company incurred third-party acquisition related expenses in the consolidated statements of income for the periods indicated in the Statements of Income in the expense item “Merger expenses”.

 

14

 

 

 

NOTE 4 - INVESTMENT SECURITIES

 

The following table summarizes the amortized cost and fair value of available for sale (“AFS”) debt securities and held to maturity (“HTM”) debt securities as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, and the corresponding amounts of gross unrealized gains and losses recognized in accumulated other comprehensive income:

 

      

Gross

  

Gross

     

(dollars in thousands)

 

Amortized

  

Unrealized

  

Unrealized

  

Fair

 

March 31, 2021

 

Cost

  

Gains

  

Losses

  

Value

 

Available for sale

                

Government agency securities

 $1,088  $20  $0  $1,108 

SBA agency securities

  4,017   138   0   4,155 

Mortgage-backed securities- Government sponsored agencies

  30,651   166   (325)  30,492 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

  88,552   244   (470)  88,326 

Commercial paper

  119,210   0   (16)  119,194 

Corporate debt securities

  36,657   512   (426)  36,743 

Municipal securities

  1,619   0   (55)  1,564 

Total

 $281,794  $1,080  $(1,292) $281,582 
                 

Held to maturity

                

Municipal taxable securities

 $1,907  $116  $0  $2,023 

Municipal securities

  4,761   236   0   4,997 

Total

 $6,668  $352  $0  $7,020 

 

      

Gross

  

Gross

     
(dollars in thousands) Amortized  Unrealized  Unrealized  Fair 

December 31, 2020

 

Cost

  

Gains

  

Losses

  

Value

 

Available for sale

                

Government agency securities

 $1,257  $37  $0  $1,294 

SBA agency securities

  4,125   269   0   4,394 

Mortgage-backed securities- Government sponsored agencies

  17,415   270   (8)  17,677 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

  48,476   491   (93)  48,874 

Commercial paper

  102,462   0   (14)  102,448 

Corporate debt securities

  33,907   662   (6)  34,563 

Municipal securities

  1,621   2   (6)  1,617 

Total

 $209,263  $1,731  $(127) $210,867 
                 

Held to maturity

                

Municipal taxable securities

 $2,407  $139  $0  $2,546 

Municipal securities

  4,767   290   0   5,057 

Total

 $7,174  $429  $0  $7,603 

 

One security with a fair value of $252,000 and $320,000 at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively, was pledged to secure a local agency deposit.

 

There were 0 sales of investment securities during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

15

 

The amortized cost and fair value of the investment securities portfolio at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 are shown by expected maturity below. Expected maturities may differ from contractual maturities if borrowers have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without call or prepayment penalties.

 

  

Less than One Year

  

More than One Year to Five Years

  

More than Five Years to Ten Years

  

More than Ten Years

  

Total

 
  

Amortized

  

Estimated

  

Amortized

  

Estimated

  

Amortized

  

Estimated

  

Amortized

  

Estimated

  

Amortized

  

Estimated

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Cost

  

Fair Value

  

Cost

  

Fair Value

  

Cost

  

Fair Value

  

Cost

  

Fair Value

  

Cost

  

Fair Value

 

March 31, 2021

                                        

Government agency securities

 $0  $0  $1,088  $1,108  $0  $0  $0  $0  $1,088  $1,108 

SBA securities

  0   0   537   559   3,480   3,596   0   0   4,017   4,155 

Mortgage-backed securities- Government sponsored agencies

  5,003   5,002   8,441   8,564   17,207   16,926   0   0   30,651   30,492 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

  0   0   39,752   39,680   48,800   48,646   0   0   88,552   88,326 

Commercial paper

  119,210   119,194   0   0   0   0   0   0   119,210   119,194 

Corporate debt securities

  7,988   8,026   11,810   11,987   13,658   13,777   3,201   2,953   36,657   36,743 

Municipal securities

  0   0   0   0   0   0   1,619   1,564   1,619   1,564 

Total available for sale

 $132,201  $132,222  $61,628  $61,898  $83,145  $82,945  $4,820  $4,517  $281,794  $281,582 
                                         

Municipal taxable securities

 $399  $403  $1,508  $1,620  $0  $0  $0  $0  $1,907  $2,023 

Municipal securities

  0   0   0   0   1,320   1,366   3,441   3,631   4,761   4,997 

Total held to maturity

 $399  $403  $1,508  $1,620  $1,320  $1,366  $3,441  $3,631  $6,668  $7,020 
(dollars in thousands)                                        

December 31, 2020

                                        

Government agency securities

 $0  $0  $1,257  $1,294  $0  $0  $0  $0  $1,257  $1,294 

SBA securities

  0   0   595   625   3,530   3,769   0   0   4,125   4,394 

Mortgage-backed securities- Government sponsored agencies

  7,992   7,987   9,423   9,690   0   0   0   0   17,415   17,677 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

  0   0   11,911   12,258   36,565   36,616   0   0   48,476   48,874 

Commercial paper

  102,462   102,448   0   0   0   0   0   0   102,462   102,448 

Corporate debt securities

  4,991   5,029   11,683   11,740   13,233   13,743   4,000   4,051   33,907   34,563 

Municipal securities

  0   0   0   0   0   0   1,621   1,617   1,621   1,617 

Total available for sale

 $115,445  $115,464  $34,869  $35,607  $53,328  $54,128  $5,621  $5,668  $209,263  $210,867 
                                         

Municipal taxable securities

 $899  $910  $1,508  $1,636  $0  $0  $0  $0  $2,407  $2,546 

Municipal securities

  0   0   0   0   874   925   3,893   4,132   4,767   5,057 

Total held to maturity

 $899  $910  $1,508  $1,636  $874  $925  $3,893  $4,132  $7,174  $7,603 

 

The following table summarizes investment securities with unrealized losses at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, aggregated by major security type and length of time in a continuous unrealized loss position:

 

  

Less than Twelve Months

  

Twelve Months or More

  

Total

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Unrealized Losses

  

Estimated Fair Value

  

No. of Issuances

  

Unrealized Losses

  

Estimated Fair Value

  

No. of Issuances

  

Unrealized Losses

  

Estimated Fair Value

  

No. of Issuances

 

March 31, 2021

                                    

Mortgage-backed securities- Government sponsored agencies

 $(325) $25,969   6  $0  $0   0  $(325) $25,969   6 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

  (470)  61,326   14   0   0   0   (470)  61,326   14 

Commercial paper

  (16)  104,197   14   0   0   0   (16)  104,197   14 

Corporate debt securities

  (426)  8,329   8   0   0   0   (426)  8,329   8 

Municipal securities

  (55)  1,564   3   0   0   0   (55)  1,564   3 

Total available for sale

 $(1,292) $201,385   45  $0  $0   0  $(1,292) $201,385   45 

 

  

Less than Twelve Months

  

Twelve Months or More

  

Total

 
                                     

(dollars in thousands)

 

Unrealized Losses

  

Estimated Fair Value

  

No. of Issuances

  

Unrealized Losses

  

Estimated Fair Value

  

No. of Issuances

  

Unrealized Losses

  

Estimated Fair Value

  

No. of Issuances

 

December 31, 2020

                                    

Mortgage-backed securities- Government sponsored agencies

 $(8) $12,982   3  $0  $0   0  $(8) $12,982   3 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

  (93)  28,521   6   0   0   0   (93)  28,521   6 

Commercial paper

  (14)  16,982   4   0   0   0   (14)  16,982   4 

Corporate debt securities

  (6)  994   2   0   0   0   (6)  994   2 

Municipal securities

  (6)  1,092   2   0   0   0   (6)  1,092   2 

Total available for sale

 $(127) $60,571   17  $0  $0   0  $(127) $60,571   17 

 

16

 

Unrealized losses have not been recognized into income because the issuer bonds are of high credit quality, management does not intend to sell, it is not more likely than not that management would be required to sell the securities prior to their anticipated recovery and the decline in fair value is largely due to changes in interest rates. The fair value is expected to recover as the bonds approach maturity.

 

Management evaluates securities for other-than-temporary impairment (“OTTI”) on a quarterly basis, and more frequently when economic or market conditions warrant such an evaluation. For securities in an unrealized loss position, management considers the extent and duration of the unrealized loss, and the financial condition and near-term prospects of the issuer. Management also assesses whether it intends to sell, or it is more likely than not that it will be required to sell, a security in an unrealized loss position before recovery of its amortized cost basis. If either of the criteria regarding intent or requirement to sell is met, the entire difference between amortized cost and fair value is recognized as impairment through earnings.

 

Equity Securities - The Company recorded a loss of $20,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and recognized 0 net gain or loss for the same period a year ago due to the increase or decrease in the fair value of equity investments without readily determinable fair values. Equity securities were $14.9 million as of both March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

 

 

 

NOTE 5 - LOANS AND ALLOWANCE FOR LOAN LOSSES

 

The Company's loan portfolio consists primarily of loans to borrowers within the Southern California metropolitan area, the New York City metropolitan area, the Chicago, Illinois metropolitan area and Las Vegas, Nevada. Although the Company seeks to avoid concentrations of loans to a single industry or based upon a single class of collateral, real estate and real estate associated businesses are among the principal industries in the Company's market area and, as a result, the Company's loan and collateral portfolios are, to some degree, concentrated in those industries.

 

The following tables present the balance and activity related to the allowance for loan losses for held for investment loans by type for the periods presented.

 

  

Three Months Ended March 31,

 
  

2021

  

2020

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Real Estate

  

Commercial

  

Other

  

Unallocated

  

Total

  

Real Estate

  

Commercial

  

Other

  

Unallocated

  

Total

 

Allowance for loan losses:

                                        

Beginning of year

 $24,677  $4,617  $43  $0  $29,337  $15,118  $3,588  $9  $101  $18,816 

Provisions

  1,257   164   45   34   1,500   1,273   735   7   (70)  1,945 

Charge-offs

  0   0   (42)  0   (42)  0   (631)  0   0   (631)

Recoveries

  0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0   0 
  $25,934  $4,781  $46  $34  $30,795  $16,391  $3,692  $16  $31  $20,130 

 

  

For the year ended December 31, 2020

 

(dollars in thousands)

 Real Estate  

Commercial

  

Other

  

Unallocated

  

Total

 

Allowance for loan losses:

                    

Beginning of year

 $15,118  $3,588  $9  $101  $18,816 

Provisions

  9,559   2,286   79   (101)  11,823 

Charge-offs

  0   (1,258)  (45)  0   (1,303)
Recoveries  0   1   0   0   1 
  $24,677  $4,617  $43  $0  $29,337 

 

17

 

The following table presents the recorded investment in loans and impairment method as of March 31, 2021 and 2020 and December 31, 2020, by portfolio segment:

 

(dollars in thousands)

                    

March 31, 2021

 Real Estate  

Commercial

  

Other

  

Unallocated

  

Total

 

Reserves:

                    

Specific

 $0  $524  $0  $0  $524 

General

  25,934   4,257   46   34   30,271 
  $25,934  $4,781  $46  $34  $30,795 

Loans evaluated for impairment:

                    

Individually

 $11,429  $8,482  $0  $0  $19,911 

Collectively

  2,302,662   388,864   3,768   0   2,695,294 
  $2,314,091  $397,346  $3,768  $0  $2,715,205 

 

March 31, 2020

 Real Estate  

Commercial

  

Other

  

Unallocated

  

Total

 

Reserves:

                    

Specific

 $0  $0  $0  $0  $0 

General

  16,391   3,692   16   31   20,130 
  $16,391  $3,692  $16  $31  $20,130 

Loans evaluated for impairment:

                    

Individually

 $5,376  $14,898  $0  $0  $20,274 

Collectively

  2,039,968   338,270   1,470   0   2,379,708 
  $2,045,344  $353,168  $1,470  $0  $2,399,982 

 

December 31, 2020

 Real Estate  

Commercial

  

Other

  

Unallocated

  

Total

 

Reserves:

                    

Specific

 $0  $525  $0  $0  $525 

General

  24,677   4,092   43   0   28,812 
  $24,677  $4,617  $43  $0  $29,337 

Loans evaluated for impairment:

                    

Individually

 $10,514  $9,025  $15  $0  $19,554 

Collectively

  2,304,203   378,935   4,074   0   2,687,212 
  $2,314,717  $387,960  $4,089  $0  $2,706,766 

 

The Company categorizes loans into risk categories based on relevant information about the ability of borrowers to service their debt such as current financial information, historical payment experience, collateral adequacy, credit documentation, and current economic trends, among other factors. The Company analyzes loans individually by classifying the loans as to credit risk. This analysis typically includes larger, non-homogeneous loans such as commercial real estate and commercial and industrial loans. This analysis is performed on an ongoing basis as new information is obtained. The Company uses the following definitions for risk ratings:

 

Pass - Loans classified as pass include loans not meeting the risk ratings defined below.

 

Special Mention - Loans classified as special mention have a potential weakness that deserves management’s close attention. If left uncorrected, these potential weaknesses may result in deterioration of the repayment prospects for the loan or of the institution's credit position at some future date.

 

Substandard - Loans classified as substandard are inadequately protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or of the collateral pledged, if any. Loans so classified have a well-defined weakness or weaknesses that jeopardize the liquidation of the debt. They are characterized by the distinct possibility that the institution will sustain some loss if the deficiencies are not corrected.

 

Impaired - A loan is considered impaired, when, based on current information and events, it is probable that the Company will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. Additionally, all loans classified as troubled debt restructurings are considered impaired.

 

18

 

The risk category of loans by class of loans was as follows at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020:

 

(dollars in thousands)

     

Special

             

March 31, 2021

 

Pass

  

Mention

  

Substandard

  

Impaired

  

Total

 

Real estate:

                    

Construction and land development

 $209,554  $0  $0  $173  $209,727 

Commercial real estate

  1,007,345   512   52,640   2,607   1,063,104 

Single-family residential mortgages

  1,032,056   122   433   8,649   1,041,260 

Commercial:

                    

Commercial and industrial

  276,018   0   8,353   1,645   286,016 

SBA

  94,079   5,225   5,189   6,837   111,330 

Other:

  3,768   0   0   0   3,768 
  $2,622,820  $5,859  $66,615  $19,911  $2,715,205 

 

(dollars in thousands)      Special             

December 31, 2020

 

Pass

  

Mention

  

Substandard

  

Impaired

  

Total

 

Real estate:

                    

Construction and land development

 $186,550  $0  $0  $173  $186,723 

Commercial real estate

  947,643   756   52,611   2,627   1,003,637 

Single-family residential mortgages

  1,113,814   2,436   393   7,714   1,124,357 

Commercial:

                    

Commercial and industrial

  278,357   999   8,620   2,163   290,139 

SBA

  86,573   186   4,200   6,862   97,821 

Other:

  4,074   0   0   15   4,089 
  $2,617,011  $4,377  $65,824  $19,554  $2,706,766 

 

The following table presents the aging of the recorded investment in past-due loans at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 by class of loans:

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

30-59

  

60-89

  

90 Days

  

Total

  

Loans Not

      

Non-Accrual

 

March 31, 2021

 

Days

  

Days

  

Or More

  

Past Due

  

Past Due

  

Total Loans

  

Loans (1)

 

Real estate:

                            

Construction and land development

 $0  $0  $173  $173  $209,554  $209,727  $173 

Commercial real estate

  636   0   1,134   1,770   1,061,334   1,063,104   1,189 

Single-family residential mortgages

  7,700   0   1,395   9,095   1,032,165   1,041,260   8,649 

Commercial:

                            

Commercial and industrial

  310   1,222   505   2,037   283,979   286,016   1,159 

SBA

  1,161   0   6,808   7,969   103,361   111,330   6,808 

Other:

  0   0   0   0   3,768   3,768   0 
  $9,807  $1,222  $10,015  $21,044  $2,694,161  $2,715,205  $17,978 

Real estate:

                            

Single-family residential mortgages held for sale

 $0  $0  $0  $0  $37,675  $37,675  $0 

 

(dollars in thousands)  30-59   60-89   90 Days   Total   Loans Not       Non- Accrual 

December 31, 2020

 

Days

  

Days

  

Or More

  

Past Due

  

Past Due

  

Total Loans

  

Loans (1)

 

Real estate:

                            

Construction and land development

 $0  $0  $173  $173  $186,550  $186,723  $173 

Commercial real estate

  449   10   1,136   1,595   1,002,042   1,003,637   1,193 

Single-family residential mortgages

  4,219   4,859   6,008   15,086   1,109,271   1,124,357   7,714 

Commercial:

                            

Commercial and industrial

  0   0   987   987   289,152   290,139   1,661 

SBA

  0   33   6,828   6,861   90,960   97,821   6,828 

Other:

  42   0   15   57   4,032   4,089   15 
  $4,710  $4,902  $15,147  $24,759  $2,682,007  $2,706,766  $17,584 

Real estate:

                            

Single-family residential mortgages held for sale

 $0  $0  $0  $0  $49,963  $49,963  $0 

 


 

(1)

Included in total loans.

 

The Company has 0 loans that are 90 days or more past due and still accruing at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. 

 

19

 

Information relating to individually impaired loans presented by class of loans was as follows at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020:

 

  

Unpaid

         

(dollars in thousands)

 

Principal

  

Recorded

  

Related

 

March 31, 2021

 

Balance

  

Investment

  

Allowance

 

With no related allowance recorded

            

Construction and land development

 $173  $173  $ 
Commercial and industrial  1,204   1,144    

Commercial real estate

  2,616   2,607    

Residential mortgage loans

  8,922   8,649    

Commercial - SBA

  6,808   6,807    

With related allowance recorded

            

Commercial and industrial

  520   501   520 

Commercial-SBA

  30   30   4 

Total

 $20,273  $19,911  $524 

 

  

Unpaid

         

(dollars in thousands)

 

Principal

  

Recorded

  

Related

 

December 31, 2020

 

Balance

  

Investment

  

Allowance

 

With no related allowance recorded

            

Construction and land development

 $173  $173  $ 

Commercial and industrial

  1,710   1,662    

Commercial real estate

  2,633   2,627    

Residential mortgage loans

  7,839   7,714    

Commercial - SBA

  6,828   6,829    

Other

  15   15    

With related allowance recorded

            

Commercial and industrial

  520   501   520 

Commercial-SBA

  33   33   5 

Total

 $19,751  $19,554  $525 

 

The following table presents information on impaired loans and leases, disaggregated by loan segment, for the periods indicated:

 

  

Three Months Ended

 
  

March 31, 2021

  

March 31, 2020

 
  

Average

  

Interest

  

Average

  

Interest

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Balance

  

Income

  

Balance

  

Income

 

With no related allowance recorded

                

Construction and land development

 $173  $0  $262  $2 
Commercial and industrial  1,211   7   1,987   9 

Commercial real estate

  2,627   33   2,423   25 

Residential mortgage loans

  8,980   0   2,962   0 

Commercial - SBA

  7,154   0   15,153   1 

With related allowance recorded

                

Commercial and industrial

  520   0   0   0 

Commercial-SBA

  32   0   0   0 

Total

 $20,697  $40  $22,787  $37 

 

NaN interest income on non-accrual loans was recognized on a cash basis for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 or for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”), signed into law on March 27, 2020, permits financial institutions to suspend requirements under GAAP for loan modifications to borrowers affected by COVID-19 that would otherwise be characterized as troubled debt restructurings ("TDRs") and suspend any determination related thereto if (i) the loan modification is made between March 1, 2020 and the earlier of December 31, 2020 or 60 days after the end of the coronavirus emergency declaration and (ii) the applicable loan was not more than 30 days past due as of December 31, 2020.  The Consolidated Appropriations Act (“CAA”), signed into law on December 27, 2020, extends the applicable period to include modification to loans held by financial institutions executed between March 1, 2020 and the earlier of (i) January 1, 2022 or (ii) 60 days after the date of the termination of the COVID-19 national emergency.  In addition, federal bank regulatory authorities have issued guidance to encourage financial institutions to make loan modifications for borrowers affected by COVID-19 and have assured financial institutions that they will neither receive supervisory criticism for such prudent loan modifications, nor be required by examiners to automatically categorize COVID-19-related loan modifications as TDRs. The Company is applying this guidance to qualifying loan modifications.

 

20

 

The Company identified six loans as TDRs at March 31, 2021 and six loans at December 31, 2020, with aggregate balances of $3.0 million and $3.1 million, respectively. Non-accrual TDRs were $1.1 million and $1.1 million at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. There were $434,000 and $435,000 specific reserves allocated to the loans as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. There are 0 commitments to lend additional amounts at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 to customers with outstanding loans that are classified as TDRs. There were 0 non-accrual loans that were modified as TDRs during the past twelve months that had payment defaults during the periods.

 

There were 0 loans modified as TDRs during the three months ended March 31, 2021.  There was 1 commercial and industrial loan modified as a TDR during the three months ended March 31, 2020.  This one loan had a pre-modification recorded investment and post-modification recorded investment of $506,000.

 

 

 

 

NOTE 6 - LOAN SERVICING

 

Mortgage and SBA loans serviced for others are not reported as assets. The principal balances at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 are as follows:

 

  

March 31,

  

December 31,

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

 

Loans serviced for others:

        

Mortgage loans

 $1,526,285  $1,512,969 

SBA loans

  154,064   156,222 

Commercial real estate loans

  4,126   4,145 

 

The fair value of servicing assets for mortgage loans was $17.6 million and $10.7 million at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. The fair value of servicing assets for SBA loans was $4.9 million and $5.0 million at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. Estimates of the loan servicing asset fair value are derived through a discounted cash flow analysis. Portfolio characteristics include loan delinquency rates, age of loans, note rate and geography. The assumptions embedded in the valuation are obtained from a range of metrics utilized by active buyers in the market place. The analysis accounts for recent transactions, and supply and demand within the market.

 

Servicing fees net of servicing asset amortization totaled $246,000 and $592,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and March 31, 2020, respectively.

 

When mortgage and SBA loans are sold with servicing retained, servicing rights are initially recorded at fair value with the income statement effect recorded in gains on sales of loans. Fair value is based on a valuation model that calculates the present value of estimated future net servicing income. All classes of servicing assets are subsequently measured using the amortization method which requires servicing rights to be amortized into noninterest income in proportion to, and over the period of, the estimated future net servicing income of the underlying loans.

 

Servicing rights are evaluated for impairment based upon the fair value of the rights as compared to carrying amount. Impairment is recognized through a valuation allowance for an individual grouping, to the extent that fair value is less than the carrying amount. If the Company later determines that all or a portion of the impairment no longer exists for a particular grouping, a reduction of the allowance may be recorded as an increase to income. During the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company did not record any impairment writedowns on mortgage servicing rights.

 

21

 

Servicing fee income is recorded for fees earned for servicing loans. The fees are based on a contractual percentage of the outstanding principal. The amortization of mortgage servicing rights is netted against loan servicing fee income.

 

  

Three Months Ended

  

Three Months Ended

 
  

March 31, 2021

  

March 31, 2020

 
  

Mortgage

  

SBA

  

Mortgage

  

SBA

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Loans

  

Loans

  

Loans

  

Loans

 

Servicing assets:

                

Beginning of period

 $10,529  $3,436  $12,997  $4,086 

Additions

  628   77   789   38 

Disposals

  (621)  (83)  (343)  (217)

Amortized to expense

  (580)  (122)  (382)  (142)

Impairment

  0   0   0   0 

End of period

 $9,956  $3,308  $13,061  $3,765 

 

 

 

NOTE 7 - GOODWILL AND INTANGIBLES

 

Goodwill is generally determined as the excess of the fair value of the consideration transferred, plus the fair value of any non-controlling interests in the acquiree, over the fair value of the net assets acquired and liabilities assumed as of the acquisition date. Goodwill resulting from whole bank acquisitions is not amortized, but tested for impairment at least annually. The Company has historically selected December 31st as the date to perform the annual impairment test. However, since the COVID-19 pandemic, the Company evaluated its goodwill and intangibles in the first, second and fourth quarters of 2020. The impairment evaluation did not identify an impairment of goodwill or the core deposit intangible in those quarters of 2020. Goodwill amounted to $69.2 million at both March 31, 2021 at December 31, 2020, and is the only intangible asset with an indefinite life on the balance sheet.

 

Other intangible assets consist of core deposit intangible ("CDI") assets arising from whole bank acquisitions. CDI assets are amortized on an accelerated method over their estimated useful life of 8 to 10 years. The unamortized balance at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 was $4.9 million and $5.2 million, respectively. CDI amortization expense was $301,000 and $357,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

Estimated CDI amortization expense for future years is as follows:

 

(dollars in thousands)

    

As of March 31:

    

Remainder of 2021

 $820 

2022

  936 

2023

  800 

2024

  683 

2025

  589 

Thereafter

  1,067 

Total

 $4,895 

 

22

 
 

NOTE 8 - DEPOSITS

 

At March 31, 2021, the scheduled maturities of time deposits are as follows:

 

(dollars in thousands)  March 31, 2021 

One year

 $1,177,404 

Two to three years

  60,515 

Over three years

  4,449 

Total

 $1,242,368 

 

The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (“Federal Reserve”) announced the reduction of the reserve requirement ratio to zero percent across all deposit tiers, effective March 26, 2020. Depository institutions that were required to maintain deposits in a Federal Reserve bank account to satisfy reserve requirements will no longer be required to do so, and can use the additional liquidity to lend to individuals and businesses. The Federal Reserve has indicated that it may adjust reserve requirement ratios in the future if conditions warrant.

 

 

 

NOTE 9 - LONG-TERM DEBT

 

In March 2016, the Company issued $50 million of 6.5% fixed to floating rate subordinated debentures, due March 31, 2026. The interest rate is fixed through March 31, 2021 and floats at the three month LIBOR plus 516 basis points thereafter. The Company redeemed these subordinated debentures on March 31, 2021.  The redemption price for the subordinated debentures was equal to 100% of principal amount of the subordinated debentures redeemed, plus any accrued and unpaid interest to, but excluding, the redemption date of March 31, 2021.  

 

In March 2021, the Company issued $120 million of 4.00% fixed to floating rate subordinated debentures, due April 1, 2031. The interest rate is fixed through April 1, 2026 and floats at three month SOFR plus 329 basis points thereafter. The Company can redeem these subordinated debentures beginning April 1, 2026. The subordinated debentures are considered Tier 2 capital at the Company.

 

At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, long-term debt was as follows:

 

   March 31,   December 31, 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

 

Principal

 $175,000  $105,000 

Unamortized debt issuance costs

 $2,419  $609 

 

The following table presents interest and amortization expense the Company incurred for the three ended March 31, 2021 and 2020:

 

  

For the Three Months Ended March 31,

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

 

Interest Expense:

        

Interest

 $1,729  $1,662 

Amortization

  79   86 

 

In July 2017, British banking regulators announced plans to eliminate the LIBOR rate by the end of 2021, before this long-term debt and subordinated debentures mature. For these subordinated debentures, there are provisions for amendments to establish a new interest rate benchmark.

 

 

 

NOTE 10 - SUBORDINATED DEBENTURES

 

The Company, through the acquisition of TFC Holding Company (“TFC”) in 2016, acquired TFC Statutory Trust (the “Trust”). The Trust conducted a pooled private offering of 5,000 trust preferred securities with a liquidation amount of $1,000 per security. TFC issued $5 million of subordinated debentures to the Trust in exchange for ownership of all of the common securities of the Trust and the proceeds of the preferred securities sold by the Trust. The Company is not considered the primary beneficiary of this Trust (variable interest entity), therefore the Trust is not consolidated in the Company's financial statements, but rather the subordinated debentures are shown as a liability at market value as of the close of the acquisition, which was $3.3 million. There was a $1.9 million valuation reserve recorded to arrive at market value, which is treated as a yield adjustment and is amortized over the life of the security. The Company also purchased an investment in the common stock of the Trust for $155,000, which is included in other assets. The Company may redeem the subordinated debentures, subject to prior approval by the Federal Reserve on or after March 15, 2012, at 100% of the principal amount, plus accrued and unpaid interest. The subordinated debentures mature on March 15, 2037. The Company has the option to defer interest payments on the subordinated debentures from time to time for a period not to exceed five consecutive years. The Company has been paying interest on a quarterly basis. The subordinated debentures may be included in Tier I capital (with certain limitations applicable) under current regulatory guidelines and interpretations. The subordinated debentures have a variable rate of interest equal to three month LIBOR plus 1.65%, which was 1.83% as of March 31, 2021 and 1.87% at December 31, 2020.

 

23

 

In October 2018, the Company, through the acquisition of First American International Corp. (“FAIC”), acquired First American International Statutory Trust I (“FAIC Trust”), a Delaware statutory trust formed in December 2004. The FAIC Trust issued 7,000 units of thirty-year fixed to floating rate capital securities with an aggregate liquidation amount of $7,000,000 to an independent investor, and FAIC issued $7.2 million of subordinated debentures to the FAIC Trust for all of its common securities, amounting to $217,000, which is included in other assets. There was a $1.2 million valuation reserve recorded to arrive at market value which is treated as a yield adjustment and is amortized over the life of the security. The Company has the option to defer interest payments on the subordinated debentures from time to time for a period not to exceed five consecutive years. The subordinated debentures have a variable rate of interest equal to three-month LIBOR plus 2.25% through final maturity on December 15, 2034. The rate at March 31, 2021 was 2.43% and 2.47% at December 31, 2020.

 

In January 2020, the Company, through the acquisition of PGBH, acquired Pacific Global Bank Trust I (“PGBH Trust”), a Delaware statutory trust formed in December 2004. PGBH Trust issued 5,000 units of fixed to floating rate capital securities with an aggregate liquidation amount of $5,000,000 and 155 common securities with an aggregate liquidation amount of $155,000. PGBH issued $5.2 million of subordinated debentures to PGBH Trust in exchange for ownership of all the common securities of PGBH Trust. There was a $763,000 valuation reserve recorded to arrive at market value which is treated as a yield adjustment and is amortized over the life of the security. The Company has the option to defer interest payments on the subordinated debentures from time to time for a period not to exceed five consecutive years. The subordinated debentures have a variable rate of interest equal to three-month LIBOR plus 2.10% through final maturity on December 15, 2034. The rate at March 31, 2021 was 2.28% and 2.32% at December 31, 2020.

 

The Company paid interest expense of $95,000 and $153,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, on the subordinated debentures. The amount of aggregate amortization expense recognized for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 was $55,000 and $55,000, respectively.  

 

For regulatory reporting purposes, the Federal Reserve has indicated that the capital or trust preferred securities qualify as Tier 1 capital of the Company subject to previously specified limitations (including that the asset size of the issuer did not exceed $15 billion), until further notice. If regulators make a determination that the capital securities can no longer be considered in regulatory capital, the securities become callable and the Company may redeem them.

 

In July 2017, British banking regulators announced plans to eliminate the LIBOR rate by the end of 2021, before these subordinated notes and debentures mature. For these subordinated debentures, there are provisions for amendments to establish a new interest rate benchmark.

 

 

 

NOTE 11 - BORROWING ARRANGEMENTS

 

The Company has established secured and unsecured lines of credit. The Company may borrow funds from time to time on a term or overnight basis from the Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco ("FHLB"), the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco ("FRB") and other financial institutions as indicated below.

 

Federal Funds Arrangements with Commercial Banks. At March 31, 2021, the Company may borrow on an unsecured basis, up to $20.0 million, $10.0 million, $12.0 million and $50.0 million overnight from Zions Bank, Wells Fargo Bank, First Horizon Bank, and Pacific Coast Bankers' Bank, respectively.

 

Letter of Credit Arrangements. At March 31, 2021, the Company had an unsecured commercial letter of credit line with Wells Fargo Bank for $2.0 million.

 

FRB Secured Line of Credit. The secured borrowing capacity with the FRB of $36.1 million at March 31, 2021 is collateralized by loans pledged with a carrying value of $47.3 million.

 

FHLB Secured Line of Credit. The secured borrowing capacity with the FHLB of $957.7 million at March 31, 2021 is collateralized by loans pledged with a carrying value of $1.3 billion.

 

FHLB Advances.  At March 31, 2021, the Company had 0 overnight advances but long-term advances of $150.0 million at a weighted average rate of 1.18% with the FHLB.  At December 31, 2020, the Company had $150.0 million at a weighted average rate of 1.18% in long-term (five year) advances with the FHLB. The Company paid interest expenses of $435,000 and $150,000 on such FHLB advances for the three months ended March 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively. There were 0 amounts outstanding under any of the other borrowing arrangements above as of March 31, 2021 and at December 31, 2020 except FHLB advances maturing in 2025.

 

24

 
 

NOTE 12 - INCOME TAXES

 

The asset and liability method is used in accounting for income taxes. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on differences between financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities and are measured using the enacted tax rates and laws that will be in effect when the differences are expected to reverse.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company recorded an income tax provision of $5.6 million and $3.3 million, respectively, reflecting an effective tax rate of 31.1% and 32.5% for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The Company recognized a tax benefit from stock option exercises of $56,000 and $28,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

 

NOTE 13 - COMMITMENTS

 

In the ordinary course of business, the Company enters into financial commitments to meet the financing needs of its customers. These financial commitments include commitments to extend credit, unused lines of credit, commercial and similar letters of credit and standby letters of credit. Those instruments involve to varying degrees, elements of credit and interest rate risk not recognized in the Company's financial statements.

 

The Company's exposure to loss in the event of nonperformance on these financial commitments is represented by the contractual amount of those instruments. The Company uses the same credit policies in making commitments as it does for loans reflected in the financial statements.

 

At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Company had the following financial commitments whose contractual amount represents credit risk:

 

  

March 31,

  

December 31,

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

 

Commitments to make loans

 $257,253  $281,496 

Unused lines of credit

  266,209   268,629 

Commercial and similar letters of credit

  524   8,284 

Standby letters of credit

  3,976   4,031 

Total

 $527,962  $562,440 

 

Commitments to extend credit are agreements to lend to a customer as long as there is no violation of any condition established in the contract. Since many of the commitments are expected to expire without being drawn upon, the total amounts do not necessarily represent future cash requirements. The Company evaluates each client's credit worthiness on a case-by-case basis. The amount of collateral obtained if deemed necessary by the Company is based on management's credit evaluation of the customer.

 

The Company is involved in various matters of litigation which have arisen in the ordinary course of business and accruals for estimates of potential losses have been provided when necessary and appropriate under generally accepted accounting principles.  In the opinion of management, the disposition of such pending litigation will not have a material effect on the Company's financial statements.

 

 

 

NOTE 14 - LEASES

 

On January 1, 2021, the Company adopted ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) and elected the package of practical expedients that permits the Company to not reassess its prior conclusions about lease identification, lease classification and initial direct costs. The Company also elected all of the new standard’s available transition practical expedients, including the short-term lease recognition exemption that includes not recognizing Right-of-Use (“ROU”) assets or lease liabilities for existing short-term leases, and the practical expedient to not separate lease and non-lease components for all of the Company's leases.

 

The Company determines if a contract arrangement is a lease at inception and primarily enters into operating lease contracts for its branch locations, office space and certain equipment. As part of its property lease agreements, the Company may seek to include options to extend or terminate at lease when it is reasonably certain that the Company will exercise those options. The Company's measurement of the ROU assets and operating lease liabilities does not include payments associated with the option to extend or terminate the lease. The ROU lease asset also includes any lease payments made and lease incentives. Lease expense for lease payments is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term. The Company did not possess any leases that have variable lease payments or residual value guarantees as of March 31, 2021.

 

The ROU assets and lease liabilities are recognized based on the present value of the future minimum lease payments over the lease term at commencement date. The Company uses its incremental borrowing rate to determine the present value of its lease liabilities.

 

The Company leases several of its operating facilities under various non-cancellable operating leases expiring at various dates through 2036. The Company is also responsible for common area maintenance, taxes and insurance at the various branch locations.

 

Future minimum rent payments on the Company’s leases were as follows at March 31, 2021:

 

(dollars in thousands)

    

As of March 31, 2021:

    

2021 remaining

 $3,476 

2022

  4,720 

2023

  3,749 

2024

  2,685 

2025

  2,532 

Thereafter

  9,478 

Total

 $26,640 
Less amount of payment representing interest  (441)
Total present value of lease payments $26,199 

 

The minimum rent payments shown above are given for the existing lease obligation and are not a forecast of future rental expense. Total rental expense, recognized on a straight-line basis, was $1.3 million and $1.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The Company received rental income of $105,000 and $84,000 in the first quarter of 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

The following table presents the operating lease related assets and liabilities recorded on the Consolidated Balance Sheet, and the weighted-average remaining lease terms and discount rates as of  March 31, 2021 and January 1, 2021:

 

  

March 31,

  

January 1,

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2021

 

Operating Leases

        

ROU assets

 $25,500  $26,814 

Lease liabilities

  26,199   27,456 
         

Weighted-average remaining lease term (in years)

  7.25   7.37 

Weighted-average discount rate

  0.95%  0.94%

 

25

 
 

NOTE 15 - RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

Loans to principal officers, directors, and their affiliates were as follows:

 

  

March 31,

  

December 31,

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

 

Beginning balance

 $1,243  $4,000 

New loans and advances

  350   11,498 

Repayments

  (1,593) $(14,255)

Ending balance

 $0  $1,243 

 

There were $11.5 million unfunded loan commitments outstanding to executive officers, directors and their related interests with whom they are associated at March 31, 2021 and $2.0 million at December 31, 2020.

 

Deposits from principal officers, directors, and their affiliates at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 were $46.5 million and $50.0 million, respectively.

 

26

 
 

NOTE 16 - STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION

 

RBB Bancorp 2010 Stock Option Plan

 

Under the RBB Bancorp 2010 Stock Option Plan (the “2010 Plan”), the Company was permitted to grant awards to eligible persons in the form of qualified and non-qualified stock options. The Company reserved up to 30% of the issued and outstanding shares of common stock as of the date the Company adopted the 2010 Plan or 3,494,478 shares, for issuance under the 2010 Plan. Following receipt of shareholder approval of the 2017 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plan (the “OSIP”) in May 2017, no additional grants were made under the 2010 Plan. The 2010 Plan has been terminated and options that were granted under the 2020 Plan have become subject to the OSIP. Awards that were granted under the 2010 Plan will remain exercisable pursuant to the terms and conditions set forth in individual award agreements, but such awards will be assumed and administered under the OSIP. The 2010 Plan award agreements allow for acceleration of exercise privileges of grants upon occurrence of a change in control of the Company. If a participant’s job is terminated for cause, then all unvested awards expire at the date of termination.

 

RBB Bancorp 2017 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plan

 

The OSIP was adopted by the Company’s board of directors in January 2017 and approved by the Company’s shareholders in May 2017. The OSIP was designed to ensure continued availability of equity awards that will assist the Company in attracting and retaining competent managerial personnel and rewarding key employees, directors and other service providers for high levels of performance. Pursuant to the OSIP, the Company’s board of directors are allowed to grant awards to eligible persons in the form of qualified and non-qualified stock options, restricted stock, restricted stock units, stock appreciation rights and other incentive awards. The Company has reserved up to 30% of issued and outstanding shares of common stock as of the date the Company adopted the OSIP, or 3,848,341 shares. As of March 31, 2021, there were 987,045 shares of common stock available for issuance under the OSIP. This represents 5.1% of the issued and outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock as of March 31, 2021. Awards vest, become exercisable and contain such other terms and conditions as determined by the board of directors and set forth in individual agreements with the employees receiving the awards. The OSIP enables the board of directors to set specific performance criteria that must be met before an award vests. The OSIP allows for acceleration of vesting and exercise privileges of grants if a participant’s termination of employment is due to a change in control, death or total disability. If a participant’s job is terminated for cause, then all awards expire at the date of termination.

 

The Company recognized stock-based compensation expense of $287,000 and $161,000, and recognized income tax benefit of $56,000 and $28,000, for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. 

 

The Company granted restricted stock for 60,000 shares at a closing price of $17.74 in 2021. There were 0 restricted stock awards in 2020. These restricted stock awards are scheduled to vest over a three year period from the January 21, 2021 grant date. As of March 31, 2021, there were 74,475 remaining unvested restricted stock awards. 

 

The following table presents restricted stock activity during the three months ended March 31, 2021. 

 

      

Weighted-Average

 
      

Grant Date

 

(dollars in thousands, except for share amounts)

 

Shares

  

Fair Value

 

Outstanding at beginning of year

  14,475  $29.38 

Granted

  60,000   17.74 

Vested

  0   0 

Forfeited/cancelled

  0   0 

Outstanding at end of period

  74,475  $22.63 

 

The compensation expense recorded for restricted stock was $176,000 and $106,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Unrecognized stock-based compensation expense related to restricted stock was $1.2 million and $585,000 as of March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. As of March 31, 2021, these costs are expected to be recognized over the next 1.8 years for restricted stock.  

 

The fair value of each option grant was estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing model with the following weighted-average assumptions presented below for 2021 and 2020.

 

  

January 2021

  

July 2020

  

January 2020

 

Expected volatility

  30.8%  31.8%  28.5%

Expected term (years)

  6.0 years   6.0 years   6.0 years 

Expected dividends

  1.86%  2.48%  1.99%

Risk free rate

  0.26%  0.29%  1.31%

Grant date fair value

 $4.14  $2.97  $4.61 

 

Since the Company had a limited amount of historical stock activity, the expected volatility was based on the historical volatility of similar banks that had a longer trading history. The expected term represents the estimated average period of time that the options remain outstanding. The expected term of options granted is based on historical data and represents the period of time that options granted are expected to be outstanding. The risk free rate of return reflects the grant date interest rate offered for zero coupon U.S. Treasury bonds over the expected term of the options.

 

A summary of the status of awards pursuant to the Company's stock option plans as of March 31, 2021 and changes during the three months ended is presented below:

 

          

Weighted-

     
      

Weighted-

  

Average

     
      

Average

  

Remaining

  

Aggregate

 
      

Exercise

  

Contractual

  

Intrinsic

 

(dollars in thousands, except for share amounts)

 

Shares

  

Price

  

Term

  

Value

 

Outstanding at beginning of year

  1,106,470  $13.30         

Granted

  135,000   17.74         

Exercised

  (32,289)  10.53         

Forfeited/cancelled

  0   0         

Outstanding at end of period

  1,209,181  $13.89   4.13 years  $7,728 
                 

Options exercisable

  963,681  $13.06   2.78 years  $6,954 

 

As of March 31, 2021 there was approximately $924,000 of total unrecognized compensation cost related to outstanding stock options that will be recognized over a weighted-average period of 2.1 years.

 

27

 

The total fair value of the shares vested was $740,000 and $350,000 during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The number of unvested stock options were 245,500 and 147,000 with a weighted-average grant date fair value of $4.11 and $4.43 as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.

 

Cash received from the exercise of 32,289 share options was $340,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and cash received from the exercise of 56,498 share options was $712,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2020. The intrinsic value of options exercised was $305,000 and $278,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

 

 

NOTE 17 - REGULATORY MATTERS

 

Holding companies (with assets over $3 billion at the beginning of the year) and banks are subject to various regulatory capital requirements administered by the federal banking agencies. Failure to meet minimum capital requirements can initiate certain mandatory - and possibly additional discretionary - actions by regulators that, if undertaken, could have a direct material effect on the Company’s financial statements.

 

In July 2013, the federal bank regulatory agencies approved the final rules implementing the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision's capital guidelines for U.S. banks. The new rules became effective on January 1, 2015, with certain of the requirements phased-in over a multi-year schedule. Under the rules, minimum requirements increased for both the quantity and quality of capital held by the Bank. The rules include a common equity Tier 1 (“CET1”) capital to risk-weighted assets ratio with minimums for capital adequacy and prompt corrective action purposes of 4.5% and 6.5%, respectively. The minimum Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets ratio was raised from 4.0% to 6.0% under the capital adequacy framework and from 6.0% to 8.0% to be well-capitalized under the prompt corrective action framework. In addition, the rules introduced the concept of a "conservation buffer" of 2.5% applicable to the three capital adequacy risk-weighted asset ratios (CET1, Tier 1, and Total). The implementation of the capital conservation buffer began on January 1, 2016 at 0.625% and was phased in over a four-year period (increasing by that amount on each subsequent January 1, until it reached 2.5% on January 1, 2019).  If the capital adequacy minimum ratios plus the phased-in conservation buffer amount exceed actual risk-weighted capital ratios, then dividends, share buybacks, and discretionary bonuses to executives could be limited in amount.

 

Under capital adequacy guidelines and the regulatory framework for prompt corrective action, the Bank must meet specific capital guidelines that involve quantitative measures of the Bank's assets, liabilities, and certain off-balance-sheet items as calculated under regulatory accounting practices. Capital amounts and classification are also subject to qualitative judgments by the regulators about components, risk weightings, and other factors. Quantitative measures established by regulation to ensure capital adequacy require the Bank to maintain minimum amounts and ratios (set forth in the table below) of total, Tier 1 and CET1 capital (as defined in the regulations) to risk-weighted assets (as defined), and of Tier 1 capital (as defined) to average assets (as defined). As permitted by the regulators for financial institutions that are not deemed to be “advanced approaches” institutions, the Company has elected to opt out of the Basel III requirement to include accumulated other comprehensive income in risk-based capital. Management believes that at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, RBB and the Bank satisfied all capital adequacy requirements to which they were subject.

 

As defined in applicable regulations and set forth in the tables below, RBB and the Bank continue to exceed the regulatory capital minimum requirements and the Bank continues to exceed the "well capitalized" standards at the dates indicated:

 

          

Amount of Capital Required

 
                  

To Be Well-Capitalized

 
          

Minimum Required for

  

Under Prompt Corrective

 
  

Actual

  

Capital Adequacy Purposes

  

Provisions

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Amount

  

Ratio

  

Amount

  

Ratio

  

Amount

  

Ratio

 

As of March 31, 2021:

                        

Tier 1 Leverage Ratio

                        

Consolidated

 $377,094   11.30% $133,426   4.0% $166,782   5.0%

Bank

  448,066   13.44%  133,382   4.0%  166,727   5.0%

Common Equity Tier 1 Risk-Based Capital Ratio

                        

Consolidated

 $362,756   14.53% $112,337   4.5% $162,264   6.5%

Bank

  448,066   17.96%  112,262   4.5%  162,156   6.5%

Tier 1 Risk-Based Capital Ratio

                        

Consolidated

 $377,094   15.11% $149,782   6.0% $199,710   8.0%

Bank

  448,066   17.96%  149,683   6.0%  199,577   8.0%

Total Risk-Based Capital Ratio

                        

Consolidated

 $580,891   23.27% $199,710   8.0% $249,637   10.0%

Bank

  479,261   19.21%  199,577   8.0%  249,471   10.0%

 

28

 
          

Amount of Capital Required

 
                  

To Be Well-Capitalized

 
          

Minimum Required for

  

Under Prompt Corrective

 
  

Actual

  

Capital Adequacy Purposes

  

Provisions

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Amount

  

Ratio

  

Amount

  

Ratio

  

Amount

  

Ratio

 

As of December 31, 2020:

                        

Tier 1 Leverage Ratio

                        

Consolidated

 $368,413   11.32% $130,219   4.0% $162,774   5.0%

Bank

  458,614   14.11%  129,989   4.0%  162,487   5.0%

Common Equity Tier 1 Risk Based Capital Ratio

                        

Consolidated

 $354,130   14.62% $109,021   4.5% $157,474   6.5%

Bank

  458,614   18.94%  108,966   4.5%  157,395   6.5%

Tier 1 Risk-Based Capital Ratio

                        

Consolidated

 $368,413   15.21% $145,361   6.0% $193,814   8.0%

Bank

  458,614   18.94%  145,288   6.0%  193,717   8.0%

Total Risk-Based Capital Ratio

                        

Consolidated

 $503,093   20.77% $193,814   8.0% $242,268   10.0%

Bank

  488,888   20.19%  193,717   8.0%  242,146   10.0%

 

The California Financial Code generally acts to prohibit banks from making a cash distribution to its shareholders in excess of the lesser of the bank's undivided profits or the bank's net income for its last three fiscal years less the amount of any distribution made by the bank's shareholders during the same period.

 

The California General Corporation Law generally acts to prohibit companies from paying dividends on common stock unless its retained earnings, immediately prior to the dividend payment, equals or exceeds the amount of the dividend. If a company fails this test, then it may still pay dividends if after giving effect to the dividend the company's assets are at least 125% of its liabilities.

 

Additionally, the Federal Reserve has issued guidance which requires that they be consulted before payment of a dividend if a financial holding company does not have earnings over the prior four quarters of at least equal to the dividend to be paid, plus other holding company obligations.

 

29

 
 

NOTE 18 - FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

 

The following is a description of valuation methodologies used for assets and liabilities recorded at fair value:

 

Securities: The fair values of securities available for sale are determined by obtaining quoted prices on nationally recognized securities exchanges (Level 1) or matrix pricing, which is a mathematical technique used widely in the industry to value debt securities without relying exclusively on quoted prices for specific securities but rather by relying on the securities' relationship to other benchmark quoted securities (Level 2).

 

Other Real Estate Owned: Nonrecurring adjustments to certain commercial and residential real estate properties classified as other real estate owned (“OREO”) are measured at the lower of carrying amount or fair value, less costs to sell. In cases where the carrying amount exceeds the fair value, less costs to sell, an impairment loss is recognized. Fair values are generally based on third party appraisals of the property which are commonly adjusted by management to reflect an expectation of the amount to be ultimately collected and selling costs (Level 3).

 

Appraisals for OREO are performed by state licensed appraisers (for commercial properties) or state certified appraisers (for residential properties) whose qualifications and licenses have been reviewed and verified by the Company.  When a Notice of Default is recorded, an appraisal report is ordered.  Once received, a member of the credit administration department reviews the assumptions and approaches utilized in the appraisal as well as the overall resulting fair value in comparison to independent data sources such as recent market data or industry wide-statistics for residential appraisals.  Commercial appraisals are sent to an independent third party to review.  The Company also compares the actual selling price of collateral that has been sold to the most recent appraised value to determine what additional adjustments, if any, should be made to the appraisal values on any remaining other real estate owned to arrive at fair value.  If the existing appraisal is older than twelve months a new appraisal report is ordered. No significant adjustments to appraised values have been made as a result of this comparison process as of March 31, 2021.

 

Collateral-dependent impaired loans:  Collateral-dependent impaired loans are carried at fair value when it is probable that the Company will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the original loan agreement and the loan has been written down to the fair value of its underlying collateral, net of expected disposition costs where applicable.  Collateral-dependent impaired loans evaluated with specific reserves are classified as Level 3 assets.

 

The following table provides the hierarchy and fair value for each major category of assets and liabilities measured at fair value at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020:

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Fair Value Measurements Using:

     

March 31, 2021

 

Level 1

  

Level 2

  

Level 3

  

Total

 

Assets measured at fair value:

                

On a recurring basis:

                

Securities available for sale

                

Government agency securities

 $0  $1,108  $0  $1,108 

SBA agency securities

  0   4,155   0   4,155 

Mortgage-backed securities

  0   30,492   0   30,492 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

  0   88,326   0   88,326 

Commercial paper

  0   119,194   0   119,194 

Corporate debt securities

  0   36,743   0   36,743 

Municipal securities

  0   1,564   0   1,564 

Interest Rate Lock Contracts

  0   0   27   27 

Forward Mortgage Loan Sale Contracts

  0   0   399   399 
  $0  $281,582  $426  $282,008 

On a non-recurring basis:

                

Other real estate owned

  0   0   293   293 
                 

 

December 31, 2020

 

Level 1

  

Level 2

  

Level 3

  

Total

 

Assets measured at fair value:

                

On a recurring basis:

                

Securities available for sale

                

Government agency securities

 $0  $1,294  $0  $1,294 

SBA agency securities

  0   4,394   0   4,394 

Mortgage-backed securities

  0   17,677   0   17,677 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

  0   48,874   0   48,874 

Commercial paper

  0   102,448   0   102,448 

Corporate debt securities

  0   34,563   0   34,563 

Municipal securities

  0   1,617   0   1,617 

Interest Rate Lock Contracts

  0   0   45   45 

Forward Mortgage Loan Sale Contracts

  0   0   214   214 
  $  $210,867  $259  $211,126 

On a non-recurring basis:

                

Other real estate owned

  0   0   293   293 

 

NaN write-downs to OREO were recorded for three months ended March 31, 2021 or for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

30

 

Quantitative information about the Company's impaired loans and OREO non-recurring Level 3 fair value measurements at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 is as follows:

 

OREO consists of one single-family residence with a fair value of $293,000 as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020.  OREO was evaluated by third party appraisals with unobservable input of management adjustment in the range of 5%-6% to reflect current conditions and selling costs.

 

Interest Rate Lock Commitments (IRLCs):  Agreements under which the Company agrees to extend credit to a borrower under certain specified terms and conditions in which the interest rate and the maximum amount of the loan are set prior to funding. Under the agreement, the Company commits to lend funds to a potential borrower (subject to the Company’s approval of the loan) on a fixed or adjustable rate basis, regardless of whether interest rates change in the market, or on a floating rate basis.  As such, outstanding IRLCs are subject to interest rate risk and related price risk during the period from the date of issuance through the date of loan funding, cancelling or expiration.  Loan commitments generally range between 30 and 90 days; however, the borrower is not obligated to obtain the loan.  The Company is subject to fallout risk related to IRLCs , which is realized if approved borrowers choose not to close on the loans within the terms of the IRLCs.  The Company uses best efforts commitments to substantially eliminate these risks.  Historical commitment-to-closing ratios are considered to estimate the quantity of mortgage loans that will fund within the terms of the IRLCs.

 

The FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“FASB ASC”) provides that IRLCs on mortgage loans that will be held for resale are derivatives and must be accounted for at fair value on the balance sheet (if material). FASB ASC Topic 820 – Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures specifies how these derivatives are to be valued.  Commitments to originate mortgage loans to be held for investment and other types of loans are generally not derivatives. Consequently, the Company has elected to account for these obligations at fair value.

 

Forward Mortgage Loan Sale Contracts (FMLSCs):  The Company is subject to interest rate and price risk on its mortgage loans held for sale from the loan funding date until the date the loan is sold.  Best efforts commitments which fix the forward the forward sales price that will be realized in the secondary market are used to eliminate the interest rate and price risk to the Company.  To avoid interest rate risk, the Company will enter into mortgage loans sales commitments (FMLSCs) at the time they make an interest rate lock commitment to the buyer. They can enter into mortgage loan sales commitments on a “mandatory” or “best efforts” basis. Mandatory commitments provide that the loan must be delivered or the commitment be “paired off”. In general, best efforts commitments provide that the loan be delivered if and when it closes.

 

Mandatory delivery commitments, also known as forward loan sales commitments, are considered to be derivatives under FASB ASC Topic 815 (Derivatives and Hedging) because they meet all of the following criteria:

 

 

They have a specified underlying (the contractually specified price for the loans)

 

They have a notional amount (the committed loan principal amount)

 

They require little or no initial net investment

 

They require or permit net settlement as the institution via a pair-off transaction or the payment of a pair-off fee.

 

 

 

NOTE 19 - FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

 

The fair value of a financial instrument is the amount at which the asset or obligation could be exchanged in a current transaction between willing parties, other than in a forced or liquidation sale. Fair value estimates are made at a specific point in time based on relevant market information and information about the financial instrument. These estimates do not reflect any premium or discount that could result from offering for sale at one time the entire holdings of a particular financial instrument. Because no market value exists for a significant portion of the financial instruments, fair value estimates are based on judgments regarding future expected loss experience, current economic conditions, risk characteristics of various financial instruments, and other factors. These estimates are subjective in nature, involve uncertainties and matters of judgment and, therefore, cannot be determined with precision. Changes in assumptions could significantly affect the estimates.

 

Fair value estimates are based on financial instruments both on and off the balance sheet without attempting to estimate the value of anticipated future business and the value of assets and liabilities that are not considered financial instruments. Additionally, tax consequences related to the realization of the unrealized gains and losses can have a potential effect on fair value estimates and have not been considered in many of the estimates.

 

In accordance with accounting guidance, the Company groups its financial assets and financial liabilities measured at fair value in three levels, based on the markets in which the assets and liabilities are traded and the reliability of the assumptions used to determine fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3 measurements). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy are described as follows:

 

Level 1 - Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets that are accessible at the measurement date for identical, unrestricted assets or liabilities.

 

Level 2 - Inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. These might include quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active, inputs other than quoted prices that are observable for the asset or liability (such as interest rates, prepayment speeds, volatilities, etc.) or model-based valuation techniques where all significant assumptions are observable, either directly or indirectly, in the market.

 

Level 3 - Valuation is generated from model-based techniques where one or more significant inputs are not observable, either directly or indirectly, in the market. These unobservable assumptions reflect the Company’s own estimates of assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability. Valuation techniques may include use of matrix pricing, discounted cash flow models, and similar techniques.

 

Because no market exists for a significant portion of the Company’s financial instruments, fair value estimates are based on judgments regarding current economic conditions, risk characteristics of various financial instruments, and other factors. These estimates are subjective in nature, and involve uncertainties and matters of significant judgment and therefore cannot be determined with precision. Changes in assumptions could significantly affect the fair values presented. Management uses its best judgment in estimating the fair value of the Company’s financial instruments; however, there are inherent limitations in any estimation technique.

 

31

 

A financial instrument’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. Management maximizes the use of observable inputs and attempts to minimize the use of unobservable inputs when determining fair value measurements. Estimated fair values are disclosed for financial instruments for which it is practicable to estimate fair value. These estimates are made at a specific point in time based on relevant market data and information about the financial instruments. These estimates do not reflect any premium or discount that could result from offering the Company’s entire holdings of a particular financial instrument for sale at one time, nor do they attempt to estimate the value of anticipated future business related to the instruments. In addition, the tax ramifications related to the realization of unrealized gains and losses can have a significant effect on fair value estimates and have not been considered in any of these estimates.

 

The Company uses the following methods and assumptions to estimate the fair value of each class of financial instruments:

 

For cash and due from banks, Federal funds sold, and cash equivalents, the carrying amount is assumed to be a reasonable estimate of fair value, a Level 1 measurement.

 

For short-term investments and interest-bearing deposits, the carrying amount is assumed to be a reasonable estimate of fair value, a Level 1 measurement.

 

Securities available for sale are measured by using quoted market prices for similar securities or dealer quotes, a Level 2 measurement. This category generally includes U.S. Government agency securities, U.S. Government sponsored entities, state and municipal securities, mortgage backed securities (“MBS”), collateralized mortgage obligations and corporate bonds.

 

Equity securities fair value are measured based on quoted market prices in active exchange markets at the reporting date, a level 3 measurement. Equity securities are comprised of other equity securities.

 

Fair values are estimated for portfolios of loans with similar financial characteristics. Each loan category is further segmented into fixed and adjustable rate interest terms and by performing and non-performing categories. The fair values are based primarily on third-party vendor pricing to determine fair values based on the exit price notion.

 

The fair value of performing loans is calculated by discounting scheduled cash flows through the estimated maturity using estimated market discount rates that reflect the credit and interest rate risk inherent in the loan, a Level 3 measurement.

 

The fair value of impaired loans is calculated based on the net realizable fair value of the collateral or the observable market price of the most recent sale or quoted price from loans held for sale. The Company does not record loans at fair value on a recurring basis. Nonrecurring fair value adjustments to collateral dependent impaired loans are recorded based on the adjusted appraised value of the collateral, a Level 3 measurement.

 

The Company records loans held for sale at fair value based on quoted prices from third party sale analysis, existing sale agreements, or appraisal reports adjusted by sales commission assumption, a Level 1 measurement.

 

Mortgage and SBA servicing rights are calculated by discounting scheduled cash flows through the estimated maturity using estimated market discount rates that reflect the credit and interest rate risk inherent in the loan, a Level 2 measurement.

 

The fair value of demand deposits, savings accounts, and certain money market deposits is assumed to be the amount payable on demand at the reporting date. The fair value of fixed-maturity certificates of deposit is estimated using the rates currently offered for deposits with similar remaining maturities, a Level 2 measurement.

 

The fair value of commitments to extend credit and standby letters of credit, interest rate lock commitments and forward mortgage loan sales contracts is estimated using the fees currently charged to enter into similar agreements. Unobservable inputs that reflect the Company's own assumptions about the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability result in a Level 3 measurement.

 

The fair value of FHLB advances is calculated by discounting scheduled cash flows through the estimated maturity using estimated market discount rates that reflect the credit and interest rate risk, a Level 2 measurement.

 

Subordinated debentures fair value is calculated by discounting scheduled cash flows through the estimated maturity using estimated market discount rates that reflect the credit and interest rate risk, a Level 2 measurement.

 

32

 

The fair value of long-term debt is calculated by discounting scheduled cash flows through the estimated maturity using estimated market discount rates that reflect the credit and interest rate risk, a Level 2 measurement.

 

Fair value is estimated in accordance with ASC Topic 825. Fair value estimates are made at specific points in time, based on relevant market information and information about the financial instrument. These estimates do not reflect any premium or discount that could result from offering for sale at one time the Bank’s entire holdings of a particular financial instrument. Because no market exists for a significant portion of the Bank’s financial instruments, fair value estimates are based on judgments regarding future expected loss experience, current economic conditions, risk characteristics of various financial instruments, and other factors. These estimates are subjective in nature and involve uncertainties and matters of significant judgment and therefore cannot be determined with precision. Changes in assumptions could significantly affect the estimates.

 

The fair value hierarchy level and estimated fair value of significant financial instruments at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 are summarized as follows:

 

   

March 31,

  

December 31,

 
   

2021

  

2020

 
 

Fair Value

 

Carrying

  

Fair

  

Carrying

  

Fair

 

(dollars in thousands)

Hierarchy

 

Value

  

Value

  

Value

  

Value

 

Financial Assets:

                 

Cash and due from banks

Level 1

 $362,930  $362,930  $137,654  $137,654 

Federal funds sold and other cash equivalents

Level 1

  57,000   57,000   57,000   57,000 

Interest-earning deposits in other financial institutions

Level 1

  600   600   600   600 

Investment securities - AFS

Level 2

  281,582   281,582   210,867   210,867 

Investment securities - HTM

Level 2

  6,668   7,020   7,174   7,603 

Mortgage loans held for sale

Level 1

  37,675   38,184   49,963   50,716 

Loans, net

Level 3

  2,684,410   2,691,371   2,677,429   2,687,751 

Equity securities

Level 3

  14,862   14,862   14,894   14,894 

Mortgage servicing rights

Level 2

  13,264   22,509   13,965   15,617 
                  
   

Notional

  

Fair

  

Notional

  

Fair

 

Derivative assets:

  

Value

  

Value

  

Value

  

Value

 

Interest Rate Lock Contracts

Level 3

 $15,636  $27  $27,665  $45 

Forward Mortgage Loan Sale Contracts

Level 3

  36,831   399   55,089   214 
                  
   

Carrying

  

Fair

  

Carrying

  

Fair

 

Financial Liabilities:

  

Value

  

Value

  

Value

  

Value

 

Deposits

Level 2

 $2,821,293  $2,812,555  $2,635,128  $2,632,933 

FHLB advances

Level 2

  150,000   149,933   150,000   149,964 

Long-term debt

Level 2

  172,581   180,218   104,391   137,930 

Subordinated debentures

Level 2

  14,338   14,858   14,283   14,654 

 

 

 

NOTE 20 - EARNINGS PER SHARE

 

The following is a reconciliation of net income and shares outstanding to the income and number of shares used to compute earnings per share (“EPS”):

 

  

For the Three Months Ended March 31,

 
  

2021

  

2020

 

(dollars in thousands except per share amounts)

 

Income

  

Shares

  

Income

  

Shares

 

Net income as reported

 $12,456      $6,748     

Less: Earnings allocated to Participating Securities

  (40)      (10)    

Shares outstanding

      19,528,249       19,739,280 

Impact of weighting shares

      (52,435)      232,576 

Used in basic EPS

  12,416   19,475,814   6,738   19,971,856 

Dilutive effect of outstanding

                

Stock options

      337,027       294,472 

Used in dilutive EPS

 $12,416   19,812,841  $6,738   20,266,328 
                 
Basic earnings per common share $0.64      $0.34     
Diluted earnings per common share  0.63       0.33     

 

Stock options for 51,000 shares and 263,500 shares of common stock were not considered in computing diluted earnings per common share for March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively because they were anti-dilutive.

 

33

 
 

NOTE 21  REVENUE FROM CONTRACTS WITH CUSTOMERS

 

On January 1, 2019, the Company adopted ASU 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers - Topic 606 and all subsequent ASUs that modified ASC 606. The Company adopted ASC 606 using the modified retrospective method applied to those contracts that were not completed as of January 1, 2019. The new standard did not materially impact the timing or measurement of the Company’s revenue recognition as it is consistent with the Company’s existing accounting for contracts within the scope of the new standard. There was no cumulative effect adjustment to retained earnings as a result of adopting this new standard.

 

The following is a summary of revenue from contracts with customers that are in-scope and not in-scope under Topic 606:

 

  For the Three Months Ended March 31, 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

 

Non-interest income, in scope (1)

        

Fees and service charges on deposit accounts

 $687  $451 

Other fees (2)

  135   149 

Other income (3)

  630   452 

Total in-scope non-interest income

  1,452   1,052 

Non-interest income, not in scope (4)

  4,442   3,563 

Total non-interest income

 $5,894  $4,615 

 


 

(1)

There were no adjustments to the Company's financial statements recorded as a result of the adoption of ASC 606.

 

 

(2)

Other fees consists of wealth management fees, miscellaneous loan fees and postage/courier fees.

 

 

(3)

Other income consists of safe deposit box rental income, wire transfer fees, security brokerage fees, annuity sales, insurance activity and OREO income.

 

 

(4)

The amounts primarily represent revenue from contracts with customers that are out of scope of ASC 606: Net loan servicing income, letter of credit commissions, import/export commissions, recoveries on purchased loans, BOLI income, and gains (losses) on sales of mortgage loans, loans and investment securities.

 

The major revenue streams by fee type that are within the scope of ASC 606 presented in the above tables are described in additional detail below:

 

34

 

Fees and Services Charges on Deposit Accounts

 

Fees and service charges on deposit accounts include charges for analysis, overdraft, cash checking, ATM, and safe deposit activities executed by our deposit clients, as well as interchange income earned through card payment networks for the acceptance of card based transactions. Fees earned from our deposit clients are governed by contracts that provide for overall custody and access to deposited funds and other related services, and can be terminated at will by either party; this includes fees from money service businesses (“MSBs”). Fees received from deposit clients for the various deposit activities are recognized as revenue once the performance obligations are met. The adoption of ASU 2014-09 had no impact to the recognition of fees and service charges on deposit accounts.

 

Wealth Management Fees

 

The Company employs financial consultants to provide investment planning services for customers including wealth management services, asset allocation strategies, portfolio analysis and monitoring, investment strategies, and risk management strategies. The fees the Company earns are variable and are generally received monthly. The Company recognizes revenue for the services performed at quarter-end based on actual transaction details received from the broker dealer the Company engages.

 

In the Company’s wealth management division, revenue is primarily generated from (1) securities brokerage accounts, (2) investment advisor accounts, (3) full service brokerage implementation fees, and (4) life insurance and annuity products.

 

Gain on Sales of OREO and Fixed Assets

 

The Company records a gain or loss from the sale of OREO and fixed assets, when control of the property or asset transfers to the buyer, which generally occurs at the time of an executed deed or sales agreement. When the Company finances the sale of OREO to a buyer, the Company assesses whether the buyer is committed to perform their obligations under the contract and whether collectability of the transaction price is probable. Once these criteria are met, the OREO asset is derecognized and the gain or loss on sale is recorded upon transfer of control of the property to the buyer. In determining the gain or loss on the sale, the Company adjusts the transaction price and related gain or loss on sale if a significant financing component is present.

 

 

 

NOTE 22 - QUALIFIED AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROJECT INVESTMENTS

 

The Company began investing in qualified housing projects in 2016. At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the balance of the investment for qualified affordable housing projects was $7.4 million and $7.6 million, respectively. This balance is reflected in the accrued interest and other assets line on the consolidated balance sheets. Total unfunded commitments related to the investments in qualified housing projects totaled $1.3 million and $1.6 million at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. The Company expects to fulfill these commitments between 2021 and 2029.

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company recognized amortization expense of $259,000 and $247,000, respectively, which was included within income tax expense on the consolidated statements of income.

 

 

 

NOTE 23 - RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

 

On April 22, 2021, RBB Bancorp announced a cash dividend of $0.13 per share for the first quarter of 2021. The dividend is payable on May 14, 2021 to common shareholders of record as of May 7, 2021.    

 

35

 
 

ITEM 2.

MANAGEMENTS DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (the “Report”) contains forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements reflect our current views with respect to, among other things, future events and our results of operations, financial condition and financial performance. These statements are often, but not always, made through the use of words or phrases such as “may,” “should,” “could,” “predict,” “potential,” “believe,” “will likely result,” “expect,” “continue,” “will,” “anticipate,” “seek,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” “projection,” “would” and “outlook,” or the negative version of those words or other comparable words of a future or forward-looking nature. These forward-looking statements are not historical facts, and are based on current expectations, estimates and projections about our industry, management’s beliefs and certain assumptions made by management, many of which, by their nature, are inherently uncertain and beyond our control. Accordingly, we caution you that any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks, assumptions and uncertainties that are difficult to predict. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in these forward-looking statements are reasonable as of the date made, actual results may prove to be materially different from the results expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements.

 

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to cause economic disruption both worldwide and in the markets we operate. Given the ongoing and dynamic nature of these circumstances, it is difficult to predict the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on our business, and there is no guarantee that our efforts to address or mitigate the adverse impacts of the coronavirus will be effective. To date, the impact has included periods of significant volatility in financial, commodities, and other markets. This volatility, if it continues, could have an adverse impact on our customers and on our business, financial condition, and results of operations, as well as our growth strategy.

 

Our business is dependent upon the willingness and ability of our customers to conduct financial transactions and fulfill their obligations. The spread of COVID-19 has caused (and could continue to cause) severe disruptions in the U.S. economy, and has resulted (and may continue to result) in disruptions to our customers’ businesses, and a decrease in consumer confidence, and adversely affect business generally. In addition, actions by U.S. federal, state, and local governments to address the pandemic, including travel bans, stay-at-home orders, and school, business, and entertainment venue closures, have had (and may continue to have) a significant adverse effect on our customers and the markets in which we conduct our business. The extent of impacts resulting from the pandemic and other events beyond our control remain dependent on future developments, including but not limited to the effectiveness and level of acceptance of vaccines, new information that may emerge concerning the severity of the pandemic, the duration of the coronavirus pandemic, any resurgence in the number of COVID-19 cases, any development and proliferation of new strains of COVID-19, actions taken to contain the coronavirus or its impact, and other similar factors; all of which are uncertain and cannot be predicted.

 

Although new loan origination began to rebound during the latter part of 2020, we believe economic impacts stemming from COVID-19 will continue to influence our loan originations in the near term, both in terms of a reduction in overall demand for new loans and our continued emphasis on prudent credit risk management, particularly within the context of the continued uncertainty surrounding the economic environment.

 

We are actively working to support our borrowers to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on them and on our loan portfolio, including through loan modifications that defer payments for those who experienced a hardship as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Although recent regulatory guidance provides that such loan modifications are exempt from the calculation and reporting of TDRs and loan delinquencies, we cannot predict whether such loan modifications may ultimately have an adverse impact on our profitability in future periods. Our inability to successfully manage the increased credit risk caused by the COVID-19 pandemic could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Disruptions to our customers or business in general could result in increased risk of delinquencies, defaults, foreclosures, and losses on our loans. The escalation of the pandemic may also negatively impact regional economic conditions for a period of time, which could result in declines in loan demand, liquidity of loan guarantors, loan collateral (particularly in real estate), loan originations, and deposit availability. If the global response to COVID-19 escalates or is unsuccessful, we could experience a material adverse situation that could affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows. In addition to the foregoing, there are or will be other important factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those indicated in these forward-looking statements, including, but not limited to, the following:

 

 

business and economic conditions generally and in the financial services industry, nationally and within our current and future geographic market areas;

 

 

economic, market, operational, liquidity, credit and interest rate risks associated with our business;

 

 

lack of seasoning in our loan portfolio;

 

 

deteriorating asset quality and higher loan charge-offs;

 

 

the laws and regulations applicable to our business;

 

 

our ability to achieve organic loan and deposit growth and the composition of such growth;

 

 

our ability to originate and sell non-qualified mortgages;

 

 

increased competition in the financial services industry, nationally, regionally or locally;

 

 

our ability to maintain our historical earnings trends;

 

 

our ability to raise additional capital to implement our business plan;

 

 

material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting;

 

 

systems failures or interruptions involving our information technology and telecommunications systems or third-party servicers;

 

 

the composition of our management team and our ability to attract and retain key personnel;

 

 

the fiscal position of the U.S. federal government and the soundness of other financial institutions;

 

 

 

our ability to monitor our lending relationships;

 

 

the composition of our loan portfolio, and the concentration of loans in mortgage-related industries;

 

 

the portion of our loan portfolio that is comprised of participations and shared national credits;

 

 

the amount of nonperforming and classified assets we hold;

 

 

time and effort necessary to resolve nonperforming assets;

 

 

the effect of acquisitions we may make, including without limitation, the failure to achieve the expected revenue growth and/or expense savings from such acquisitions, and/or the failure to effectively integrate an acquisition target into our operations;

 

 

our limited operating history as an integrated company including prior acquisitions;

 

 

environmental liability associated with our lending activities;

 

 

geopolitical and public health conditions such as acts or threats of terrorism, military conflicts, pandemics and public health issues or crises, such as that related to the COVID-19 pandemic;

 

 

the geographic concentration of our markets in Southern California, Las Vegas (Nevada), Chicago (Illinois) and the New York City metropolitan area and the southwest United States;

 

 

the commencement and outcome of litigation and other legal proceedings against us or to which we may become subject;

 

 

the impact of recent and future legislative and regulatory changes, including changes in banking, securities and tax laws and regulations and their application by our regulators;

 

 

uncertainty relating to the LIBOR calculation process, the phasing out of LIBOR after 2021, and uncertainty regarding potential alternative reference rates, including SOFR;

 

 

possible impairment charges to goodwill;

 

 

natural disasters, earthquakes, fires and severe weather;

 

 

the effect of changes in accounting policies and practices as may be adopted from time to time by our regulatory agencies, as well as by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, the Financial Accounting Standards Board and other accounting standards setters, including ASU 2016-13 (Topic 326), “Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments,” commonly referenced as the CECL model, which will change how we estimate credit losses and may increase the required level of our allowance for loan losses after adoption;

 

 

requirements to remediate adverse examination findings;

 

 

changes in the scope and cost of FDIC deposit insurance premiums;

 

 

implementation of regulatory initiatives regarding bank capital requirements that may require heightened capital;

 

 

the obligations associated with being a public company;

 

 

cybersecurity threats and the cost of defending against them;

 

 

RBB’s status as an EGC and the potential effects of no longer qualifying as an EGC in future periods;

 

 

our success at managing the risks involved in the foregoing items;

 

 

our modeling estimates related to an increased interest rate environment;

 

 

our ability to achieve the cost savings and efficiencies in connection with branch closures;

 

 

our estimates as to our expected operational leverage and the expected additional loan capacity of our relationship managers; and

 

 

our success at managing the risks involved in the foregoing items.

 

The foregoing factors should not be construed as exhaustive and should be read together with the other cautionary statements included in this Report. If one or more events related to these or other risks or uncertainties materialize, or if our underlying assumptions prove to be incorrect, actual results may differ materially from what we anticipate. Accordingly, you should not place undue reliance on any such forward-looking statements. Any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which it is made, and we do not undertake any obligation to publicly update or review any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise. New factors emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict which will arise. In addition, we cannot assess the impact of each factor on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements.

 

 

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

The discussion and analysis of the Company’s unaudited consolidated financial statements are based upon its unaudited consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with GAAP. The preparation of these unaudited consolidated financial statements requires management to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of our financial statements. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

 

The following is a summary of the more judgmental and complex accounting estimates and principles. In each area, we have identified the variables we believe are most important in our estimation process. We utilize information available to us to make the necessary estimates to value the related assets and liabilities. Actual performance that differs from our estimates and future changes in the key variables and information could change future valuations and impact the results of operations.

 

 

Loans held for investment

 

 

Loans available for sale

 

 

Securities

 

 

Allowance for loan losses (“ALLL”)

 

 

Goodwill and other intangible assets

 

 

Deferred income taxes

 

 

Servicing rights

 

 

Income taxes

 

 

Stock-based compensation

 

Our significant accounting policies are described in greater detail in our 2020 audited consolidated financial statements included in our 2020 Annual Report, which are essential to understanding Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

GENERAL

 

RBB is a financial holding company registered under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended. Our principal business is to serve as the holding company for the Bank and RAM. At March 31, 2021, RBB had total consolidated assets of $3.7 billion, gross consolidated loans of $2.8 billion HFI and HFS, total consolidated deposits of $2.8 billion and total consolidated stockholders' equity of $435.7 million. RBB’s common stock trades on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol “RBB”.

 

The Bank provides business banking services to the Chinese-American communities in Los Angeles County, Orange County, Ventura County (California), Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan (New York City), Chinatown and Bridgeport (Chicago), Las Vegas (Clark County, Nevada) and in Edison, New Jersey, including remote deposit, E-banking, mobile banking, commercial and investor real estate loans, business loans and lines of credit, SBA 7A and 504 loans, mortgage loans, trade finance and a full range of depository accounts. RAM was formed to hold and manage problem assets acquired in business combinations.

 

RBB operates 22 full-service banking offices in Arcadia, Cerritos, Diamond Bar, Irvine, Los Angeles, Monterey Park, Oxnard, Rowland Heights, San Gabriel, Silver Lake, Torrance, and Westlake Village (California), Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan (New York City), Chinatown and Bridgeport (Chicago), Las Vegas (Nevada) and Edison, New Jersey. The Bank is a Community Development Financial Institution and as such is able to receive grants from the United States Treasury Department. Any grants we receive will be used to invest in low-to-moderate income areas in the communities we serve.

 

RBB has completed six acquisitions since 2011, including the acquisition of PGBH which was completed on January 10, 2020.

 

 

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic and declaration of a national emergency by the Trump administration, the Company fully implemented our Business Continuity Plan to safeguard its employees and operations. The banking and finance sectors have been identified as one of the 13 critical infrastructure sectors essential to our nation’s security, and economic and social stability. All Bank branches remain open, with routine banking services offered through online banking, drive-up windows and limited lobby access.

 

We implemented a number of actions to support a healthy workforce:

 

 

Flexible work practices such as work-from-home options, working in shifts and placing greater distances between employees;

 

 

Discontinued non-essential business travel and meetings; and

 

 

Utilizing online meeting platforms.

 

We have been and will continue to actively address client needs, including offering loan relief to all impacted clients. We have enrolled clients in the SBA Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”). See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – Analysis of Financial Condition – COVID-19 Impact on Loan Quality” for a discussion of the pandemic’s effect on the Company’s loan portfolio with certain information provided as of March 31, 2021.

 

Since mid-August, most of our employees located in our operations center are working alternating 14-day shifts in the office, unless they require working remotely from home. We implemented “social distancing” to space employees in work areas. Employees wear masks as a further precaution, and we are encouraging all staff to be vaccinated.

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted and will continue to impact our financial performance in the following manner:

 

 

We expect similar single-family loan growth except we expect the mix will change. We expect higher FNMA loan originations and lower non-qualified mortgage originations;

 

 

We expect lower loan sales volume and gains due to lower non-qualified mortgage originations;

 

 

We expect commercial real estate loan origination volume to remain stable;

 

 

We have not currently experienced any run-off in deposits. We borrowed $150 million in 5-year fixed-rate FHLB advances to enhance our liquidity and obtain funding at an attractive interest rate. In addition, deposit customers are not as rate sensitive and we have lowered deposit rates significantly.  We raised an additional $120.0 million and redeemed $50.0 million in subordinated debentures in March 2021; and

 

 

We expect higher loan losses in the third and fourth quarters of 2021 after loan deferment agreements expire. See “COVID-19 Impact on Loan Quality” for further discussion.

 

 

 

The CARES Act, signed into law on March 27, 2020, permits financial institutions to suspend requirements under GAAP for loan modifications to borrowers affected by COVID-19 that would otherwise be characterized as TDRs and suspend any determination related thereto if (i) the loan modification is made between March 1, 2020 and the earlier of December 31, 2020 or 60 days after the end of the coronavirus emergency declaration and (ii) the applicable loan was not more than 30 days past due as of December 31, 2019.  The CAA, signed into law on December 27, 2020, extends the applicable period to include modification to loans held by financial institutions executed between March 1, 2020 and the earlier of (i) January 1, 2022, or (ii) 60 days after the date of termination of the COVID-19 national emergency.  In addition, federal bank regulatory authorities have issued guidance to encourage financial institutions to make loan modifications for borrowers affected by COVID-19 and have assured financial institutions that they will neither receive supervisory criticism for such prudent loan modifications, nor be required by examiners to automatically categorize COVID-19-related loan modifications as TDRs. The Company is applying this guidance to qualifying loan modifications

 

 

OVERVIEW

 

The following discussion provides information about the results of operations, financial condition, liquidity and capital resources of RBB and its wholly owned subsidiaries. This information is intended to facilitate the understanding and assessment of significant changes and trends related to our financial condition and the results of our operations. This discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with our audited financial statements included in our 2020 Annual Report, and the unaudited consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes presented elsewhere in this Report.

 

For the first quarter of 2021, we reported net earnings of $12.5 million, compared with $6.7 million for the first quarter of 2020, for an increase of $5.8 million from the first quarter of 2020. Diluted earnings per share were $0.63 per share for the first quarter of 2021, compared to $0.33 for the same period last year.

 

At March 31, 2021, total assets were $3.7 billion, an increase of $314.2 million, or 9.4%, from total assets of $3.4 billion at December 31, 2020. Interest-earning assets were $3.4 billion as of March 31, 2021, an increase of $287.0 million, or 9.1%, compared with $3.2 billion at December 31, 2020. The increase in interest-earning assets was primarily due to a $220.7 million increase in interest income due from banks, a $70.2 million increase in investment securities and an $8.4 million increase in loans held for investment, partially offset by a $12.3 million decrease in mortgage loans held for sale.

 

At March 31, 2021, AFS investment securities totaled $281.6 million, inclusive of a pre-tax net unrealized loss of $212,000, compared to $210.9 million, inclusive of a pre-tax unrealized gain of $1.6 million at December 31, 2020. HTM investment securities totaled $6.7 million at March 31, 2021 and $7.2 million at December 31. 2020.

 

Total HFI loans and leases, net of deferred fees and discounts, increased $8.4 million or 0.3% to $2.72 billion at March 31, 2021, compared to $2.71 billion at December 31, 2020. The increase was primarily due to organic loan growth. Between March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, commercial real estate (“CRE”) loans increased by $59.5 million, construction and land development (“C&D”) loans increased by $23.0 million, and SBA loans increased by $13.5 million, which were partially offset by decreases in single-family residential (“SFR”) mortgage loans by $83.1 million, commercial and industrial ("C&I") loans by $4.1 million and other loans by $321,000.

 

HFS loans were $37.7 million at March 31, 2021, compared to $50.0 million at December 31, 2020.  The decrease was due to loan sales.

 

Noninterest-bearing deposits were $787.4 million at March 31, 2021, an increase of $170.2 million, or 27.6%, compared to $617.2 million at December 31, 2020. Interest-bearing deposits were $2.03 billion at March 31, 2021, an increase of $15.9 million, or 0.79%, compared to $2.02 billion at December 31, 2020. The increases were driven by normal business growth. At March 31, 2021, noninterest-bearing deposits were 27.9% of total deposits, compared to 23.4% at December 31, 2020.

 

Our average cost of total deposits was 0.55% for the quarter ended March 31, 2021, compared to 1.38% for the same period last year. The decrease is primarily due to an increase of $188.9 million in average demand deposits, and a decrease in the average rate paid on interest-bearing deposits to 0.73% from 1.72% due to the decline in market rates.

 

Borrowings, consisting of long-term and short-term FHLB advances, long-term debt and subordinated debt, increased to $336.9 million at March 31, 2021, compared to $268.7 million as of December 31, 2020, or an increase of $68.2 million.  This primarily was due to the subordinated debenture issuance in March 2021 of $120.0 million, partially offset by the redemption of $50 million in subordinated debentures that were issued in March 2016.  The $120.0 million of ten-year subordinated debentures have a fixed to floating rate, with a fixed rate of 4.00% through April 1, 2026 and a floating rate thereafter of three month SOFR plus 329 basis points and will mature by April 1, 2031. The $150.0 million in five-year FHLB advances have an average fixed rate of 1.18% and will mature by March 2025. The purpose of the advances was to enhance our liquidity in light of the COVID-19 pandemic at an attractive interest rate. As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, we had no short term advances from the FHLB.

 

The Company adopted ASU 2016-02, Leases, as of January 1, 2021.  As of March 31, 2021, the Company reported $25.5 million in right-of-use assets for operating leases, in addition to $26.2 million in lease liabilities.

 

The allowance for loan losses was $30.8 million at March 31, 2021, compared to $29.3 million at December 31, 2020. The allowance for loan losses increased by $1.5 million during the three-month period ending March 31, 2021. The increase was due to a $1.5 million loan loss provision, attributable to increases in non-performing loans and loans held-for-investment 30 to 89 days past due increasing to $10.7 million at March 31, 2021, as well as an increase in our general reserve qualitative factors as a result of economic conditions resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. The allowance for loan losses to total HFI loans and leases outstanding was 1.13% and 1.08% as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.

 

Shareholders’ equity increased $7.2 million, or 1.7%, to $435.7 million during the three-month period ending March 31, 2021 due to $12.5 million of net income, $340,000 from the exercise of stock options and $287,000 from stock-based compensation, which was partially offset by $2.3 million of common stock dividends declared, $2.3 million from the repurchase of common stock and a $1.3 million decrease in net accumulated other comprehensive income. The decrease in accumulated other comprehensive income primarily resulted from decreases in unrealized gains on AFS securities.

 

Our capital ratios under the revised capital framework referred to as Basel III remain well capitalized. As of March 31, 2021, the Company’s Tier 1 leverage capital ratio was 11.30%, the common equity Tier 1 ratio was 14.53%, the Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio was 15.11%, and the total risk-based capital ratio was 23.27%. See “Analysis of Financial Condition -- Regulatory Capital Requirements herein for a further discussion of our regulatory capital requirements.

 

 

ANALYSIS OF RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Financial Performance

 

  

For the Three Months Ended March 31,

  

Increase (Decrease)

 
  

2021

  

2020

  

$ or #

  

%

 
  

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

Interest income

 $35,540  $34,028  $1,512   4.4%

Interest expense

  6,055   10,435   (4,380)  (42.0)%

Net interest income

  29,485   23,593   5,892   25.0%

Provision for loan losses

  1,500   1,945   (445)  (22.9)%

Net interest income after provision for credit losses

  27,985   21,648   6,337   29.3%

Noninterest income

  5,894   4,615   1,279   27.7%

Noninterest expense

  15,792   16,263   (471)  (2.9)%

Income before income taxes

  18,087   10,000   8,087   80.9%

Income tax expense

  5,631   3,252   2,379   73.2%

Net income

 $12,456  $6,748  $5,708   84.6%

Share Data

                

Earnings per common share:

                
Basic $0.64  $0.34  $0.30   88.2%
Diluted (1)  0.63   0.33   0.30   90.9%

Weighted average shares outstanding (1):

                

Basic

  19,475,814   19,971,856   (496,042)  (2.5)%

Diluted

  19,812,841   20,266,328   (453,487)  (2.2)%

Dividend payout ratio

  18.75%  35.29%  (16.54)%  (46.9)%

Performance Ratios

                
Return on average assets  1.47%  0.90%  0.57%  63.3%
Return on average shareholders’ equity  11.64%  6.60%  5.04%  76.4%
Noninterest income to average assets, annualized  0.70%  0.61%  0.09%  14.8%
Noninterest expense to average assets, annualized  1.86%  2.16%  (0.30)%  (13.9)%

Efficiency ratio

  44.64%  57.65%  (13.01)%  (22.6)%
Average equity to asset ratio  12.63%  13.56%  (0.93)%  (6.9)%
Return on average tangible common equity (2)  14.05%  8.13%  5.92%  72.8%
Tangible book value per share (2) $18.51  $16.82  $1.69   10.1%

 


  

(1)

Basic earnings per share are calculated by dividing earnings to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding. Diluted earnings per share are calculated by dividing earnings by the weighted average number of shares adjusted for the dilutive effect of outstanding stock options using the treasury stock method.

  

(2)

Tangible book value per share, and return on average tangible common equity are non-GAAP financial measures. See "Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for a reconciliation of these measures to their most comparable GAAP measures.

 

 

Net Interest Income

 

The principal component of our earnings is net interest income, which is the difference between the interest and fees earned on loans and investments (interest-earning assets) and the interest paid on deposits and borrowed funds (interest-bearing liabilities). Net interest margin is net interest income as a percentage of average interest-earning assets for the period. The level of interest rates and the volume and mix of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities impact net interest income and net interest margin. The net interest spread is the yield on average interest earning assets minus the cost of average interest-bearing liabilities. Net interest margin and net interest spread are included on a tax equivalent (“TE”) basis by adjusting interest income utilizing the federal statutory tax rate of 21% for 2020 and 2021. Our net interest income, interest spread, and net interest margin are sensitive to general business and economic conditions. These conditions include short-term and long-term interest rates, inflation, monetary supply, and the strength of the international, national and state economies, in general, and more specifically, the local economies in which we conduct business. Our ability to manage net interest income during changing interest rate environments will have a significant impact on our overall performance. We manage net interest income through affecting changes in the mix of interest-earning assets as well as the mix of interest-bearing liabilities, changes in the level of interest-bearing liabilities in proportion to interest-earning assets, and in the growth and maturity of earning assets. For additional information see the sections on “Capital Resources and Liquidity Management” and Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk included in this Report.

 

The following tables present average balance sheet information, interest income, interest expense and the corresponding average yields earned and rates paid for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020. The average balances are principally daily averages and, for loans, include both performing and nonperforming balances. Interest income on loans includes the effects of discount accretion and net deferred loan origination costs accounted for as yield adjustments.

 

Interest-Earning Assets and Interest-Bearing Liabilities

 

  

For the Three Months Ended March 31,

 
  

2021

  

2020

 

(tax-equivalent basis, dollars in thousands)

 

Average

  

Interest

  

Yield /

  

Average

  

Interest

  

Yield /

 
  

Balance

  

& Fees

  

Rate

  

Balance

  

& Fees

  

Rate

 

Interest-earning assets:

                        

Federal funds sold, cash equivalents and other (1)

 $215,230  $397   0.75% $249,568  $931   1.50%

Securities (2)

                        

Available for sale

  239,768   571   0.97%  138,574   755   2.19%

Held to maturity

  7,000   64   3.71%  8,016   74   3.71%

Mortgage loans held for sale

  54,021   411   3.09%  78,063   981   5.05%

Loans held for investment: (3)

                        

Real estate

  2,307,431   29,521   5.19%  2,007,286   26,428   5.30%

Commercial (4)

  384,442   4,584   4.84%  337,548   4,867   5.80%

Total loans held for investment

  2,691,873   34,105   5.14%  2,344,834   31,295   5.37%

Total earning assets

  3,207,892  $35,548   4.49%  2,819,055  $34,036   4.86%

Noninterest-earning assets

  228,002           212,568         

Total assets

 $3,435,894          $3,031,623         
                         

Interest-bearing liabilities:

                        
NOW $64,592  $44   0.28% $43,838  $42   0.39%
Money market  579,347   623   0.44%  432,005   1,146   1.07%

Saving deposits

  131,151   31   0.10%  114,951   55   0.19%
Time deposits, less than $250,000  663,029   1,496   0.92%  737,755   3,376   1.84%

Time deposits, $250,000 and over

  593,981   1,468   1.00%  620,884   3,710   2.40%

Total interest-bearing deposits

  2,032,100   3,662   0.73%  1,949,433   8,329   1.72%

FHLB advances

  150,000   435   1.18%  51,978   150   1.18%

Long-term debt

  111,739   1,808   6.56%  104,083   1,748   6.75%

Subordinated debentures

  14,302   150   4.25%  14,327   208   5.84%

Total interest-bearing liabilities

  2,308,141   6,055   1.06%  2,119,821   10,435   1.98%

Noninterest-bearing liabilities

                        

Noninterest-bearing deposits

  653,674           485,555         

Other noninterest-bearing liabilities

  40,119           15,056         

Total noninterest-bearing liabilities

  693,793           500,611         

Shareholders' equity

  433,960           411,191         

Total liabilities and shareholders equity

 $3,435,894          $3,031,623         

Net interest income / interest rate spreads

     $29,493   3.43%     $23,601   2.88%

Net interest margin

          3.73%          3.37%

 


 

(1)

Includes income and average balances for FHLB stock, term federal funds, interest-bearing time deposits and other miscellaneous interest-bearing assets.

 

(2)

Interest income and average rates for tax-exempt securities are presented on a tax-equivalent basis.

 

(3)

Average loan balances include nonaccrual loans. Interest income on loans includes amortization of deferred loan fees, net of deferred loan costs.

 

 

Interest Rates and Operating Interest Differential

 

Increases and decreases in interest income and interest expense result from changes in average balances (volume) of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities, as well as changes in average interest rates. The following table shows the effect that these factors had on the interest earned on our interest-earning assets and the interest incurred on our interest-bearing liabilities. The effect of changes in volume is determined by multiplying the change in volume by the previous period’s average rate. Similarly, the effect of rate changes is calculated by multiplying the change in average rate by the previous period’s volume. Changes which are not due solely to volume or rate have been allocated to these categories based on the respective percent changes in average volume and average rate as they compare to each other.

 

  

Comparison of Three Months Ended

 
  

March 31, 2021 and March 31, 2020

 
  

Change due to:

     

(tax-equivalent basis, dollars in thousands)

 

Volume

  

Rate

  

Interest Variance

 

Earning assets:

            

Federal funds sold, cash equivalents & other (1)

 $(115) $(419) $(534)

Securities (2)

            

Available for sale

  1,814   (1,998)  (184)

Held to maturity

  (10)  0   (10)

Mortgage loans held for sale

  (252)  (318)  (570)

Loans held for investment: (3)

            

Real estate

  6,594   (3,501)  3,093 

Commercial

  2,828   (3,111)  (283)

Total loans held for investment

  9,422   (6,612)  2,810 

Total earning assets

 $10,859  $(9,347) $1,512 
             

Interest-bearing liabilities

            
NOW $62  $(60) $2 
Money market  1,805   (2,328)  (523)

Saving deposits

  42   (66)  (24)

Time deposits, less than $250,000

  (317)  (1,563)  (1,880)

Time deposits, $250,000 and over

  (155)  (2,087)  (2,242)

Total interest-bearing deposits

  1,437   (6,104)  (4,667)

FHLB advances

  285   0   285 

Long-term debt

  330   (270)  60 

Subordinated debentures

  0   (58)  (58)

Total interest-bearing liabilities

  2,052   (6,432)  (4,380)

Changes in net interest income

 $8,807  $(2,915) $5,892 

 


 

(1)

Includes income and average balances for FHLB stock, term federal funds, interest-bearing time deposits and other miscellaneous interest-bearing assets.

 

(2)

Interest income and average rates for tax-exempt securities are presented on a tax-equivalent basis.

 

(3)

Average loan balances include nonaccrual loans. Interest income on loans includes amortization of deferred loan fees, net of deferred loan costs.

 

 

Results of OperationsComparison of Results of Operations for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2021 and 2020

 

The following discussion of our results of operations compares the three months ended March 31, 2021 and the three months ended March 31, 2020. The results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2021 are not necessarily indicative of the results of operations that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2021.

 

Net Interest Income/Average Balance Sheet. In the first quarter of 2021, we generated $29.5 million of taxable-equivalent net interest income, which was an increase of $5.9 million, or 25.0%, from the $23.6 million of taxable-equivalent net interest income we earned in the first quarter of 2020. The increase in net interest income was primarily due to a $388.8 million increase in average earning assets, a 92 basis point decrease in the average rate paid on interest-bearing liabilities and a $168.1 million increase in average non-interest earning deposits, partially offset by a 37 basis point decrease in the average yield on interest-earning assets. The increase in average interest-earning assets reflected increases in average investment securities and HFI loan average balances.

 

Our average interest bearing deposit balances increased by $82.7 million, primarily as a result of organic growth. The decrease in interest expense was primarily due to a 92 basis point decrease in the average rate paid on interest-bearing liabilities, and a $168.1 million increase in average non-interest bearing demand deposits. For the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, our net interest margin was 3.73% and 3.37%, respectively.  Our net interest margin benefits from discount accretion on our purchased loan portfolios. Our net interest margin for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, excluding accretion income, would have been 3.67% and 3.27%, respectively.

 

Total tax-equivalent interest income was $35.5 million for the first quarter of 2021 compared to $34.0 million for the first quarter of 2020. The $1.5 million or 4.4%, increase in total interest income was primarily due to a $388.8 million increase in average earning assets, partially offset by a 37 basis point decrease in the yield on average earning assets.

 

Interest and fees on HFI and HFS loans for the first quarter of 2021 was $34.5 million compared to $32.3 million for the first quarter of 2020. The $2.2 million, or 6.9%, increase was primarily due to a $323.0 million, or 13.3%, increase in the average balance of total loans outstanding, partially offset by a 26 basis point decrease in the average yield on loans, reflecting the decline in market interest rates.  The increase in the average loan balance was primarily due to organic loan growth. Purchased loan discount accretion income totaled $481,000 in the first quarter of 2021 compared to $889,000 in the first quarter of 2020. The average yield on loans benefits from discount accretion on our purchased loan portfolio. For the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, the yield on total HFI and HFS loans was 5.10% and 5.36%, respectively, while the yield on total loans excluding accretion income would have been 5.03% and 5.21%, respectively.  Due to payoffs of acquired loans, we expect accretion income to decline through the remainder of 2021.

 

  As of and For the Three Months Ended 
  

March 31,

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

 

Beginning balance of discount on purchased loans

 $2,872  $5,068 

Additions due to acquisitions:

        

Commercial and industrial

     35 

Construction and land development

     10 

Commercial real estate

     145 

Single family residential mortgages

     696 

Total additions

 $  $886 

Accretion:

        

Commercial and industrial

  (5)  (1)

SBA

  3   8 

Construction and land development

  1   1 

Commercial real estate

  159   429 

Single family residential mortgages

  323   452 

Total accretion

 $481  $889 

Ending balance of discount on purchased loans

 $2,391  $5,065 

 

Interest income on our securities portfolio (taxable equivalent) decreased $194,000, or 23.4%, to $635,000 in the first quarter of 2021 compared to $829,000 in the first quarter of 2020. This decrease is primarily attributable to a 123 basis point decrease in the yield on average securities, partially offset by a $100.2 million, or 68.3%, increase in the average balance, in the first quarter of 2021 as compared to the first quarter of 2020. Securities income reported in the average balance sheet has been adjusted to a tax-equivalent basis; interest income reported in the Company’s consolidated statements of income has not been grossed-up.

 

Interest income on interest earning deposits, dividend income on FHLB stock, federal funds sold, cash equivalents and other investments decreased to $397,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to $931,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2020. This decrease was primarily due to a 75 basis point decrease in the average yield between the two periods and a $34.3 million decrease in the average balance of short-term cash investments.

 

Interest expense on interest-bearing liabilities decreased by $4.4 million, or 42.0%, to $6.1 million for the first quarter of 2021 as compared to $10.4 million in the first quarter of 2020 due to decreases in interest rates on both deposits and borrowings, partially offset by increases in most interest-bearing balances and an $168.1 million increase in average non-interest bearing deposits.

 

Interest expense on deposits decreased to $3.7 million for the first quarter of 2021 as compared to $8.3 million for the first quarter of 2020. The $4.7 million, or 56.0%, decrease in interest expense on deposits was primarily due to a 99 basis point decrease in the average rate paid on interest-bearing deposits, plus a $101.6 million decrease in average time deposits, partially offset by $168.3 million increase in average NOW, money market and saving deposits. Deposits increased due to organic deposit growth. The average balance of interest-bearing deposits increased $82.7 million, or 4.2%, from $1.9 billion in the first quarter of 2020 compared to $2.0 billion in the first quarter of 2021.  Average brokered certificates of deposit were $17.4 million in the first quarter of 2021 and $66.4 million in the first quarter of 2020. Average non-interest bearing deposits increased to $653.7 million, or 34.6%, from $485.6 million in the first quarter of 2020. The 99 basis point decrease in the average rate paid on interest-bearing deposits was primarily due to lower market interest rates.

 

 

Interest expense on FHLB advances increased $285,000 from $150,000 in the first quarter of 2020 to $435,000 in the first quarter of 2021. The average balance increased from $52.0 million to $150.0 million between the two quarters. The $150.0 million in FHLB advances at March 31, 2021 were fixed-rate FHLB advances with an average rate of 1.18% maturing in the first quarter of 2025. The purpose of these borrowings was to obtain funding in order to enhance liquidity in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and obtain funding at an attractive interest rate. The Company had no outstanding overnight FHLB advances as of March 31, 2021, which are used for general liquidity needs.  The FHLB advances at March 31, 2020 were overnight advances.

 

Interest expense on long-term debt and subordinated debentures increased slightly by $2,000 to $2.0 million in the first quarter of 2021 from the first quarter of 2020. The increase in interest expense on long-term debt and subordinated debentures was due to the issuance of $120.0 million of subordinated debentures at 4.0%, on March 23, 2021, of which $50.0 million was used to redeem the 2016 issuance of subordinated debentures. The average long-term debt and subordinated debentures increased to $126.0 million in the first quarter of 2021, compared to $118.4 million in the first quarter of 2020.  The average rate on long-term debt and subordinated debentures was 6.30% in the first quarter of 2021 compared to 6.64% in the first quarter of 2020.

 

Provision for Loan Losses. The $445,000 decrease in the provision for loan losses, to $1.5 million in the first quarter of 2021 compared to $1.9 million in the first quarter of 2020, was primarily attributable a decrease in 30-89 day past due loans and a decrease in non-performing loans. There were $42,000 in net loan charge-offs in the first quarter of 2021, as compared to $631,000 in net loan charge-offs in the first quarter of 2020.

 

Noninterest Income. Noninterest income increased $1.3 million, or 27.7%, to $5.9 million for the first quarter of 2021, compared to $4.6 million in the same quarter in the prior year. The following table sets forth the major components of our noninterest income for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020:

 

  

For the Three Months Ended March 31,

  

Increase (decrease)

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

  

$

  

%

 

Noninterest income:

                

Service charges, fees and other

 $1,410  $1,079  $331   30.7%

Gain on sale of loans

  3,841   2,711   1,130   41.7%

Loan servicing fee, net of amortization

  246   592   (346)  (58.4)%

Recoveries on loans acquired in business combinations

  5   42   (37)  (88.1)%

Unrealized loss on equity investments

  (20)     (20)  100.0%

Gain on Derivatives

  225      225   100.0%

Increase in cash surrender of life insurance

  187   191   (4)  (2.1)%

Total noninterest income

 $5,894  $4,615  $1,279   27.7%

 

Service charges, fees and other income. Service charges, fees and other income totaled $1.4 million in the first quarter of 2021, compared to $1.1 million in the first quarter of 2020. The $331,000 increase was in part due to an $11,000 increase in safe deposit box rent fees, a $157,000 increase in wire transfer fees, and a $285,000 increase in analysis charges.

 

Gain on sale of loans. Gains on sale of loans are comprised primarily of gains on sale of SFR mortgage loans and SBA loans. Gains on sale of loans totaled $3.8 million in the first quarter of 2021, compared to $2.7 million in the first quarter of 2020. The increase was primarily caused by an increase of $31.9 million in loan sale volume, primarily due to an increase in FNMA loan sales.

 

 

The following table presents information on loans sold and gains on loans sold for the three ended March 31, 2021 and 2020.

 

  

For the Three Months Ended March 31,

  

Increase (Decrease)

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

  

$

  

%

 

Loans sold:

                

SBA

 $3,540  $1,249  $2,291   183.4%

Single family residential mortgage

  130,088   100,464   29,624   29.5%
  $133,628  $101,713  $31,915   31.4%

Gain on loans sold:

                

SBA

 $355  $89  $266   298.9%

Single family residential mortgage

  3,486   2,622   864   33.0%
  $3,841  $2,711  $1,130   41.7%

 

Loan servicing income, net of amortization. Our loan servicing income, net of amortization, decreased by $346,000 to $246,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to net servicing income of $592,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2020. Loan servicing income, net of amortization decreased due to a lower amount of SFR loans serviced, and loan payoffs.  Lower serviced loan prepayments contributed to the higher SBA loan servicing income in the first quarter of 2021. The following table presents information on loans servicing income for the three ended March 31, 2021 and 2020.

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

For the Three Months Ended March 31,

  

Increase (Decrease)

 

For the period

 

2021

  

2020

  

$

  

%

 

Loan servicing income, net of amortization:

                

Single family residential loans serviced

 $10  $537  $(527)  (98.1)%

SBA loans serviced

  236   55   181   329.1%

Total

 $246  $592  $(346)  (58.4)%

 

We are servicing SFR mortgage loans for other financial institutions and FNMA, and we are servicing SBA and CRE loans as of March 31, 2021. The decline in the respective servicing portfolios reflects prepayment of loans and sales of loans from 2020 through the first quarter of 2021.

 

The following table shows loans serviced for others as of March 31, 2021 and 2020:

 

  

March 31,

  

Increase (Decrease)

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

  

$

  

%

 

As of period-end

                

Single family residential loans serviced

 $1,526,285  $1,673,304  $(147,019)  (8.8)%

SBA loans serviced

  154,064   156,750   (2,686)  (1.7)%
Commercial real estate loans serviced  4,126   4,199   (73)  (1.7)%

Total

 $1,684,475  $1,834,253  $(149,778)  (8.2)%

 

Recoveries on loans acquired in business combinations. Recoveries on loans acquired in business combinations was $5,000 in the quarter ended March 31, 2021, compared to $42,000 in the comparable quarter of 2020.

 

Unrealized gain (loss) on equity securities.  There was $20,000 in unrealized loss on equity securities for the first quarter of 2021 and none in 2020 per the guidance of ASU 2016-01.

 

Gain on Derivatives.  The $225,000 gain on derivatives in the first quarter was due to the amount of loans that were committed to be delivered to FNMA at quarter-end.

 

Cash surrender value of life insurance. The income from the cash surrender value of life insurance decreased $4,000 in the quarter ended March 31, 2021 compared to the same quarter in 2020.

 

 

Noninterest expense. Noninterest expense decreased $471,000, or 2.9%, to $15.8 million in the first quarter of 2021 compared to $16.3 million in the first quarter of 2020. The following table sets forth major components of our noninterest expense for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020:

 

  

For the Three Months Ended March 31,

  

Increase (decrease)

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

  

$

  

%

 

Noninterest expense:

                

Salaries and employee benefits

 $9,242  $9,505  $(263)  (2.8)%

Occupancy and equipment expenses

  2,242   2,404   (162)  (6.7)%

Data processing

  1,440   1,142   298   26.1%

Legal and professional

  805   604   201   33.3%

Office expenses

  255   323   (68)  (21.1)%

Marketing and business promotion

  184   214   (30)  (14.0)%

Insurance and regulatory assessments

  348   177   171   96.6%

Amortization of core deposit intangible

  301   357   (56)  (15.7)%

OREO expenses

  5   14   (9)  (64.3)%

Merger expenses

  42   403   (361)  (89.6)%

Other expenses

  928   1,120   (192)  (17.1)%

Total noninterest expense

 $15,792  $16,263  $(471)  (2.9)%

 

Salaries and employee benefits expense. Salaries and employee benefits expense decreased $263,000, or 2.8%, to $9.2 million for the first quarter of 2021 compared to $9.5 million for the first quarter of 2020 due to fully integrating PGBH in the first and second quarters of 2020.  The number of full-time equivalent employees was 366 at March 31, 2021 compared to 382 at March 31, 2020. None of our employees are represented by a labor union, or governed by any collective bargaining agreements. We consider relations with our employees to be satisfactory.  On a periodic basis, the human resources department will advise senior management of the following human capital management metrics:  (1) open positions, (2) overtime expense, (3) staff turnover, and (4) employee headcount.

 

Occupancy and equipment expense. Occupancy and equipment expense decreased $162,000, or 6.7%, to $2.2 million for the first quarter of 2021 compared to $2.4 million for the first quarter of 2020 due to branch closures that contributed to rent decreases. 

 

Data processing expense. Data processing expense increased $298,000, or 26.1%, to $1.4 million for the first quarter of 2021, compared to $1.1 million for the first quarter of 2020 due to the establishment of reserves for ongoing IT projects. Effective June 2019, the Company renegotiated its data processing master agreement with the vendor, under which the Company is allowed to offset future monthly data processing expenses up to approximately $2.2 million through January 2026. As of March 31, 2021, $1.5 million of this benefit remained for future use.

 

Legal and professional expense. Legal and professional expense increased $201,000 to $805,000 in the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to $604,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2020. This increase was primarily due to normal business activity.

 

Office expenses. Office expenses are comprised of communications, postage, armored car, and office supplies and were $255,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to $323,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2020. This decrease primarily resulted from normal business activity.

 

Marketing and business promotion expenses. Marketing and business promotion expense decreased by $30,000, or 14.0%, to $184,000 in the first quarter of 2021, compared to $214,000 for the first quarter of 2020. The decrease was primarily due to less travel in the first quarter of 2021.

 

 

Insurance and regulatory expenses. Insurance and regulatory assessments increased $171,000, or 96.6%, to $348,000 in the first quarter of 2021. The increase is due to a FDIC small bank assessment credit of $179,000 received in the first quarter of 2020.

 

Amortization of core deposit intangible expense. Amortization of the core deposit intangible was $301,000 in the first quarter of 2021, compared to $357,000 in the same period of 2020.

 

Merger expenses. Merger expense was $42,000 in the first quarter of 2021 compared to $403,000 in the same period of 2020, following the completion of the PGBH acquisition in the first quarter of 2020.

 

Other Expenses. Other expenses decreased $192,000, or 17.1%, to $928,000 for the first quarter of 2021, compared to $1.1 million in the first quarter of 2020.  There was a recovery in the provision for unfunded commitments of $63,000 in the first quarter of 2021 compared to a charge of $153,000 in the first quarter of 2020.

 

Income Tax Expense. During the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company recorded an income tax provision of $5.6 million and $3.3 million, respectively, reflecting an effective tax rate of 31.1% and 32.5% for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The Company recognized tax benefit from stock option exercises of $56,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and $28,000 for the same period in 2020.

 

Net Income. Net income after tax amounted to $12.5 million for the first quarter 2021, a $5.7 million increase, or an 84.6% increase from $6.7 million in the first quarter of 2020. For the first quarter of 2021 as compared to the first quarter of 2020, net interest income before the provision for loan losses increased by $5.9 million, the provision for loan losses decreased by $445,000, non-interest income increased by $1.3 million, non-interest expense decreased by $471,000, and income tax expense increased by $2.4 million.

 

 

ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION

 

Assets

 

Total assets were $3.7 billion as of March 31, 2021 and $3.4 billion as of December 31, 2020. Cash and cash equivalents increased by $225.3 million, investment securities increased by $70.2 million, net HFI loans increased by $7.0 million and the Company recorded $25.5 million in right-of-use assets for operating leases per the adoption of ASU 2016-02, which were partially offset by decrease of $12.3 million in HFS loans.

 

Investment Securities

 

Our investment strategy aims to maximize earnings while maintaining liquidity in securities with minimal credit risk. The types and maturities of securities purchased are primarily based on our current and projected liquidity and interest rate sensitivity positions.

 

The following table sets forth the book value and percentage of each category of securities at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. The book value for debt securities classified as available for sale is reflected at fair market value and the book value for securities classified as held to maturity is reflected at amortized cost.

 

  

March 31, 2021

 

December 31, 2020

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Amount

 

% of Total

 

Amount

  

% of Total

 

Securities, available for sale, at fair value

             

Government agency securities

 $1,108 

0.4%

 $1,294   0.6%

SBA agency securities

  4,155 

1.4%

  4,394   2.0%

Mortgage-backed securities - Government sponsored agencies

  30,492 

10.6%

  17,677   8.1%

Collateralized mortgage obligations

  88,326 

30.6%

  48,874   22.4%

Commercial paper

  119,194 

41.4%

  102,448   47.0%

Corporate debt securities (1)

  36,743 

12.7%

  34,563   15.9%
Municipal securities  1,564 0.5%  1,617   0.7%
Total securities, available for sale, at fair value $281,582 97.6% $210,867   96.7%

Securities, held to maturity, at amortized cost

             

Taxable municipal securities

 $1,907 

0.7%

 $2,407   1.1%

Tax-exempt municipal securities

  4,761 

1.7%

  4,767   2.2%

Total securities, held to maturity, at amortized cost

  6,668 

2.4%

  7,174   3.3%
Total securities $288,250 100.0% $218,041   100.0%

 


 

(1)

Comprised of corporate note securities, commercial paper and financial institution subordinated debentures.

 

 

The tables below set forth investment debt securities AFS and HTM for the periods presented.

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Amortized

  

Unrealized

  

Unrealized

  

Fair

 

March 31, 2021

 

Cost

  

Gains

  

Losses

  

Value

 

Available for sale

                

Government agency securities

 $1,088  $20  $  $1,108 

SBA agency securities

  4,017   138      4,155 

Mortgage-backed securities- Government sponsored agencies

  30,651   166   (325)  30,492 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

  88,552   244   (470)  88,326 

Commercial paper

  119,210      (16)  119,194 

Corporate debt securities

  36,657   512   (426)  36,743 

Municipal securities

  1,619      (55)  1,564 
  $281,794  $1,080  $(1,292) $281,582 

Held to maturity

                

Municipal taxable securities

 $1,907  $116  $  $2,023 

Municipal securities

  4,761   236      4,997 
  $6,668  $352  $  $7,020 

December 31, 2020

                

Available for sale

                

Government agency securities

 $1,257  $37  $  $1,294 

SBA securities

  4,125   269      4,394 

Mortgage-backed securities- Government sponsored agencies

  17,415   270   (8)  17,677 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

  48,476   491   (93)  48,874 

Commercial paper

  102,462      (14)  102,448 

Corporate debt securities

  33,907   662   (6)  34,563 

Municipal securities

  1,621   2   (6)  1,617 
  $209,263  $1,731  $(127) $210,867 

Held to maturity

                

Municipal taxable securities

 $2,407  $139  $  $2,546 

Municipal securities

  4,767   290      5,057 
  $7,174  $429  $  $7,603 

 

The weighted-average book yield on the total investment portfolio at March 31, 2021 was 0.97% with a weighted-average life of 3.5 years. This compares to a weighted-average yield of 1.35% with a weighted-average life of 3.3 years at December 31, 2020. The weighted-average life is the average number of years that each dollar of unpaid principal due remains outstanding. Average life is computed as the weighted-average time to the receipt of all future cash flows, using as the weights the dollar amounts of the principal pay-downs.

 

 

The table below shows the Company’s investment securities’ gross unrealized losses and estimated fair value by investment category and length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position, at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. The unrealized losses on these securities were primarily attributed to changes in interest rates. The issuers of these securities have not, to our knowledge, evidenced any cause for default on these securities. These securities have fluctuated in value since their purchase dates as market rates have fluctuated. However, we have the ability and the intention to hold these securities until their fair values recover to cost or maturity. As such, management does not deem these securities to be other-than-temporarily-impaired A summary of our analysis of these securities and the unrealized losses is described more fully in Note 4 — Investment Securities in the Notes to the 2020 consolidated financial statements included in our 2020 Annual Report. Economic trends may adversely affect the value of the portfolio of investment securities that we hold.

 

  

Less than Twelve Months

  

Twelve Months or More

  

Total

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Unrealized

  

Estimated

  

No. of

  

Unrealized

  

Estimated

  

No. of

  

Unrealized

  

Estimated

  

No. of

 

March 31, 2021

 

Losses

  

Fair Value

  

Issuances

  

Losses

  

Fair Value

  

Issuances

  

Losses

  

Fair Value

  

Issuances

 

Mortgage-backed securities- Government sponsored agencies

 $(325) $25,969   6  $  $     $(325) $25,969   6 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

  (470)  61,326   14            (470)  61,326   14 

Commercial paper

  (16)  104,197   14               (16)  104,197   14 

Corporate debt securities

  (426)  8,329   8            (426)  8,329   8 

Municipal securities

  (55)  1,564   3            (55)  1,564   3 

Total available for sale

 $(1,292) $201,385   45  $  $     $(1,292) $201,385   45 
                                     

December 31, 2020

                                    

Mortgage-backed securities- Government sponsored agencies

 $(8) $12,982   3  $  $     $(8) $12,982   3 

Collateralized mortgage obligations

  (93)  28,521   6            (93)  28,521   6 

Commercial paper

  (14)  16,982   4            (14)  16,982   4 

Corporate debt securities

  (6)  994   2            (6)  994   2 

Municipal securities

  (6)  1,092   2            (6)  1,092   2 

Total available for sale

 $(127) $60,571   17  $  $     $(127) $60,571   17 
                                     

 

The Company did not record any charges for other-than-temporary impairment losses for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020.

 

 

Loans

 

At March 31, 2021, total loans held for investment, net of allowance for loan losses, totaled $2.7 billion. The following table presents the balance and associated percentage of each major category in our loan portfolio at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020:

 

  

As of March 31, 2021

  

As of December 31, 2020

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

$

  

Mix %

  

$

  

Mix %

 

Loans:(1)

                

Commercial and industrial

 $286,016   10.5% $290,139   10.7%

SBA

  111,330   4.1%  97,821   3.6%

Construction and land development

  209,727   7.7%  186,723   6.9%

Commercial real estate (2)

  1,063,104   39.2%  1,003,637   37.1%

Single-family residential mortgages

  1,041,260   38.3%  1,124,357   41.5%

Other loans

  3,768   0.1%  4,089   0.2%

Total loans

  2,715,205   100%  2,706,766   100%

Allowance for loan losses

  (30,795)      (29,337)    

Total loans, net

 $2,684,410      $2,677,429     

 


 

(1)

Net of discounts and deferred fees and costs.

 

(2)

Includes non-farm & non-residential real estate loans, multifamily residential and single-family residential loans for a business purpose.

 

Total HFI loans increased $8.4 million, or 0.31%, to $2.7 billion at March 31, 2021 compared to $2.7 billion at December 31, 2020. The total loan portfolio increased primarily in SBA, commercial real estate, and construction and land development loans, partially offset by decreases in commercial and industrial, single-family residential mortgages and other loans.

 

Commercial and industrial loans. We provide a mix of variable and fixed rate commercial and industrial loans. The loans are typically made to small- and medium-sized manufacturing, wholesale, retail and service businesses for working capital needs, business expansions and for international trade financing. Commercial and industrial loans include lines of credit with a maturity of one year or less, commercial and industrial term loans with maturities of five years or less, shared national credits with maturities of five years or less, mortgage warehouse lines with a maturity of one year or less, purchased receivables with a maturity of two months or less and international trade discounts with a maturity of three months or less. Substantially all of our commercial and industrial loans are collateralized by business assets or by real estate.

 

Commercial and industrial loans decreased $4.1 million, or 1.4%, to $286.0 million as of March 31, 2021 compared to $290.1 million at December 31, 2020 due to normal loan activity.

 

Commercial real estate loans. Commercial real estate loans include owner-occupied and non-occupied commercial real estate, multi-family residential and SFR mortgage loans originated for a business purpose. The interest rate for the majority of these loans are prime-based and have a maturity of five years or less except for the SFR mortgage loans originated for a business purpose which may have a maturity of one year. Our policy maximum loan-to-value (“LTV”) ratio is 75% for commercial real estate loans; however, we temporally lowered the applicable LTV to 70% to be conservative in regards to real estate valuations. The total commercial real estate portfolio increased $59.5 million, or 5.9%, to $1.1 billion at March 31, 2021, compared to $1.0 billion at December 31, 2020. The multi-family residential loan portfolio was $360.1 million as of March 31, 2021 and $346.6 million as of December 31, 2020. The SFR mortgage loan portfolio originated for a business purpose totaled $35.0 million as of March 31, 2021 and $24.0 million as of December 31, 2020.

 

Construction and land development loans. Construction and land development loans increased $23.0 million, or 12.3%, to $209.7 million at March 31, 2021 as compared to $186.7 million at December 31, 2020, as originations exceeded loan repayments. The following table shows the categories of our construction and land development portfolio as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020:

 

  

As of March 31, 2021

  

As of December 31, 2020

  

Increase (Decrease)

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

$

  

Mix %

  

$

  

Mix %

  

$

  

%

 

Residential construction

 $138,500   66.0% $124,255   66.5% $14,245   11.5%

Commercial construction

  54,578   26.0%  45,540   24.4%  9,038   19.8%

Land development

  16,649   8.0%  16,928   9.1%  (279)  (1.6)%

Total construction and land development loans

 $209,727   100.0% $186,723   100.0% $23,004   12.3%

 

SBA guaranteed loans. We are designated a Preferred Lender under the SBA Preferred Lender Program. We offer mostly SBA 7(a) variable-rate loans. We generally sell the 75% guaranteed portion of the SBA loans that we originate. Our SBA loans are typically made to small-sized manufacturing, wholesale, retail, hotel/motel and service businesses for working capital needs or business expansions. SBA loans can have any maturity up to 25 years. Typically, non-real estate secured loans mature in less than 10 years. Collateral may also include inventory, accounts receivable and equipment, and includes personal guarantees. Our unguaranteed SBA loans collateralized by real estate are monitored by collateral type and are included in our CRE Concentration Guidance.

 

SBA loans increased $13.5 million, or 13.8%, to $111.3 million at March 31, 2021 compared to $97.8 million at December 31, 2020. $21.5 million in SBA loans originated during the first quarter of 2021 were through the SBA's PPP loan program which were partially offset by $3.5 million in sales and $4.5 million in payoffs and paydowns.

 

SFR Loans. We originate both qualified and non-qualified, alternative documentation SFR mortgage loans through correspondent relationships or through our branch network or retail channel to accommodate the needs of the Asian-American market. As of March 31, 2021, we had $1.0 billion of SFR real estate loans, representing 38.3% of our HFI loan portfolio, excluding available for sale SFR loans.

 

Our non-qualified SFR loan product is a seven-year hybrid adjustable mortgage which re-prices at seven years to the one-year Constant Maturity Treasury rate plus 2.50%. The start rate for the seven-year hybrid in the Eastern region is 4.00% plus 1% in points. In the Western region we offer a seven-year hybrid and the start rate is 4.00%.

 

 

As of March 31, 2021, the weighted-average loan-to-value of the portfolio was 56.4%, the weighted average FICO score was 756 and the average duration of the portfolio was 2.67 years.  We also offer qualified SFR mortgage loans as a correspondent to a national financial institution.

 

We originate these non-qualified SFR mortgage loans both to sell and hold for investment. The loans held for investment are generally originated through our retail branch network to our customers, many of whom establish a deposit relationship with us. We sell many of these non-qualified SFR mortgage loans to other Asian-American banks, FNMA and other investors.

 

Except for SFR loans sold to FNMA or in connection with a securitization, the loans are sold with no representation or warranties and with a replacement feature for the first 90-days if the loan pays off early. As a condition of the sale, the buyer must have the loans audited for underwriting and compliance standards.  We originate qualified mortgages and sell them directly to FNMA. These loans are underwritten under FNMA guidelines and sold with the normal FNMA conditions. In addition, we may sell some of our non-qualified SFR mortgage loans to FNMA in a bulk sale with limited recourse to us.

 

SFR mortgage real estate loans (which include $4.9 million of home equity loans) decreased $83.1 million, or 7.4%, to $1.0 billion as of March 31, 2021 as compared to $1.1 billion as of December 31, 2020. In addition, loans held for sale decreased $12.3 million, or 24.6% to $37.7 million as of March 31, 2021 compared to $50.0 million December 31, 2020. The decrease in loans held for sale is primarily due to loan sales during the first quarter of 2021.

 

 

Loan Quality

 

We use what we believe is a comprehensive methodology to monitor credit quality and prudently manage credit concentration within our loan portfolio. Our underwriting policies and practices govern the risk profile and credit and geographic concentration for our loan portfolio. We also have what we believe to be a comprehensive methodology to monitor these credit quality standards, including a risk classification system that identifies potential problem loans based on risk characteristics by loan type as well as the early identification of deterioration at the individual loan level. In addition to our allowance for loan losses, our purchase discounts on acquired loans provide additional protections against credit losses.

 

Discounts on Purchased Loans. In connection with our acquisitions, we hire a third-party to determine the fair value of loans acquired. In many instances, fair values were determined by estimating the cash flows expected to result from those loans and discounting them at appropriate market rates. The excess of expected cash flows above the fair value of the majority of loans will be accreted to interest income over the remaining lives of the loans in accordance with FASB ASC 310-20, ReceivablesNonrefundable Fees and Other Costs.

 

Analysis of the Allowance for Loan Losses. The following table allocates the allowance for loan losses, or the allowance, by category:

 

  

As of March 31, 2021

  

As of December 31, 2020

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

$

  

% (1)

  

$

  

% (1)

 

Loans:

                
Commercial and industrial $3,743   1.31% $3,690   1.27%
SBA  1,038   0.93%  927   0.95%
Construction and land development  2,878   1.37%  2,473   1.32%
Commercial real estate (2)  14,975   1.41%  13,718   1.37%
Single family residential mortgages  8,081   0.78%  8,486   0.75%
Other  46   1.22%  43   1.05%

Unallocated

  34   0.00%      
Allowance for loan losses $30,795   1.13% $29,337   1.08%

 


 

(1)

% of allowance to total loans in the respective category

 

(2)

Includes non-farm and non-residential real estate loans, multi-family residential and single-family residential loans originated for a business purpose.

 

The allowance and the balance of accretable credit discounts represent our estimate of probable and reasonably estimable credit losses inherent in loans held for investment as of the respective balance sheet date. The accretable credit discount was $4.3 million at March 31, 2021 and $4.8 million at December 31, 2020.

 

Allowance for loan losses. Our methodology for assessing the appropriateness of the allowance for loan losses includes a general allowance for performing loans, which are grouped based on similar characteristics, and a specific allowance for individual impaired loans or loans considered by management to be in a high-risk category. General allowances are established based on a number of factors, including historical loss rates, an assessment of portfolio trends and conditions, accrual status and economic conditions.

 

 

For commercial and industrial, SBA, commercial real estate, construction and land development and SFR mortgage loans held for investment, a specific allowance may be assigned to individual loans based on an impairment analysis. Loans are considered impaired when it is probable that we will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. The amount of impairment is based on an analysis of the most probable source of repayment, including the present value of the loan’s expected future cash flows, the estimated market value or the fair value of the underlying collateral. Interest income on impaired loans is accrued as earned, unless the loan is placed on nonaccrual status.

 

Credit-discount on loans purchased through bank acquisitions. Purchased loans are recorded at market value in two categories, credit discount, and liquidity discount and premiums. The remaining credit discount at the end of a period is compared to the analysis for loan losses for each acquisition. If the credit discount is greater than the expected loss no additional provision is needed. The following table shows our credit discounts by loan portfolio for purchased loans only as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. We have recorded additional reserves of $1.9 million due to the credit discounts on acquired loans being less than the analysis for loan losses on those acquisitions as of March 31, 2021.

 

  

As of March 31,

  

As of December 31,

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

 

Commercial and industrial

 $48  $53 

SBA

  35   36 

Construction and land development

  4   6 

Commercial real estate

  902   1,029 

Single-family residential mortgages

  3,339   3,653 

Total credit discount on purchased loans

 $4,328  $4,777 

Total remaining balance of purchased loans through acquisition

 $530,919  $583,605 
Credit-discount to remaining balance of purchased loans  0.82%  0.82%

 

Individual loans considered to be uncollectible are charged off against the allowance. Factors used in determining the amount and timing of charge-offs on loans include consideration of the loan type, length of delinquency, sufficiency of collateral value, lien priority and the overall financial condition of the borrower. Collateral value is determined using updated appraisals and/or other market comparable information. Charge-offs are generally taken on loans once the impairment is determined to be other-than-temporary. Recoveries on loans previously charged off are added to the allowance. Net charge-offs (recoveries) to average loans were 0.01% and 0.11% for the three-months, ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

The allowance for loan losses was $30.8 million at March 31, 2021 compared to $29.3 million at December 31, 2020. The $1.5 million increase was due to a $1.5 million loan loss provision primarily attributable to the higher loan balances, a $1.4 million increase in 30-89 day past due loans, and a $357,000 increase in non-performing loans.

 

We analyze the loan portfolio, including delinquencies, concentrations, and risk characteristics, at least quarterly in order to assess the overall level of the allowance and nonaccretable discounts. We also rely on internal and external loan review procedures to further assess individual loans and loan pools, and economic data for overall industry and geographic trends.

 

In determining the allowance and the related provision for loan losses, we consider three principal elements: (i) valuation allowances based upon probable losses identified during the review of impaired commercial and industrial, commercial real estate, construction and land development loans, (ii) allocations, by loan classes, on loan portfolios based on historical loan loss experience and qualitative factors and (iii) review of the credit discounts in relationship to the valuation allowance calculated for purchased loans. Provisions for loan losses are charged to operations to record changes to the total allowance to a level deemed appropriate by us.

 

 

The following table provides an analysis of the allowance for loan losses, provision for loan losses and net charge-offs for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020:

 

  

For the Three Months Ended March 31,

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

 

Balance, beginning of period

 $29,337  $18,816 

Charge-offs:

        

SBA

     (631)

Other

  (42)   

Total charge-offs

  (42)  (631)

Total recoveries

      

Net (charge-offs)/recoveries

  (42)  (631)

Provision for loan losses

  1,500   1,945 

Balance, end of period

 $30,795  $20,130 

Total HFI loans at end of period

  2,715,205  $2,399,982 

Average HFI loans

  2,691,873   2,344,834 

Net charge-offs to average HFI loans

  0.01%  0.11%

Allowance for loan losses to total loans

  1.13%  0.84%

Credit discount on loans purchased through acquisitions

 $4,328  $6,398 

 

Problem Loans. Loans are considered delinquent when principal or interest payments are past due 30 days or more; delinquent loans may remain on accrual status between 30 days and 89 days past due. Loans on which the accrual of interest has been discontinued are designated as nonaccrual loans. Typically, the accrual of interest on loans is discontinued when principal or interest payments are past due 90 days or when, in the opinion of management, there is a reasonable doubt as to collectability in the normal course of business. When loans are placed on nonaccrual status, all interest previously accrued but not collected is reversed against current period interest income. Income on nonaccrual loans is subsequently recognized only to the extent that cash is received and the loan’s principal balance is deemed collectible. Loans are restored to accrual status when loans become well-secured and management believes full collectability of principal and interest is probable.

 

A loan is considered impaired when it is probable that we will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. Impaired loans include loans on nonaccrual status and performing restructured loans. Income from loans on nonaccrual status is recognized to the extent cash is received and when the loan’s principal balance is deemed collectible. Depending on a particular loan’s circumstances, we measure impairment of a loan based upon either the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, the loan’s observable market price, or the fair value of the collateral less estimated costs to sell if the loan is collateral dependent. A loan is considered collateral dependent when repayment of the loan is based solely on the liquidation of the collateral. Fair value, where possible, is determined by independent appraisals, typically on an annual basis. Between appraisal periods, the fair value may be adjusted based on specific events, such as if deterioration of quality of the collateral comes to our attention as part of our problem loan monitoring process, or if discussions with the borrower lead us to believe the last appraised value no longer reflects the actual market for the collateral. The impairment amount on a collateral-dependent loan is charged-off to the allowance if deemed not collectible and the impairment amount on a loan that is not collateral-dependent is set up as a specific reserve.

 

In cases where a borrower experiences financial difficulties and we make certain concessionary modifications to contractual terms, the loan is classified as a TDR. These concessions may include a reduction of the interest rate, principal or accrued interest, extension of the maturity date or other actions intended to minimize potential losses. Loans restructured at a rate equal to or greater than that of a new loan with comparable risk at the time the loan is modified may be excluded from restructured loan disclosures in years subsequent to the restructuring if the loans are in compliance with their modified terms. A restructured loan is considered impaired despite its accrual status and a specific reserve is calculated based on the present value of expected cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate or the fair value of the collateral less estimated costs to sell if the loan is collateral dependent.

 

 

Pursuant to recent regulatory guidance, we have elected under the CARES Act to not apply GAAP requirements to loan modifications related to the COVID-19 pandemic that would otherwise be categorized as a TDR, and have suspended the determination of loan modifications related to the pandemic from being treated as TDRs. Modifications include the following: (1) forbearance agreements, (2) interest-rate modifications, (3) repayment plans, and (4) any other similar arrangements that defer or delay payments of principal or interest. The relief from TDR guidance applies to modifications of loans that were not more than 30 days past due as of December 31, 2019, and that occur beginning on March 1, 2020, until the earlier of the following dates: (1) 60 days after the date on which the national emergency related to the COVlD-19 pandemic outbreak is terminated, or (2) January 1, 2022.  The suspension of TDR accounting and reporting guidance may not be applied to any loan of a borrower that is not related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Real estate we acquire as a result of foreclosure or by deed-in-lieu of foreclosure is classified as OREO until sold, and is carried at estimated fair value less estimated costs to sell.

 

The following table sets forth the allocation of our nonperforming assets among our different asset categories as of the dates indicated. Nonperforming loans include nonaccrual loans, loans past due 90 days or more and still accruing interest (of which there were none during the periods presented), and loans modified under TDRs. Nonperforming loans exclude PCI loans. The balances of nonperforming loans reflect the net investment in these assets.

 

  

As of March 31,

  

As of December 31,

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

 

Accruing troubled debt restructured loans:

        

Commercial and industrial

 $486  $502 

SBA

  30   34 

Commercial real estate

  1,417   1,434 

Total accruing troubled debt restructured loans

  1,933   1,970 

Non-accrual loans:

        

Commercial and industrial

  90   580 

Commercial and industrial - TDR

  1,069   1,081 

SBA

  6,807   6,828 

Construction and land development

  173   173 

Commercial real estate

  1,190   1,193 

Single-family residential mortgages

  8,649   7,714 

Other

     15 

Total non-accrual loans

  17,978   17,584 

Total non-performing loans

  19,911   19,554 

OREO

  293   293 

Nonperforming assets

 $20,204  $19,847 

Nonperforming loans to total loans

  0.73%  0.72%
Nonperforming assets to total assets  0.55%  0.59%

 

The $357,000 increase in nonperforming loans at March 31, 2021 was primarily due to the additions to non-accrual loans of four SFR mortgage loans totaling $2.9 million, partially offset by three SFR loans removed from non-accrual status in the amount of $1.8 million, payoffs of $537,000, and paydowns of $221,000 during the first quarter of 2021.

 

Our 30-89 day delinquent loans, excluding nonaccrual loans, increased to $10.7 million as of March 31, 2021 from $8.9 million as of December 31, 2020, excluding impaired loans. The increase in past due loans (which consist primarily of SFR mortgages) was due to the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

 

We did not recognize any interest income on nonaccrual loans during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, while the loans were in nonaccrual status. We recognized interest income on loans modified under TDRs of $40,000 and $37,000 during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

We utilize an asset risk classification system in compliance with guidelines established by the FDIC as part of our efforts to improve asset quality. In connection with examinations of insured institutions, examiners have the authority to identify problem assets and, if appropriate, classify them. There are three classifications for problem assets: “substandard,” “doubtful,” and “loss.” Substandard assets have one or more defined weaknesses and are characterized by the distinct possibility that the insured institution will sustain some loss if the deficiencies are not corrected. Doubtful assets have the weaknesses of substandard assets with the additional characteristic that the weaknesses make collection or liquidation in full questionable and there is a high probability of loss based on currently existing facts, conditions and values. An asset classified as loss is not considered collectable and is of such little value that continuance as an asset is not warranted.

 

We use a risk grading system to categorize and determine the credit risk of our loans. Potential problem loans include loans with a risk grade of 6, which are “special mention,” loans with a risk grade of 7, which are “substandard” loans that are generally not considered to be impaired and loans with a risk grade of 8, which are “doubtful” loans generally considered to be impaired. These loans generally require more frequent loan officer contact and receipt of financial data to closely monitor borrower performance. Potential problem loans are managed and monitored regularly through a number of processes, procedures and committees, including oversight by a loan administration committee comprised of executive officers and other members of the Bank’s senior management.

 

COVID-19 Impact on Loan Quality

 

We increased SBA lending during the first quarter of 2021 as many of the Bank’s customers sought to participate in the SBA’s PPP Program. As of March 31, 2021, the Company has processed approximately 285 PPP loans with the SBA in the total amount of approximately $42.9 million or 1.56% of the Company’s total HFI loan portfolio. In addition to actively participating in the PPP loan program, we are making available to our SBA customers the SBA six-month payment guarantee program.

 

As of March 31, 2021, borrowers representing approximately 14 SFR mortgage loans totaling $7.6 million, or 0.3% of the Company’s total HFI loan portfolio, and 7 commercial borrowers representing $10.1 million, or 0.4% of the Company’s HFI loan portfolio, have requested some form of payment deferral. The majority of our non-single-family residential loan portfolio customer requests is to defer payment for three months. 

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents. Cash and cash equivalents increased $225.3 million, or 115.7%, to $419.9 million as of March 31, 2021 as compared to $194.7 million at December 31, 2020. This increase was primarily due to $109.2 million in cash from operating activities, $250.1 million in cash from financing activities, partially offset by $134.0 million used in investing activities.

 

The Federal Reserve announced the reduction of the reserve requirement ratio to zero percent across all deposit tiers, effective March 26, 2020. Depository institutions that were required to maintain deposits in a Federal Reserve Bank account to satisfy reserve requirements will no longer be required to do so and can use the additional liquidity to lend to individuals and businesses. It is our understanding that the Federal Reserve currently has no current plans to reinstate the reserve requirement. However, the Federal Reserve may adjust reserve requirement ratios in the future if conditions warrant.

 

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets. Goodwill was $69.2 million at both March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. Goodwill represents the excess of the consideration paid over the fair value of the net assets acquired. Other intangible assets, which consist of CDI, were $4.9 million and $5.2 million at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. The CDI assets are amortized primarily on an accelerated basis over their estimated useful lives, generally over a period of eight to ten years.

 

Liabilities. Total liabilities increased by $307.0 million to $3.2 billion at March 31, 2021 from $2.9 billion at December 31, 2020, primarily due to $186.2 million in deposit growth and long-term debt issuance (net of redemptions) of $68.1 million  in March 2021.

 

 

Deposits. As a Chinese-American business bank that focuses on successful businesses and their owners, many of our depositors choose to make large deposits with us. The Bank measures core deposits by reviewing all relationships over $250,000 on a quarterly basis. We track all deposit relationships over $250,000 on a quarterly basis and consider a relationship to be core if there are any three or more of the following: (i) relationships with us (as a director or shareholder); (ii) deposits within our market area; (iii) additional non-deposit services with us; (iv) electronic banking services with us; (v) active demand deposit account with us; (vi) deposits at market interest rates; and (vii) longevity of the relationship with us. We consider all deposit relationships under $250,000 as a core relationship except for time deposits originated through an internet service. This differs from the traditional definition of core deposits which is demand and savings deposits plus time deposits less than $250,000. As many of our customers have more than $250,000 on deposit with us, we believe that using this method reflects a more accurate assessment of our deposit base. As of March 31, 2021, the Bank considers $2.3 billion or 83% of our deposits as core relationships.

 

As of March 31, 2021, our top ten deposit relationships totaled $480.4 million, of which four are related to directors and shareholders of the Company for a total of $69.9 million, or 14.6% of our top ten deposit relationships. As of March 31, 2021, our directors and shareholders with deposits over $250,000 totaled $78.6 million or 4.3% of all relationships over $250,000.

 

The following table summarizes our average deposit balances and weighted average rates for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and year ended December 31, 2020:

 

  

For the Three Months Ended

  

For the Year Ended

 
  

March 31, 2021

  

December 31, 2020

 
      

Weighted

      

Weighted

 
  

Average

  

Average

  

Average

  

Average

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Balance

  

Rate (%)

  

Balance

  

Rate (%)

 

Noninterest-bearing demand

 $653,674     $564,111    

Interest-bearing:

                
NOW  64,592   0.28%  55,794   0.36%
Savings  131,151   0.10%  123,568   0.12%
Money market  579,347   0.44%  449,111   0.71%
Time, less than $250,000  663,029   0.92%  715,181   1.60%
Time, $250,000 and over  593,981   1.00%  597,262   1.71%
Total interest-bearing  2,032,100   0.73%  1,940,916   1.30%
Total deposits $2,685,774   0.55% $2,505,027   1.01%

 

The following table sets forth the maturity of time deposits of $250,000 or more and wholesale deposits as of March 31, 2021:

 

  

Maturity Within:

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

Three Months

  

After Three to Six Months

  

Six to 12 Months

  

After 12 Months

  

Total

 

Time, $250,000 and over

 $147,956  $218,448  $227,371  $12,902  $606,677 

Wholesale deposits (1)

  9,557   12,743   24,845   10,470   57,615 

Time, brokered

     14,986   2,395      17,381 

Total

 $157,513  $246,177  $254,611  $23,372  $681,673 

 


 

(1)

Wholesale deposits are defined as time deposits originated through via internet rate line and/or through other deposit originators.

 

We acquire wholesale time deposits from the internet and outside deposits originators as needed to supplement liquidity. These time deposits are primarily under $250,000 and we do not consider them core deposits. The total amount of such deposits was $57.6 million as of March 31, 2021 and $93.7 million as of December 31, 2020. The Bank had $17.4 million in brokered deposits at March 31, 2021 and $17.4 million as of December 31, 2020. The brokered deposits were acquired to support our loan growth.

 

Total deposits increased $186.2 million to $2.8 billion at March 31, 2021 as compared to $2.6 billion at December 31, 2020. As of March 31, 2021, total deposits were comprised of 27.9% noninterest-bearing demand accounts, 28.1% of interest-bearing non-maturity accounts and 44.0% of time deposits.

 

As of March 31, 2021, $174,000 in deposit overdrafts were reclassified as other loans. As of December 31, 2020, the amount was $131,000.

 

 

FHLB Borrowings. In addition to deposits, we have used long- and short-term borrowings, such as federal funds purchased and FHLB long-and short-term advances, as a source of funds to meet the daily liquidity needs of our customers and fund growth in earning assets. We had no FHLB short-term advances at March 31, 2021, and none at December 31, 2020. We had $150.0 million in FHLB long-term advances at March 31, 2021 and at December 31, 2020. The term is five years, maturing by March 2025. The average fixed interest rate is 1.18%. The Company secured this funding in case it experienced a liquidity issue caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and to obtain an attractive interest rate. The following table sets forth information on our total FHLB advances during the periods presented:

 

  

As of and for the Three Months Ended

 
  

March 31,

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

 

Outstanding at period-end

 $150,000  $150,000 

Average amount outstanding

  150,000   51,978 

Maximum amount outstanding at any month-end

  150,000   150,000 

Weighted average interest rate:

        

During period

  1.18%  1.18%

End of period

  1.18%  1.18%

 

Long-term Debt.  In March 2016, the Company issued $50 million of 6.5% fixed to floating rate subordinated debentures, due March 31, 2026. The interest rate is fixed through March 31, 2021 and floats at three month LIBOR plus 516 basis points thereafter. The Company redeemed these subordinated debentures on March 31, 2021.  The redemption price for the subordinated debentures was equal to 100% of principal amount of the Notes redeemed, plus any accrued and unpaid interest to, but excluding, the redemption date of March 31, 2021.  

 

In November 2018, the Company issued $55.0 million, 6.18% fixed-to-floating rate subordinated notes due December 1, 2028. The Company used the net proceeds from the offering for general corporate purposes, including providing capital to the Bank and maintaining adequate liquidity at the Company. The subordinated notes bear interest at the initial rate of 6.18% per annum from December 1, 2018 until but excluding December 1, 2023, payable on June 1 and December 1 of each year. Thereafter, the Company will pay interest on the principal amount of this note at a variable rate equal to three month LIBOR plus 315 basis points each March 1, June 1, September 1 and December 1.

 

In March 2021, the Company issued $120 million of 4.00% fixed to floating rate subordinated debentures, due April 1, 2031. The interest rate is fixed through July 1, 2026 and floats at 3 month SOFR plus 329 basis points thereafter. The Company can redeem these subordinated debentures beginning April 1, 2026. The subordinated debentures are considered Tier 2 capital at the Company.

 

Subordinated Debentures. Subordinated debentures consist of subordinated notes. As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the amount outstanding was $14.3 million and $14.3 million, respectively. Under the terms of our subordinated notes and the related subordinated notes purchase agreements, we are not permitted to declare or pay any dividends on our capital stock if an event of default occurs under the terms of the long term debt. These subordinated notes consist of the following:

 

The Company maintains the Trust, which has issued a total of $5.2 million securities ($5.0 million in capital securities and $155,000 in common securities). These trust preferred securities were originally issued by the Trust, which was a subsidiary of TFC, which was acquired by the Company in February 2016. The Company determined the fair value as of the valuation date of the Trust issuance was $3.3 million, indicating a discount of $1.9 million. The underlying debentures bear interest equal to three month LIBOR plus 1.65%, payable each March 15, June 15, September 15 and December 15. The maturity date is March 15, 2037. The subordinated debentures have a variable rate of interest equal to the three month LIBOR plus 1.65%, which was 1.83% as of March 31, 2021 and 1.87% at December 31, 2020.

 

The Company maintains FAIC Trust, which has issued a total of $7.2 million securities ($7.0 million in capital securities and $217,000 in common securities). These trust preferred securities were originally issued by FAIC Trust, which was a subsidiary of FAIC, which the Company acquired in October 2018. The Company determined the fair value as of the valuation date of the FAIC Trust issuance was $6.0 million, with a discount of $1.2 million. The underlying debentures bear interest equal to three month LIBOR plus 2.25%, payable each March 15, June 15, September 15 and December 15. The maturity is December 15, 2034. The rate at March 31, 2021 was 2.43% and 2.47% at December 31, 2020.

 

In January 2020, the Company, through the acquisition of PGBH, acquired PGBH Trust, a Delaware statutory trust formed in December 2004. PGBH Trust issued 5,000 units of fixed-to-floating rate capital securities with an aggregate liquidation amount of $5.0 million and 155 common securities with an aggregate liquidation amount of $155,000. There was a $763,000 discount recorded to arrive at market value which is treated as a yield adjustment and is amortized over the life of the security. The Company has the option to defer interest payments on the subordinated debentures from time to time for a period not to exceed five consecutive years. The subordinated debentures have a variable rate of interest equal to the three-month LIBOR plus 2.10% through final maturity on December 15, 2034. The rate at December 31, 2021 was 2.28% and 2.32% at December 31, 2020.

 

In July 2017, British banking regulators announced plans to eliminate the LIBOR rate by the end of 2021, before these subordinated notes and debentures mature. For these subordinated debentures, there are provisions for amendments to establish a new interest rate benchmark.

 

 

Capital Resources and Liquidity Management

 

Capital Resources. Shareholders’ equity is influenced primarily by earnings, dividends, sales and redemptions of common stock and changes in accumulated other comprehensive income caused primarily by fluctuations in unrealized holding gains or losses, net of taxes, on available for sale investment securities.

 

Shareholders’ equity increased $7.2 million, or 1.7%, to $435.7 million during the three-month period ending March 31, 2021 due to $12.5 million of net income, $340,000 from the exercise of stock options and $287,000 from stock-based compensation, which was partially offset by $1.3 million decrease in net accumulated other comprehensive income, $2.3 million of common dividends declared and $2.3 million of common stock repurchases. The decrease in accumulated other comprehensive income primarily resulted from decreases in unrealized gains on AFS securities.

 

Liquidity Management. Liquidity refers to the measure of our ability to meet the cash flow requirements of depositors and borrowers, while at the same time meeting our operating, capital and strategic cash flow needs, all at a reasonable cost. We continuously monitor our liquidity position to ensure that assets and liabilities are managed in a manner that will meet all short-term and long-term cash requirements. We manage our liquidity position to meet the daily cash flow needs of customers, while maintaining an appropriate balance between assets and liabilities to meet the return on investment objectives of our shareholders.

 

Our liquidity position is supported by management of liquid assets and liabilities and access to alternative sources of funds. Liquid assets include cash, interest-bearing deposits in banks, federal funds sold, available for sale securities, term federal funds, purchased receivables and maturing or prepaying balances in our securities and loan portfolios. Liquid liabilities include core deposits, federal funds purchased, securities sold under repurchase agreements and other borrowings. Other sources of liquidity include the sale of loans, the ability to acquire additional national market non-core deposits, the issuance of additional collateralized borrowings such as FHLB advances, the issuance of debt securities, additional borrowings through the Federal Reserve’s discount window and the issuance of preferred or common securities. Our short-term and long-term liquidity requirements are primarily to fund on-going operations, including payment of interest on deposits and debt, extensions of credit to borrowers, capital expenditures and shareholder dividends. These liquidity requirements are met primarily through cash flow from operations, redeployment of prepaying and maturing balances in our loan and investment portfolios, debt financing and increases in customer deposits. For additional information regarding our operating, investing and financing cash flows, see the consolidated statements of cash flows provided in our consolidated financial statements.

 

Integral to our liquidity management is the administration of short-term borrowings. To the extent we are unable to obtain sufficient liquidity through core deposits, we seek to meet our liquidity needs through wholesale funding or other borrowings on either a short- or long-term basis.

 

As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, we had $92.0 million and $92.0 million, respectively, of unsecured federal funds lines with no amounts advanced against the lines as of such dates. In addition, lines of credit from the Federal Reserve Discount Window were $36.1 million at March 31, 2021 and $9.8 million at December 31, 2020, respectively. Federal Reserve Discount Window lines were collateralized by a pool of loans totaling $47.3 million and $20.1 million as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. We did not have any borrowings outstanding with the Federal Reserve at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, and our borrowing capacity is limited only by eligible collateral.

 

At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, we had $150.0 million in FHLB long-term advances outstanding. At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, we had no FHLB short-term (overnight) advances outstanding. Based on the values of loans pledged as collateral, we had $957.7 million of borrowing capacity with the FHLB as of March 31, 2021 and $915.2 million at December 31, 2020. We also maintain relationships in the capital markets with brokers and dealers to issue certificates of deposit.

 

RBB is a corporation separate and apart from the Bank and, therefore, must provide for its own liquidity. RBB’s main source of funding is dividends declared and paid to RBB by the Bank and RAM. There are statutory, regulatory and debt covenant limitations that affect the ability of the Bank to pay dividends to RBB. Management believes that these limitations will not impact our ability to meet the Company’s ongoing short-term cash obligations.

 

 

Regulatory Capital Requirements

 

We are subject to various regulatory capital requirements administered by the federal and state banking regulators. Failure to meet regulatory capital requirements may result in certain mandatory and possible additional discretionary actions by regulators that, if undertaken, could have a direct material effect on our financial statements. Under capital adequacy guidelines and the regulatory framework for “prompt corrective action” (described below), we must meet specific capital guidelines that involve quantitative measures of our assets, liabilities and certain off-balance sheet items as calculated under regulatory accounting policies.

 

In the wake of the global financial crisis of 2008-2009, the role of capital has become fundamentally more important, as banking regulators have concluded that the amount and quality of capital held by banking organizations was insufficient to absorb losses during periods of severely distressed economic conditions. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, or the Dodd-Frank Act, and banking regulations promulgated by the U.S. federal banking regulators to implement Basel III have established strengthened capital standards for banks and bank holding companies and require more capital to be held in the form of common stock. These provisions, which generally became applicable to RBB and the Bank on January 1, 2015, impose meaningfully more stringent regulatory capital requirements than those applicable to RBB and the Bank prior to that date. In addition, the Basel III regulations implemented a concept known as the “capital conservation buffer.” In general, banks and bank holding companies are required to hold a buffer of common equity Tier 1 capital equal to 2.5% of risk-weighted assets over each minimum capital ratio to avoid being subject to limits on capital distributions (e.g., dividends, stock buybacks, etc.) and certain discretionary bonus payments to executive officers. For community banks, the capital conservation buffer requirement commenced on January 1, 2016, with a gradual phase-in. Full compliance with the capital conservation buffer was required by January 1, 2019.

 

The table below summarizes the minimum capital requirements applicable to RBB and the Bank pursuant to Basel III regulations as of the dates reflected and assuming the capital conservation buffer has been fully-phased in. The minimum capital requirements are only regulatory minimums and banking regulators can impose higher requirements on individual institutions. For example, banks and bank holding companies experiencing internal growth or making acquisitions generally will be expected to maintain strong capital positions substantially above the minimum supervisory levels. Higher capital levels may also be required if warranted by the particular circumstances or risk profiles of individual banking organizations. The table below also summarizes the capital requirements applicable to RBB and the Bank in order to be considered “well-capitalized” from a regulatory perspective, as well as RBB’s and the Bank’s capital ratios as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. RBB and the Bank exceeded all regulatory capital requirements under Basel III and the Bank was considered to be “well-capitalized” as of the dates reflected in the table below:

 

  

Ratio at March 31, 2021

  

Ratio at December 31, 2020

  

Regulatory Capital Ratio Requirements

  

Regulatory Capital Ratio Requirements, including fully phased-in Capital Conservation Buffer

  

Minimum Requirement for "Well Capitalized" Depository Institution

 

Tier 1 Leverage Ratio

                    
Consolidated  11.30%  11.32%  4.00%  4.00%  5.00%

Bank

  13.44%  14.11%  4.00%  4.00%  5.00%

Common Equity Tier 1 Risk-Based Capital Ratio (1)

                    
Consolidated  14.53%  14.62%  4.50%  7.00%  6.50%

Bank

  17.96%  18.94%  4.50%  7.00%  6.50%

Tier 1 Risk-Based Capital Ratio

                    
Consolidated  15.11%  15.21%  6.00%  8.50%  8.00%

Bank

  17.96%  18.94%  6.00%  8.50%  8.00%

Total Risk-Based Capital Ratio

                    
Consolidated  23.27%  20.77%  8.00%  10.50%  10.00%

Bank

  19.21%  20.19%  8.00%  10.50%  10.00%

 

The Basel III regulations also revised the definition of capital and describe the capital components and eligibility criteria for common equity Tier 1 capital, additional Tier 1 capital and Tier 2 capital. The most significant changes to the capital criteria were that: (i) the prior concept of unrestricted Tier 1 capital and restricted Tier 1 capital has been replaced with additional Tier 1 capital and a regulatory capital ratio that is based on common equity Tier 1 capital; and (ii) trust preferred securities and cumulative perpetual preferred stock issued after May 19, 2010 no longer qualify as Tier 1 capital. This change is already effective due to the Dodd-Frank Act, although such instruments issued prior to May 19, 2010 continue to qualify as Tier 1 capital (assuming they qualified as such under the prior regulatory capital standards and that the asset size of the issuer does not exceed $15 billion), subject to the 25% of Tier 1 capital limit.

 

 

Contractual Obligations

 

The following table contains supplemental information regarding our total contractual obligations at March 31, 2021:

 

  

Payments Due

 
  

Within

  

One to

  

Three to

  

After Five

     

(dollars in thousands)

 

One Year

  

Three Years

  

Five Years

  

Years

  

Total

 

Deposits without a stated maturity

 $1,578,925  $  $  $  $1,578,925 

Time deposits

  1,177,404   60,515   4,447   2   1,242,368 

FHLB advances

        150,000      150,000 

Long-term debt

           14,338   14,338 

Subordinated debentures

           172,581   172,581 

Leases

  4,673   8,052   5,084   8,831   26,640 

Total contractual obligations

 $2,761,002  $68,567  $159,531  $195,752  $3,184,852 

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We have limited off-balance sheet arrangements that have, or are reasonably likely to have, a current or future material effect on our financial condition, revenues, expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources.

 

In the ordinary course of business, the Company enters into financial commitments to meet the financing needs of its customers. These financial commitments include commitments to extend credit, unused lines of credit, commercial and similar letters of credit and standby letters of credit. Those instruments involve to varying degrees, elements of credit and interest rate risk not recognized in the Company’s financial statements.

 

The Company’s exposure to loan loss in the event of nonperformance on these financial commitments is represented by the contractual amount of those instruments. The Company uses the same credit policies in making commitments as it does for loans reflected in its financial statements.

 

Commitments to extend credit are agreements to lend to a customer as long as there is no violation of any condition established in the contract. Since many of the commitments are expected to expire without being drawn upon, the total amounts do not necessarily represent future cash requirements. The Company evaluates each client’s credit worthiness on a case-by-case basis. The amount of collateral obtained if deemed necessary by the Company is based on management’s credit evaluation of the customer.

 

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

 

Some of the financial measures included herein are not measures of financial performance recognized by GAAP. These non-GAAP financial measures include “tangible common equity to tangible assets,” “tangible book value per share,” “return on average tangible common equity,” “adjusted earnings,” “adjusted diluted earnings per share,” “adjusted return on average assets,” and “adjusted return on average tangible common equity”. Our management uses these non-GAAP financial measures in its analysis of our performance.

 

Tangible Common Equity to Tangible Assets Ratio and Tangible Book Value Per Share. The tangible common equity to tangible assets ratio and tangible book value per share are non-GAAP measures generally used by financial analysts and investment bankers to evaluate capital adequacy. We calculate: (i) tangible common equity as total shareholders’ equity less goodwill and other intangible assets (excluding mortgage servicing rights); (ii) tangible assets as total assets less goodwill and other intangible assets; and (iii) tangible book value per share as tangible common equity divided by shares of common stock outstanding.

 

 

Our management, banking regulators, many financial analysts and other investors use these measures in conjunction with more traditional bank capital ratios to compare the capital adequacy of banking organizations with significant amounts of goodwill or other intangible assets, which typically stem from the use of the purchase accounting method of accounting for mergers and acquisitions. Tangible common equity, tangible assets, tangible book value per share and related measures should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for total shareholders’ equity, total assets, book value per share or any other measure calculated in accordance with GAAP. Moreover, the manner in which we calculate tangible common equity, tangible assets, tangible book value per share and any other related measures may differ from that of other companies reporting measures with similar names. The following table reconciles shareholders’ equity (on a GAAP basis) to tangible common equity and total assets (on a GAAP basis) to tangible assets, and calculates our tangible book value per share:

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

March 31, 2021

  

December 31, 2020

 

Tangible common equity:

        

Total shareholders' equity

 $435,668  $428,488 

Adjustments

        

Goodwill

  (69,243)  (69,243)

Core deposit intangible

  (4,895)  (5,196)

Tangible common equity

 $361,530  $354,049 

Tangible assets:

        

Total assets-GAAP

 $3,664,299  $3,350,072 

Adjustments

        

Goodwill

  (69,243)  (69,243)

Core deposit intangible

  (4,895)  (5,196)

Tangible assets:

 $3,590,161  $3,275,633 

Common shares outstanding

  19,528,249   19,565,921 
Tangible common equity to tangible assets ratio  10.07%  10.81%
Tangible book value per share $18.51  $18.10 

 

Return on Average Tangible Common Equity. Management measures return on average tangible common equity (“ROATCE”) to assess the Company’s capital strength and business performance. Tangible equity excludes goodwill and other intangible assets (excluding mortgage servicing rights), and is reviewed by banking and financial institution regulators when assessing a financial institution’s capital adequacy. This non-GAAP financial measure should not be considered a substitute for operating results determined in accordance with GAAP and may not be comparable to other similarly titled measures used by other companies. The following table reconciles return on average tangible common equity to its most comparable GAAP measure:

 

  

For the Three Months Ended March 31,

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

2021

  

2020

 

Net income available to common shareholders

 $12,456  $6,748 

Average shareholders equity

 $433,960  $411,191 

Adjustments:

        

Goodwill

  (69,243)  (71,547)

Core deposit intangible

  (5,092)  (5,973)

Adjusted average tangible common equity

 $359,625  $333,671 
Return on average tangible common equity  14.05%  8.13%

 

 

Regulatory Reporting to Financial Statements

 

Core Deposits and Non-core Funding Dependency. The Bank measures core deposits by reviewing all relationships over $250,000 on a quarterly basis. We track all deposit relationships over $250,000 on a quarterly basis and consider a relationship to be core if there are any three or more of the following: (i) relationships with us (as a director or shareholder); (ii) deposits within our market area; (iii) additional non-deposit services with us; (iv) electronic banking services with us; (v) active demand deposit account with us; (vi) deposits at market interest rates; and (vii) longevity of the relationship with us. We consider all deposit relationships under $250,000 as a core relationship except for time deposits originated through an internet service. This differs from the traditional definition of core deposits which is demand and savings deposits plus time deposits less than $250,000. As many of our customers have more than $250,000 on deposit with us, we believe that using this method reflects a more accurate assessment of our deposit base. The following table reconciles the adjusted core deposit to total deposits and the adjusted net non-core dependency ratio.

 

  

As of

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

March 31, 2021

  

December 31, 2020

 
         

Adjusted core deposit to total deposit ratio:

        
Core deposits: demand and savings deposits of any amount plus time deposits less than $250,000 $2,228,115  $2,037,164 

Adjustments:

        

CDs > $250,000 considered core deposits (1)

  410,171   448,159 

Less brokered deposits considered non-core

  (17,381)  (17,374)
Less internet and outside deposit originated time deposits < $250,000 considered non-core  (57,615)  (76,356)

Less other deposits not considered core (2)

  (220,622)  (80,016)

Total adjustments

  114,553   274,413 

Adjusted core deposits

  2,342,668   2,311,577 

Total deposits

 $2,821,293  $2,635,128 
Adjusted core deposits to total deposits ratio  83.04%  87.72%

Non-core deposits: Time deposits greater than $250,000

 $593,178   597,963 

Less total adjustments

  (114,553)  (274,413)

Total adjusted non-core deposits

  478,625   323,550 

Short term borrowing outstanding

      

Adjusted non-core liabilities (A)

  478,625   323,550 

Short term assets(3)

  553,172   311,598 

Adjustment to short term assets:

        

Purchased receivables with maturities less than 90-days

      

Adjusted short term assets (B)

  553,172   311,598 

Net non-core funding (A-B)

 $(74,547)  11,952 

Total earning assets

  3,444,479   3,141,819 
Adjusted net non-core funding dependency ratio  -2.16%  0.38%

 


 

(1)

Comprised of time deposits to core customers over $250,000 as defined in the lead-in to the table above.

 

 

(2)

Comprised of demand and savings deposits in relationships over $250,000, which are considered non-core deposits because they do not satisfy the definition of core deposits set forth in the lead-in to the table above.

 

 

(3)

Short term assets include cash equivalents and investment with maturities less than one year.

 

 

 

ITEM 3.

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Market Risk represents the risk of loss due to changes in market values of assets and liabilities. We incur market risk in the normal course of business through exposures to market interest rates, equity prices, and credit spreads. We have identified two primary sources of market risk: interest rate risk and price risk.

 

Interest Rate Risk is the risk to earnings and value arising from changes in market interest rates. Interest rate risk arises from timing differences in the repricings and maturities of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities (repricing risk), changes in the expected maturities of assets and liabilities arising from embedded options, such as borrowers’ ability to prepay residential mortgage loans at any time and depositors’ ability to redeem certificates of deposit before maturity (option risk), changes in the shape of the yield curve where interest rates increase or decrease in a nonparallel fashion (yield curve risk), and changes in spread relationships between different yield curves, such as U.S. Treasuries and LIBOR (basis risk).

 

Our asset liability committee ("ALCO"), establishes broad policy limits with respect to interest rate risk. ALCO establishes specific operating guidelines within the parameters of the board of directors’ policies. In general, we seek to minimize the impact of changing interest rates on net interest income and the economic values of assets and liabilities. Our ALCO meets monthly to monitor the level of interest rate risk sensitivity to ensure compliance with the board of directors’ approved risk limits.

 

Interest rate risk management is an active process that encompasses monitoring loan and deposit flows complemented by investment and funding activities. Effective management of interest rate risk begins with understanding the dynamic characteristics of assets and liabilities and determining the appropriate interest rate risk posture given business forecasts, management objectives, market expectations, and policy constraints.

 

An asset sensitive position refers to a balance sheet position in which an increase in short-term interest rates is expected to generate higher net interest income, as rates earned on our interest-earning assets would reprice upward more quickly than rates paid on our interest-bearing liabilities, thus expanding our net interest margin. Conversely, a liability sensitive position refers to a balance sheet position in which an increase in short-term interest rates is expected to generate lower net interest income, as rates paid on our interest-bearing liabilities would reprice upward more quickly than rates earned on our interest-earning assets, thus compressing our net interest margin.

 

Interest rate risk measurement is calculated and reported to the board and ALCO at least quarterly. The information reported includes period-end results and identifies any policy limits exceeded, along with an assessment of the policy limit breach and the action plan and timeline for resolution, mitigation, or assumption of the risk.

 

We use two approaches to model interest rate risk: Net Interest Income at Risk ("NII at Risk") and Economic Value of Equity ("EVE"). Under NII at Risk, net interest income is modeled utilizing various assumptions for assets, liabilities, and derivatives. EVE measures the period end market value of assets minus the market value of liabilities and the change in this value as rates change. EVE is a period end measurement.

 

  

Net Interest Income Sensitivity

 
  

Immediate Change in Rates

 

(dollars in thousands)

 -200  -100  

+100

  

+200

 

March 31, 2021

                

Dollar change

 $12  $908  $8,198  $18,168 
Percent change  0.01%  0.78%  7.06%  15.65%

December 31, 2020

                

Dollar change

 $(1,212) $(407) $5,361  $12,590 

Percent change

  (1.05)%  (0.35)%  4.63%  10.87%

 

We report NII at Risk to isolate the change in income related solely to interest earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities. The NII at Risk results included in the table above reflect the analysis used quarterly by management. It models immediate -200, -100, +100 and +200 basis point parallel shifts in market interest rates, implied by the forward yield curve over the next one-year period.

 

 

We are within board policy limits for the +/-100 and +/-200 basis point scenarios. The NII at Risk reported at March 31, 2021, projects that our earnings are expected to be slightly asset sensitive to changes in interest rates over the next year. In recent periods, the amount of floating rate assets increased, resulting in a position shift from interest rate neutral to slightly asset sensitive.

 

  

Economic Value of Equity Sensitivity (Shock)

 
  

Immediate Change in Rates

 

(dollars in thousands)

 

-200

  

-100

  

+100

  

+200

 

March 31, 2021

                

Dollar change

  (25,311)  (29,557)  436   4,072 
Percent change  (5.61)%  (6.55)%  0.10%  0.90%

December 31, 2020

                

Dollar change

  36,247   6,141   (7,720)  (12,098)

Percent change

  8.86%  1.50%  (1.89)%  (2.96)%

 

The EVE results included in the table above reflect the analysis used quarterly by management. It models immediate +/-100 and +/-200 basis point parallel shifts in market interest rates.

 

We are within board policy limits for the +/-100 and +/-200 basis point scenarios. The EVE reported at March 31, 2021 projects that as interest rates increase immediately, the economic value of equity position will be expected to increase slightly. When interest rates rise, fixed rate assets generally lose economic value; the longer the duration, the greater the value lost. The opposite is true when interest rates fall.

 

Price Risk represents the risk of loss arising from adverse movements in the prices of financial instruments that are carried at fair value and subject to fair value accounting. We have price risk from our available for sale SFR mortgage loans and our fixed-rate available for sale securities.

 

Basis Risk represents the risk of loss arising from asset and liability pricing movements not changing in the same direction. We have basis risk in our SFR mortgage loan portfolio and our securities portfolio.

 

ITEM 4.

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of disclosure controls and procedures. The Company’s management, including our President and Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer, have evaluated the effectiveness of our “disclosure controls and procedures” (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”)), as of the end of the period covered by this Report. Based on such evaluation, our President and Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer have concluded that, as of the end of such period, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective.

 

Changes in internal control over financial reporting. There have not been any changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting (as such term is defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act) during the fiscal quarter to which this Report relates that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

 

PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

There are no material pending legal proceedings, other than ordinary routine litigation incidental to our business. Management believes that none of the legal proceedings occurring in the ordinary course of business, individually or in the aggregate, will have a material adverse impact on the results of operations or financial condition of the Company.

 

ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS

 

There have been no material changes to the risk factors as previously disclosed in Item 1A to Part I of our 2020 Annual Report, as filed with the SEC on March 22, 2021.  The materiality of any risks and uncertainties identified in our Forward Looking Statements contained in this report or those that are presently unforeseen could result in significant adverse effects on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. See Part I, Item 2 for “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this Report.

 

ITEM 2.

UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

 

On June 24, 2019, the Board of Directors approved a stock repurchase program to buy back up to an aggregate of 1.0 million shares of our common stock.  For the three months ended March 31, 2021, we repurchased shares of common stock, as set forth in the table below.

 

  

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

     
  

(a)

  

(b)

  

(c)

  

(d)

 

Period

 

Total Number of Shares Purchased

  

Average Price Paid per Share

  

Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publically Announced Plan

  

Maximum Number of Shares that May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plan

 
January 1, 2021 to January 31, 2021  68,581  $17.25   68,581   240,191 

February 1, 2021 to February 28, 2021

  61,381  $17.81   129,962   178,810 
March 1, 2021 to March 31, 2021    $      178,810 
Total  129,962           178,810 

 

 

ITEM 3.

DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES

 

None

 

ITEM 4.

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable

 

ITEM 5.

OTHER INFORMATION

 

None

 

 

ITEM 6.

EXHIBITS

 

Exhibit No

 

Description of Exhibits

   

2.1

 

Agreement and Plan of Merger By and Among RBB Bancorp, Royal Business Bank, PGH Holdings, Inc. and Pacific Global Bank, effective as of September 5, 2019 (1)

   

3.1

 

Articles of Incorporation of RBB Bancorp (2)

   

3.2

 

Bylaws of RBB Bancorp (3)

   

3.3

 

Amendment to Bylaws of RBB Bancorp (5)

   

4.1

 

Specimen Common Stock Certificate of RBB Bancorp (4)

   
  

The other instruments defining the rights of holders of the long-term debt securities of the Company and its subsidiaries are omitted pursuant to section (b)(4)(iii)(A) of Item 601 of Regulation S-K. The Company hereby agrees to furnish copies of these instruments to the SEC upon request.

   
4.2 Subordinated Indenture, dated as of March 26, 2021 by and between RBB Bancorp and Wilmington Trust, National Association (6)
   
4.3 First Supplemental Indenture, dated as of March 26, 2021, between RBB Bancorp and Wilmington Trust, National Association (6)
   
4.4 Form of 4.00% Fixed-to-Floating Rate Subordinated Notes due 2031 (included in Exhibit 4.2)(6)
   

31.1

 

Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

   

31.2

 

Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

   

32.1

 

Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

   

32.2

 

Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

   

101.INS

 

Inline XBRL Instance Document

   

101.SCH

 

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document

   

101.CAL

 

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document

   

101.DEF

 

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document

   

101.LAB

 

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document

   

101.PRE

 

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

   

104

 

The cover page of RBB Bancorp’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2021, formatted in Inline XBRL (contained in Exhibit 101)

 

(1)

Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 2.1 of the Registrant’s Quarterly Report in Form 10-Q filed with the SEC on November 12, 2019.

 

(2)

Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 3.1 of the Registrant’s Registration Statement in Form S-1 filed with the SEC on June 28, 2017.

 

(3)

Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 3.2 of the Registrant’s Registration Statement in Form S-1 filed with the SEC on June 28, 2017.

 

(4)

Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 4.1 of the Registrant’s Registration Statement in Form S-1 filed with the SEC on June 28, 2017.

 

(5)

Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 3.3 of the Registrant’s Quarterly Report in Form 10-Q filed with the SEC on November 13, 2018.

  
(6)Incorporated by reference from Exhibit 1.1 of the Registrant’s Current Report in Form 8-K filed with the SEC on March 26, 2021.

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

  

RBB BANCORP

  

(Registrant)

   

Date:  May 6, 2021

 

/s/ David Morris

  

David Morris

Duly Authorized Officer, Executive Vice President and

Chief Financial Officer

 

 

70