Docoh
Loading...

SILO Silo Pharma

Filed: 16 Feb 21, 5:28pm

As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 16, 2021

Registration No. 333-          

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM S-1

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER

THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware 2834 27-3046338
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 (Primary Standard Industrial
Classification Code Number)
 (I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)

 

560 Sylvan Avenue, Suite 3160

Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632

(718) 400-9031
(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of Registrant’s principal executive offices)

 

Eric Weisblum

Chief Executive Officer

560 Sylvan Avenue, Suite 3160

Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632

(718) 400-9031

(Name, address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)

 

Copies to:

 

Richard A. Friedman, Esq.

Nazia Khan, Esq.

Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton LLP
30 Rockefeller Plaza
New York, NY 10112
Telephone: (212) 653-8700

 

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public:

As soon as practicable after the effective date of this registration statement.

 

If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933 check the following box: ☒

 

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, please check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

 

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. ☐

 

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company
   Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided to Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act. ☐

 

 

 

CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE

 

     Proposed  Proposed    
    Maximum  Maximum    
  Amount  Offering  Aggregate  Amount of 
Title of Each Class of Securities to be Registered (1) to be
Registered
  Price Per
Share (2)
  Offering
Price (2)
  Registration
Fee
 
Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share (3)  14,253,323  $0.32  $4,561,064  $497.61 
Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share (4)  14,253,323  $0.32  $4,561,064  $497.61 
Total  28,506,646      $  $995.22 

 

(1)The shares of our common stock being registered hereunder are being registered for sale by the selling security holders named in the prospectus. Under Rule 416 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, the shares being registered include such indeterminate number of shares of common stock as may be issuable with respect to the shares being registered in this registration statement as a result of any stock splits, stock dividends or other similar event.

 

(2)The proposed maximum offering price per share and the proposed maximum aggregate offering price have been estimated solely for the purpose of calculating the amount of the registration fee in accordance with Rule 457(c) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended using the average of the high and low prices as reported on the OTCQB on February 8, 2021.

 

(3)Represents shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of outstanding warrants to purchase shares of common stock offered by the selling stockholders.

 

(4)Represents shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of Series C Convertible Preferred Stock.

 

The registrant hereby amends this registration statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this registration statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or until the registration statement shall become effective on such date as the Securities and Exchange Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 

 

 

 

The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. These securities may not be sold until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is declared effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell nor does it seek an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted

 

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS

 

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED FEBRUARY 16, 2021

 

 

Silo Pharma, Inc.

 

28,506,646 Shares of Common Stock

 

This prospectus relates to the resale by certain selling stockholders of Silo Pharma, Inc., a Delaware corporation (the “Company”) identified in this prospectus of up to 28,506,646 shares (the “Resale Shares”) of our common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, including 14,253,323 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of outstanding warrants and 14,253,323 shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of outstanding shares of Series C Preferred Stock. All of the Resale Shares were purchased from the Company in private placement transactions and are being offered for resale by the selling stockholders only.

 

The Resale Shares may be sold by the selling stockholders to or through underwriters or dealers, directly to purchasers or through agents designated from time to time. For additional information regarding the methods of sale you should refer to the section entitled “Plan of Distribution” in this Prospectus.

 

The prices at which the selling stockholders may sell the Resale Shares will be determined by the prevailing market price for shares of the Company’s common stock or in privately negotiated transactions. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of the Resale Shares by the selling stockholders; provided, however, we will receive the proceeds from any cash exercise of warrants.

 

We will bear all costs relating to the registration of the Resale Shares, other than any selling stockholders legal or accounting costs or commissions.

 

Our common stock is presently quoted on The OTCQB tier of the OTC Markets Group, Inc. (the “OTCQB”) under the symbol “SILO.” The closing price of our common stock on February 12, 2021, as reported on the OTCQB was $0.41 per share.

 

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. See the section entitled “Risk Factors” beginning on page 7 of this prospectus and elsewhere in this prospectus for a discussion of information that should be considered in connection with an investment in our common stock.

 

We may amend or supplement this prospectus from time to time by filing amendments or supplements as required. You should read the entire prospectus and any amendments or supplements carefully before you make your investment decision.

 

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or passed upon the adequacy or accuracy of this prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

The date of this prospectus is _________, 2021.

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 Page
PROSPECTUS SUMMARY1
RISK FACTORS7
SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS32
INDUSTRY AND MARKET DATA33
USE OF PROCEEDS33
MARKET FOR OUR COMMON STOCK AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS33
DIVIDEND POLICY33
SELLING STOCKHOLDERS34
PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION40
DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES41
DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS44
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS51
MANAGEMENT66
EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION68
SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT71
CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS73
LEGAL MATTERS73
EXPERTS73
WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION73
FINANCIAL STATEMENTSF-1

 

i

 

ABOUT THIS PROSPECTUS

 

We have not, and the underwriters have not, authorized anyone to provide any information or to make any representations other than those contained in this prospectus or in any free writing prospectus prepared by or on behalf of us or to which we have referred you. We take no responsibility for, and can provide no assurance as to the reliability of, any other information that others may give to you.

 

You should rely only on the information contained in this prospectus. No dealer, salesperson or other person is authorized to give information that is not contained in this prospectus. This prospectus is not an offer to sell nor is it seeking an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted. The information in this prospectus is accurate only as of the date of this prospectus, regardless of the time of delivery of this prospectus or of any sale of these securities.

 

ii

 

PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

 

The following summary highlights selected information contained elsewhere in this prospectus and is qualified in its entirety by the more detailed information and financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. It does not contain all the information that may be important to you and your investment decision. You should carefully read this entire prospectus, including the matters set forth under “Risk Factors,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and our financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus. In this prospectus, unless context requires otherwise, references to “we,” “us,” “our,” “Silo” or “the Company” refer to Silo Pharma, Inc. and its subsidiary.

 

Overview

 

We are a developmental stage biopharmaceutical company focused on merging traditional therapeutics with psychedelic research. We seek to acquire assets to license and fund research which we believe will be transformative to the well-being of patients and the health care industry, and we are committed to developing innovative solutions to address a variety of underserved conditions. In these uncertain times, the mental health of the nation and beyond is being put to the test. More than ever, creative new therapies are needed to address the health challenges of today. Combining our resources with world-class medical research partners, we hope to make significant advances in the medical and psychedelic space.

 

In addition to our primary focus on psychedelic research, we have been engaged in the development of the streetwear apparel brand, NFID, which stands for “No Found Identification.”

 

Rare Disease Therapeutics

 

We have been exploring opportunities to expand our business by seeking to acquire and/or develop intellectual property or technology rights from leading universities and researchers to treat rare diseases, including the use of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, and the potential benefits they may have in certain cases involving depression, mental health issues and neurological disorders. We intend to focus on merging traditional therapeutics with psychedelic research for people suffering from indications such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (“PTSD”), Parkinson’s and other rare neurological disorders. Our mission is to identify assets to license and fund the research which we believe will be transformative to the well-being of patients and the health care industry. 

  

The potential of psilocybin therapy in mental health conditions has been demonstrated in a number of academic-sponsored studies over the last decade. In these early studies, it was observed that psilocybin therapy provided rapid reductions in depression symptoms after a single high dose, with antidepressant effects lasting for up to at least six months for a number of patients. These studies assessed symptoms related to depression and anxiety through a number of widely used and validated scales. The data generated by these studies suggest that psilocybin is generally well-tolerated and has the potential to treat depression when administered with psychological support.

 

We have recently engaged in discussions with a number of world-renowned educational institutions and advisors regarding potential opportunities and have formed a scientific advisory board that is intended to help advise management regarding potential acquisition and development of products.

 

In addition to the foregoing, effective July 15, 2020, we entered into a commercial evaluation license and option agreement (the “Option Agreement”) with the University of Maryland, Baltimore (“UMB”) pursuant to which, UMB has granted us an exclusive, non-sublicensable, non-transferable license with respect to the exploration of the potential use of central nervous system-homing peptides in vivo and their use for the investigation and treatment of multiple sclerosis and other neuroinflammatory pathology. The option was extended and exercised. On February 12, 2021, we entered into a Master License Agreement (the “UMB License Agreement”) with UMB pursuant to which UMB granted us an exclusive, worldwide, sublicensable, royalty-bearing license to certain intellectual property (i) to make, have made, use, sell, offer to sell, and import certain licensed products and (ii) to use the invention titled, “Central nervous system-homing peptides in vivo and their use for the investigation and treatment of multiple sclerosis and other neuroinflammatory pathology” and UMB’s confidential information to develop and perform certain licensed processes for the therapeutic treatment of neuroinflammatory disease.

 

We plan to actively pursue the acquisition and/or development of intellectual property or technology rights to treat rare diseases, and to ultimately expand our business to focus on this new line of business.

 

1

 

 

Apparel

 

On September 29, 2018, we entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement with Blind Faith Concepts Holdings, Inc. pursuant to which we completed the acquisition of the assets of NFID which consisted of three trademarks related to the NFID brand, the NFID website, shoe designs and samples, and the assumption of a one-year Brand Ambassador Agreement in exchange for 2,000,000 shares of our common stock. NFID is a recently developed unisex clothing brand, and we plan on continuing product development to fully launch the product.

 

Since the completion of the acquisition of the assets of NFID in September 2018, we have been engaged in the development of NFID, which stands for “No Found Identification.” We have developed NFID as an exclusive brand of apparel consisting initially of sweatshirts, hoodies, t-shirts, jackets and hats. Our clothing brand features lifestyles graphic designs. The collection is inspired towards the lifestyle and wellness culture.

 

Recent Developments

 

Investigator-sponsored Study Agreement with Maastricht University of the Netherlands

 

On December 1, 2020, we entered into an investigator-sponsored study agreement with Maastricht University of the Netherlands. The research project is a clinical study to examine the effects of repeated low doses of psilocybin and lysergic acid diethylamide (“LSD”) on cognitive and emotional dysfunctions in Parkinson’s disease and to understand its mechanism of action.

 

Patent License Agreement with AIKido Pharma Inc.

 

On January 5, 2021, we entered into a Patent License Agreement (the “Patent License Agreement”) with Silo Pharma, Inc., a Florida corporation, our wholly-owned subsidiary, and our and our subsidiary’s affiliates and subsidiaries, as licensor, and AIkido Pharma Inc. (“AIkido”) pursuant to which we granted AIkido an exclusive, worldwide, sublicensable, royalty-bearing license to certain intellectual property (i) to make, have made, use, provide, import, export, lease, distribute, sell, offer for sale, develop and advertise certain licensed products and (ii) to develop and perform certain licensed processes for the treatment of cancer and symptoms caused by cancer. In addition, if we exercise the option granted to us pursuant to the Option Agreement, we shall grant AIKido a non-exclusive sublicense to certain UMB patent rights in the field of neuroinflammatory diseases occurring in patients diagnosed with cancer.

 

Binding Letter of Intent to Grant Sublicense with AIKido Pharma Inc.

 

On February 12, 2021, we entered into a binding letter of intent (the “Letter of Intent”) with AIkido pursuant to which we agreed to grant AIkido a worldwide, exclusive sublicense of our licensed patents under the UMB License Agreement for use in the therapeutic treatment of neuroinflammatory disease in cancer patients (the “Sublicense”). The parties have agreed to use their best efforts to complete the Sublicense arrangement as soon as reasonably possible. The terms and conditions of the Sublicense are subject to compliance with the terms and conditions of the UMB License Agreement, including, but not limited to, the provisions regarding the granting of sublicenses set forth in the UMB License Agreement.

 

Investigator-sponsored Study Agreement with UMB

 

On January 5, 2021, we entered into a entered into an investigator-sponsored study agreement with UMB. The research project is a clinical study to examine a novel peptide-guided drug delivery approach for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (“MS”). More specifically, the study is designed to evaluate (1) whether MS-1-displaying liposomes can effectively deliver dexamethasone to the central nervous system and (2) whether MS-1-displaying liposomes are superior to plain liposomes, also known as free drug, in inhibiting the relapses and progression of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

 

February 2021 Private Placement

 

On February 9, 2021, we entered into securities purchase agreements (collectively, the “Purchase Agreements”) with certain institutional and accredited investors (collectively, the “Investors”) for the sale of an aggregate of 4,276 shares of our newly designated Series C Preferred Stock (“Series C Preferred Stock”) and warrants (“Warrants”) to purchase up to 14,253,323 shares of our common stock for gross proceeds of approximately $4,276,000, before deducting placement agent and other offering expenses. The closing of the offering occurred on February 12, 2021. In connection with the offering, we entered into a registration rights agreement with the Investors pursuant to which we agreed to file a registration, of which this prospectus is a part, to register, under the Securities Act, the resale of the shares (the “Conversion Shares”) of common stock issuable upon conversion of the Series C Preferred Stock and the shares (the “Warrant Shares”) of common stock issuable upon exercise of the Warrants. Accordingly, this prospectus relates to the offering by the selling stockholders of up to 28,506,646 Resale Shares, which includes the Conversion Shares and the Warrant Shares.

 

2

 

 

In addition, pursuant to the terms of the offering, we issued the placement agents warrants to purchase up to an aggregate of 2,850,664 shares of our common stock.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We have filed four provisional patent applications related to the use of the central nervous system-homing peptides covered by the UMB Option Agreement to deliver certain compounds, including a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and/or psilocybin, for the treatment of arthritis, central nervous system diseases, neuroinflammatory diseases as well as cancer. In addition, pursuant to our acquisition of NFID, we acquired three trademarks related to the NFID brand.

 

Potential Corporate Actions to be Approved at a Meeting of Stockholders

 

On February 10, 2021, we filed a preliminary proxy statement on Schedule 14A with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) in connection with the following proposed corporate actions to be voted upon at a special meeting of our stockholders (“Special Meeting”): (i) an amendment to our Certificate of Incorporation, as amended (“Certificate of Incorporation”) to increase the number of authorized shares of common stock from 100,000,000 shares to 500,000,000 shares (Proposal No. 1); (ii) a reverse stock split of our issued and outstanding common stock in a ratio to be determined by our board of directors, which ratio shall not be less than 1-for-5 nor more than 1-for-50, with the exact ratio to be set at a whole number within this range as determined by our board of directors, provided that, we shall not effect reverse stock splits that, in the aggregate, exceed 1-for-50, and any reverse stock split is completed no later than February 5, 2022 (Proposal No. 2); and (iii) approval of our 2020 Omnibus Equity Incentive Plan and the reservation of 8,500,000 shares of common stock for issuance thereunder (Proposal No. 3) (collectively, the “Corporate Actions”). Prior to this prospectus being declared effective by the SEC, we will need our stockholders to approve Proposal No. 1.

 

Important Additional Information

 

In connection with the Special Meeting and the Corporate Actions, we filed a preliminary proxy statement (the “Preliminary Proxy Statement”) with the SEC and we intend to file a definitive proxy statement (the “Definitive Proxy Statement” and together with the Preliminary Proxy Statement, the “Proxy Statement) with the SEC.

 

The Proxy Statement contains important information regarding the Corporate Actions including, among other things, the recommendation of our board of directors with respect to the Corporate Actions. STOCKHOLDERS ARE URGED TO READ THE PROXY STATEMENT AND OTHER PROXY MATERIALS THAT WE MAY FILE WITH THE SEC WHEN THEY BECOME AVAILABLE BECAUSE THEY WILL CONTAIN IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT THE SPECIAL MEETING AND THE CORPORATE ACTIONS. You will be able to obtain the Proxy Statement, as well as other filings containing information about us, free of charge, at the website maintained by the SEC at www.sec.gov. Copies of the Proxy Statement and other filings made by us with the SEC can also be obtained, free of charge, by directing a request to Silo Pharma, Inc., 560 Sylvan Avenue, Suite 3160, Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632, Attention: Corporate Secretary.

 

Participants in the Solicitation

 

We and our executive officers and directors may be deemed, under SEC rules, to be participants in the solicitation of consents from our stockholders with respect to the proposed Corporate Actions. Information regarding our executive officers and directors and their respective ownership of our common stock is included in the Proxy Statement. To the extent that holdings of our securities have changed since the amounts printed in the Proxy Statement, such changes have been or will be reflected on Statements of Change in Ownership on Form 4 filed with the SEC. More detailed information regarding the identity of the potential participants, and their direct or indirect interests, by security holdings or otherwise, is set forth in the Proxy Statement and other materials to be filed with SEC in connection with the proposed Corporate Actions.

 

3

 

 

Risks Associated with Our Business

 

There is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

We will require additional financing in the future to fund our operations, and raising additional capital may cause dilution to holders of our stockholders, restrict our operations or require us to relinquish certain rights.

 

Clinical drug development is a lengthy and expensive process with uncertain timelines and uncertain outcomes. If clinical trials of any future therapeutic candidates are prolonged or delayed, we or our current or future collaborators may be unable to obtain required regulatory approvals, and therefore we will be unable to commercialize our future therapeutic candidates on a timely basis or at all, which will adversely affect our business.

 

Even if any of our future therapeutic candidates obtain regulatory approval, we will be subject to ongoing obligations and continued regulatory review, which may result in significant additional expense. Additionally, any such therapeutic candidates, if approved, could be subject to labeling and other restrictions and market withdrawal, and we may be subject to penalties if we fail to comply with regulatory requirements or experience unanticipated problems with any of our future therapeutic candidates.

 

Psilocybin and psilocin are listed as Schedule I controlled substances under the Controlled Substances Act in the U.S., and similar controlled substance legislation in other countries and any significant breaches in our compliance with these laws and regulations, or changes in the laws and regulations may result in interruptions to our development activity or business continuity.

 

Any therapeutic candidates we may develop in the future may be subject to controlled substance laws and regulations in the territories where the product will be marketed, and failure to comply with these laws and regulations, or the cost of compliance with these laws and regulations, may adversely affect the results of our business operations and our financial condition.

 

4

 

 

Our product candidates may contain controlled substances, the use of which may generate public controversy. Adverse publicity or public perception regarding psilocybin or our current or future investigational therapies using psilocybin may negatively influence the success of these therapies.

 

We have never commercialized a therapeutic candidate before and may lack the necessary expertise, personnel and resources to successfully commercialize our therapies on our own or with suitable collaborators.

 

The future commercial success of our future therapeutic candidates will depend on the degree of market access and acceptance of our potential therapies among healthcare professionals, patients, healthcare payors, health technology assessment bodies and the medical community at large.

 

We may become exposed to costly and damaging liability claims, and our product liability insurance may not cover all damages from such claims.

 

Our business operations and current and future relationships with investigators, health care professionals, consultants, third-party payors and customers may be subject, directly or indirectly, to U.S. federal and state healthcare fraud and abuse laws, false claims laws, health information privacy and security laws, other healthcare laws and regulations and other foreign privacy and security laws. If we are unable to comply, or have not fully complied, with such laws, we could face substantial penalties.

 

The failure to obtain or maintain patents, licensing agreements and other intellectual property could materially impact our ability to compete effectively.

 

If we fail to comply with our obligations in the agreements under which we may license intellectual property rights from third parties or otherwise experience disruptions to our business relationships with our licensors, we could lose rights that are important to our business.

 

If we do not continually enhance our brand recognition with respect to our apparel segment, increase distribution of our products, attract new customers and introduce new products, either on a timely basis or at all, our business may suffer.

 

A rise in the cost of raw materials, labor and transportation could increase our cost of sales with respect to our apparel segment and cause our results of operations and margins to decline.

  

We have never paid cash dividends and have no plans to pay cash dividends in the future.

  

Corporate Information

 

We were incorporated as a Nevada corporation on May 16, 2017. Our principal executive offices are located at 560 Sylvan Avenue, Suite 3160, Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632 and our telephone number is (718) 400-9031.

5

 

 

THE OFFERING

 

Common stock offered by selling stockholders: 28,506,646 shares of common stock including  14,253,323shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of outstanding warrants and 14,253,323 shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of outstanding shares of Series C Preferred Stock
   
Offering price: Market price or privately negotiated prices.
   
Common stock outstanding after the offering: 85,176,956
   
Use of proceeds: We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of the Resale Shares by the selling stockholders; however, we will receive the proceeds from any cash exercise of warrants.
   
Risk factors: An investment in our securities involves a high degree of risk and could result in a loss of your entire investment. Prior to making an investment decision, you should carefully consider all of the information in this prospectus and, in particular, you should evaluate the risk factors set forth under the caption “Risk Factors” beginning on page 7. 
   
OTCQB Symbol: SILO

 

The number of shares of common stock to be outstanding immediately after this offering is based on 85,176,956 shares of common stock outstanding as of February 12, 2021 and excludes:

 

250,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of warrants with an exercise price of $0.20 per share;

 

14,253,323 shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of 4,276 shares of Series C Preferred Stock; and

 

300,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options with a weighted average exercise price of $0.0001 per share.

 

6

 

 

RISK FACTORS

 

Any investment in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. Before deciding whether to purchase our common stock, investors should carefully consider the risks described below. Our business, financial condition, operating results and prospects are subject to the following material risks. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently foreseeable to us may also impair our business operations. If any of the following risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition or operating results could be materially adversely affected. In such case, the trading price of our common stock could decline, and our stockholders may lose all or part of their investment in the shares of our common stock.

 

Risks Related to Our Financial Position and Need for Capital

 

We have only a limited history upon which an evaluation of our prospects and future performance can be made and have no history of profitable operations.

 

We commenced operations in 2010 and have a limited history upon which an evaluation of our prospects and future performance can be made and have no history of profitable operations. We may sustain losses in the future as we implement our business plan. We have not yet achieved positive cash flow on a monthly basis during any fiscal year including the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019, and there can be no assurance that we will ever generate revenues or operate profitably.

 

There is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

Our financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the settlement of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. We had a net loss of $1,013,294 and $969,463 for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2019, we used cash in operations of $794,324. Additionally, we had an accumulated deficit and stockholders’ deficit of $2,655,804 and $22,892 at December 31, 2019. We have generated minimal revenues under our new business plan. These conditions coupled with our current liquidity position raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Furthermore, since we are pursuing new products and services, this diminishes our ability to accurately forecast our revenues and expenses. We expect that our ability to continue as a going concern depends, in large part, on our ability to generate sufficient revenues, limit our expenses and/or obtain necessary financing. If we are unable to generate sufficient revenues, limit our expenses and/or obtain necessary financing, we may be forced to curtail or cease operations.

 

We will require additional financing in the future to fund our operations.

 

We will need additional capital in the future to continue to execute our business plan. Therefore, we will be dependent upon additional capital in the form of either debt or equity to continue our operations. At the present time, we do not have arrangements to raise all of the needed additional capital, and we will need to identify potential investors and negotiate appropriate arrangements with them. Our ability to obtain additional financing will be subject to a number of factors, including market conditions, our operating performance and investor sentiment. If we are unable to raise additional capital when required or on acceptable terms, we may have to significantly delay, scale back or discontinue our operations.

 

Raising additional capital may cause dilution to holders of our stockholders, restrict our operations or require us to relinquish certain rights.

 

We may seek additional capital through a combination of equity offerings, debt financings, strategic collaborations and alliances or licensing arrangements. To the extent that we raise additional capital through the sale of equity, convertible debt securities or other equity-based derivative securities, your ownership interest will be diluted and the terms may include liquidation or other preferences that adversely affect your rights as a stockholder. Any indebtedness we incur could involve restrictive covenants, such as limitations on our ability to incur additional debt, acquire or license intellectual property rights, declare dividends, make capital expenditures and other operating restrictions that could adversely impact our ability to conduct our business. Furthermore, the issuance of additional securities, whether equity or debt, by us, or the possibility of such issuance, may cause the market price of our common stock to decline. If we raise additional funds through strategic collaborations and alliances or licensing arrangements with third parties, we may have to relinquish valuable rights including to our apparel brand and future therapeutic candidates or otherwise agree to terms unfavorable to us, any of which may have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and prospects. Adequate additional financing may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all. If we are unable to raise additional funds when needed, we may be required to delay, limit, reduce or terminate our product development or future commercialization efforts or grant rights to develop and market our future therapeutic candidates that we would otherwise prefer to develop and market ourselves.

 

7

 

 

Risks Related to our Rare Disease Therapeutics Business

 

We cannot give any assurance that any product candidates will successfully complete clinical trials or receive regulatory approval, which is necessary before they can be commercialized.

 

We currently have no therapies that are approved for commercial sale and may never be able to develop marketable therapies. We entered into the Option Agreement with UMB pursuant to which, UMB has granted us an exclusive, non-sublicensable, non-transferable license with respect to the exploration of the potential use of central nervous system-homing peptides in vivo and their use for the investigation and treatment of MS and other neuroinflammatory pathology. Accordingly, our business may depend on the successful regulatory approval of potential in-licensed product candidates. We cannot be certain that any product candidates will receive regulatory approval or that our therapy will be successfully commercialized even if we receive regulatory approval.

 

The research, testing, manufacturing, safety, efficacy, labeling, approval, sale, marketing, and distribution of any in-licensed product is, and will remain, subject to comprehensive regulation by the FDA, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (“DEA”), the European Medicines Agency (“EMA”), the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (“MHRA”) and foreign regulatory authorities.

 

Any therapeutic candidates we may develop in the future may be subject to controlled substance laws and regulations in the territories where the product will be marketed, and failure to comply with these laws and regulations, or the cost of compliance with these laws and regulations, may adversely affect the results of our business operations, both during clinical development and post approval, and our financial condition.

 

In the United States, psychedelics, or psilocybin, and its active metabolite, psilocin, are listed by the DEA as “Controlled Substances” or scheduled substances, under the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970, also known as the Controlled Substances Act (“CSA”) specifically as a Schedule I substance. The DEA regulates chemical compounds as Schedule I, II, III, IV or V substances. Schedule I substances by definition have a high potential for abuse, have no currently “accepted medical use” in the United States, lack accepted safety for use under medical supervision, and may not be prescribed marketed or sold in the United States. Pharmaceutical products approved for use in the United States may be listed as Schedule II, III, IV or V, with Schedule II substances considered to present the highest potential for abuse or dependence and Schedule V substances the lowest relative risk of abuse among such substances. Schedule I and II drugs are subject to the strictest controls under the CSA, including manufacturing and procurement quotas, security requirements and criteria for importation. In addition, dispensing of Schedule II drugs is further restricted. For example, they may not be refilled without a new prescription and may have a black box warning. Further, most, if not all, state laws in the United States classify psilocybin and psilocin as Schedule I controlled substances. For any product containing psilocybin to be available for commercial marketing in the United States, psilocybin and psilocin must be rescheduled, or the product itself must be scheduled, by the DEA to Schedule II, III, IV or V. Commercial marketing in the United States will also require scheduling-related legislative or administrative action.

 

Scheduling determinations by the DEA are dependent on FDA approval of a substance or a specific formulation of a substance. Therefore, while psilocybin and psilocin are Schedule I controlled substances, products approved by the FDA for medical use in the United States that contain psilocybin or psilocin should be placed in Schedules II-V, since approval by the FDA satisfies the “accepted medical use” requirement. If one of our product candidates receives FDA approval, we anticipate that the DEA will make a scheduling determination and place it in a schedule other than Schedule I in order for it to be prescribed to patients in the United States. This scheduling determination will be dependent on FDA approval and the FDA’s recommendation as to the appropriate schedule. During the review process, and prior to approval, the FDA may determine that it requires additional data, either from non-clinical or clinical studies, including with respect to whether, or to what extent, the substance has abuse potential. This may introduce a delay into the approval and any potential rescheduling process. That delay would be dependent on the quantity of additional data required by the FDA. This scheduling determination will require DEA to conduct notice and comment rule making including issuing an interim final rule. Such action will be subject to public comment and requests for hearing which could affect the scheduling of these substances. There can be no assurance that the DEA will make a favorable scheduling decision. Even assuming categorization as a Schedule II or lower controlled substance (i.e., Schedule III, IV or V), at the federal level, such substances would also require scheduling determinations under state laws and regulations.

 

8

 

 

In addition, therapeutic candidates containing controlled substances are subject to DEA regulations relating to manufacturing, storage, distribution and physician prescription procedures, including:

 

 DEA registration and inspection of facilities. Facilities conducting research, manufacturing, distributing, importing or exporting, or dispensing controlled substances must be registered (licensed) to perform these activities and have the security, control, recordkeeping, reporting and inventory mechanisms required by the DEA to prevent drug loss and diversion. All these facilities must renew their registrations annually, except dispensing facilities, which must renew every three years. The DEA conducts periodic inspections of certain registered establishments that handle controlled substances. Obtaining and maintaining the necessary registrations may result in delay of the importation, manufacturing or distribution of product candidates. Furthermore, failure to maintain compliance with the CSA, particularly non-compliance resulting in loss or diversion, can result in regulatory action that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The DEA may seek civil penalties, refuse to renew necessary registrations, or initiate proceedings to restrict, suspend or revoke those registrations. In certain circumstances, violations could lead to criminal proceedings.

 

 State-controlled substances laws. Individual U.S. states have also established controlled substance laws and regulations. Though state-controlled substances laws often mirror federal law, because the states are separate jurisdictions, they may separately schedule product candidates. While some states automatically schedule a drug based on federal action, other states schedule drugs through rule making or a legislative action. State scheduling may delay commercial sale of any product for which we obtain federal regulatory approval and adverse scheduling could have a material adverse effect on the commercial attractiveness of such product. We or any partners must also obtain separate state registrations, permits or licenses in order to be able to obtain, handle, and distribute controlled substances for clinical trials or commercial sale, and failure to meet applicable regulatory requirements could lead to enforcement and sanctions by the states in addition to those from the DEA or otherwise arising under federal law.

 

 Clinical trials. Because any product candidates may contain psilocybin, to conduct clinical trials in the United States prior to approval, each of our research sites must submit a research protocol to the DEA and obtain and maintain a DEA researcher registration that will allow those sites to handle and dispense such product candidates and to obtain the product from our importer. If the DEA delays or denies the grant of a researcher registration to one or more research sites, the clinical trial could be significantly delayed, and we could lose clinical trial sites.

 

 Importation. If any of our product candidates is approved and classified as a Schedule II, III or IV substance, an importer can import it for commercial purposes if it obtains an importer registration and files an application for an import permit for each import. The DEA provides annual assessments/estimates to the International Narcotics Control Board, which guides the DEA in the amounts of controlled substances that the DEA authorizes to be imported. The failure to identify an importer or obtain the necessary import authority, including specific quantities, could affect the availability of our product candidates and have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, an application for a Schedule II importer registration must be published in the Federal Register, and there is a waiting period for third-party comments to be submitted. It is always possible that adverse comments may delay the grant of an importer registration.

 

 Manufacture. If, because of a Schedule II classification or voluntarily, we were to conduct manufacturing or repackaging/relabeling in the United States, our contract manufacturers would be subject to the DEA’s annual manufacturing and procurement quota requirements.

 

 Distribution. If any of our product candidates is scheduled as Schedule II, III or IV, we would also need to identify wholesale distributors with the appropriate DEA registrations and authority to distribute any future therapeutic candidates. These distributors would need to obtain Schedule II, III or IV distribution registrations.

 

9

 

 

The potential reclassification of psilocybin and psilocin in the United States could create additional regulatory burdens on our operations and negatively affect our results of operations.

 

If psilocybin and/or psilocin, other than the FDA-approved formulation, is rescheduled under the CSA as a Schedule II or lower controlled substance (i.e., Schedule III, IV or V), the ability to conduct research on psilocybin and psilocin would most likely be improved. However, rescheduling psilocybin and psilocin may materially alter enforcement policies across many federal agencies, primarily the FDA and DEA. The FDA is responsible for ensuring public health and safety through regulation of food, drugs, supplements, and cosmetics, among other products, through its enforcement authority pursuant to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (“FDCA”). The FDA’s responsibilities include regulating the ingredients as well as the marketing and labeling of drugs sold in interstate commerce. Because it is currently illegal under federal law to produce and sell psilocybin and psilocin, and because there are no federally recognized medical uses, the FDA has historically deferred enforcement related to psilocybin and psilocin to the DEA. If psilocybin and psilocin were to be rescheduled to a federally controlled, yet legal, substance, the FDA would likely play a more active regulatory role. The DEA would continue to be active in regulating manufacturing, distribution and dispensing of such substances. The potential for multi-agency enforcement post-rescheduling could threaten or have a materially adverse effect on our business.

 

Psilocybin and psilocin are listed as Schedule I controlled substances under the CSA in the U.S., and similar controlled substance legislation in other countries and any significant breaches in our compliance with these laws and regulations, or changes in the laws and regulations may result in interruptions to our development activity or business continuity.

 

Psilocybin and psilocin are categorized as Schedule I controlled substances under the CSA, and are similarly categorized by most states and foreign governments. Even assuming any future therapeutic candidates containing psilocybin or psilocin are approved and scheduled by regulatory authorities to allow their commercial marketing, the ingredients in such therapeutic candidates would likely continue to be Schedule I, or the state or foreign equivalent. Violations of any federal, state or foreign laws and regulations could result in significant fines, penalties, administrative sanctions, convictions or settlements arising from civil proceedings conducted by either the federal government or private citizens, or criminal charges and penalties, including, but not limited to, disgorgement of profits, cessation of business activities, divestiture or prison time. This could have a material adverse effect on us, including on our reputation and ability to conduct business, the potential listing of our shares, our financial position, operating results, profitability or liquidity or the market price of our shares. In addition, it is difficult for us to estimate the time or resources that would be needed for the investigation or defense of any such matters or our final resolution because, in part, the time and resources that may be needed are dependent on the nature and extent of any information requested by the applicable authorities involved, and such time or resources could be substantial. It is also illegal to aid or abet such activities or to conspire or attempt to engage in such activities. An investor’s contribution to and involvement in such activities may result in federal civil and/or criminal prosecution, including, but not limited to, forfeiture of his, her or its entire investment, fines and/or imprisonment.

 

Various federal, state, provincial and local laws govern our business in any jurisdictions in which we may operate, and to which we may export our products, including laws relating to health and safety, the conduct of our operations, and the production, storage, sale and distribution of our products. Complying with these laws requires that we comply concurrently with complex federal, state, provincial and/or local laws. These laws change frequently and may be difficult to interpret and apply. To ensure our compliance with these laws, we will need to invest significant financial and managerial resources. It is impossible for us to predict the cost of such laws or the effect they may have on our future operations. A failure to comply with these laws could negatively affect our business and harm our reputation. Changes to these laws could negatively affect our competitive position and the markets in which we operate, and there is no assurance that various levels of government in the jurisdictions in which we operate will not pass legislation or regulation that adversely impacts our business.

 

10

 

 

In addition, even if we or third parties were to conduct activities in compliance with U.S. state or local laws or the laws of other countries and regions in which we conduct activities, potential enforcement proceedings could involve significant restrictions being imposed upon us or third parties, while diverting the attention of key executives. Such proceedings could have a material adverse effect on our business, revenue, operating results and financial condition as well as on our reputation and prospects, even if such proceedings conclude successfully in our favor. In the extreme case, such proceedings could ultimately involve the criminal prosecution of our key executives, the seizure of corporate assets, and consequently, our inability to continue business operations. Strict compliance with state and local laws with respect to psilocybin and psilocin does not absolve us of potential liability under U.S. federal law or EU law, nor provide a defense to any proceeding which may be brought against us. Any such proceedings brought against us may adversely affect our operations and financial performance.

 

Despite the current status of psilocybin and psilocin as Schedule I controlled substances in the United States, there may be changes in the status of psilocybin or psilocin under the laws of certain U.S. cities or states. For instance, the city of Denver voted to decriminalize the possession of psilocybin in 2019 and five other cities have decriminalized psilocybin since (Oakland, California; Santa Cruz, California; Ann Arbor, Michigan; Cambridge, Massachusetts; and Somerville, Massachusetts). Moreover, in the November 2020 election, Oregon passed Measure 109 which legalizes medical use of “psilocybin products,” including magic mushrooms, to treat mental health conditions in licensed facilities with registered therapists.

 

The legalization of psilocybin without regulatory oversight may lead to the setup of clinics without proper therapeutic infrastructure or adequate clinical research, which could put patients at risk and bring reputational and regulatory risk to the entire industry, making it harder for us to achieve regulatory approval.

 

Our product candidates may contain controlled substances, the use of which may generate public controversy. Adverse publicity or public perception regarding psilocybin or our current or future investigational therapies using psilocybin may negatively influence the success of these therapies.

 

Therapies containing controlled substances may generate public controversy. Political and social pressures and adverse publicity could lead to delays in approval of, and increased expenses for any future therapeutic candidates we may develop. Opponents of these therapies may seek restrictions on marketing and withdrawal of any regulatory approvals. In addition, these opponents may seek to generate negative publicity in an effort to persuade the medical community to reject these therapies. For example, we may face media-communicated criticism directed at our clinical development program. Adverse publicity from psilocybin misuse may adversely affect the commercial success or market penetration achievable by our product candidates. Anti-psychedelic protests have historically occurred and may occur in the future and generate media coverage. Political pressures and adverse publicity could lead to delays in, and increased expenses for, and limit or restrict the introduction and marketing of any future therapeutic candidates.

 

Clinical drug development is a lengthy and expensive process with uncertain timelines and uncertain outcomes. If clinical trials of any future therapeutic candidates are prolonged or delayed, we or our current or future collaborators may be unable to obtain required regulatory approvals, and therefore we will be unable to commercialize our future therapeutic candidates on a timely basis or at all, which will adversely affect our business.

 

Clinical testing is expensive and can take many years to complete, and its outcome is inherently uncertain. Failure can occur at any time during the clinical trial process and our future clinical trial results may not be successful. We may experience delays in initiating or completing our clinical trials. We may also experience numerous unforeseen events during our clinical trials that could delay or prevent our ability to receive marketing approval or commercialize any future therapeutic candidates

 

11

 

 

Our clinical trials may fail to demonstrate substantial evidence of the safety and effectiveness of future product candidates that we may identify and pursue, which would prevent, delay or limit the scope of regulatory approval and commercialization.

 

Before obtaining regulatory approvals for the commercial sale of future therapeutic candidates, we must demonstrate through lengthy, complex and expensive nonclinical studies, preclinical studies and clinical trials that the applicable therapeutic candidate is both safe and effective for use in each target indication. A therapeutic candidate must demonstrate an adequate risk versus benefit profile in its intended patient population and for its intended use.

 

Clinical testing is expensive and can take many years to complete, and its outcome is inherently uncertain. Most product candidates that begin clinical trials are never approved by regulatory authorities for commercialization. We have limited experience in designing clinical trials and may be unable to design and execute a clinical trial to support marketing approval.

 

We cannot be certain that any clinical trials will be successful. In some instances, there can be significant variability in safety or efficacy results between different clinical trials of the same therapeutic candidate due to numerous factors, including changes in trial procedures set forth in protocols, differences in the size and type of the patient populations, changes in and adherence to the clinical trial protocols and the rate of dropout among clinical trial participants.

 

Even if any of our future therapeutic candidates obtain regulatory approval, we will be subject to ongoing obligations and continued regulatory review, which may result in significant additional expense. Additionally, any such therapeutic candidates, if approved, could be subject to labeling and other restrictions and market withdrawal, and we may be subject to penalties if we fail to comply with regulatory requirements or experience unanticipated problems with any of our future therapeutic candidates.

 

If the FDA, the EMA, the MHRA or a comparable foreign regulatory authority approves any of our future therapeutic candidates, the manufacturing processes, labeling, packaging, distribution, adverse event reporting, storage, advertising, promotion and recordkeeping for the therapy and underlying therapeutic substance will be subject to extensive and ongoing regulatory requirements. These requirements include submissions of safety and other post-marketing information and reports, registration, as well as continued compliance with current good manufacturing practices (“cGMPs”) and with good clinical practices (“GCPs”) for any clinical trials that we conduct post-approval, all of which may result in significant expense and limit our ability to commercialize such therapies. Later discovery of previously unknown problems with any approved therapeutic candidate, including adverse events of unanticipated severity or frequency, or with our third-party manufacturers or manufacturing processes, or failure to comply with regulatory requirements, may result in, among other things:

 

restrictions on the labeling, distribution, marketing or manufacturing of our future therapeutic candidates, withdrawal of the product from the market, or product recalls;

 

untitled and warning letters, or holds on clinical trials;

 

refusal by the FDA, the EMA, the MHRA or other foreign regulatory body to approve pending applications or supplements to approved applications we filed or suspension or revocation of license approvals;

 

requirements to conduct post-marketing studies or clinical trials;

 

restrictions on coverage by third-party payors;

 

fines, restitution or disgorgement of profits or revenue;

 

suspension or withdrawal of marketing approvals;

 

product seizure or detention, or refusal to permit the import or export of the product; and

 

injunctions or the imposition of civil or criminal penalties.

 

In addition, any regulatory approvals that we receive for our future therapeutic candidates may also be subject to limitations on the approved indicated uses for which the therapy may be marketed or to the conditions of approval, or contain requirements for potentially costly post-marketing testing, including Phase IV clinical trials, and surveillance to monitor the safety and efficacy of such therapeutic candidates.

 

12

 

 

If there are changes in the application of legislation, regulations or regulatory policies or if we or one of our distributors, licensees or co-marketers fails to comply with regulatory requirements, the regulators could take various actions. These include imposing fines on us, imposing restrictions on the therapeutic or its manufacture and requiring us to recall or remove the therapeutic from the market. The regulators could also suspend or withdraw our marketing authorizations, requiring us to conduct additional clinical trials, change our therapeutic labeling or submit additional applications for marketing authorization. If any of these events occurs, our ability to sell such therapy may be impaired, and we may incur substantial additional expense to comply with regulatory requirements, which could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Research and development of drugs targeting the central nervous system is particularly difficult, which makes it difficult to predict and understand why the drug has a positive effect on some patients but not others.

 

Discovery and development of new drugs targeting central nervous system disorders are particularly difficult and time-consuming, evidenced by the higher failure rate for new drugs for central nervous system disorders compared with most other areas of drug discovery. For example, in 2019, both Rapastinel and SAGE-217, two new drugs targeting MDD, failed to meet their primary endpoints in Phase III trials. ALKS 5461, another new drug targeting MDD, was rejected by FDA in 2019 after its Phase III trials as FDA required additional clinical data to provide substantial evidence of effectiveness. Any such setbacks in our clinical development could have a material adverse effect on our business and operating results. In addition, our later stage clinical trials may present challenges related to conducting adequate and well-controlled clinical trials, including designing an appropriate comparator arm in trials given the potential difficulties related to maintaining the blinding during the trial or placebo or nocebo effects. Due to the complexity of the human brain and the central nervous system, it can be difficult to predict and understand why a drug may have a positive effect on some patients but not others and why some individuals may react to the drug differently from others.

 

The results of preclinical studies and early-stage clinical trials of our future therapeutic candidates may not be predictive of the results of later stage clinical trials. Initial success in our ongoing clinical trials may not be indicative of results obtained when these trials are completed or in later stage trials.

 

Therapeutic candidates in later stages of clinical trials may fail to show the desired safety and efficacy traits despite having progressed through preclinical studies and initial clinical trials. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that any of our clinical trials will ultimately be successful or support further clinical development of any of our future therapeutic candidates. There is a high failure rate for drugs proceeding through clinical trials. A number of companies in the pharmaceutical industry have suffered significant setbacks in clinical development even after achieving promising results in earlier studies.

 

We will depend on enrollment of patients in our clinical trials for our future therapeutic candidates. If we are unable to enroll patients in our clinical trials, our research and development efforts and business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

 

Identifying and qualifying patients to participate in our clinical trials will be critical to our success. Patient enrollment depends on many factors, including:

 

the size of the patient population required for analysis of the trial’s primary endpoints and the process for identifying patients;

 

identifying and enrolling eligible patients, including those willing to discontinue use of their existing medications;

 

the design of the clinical protocol and the patient eligibility and exclusion criteria for the trial;

 

safety profile, to date, of the therapeutic candidate under study;

 

the willingness or availability of patients to participate in our trials, including due to the perceived risks and benefits, stigma or other side effects of use of a controlled substance;

 

13

 

 

perceived risks and benefits of our approach to treatment of indication;

 

the proximity of patients to clinical sites;

 

our ability to recruit clinical trial investigators with the appropriate competencies and experience;

 

the availability of competing clinical trials;

 

the availability of new drugs approved for the indication the clinical trial is investigating;

 

clinicians’ and patients’ perceptions of the potential advantages of the drug being studied in relation to other available therapies, including any new therapies that may be approved for the indications we are investigating; and

 

our ability to obtain and maintain patient informed consents.

 

Even once enrolled, we may be unable to retain a sufficient number of patients to complete any of our trials.

 

In addition, any negative results we may report in clinical trials may make it difficult or impossible to recruit and retain patients in other clinical trials of that same therapeutic candidate. Delays in the enrollment for any clinical trial will likely increase our costs, slow down the approval process and delay or potentially jeopardize our ability to commence sales of our future therapeutic candidates and generate revenue. In addition, some of the factors that cause, or lead to, a delay in the commencement or completion of clinical trials may also ultimately lead to the denial of regulatory approval of any future therapeutic candidates.

 

We have never commercialized a therapeutic candidate before and may lack the necessary expertise, personnel and resources to successfully commercialize our therapies on our own or with suitable collaborators.

 

We have limited organizational experience in the sale or marketing of therapeutic candidates. To achieve commercial success for any approved therapy, we must develop or acquire a sales and marketing organization, outsource these functions to third parties or enter into partnerships.

 

If we enter into arrangements with third parties to perform market access and commercial services for any approved therapies, the revenue or the profitability of these revenue to us could be lower than if we were to commercialize any therapies that we develop ourselves. Such collaborative arrangements may place the commercialization of any approved therapies outside of our control and would make us subject to a number of risks including that we may not be able to control the amount or timing of resources that our collaborative partner devotes to our therapies or that our collaborator’s willingness or ability to complete its obligations, and our obligations under our arrangements may be adversely affected by business combinations or significant changes in our collaborator’s business strategy. We may not be successful in entering into arrangements with third parties to commercialize our therapies or may be unable to do so on terms that are favorable to us. Acceptable third parties may fail to devote the necessary resources and attention to commercialize our therapies effectively, to set up sufficient number of treatment centers in third-party therapy sites, or to recruit, train and retain adequate number of therapists to administer our therapies.

 

If we do not establish commercial capabilities successfully, either on our own or in collaboration with third parties, we may not be successful in commercializing our therapies, which in turn would have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

 

14

 

 

The future commercial success of our future therapeutic candidates will depend on the degree of market access and acceptance of our potential therapies among healthcare professionals, patients, healthcare payors, health technology assessment bodies and the medical community at large.

 

We may never have a therapy that is commercially successful. To date, we have no therapy authorized for marketing. Furthermore, if approved, our future therapies may not achieve an adequate level of acceptance by payors, health technology assessment bodies, healthcare professionals, patients and the medical community at large, and we may not become profitable. The level of acceptance we ultimately achieve may be affected by negative public perceptions and historic media coverage of psychedelic substances, including psilocybin. Because of this history, efforts to educate the medical community and third-party payors and health technologies assessment bodies on the benefits of our future therapies may require significant resources and may never be successful, which would prevent us from generating significant revenue or becoming profitable. Market acceptance of our future therapies by healthcare professionals, patients, healthcare payors and health technology assessment bodies will depend on a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control, including, but not limited to, the following:

 

acceptance by healthcare professionals, patients and healthcare payors of each therapy as safe, effective and cost-effective;

 

changes in the standard of care for the targeted indications for any therapeutic candidate;

 

the strength of sales, marketing and distribution support;

 

potential product liability claims;

 

the therapeutic candidate’s relative convenience, ease of use, ease of administration and other perceived advantages over alternative therapies;

 

the prevalence and severity of adverse events or publicity;

 

limitations, precautions or warnings listed in the summary of therapeutic characteristics, patient information leaflet, package labeling or instructions for use;

 

the cost of treatment with our therapy in relation to alternative treatments;

 

the ability to manufacture our product in sufficient quantities and yields;

 

the availability and amount of coverage and reimbursement from healthcare payors, and the willingness of patients to pay out of pocket in the absence of healthcare payor coverage or adequate reimbursement;

 

the willingness of the target patient population to try, and of healthcare professionals to prescribe, the therapy;

 

any potential unfavorable publicity, including negative publicity associated with recreational use or abuse of psilocybin;

 

the extent to which therapies are approved for inclusion and reimbursed on formularies of hospitals and managed care organizations; and

 

whether our therapies are designated under physician treatment guidelines or under reimbursement guidelines as a first-line, second-line, third-line or last-line therapy.

 

If our future therapeutic candidates fail to gain market access and acceptance, this will have a material adverse impact on our ability to generate revenue to provide a satisfactory, or any, return on our investments. Even if some therapies achieve market access and acceptance, the market may prove not to be large enough to allow us to generate significant revenue.

 

Changes in methods of therapeutic candidate manufacturing or formulation may result in additional costs or delay.

 

As therapeutic candidates are developed through preclinical studies to late-stage clinical trials towards potential approval and commercialization, it is common that various aspects of the development program, such as manufacturing methods and formulation, may be altered along the way in an effort to optimize processes and results. Any of these changes could cause any of our future therapeutic candidates to perform differently and affect the results of planned clinical trials or other future clinical trials conducted with the materials manufactured using altered processes. Such changes may also require additional testing, FDA notification or FDA approval. This could delay completion of clinical trials, require the conduct of bridging clinical trials or the repetition of one or more clinical trials, increase clinical trial costs, delay approval of any of our future therapeutic candidates and jeopardize our ability to commence product sales and generate revenue.

 

15

 

 

We may become exposed to costly and damaging liability claims, either when testing our future therapeutic candidates in the clinic or at the commercial stage, and our product liability insurance may not cover all damages from such claims.

 

We will be exposed to potential product liability and professional indemnity risks that are inherent in the research, development, manufacturing, marketing and use of therapeutic substances. Currently, we have no therapies that have been approved for commercial sale; however, any future therapeutic candidates by us and our corporate collaborators in clinical trials, and the potential sale of any approved therapies in the future, may expose us to liability claims. These claims might be made by patients who use our therapies, healthcare providers, pharmaceutical companies, our corporate collaborators or other third parties that sell our therapies. Any claims against us, regardless of their merit, could be difficult and costly to defend and could materially adversely affect the market for our future therapeutic candidates or any prospects for commercialization of our future therapeutic candidates. Although the clinical trial process is designed to identify and assess potential side effects, it is always possible that a drug, even after regulatory approval, may exhibit unforeseen side effects. If any of our future therapeutic candidates causes adverse side effects during clinical trials or after regulatory approval, we may be exposed to substantial liabilities.

 

Physicians and patients may not comply with warnings that identify known potential adverse effects and describe which patients should not any of our future therapeutic candidates. Regardless of the merits or eventual outcome, liability claims may cause, among other things, the following:

 

decreased demand for our therapies due to negative public perception;

 

injury to our reputation;

 

withdrawal of clinical trial participants or difficulties in recruiting new trial participants;

 

initiation of investigations by regulators;

 

costs to defend or settle the related litigation;

 

a diversion of management’s time and our resources;

 

substantial monetary awards to trial participants or patients;

 

recalls, withdrawals or labeling, marketing or promotional restrictions;

 

loss of revenue from therapeutic sales; and

 

the inability to commercialize any of our future therapeutic candidates, if approved.

 

In addition we may not be able to obtain or maintain insurance coverage at a reasonable cost or obtain insurance coverage that will be adequate to satisfy any liability that may arise. If a successful product liability claim or series of claims is brought against us for uninsured liabilities or in excess of insured liabilities, our assets may not be sufficient to cover such claims and our business, financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected. Liability claims resulting from any of the events described above could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

16

 

 

Enacted and future legislation may increase the difficulty and cost for us to obtain marketing approval of and commercialize any of our future therapeutic candidates and could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

In the United States, the EU and other foreign jurisdictions, there have been a number of legislative and regulatory changes to the healthcare system that could affect our future results of operations. In particular, there have been and continue to be a number of initiatives at the U.S. federal and state levels that seek to reduce healthcare costs and improve the quality of healthcare. For example, in March 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively, “ACA”), substantially changed the way healthcare is financed by both governmental and private insurers, and significantly impacted the U.S. biopharmaceutical industry.

 

Among the provisions of the ACA of importance to our potential therapeutic candidates are the following:

 

an annual, nondeductible fee on any entity that manufactures or imports specified branded prescription drugs, apportioned among these entities according to their market share in certain government healthcare programs, although this fee would not apply to sales of certain products approved exclusively for orphan indications;

 

expansion of eligibility criteria for Medicaid programs, a Federal and state program which extends healthcare to low income individuals and other groups, by, among other things, allowing states to offer Medicaid coverage to certain individuals and adding new eligibility categories for certain individuals with income at or below 133% of the federal poverty level, thereby potentially increasing a manufacturer’s Medicaid rebate liability;

 

expansion of manufacturers’ rebate liability under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program, which requires that drug manufacturers provide rebates to states in exchange for state Medicaid coverage for most of the manufacturers’ drugs by increasing the minimum rebate for both branded and generic drugs and revising the definition of “average manufacturer price,” for calculating and reporting Medicaid drug rebates on outpatient prescription drug prices and extending rebate liability to prescriptions for individuals enrolled in Medicare Advantage plans (i.e., a type of Medicare healthcare plan offered by private companies);

 

a new methodology by which rebates owed by manufacturers under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program are calculated for products that are inhaled, infused, instilled, implanted or injected;

 

expansion of the types of entities eligible for the 340B drug discount program, which requires drug manufacturers to provide outpatient drugs to eligible healthcare organizations and covered entities at significantly reduced prices;

 

establishment of the Medicare Part D coverage gap discount program, which requires manufacturers to provide a 50% point-of-sale-discount (increased to 70% pursuant to the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, or BBA, effective as of January 1, 2019) off the negotiated price of applicable products to eligible beneficiaries during their coverage gap period as a condition for the manufacturers’ outpatient products to be covered under Medicare Part D;

 

creation of a new non-profit, nongovernmental institute, called the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, to oversee, identify priorities in and conduct comparative clinical effectiveness research, along with funding for such research; and

 

establishment of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation within Centers for Medicare & Medicaid to test innovative payment and service delivery models to lower Medicare and Medicaid spending, potentially including prescription product spending.

 

Since its enactment, there have been numerous judicial, administrative, executive, and legislative challenges to certain aspects of the ACA, and we expect there will be additional challenges and amendments to the ACA in the future. It is unclear whether the ACA will be overturned, repealed, replaced, or further amended. We cannot predict what affect further changes to the ACA would have on our business.

 

In addition, new laws and additional health reform measures may result in additional reductions in Medicare and other healthcare funding, which may adversely affect customer demand and affordability for our future therapeutic candidates and, accordingly, the results of our financial operations.

 

17

 

 

Our business operations and current and future relationships with investigators, health care professionals, consultants, third-party payors and customers may be subject, directly or indirectly, to U.S. federal and state healthcare fraud and abuse laws, false claims laws, health information privacy and security laws, other healthcare laws and regulations and other foreign privacy and security laws. If we are unable to comply, or have not fully complied, with such laws, we could face substantial penalties.

 

Although we do not currently have any therapies on the market, our current and future operations may be directly, or indirectly through our relationships with investigators, health care professionals, customers and third-party payors, subject to various U.S. federal and state healthcare laws and regulations, including, without limitation, the U.S. federal Anti-Kickback Statute or the federal Anti-Kickback Statute. Healthcare providers, physicians and others play a primary role in the recommendation and prescription of any therapies for which we obtain marketing approval. These laws impact, among other things, our research activities and proposed sales, marketing and education programs and constrain our business and financial arrangements and relationships with third-party payors, healthcare professionals who participate in our clinical research program, healthcare professionals and others who recommend, purchase, or provide our approved therapies, and other parties through which we market, sell and distribute our therapies for which we obtain marketing approval. In addition, we may be subject to patient data privacy and security regulation by both the U.S. federal government and the states in which we conduct our business, along with foreign regulators (including European data protection authorities). Finally, our current and future operations will be subject to additional healthcare-related statutory and regulatory requirements and enforcement by foreign regulatory authorities in jurisdictions in which we conduct our business. These laws include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

the federal Anti-Kickback Statute, which prohibits, among other things, persons or entities from knowingly and willfully soliciting, offering, receiving or paying any remuneration (including any kickback, bribe, or certain rebate), directly or indirectly, overtly or covertly, in cash or in kind, to induce or reward either the referral of an individual for, or the purchase, lease, order or recommendation of, any good, facility, item or service, for which payment may be made, in whole or in part, under U.S. federal and state healthcare programs such as Medicare and Medicaid. A person or entity does not need to have actual knowledge of the statute or specific intent to violate it in order to have committed a violation. Violations are subject to significant civil and criminal fines and penalties for each violation, plus up to three times the remuneration involved, imprisonment, and exclusion from government healthcare programs. In addition, the government may assert that a claim that includes items or services resulting from a violation of the federal Anti-Kickback Statute constitutes a false or fraudulent claim for purposes of the civil False Claims Act (“FCA”). The definition of the “remuneration” under the federal Anti-Kickback Statute has been interpreted to include anything of value. Further, courts have found that if “one purpose” of remuneration is to induce referrals, the federal Anti-Kickback Statute is violated. The Anti-Kickback Statute has been interpreted to apply to arrangements between pharmaceutical manufacturers on the one hand and prescribers, purchasers, and formulary managers on the other. There are a number of statutory exceptions and regulatory safe harbors protecting some common activities from prosecution; but the exceptions and safe harbors are drawn narrowly and require strict compliance in order to offer protection;

 

the federal civil and criminal false claims laws, such as the FCA, which prohibits individuals or entities from, among other things, knowingly presenting, or causing to be presented, false or fraudulent claims for payment to, or approval by Medicare, Medicaid, or other federal healthcare programs, knowingly making, using or causing to be made or used a false record or statement material to a false or fraudulent claim or an obligation to pay or transmit money to the federal government, or knowingly concealing or knowingly and improperly avoiding or decreasing or concealing an obligation to pay money to the U.S. federal government. Manufacturers can be held liable under the FCA even when they do not submit claims directly to government payors if they are deemed to “cause” the submission of false or fraudulent claims. The FCA also permits a private individual acting as a “whistleblower” to bring actions on behalf of the federal government alleging violations of the FCA and to share in any monetary recovery. When an entity is determined to have violated the FCA, the government may impose civil fines and penalties for each false claim, plus treble damages, and exclude the entity from participation in Medicare, Medicaid and other federal healthcare programs;

 

18

 

 

the federal civil monetary penalties laws, which impose civil fines for, among other things, the offering or transfer or remuneration to a Medicare or state healthcare program beneficiary if the person knows or should know it is likely to influence the beneficiary’s selection of a particular provider, practitioner, or supplier of services reimbursable by Medicare or a state health care program, unless an exception applies;

 

the U.S. federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”) which imposes criminal and civil liability for, among other things, knowingly and willfully executing, or attempting to execute, a scheme to defraud any healthcare benefit program or obtain, by means of false or fraudulent pretenses, representations, or promises, any of the money or property owned by, or under the custody or control of, any healthcare benefit program, regardless of the payor (i.e., public or private), and knowingly and willfully falsifying, concealing or covering up by any trick or device a material fact or making any materially false statements, in connection with the delivery of, or payment for, healthcare benefits, items or services relating to healthcare matters. Similar to the federal Anti-Kickback Statute, a person or entity can be found guilty of violating HIPAA without actual knowledge of the statute or specific intent to violate it;

 

HIPAA, as amended by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 (“HITECH”), and their respective implementing regulations, and as amended again by the Final HIPAA Omnibus Rule, published in January 2013, which imposes certain obligations, including mandatory contractual terms, with respect to safeguarding the privacy, security and transmission of individually identifiable health information without appropriate authorization by covered entities subject to the rule, such as health plans, healthcare clearinghouses and certain healthcare providers, as well as their business associates that perform certain services involving the use or disclosure of individually identifiable health information. HITECH also created new tiers of civil monetary penalties, amended HIPAA to make civil and criminal penalties directly applicable to business associates, and gave state attorneys general new authority to file civil actions for damages or injunctions in federal courts to enforce the federal HIPAA laws and seek attorneys’ fees and costs associated with pursuing federal civil actions;

 

the FDCA, which prohibits, among other things, the adulteration or misbranding of drugs, biologics and medical devices;

 

the U.S. federal legislation commonly referred to as Physician Payments Sunshine Act, and its implementing regulations, which requires certain manufacturers of drugs, devices, biologics and medical supplies that are reimbursable under Medicare, Medicaid, or the Children’s Health Insurance Program to report annually to the CMS information related to certain payments and other transfers of value to physicians (defined to include doctors, dentists, optometrists, podiatrists, and chiropractors) and teaching hospitals, as well as ownership and investment interests held by physicians and their immediate family members. Effective January 1, 2022, these reporting obligations will extend to include transfers of value made during the previous year to certain non-physician providers such as physician assistants and nurse practitioners; and

 

analogous state laws and regulations, including the following: state anti-kickback and false claims laws, which may be broader in scope than their federal equivalents, and which may apply to our business practices, including research, distribution, sales and marketing arrangements and claims involving healthcare items or services reimbursed by any third-party payor, including private insurers; state laws that require pharmaceutical companies to comply with the pharmaceutical industry’s voluntary compliance guidelines and the relevant compliance guidance promulgated by the U.S. federal government, or otherwise restrict payments that may be made to healthcare providers and other potential referral sources; state laws and regulations that require drug manufacturers to file reports relating to pricing and marketing information, which requires tracking gifts and other remuneration and items of value provided to healthcare professionals and entities; state and local laws that require the registration of pharmaceutical sales representatives and state laws governing the privacy and security of health information in certain circumstances, many of which differ from each other in significant ways and often are not preempted by HIPAA, thus complicating compliance efforts.

 

The distribution of pharmaceutical products is subject to additional requirements and regulations, including licensing, extensive record-keeping, storage and security requirements intended to prevent the unauthorized sale of pharmaceutical products.

 

19

 

 

The scope and enforcement of each of these laws is uncertain and subject to rapid change in the current environment of healthcare reform, especially in light of the lack of applicable precedent and regulations. Federal and state enforcement bodies have recently increased their scrutiny of interactions between healthcare companies and healthcare providers, which has led to a number of investigations, prosecutions, convictions and settlements in the healthcare industry. Even if precautions are taken, it is possible that governmental authorities will conclude that our business practices may not comply with current or future statutes, regulations or case law involving applicable fraud and abuse or other healthcare laws and regulations. If our operations are found to be in violation of any of these laws or any other governmental regulations that may apply to us, we may be subject to significant civil, criminal and administrative penalties, damages, fines, disgorgement, imprisonment, exclusion of drugs from government funded healthcare programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, additional reporting requirements and oversight if we become subject to a corporate integrity agreement or similar agreement to resolve allegations of non-compliance with these laws, reputational harm and the curtailment or restructuring of our operations. If any of the physicians or other healthcare providers or entities with whom we expect to do business is found not to be in compliance with applicable laws, that person or entity may be subject to significant criminal, civil or administrative sanctions, including exclusions from government funded healthcare programs. Prohibitions or restrictions on sales or withdrawal of future marketed products could materially affect business in an adverse way.

 

Efforts to ensure that our business arrangements with third parties will comply with applicable healthcare laws and regulations will involve substantial costs. Any action against us for violation of these laws, even if we successfully defend against it, could cause us to incur significant legal expenses and divert our management’s attention from the operation of our business. The shifting compliance environment and the need to build and maintain robust and expandable systems to comply with multiple jurisdictions with different compliance or reporting requirements increases the possibility that a healthcare company may run afoul of one or more of the requirements.

 

Failure to comply with health and data protection laws and regulations could lead to U.S. federal and state government enforcement actions, including civil or criminal penalties, private litigation, and adverse publicity and could negatively affect our operating results and business.

 

We and any potential collaborators may be subject to U.S. federal and state data protection laws and regulations, such as laws and regulations that address privacy and data security. In the United States, numerous federal and state laws and regulations, including state data breach notification laws, state health information privacy laws, and federal and state consumer protection laws, govern the collection, use, disclosure, and protection of health-related and other personal information. In addition, we may obtain health information from third parties, including research institutions from which we obtain clinical trial data, which are subject to privacy and security requirements under HIPAA, as amended by HITECH. To the extent that we act as a business associate to a healthcare provider engaging in electronic transactions, we may also be subject to the privacy and security provisions of HIPAA, as amended by HITECH, which restricts the use and disclosure of patient-identifiable health information, mandates the adoption of standards relating to the privacy and security of patient-identifiable health information, and requires the reporting of certain security breaches to healthcare provider customers with respect to such information. Additionally, many states have enacted similar laws that may impose more stringent requirements on entities like ours. Depending on the facts and circumstances, we could be subject to significant civil, criminal, and administrative penalties if we obtain, use, or disclose individually identifiable health information maintained by a HIPAA-covered entity in a manner that is not authorized or permitted by HIPAA.

 

Compliance with U.S. and foreign privacy and data protection laws and regulations could require us to take on more onerous obligations in our contracts, restrict our ability to collect, use and disclose data, or in some cases, impact our ability to operate in certain jurisdictions. Failure to comply with these laws and regulations could result in government enforcement actions (which could include civil, criminal and administrative penalties), private litigation, and/or adverse publicity and could negatively affect our operating results and business. Moreover, clinical trial subjects, employees and other individuals about whom we or our potential collaborators obtain personal information, as well as the providers who share this information with us, may limit our ability to collect, use and disclose the information. Claims that we have violated individuals’ privacy rights, failed to comply with data protection laws, or breached our contractual obligations, even if we are not found liable, could be expensive and time-consuming to defend and could result in adverse publicity that could harm our business.

 

20

 

 

The successful commercialization of any of our future therapeutic candidates will depend in part on the extent to which governmental authorities and health insurers establish adequate reimbursement levels and pricing policies. Failure to obtain or maintain adequate coverage and reimbursement for any of our future therapeutic candidates, if approved, could limit our ability to market those therapies and decrease our ability to generate revenue.

 

The availability and adequacy of coverage and reimbursement by governmental healthcare programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, private health insurers and other third-party payors are essential for most patients to be able to afford therapies. As Schedule I substances under the CSA, psilocybin and psilocin are deemed to have no accepted medical use and therapies that use psilocybin or psilocin are precluded from reimbursement in the United States. Our products must be scheduled as a Schedule II or lower controlled substance (i.e., Schedule III, IV or V) before they can be commercially marketed. Our ability to achieve acceptable levels of coverage and reimbursement for therapies by governmental authorities, private health insurers and other organizations will have an effect on our ability to successfully commercialize, and attract additional collaboration partners to invest in the development of our future therapeutic candidates. Even if we obtain coverage for a given therapy by third-party payors, the resulting reimbursement payment rates may not be adequate or may require patient out-of-pocket costs that patients may find unacceptably high. We cannot be sure that coverage and reimbursement in the United States or elsewhere will be available for any therapy that we may develop, and any reimbursement that may become available may be decreased or eliminated in the future.

 

Furthermore, third-party payors are increasingly challenging prices charged for therapeutic substances and services, and many third-party payors may refuse to provide coverage and reimbursement for particular drugs when an equivalent generic drug or a less expensive therapy is available. It is possible that a third-party payor may consider our future therapeutic candidates as substitutable and only offer to reimburse patients for the less expensive therapy. These payors may deny or revoke the reimbursement status of a given drug product or establish prices for new or existing marketed therapies at levels that are too low to enable us to realize an appropriate return on our investment in product development. If reimbursement is not available or is available only at limited levels, we may not be able to successfully commercialize our future therapeutic candidates, and may not be able to obtain a satisfactory financial return on therapeutic candidates that we may develop.

 

There is significant uncertainty related to the insurance coverage and reimbursement of newly approved therapies. In the United States, third-party payors, including private and governmental payors, such as the Medicare and Medicaid programs, play an important role in determining the extent to which new drugs will be covered. The Medicare and Medicaid programs increasingly are used as models for how private payors and other governmental payors develop their coverage and reimbursement policies for drugs. Some third-party payors may require pre-approval of coverage for new or innovative devices or drug therapies before they will reimburse health care providers who use such therapies. It is difficult to predict at this time what third-party payors will decide with respect to the coverage and reimbursement for our future therapeutic candidates.

 

Furthermore, obtaining and maintaining reimbursement status is time-consuming and costly. No uniform policy for coverage and reimbursement for drug therapies exists among third-party payors in the United States. Therefore, coverage and reimbursement for drug therapies can differ significantly from payor to payor. As a result, the coverage determination process is often a time-consuming and costly process that will require us to provide scientific and clinical support for the use of our therapies to each payor separately, with no assurance that coverage and adequate reimbursement will be applied consistently or obtained in the first instance. Furthermore, rules and regulations regarding reimbursement change frequently, in some cases at short notice, and we believe that changes in these rules and regulations are likely.

 

Outside the United States, international operations are generally subject to extensive governmental price controls and other market regulations. Other countries allow companies to fix their own prices for medical therapies, but monitor and control company profits. Additional foreign price controls or other changes in pricing regulation could restrict the amount that we are able to charge for our future therapeutic candidates. Accordingly, in markets outside the United States, the reimbursement for our therapies may be reduced compared with the United States and may be insufficient to generate commercially reasonable revenue and profits.

 

21

 

 

We will be subject to environmental, health and safety laws and regulations, and we may become exposed to liability and substantial expenses in connection with environmental compliance or remediation activities which may adversely affect our business and financial condition.

 

Our operations, including our research, development, testing and manufacturing activities, will be subject to numerous foreign, federal, state and local environmental, health and safety laws and regulations. These laws and regulations govern, among other things, the controlled use, manufacture, handling, release and disposal of and the maintenance of a registry for, hazardous materials, such as chemical solvents, human cells, carcinogenic compounds, mutagenic compounds and compounds that have a toxic effect on reproduction, laboratory procedures and exposure to blood-borne pathogens.

 

We may incur significant costs to comply with these current or future environmental and health and safety laws and regulations. Furthermore, if we fail to comply with such laws and regulations, we could be subject to fines or other sanctions.

 

Risks Related to our Apparel Business

 

If we do not continually enhance our brand recognition, increase distribution of our products, attract new customers and introduce new products, either on a timely basis or at all, our business may suffer.

 

The retail industry is subject to intense competition as well as rapid and frequent changes in consumer demands. Because consumers in this industry are constantly seeking new products, our success relies heavily on our ability to continue to market new products. We may not be successful in introducing or marketing new products on a timely basis, if at all. If we are unable to commercialize new products, our revenue may not grow as expected, which would adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Any damage to our brand or reputation could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We must protect and grow the value of our brand to continue to be successful in the future. Any incident that erodes consumer affinity for our brand could significantly reduce our value and damage our business. For example, negative third-party reports regarding our products, whether accurate or not, may adversely impact consumer perceptions. This negative publicity could adversely affect our brand and reputation which would have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

 

If we fail to protect our name and brand in the marketplace, there could be a negative effect on our business and limitations on our ability to penetrate new markets.

 

We believe that our “NFID” trademarks are integral to our design and our success in building consumer loyalty to our brand. We have three trademarks registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, which we believe are important to our business. We cannot assure you that these registrations will prevent imitation of our name or merchandising concept, or the infringement of our other intellectual property rights by others. Imitation of our name, concept or merchandise in a manner that projects lesser quality or carries a negative connotation of our brand image could have an adverse effect on our reputation, business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

In addition, there can be no assurance that others will not try to block the manufacture or sale of our “NFID” branded merchandise by claiming that our merchandise violates their trademarks or other proprietary rights since other entities may have rights to trademarks that contain the word “NFID” or may have rights in similar or competing marks for apparel and/or accessories.

 

If we face litigation relating to our trademarks, it could result in substantial costs and a diversion of management’s attention and resources, which could harm our business and result in a decline in the market price of our common stock. In addition, such litigation could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

22

 

 

Our sales could be severely impacted by decreases in consumer spending.

 

We depend upon consumers feeling confident to spend discretionary income on our product offering to drive our sales. Consumer spending may be adversely impacted by economic conditions such as consumer confidence in future economic conditions, interest and tax rates, employment levels, salary and wage levels, general business conditions, the availability of consumer credit and the level of housing, energy and food costs. In addition, consumer spending can be impacted by non-economic factors, including geopolitical issues, trade restrictions, unseasonable weather, pandemics/epidemics, including the current COVID-19 pandemic, and other factors that are outside of our control. These risks may be exacerbated for product developers and brands like us who focus on specialty apparel. We have already seen significant decreases in consumer spending as a result of COVID-19, particularly in our industry, and such trends may continue. If periods of decreased consumer spending persist, our sales could decrease, and our financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

We operate in a highly competitive industry.

 

The retail industry is intensely competitive and consolidation in this industry continues. In addition, we compete with independent specialty shops, department stores, off-price retailers, online marketplaces such as Amazon, stores and direct marketers that sell similar lines of merchandise and target customers through catalogs and e-commerce. Moreover, the internet and other new technologies facilitate competitive entry and comparison shopping in our retail market. We face competition in the areas of brand recognition, quality, price, advertising/promotion and service. A number of our competitors are larger than us and have substantial financial, marketing and other resources as well as substantial international operations. In addition, reduced barriers to entry and easier access to funding are creating new competition. Furthermore, in order to protect our existing market share or capture increased market share in this highly competitive environment, we may be required to increase expenditures for promotions and advertising, and must continue to introduce and establish new products. Due to inherent risks in the marketplace associated with advertising and new product introductions, including uncertainties about trade and consumer acceptance, increased expenditures may not prove successful in maintaining or enhancing our market share and could impact our operating results.

 

Our business depends upon us identifying and responding to changing customer fashion preferences and fashion-related trends. If we cannot identify trends in advance or we select the wrong fashion trends, our sales could be adversely affected.

 

Fashion trends in the streetwear apparel market can change rapidly. We need to anticipate, identify and respond quickly to changing trends and consumer demands in order to provide the merchandise our customers seek and maintain our brand image. If we cannot identify changing trends in advance, fail to react to changing trends or misjudge the market for a trend, our sales could be adversely affected, and we may be faced with a substantial amount of unsold inventory or missed opportunities. As a result, we may be forced to mark down our merchandise in order to dispose of slow moving inventory, which may result in lower profit margins, negatively impacting our financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our business operations could be disrupted if our information technology systems fail to perform adequately.

 

The efficient operation of our business depends on our information technology systems. We rely on our information technology systems to effectively manage our business data, communications, supply chain, order entry and fulfillment and other business processes. The failure of our information technology systems to perform as we anticipate could disrupt our business and could result in transaction errors, processing inefficiencies, and the loss of sales and customers, causing our business and results of operations to suffer. In particular, as we grow, we need to make sure that our information technology systems are upgraded and integrated throughout our business and able to generate reports sufficient for management to run our business. In addition, our information technology systems may be vulnerable to damage, interruption or security breaches from circumstances beyond our control, including fire, natural disasters, system failures, cyber-attacks, corporate espionage and viruses. Any such damage, interruption or security breach could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

23

 

 

A rise in the cost of raw materials, labor and transportation could increase our cost of sales and cause our results of operations and margins to decline.

 

Fluctuations in the price, availability and quality of fabrics or other raw materials used to manufacture our products, as well as the price for transportation and labor, including the impact of federal or state minimum wage rate increases, could have adverse impacts on our cost of sales and our ability to meet our customers’ demands. In particular, because a key component of our clothing products is cotton, increases in the cost of cotton may significantly affect the cost of our products and could have an adverse impact on our cost of sales. We may not be able to pass all or a portion of these higher costs on to our customers, which could have a material adverse effect on our profitability.

 

Disruptions in the worldwide economy may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. 

 

Adverse and uncertain economic conditions may impact distributor, retailer and consumer demand for our products. In addition, our ability to manage normal commercial relationships with our suppliers, distributors, retailers and consumers may suffer. Consumers may shift to purchasing lower-priced products during economic downturns, making it more difficult for us to sell our premium products. During economic downturns, it may be more difficult to persuade existing consumers to continue to use our brand or persuade new consumers to select our brand without price promotions. Furthermore, during economic downturns, distributors and retailers may reduce their inventories of our products. Our results of operations depend upon, among other things, our ability to maintain and increase sales volume with our existing distributors and retailers, to attract new consumers and to provide products that appeal to consumers at prices they are willing and able to pay. Prolonged unfavorable economic conditions may have an adverse effect on our results of operation and financial condition.

 

Our business could suffer if we fail to comply with labor laws or if one of our manufacturers fails to use acceptable labor or environmental practices.

 

We are subject to labor laws governing relationships with employees, including minimum wage requirements, overtime, working conditions and citizenship requirements. Compliance with these laws may lead to increased costs and operational complexity and may increase our exposure to governmental investigations or litigation.

 

Our business could suffer if we need to replace third-party manufacturers and transportation providers.

 

We do not own or operate any manufacturing facilities and depend exclusively on independent third parties for the manufacture of our products. We compete with other companies for the production capacity of our manufacturers. Some of these competitors may place larger orders than we do, and thus may have an advantage in securing production capacity. If we experience a significant increase in demand, or if an existing manufacturer of ours must be replaced, we may have to expand our third-party manufacturing capacity. We cannot guarantee that this additional capacity will be available when required on terms that are acceptable to us.

 

We also rely upon third-party transportation providers for our product shipments. Our utilization of these shipping services is subject to various risks, including, but not limited to, potential labor shortages (stemming from labor disputes, strikes, or otherwise), severe weather, and pandemic diseases, which could delay the timing of shipments, and increases in wages and fuel prices, which could result in higher transportation costs. Any delays in the timing of our product shipments or increases in transportation costs could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition.

  

Risks Relating to Our Intellectual Property Rights

 

The failure to obtain or maintain patents, licensing agreements and other intellectual property could materially impact our ability to compete effectively.

 

In order for our business to be viable and to compete effectively, we need to develop and maintain, and we will heavily rely on, a proprietary position with respect to our intellectual property. However, there are significant risks associated with our actual or proposed intellectual property. The risks and uncertainties that we face with respect to our rights principally include the following:

 

pending patent applications we have filed or will file may not result in issued patents or may take longer than we expect to result in issued patents;

 

we may be subject to interference proceedings;

 

we may be subject to reexamination proceedings;

 

24

 

 

we may be subject to post grant review proceedings;

 

we may be subject to inter partes review proceedings;

 

we may be subject to derivation proceedings;

 

we may be subject to opposition proceedings in the U.S. or in foreign countries;

 

any patents that are issued or licensed to us may not provide us with any competitive advantages or meaningful protection;

 

we may not be able to develop additional proprietary technologies that are patentable;

 

other companies may challenge patents licensed or issued to us;

 

other companies may have independently developed and patented (or may in the future independently develop and patent) similar or alternative technologies, or duplicate our technologies;

 

other companies may design around technologies we have licensed or developed;

 

enforcement of patents is complex, uncertain and very expensive and we may not be able to secure, enforce and defend our patents; and

 

in the event that we were to ever seek to enforce our patents in ligation, there is some risk that they could be deemed invalid, not infringed, or unenforceable.

 

the patents of others may have an adverse effect on our business.

 

We cannot be certain that any patents will be issued as a result of any pending or future applications, or that any patents, once issued, will provide us with adequate protection from competing products. For example, issued patents may be circumvented or challenged, declared invalid or unenforceable, or narrowed in scope. In addition, since publication of discoveries in scientific or patent literature often lags behind actual discoveries, we cannot be certain that we or our licensors were the first to invent or to file patent applications covering them.

 

It is also possible that others may have or may obtain issued patents that could prevent us from commercializing our products or require us to obtain licenses requiring the payment of significant fees or royalties in order to enable us to conduct our business. There is no guarantee that such licenses will be available based on commercially reasonable terms. As to those patents that we have licensed, our rights depend on maintaining our obligations to the licensor under the applicable license agreement, and we may be unable to do so.

 

If we are unable to obtain and maintain patent protection for our products, or if the scope of the patent protection obtained is not sufficiently broad, competitors could develop and commercialize products similar or identical to ours, and our ability to successfully commercialize our products could be impaired.

 

The patent prosecution process is expensive and time-consuming, and we may not be able to file and prosecute all necessary or desirable patent applications at a reasonable cost, in a timely manner, or in all jurisdictions. It is also possible that we will fail to identify patentable aspects of our development output before it is too late to obtain patent protection.

 

25

 

 

The patent position of life science companies generally is highly uncertain, involves complex legal and factual questions and has in past years been the subject of much litigation. In addition, the laws of foreign countries may not protect our rights to the same extent as the laws of the United States and we may fail to seek or obtain patent protection in all major markets. For example, unlike the U.S., European patent law restricts the patentability of methods of treatment of the human body. Our pending and future patent applications may not result in patents being issued which protect our technology or products, in whole or in part, or which effectively prevent others from commercializing competitive technologies and products. Changes in either the patent laws or interpretation of the patent laws in the United States and other countries may diminish the value of our patents or narrow the scope of our patent protection, even post-grant.

 

Recent patent reform legislation has increased the uncertainties and costs surrounding the prosecution of patent applications and the enforcement or defense of issued patents. On September 16, 2011, the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act, or the Leahy-Smith Act, was signed into law. The Leahy-Smith Act includes a number of significant changes to United States patent law. These include provisions that affect the way patent applications are prosecuted and may also affect patent litigation. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) recently developed new regulations and procedures to govern administration of the Leahy-Smith Act, and many of the substantive changes to patent law associated with the Leahy-Smith Act, and in particular, the first to file provisions, only became effective on March 16, 2013. Accordingly, it is not clear what, if any, impact the Leahy-Smith Act will have on the operation of our business. However, the Leahy-Smith Act and its implementation could increase the uncertainties and costs surrounding the prosecution of our patent applications and the enforcement or defense of our issued patents, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

 

Moreover, we may be subject to a third-party pre-issuance submission of prior art to the USPTO, or become involved in opposition, derivation, reexamination, inter partes review, post-grant review or interference proceedings challenging our patent rights (whether licensed or otherwise held) or the patent rights of others. An adverse determination in any such submission, proceeding or litigation could reduce the scope of, or invalidate, our patent rights (whether licensed or otherwise held), allow third parties to commercialize our products and compete directly with us, without payment to us, or result in our inability to manufacture or commercialize products without infringing third-party patent rights. In addition, if the breadth or strength of protection provided by our patents and patent applications (whether licensed or otherwise held) is threatened, it could dissuade companies from collaborating with us to license, develop or commercialize current or future product candidates.

 

Even if our patent applications (whether licensed or otherwise held) result in the issuance of patents, they may not issue in a form that will provide us with any meaningful protection, prevent competitors from competing with us or otherwise provide us with any competitive advantage. Our competitors may be able to circumvent our owned or licensed patents by developing similar or alternative technologies or products in a non-infringing manner.

 

The issuance of a patent is not conclusive as to its inventorship, scope, validity or enforceability, and our licensed or owned patents may be challenged in the courts or patent offices in the United States and abroad. Such challenges may result in loss of exclusivity or freedom to operate or in patent claims being narrowed, invalidated or held unenforceable, in whole or in part, which could limit our ability to stop others from using or commercializing similar or identical products, or limit the duration of the patent protection of our products. Given the amount of time required for the development, testing and regulatory review of new life science product candidates, patents protecting such candidates might expire before or shortly after such candidates are commercialized. As a result, our intellectual property rights portfolio may not provide us with sufficient rights to exclude others from commercializing products similar or identical to ours.

 

We may become involved in lawsuits to protect or enforce our intellectual property rights, which could be expensive, time-consuming and ultimately unsuccessful.

 

Competitors may infringe our intellectual property. To counter infringement or unauthorized use, we may be required to sue a third party, or otherwise make a claim, alleging infringement or other violation of patents, trademarks, trade dress, copyrights, trade secrets, domain names or other intellectual property rights that we either own or license from a third party. If we do not prevail in enforcing our intellectual property rights in this type of litigation, we may be subject to:

 

paying monetary damages related to the legal expenses of the third party;

 

facing additional competition that may have a significant adverse effect on our product pricing, market share, business operations, financial condition, and the commercial viability of our product; and

 

restructuring our Company or delaying or terminating select business opportunities, including, but not limited to, research and development, clinical trial, and commercialization activities, due to a potential deterioration of our financial condition or market competitiveness.

 

26

 

 

Any claims we assert against perceived infringers could provoke these parties to assert counterclaims against us alleging that we infringe their intellectual property or that our intellectual property is invalid or unenforceable. The result of these challenges may narrow the scope or claims of or invalidate or found unenforceable patents that are integral to our product or product candidate. In addition, in a patent infringement proceeding, a court may decide that a licensed or owned patent of ours is invalid or unenforceable, in whole or in part, construe the patent’s claims narrowly or refuse to stop the other party from using the technology at issue on the grounds that our patents do not cover that technology. Moreover, lawsuits to protect or enforce our intellectual property rights could be expensive, time-consuming and ultimately unsuccessful.

 

Third parties may initiate legal proceedings alleging that we are infringing their intellectual property rights, the outcome of which would be uncertain.

 

Our commercial success depends upon our ability to develop, manufacture, market and sell our product candidates without infringing the proprietary rights of third parties. There is considerable intellectual property litigation in the life sciences industry. We cannot guarantee that our product candidates will not infringe third-party patents or other proprietary rights. We may become party to, or threatened with, future adversarial proceedings or litigation regarding intellectual property rights with respect to our products and technology, including inter partes review, interference, or derivation proceedings before the USPTO and similar bodies in other countries. Third parties may assert infringement claims against us based on existing intellectual property rights and intellectual property rights that may be granted in the future.

 

If we are found to infringe a third party’s intellectual property rights, we could be required to obtain a license from such third party to continue developing and marketing our products. However, we may not be able to obtain any required license on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Even if we were able to obtain a license, it could be non-exclusive, thereby giving our competitors access to the same technologies licensed to us. We could be forced, including by court order, to cease commercializing the infringing technology or product. In addition, we could be found liable for monetary damages, including treble damages and attorneys’ fees if we are found to have willfully infringed a patent. A finding of infringement could prevent us from commercializing our product candidates or force us to cease some of our business operations, which could materially harm our business. Claims that we have misappropriated the confidential information or trade secrets of third parties could have a similar negative impact on our business.

 

Obtaining and maintaining our patent protection depends on compliance with various procedural, document submission, fee payment and other requirements imposed by governmental patent agencies, and our own patent protection could be reduced or eliminated for noncompliance with these requirements.

 

Periodic maintenance fees and annuities on any issued patent are due to be paid to the USPTO and foreign patent agencies in several stages over the lifetime of the patent. The USPTO and various foreign governmental patent agencies require compliance with a number of procedural, documentary, fee payment and other similar provisions during the patent application process. While an inadvertent lapse can in many cases be cured by payment of a late fee or by other means in accordance with the applicable rules, there are situations in which noncompliance can result in abandonment or lapse of the patent or patent application, resulting in partial or complete loss of patent rights in the relevant jurisdiction. Noncompliance events that could result in abandonment or lapse of a patent or patent application include, but are not limited to, failure to respond to official actions within prescribed time limits, non-payment of fees and failure to properly legalize and submit formal documents. In such an event, our competitors might be able to enter our markets, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

27

 

 

We may be subject to claims by third parties asserting that our employees or we have misappropriated their intellectual property or claiming ownership of what we regard as our own intellectual property.

 

We may retain employees and contractors that were previously employed at universities or other companies, including potential competitors. Although we will try to ensure that our employees and contractors do not use the proprietary information or know-how of others in their work for us, we may be subject to claims that these employees or we have used or disclosed intellectual property, including trade secrets or other proprietary information, of any such employee’s former employer. Litigation may be necessary to defend against these claims, and any such litigation could have an unfavorable outcome.

 

In addition, while it is our policy to require our employees and contractors who may be involved in the development of intellectual property to execute agreements assigning such intellectual property to us, we may be unsuccessful in executing such an agreement with each party who in fact develops intellectual property that we regard as our own. Our and their assignment agreements may not be self-executing or may be breached, and we may be forced to bring claims against third parties, or defend claims they may bring against us, to determine the ownership of what we regard as our intellectual property.

 

If we fail in prosecuting or defending any such claims, in addition to paying monetary damages, we may lose valuable intellectual property rights or personnel. Even if we are successful in prosecuting or defending against such claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and adverse results, and be a distraction to management.

 

If we fail to comply with our obligations in the agreements under which we may license intellectual property rights from third parties or otherwise experience disruptions to our business relationships with our licensors, we could lose rights that are important to our business.

 

We have licensed and may be required to enter into intellectual property license agreements that are important to our business. These license agreements may impose various diligence, milestone payment, royalty and other obligations on us. For example, we may enter into exclusive license agreements with various universities and research institutions, we may be required to use commercially reasonable efforts to engage in various development and commercialization activities with respect to licensed products, and may need to satisfy specified milestone and royalty payment obligations. If we fail to comply with any obligations under our agreements with any of these licensors, we may be subject to termination of the license agreement in whole or in part, increased financial obligations to our licensors or loss of exclusivity in a particular field or territory, in which case our ability to develop or commercialize products covered by the license agreement will be impaired.

 

In addition, disputes may arise regarding intellectual property subject to a license agreement, including:

 

the scope of rights granted under the license agreement and other interpretation-related issues;

 

the extent to which our processes infringe on intellectual property of the licensor that is not subject to the licensing agreement;

 

our diligence obligations under the license agreement and what activities satisfy those obligations;

 

if a third-party expresses interest in an area under a license that we are not pursuing, under the terms of certain of our license agreements, we may be required to sublicense rights in that area to a third party, and that sublicense could harm our business; and

 

the ownership of inventions and know-how resulting from the joint creation or use of intellectual property by our licensors and us.

 

Disputes over intellectual property that we have licensed may prevent or impair our ability to maintain our current licensing arrangements on acceptable terms, and we may be unable to successfully develop and commercialize our product candidate.

 

28

 

 

Intellectual property litigation could cause us to spend substantial resources and distract our personnel from their normal responsibilities.

 

Even if resolved in our favor, litigation or other legal proceedings relating to intellectual property claims may cause us to incur significant expenses and could distract our technical and management personnel from their normal responsibilities. In addition, there could be public announcements of the results of hearings, motions or other interim proceedings or developments and if securities analysts or investors perceive these results to be negative, it could have an adverse effect on the price of our common stock. Such litigation or proceedings could increase our operating losses and reduce the resources available for development activities or any future sales, marketing or distribution activities. We may not have sufficient financial or other resources to conduct such litigation or proceedings adequately. Some of our competitors may be able to sustain the costs of such litigation or proceedings more effectively than we can because of their greater financial resources. Uncertainties resulting from the initiation and continuation of patent litigation or other proceedings could compromise our ability to compete in the marketplace.

 

We may spend considerable resources developing and maintaining patents, licensing agreements and other intellectual property that may later be abandoned or may otherwise never result in products brought to market.

 

Not all technologies and candidate products that initially show potential as the basis for future products will ultimately meet the rigors of our development process and as a result may be abandoned and/or never otherwise result in products brought to market.  In some cases, prior to abandonment we may be required to incur significant costs developing and maintaining intellectual property and/or maintaining license agreements and our business could be harmed by such costs.

 

If we are not able to adequately prevent disclosure of trade secrets and other proprietary information, the value of our technology and product could be significantly diminished.

 

We rely on trade secrets to protect our proprietary technologies, especially where we do not believe patent protection is appropriate or obtainable. However, trade secrets are difficult to protect. We rely in part on confidentiality agreements with our employees, consultants, outside scientific collaborators, sponsored researchers and other advisors to protect our trade secrets and other proprietary information. These agreements may not effectively prevent disclosure of confidential information and may not provide an adequate remedy in the event of unauthorized disclosure of confidential information. In addition, others may independently discover our trade secrets and proprietary information. For example, the FDA, as part of its transparency initiative, is currently considering whether to make additional information publicly available on a routine basis, including information that we may consider to be trade secrets or other proprietary information, and it is not clear at the present time how the FDA’s disclosure policies may change in the future, if at all. Costly and time-consuming litigation could be necessary to enforce and determine the scope of our proprietary rights, and failure to obtain or maintain trade secret protection could adversely affect our competitive business position.

 

We rely on information technology, and if we are unable to protect against service interruptions, data corruption, cyber-based attacks or network security breaches, our operations could be disrupted, and our business could be negatively affected.

 

We rely on information technology networks and systems to process, transmit and store electronic and financial information; to coordinate our business; and to communicate within our Company and with customers, suppliers, partners and other third-parties. These information technology systems may be susceptible to damage, disruptions or shutdowns, hardware or software failures, power outages, computer viruses, cyber-attacks, telecommunication failures, user errors or catastrophic events. If our information technology systems suffer severe damage, disruption or shutdown, and our business continuity plans do not effectively resolve the issues in a timely manner, our operations could be disrupted, and our business could be negatively affected. In addition, cyber-attacks could lead to potential unauthorized access and disclosure of confidential information, and data loss and corruption. There is no assurance that we will not experience these service interruptions or cyber-attacks in the future.

 

29

 

 

Other Risks Related to Our Business

 

We may not be successful in hiring and retaining key employees, including executive officers.

 

Our success materially depends upon the expertise, experience and continued service of our management and other key personnel, including, but not limited to, Eric Weisblum, our Chief Executive Officer. If we lose the services of Mr. Weisblum or any of other member of management, our business would be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our future success also depends upon our ability to attract and retain highly qualified management personnel and other employees. There can be no assurance that these professionals will be available in the market, or that we will be able to retain existing professionals or to meet or to continue to meet their compensation requirements. Furthermore, the cost base in relation to such compensation, which may include equity compensation, may increase significantly, which could have a material adverse effect on us. Failure to establish and maintain an effective management team and work force could adversely affect our ability to operate, grow and manage our business.

 

Unfavorable global economic, business or political conditions could adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations. 

 

Our results of operations could be adversely affected by general conditions in the global economy and in the global financial markets, including conditions that are outside of our control, including the impact of health and safety concerns, such as those relating to the current COVID-19 outbreak. The most recent global financial crisis caused extreme volatility and disruptions in the capital and credit markets. A severe or prolonged economic downturn could result in a variety of risks to our business, including weakened demand for our products and our ability to raise additional capital when needed on acceptable terms, if at all. A weak or declining economy could strain our domestic and international customers, possibly resulting in delays in customer payments. Any of the foregoing could harm our business and we cannot anticipate all the ways in which the current economic climate and financial market conditions could adversely impact our business.

 

Risks Relating to Our Securities

 

Our Certificate of Incorporation grants our board of directors, without any action or approval by our stockholders, the power to designate and issue preferred stock with rights, preferences and privileges that may be adverse to the rights of the holders of our common stock.

 

The total number of preferred stock that we are authorized to issue is 5,000,000 shares of which 1,000,000 shares have been designated as Series A Preferred Stock, none of which are issued and outstanding as of February 12, 2021; 2,000 shares have been designated as Series B Preferred Stock, none of which are issued and outstanding as of February 12, 2021 and 4,280 shares have been designated as Series C Preferred Stock, of which 4,276 shares are issued and outstanding as of February 12, 2021. Pursuant to authority granted by our Certificate of Incorporation, our board of directors, without any action or approval by our stockholders, may issue preferred stock in one or more series, the terms of which may be determined at the time of issuance by our board of directors without further action by stockholders. The terms of any series of preferred stock may include voting rights (including the right to vote as a series on particular matters), preferences as to dividend, liquidation, conversion and redemption rights and sinking fund provisions. The rights of holders of other classes or series of capital stock, including preferred stock that may be issued could be superior to the rights of the holders of shares of our common stock. The designation and issuance of shares of capital stock having preferential rights could materially adversely affect the rights of the holders of our common stock. In addition, any issuances of additional capital stock (common or preferred) will dilute the percentage of ownership interest of our stockholders.

 

Our common stock is subject to the “penny stock” rules of the SEC and the trading market in the securities is limited, which makes transactions in the stock cumbersome and may reduce the value of an investment in the stock.

 

Rule 15g-9 under the Exchange Act establishes the definition of a “penny stock,” for the purposes relevant to us, as any equity security that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share or with an exercise price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. For any transaction involving a penny stock, unless exempt, the rules require: (a) that a broker or dealer approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks; and (b) the broker or dealer receive from the investor a written agreement to the transaction, setting forth the identity and quantity of the penny stock to be purchased.

 

30

 

 

In order to approve a person’s account for transactions in penny stocks, the broker or dealer must: (a) obtain financial information and investment experience objectives of the person and (b) make a reasonable determination that the transactions in penny stocks are suitable for that person and the person has sufficient knowledge and experience in financial matters to be capable of evaluating the risks of transactions in penny stocks.

 

The broker or dealer must also deliver, prior to any transaction in a penny stock, a disclosure schedule prescribed by the SEC relating to the penny stock market, which, in highlight form: (a) sets forth the basis on which the broker or dealer made the suitability determination; and (b) confirms that the broker or dealer received a signed, written agreement from the investor prior to the transaction. Generally, brokers may be less willing to execute transactions in securities subject to the “penny stock” rules. This may make it more difficult for investors to dispose of our common stock and cause a decline in the market value of our common stock.

 

Disclosure also has to be made about the risks of investing in penny stocks in both public offerings and in secondary trading and about the commissions payable to both the broker or dealer and the registered representative, current quotations for the securities and the rights and remedies available to an investor in cases of fraud in penny stock transactions. Finally, monthly statements have to be sent disclosing recent price information for the penny stock held in the account and information on the limited market in penny stocks.

 

We have never paid cash dividends and have no plans to pay cash dividends in the future.

 

Holders of shares of our common stock are entitled to receive such dividends as may be declared by our board of directors. To date, we have paid no cash dividends on our capital stock and we do not expect to pay cash dividends in the foreseeable future. We intend to retain future earnings, if any, to provide funds for operations of our business. Therefore, any return investors in our capital stock may have will be in the form of appreciation, if any, in the market value of their shares of common stock.

 

If we fail to remain current in our reporting requirements, we could be removed from the OTCQB which would limit the ability of broker-dealers to sell our securities and the ability of stockholders to sell their securities in the secondary market.

 

As a company listed on the OTCQB and subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, we must be current with our filings pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act in order to maintain price quotation privileges on the OTCQB. If we fail to remain current in our reporting requirements, we could be removed from the OTCQB. As a result, the market liquidity of our securities could be severely adversely affected by limiting the ability of broker-dealers to trade our securities and the ability of stockholders to sell their securities in the secondary market.

 

Our common stock could be subject to extreme volatility.

 

The trading price of our common stock may be affected by a number of factors, including events described in the risk factors set forth herein and in our other reports filed with the SEC from time to time, as well as our operating results, financial condition and other events or factors. In addition to the uncertainties relating to future operating performance and the profitability of operations, factors such as variations in interim financial results or various, and unpredictable, factors, many of which are beyond our control, may have a negative effect on the market price of our common stock. In recent years, broad stock market indices, in general, and smaller capitalization companies, in particular, have experienced substantial price fluctuations. In a volatile market, we may experience wide fluctuations in the market price of our common stock and wide bid-ask spreads. These fluctuations may have a negative effect on the market price of our common stock. In addition, the securities market has, from time to time, experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are not related to the operating performance of particular companies. These market fluctuations may have a material adverse effect the market price of our common stock.

 

31

 

 

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS 

 

This prospectus contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. All statements other than statements of historical facts contained in this prospectus are forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements in this prospectus are only predictions. We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events and financial trends that we believe may affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. In some cases, you can identify these forward-looking statements by terms such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “continue,” “could,” “depends,” “estimate,” “expects,” “intend,” “may,” “ongoing,” “plan,” “potential,” “predict,” “project,” “should,” “will,” “would” or the negative of those terms or other similar expressions, although not all forward-looking statements contain those words. We have based these forward-looking statements on our current expectations and projections about future events and trends that we believe may affect our financial condition, results of operations, strategy, short-term and long-term business operations and objectives and financial needs.

 

These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of risks, uncertainties and assumptions, including those described in “Risk Factors.” Moreover, we operate in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment. New risks emerge from time to time. It is not possible for our management to predict all risks, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements we may make. In light of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions, the forward-looking events and circumstances discussed in this prospectus may not occur and actual results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated or implied in the forward-looking statements.

 

You should not rely upon forward-looking statements as predictions of future events. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee that the future results, levels of activity, performance or events and circumstances reflected in the forward-looking statements will be achieved or occur. Moreover, except as required by law, neither we nor any other person assumes responsibility for the accuracy and completeness of the forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements for any reason after the date of this prospectus to conform these statements to actual results or to changes in our expectations.

 

You should read this prospectus and the documents that we reference in this prospectus and have filed with the SEC as exhibits to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part with the understanding that our actual future results, levels of activity, performance and events and circumstances may be materially different from what we expect.

 

32

 

 

INDUSTRY AND MARKET DATA

 

This prospectus contains estimates and other statistical data made by independent parties and by us relating to market size and growth and other data about our industry. We obtained the industry and market data in this prospectus from our own research as well as from industry and general publications, surveys and studies conducted by third parties. This data involves a number of assumptions and limitations and contains projections and estimates of the future performance of the industries in which we operate that are subject to a high degree of uncertainty, including those discussed in “Risk Factors.” We caution you not to give undue weight to such projections, assumptions and estimates. Further, industry and general publications, studies and surveys generally state that they have been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, although they do not guarantee the accuracy or completeness of such information. While we believe that these publications, studies and surveys are reliable, we have not independently verified the data contained in them. In addition, while we believe that the results and estimates from our internal research are reliable, such results and estimates have not been verified by any independent source.

 

USE OF PROCEEDS

 

The selling stockholders will receive all of the proceeds from the sale of the Resale Shares offered by them pursuant to this prospectus. We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of the Resale Shares by the selling stockholders covered by this prospectus. If the warrants are exercised for cash, we will use the proceeds for working capital.

 

MARKET FOR OUR COMMON STOCK AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock is quoted on the OTCQB under the symbol “SILO.”

 

Stockholders

 

As of February 12, 2021, there were 122 stockholders of record of our common stock. The actual number of holders of our common stock is greater than this number of record holders, and includes stockholders who are beneficial owners, but whose shares are held in street name by brokers or held by other nominees.

 

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

 

As of December 31, 2020, we did not have any equity compensation plans in effect.

 

DIVIDEND POLICY 

 

We have never declared or paid any cash dividends on our capital stock. We intend to retain future earnings, if any, to finance the operation and expansion of our business and do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Any future determination related to our dividend policy will be made at the discretion of our board of directors after considering our financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements, business prospects and other factors our board of directors deems relevant.

 

33

 

 

SELLING STOCKHOLDERS

  

On February 9, 2021, we entered into the Purchase Agreements with the Investors for the sale of an aggregate of 4,276 shares of our newly designated Series C Preferred Stock and Warrants to purchase up to 14,253,323 shares of our common stock for gross proceeds of approximately $4,276,000, before deducting placement agent and other offering expenses. The Series C Preferred Stock are initially convertible into an aggregate of 14,253,323 shares of our common stock. The closing of the offering occurred on February 12, 2021.

 

This prospectus relates to the resale from time to time by the selling security holders identified herein of up to an aggregate of 28,506,646 Resale Shares consisting of 14,253,323 Warrant Shares and 14,253,323 Conversion Shares.

 

The transactions by which the selling stockholders acquired their securities from us were exempt under the registration provisions of the Securities Act.

 

The Resale Shares are being registered to permit public sales of such securities, and the selling stockholders may offer the Resale Shares for resale from time to time pursuant to this prospectus. The selling stockholders may also sell, transfer or otherwise dispose of all or a portion of their Resale Shares in transactions exempt from the registration requirements of the Securities Act or pursuant to another effective registration statement covering the sale of such securities.

 

The following table sets forth, based on information provided to us by the selling stockholders or known to us, the names of the selling stockholders, the nature of any position, office or other material relationship, if any, which the selling stockholders have had, within the past three years, with us or with any of our predecessors or affiliates, and the number of shares of our common stock beneficially owned by the selling stockholders before and after this offering. The number of shares owned are those beneficially owned, as determined under the rules of the SEC, and the information is not necessarily indicative of beneficial ownership for any other purpose. Under these rules, beneficial ownership includes any shares of common stock as to which a person has sole or shared voting power or investment power and any shares of common stock that the person has the right to acquire within 60 days of February 12, 2021 through the exercise of any option, warrant or right, through conversion of any security or pursuant to the automatic termination of a power of attorney or revocation of a trust, discretionary account or similar arrangement. Except as otherwise set forth herein, none of the selling stockholders are a broker-dealer or an affiliate of a broker-dealer.

 

Pursuant to the terms of the Certificate of Designation of Preferences, Rights and Limitations of Series C Convertible Preferred Stock and the Warrants, a selling stockholder may not convert the Series C Preferred Stock or exercise the Warrants to the extent such conversion or exercise would cause such selling stockholder, together with its affiliates and attribution parties, to beneficially own a number of shares of common stock which would exceed 4.99% (or at the election of certain selling stockholders, 9.99%) of our then outstanding common stock following such conversion or exercise, excluding for purposes of such determination shares of common stock issuable upon conversion of the Series C Preferred Stock or exercise of the Warrants which have not been converted or exercised. The number of shares in the second and fourth columns do not reflect these limitations, but the percentages in the fifth columns do give effect to these limitations.

 

34

 

 

Except as otherwise noted below, the address for each person or entity listed in the table is c/o Silo Pharma, Inc., 560 Sylvan Avenue, Suite 3160, Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632.

 

  Number of Shares of  Common Stock  Beneficial Ownership 
  Common  Saleable  of Common Stock 
  Stock Prior  Pursuant  After the Offering (1) 
  to the  to This  Number of  Percent of 
Name of Selling Stockholder Offering  Prospectus  Shares  Class (2) 
Gil Bensasson  166,666   166,666(3)  0   0%
Andrew Dits  133,332   133,332(4)  0   0%
David & Lisa Dvorin, JTWROS  166,666   166,666(5)  0   0%
FirstFire Global Opportunities Fund LLC (6)  800,000   800,000(7)  0   0%
FMO of Boca Raton Inc (8)  66,666   66,666(9)  0   0%
Craig Friou  166,666   166,666(10)  0   0%
Daniel W. and Allaire Hummel, JTWROS  825,000(11)  200,000(12)  625,000   * 
Jesse Janssen (13)  119,416(14)  66,666(15)  52,750   * 
Morgan Janssen (16)  254,166(17)  166,666(18)  87,500   * 
Christian Olav Kirsebom  166,666   166,666(19)  0   0%
Samuel Koplowitz  263,332(20)  233,332(21)  30,000   * 
Lee J. Seidler Revocable Trust dtd 4.12.1990 (22)  666,666   666,666(23)  0   0%
Matt Lopatin  387,520(24)  200,000(25)  187,520   * 
Michael J. Mathieu  266,666   266,666(26)  0   0%
Robert G. Maxon  140,000   140,000(27)  0   0%
John Gregory O’Brien  300,000   300,000(28)  0   0%
Peter Ohler  1,137,500(29)  200,000(30)  937,500   1.10%
Quick Capital, LLC (31)  166,666   166,666(32)  0   0%
Stephen A. Renaud (33)  718,417(34)  400,000(35)  318,417   * 
Erick E. Richardson  200,000   200,000(36)  0   0%
Dennis Saadeh  166,666   166,666(37)  0   0%
Amedeo Dino Sgueglia  166,666   166,666(38)  0   0%
Michael A. Silverman (39)  1,586,666(40)  766,666(41)  820,000   * 
Tony Sinishtaj  200,000   200,000(42)  0   0%
Casimir S. Skrypczak  200,000   200,000(43)  0   0%
James K. Sternlicht  133,332   133,332(44)  0   0%
William Sykes  333,332   333,332(45)  0   0%
The Chitayat Family Gift Trust dtd 12.19.2003 (46)  166,666   166,666(47)  0   0%
The Konfida Trust dtd 05.01.15 (48)  1,000,000   1,000,000(49)  0   0%
John V. Wagner, Jr.  450,000(50)  200,000(51)  250,000   * 
Lonnie Williams  100,000   100,000(52)  0   0%
Joel Yanowitz  200,000   200,000(53)  0   0%
Thomas Zahavi  1,233,332(54)  333,332(55)  900,000   1.06%
Linda Mackay (56)  200,000   200,000(57)  0   0%
Michael Scrobe (58)  200,000   200,000(59)  0   0%
The Special Equities Opportunity Fund, LLC (60)  7,000,000(61)  4,750,000(62)  2,250,000   2.64%
32 Entertainment LLC (63)  2,666,666(64)  1,666,666(65)  1,000,000   1.17%
Timothy Tyler Berry (66)  800,000(67)  300,000(68)  500,000   * 
Gregory Castaldo  2,375,000(69)  1,750,000(70)  625,000   * 
Richard Molinsky  400,000   400,000(71)  0   0%
Slee 3 Consulting, Inc. (72)  200,000   200,000(73)  0   0%
Iroquois Capital Investment Group LLC (74)  2,479,166(75)  2,166,666(76)  312,500   * 
Iroquois Master Fund Ltd. (77)  2,104,166(78)  1,166,666(79)  937,500   * 
Empery Asset Master, LTD (80)  4,754,070(81)  3,946,666(82)  807,404   * 
Empery Tax Efficient, LP (83)  1,371,324(84)  1,093,332(85)  277,992   * 
Empery Tax Efficient III, LP (86)  2,811,770(87)  1,626,666(88)  1,185,104   1.39%
Pauline M. Howard Trust DTD 01/02/98 Candy D’Azevedo Trust (89)  512,500(90)  200,000(91)  312,500   * 
                 
TOTAL      28,506,646         

  

*Less than 1%.

 

(1)Assumes that all of the Resale Shares held by the selling stockholders covered by this prospectus are sold and that the selling stockholders acquire no additional shares of common stock before the completion of this offering. However, as the selling stockholders can offer all, some, or none of their Resale Shares, no definitive estimate can be given as to the number of Resale Shares that the selling stockholders will ultimately offer or sell under this prospectus or the Resale Shares that will be held by the selling stockholders upon the termination of the offering.

35

 

 

(2)Calculated based on 85,176,956 shares of common stock issued and outstanding as of February 12, 2021.

 

(3)Includes (i) 83,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 83,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(4)Includes (i) 66,666 Conversion Shares and (ii) 66,666 Warrant Shares.

 

(5)Includes (i) 83,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 83,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(6)Eliezer S. Fireman is the Managing Member of FirstFire Global Opportunities Fund LLC and in such capacity has the right to vote and dispose of the securities held by such entity. The address of FirstFire Global Opportunities Fund LLC is 1040 1st Avenue, Suite 190, New York, NY 10022.

 

(7)Includes (i) 400,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 400,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(8)Roy Weisman is the President FMO of Boca Raton Inc and in such capacity has the right to vote and dispose of the securities held by such entity. The address of FMO of Boca Raton Inc is 1761 W. Hillsboro Boulevard, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442.

 

(9)Includes (i) 33,333 Conversion Shares and 33,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(10)Includes (i) 83,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 83,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(11)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares, (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares and (iii) 625,000 shares of common stock.

 

(12)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(13)Katalyst Securities LLC (“Katalyst”) is a member of FINRA and Jesse Janssen is a broker of Katalyst.

 

(14)Includes (i) 33,333 Conversion Shares, (ii) 33,333 Warrant Shares and (iii) 52,750 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of warrants.

 

(15)Includes (i) 33,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 33,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(16)Katalyst is a member of FINRA and Morgan Janssen is a broker of Katalyst.

 

(17)Includes (i) 83,333 Conversion Shares, (ii) 83,333 Warrant Shares and (iii) 87,500 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of warrants.

 

(18)Includes (i) 83,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 83,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(19)Includes (i) 83,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 83,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(20)Includes (i) 116,666 Conversion Shares, (ii) 116,666 Warrant Shares and (iii) 30,000 shares of common stock.

 

(21)Includes (i) 116,666 Conversion Shares and (ii) 116,666 Warrant Shares.

 

(22)Lee J. Seidler is the Trustee of Lee J. Seidler Revocable Trust dtd 4.12.1990 and in such capacity has the right to vote and dispose of the securities held by such trust.

 

(23)Includes (i) 333,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 333,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(24)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares, (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares and (iii) 187,520 shares of common stock.

 

(25)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(26)Includes (i) 133,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 133,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(27)Includes (i) 70,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 70,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(28)Includes (i) 150,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 150,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(29)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares, (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares and (iii) 937,500 shares of common stock.

 

(30)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares.

 

36

 

 

(31)Eilon Natan is the President of Quick Capital, LLC and in such capacity has the right to vote and dispose of the securities held by such entity. The address of Quick Capital, LLC is 66 Flagler Street, Suite 900 - #2292, Miami, FL 33130.

 

(32)Includes (i) 83,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 83,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(33)Katalyst is a member of FINRA and Stephen A. Renaud is a broker of Katalyst.  

 

(34)Includes (i) 200,000 Conversion Shares, (ii) 200,000 Warrant Shares and (iii) 318,417 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of warrants.

 

(35)Includes (i) 200,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 200,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(36)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(37)Includes (i) 83,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 83,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(38)Includes (i) 83,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 83,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(39)Katalyst is a member of FINRA and Michael A. Silverman is a broker of Katalyst.

 

(40)Includes (i) 383,333 Conversion Shares, (ii) 383,333 Warrant Shares and (iii) 820,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of warrants.

 

(41)Includes (i) 383,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 383,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(42)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(43)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(44)Includes (i) 66,666 Conversion Shares and (ii) 66,666 Warrant Shares.

 

(45)Includes (i) 166,666 Conversion Shares and (ii) 166,666 Warrant Shares.

 

(46)Jack Chitayat is the Trustee of The Chitayat Family Gift Trust dtd 12.19.2003 and in such capacity has the right to vote and dispose of the securities held by such trust.

 

(47)Includes (i) 83,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 83,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(48)Melodie Durfee is the Trustee of The Konfida Trust dtd 05.01.15 and in such capacity has the right to vote and dispose of the securities held by such trust.

 

(49)Includes (i) 500,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 500,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(50)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares, (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares and (iii) 250,000 shares of common stock.

 

(51)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(52)Includes (i) 50,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 50,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(53)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(54)Includes (i) 166,666 Conversion Shares, (ii) 166,666 Warrant Shares and (iii) 900,000 shares of common stock.

 

(55)Includes (i) 166,666 Conversion Shares and (ii) 166,666 Warrant Shares.

 

(56)Bradley Woods & Co. Ltd. (“Bradley Woods”) is a member of FINRA and Linda Mackay is a broker of Bradley Woods.

 

(57)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(58)Bradley Woods is a member of FINRA and Michael Scrobe is a broker of Bradley Woods.

 

(59)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares.

 

37

 

 

(60)The Special Equities Opportunity Fund, LLC is an affiliate of a broker-dealer. Jonathan Schechter, Joseph Reda, and Andrew Amo are the Principals of The Special Equities Opportunity Fund, LLC and have voting and dispositive control over the securities held by such entity.

 

(61)

Includes (i) 2,250,000 shares of common stock and (ii) 2,375,000 Conversion Shares and (iii) 2,375,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(62)Includes (i) 2,375,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 2,375,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(63)Robert Wolf is the Chief Executive Officer of 32 Entertainment LLC and in such capacity has the right to vote and dispose of the securities held by such entity. The address of 32 Entertainment LLC is 9 Westerleigh Road, Purchase, NY 10577.

 

(64)Includes (i) 833,333 Conversion Shares, (ii) 833,333 Warrant Shares and (iii) 1,000,000 shares of common stock.

 

(65)Includes (i) 833,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 833,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(66)Bradley Woods is a member of FINRA and Timothy Tyler Berry is a broker of Bradley Woods.

 

(67)Includes (i) 150,000 Conversion Shares, (ii) 150,000 Warrant Shares and (iii) 500,000 shares of common stock.

 

(68)Includes (i) 150,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 150,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(69)Includes (i) 875,000 Conversion Shares, (ii) 875,000 Warrant Shares and (iii) 625,000 shares of common stock.

 

(70)Includes (i) 875,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 875,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(71)Includes (i) 200,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 200,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(72)Adam H. Selkin is the Chief Executive Officer and President of Slee 3 Consulting, Inc. and in such capacity has the right to vote and dispose of the securities held by such entity. The address of Slee 3 Consulting, Inc is 10 Pamela Road, Cortland Manor, NY 10567.

 

(73)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares.

 

(74)Richard Abbe is the Managing Member of Iroquois Capital Investment Group LLC and in such capacity has the right to vote and dispose of the securities held by such entity. The address of Iroquois Capital Investment Group LLC is 125 Park Avenue, 25th Floor, New York, NY 10017.

 

(75)Includes (i) 1,083,333 Conversion Shares, (ii) 1,083,333 Warrant Shares and (iii) 312,500 shares of common stock.

 

(76)Includes (i) 1,083,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 1,083,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(77)Richard Abbe is the Director, General Partner of Iroquois Master Fund Ltd. and in such capacity has the right to vote and dispose of the securities held by such entity. The address of Iroquois Master Fund Ltd. is 125 Park Avenue, 25th Floor, New York, NY 10017.

 

(78)Includes (i) 583,333 Conversion Shares, (ii) 583,333 Warrant Shares and (iii) 937,500 shares of common stock.

 

(79)Includes (i) 583,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 583,333 Warrant Shares.

 

38

 

 

(80)Empery Asset Management, LP, the authorized agent of Empery Asset Master Ltd (“EAM”), has discretionary authority to vote and dispose of the shares held by EAM and may be deemed to be the beneficial owner of these shares. Martin Hoe and Ryan Lane, in their capacity as investment managers of Empery Asset Management LP, may also be deemed to have investment discretion and voting power over the shares held by EAM. EAM, Mr. Hoe and Mr. Lane each disclaim any beneficial ownership of these shares.

 

(81)

Includes (i) 807,404 shares of common stock, (ii) 1,973,333 Conversion Shares and (iii) 1,973,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(82)Includes (i) 1,973,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 1,973,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(83)Empery Asset Management, LP, the authorized agent of Empery Tax Efficient, LP (“ETE”), has discretionary authority to vote and dispose of the shares held by ETE and may be deemed to be the beneficial owner of these shares. Martin Hoe and Ryan Lane, in their capacity as investment managers of Empery Asset Management LP, may also be deemed to have investment discretion and voting power over the shares held by ETE. ETE, Mr. Hoe and Mr. Lane each disclaim any beneficial ownership of these shares.

 

(84)Includes (i) 546,666 Conversion Shares, (ii) 546,666 Warrant Shares and (iii) 277,992 shares of common stock.

 

(85)Includes (i) 546,666 Conversion Shares and (ii) 546,666 Warrant Shares.

 

(86)Empery Asset Management, LP, the authorized agent of Empery Tax Efficient III, LP (“ETE III”), has discretionary authority to vote and dispose of the shares held by ETE III and may be deemed to be the beneficial owner of these shares. Martin Hoe and Ryan Lane, in their capacity as investment managers of Empery Asset Management LP, may also be deemed to have investment discretion and voting power over the shares held by ETE III. ETE III, Mr. Hoe and Mr. Lane each disclaim any beneficial ownership of these shares.

 

(87)Includes (i) 813,333 Conversion Shares, (ii) 813,333 Warrant Shares and (iii) 1,185,104 shares of common stock.

 

(88)Includes (i) 813,333 Conversion Shares and (ii) 813,333 Warrant Shares.

 

(89)Candy D’Azevedo Bathon is the Trustee of the Pauline M. Howard Trust DTD 01/02/98 Candy D’Azevedo Trust and in such capacity has the right to vote and dispose of the securities held by such trust.

 

(90)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares, (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares and (iii) 312,500 shares of common stock.

 

(91)Includes (i) 100,000 Conversion Shares and (ii) 100,000 Warrant Shares.

 

39

 

 

PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

 

The selling stockholders may, from time to time, sell, transfer, or otherwise dispose of any or all of their Resale Shares on any stock exchange, market, or trading facility on which the shares are traded, or in private transactions. These dispositions may be at fixed prices, at prevailing market prices at the time of sale, at prices related to the prevailing market price, at varying prices determined at the time of sale or at negotiated prices.

 

The selling stockholders may use any one or more of the following methods when disposing of shares or interests therein:

 

disposition on any national securities exchange on which our common stock may be listed at the time of the sale;

 

disposition in the over-the-counter markets;

 

ordinary brokerage transactions and transactions in which the broker-dealer solicits purchasers;

 

block trades in which the broker-dealer will attempt to sell the shares as agent, but may position and resell a portion of the block as principal to facilitate the transaction;

 

purchases by a broker-dealer as principal and resale by the broker-dealer for its account;

 

an exchange distribution in accordance with the rules of the applicable exchange;

 

privately negotiated transactions;

 

short sales;

 

writing or settlement of options or other hedging transactions, whether through an options exchange or otherwise;

 

disposition in one or more underwritten offerings in a best efforts basis or firm commitment basis;

 

broker-dealers may agree with the selling stockholders to sell a specified number of such shares at a stipulated price per share;

 

a combination of any such methods of sale; or

 

any other method permitted by applicable law.

 

We do not know of specific arrangements by the selling stockholders for the sale of their Resale Shares. The aggregate proceeds to the selling stockholders from any sale of the Resale Shares offered by them will be the purchase price of the Resale Shares less discounts or commissions, if any. The selling stockholders reserve the right to accept and, together with their respective agents from time to time, to reject, in whole or in part, any proposed purchase of Resale Shares to be made directly or through agents. We will not receive any of the proceeds from any such sale; however, we will receive the proceeds from any cash exercise of warrants.

 

The selling stockholders also may resell all or a portion of the Resale Shares in reliance upon Rule 144 promulgated under the Securities Act or any other exemption from registration under the Securities Act, provided that they meet the criteria and conform to the requirements of any such rule.

 

The selling stockholders and any broker-dealers or agents that participate in the sale of the Resale Shares may be deemed to be “underwriters” within the meaning of Section 2(11) of the Securities Act. Any discounts, commissions, concessions or profit they earn on any resale of the shares may be underwriting discounts and commissions under the Securities Act. The selling stockholders are subject to the prospectus delivery requirements of the Securities Act.

 

The selling stockholders will bear all commissions and discounts, if any, attributable to the sale or disposition of the Resale Shares, or interests therein. We will bear all costs, expenses, and fees in connection with the registration of the Resale Shares. We will not be paying any underwriting discounts or commissions in this offering.

 

40

 

 

DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES

 

The following description of the Company’s capital stock and provisions of its Certificate of Incorporation and Bylaws are summaries and are qualified by reference to the Company’s Certificate of Incorporation and Bylaws.

 

General

 

Our Certificate of Incorporation authorizes the issuance of 105,000,000 shares of capital stock, 100,000,000 shares of which are designated as common stock, par value $0.0001 per share, and 5,000,000 of which are designated as preferred stock, par value $0.0001 per share. As of February 12, 2021, we have (i) 85,176,956 shares of common stock issued and outstanding and 4,276 shares of Series C Preferred Stock issued and outstanding.

 

Common Stock

 

Each stockholder of our common stock is entitled to a pro rata share of cash distributions made to stockholders, including dividend payments. The holders of our common stock are entitled to one vote for each share of record on all matters to be voted on by stockholders. There is no cumulative voting with respect to the election of our directors or any other matter. Therefore, the holders of more than 50% of the shares voted for the election of those directors can elect all of the directors. The holders of our common stock are entitled to receive dividends when and if declared by our Board of Directors from funds legally available therefore. Cash dividends are at the sole discretion of our Board of Directors. In the event of our liquidation, dissolution or winding up, the holders of common stock are entitled to share ratably in all assets remaining available for distribution to them after payment of our liabilities and after provision has been made for each class of stock, if any, having any preference in relation to our common stockholders of shares of our common stock have no conversion, preemptive or other subscription rights, and there are no redemption provisions applicable to our common stock.

 

Preferred Stock

 

Series C Preferred Stock

 

On February 9, 2021, we filed a Certificate of Designation of Preferences, Rights and Limitations of Series C Convertible Preferred Stock (the “Certificate of Designations”) with the Delaware Secretary of State, designating 4,280 shares of preferred stock as Series C Convertible Preferred Stock. The following is only a summary of the Certificate of Designations and is qualified in its entirety by reference to the full text of the Certificate of Designations which is filed as an exhibit to this registration statement.

 

Designation

 

We have designated 4,280 shares of preferred stock as Series C Preferred Stock. Each share of Series C Preferred Stock has a par value of $0.0001 per share and a stated value of $1,000 (the “Stated Value”).

 

Dividends

 

Holders of Series C Preferred Stock shall be entitled to receive dividends (on an as-if-converted-to-common-stock basis) in the same form as dividends actually paid on shares of the common stock when, as and if such dividends are paid on shares of the common stock. No other dividends shall be paid on shares of Series C Preferred Stock.

 

41

 

 

Liquidation

 

Upon any liquidation, dissolution or winding-up of the Company, whether voluntary or involuntary, the holders of Series C Preferred Stock shall be entitled to receive the same amount that a holder of common stock would receive if the Series C Preferred Stock were fully converted into common stock (disregarding any conversion limitations) which amounts shall be paid pari passu with all holders of common stock.

 

Voting Rights

 

Except as otherwise provided in the Certificate of Designations or as otherwise required by law, the Series C Preferred Stock shall have no voting rights. However, as long as any shares of Series C Preferred Stock are outstanding, we shall not, without the affirmative vote of the holders of a majority of the then outstanding shares of the Series C Preferred Stock, (a) alter or change adversely the powers, preferences or rights given to the Series C Preferred Stock or alter or amend the Certificate of Designations, (b) amend our Certificate of Incorporation or other charter documents in any manner that adversely affects any rights of the holders of the Series C Preferred Stock, (c) increase the number of authorized shares of Series C Preferred Stock, or (d) enter into any agreement with respect to any of the foregoing.

 

Conversion

 

Each share of Series C Preferred Stock is convertible, at any time and from time to time after the issuance date, at the option of the holder, into such number of shares of common stock determined by dividing the Stated Value by the Conversion Price. “Conversion Price” means $0.30, subject to adjustment.

 

Exercisability

 

A holder of Series C Preferred Stock may not convert any portion of the Series C Preferred Stock to the extent that the holder, together with its affiliates and any other person or entity acting as a group, would own more than 4.99% (or, upon election by a holder prior to issuance, 9.99%) of the outstanding shares of common stock after conversion, which beneficial ownership limitation may be increased by the holder up to, but not exceeding, 9.99%.

 

Warrants

 

On February 12, 2021, we issued Warrants to purchase up to 14,253,323 shares of our common stock in a private offering. The Warrants are exercisable for a period of five years from the date of issuance at an exercise price of $0.30 per share. If, after a period of 180 days after the date of issuance of the Warrants, a registration statement covering the resale of the Warrant Shares is not effective, the holders may exercise the Warrants by means of a cashless exercise. We are prohibited from effecting an exercise of the Warrants to the extent that, as a result of such exercise, the holder of the Warrant together with the holder’s affiliates, would beneficially own more than 4.99% of the number of shares of common stock outstanding immediately after giving effect to the issuance of the Warrant Shares, which beneficial ownership limitation may be increased by the holder up to, but not exceeding, 9.99%.

 

In connection with the private placement of the Warrant, we issued the placement agents warrants to purchase up to an aggregate of 2,850,664 shares of our common stock. The placement agent warrants are exercisable for a period of five years from the closing date of the offering at an exercise price of $0.35 per share, subject to adjustment.

 

As of February 12, 2021, we have warrants to purchase up to 250,000 shares of our common stock issued and outstanding at an exercise price of $0.20 per share.

 

Options

 

As of February 12, 2021, we have options to purchase up to 300,000 shares of our common stock issued and outstanding at an exercise price of $$0.0001 per share.

 

42

 

 

Registration Rights

 

On February 9, 2021, in connection with the Purchase Agreements, we entered into Registration Rights Agreements (“RRAs”) with the investors pursuant to which we agreed to file a registration statement to register the resale of the Conversion Shares and the Warrant Shares. Pursuant to the RRA, we shall use our best efforts to cause the registration to be declared effective no later than the 60th calendar day following February 9, 2021, or in the event of a full review by the SEC, the 90th calendar day following February 9, 2021, and to maintain the effectiveness of the registration statement until all of the Conversion Shares and Warrant Shares have been sold or are otherwise able to be sold pursuant to Rule 144 under the Securities Act. If we fail to file the registration statement or have it declared effective by the dates set forth above, amongst other things, we will be obligated to pay the investors damages in the amount of 1% of their subscription amount, per month, until such events are satisfied.

 

Anti-Takeover Provisions of our Certificate of Incorporation and our Bylaws

 

Board of Directors Vacancies

 

Our Bylaws authorize only our board of directors to fill vacant directorships. In addition, the number of directors constituting our board of directors may be set only by resolution of the majority of the incumbent directors; provided, however, the number of directors shall not be less than three.

 

Special Meeting of Stockholders

 

Our Bylaws provide that special meetings of our stockholders may be called by our President or our board of directors and our Secretary at the request in writing of our stockholders owning a majority of our voting capital.

 

Authorized but Unissued Shares

 

Our authorized but unissued shares of common stock and preferred stock are available for future issuance without stockholder approval and may be utilized for a variety of corporate purposes, including future public offerings to raise additional capital, corporate acquisitions and employee benefit plans. The existence of authorized but unissued and unreserved common stock and preferred stock could render more difficult or discourage an attempt to obtain control of us by means of a proxy contest, tender offer, merger or otherwise.

 

Transfer Agent and Registrar

 

Our transfer agent and registrar is West Coast Stock Transfer, Inc. whose address is 721 N. Vulcan Avenue, Suite 106, Encinitas, CA 92024.

 

Listing

 

Our common stock is quoted on the OTCQB under the symbol “SILO.”

 

43

 

 

DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS

 

Overview

 

We are a developmental stage biopharmaceutical company focused on merging traditional therapeutics with psychedelic research. We seek to acquire assets to license and fund research which we believe will be transformative to the well-being of patients and the health care industry, and we are committed to developing innovative solutions to address a variety of underserved conditions. In these uncertain times, the mental health of the nation and beyond is being put to the test. More than ever, creative new therapies are needed to address the health challenges of today. Combining our resources with world-class medical research partners, we hope to make significant advances in the medical and psychedelic space.

 

In addition to our primary focus on psychedelic research, we have been engaged in the development of the streetwear apparel brand, NFID, which stands for “No Found Identification.”

 

Rare Disease Therapeutics

 

We have been exploring opportunities to expand our business by seeking to acquire and/or develop intellectual property or technology rights from leading universities and researchers to treat rare diseases, including the use of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, and the potential benefits they may have in certain cases involving depression, mental health issues and neurological disorders. We intend to focus on merging traditional therapeutics with psychedelic research for people suffering from indications such as depression, PTSD, Parkinson’s, and other rare neurological disorders. Our mission is to identify assets to license and fund the research which we believe will be transformative to the well-being of patients and the health care industry. 

 

Psilocybin is considered a serotonergic hallucinogen and is an active ingredient in some species of mushrooms. Recent industry studies using psychedelics, such as psilocybin, have been promising, and management believes there is a large unmet need with many people suffering from depression, mental health issues and neurological disorders. While classified as a Schedule I drug, there is an accumulating body of evidence that psilocybin may have beneficial effects on depression and other mental health conditions. Therefore, the FDA and DEA have permitted the use of psilocybin in clinical studies for the treatment of a range of psychiatric conditions.

 

The potential of psilocybin therapy in mental health conditions has been demonstrated in a number of academic-sponsored studies over the last decade. In these early studies, it was observed that psilocybin therapy provided rapid reductions in depression symptoms after a single high dose, with antidepressant effects lasting for up to at least six months for a number of patients. These studies assessed symptoms related to depression and anxiety through a number of widely used and validated scales. The data generated by these studies suggest that psilocybin is generally well-tolerated and has the potential to treat depression when administered with psychological support.

 

We have recently engaged in discussions with a number of world-renowned educational institutions and advisors regarding potential opportunities and have formed a scientific advisory board that is intended to help advise management regarding potential acquisition and development of products. In addition, we entered into the Option Agreement with the UMB and are seeking to enter into additional scientific research agreements and partnerships with other universities, though we have no definitive agreements or commitments for any such arrangements in place at this time.

 

We plan to actively pursue the acquisition and/or development of intellectual property or technology rights to treat rare diseases, and to ultimately expand our business to focus on this new line of business.

 

Commercial Evaluation License and Option Agreement with the University of Baltimore, Maryland

 

Effective as of July 15, 2020, we, through our wholly-owned subsidiary, Silo Pharma Inc., entered into the Option Agreement with UMB pursuant to which UMB has granted us an exclusive, non-sublicenseable, non-transferable license to with respect to the exploration of the potential use of central nervous system-homing peptides in vivo and their use for the investigation and treatment of MS and other neuroinflammatory pathology. In addition, UMB granted us an exclusive, option to negotiate and obtain an exclusive, sublicenseable, royalty-bearing license to with respect to the subject technology. Pursuant to the agreement, we paid UMB an initial license fee of $10,000. The option was extended and exercised. On February 12, 2021, we entered into the UMB License Agreement with UMB pursuant to which UMB granted us an exclusive, worldwide, sublicensable, royalty-bearing license to certain intellectual property (i) to make, have made, use, sell, offer to sell, and import certain licensed products and (ii) to use the invention titled, “Central nervous system-homing peptides in vivo and their use for the investigation and treatment of multiple sclerosis and other neuroinflammatory pathology” and UMB’s confidential information to develop and perform certain licensed processes for the therapeutic treatment of neuroinflammatory disease. Pursuant to the UMB License Agreement, we shall pay UMB (i) a license fee in the high five-digit figures, (ii) certain event-based milestone payments, (iii) royalty payments in the low single digits or mid single digits, depending on net revenues, and (iv) a tiered percentage of sublicense income. The UMB License Agreement will remain in effect until the later of: (a) the last patent covered under the UMB License Agreement expires, (b) the expiration of data protection, new chemical entity, orphan drug exclusivity, regulatory exclusivity, or other legally enforceable market exclusivity, if applicable, or (c) ten years after the first commercial sale of a licensed product in that country, unless earlier terminated in accordance with the provisions of the UMB License Agreement.

 

44

 

 

Apparel

 

On September 29, 2018, we entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement with Blind Faith Concepts Holdings, Inc. pursuant to which we completed the acquisition of the assets of NFID which consisted of three trademarks related to the NFID brand, the NFID website, shoe designs and samples, and the assumption of a one-year Brand Ambassador Agreement in exchange for 2,000,000 shares of our common stock. NFID is a recently developed unisex clothing brand, and we plan on continuing product development to fully launch the product.

 

Since the completion of the acquisition of the assets of NFID in September 2018, we have been engaged in the development of NFID, which stands for “No Found Identification.” We have developed NFID as an exclusive brand of apparel consisting initially of sweatshirts, hoodies, t-shirts, jackets and hats. Our clothing brand features lifestyles graphic designs. The collection is inspired towards the lifestyle and wellness culture

  

Recent Developments

 

Investigator-sponsored Study Agreement with Maastricht University of the Netherlands

 

On December 1, 2020, we entered into a entered into an investigator-sponsored study agreement with Maastricht University of the Netherlands. The research project is a clinical study to examine the effects of repeated low doses of psilocybin and LSD on cognitive and emotional dysfunctions in Parkinson’s disease and to understand its mechanism of action. The agreement shall terminate on October 31, 2024, unless earlier terminated pursuant to the terms thereof.

 

Patent License Agreement with AIKido Pharma Inc.

 

On January 5, 2021, we entered into the Patent License Agreement with Silo Pharma, Inc., a Florida corporation, our wholly-owned subsidiary, and our and our subsidiary’s affiliates and subsidiaries, as licensor, and AIkido pursuant to which we granted AIkido an exclusive, worldwide (“Territory”), sublicensable, royalty-bearing license to certain intellectual property (i) to make, have made, use, provide, import, export, lease, distribute, sell, offer for sale, develop and advertise certain licensed products and (ii) to develop and perform certain licensed processes for the treatment of cancer and symptoms caused by cancer (the “Field of Use”). In addition, if we exercise the option granted to us pursuant to the Option Agreement, we shall grant AIKido a non-exclusive sublicense to certain UMB patent rights in the field of neuroinflammatory diseases occurring in patients diagnosed with cancer.

 

45

 

 

Pursuant to the Patent License Agreement, AIkido shall pay us, among other things, (i) a one-time cash payment of $500,000 and (ii) royalty payments equal to 2% of Net Sales (as defined in the Patent License Agreement) in the Field of Use in the Territory. In addition, AIkido issued us 500 shares of its Series M Convertible Preferred Stock. The Patent License Agreement will remain in effect until the expiration or abandonment of all issued patents and filed patent applications within the licensed patents set forth in the Patent License Agreement, unless earlier terminated in accordance with the provisions of the Patent License Agreement.

 

Binding Letter of Intent to Grant Sublicense with AIKido Pharma Inc.

 

On February 12, 2021, we entered into a binding letter of intent (the “Letter of Intent”) with AIkido pursuant to which we agreed to grant AIkido a worldwide, exclusive sublicense of our licensed patents under the UMB License Agreement for use in the therapeutic treatment of neuroinflammatory disease in cancer patients. Pursuant to the Letter of Intent, AIkido shall pay us (i) a one-time license fee in the mid five-digit figures and (ii) the same royalty payments that we are subject to under the UMB License Agreement. The parties have agreed to use their best efforts to complete the Sublicense arrangement as soon as reasonably possible. The terms and conditions of the Sublicense are subject to compliance with the terms and conditions of the UMB License Agreement, including, but not limited to, the provisions regarding the granting of sublicenses set forth in the UMB License Agreement.

 

Investigator-sponsored Study Agreement with UMB

 

On January 5, 2021, we entered into a entered into an investigator-sponsored study agreement with UMB. The research project is a clinical study to examine a novel peptide-guided drug delivery approach for the treatment of MS. More specifically, the study is designed to evaluate (1) whether MS-1-displaying liposomes can effectively deliver dexamethasone to the central nervous system and (2) whether MS-1-displaying liposomes are superior to plain liposomes, also known as free drug, in inhibiting the relapses and progression of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis. Pursuant to the agreement, the Project Work (as defined in the agreement) shall commence on March 1, 2021 and will continue until substantial completion, subject to renewal upon mutual written consent of the parties.

 

February 2021 Private Placement

 

On February 9, 2021, we entered into the Purchase Agreements with the Investors for the sale of an aggregate of 4,276 shares of our newly designated Series C Preferred Stock and Warrants to purchase up to 14,253,323 shares of our common stock for gross proceeds of approximately $4,276,000, before deducting placement agent and other offering expenses. The closing of the offering occurred on February 12, 2021. In connection with the offering, we entered into a registration rights agreement with the Investors pursuant to which we agreed to file a registration, of which this prospectus is a part, to register, under the Securities Act, the resale of the Conversion Shares and the Warrant Shares. Accordingly, this prospectus relates to the offering by the selling stockholders of up to 28,506,646 Resale Shares, which includes the Conversion Shares and the Warrant Shares.

 

In addition, pursuant to the terms of the offering, we issued the placement agents warrants to purchase up to an aggregate of 2,850,664 shares of our common stock. The placement agent warrants are exercisable for a period of five years from the closing date of the offering at an exercise price of $0.35 per share, subject to adjustment.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We ensure that we own intellectual property created for us by signing agreements with employees, independent contractors, consultants, companies, and any other third party that create intellectual property for us or that assign any intellectual property rights to us.

 

We have established business procedures designed to maintain the confidentiality of our proprietary information, including the use of confidentiality agreements with employees, independent contractors, consultants and entities with which we conduct business.

 

We have filed four provisional patent applications related to the use of the central nervous system-homing peptides covered by the UMB Option Agreement to deliver certain compounds, including a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and/or psilocybin, for the treatment of arthritis, central nervous system diseases ,neuroinflammatory diseases as well as cancer. In addition, pursuant to our acquisition of NFID, we acquired three trademarks related to the NFID brand.

 

46

 

 

Competition

 

With respect to the rare disease therapeutics segment of our business, our industry is characterized by many newly emerging and innovative technologies, intense competition and a strong emphasis on proprietary product rights. We face potential competition from many different sources, including major pharmaceutical, specialty pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, academic institutions, governmental agencies and medical research organizations. Any product candidates that we may successfully develop and commercialize will compete with the standard of care and new therapies that may become available in the future.

 

Many of the pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical and biotechnology companies with whom we may compete have established markets for their therapies and have substantially greater financial, technical, human and other resources than we do and may be better equipped to develop, manufacture and market superior products or therapies. In addition, many of these potential competitors have significantly greater experience than we have in undertaking non-clinical studies and human clinical trials of new therapeutic substances and in obtaining regulatory approvals of human therapeutic products. Accordingly, our competitors may succeed in obtaining regulatory approvals for alternative or superior products. In addition, many competitors have greater name recognition and more extensive collaborative relationships. Smaller and earlier-stage companies may also prove to be significant competitors, particularly through collaborative arrangements with large, established companies. An increasing number of companies are increasing their efforts in discovery of new psychedelic compounds.

 

With respect to the apparel segment of our business, the apparel industry is highly competitive and fragmented and is subject to rapidly changing consumer demands and preferences. We compete with numerous apparel retailers, manufacturers and distributors, both domestically and internationally, as well as several well-known designers. Many of our competitors may be significantly larger and have substantially greater resources than us.

 

Government Regulation

 

The FDA and other regulatory authorities at federal, state and local levels, as well as in foreign countries, extensively regulate, among other things, the research, development, testing, manufacture, quality control, import, export, safety, effectiveness, labeling, packaging, storage, distribution, recordkeeping, approval, advertising, promotion, marketing, post-approval monitoring and post-approval reporting of drugs. We, along with any potential our vendors, contract research organizations and contract manufacturers, will be required to navigate the various preclinical, clinical, manufacturing and commercial approval requirements of the governing regulatory agencies of the countries in which we wish to conduct studies or seek approval of our product candidates. The process of obtaining regulatory approvals of drugs and ensuring subsequent compliance with appropriate federal, state, local and foreign statutes and regulations requires the expenditure of substantial time and financial resources

 

In the United States, the FDA regulates drug products under the FDCA, its implementing regulations and other laws. If we fail to comply with applicable FDA or other requirements at any time with respect to product development, clinical testing, approval or any other legal requirements relating to product manufacture, processing, handling, storage, quality control, safety, marketing, advertising, promotion, packaging, labeling, export, import, distribution, or sale, we may become subject to administrative or judicial sanctions or other legal consequences. These sanctions or consequences could include, among other things, the FDA’s refusal to approve pending applications, issuance of clinical holds for ongoing studies, suspension or revocation of approved applications, warning or untitled letters, product withdrawals or recalls, product seizures, relabeling or repackaging, total or partial suspensions of manufacturing or distribution, injunctions, fines, civil penalties or criminal prosecution.

 

The process required by the FDA before any product candidates are approved as drugs for therapeutic indications and may be marketed in the United States generally involves the following:

 

 Completion of extensive preclinical studies in accordance with applicable regulations, including studies conducted in accordance with good laboratory practice requirements;
   
 Completion of the manufacture, under cGMP condition  of the drug substance and drug product that the sponsor intends to use in human clinical trials along with required analytical and stability testing;

 

 Submission to the FDA of an investigational new drug application (“IND”) which must become effective before clinical trials may begin;

 

47

 

 

 Approval by an institutional review board or independent ethics committee at each clinical trial site before each trial may be initiated;

 

 Performance of adequate and well-controlled clinical trials in accordance with applicable IND regulations,  GCP requirements and other clinical trial-related regulations to establish the safety and efficacy of the investigational product for each proposed indication;

 

 Submission to the FDA of a New Drug Application (“NDA”);

 

 Payment of user fees for FDA review of the NDA;

 

 A determination by the FDA within 60 days of its receipt of an NDA, to accept the filing for review;

 

 Satisfactory completion of one or more FDA pre-approval inspections of the manufacturing facility or facilities where the drug will be produced to assess compliance with cGMP requirements to assure that the facilities, methods and controls are adequate to preserve the drug’s identity, strength, quality and purity;

 

 Potentially, satisfactory completion of FDA audit of the clinical trial sites that generated the data in support of the NDA; and

 

 FDA review and approval of the NDA, including consideration of the views of any FDA advisory committee, prior to any commercial marketing or sale of the drug in the United States.

 

Controlled Substances

 

The federal CSA and its implementing regulations establish a “closed system” of regulations for controlled substances. The CSA imposes registration, security, recordkeeping and reporting, storage, manufacturing, distribution, importation and other requirements under the oversight of the DEA. The DEA is the federal agency responsible for regulating controlled substances, and requires those individuals or entities that manufacture, import, export, distribute, research, or dispense controlled substances to comply with the regulatory requirements in order to prevent the diversion of controlled substances to illicit channels of commerce.

 

The DEA categorizes controlled substances into one of five schedules — Schedule I, II, III, IV or V — with varying qualifications for listing in each schedule. Schedule I substances by definition have a high potential for abuse, have no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States and lack accepted safety for use under medical supervision. Pharmaceutical products having a currently accepted medical use that are otherwise approved for marketing may be listed as Schedule II, III, IV or V substances, with Schedule II substances presenting the highest potential for abuse and physical or psychological dependence, and Schedule V substances presenting the lowest relative potential for abuse and dependence.

 

Facilities that manufacture, distribute, import or export any controlled substance must register annually with the DEA. The DEA registration is specific to the particular location, activity(ies) and controlled substance schedule(s).

 

The DEA inspects all manufacturing facilities to review security, recordkeeping, reporting and handling prior to issuing a controlled substance registration. The specific security requirements vary by the type of business activity and the schedule and quantity of controlled substances handled. The most stringent requirements apply to manufacturers of Schedule I and Schedule II substances. Required security measures commonly include background checks on employees and physical control of controlled substances through storage in approved vaults, safes and cages, and through use of alarm systems and surveillance cameras. Once registered, manufacturing facilities must maintain records documenting the manufacture, receipt and distribution of all controlled substances. Manufacturers must submit periodic reports to the DEA of the distribution of Schedule I and II controlled substances, Schedule III narcotic substances, and other designated substances. Registrants must also report any controlled substance thefts or significant losses, and must obtain authorization to destroy or dispose of controlled substances. Imports of Schedule I and II controlled substances for commercial purposes are generally restricted to substances not already available from a domestic supplier or where there is not adequate competition among domestic suppliers. In addition to an importer or exporter registration, importers and exporters must obtain a permit for every import or export of a Schedule I and II substance or Schedule III, IV and V narcotic, and submit import or export declarations for Schedule III, IV and V non-narcotics. In some cases, Schedule III non-narcotic substances may be subject to the import/export permit requirement, if necessary, to ensure that the United States complies with its obligations under international drug control treaties.

 

48

 

 

For drugs manufactured in the United States, the DEA establishes annually an aggregate quota for the amount of substances within Schedules I and II that may be manufactured or produced in the United States based on the DEA’s estimate of the quantity needed to meet legitimate medical, scientific, research and industrial needs. The quotas apply equally to the manufacturing of the active pharmaceutical ingredient and production of dosage forms. The DEA may adjust aggregate production quotas a few times per year, and individual manufacturing or procurement quotas from time to time during the year, although the DEA has substantial discretion in whether or not to make such adjustments for individual companies.

 

The states also maintain separate controlled substance laws and regulations, including licensing, recordkeeping, security, distribution, and dispensing requirements. State authorities, including boards of pharmacy, regulate use of controlled substances in each state. Failure to maintain compliance with applicable requirements, particularly as manifested in the loss or diversion of controlled substances, can result in enforcement action that could have a material adverse effect on our business, operations and financial condition. The DEA may seek civil penalties, refuse to renew necessary registrations, or initiate proceedings to revoke those registrations. In certain circumstances, violations could lead to criminal prosecution.

 

Employees

 

As of February 12, 2021, we employed a total of one full-time employee. We are not a party to any collective bargaining agreements. We believe that we maintain good relations with our employees.

 

Corporate History

 

We were incorporated as Gold Swap, Inc. under the laws of the State of New York on July 13, 2010.

 

On December 11, 2012, stockholders approved changing our state of incorporation from New York to Delaware via the merger of Gold Swap with and into our wholly-owned subsidiary, Point Capital, Inc., and to change our name from “Gold Swap Inc.” to “Point Capital, Inc.” The merger was effective on January 24, 2013.

 

On May 21, 2019, we amended our Certificate of Incorporation to change our name to “Uppercut Brands, Inc,” and on September 24, 2020, we amended our Certificate of Incorporation to change our name to “Silo Pharma, Inc.” 

 

Through September 28, 2018, we were a closed-end, non-diversified investment company that had elected to be regulated as a business development company under the Investment Company Act.  As a business development company, we were required to comply with certain regulatory requirements.  For instance, we generally had to invest at least 70% of our total assets in “qualifying assets,” including securities of private U.S. companies, cash, cash equivalents, U.S. government securities and high-quality debt investments that mature in one year or less.

 

On September 29, 2018, we filed Form N-54C, Notification of Withdrawal of election to be Subject to Section 55 through 65 of the Investment Company Act, whereas we have changed the nature of our business so as to cease to be a business development company. Accordingly, as of December 31, 2018, our consolidated financial statements of have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

As a result of this change in status, we shall discontinue applying the guidance in Financial Accounting Standards Board ASC Topic 946 - Financial Services – Investment Company and shall account for the change in our status prospectively by accounting for our equity investments in accordance with ASC Topics 320 - Investments—Debt and Equity Securities as of the date of the change in status. In addition, the presentation of the financial statements will be that of a commercial company rather than that of an investment company.

 

49

 

 

In accordance with ASC 946, we are making this change to our financial reporting prospectively, and not restating periods prior to our change in status to a non-investment company effective September 29, 2018, Accordingly, we may refer to both accounting in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles applicable to corporations (Corporation Accounting), which applies commencing September 29, 2018 and to that applicable to investment companies under the Investment Company Act (Investment Company Accounting) which applies to prior periods. We determined that there is no cumulative effect of the change from Investment Company Accounting to Corporation Accounting on periods prior to those presented, and that there is no effect on our financial position or results of operations as a result of this change.

 

In order to maintain our status as a non-investment company, we will now operate so as to fall outside the definition of an “investment company” or within an applicable exception. We expect to continue to operate outside the definition of an “investment company” as a developmental stage company primarily engaged in merging traditional therapeutics with psychedelic research.

 

Through March 31, 2017, we elected to be treated as an RIC under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code and operated in a manner so as to qualify for the tax treatment applicable to RICs. At March 31, 2017, we failed this diversification test since our investment in IPSIDY INC. accounted for over 25% of our total assets. We did not cure our failure to retain our status as a RIC and we will not seek to obtain RIC status again. Accordingly, beginning in 2017, we became subject to income taxes at corporate tax rates. The loss of the our status as a RIC did not have any impact on our financial position or results of operations.

 

Currently, we are not making any new equity investments.

 

On September 29, 2018, we entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement with Blind Faith Concepts Holdings, Inc. pursuant to which we completed the acquisition of 100% of the assets of NFID from the Seller which consisted of three trademarks related to the NFID brand, the NFID website, shoe designs and samples, and the assumption of a one-year Brand Ambassador Agreement in exchange for 2,000,000 shares of our common stock. NFID is a recently developed unisex clothing brand. We plan on continuing product development to fully launch the product. Our acquisition of the NFID assets gives us access to the growing market for unisex products. 

 

On November 5, 2018, we entered into 14 separate Return to Treasury Agreements, whereby certain stockholders holding an aggregate of 28,734,901 shares of our common stock agreed to return a portion of their respective holdings to treasury in exchange for cash payments aggregating $2,872. As a result, the total issued and outstanding number of our common stock was reduced by 28,734,901 shares.

 

On April 8, 2020, we incorporated a wholly-owned subsidiary, Silo Pharma Inc., in the State of Florida.

 

Our Corporate Information

  

We were incorporated as a Nevada corporation on May 16, 2017. Our principal executive offices are located at 560 Sylvan Avenue, Suite 3160, Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632 and our telephone number is (718) 400-9031.

 

50

 

 

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

You should read the following discussion of our financial condition and results of operations in conjunction with financial statements and notes thereto, as well as the “Risk Factors” and “Description of Business” sections included elsewhere in this prospectus. The following discussion contains forward-looking statements that reflect our plans, estimates and beliefs. Our actual results could differ materially from those discussed in the forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to these differences include those discussed below and elsewhere in this prospectus, particularly in “Risk Factors.”

 

Overview

 

On September 29, 2018 (the “Closing Date”), we entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement (“APA”) with Blind Faith Concepts Holdings, Inc. a Nevada corporation (the “Seller”) whereby we completed the acquisition of 100% of the assets of “NFID” from the Seller. We have developed NFID as an exclusive brand of clothing consisting initially of sweatshirts, hoodies, t-shirts, jackets, and hats. Our clothing brand features non-binary work wear-inspired clothing for the revolutionarily-spirited person.

 

We have developed the streetwear apparel brand, NFID, which stands for “No Found Identification.” The streetwear collection is inspired by music, fashion and captures the social consciousness of popular culture. The brand unapologetically celebrates the freedom of choice and expression. Generational political shifts have changed the way younger generations express and interpret gender, particularly in youth subculture and countercultural movements. While today’s youth culture rebellion is gender neutral, there is no single brand providing a uniform for the expression of that rebellion.

 

Strategy

 

The Company has developed the streetwear apparel brand, NFID, which stands for “No Found Identification.” The streetwear collection is inspired by music, fashion and captures the social consciousness of popular culture. The brand unapologetically celebrates the freedom of choice and expression. Generational political shifts have changed the way younger generations express and interpret gender, particularly in youth subculture and countercultural movements. While today’s youth culture rebellion is gender neutral, there is no single brand providing a uniform for the expression of that rebellion.

 

Branded hooded sweatshirts, shirts, jackets, and hats are our initial product launch. The business model is uses concepts of “Less is More” and utilizes social media and the “Have to Have” market. This is achieved through limited quantities and styles released strategically to generate maximum trending on social media platforms.

 

Our strategy involves developing the NFID brand through a direct to consumer (“DTC”) sales model, fed into by parallel digital marketing strategies, including collaboration with established brands throughout industry categories as well as seeding to celebrities/social media influencer sponsorships and viral product placement.

 

Parallel to this strategy is a series of targeted influencer events rather than mass marketing. These events are individually planned intimate cultural events in New York City which touch on niche themes such as political dissent, free speech, gender expression, cult film screenings, and culinary pop-ups.

 

We are developing plans to create a database of each customer of consumer information of a very loyal cult like following.

 

Combining the right product with a branding message around unisex, the MeToo Movement, Times Up, and various current issues, the company is investigating possible alignments with a notable charity organization to further leverage is recognition as a socially relevant new brand.

  

51

 

 

NFID initial plan and launch is to sell its products using the DTC model while utilizing digital marketing campaigns selected influencers, brand ambassadors, and social media.

 

NFID.com started to launch its apparel business during the third quarter on 2019 and began to generate minimal revenues.

 

Recent Developments

 

Proposed Expansion of Scope of Business

 

Recently, management has begun to explore opportunities to expand its business by seeking to acquire and/or develop intellectual property or technology rights from leading universities and researchers to treat rare diseases. To that end, the Company has engaged in discussions with a number of world-renowned educational institutions and advisors regarding potential opportunities and will be seeking to expand its advisors to include a scientific advisory board that can help advise management regarding potential acquisition and development of products. In July 2020, the Company, through a newly formed subsidiary, entered into a commercial evaluation license and option agreement with the UMB pursuant to which UMB has granted us an exclusive, non-sublicenseable, non-transferable license to with respect to the exploration of the potential use of central nervous system-homing peptides in vivo and their use for the investigation and treatment of multiple sclerosis and other neuroinflammatory pathology. See “Commercial Evaluation License and Option Agreement with the University of Baltimore, Maryland” below.

 

Formation of Subsidiary – Silo Pharma, Inc.

 

On April 8, 2020, the Company incorporated a new wholly-owned subsidiary, Silo Pharma Inc., in the State of Florida. The Company has also secured the domain name www.silopharma.com.

 

Commercial Evaluation License and Option Agreement with the University of Baltimore, Maryland

 

Effective as of July 15, 2020, through our subsidiary, Silo Pharma Inc., we entered into a commercial evaluation license and option agreement with the UMB pursuant to which UMB has granted us an exclusive, non-sublicenseable, non-transferable license to with respect to the exploration of the potential use of central nervous system-homing peptides in vivo and their use for the investigation and treatment of multiple sclerosis and other neuroinflammatory pathology. In addition, UMB granted us an exclusive, option to negotiate and obtain an exclusive, sublicenseable, royalty-bearing license to with respect to the subject technology. Pursuant to the agreement, we paid the initial license fee of $10,000 to UMB in July 2020.

 

Appointment of Director 

 

Effective October 1, 2020, the board of directors of the Company appointed Dr. Kevin Muñoz as a director of the Company to fill a vacancy on the Board. Dr. Muñoz will serve on the Board’s Audit and Compensation Committees. Dr. Kevin Muñoz, 42, is currently the Director of Operations at Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, an outpatient facility for the treatment of musculoskeletal issues, and has served in various capacities with Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation since 2008. Dr. Muñoz holds an MD from Xavier University School of Medicine and a BS from the University of Michigan.

 

Common Stock Financing

 

Between April 9, 2020 to April 18, 2020, we entered into subscription agreements with certain accredited investors pursuant to which it issued an aggregate of 7,764,366 shares of our common stock for proceeds of $75,644, and subscription receivable of $2,000 or $0.01 per share. We collected the subscription receivable of $2,000 on July 6, 2020.

 

On April 28, 2020, we entered into securities purchase agreements with certain accredited institutions and investors for the sale of an aggregate of 29,993,750 shares of our common stock at a price of approximately $0.08 per share for gross proceeds of $2,399,500, before deducting placement agent and other offering expenses of $361,410.

 

52

 

 

Conversion of Series A Preferred Stock into common shares

 

On August 3, 2020, we converted 4,000 Series A Preferred Stock into 2,000,000 shares of our common stock. After such conversion, we reclassed the $400,000 redemption value of the Series A preferred stock to additional paid in capital.

 

Going Concern

 

Our financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the settlement of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. As reflected in the accompanying financial statements, we had a net loss and cash used in operations of $2,247,703 and $620,673 for the nine months ended September 30, 2020, respectively. Additionally, we had an accumulated deficit of $4,972,507 at September 30, 2020 and have generated minimal revenues under our new business plan. These factors raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern for a period of twelve months from the issuance date of this report. Management cannot provide assurance that we will ultimately achieve profitable operations or become cash flow positive or raise additional debt and/or equity capital. We are seeking to raise capital through additional debt and/or equity financings to fund our operations in the future. If we are unable to raise additional capital or secure additional lending in the near future to fund our business plan, management expects that we will need to curtail our operations. Our financial statements do not include any adjustments related to the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should we be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

COVID-19

 

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic and recommended containment and mitigation measures worldwide. We are monitoring this closely, and although operations have not been materially affected by the COVID-19 outbreak to date, the ultimate duration and severity of the outbreak and its impact on the economic environment and our business is uncertain. As of August 14, 2020, our business remains open. At this time, we do not foresee any material changes to our operations from COVID-19. While we do not anticipate an impact on our operations, we cannot estimate the duration of the pandemic and potential impact on our business if our business must close. In addition, a severe or prolonged economic downturn could result in a variety of risks to our business, including weakened demand for our products and a decreased ability to raise additional capital when needed on acceptable terms, if at all. At this time, the Company is unable to estimate the impact of this event on its operations. 

 

Results of Operations – September 30, 2020 Compared to September 30, 2019

 

The following table summarizes the results of operations for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019 and were based primarily on the comparative unaudited condensed financial statements, footnotes and related information for the periods identified and should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and the notes to those statements that are included elsewhere in this report.

 

  For the Three Months  For the Nine Months 
  Ended September 30,  Ended September 30, 
  2020  2019  2020  2019 
Revenues $16,285  $268  $18,795  $268 
Cost of sales  29,449   82   30,866   82 
Gross (loss) profit  (13,164)  186   (12,071)  186 
Operating expenses  (623,056)  (242,693)  (1,780,200)  (607,132)
Loss from operations  (636,220)  (242,507)  (1,792,271)  (606,946)
Other income (expense), net  2,425   (22,974)  (455,432)  (24,269)
Net loss $(633,795) $(265,481) $(2,247,703) $(631,215)

 

Revenues and Cost of Sales:

 

During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, we generated minimal revenues from operations. We also generated minimal revenues during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, revenues consisted of revenues generated from the sale of NFID products of $16,285 and $18,795, respectively.

  

53

 

 

During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, cost of sales amounted to $29,449 and $30,866, respectively, as compared to $82 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019. The primary components of cost of sales include the cost of the product, production costs, warehouse storage costs and shipping fees. Additionally, we recorded an inventory write-down on raw materials for $19,879 for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020 which resulted in a negative gross margins for those periods.

 

Operating Expenses:

 

For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, total operating expenses consisted of the following:

 

  For the Three Months  For the Nine Months 
  Ended September 30,  Ended September 30, 
  2020  2019  2020  2019 
Compensation expense $37,308  $87,845  $717,198  $203,722 
Professional fees  441,409   108,481   831,665   314,702 
Produce development  17,364   -   53,689   - 
Insurance expense  13,578   8,174   17,560   24,521 
Bad debt expense (recovery)  85,000   (6,000)  84,000   (11,500)
General and administrative expenses  28,397   44,553   76,088   75,687 
                 
Total operating expenses $623,056  $242,693  $1,780,200  $607,132 

 

Compensation expense:

 

For the nine months ended September 30, 2020, compensation expense increased by $513,476, or 252%, as compared to the nine months ended September 30, 2019. This increase was primarily attributable to increase stock-based compensation of $514,253 related to the issuance of stock to our chief executive officer for his employment agreement of which is approximately $610,000 in 2020 and increase in his compensation and related benefits expense of $46,723, offset by a decrease in compensation expense for directors of $47,500.

 

For the three months ended September 30, 2020, compensation expense decreased by $50,177, or 57%, as compared to the three months ended September 30, 2019. This decrease was primarily attributable to decrease stock-based compensation of $52,485.

 

Professional fees:

 

For the nine months ended September 30, 2020, professional fees increased by $516,963, or 164%, as compared to the nine months ended September 30, 2019. The increase was primarily attributable to an increase in stock-based consulting fees of $434,039 related to the issuance of shares to consultants for business advisory and strategic planning services, increase legal fees of $72,500, increase investor relation fees of $14,000 offset by decrease in other consulting fees of $2,660 and accounting fees of $916.

 

For the three months ended September 30, 2020, professional fees increased by $332,928, or 307%, as compared to the three months ended September 30, 2019. The increase was primarily attributable to an increase in stock-based consulting fees of $234,233 related to the issuance of shares to consultants for business advisory and strategic planning services, increase legal fees of $61,173, increase investor relation fees of $10,500, and increase in other consulting fees of $27,021.

 

54

 

 

Product development costs:

 

For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, in connection with the development of our NFID product line, we incurred product development costs of $17,364 and $53,689, respectively. We did not incur these costs during the nine months ended September 30, 2019.

 

Insurance expense:

 

For the nine months ended September 30, 2020, insurance expense decreased by $6,961, or 28%, as compared to the nine months ended September 30, 2019. These decreases were a result of non-renewal of certain insurance policies.

 

For the three months ended September 30, 2020, insurance expense increased by $5,404, or 66%, as compared to the three months ended September 30, 2019. The increase was primarily related to increase health insurance paid for our CEO. 

 

Bad debt expense (recovery):

 

For the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, we recorded bad debt expense of $84,000 and bad debt recovery from the receipt of proceeds of $11,500, respectively. For the three months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, we recorded bad debt expense of $85,000 and bad debt recovery from the receipt of proceeds of $6,000 from the collection of a previously written off note receivable deemed uncollectible. The Company recorded an allowance on bad debt of $90,000 on its note receivable during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020 due to slow collection of the installment payments pursuant to the agreement.

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses:

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses consist of advertising and promotion, transfer agent fees, custodian fees, bank service charges, travel, and other fees and expenses. For the nine months ended September 30, 2020, general and administrative expenses increased by $401, or 1%, as compared to the nine months ended September 30, 2019.

 

For the three months ended September 30, 2020, general and administrative expenses decreased by $16,156, or 36%, as compared to the three months ended September 30, 2019. The increase in selling, general and administrative expenses was primarily attributed to an increase in advertising and promotion expense, EDGAR filing fees, and other expenses related to our new business operations.

 

Loss from Operations:

 

For the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, loss from operations amounted to $1,792,271 and $606,946, respectively, an increase of $1,185,325, or 195%. For the three months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, loss from operations amounted to $636,220 and $242,507, respectively, an increase of $393,713, or 162%.

 

The increase was primarily a result of the decrease in operating expenses discussed above.

 

Other (Expenses) Income:

 

For the nine months ended September 30, 2020, total other expenses, net amounted to $455,432, as compared to $24,269, a change of $431,163, or 1,777%. For the three months ended September 30, 2020, total other income (expenses), net amounted to $2,425, as compared to $(22,974), a change of $25,399, or 111%.

 

 Interest income:

 

For the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, we earned interest income of $8,788 and $9,129, respectively, and for the three months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, we earned interest income of $2,818 and $3,083, respectively, primarily resulting from interest earned on notes receivable. The decrease was attributable to the decrease in income-earning notes receivable as a result of principal collections.

 

55

 

 

 Interest expense:

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2020, we incurred interest expense of $268,996 primarily related to borrowings under convertible debt agreements and included amortization of debt discount to interest expense of $268,125. All convertible notes were exchanged into common stock during the second quarter of year 2020.

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2020, we incurred interest expense of $393 primarily related to borrowings under a note payable. During the three months ended September 30, 2019, we incurred interest expense of $469. The decrease in interest expense is due to the exchange of all convertible notes into common stock during the second quarter of year 2020.

  

 Net change in realized gain on investments:

 

During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019, we recorded a realized gain on equity investments of $92,264 and $138,032, respectively, primarily attributed to a gain from the sale of our remaining equity investment in Ipsidy, Inc. and other equity investments. We did not have such realized gain or loss during the 2020 period.

 

 Net change in unrealized loss on investments:

 

During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2019, we recorded an unrealized loss on equity investments of $117,852 and $170,191, respectively, attributable to our analysis of the fair value of our investment in Ipsidy, Inc. and other equity investments. We did not have such unrealized gain or loss during the 2020 period.

 

 Loss on debt extinguishment:

 

During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, we recorded loss on debt extinguishment of $0 and $198,000, respectively, due to the exchange of the convertible notes into common stock pursuant to Exchange Agreements. We did not have such loss during the 2019 period.

 

Net Loss:

 

For the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, net loss amounted to $2,247,703 and $631,215, respectively, an increase of $1,616,488, or 256%. For the three months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, net loss amounted to $633,795 and $265,481, respectively, an increase of $368,314, or 139%. The increase was primarily a result of the increase in operating expenses, and other expenses, net discussed above.

 

Net Loss Available to Common Stockholders:

 

For the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, net loss available to common stockholders amounted to $2,316,703 or $(0.04) per common share (basic and diluted), and $631,215 or $(0.03) per common share (basic and diluted), respectively, an increase of $1,685,488, or 267%. For the three months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019, net loss available to common stockholders amounted to $633,795 or $(0.01) per common share (basic and diluted), and $265,481 or $(0.01) per common share (basic and diluted), respectively, an increase of $368,314, or 139%. The increase was primarily a result of the increase in operating expenses, and other expenses, net discussed above. 

 

56

 

 

Results of Operations – Year Ended December 31, 2019 Compared to December 30, 2018

 

The following table summarizes the results of operations for the years ending December 31, 2019 and 2018 and were based primarily on the comparative audited financial statements, footnotes and related information for the periods identified and should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and the notes to those statements that are included elsewhere in this report.

 

  Years Ended December 31, 
  2019  2018 
Revenues $40,569  $- 
Cost of sales  (27,387)  - 
Operating expenses  (943,585)  594,242 
Loss from operations  (930,403)  (594,242)
Other (expense) income, net  (82,891)  (375,221)
Net loss $(1,013,294) $(969,463)

 

Revenues and Cost of Sales:

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we generated minimal revenues from operations. We did not generate revenues during the year ended December 31, 2018. For the year ended December 31, 2019, revenues consisted of revenues generated from the sale of shoes of $40,000 and revenues generated from the sale of NFID products of $569.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, cost of sales amounted to $27,387 as compared to $0 for the year ended December 31, 2018. For the year ended December 31, 2019, revenues consisted of cost of sales incurred from the sale of shoes of $26,973 and cost of sales incurred from the sale of NFID products of $414.

 

Operating Expenses:

 

For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, total operating expenses consisted of the following:

 

  For the Years Ended
December 31,
 
  2019  2018 
Compensation expense $319,587  $145,000 
Professional fees  431,015   203,559 
Product development  63,465   - 
Insurance expense  26,565   35,195 
Bad debt (recovery) expense  (13,500)  35,000 
Selling, general and administrative expenses  87,013   76,076 
Impairment loss  29,440   99,412 
Total operating expenses $943,585  $594,242 

 

 Compensation expense:

 

For the year ended December 31, 2019, compensation expense increased by $174,587, or 120.4%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2018. This increase was attributable to an increase in stock-based compensation of $142,960 and an increase in compensation expense of $31,627.

 

 Professional fees:

  

For the year ended December 31, 2019, professional fees increased by $227,456, or 111.7%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2018. The increase was attributable to an increase in consulting fee of $238,862, of which $35,000 was stock based compensation, related to marketing and advisory services related to our new NFID clothing product line.

  

 Product development costs:

 

For the year ended December 31, 2019, in connection with the development of our NFID product line, we incurred product development costs of $63,465. We did not incur these costs during the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

57

 

 

 Insurance expense:

 

For the year ended December 31, 2018, insurance expense decreased by $8,630, or 24.5%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

 Bad debt (recovery) expense:

 

For the year ended December 31, 2019, we recorded bad debt recovery from the receipt of proceeds of $13,500 from the collection of a previously written off note receivable deemed uncollectible. For the year ended December 31, 2018, we recorded bad debt of $50,000 related to the recording of an allowance for doubtful accounts related to a note receivable deemed uncollectible offset by the receipt of proceeds of $15,000 from the collection of previously written off a convertible debt investment.

 

 Selling, general and administrative expenses:

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses consist of non-cash amortization expense of intangible assets, advertising and promotion, transfer agent fees, custodian fees, bank service charges, travel, and other fees and expenses. For the year ended December 31, 2019, general and administrative expenses increased by $10,937, or 14.4%, as compared to the year ended December 31, 2018. The increase in selling, general and administrative expenses was primarily attributed to an increase in advertising and promotion expense, computer and internet expenses, and other expenses related to our new business operations offset be a decrease in custody fees and a decrease in amortization of intangible assets.

   

 Impairment loss

 

At December 31, 2018, based on management’s impairment analysis, we recorded an impairment loss of $99,412 due to the write off the remaining unamortized carrying value of our intangible asset of $87,745 and the remaining prepaid expense of $11,667 related to the Brand Ambassador Agreements. We determined that there was a significant adverse change in the extent or manner in which this long-lived asset was being used. Additionally, at December 31, 2019, based on management’s impairment analysis, we recorded an impairment loss of $29,440 due to the impairment of trademarks. We determined that there was a significant adverse change in the extent or manner in which we use our trademarks.

 

Loss from Operations:

 

For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, loss from operations amounted to $930,403 and $594,242, respectively, an increase of $349,343, or 58.8%. The increase was primarily a result of the changes in operating expenses discussed above.

 

Other (Expenses) Income:

 

For the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, other expenses, net amounted to $82,891 and $375,221, respectively, a decrease of $292,330, or 77.9%.

 

 Interest income:

 

For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, we earned interest income of $12,196 and $4,218, primarily resulting from interest earned on notes receivable, convertible notes receivable and other notes receivable, and on bank deposits. The increase was attributable to an increase in income-earning notes receivable.

 

58

 

 

 Interest expense:

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we incurred interest expense of $62,928 primarily related to the increase in borrowings under convertible debt agreements and included amortization of debt discount to interest expense of $61,875. We did not incur interest expense during the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

 Net realized gain (loss) on investments:

 

For the year ended December 31, 2019, we recorded a net realized gain of $138,032 primarily attributed to a gain from the sale of our remaining equity investment in Ipsidy, Inc.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2018, we disposed of or permanently impaired certain equity investments recognizing a net realized loss of $100,759. For the year ended December 31, 2018, net realized loss of equity investments was attributed to a net realized gain of $616,941 from sale of two investments offset by net realized loss of $717,700 due to the expiration of warrants and permanent impairment of certain debentures, warrants and non-marketable equity securities.

 

 Net change in unrealized (loss) gain on investments:

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, we recorded an unrealized loss on equity investments of $(170,191) attributable to our analysis of the fair value of our investment in Ipsidy, Inc. and attributable to the reversal of previously recorded unrealized gains upon sales of Ipsidy. 

 

For the year ended December 31, 2018, we recognized a net change in unrealized (loss) gain on investments of $(278,680). The change was attributed to our analysis of the fair value of our investment in Ipsidy, Inc. coupled with the reversal of previously recorded unrealized gains upon sales of Ipsidy common shares for which we recorded an unrealized loss on investments of ($991,380), offset by the permanent write down of nonmarketable securities resulting in the reversal of previously recorded unrealized losses for which we recorded an unrealized gain of $712,700.

 

Net Loss:

 

For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, net loss amounted to $1,013,294 or $(0.04) per common share (basic and diluted), and $969,463 or $(0.02) per common share (basic and diluted), respectively, a change of $43,831, or 4.5%. The change was primarily a result of the changes in revenue. Cost of sales, operating expenses, and other expenses, net discussed above. 

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Liquidity is the ability of an enterprise to generate adequate amounts of cash to meet its needs for cash requirements. We had a working capital of $1,964,804 and $1,645,712 in cash and cash equivalents as of September 30, 2020 and working capital of $377,108 and $111,752 in cash and cash equivalents as of December 31, 2019.  

 

        Nine months ended
September 30, 2020
 
  September 30,
2020
  December 31,
2019
  Working
Capital
Change
  Percentage
Change
 
Working capital:            
Total current assets $2,086,834  $493,845  $1,592,989   323%
Total current liabilities  (122,030)  (116,737)  5,293   5%
Working capital: $1,964,804  $377,108  $1,587,696   421%

 

The increase in working capital of $1,587,696 was primarily attributable to an increase in current assets of $1,592,989 which was primarily attributable to an increase in cash of $1,533,960, increase in prepaid and other current assets of $294,651 offset by decreases in notes receivable of $110,000 and inventory – current of $125,622.

 

59

 

 

In October 2019, we entered into Securities Purchase Agreements (the “Purchase Agreements”) with accredited investors. Pursuant to the terms of the Purchase Agreements, we issued and sold to investors a convertible promissory note in the aggregate principal amount of $330,000 (the “Notes”), and a warrant to purchase up to 1,650,000 shares of the Company’s common stock (the “Warrants”). We received net proceeds of $295,000, net of origination issue discount of $30,000 and fees of $5,000. The Notes are due and payable in October 2020. Prior to an Event of Default, no interest shall accrue on these Notes. On April 15, 2020, the Company entered into Exchange Agreements with the holders of these convertible promissory notes, which notes were originally issued in October 2019. Pursuant to these Exchange Agreements, the holders agreed to exchange their convertible promissory notes and 1,650,000 warrants issued in connection with this debt for an aggregate of 4,125,000 shares of our common stock at a price of $0.08 per share.

 

On April 1, 2020, we entered into a Promissory Note Agreement (the “Note”) with a company owned by the Company’s chief executive officer in the amount of $20,000. The Note bearing at 6% per annum, was unsecured, and all principal and interest amounts outstanding was due on June 30, 2020. On April 30, 2020, we repaid this note payable – related party and all interest due. 

 

On March 11, 2020, we entered into a Promissory Note Agreement (the “Note”) with our chief executive officer in the amount of $15,000. The Note bearing at 6% per annum, was unsecured, and all principal and interest amounts outstanding was due on April 10, 2020. On April 30, 2020, we repaid the note payable – related party of $15,000 and all interest due.

 

On April 17, 2020, we entered into subscription agreements with certain accredited investors pursuant to which we issued an aggregate of 7,764,366 shares of the Company’s common stock for proceeds of $77,644, or $0.01 per share.

 

On April 28, 2020 (the “Closing Date”), we entered into securities purchase agreements (collectively, the “Purchase Agreement”) with certain institutions and accredited investors (each an “Investor” and collectively, the “Investors”) for the sale of an aggregate 29,993,750 shares of the Company’s common stock at a price of $0.08 per share for gross proceeds of $2,399,500, before deducting placement agent of $242,950 and other offering expenses of $118,460 (the “Private Placement”). The Purchase Agreement contains customary representations, warranties and covenants of the parties, and the closing was subject to customary closing conditions. The Purchase Agreement also provides that until the six (6) month anniversary of the date of the Purchase Agreement, in the event of a subsequent financing (except for certain exempt issuances as provided in the Purchase Agreement) by the Company, each Investor that invested over $100,000 pursuant to the Purchase Agreement will have the right to participate in such subsequent financing up to an amount equal to 50% of the subsequent financing on the same terms, conditions and price provided for in the subsequent financing. The net proceeds of the Private Placement are expected to be used for working capital purposes and to further execute on the Company’s existing business.

 

Cash Flows

 

A summary of cash flow activities is summarized as follows:

 

  Nine months ended
September 30,
 
  2020  2019 
Cash used in operating activities $(620,673) $(501,520)
Cash provided by investing activities  20,000   186,741 
Cash provided by (used in) financing activities  2,134,633   2,656 
Net increase (decrease) in cash $1,533,960  $(312,123)

 

60

 

 

Net Cash Used in Operating Activities:

 

Net cash flow used in operating activities was $620,673 for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 as compared to $501,520 for the nine months ended September 30, 2019, an increase of $119,153.

 

 Net cash flow used in operating activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 primarily reflected a net loss of $2,247,703 adjusted for the add-back of non-cash items such as amortization of debt discount of $268,125, bad debt of $90,000, total stock-based compensation of $1,070,765, loss from debt extinguishment of $198,000, inventory write-down of $19,879, and changes in operating asset and liabilities primarily consisting of an increase in prepaid expenses and other current assets of $68,045, and an increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses of $59,910.
   
 Net cash flow used in operating activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 primarily reflected a net loss of $631,215 adjusted for the add-back on non-cash items such as stock-based compensation of $122,472, net realized gain on equity investments of $138,032, and a net unrealized loss on equity investments of $170,191, and changes in operating asset and liabilities consisting of an increase in inventory of $72,607, a decrease in prepaid expenses and other current assets of $10,471 and an increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses of $36,825.

 

Cash Provided by Investing Activities

 

Net cash provided by investing activities was $20,000 for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and consisted of proceeds from collection on note receivable. Net cash provided by investing activities was $186,741 for the nine months ended September 30, 2019 and consisted of proceeds from the sale of equity securities of $191,938 offset by the purchase of equity investment, at fair value of $5,197.

 

Cash Provided by Financing Activities

 

Net cash provided by financing activities was $2,134,633 for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 as compared to cashed provided in financing activities of $2,656 for the nine months ended September 30, 2019. During the nine months ended September 30, 2020, we received net proceeds from sale of common stock of $2,115,733, related party loans of $35,000, proceeds from a note payable of $18,900 offset by repayment on notes payable- related party of $35,000. During the nine months ended September 30, 2019, we received proceeds from note payable – related party of $25,000 and repaid $22,344 of an insurance finance loan.

 

Cash Requirements

 

We believe that our existing available cash will not be enough to enable us to meet the working capital requirements for at least 12 months from the date of this report. Our primary uses of cash have been for salaries, fees paid to third parties for professional services, and general and administrative expenses. The following trends are reasonably likely to result in changes in our liquidity over the near to long term:

 

 An increase in working capital requirements to finance our current business,
   
 An increase in product development and marketing fees related to recently acquired NFID product line and other lines of business;
   
 Addition of administrative and sales personnel as the business grows, and
   
 The cost of being a public company.

 

Since we believe that our existing available cash will not enable us to meet our working capital requirements for at least 12 months from the date of this report, we will need to raise additional funds to for the development and marketing of our recently acquitted NFID product line. If we are unable to raise capital, we may be required to reduce the scope of our product development and marketing activities, which could harm our business plans, financial condition and operating results, cease our operations entirely, in which case, you will lose all of your investment.

 

Management cannot provide assurance that we will ultimately achieve profitable operations or become cash flow positive or raise additional debt and/or equity capital. We will seek to raise capital through additional debt and/or equity financings to fund operations, for product development and for marketing in the future. If we are unable to raise capital or secure lending in the near future, management expects that the Company may need to curtail its operations.

 

61

 

 

Until such time as we generate substantial product revenue to offset operational expenses, we expect to finance our cash needs through a combination of public and private equity offerings and debt financing. We may be unable to raise capital or enter into such other arrangements when needed or on favorable terms or at all. Our failure to raise capital or enter into such other arrangements as and when needed would have a negative impact on our financial condition. We have no agreements or arrangements to raise capital.

 

We currently have no material commitments for any capital expenditures.

 

Liquidity is the ability of an enterprise to generate adequate amounts of cash to meet its needs for cash requirements. We had a working capital of $377,108 and $111,752 in cash and cash equivalents as of December 31, 2019 and working capital of $578,002 and $336,679 in cash and cash equivalents as of December 31, 2018.

  

        

Year Ended

December 31, 2019

 
  December 31,
2019
  December 31,
2018
  Working
Capital
Change
  Percentage
Change
 
Working capital:            
Total current assets $493,845  $625,977  $(132,132)  (23.1)%
Total current liabilities  (116,737)  (47,975)  (68,762)  (143.3)%
Working capital: $377,108  $578,002  $(200,894)  (34.8)%

 

The decrease in working capital of $200,894 was primarily attributable to a decrease in current assets of $132,132 which was primarily attributable to a decrease in cash of $224,927 and a decrease in equity investments, at fair value of $215,528, offset by an increase in note receivable of $200,000 and an increase in inventory of $129,393, and an increase in current liabilities of $68,762.

 

In October 2019, we entered into Securities Purchase Agreements (the “Purchase Agreements”) with accredited investors. Pursuant to the terms of the Purchase Agreements, we issued and sold to investors a convertible promissory note in the aggregate principal amount of $330,000 (the “Notes”), and a warrant to purchase up to 1,650,000 shares of the Company’s common stock (the “Warrants”). We received net proceeds of $295,000, net of origination issue discount of $30,000 and fees of $5,000. The Notes are due and payable in October 2020. Prior to an Event of Default, no interest shall accrue on these Notes.

 

At any time after the Original Issue Date until the respective Note is no longer outstanding, the Notes shall be convertible, in whole or in part, into shares of our common stock at the option of the Holder, at any time and from time to time. In accordance with the Purchase Agreements and the Notes, subject to the adjustments as defined in the Purchase Agreements and Notes. The conversion price (the “Conversion Price”) shall be equal to $0.20. We may prepay the Notes at any time prior to its six-month anniversary, subject to pre-payment charges as detailed in the Note. Upon every conversion, we shall deliver an additional $1,250 worth of shares (as calculated by the Conversion Price in effect on the conversion notice being honored) to cover the Holder’s expenses and deposit fees associated with each notice of conversion.

 

Cash Flows

 

A summary of cash flow activities is summarized as follows:

 

  Year Ended December 31, 
  2019  2018 
Cash (used in) provided by operating activities $(794,324) $272,637 
Cash provided by (used in) investing activities  186,741   (250,000)
Cash provided by financing activities  382,656   19,451 
Net (decrease) increase in cash $(224,927) $42,088 

  

62

 

 

Net Cash (Used in) Provided by Operating Activities:

 

Net cash flow (used in) provided by operating activities was $(794,324) for the year ended December 31, 2019 as compared to $272,637 for the year ended December 31, 2018, a negative change of $1,066,961.

 

 Net cash flow used in operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 primarily reflected a net loss of $1,013,294 adjusted for the add-back of non-cash items such as impairment loss of $29,440, stock-based compensation of $177,960, amortization of debt discount of $61,875, net realized gain on equity investments of $138,032, and a net unrealized loss on equity investments of $170,191, and changes in operating asset and liabilities consisting of an increase in inventory of $129,393, a decrease in prepaid expenses and other current assets of $17,698, and an increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses of $29,231.
   
 Net cash flow provided by operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2018 primarily reflected our net loss of $969,463 adjusted for the add-back on non-cash items such as amortization expense of $17,550, impairment loss of $99,412, bad debt expense, net of recovery of $15,000, of $35,000, net realized loss on equity investments of $100,759, and net unrealized loss on equity investments of $278,680, and changes in operating asset and liabilities consisting of cash proceeds from sale of equity investments of $727,496, a decrease in prepaid expenses of $22,888, an increase in inventory of $26,973, and a decrease in accounts payable and accrued expenses of $12,712.

 

Net Cash Used in Investing Activities

 

Net cash flow provided by (used in) investing activities was $186,741 for the year ended December 31, 2019 as compared to $(250,000) for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2019, we received proceeds from the sale of equity investments of $191,938 offset by the purchase of equity investments of $5,197.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, we used cash of $250,000 to fund a) a two-year promissory note receivable agreement with a principal balance of $200,000 of which $100,000 was funded to the Seller in September 2018 and the remaining $100,000 was funded in October 2018, and b) a Promissory Note Agreement with a principal balance of $50,000.

 

Cash Provided by Financing Activities

 

Net cash provided by financing activities was $382,656 for the year ended December 31, 2019 as compared to $19,451 for the year ended December 31, 2018. During the year ended December 31, 2019, we received net proceeds from the sale of series B preferred stock of $110,000, net proceeds from the convertible debt of $295,000, and proceeds from related party loan of $25,000 offset by the repayment of insurance finance loan of $22,344 and the repayment of related party loan $25,000. During the year ended December 31, 2018, we received net proceeds from the sale of common stock of $24,500 offset by payments made for the redemption of common stock of $2,872 and repayment of an insurance finance loan of $2,177.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements; Commitments and Contractual Obligations

 

As of September 30, 2020, we did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements as defined in Item 303(a)(4)(ii) of Regulation S-K and did not have any commitments or contractual obligations.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, (“U.S. GAAP”).

 

63

 

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

We consider all highly liquid instruments purchased with an original maturity of three months or less and money market accounts to be cash equivalents.

 

Inventory

 

Inventory, consisting of raw materials and finished goods, are stated at the lower of cost and net realizable value utilizing the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method. A reserve is established when management determines that certain inventories may not be saleable. If inventory costs exceed expected net realizable value due to obsolescence or quantities in excess of expected demand, the Company will record reserves for the difference between the cost and the net realizable value. These reserves shall be recorded based on estimates and included in cost of sales. Additionally, the Company shall make an analysis of its inventory for any slow-moving inventory. Accordingly, the Company shall reclass sellable inventories that may not be sold in one year to non-current assets.

 

Intangible Assets

 

Intangible assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortization, computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives. Intangible assets consist of a brand ambassador agreement which was being amortized over a period of one year and trademarks which are recorded at cost and have an indefinite useful life and are not amortized. 

 

Impairment of Long-lived Assets

 

In accordance with ASC Topic 360, we review long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the assets may not be fully recoverable, or at least annually. We recognize an impairment loss when the sum of expected undiscounted future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the asset. The amount of impairment is measured as the difference between the asset’s estimated fair value and its book value.

 

Equity Investments

 

Equity investments comprised mainly of nonmarketable common stock and membership interests, are recorded at cost, as adjusted for other than temporary impairment write-downs and are evaluated for impairment periodically.

 

Net Realized Gains or Losses and Net Change in Unrealized Gains or Losses on Investments

 

Realized gain or loss is recognized when an investment is disposed of and is computed as the difference between the Company’s cost basis and the net proceeds received from such disposition.  Realized gains and losses on investment transactions are determined by specific identification. Net change in unrealized appreciation or depreciation is computed as the difference between the fair value of the investment and the cost basis of such investment, including any reversal of previously recorded unrealized appreciation/depreciation when gains or losses are realized.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments and Fair Value Measurements

 

The Company uses the guidance of ASC Topic 820 for fair value measurements which clarifies the definition of fair value, prescribes methods for measuring fair value, and establishes a fair value hierarchy to classify the inputs used in measuring fair value as follows:

 

Level 1-Inputs are unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities available at the measurement date.

 

Level 2-Inputs are unadjusted quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets and liabilities in markets that are not active, inputs other than quoted prices that are observable, and inputs derived from or corroborated by observable market data.

 

64

 

 

Level 3-Inputs are unobservable inputs which reflect the reporting entity’s own assumptions on what assumptions the market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability based on the best available information.

 

The carrying amounts reported in the balance sheets for cash, notes receivable, prepaid expenses and other current assets, inventory, accounts payable and accrued expenses, note payable – related party, and convertible notes payable approximate their fair market value based on the short-term maturity of these instruments.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company applies ASC Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (“ASC 606”). ASC 606 establishes a single comprehensive model for entities to use in accounting for revenue arising from contracts with customers and supersedes most of the existing revenue recognition guidance. This standard requires an entity to recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services and also requires certain additional disclosures. The Company adopted this standard using the modified retrospective approach, which requires applying the new standard to all existing contracts not yet completed as of the effective date and recording a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings as of the beginning of the fiscal year of adoption. The adoption of ASC 606 on January 1, 2018 did not have any impact on the process for, timing of, and presentation and disclosure of revenue recognition from contracts and there was no cumulative effect adjustment.

 

We record interest and dividend income on an accrual basis to the extent that we expect to collect such amounts.

 

Product sales are recognized when the product is shipped to the customer and title is transferred and are recorded net of any discounts or allowances.

  

Stock-based Compensation

 

Stock-based compensation is accounted for based on the requirements of ASC 718 – “Compensation –Stock Compensation”, which requires recognition in the financial statements of the cost of employee, director, and non-employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments over the period the employee, director , or non-employee is required to perform the services in exchange for the award (presumptively, the vesting period). The ASC also requires measurement of the cost of employee, director, and non-employee services received in exchange for an award based on the grant-date fair value of the award. The Company has elected to recognize forfeitures as they occur as permitted under ASU 2016-09 Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment.

 

Income Taxes

 

Deferred income tax assets and liabilities arise from temporary differences between the financial statements and tax basis of assets and liabilities, as measured by the enacted tax rates, which are expected to be in effect when these differences reverse. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are classified as current or non-current, depending upon the classification of the asset or liabilities to which they relate. Deferred tax assets and liabilities not related to an asset or liability are classified as current or non-current depending on the periods in which the temporary differences are expected to reverse. Valuation allowances are established when necessary to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized.

 

The Company follows the provisions of FASB ASC 740-10, “Uncertainty in Income Taxes”. Certain recognition thresholds must be met before a tax position is recognized in the financial statements. An entity may only recognize or continue to recognize tax positions that meet a “more-likely-than-not” threshold. The Company does not believe it has any uncertain tax positions as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 that would require either recognition or disclosure in the accompanying financial statements.

 

65

 

 

MANAGEMENT

 

The following table sets forth the name, age and positions of our executive officers and directors. Each director of the Company serves for a term of one year or until the successor is elected at the Company’s annual shareholders’ meeting and is qualified, subject to removal by the Company’s shareholders.  Each officer serves, at the pleasure of the board of directors, for a term of one year and until the successor is elected at the annual meeting of the board of directors and is qualified.

 

Name and Business Address Age Position
Eric Weisblum 50 Chairman, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer and President
Wayne D. Linsley (1) 63 Director
Dr. Kevin Muñoz 43 Director

 

The following is a brief account of the education and business experience of each director and executive officer of our Company, indicating the person’s principal occupation during that period, and the name and principal business of the organization in which such occupation and employment were carried out.

 

Eric Weisblum. Mr. Weisblum has been our Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board since November 2015, and our President and a member of the Board since January 2013. Mr. Weisblum co-founded Whalehaven Capital in 2003. Mr. Weisblum is currently a Partner of Whalehaven Capital’s General Partner and Managing Member of JAWS Capital Partners, LLC.  From 2002 to 2003, Mr. Weisblum was a registered representative with Domestic Securities, a New Jersey-based broker dealer. While with Domestic Securities, Mr. Weisblum held the Series 7 - General Securities Representative, the Series 63 – Uniform Securities Agent State Law Examination, and the Series 55 – Registered Equity Trader securities registrations.  From 1993 to 2002, Mr. Weisblum originated, structured, traded, and placed structured financing transactions at M.H. Meyerson & Co. Inc., a publicly traded registered investment bank. Mr. Weisblum holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Hartford’s Barney Business School.  Mr. Weisblum’s significant experience with private investment funds was instrumental in his selection as a member of the Board.

 

Wayne D. Linsley.   Wayne Linsley has served as our director since January 2020. Since 2011, Mr. Linsley has served as the Vice President of Operations of CFO Oncall, Inc., a company that provides financial management and CFO services, and since 2010 he has served as the Managing Member of Flagship Advisory & Management Group, LLC, a management consulting firm. In addition, since 2019, Mr. Linsley has served as the Chief Executive Officer and sole owner of Executive Outsource Group, Inc., a company that provides financial reporting services. Mr. Linsley has served in various other capacities including Alternate Channels Manager of Mettel; Director of Channel Sales of Impsat, USA; National Accounts Manager of Venali, Inc; and Director of Sales of Broadview Networks. Since April 2020, Mr. Linsley has served as a member of the board of directors of Hoth Therapeutics, Inc. Mr. Linsley received his bachelor of business administration degree in accounting/business administration from Siena College. Mr. Linsley is qualified to serve as a member of the Board because of his financial reporting and general business knowledge.

 

Dr. Kevin Muñoz. Dr. Muñoz has served as our director since October 1, 2020. Dr. Muñoz is currently the Director of Operations at Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, an outpatient facility for the treatment of musculoskeletal issues, and has served in various capacities with Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation since 2008. Dr. Muñoz holds an MD from Xavier University School of Medicine and a BS from the University of Michigan. Mr. Muñoz is qualified to serve as a member of the Board because of his medical qualifications and his general business knowledge.

 

Family Relationships

 

There are no family relationships among any of our executive officers or directors.

 

Arrangements between Officers and Directors 

 

Except as set forth herein, to our knowledge, there is no arrangement or understanding between any of our officers or directors and any other person pursuant to which the officer or director was selected to serve as an officer or director. 

 

66

 

 

Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings 

 

We are not aware of any of our directors or officers being involved in any legal proceedings in the past ten years relating to any matters in bankruptcy, insolvency, criminal proceedings (other than traffic and other minor offenses), or being subject to any of the items set forth under Item 401(f) of Regulation S-K. 

 

Board Independence and Committees

 

We are not required to have any independent members of the Board of Directors. The board of directors has determined that (i) Eric Weisblum has a relationship with the company which, in the opinion of the board of directors, would not allow him to be considered as an “independent director” as defined in the Marketplace Rules of The NASDAQ Stock Market and (ii) Wayne D. Linsley and Dr. Kevin Muñoz are independent directors as defined in the Marketplace Rules of The NASDAQ Stock Market.

 

As the Company was formerly a BDC as defined by the Investment Company Act, the Board of Directors was required to establish an Audit Committee. Although the Company is no longer defined as a BDC, the Company maintained an Audit Committee through December 2019. The Company no longer maintains an Audit Committee.

 

The Board as a whole carries out the functions of nominating and corporate governance and compensation committees.

 

Scientific Advisory Board

 

We have formed a scientific advisory board that is intended to help advise management regarding potential acquisition and development of products. The members of such board are as follows: Matthew W. Johnson, Ph.D.; Dr. Josh Woolley MD/Ph.D.; Dr. Peter Hendricks; and Dr. Charles Nemeroff.

 

Matthew W. Johnson, Ph.D., Professor at Johns Hopkins, is an expert on psychedelics, other drugs, and addiction. Working with psychedelics since 2004, he has published over 50 scientific papers on psychedelics. Mr. Johnson published psychedelic safety guidelines in 2008, helping to resurrect psychedelic research. He published the first research on psychedelic treatment of tobacco addiction in 2014, and the largest study of psilocybin in cancer distress in 2016. His 2018 psilocybin review recommended Schedule IV upon medical approval. He has guided over 100 psychedelic sessions. Mr. Johnson also conducts behavioral economic research on both addiction and sexual risk. He conducts research with most psychoactive drug classes, was 2018 President of the Psychopharmacology Division of the American Psychological Association, and is the 2020-2021 President of the International Society for Research on Psychedelics.

 

Dr. Josh Woolley MD/Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco (“UCSF”). He is also a licensed psychiatrist on staff at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. He received both his MD and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from UCSF and completed his psychiatry residency training at UCSF. Dr. Woolley is the director and founder of the Bonding and Attunement in Neuropsychiatric Disorders (“BAND”) Laboratory. The mission of the BAND Lab is to understand why people with mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, posttraumatic stress disorder, mood disorders, and substance use disorders, have trouble with social connection, and to develop and test novel treatments for these deficits. His laboratory is actively investigating psilocybin therapy for multiple disorders including major depressive disorder, bipolar depression, chronic pain, and mood symptoms associated with Parkinson's Disease.

 

Dr. Peter Hendricks, Professor in the Department of Health Behavior, University of Alabama at Birmingham is currently researching the use of psilocybin to see if it will help individuals addicted to cocaine stop using the harmful drug. He theorizes that psilocybin, which is the active compound found in Psilocybe mushrooms, also known as "magic mushrooms," can be understood as working from multiple angles, including neurobiological and psychological, with an emphasis on subjective transcendent experiences of awe. Dr. Hendricks is able to speak about his research as well as novel and more effective treatments for substance abuse dependence, with specific areas of focus on tobacco, cocaine and polysubstance abuse in vulnerable populations.

 

Dr. Charles Nemeroff is chair and professor with the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He also directs the Institute for Early Life Adversity Research within the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences as part of the Mulva Clinic for the Neurosciences. Prior to joining Dell Med, Dr. Nemeroff was chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and clinical director of the Center on Aging at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Miami, Florida. He received his medical degree and doctorate degrees in neurobiology from the University of North Carolina (“UNC”) School of Medicine. After psychiatry residency training at UNC and Duke University, he held faculty positions at Duke University Medical Center and at Emory University School of Medicine before relocating to the University of Miami in 2009. He has served as president of the American College of Psychiatrists and the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, and sits on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Brain and Behavior Research Foundation. He is President-elect of the Anxiety and Depression Association of America and a member of the National Academy of Medicine.

 

67

 

 

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

Our principal executive officer during our fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 (whom we also refer to as our “named executive officer”) was Eric Weisblum.

 

Summary Compensation Table

 

Name and
Principal Position
 Fiscal
Years
Ended
12/31
  Salary
Paid
($)
  Bonus
($)
  Stock
Awards
($)
  Option
Awards
($)
  Non-Equity
Incentive Plan
Compensation
($)
  Non- Qualified Deferred
Compensation
Earnings
($)
  Other
Compensation
($)
  Total
($)
 
Eric Weisblum,  2020  $115,000   -  $610,476(3)  -   -   -   -  $725,476 
Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer (1)  2019   90,989   -   -   107,970(2)  -   -   -  $198,959 

 

(1)Represents fees paid to Eric Weisblum as an independent contractor.
  
(2)On April 15, 2019, pursuant to an employment agreement, we granted Mr. Weisblum an option pursuant to purchase 200,000 of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.0001 per share. The Options expire through July 15, 2024. This option fully vested on July 15, 2019. Additionally, on October 15, 2019, we granted to Mr. Weisblum an option to purchase 100,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price equal to par value of the Company’s common stock of $0.0001 per share. Should the Company terminate this employment agreement, the right to purchase shares shall cease as of the date of termination. The options were valued at the grant date using a Black-Scholes option pricing model with the following assumptions; risk-free interest rates ranging from 1.59% to 2.37%, expected dividend yield of 0%, expected option term of 5 years using the simplified method and expected volatility ranging from 74% to 158.6% based on comparable and calculated volatility. On the grant dates, the fair value of the options aggregated $107,970.
  
(3)On April 17, 2020, the Company entered into an Employment Agreement with Mr. Weisblum, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, pursuant to which Mr. Weisblum will continue to serve as Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer of the Company. Mr. Weisblum’s base salary was $120,000, and he shall be eligible to earn a bonus in an amount of up to $120,000, subject to the sole discretion of the Company’s board of directors. In addition, Mr. Weisblum was granted 7,630,949 shares of the Company’s common stock. These shares were valued at $610,476, or $0.08 per common share, based on contemporaneous common share sales. Such employment agreement was amended in January 2021.

68

 

 

Option/SAR Grants in Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2020

 

Pursuant to a six month employment agreement with the Company’s chief executive officer (the “Executive”) dated April 15, 2019 (the “Effective Date”), the Company agreed to grant to Executive an option (the “Option’’) to purchase up to 200,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price equal to par value of the Company’s common stock of $0.0001 per share, of which 100,000 vested on April 15, 2019 and 100,000 vested on July 15, 2019. On October 15, 2019, the Company granted to Executive an option to purchase 100,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price equal to par value of the Company’s common stock of $0.0001 per share. Should the Company terminate this employment agreement, the right to purchase shares shall cease as of the date of termination.

 

Pursuant to a six month employment agreement dated April 15, 2019 (the “Effective Date”), the Company agreed that an executive officer of the Company will be granted an option (the “Option’’) to purchase up to 100,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price equal to par value of the Company’s common stock of $0.0001 per share, of which 50,000 vested on April 15, 2019 and 50,000 vested on July 15, 2019. Should the Company terminate this agreement, the right to purchase shares shall cease as of the date of termination.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End

 

The following table provides information regarding option and restricted stock unit awards held by each of our named executive officers that were outstanding as of December 31, 2020. There were no stock awards or other equity awards outstanding as of December 31, 2020.

 

  Option Awards  Stock Awards 
Name Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options (#)
(Exercisable)
  Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Options (#)
(Unexercisable)
  Equity
Incentive
Plan
Awards:
Number of
Securities
Underlying
Unexercised
Unearned
Options (#)
  Option
Exercise
Price
($)
  Option
Expiration
Date
  Number of
Shares or
Units of
Stock That
Have Not
Vested
(#)
  Market
Value of
Shares or
Units of
Stock That
Have Not
Vested (#)
  Equity
Incentive
Plan Awards:
Number of
Unearned
Shares, Units
or Other
Rights that
Have Not
Vested
(#)
  Equity
Incentive
Plan Awards:
Market or
Payout Value
of Unearned
Shares, Units
or Other
Rights that
Have Not
Vested
($)
 
Eric Weisblum  300,000   -   -  $0.0001           (1)  -   -   -   - 
Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer                                    

 

(1)The options expire between April 2024 and October 2024.

 

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

 

None.

 

Employment Agreements

 

On April 17, 2020 (the “Weisblum Effective Date”), the Company entered into an employment agreement with Eric Weisblum, as amended on January 18, 2021 (as amended, “Employment Agreement”), pursuant to which Mr. Weisblum serves as Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer of the Company. The term of the Employment Agreement will continue for a period of one year from the Weisblum Effective Date and automatically renews for successive one year periods at the end of each term until either party delivers written notice of their intent not to review at least six months prior to the expiration of the then effective term. Pursuant to the terms of the Employment Agreement, Mr. Weisblum shall receive a base salary of $180,000 and shall be eligible to earn a bonus in an amount of up to $120,000, subject to the sole discretion of the Company’s board of directors. In addition, Mr. Weisblum was granted 7,630,949 shares of the Company’s common stock in April 2020.

 

69

 

 

The Employment Agreement may be terminated by either the Company or Mr. Weisblum at any time and for any reason upon sixty days’ prior written notice. Upon termination of the Employment Agreement, Mr. Weisblum shall (i) receive his then base salary up to and including the date of termination, (ii) payment of unreimbursed expenses and (iii) any accrued benefits under the Company’s benefit plan, paid pursuant to the terms of such plan (collectively, the “Accrued Obligations”). In the event Mr. Weisblum’s employment is terminated by Cause (as defined in the Employment Agreement), Disability (as defined in the Employment Agreement) or death, Mr. Weisblum shall receive the Accrued Obligations.

 

Non-Employee Director Compensation

 

The following table presents the total compensation for each person who served as a non-employee member of our board of directors and received compensation for such service during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020. Other than as set forth in the table and described more fully below, we did not pay any compensation, make any equity awards or non-equity awards to, or pay any other compensation to any of the non-employee members of our board of directors in 2020.

 

 

Name Fees earned or paid in cash
($)
  Stock
awards
($)
  Option awards
($)
  Non-equity incentive plan compensation
($)
  Nonqualified deferred compensation earnings
($)
  All other compensation
($)
  Total
($)
 
Wayne Linsley $20,000          -          -          -          -          -  $20,000 
Kevin Muñoz $1,500   -   -   -   -   -  $1,500 

 

70

 

 

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT

 

The following table sets forth certain information regarding the beneficial ownership of our capital stock outstanding as of February 12, 2021 by:

 

each person, or group of affiliated persons, known by us to beneficially own more than 5% of our shares of common stock;

 

each of our directors;

 

each of our named executive officers; and

 

all of our directors and named executive officers as a group.

 

The percentage ownership information is based on 85,176,956 shares of common stock outstanding as of February 12, 2021. Information with respect to beneficial ownership has been furnished by each director, officer or beneficial owner of more than 5% of our common stock. We have determined beneficial ownership in accordance with the rules of the SEC. These rules generally attribute beneficial ownership of securities to persons who possess sole or shared voting power or investment power with respect to those securities. In addition, the rules attribute beneficial ownership of securities as of a particular date to persons who hold options or warrants to purchase shares of common stock and that are exercisable within 60 days of such date. These shares are deemed to be outstanding and beneficially owned by the person holding those options or warrants for the purpose of computing the percentage ownership of that person, but they are not treated as outstanding for the purpose of computing the percentage ownership of any other person. Unless otherwise indicated, the persons or entities identified in this table have sole voting and investment power with respect to all shares shown as beneficially owned by them, subject to applicable community property laws.

 

71

 

 

Except as otherwise noted below, the address for each person or entity listed in the table is c/o Silo Pharma, Inc., 560 Sylvan Avenue, Suite 3160, Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632.

 

Name and Address of Beneficial Owner Number of
shares
beneficially
owned
  Percentage of
shares
beneficially
owned
 
5% or greater shareholders:      
Scott Wilfong (1)  5,393,787   6.33%
         
Directors and Named Executive Officers:        
Eric Weisblum (2)  7,989,063   9.35%
Wayne D. Linsley  0   0%
Kevin Muñoz  0   0%
All executive officers and directors as a group (3 persons)  7,989,063   9.35%

 

(1)Pursuant to Scott Wilfong’s Schedule 13G filed with the SEC on May 21, 2020, Scott Wilfong is the beneficial owner of 5,393,787 shares of the Company’s common stock, and his address is 6427 Lake Washington Blvd. NE, Kirkland, WA 98033.

 

(2)Consists of (i) 7,689,063 shares of common stock and (ii) 300,000 shares of common stock issuable upon exercise of options.

 

72

 

 

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

There were no transactions during our fiscal years ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 to which we were a party, including transactions in which the amount involved in the transaction exceeds the lesser of $120,000 or 1% of the average of our total assets at year-end for the last two completed fiscal years, and in which any of our directors, executive officers or, to our knowledge, beneficial owners of more than 5% of our capital stock or any member of the immediate family of any of the foregoing persons had or will have a direct or indirect material interest, other than equity and other compensation, termination, change in control and other arrangements, which are described elsewhere in this registration statement. We are not otherwise a party to a current related party transaction, and no transaction is currently proposed, in which the amount of the transaction exceeds the lesser of $120,000 or 1% of the average of our total assets at year-end for the last two completed fiscal years and in which a related person had or will have a direct or indirect material interest.

 

LEGAL MATTERS

 

Unless otherwise indicated, Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton LLP, New York, New York, will pass upon the validity of the shares of our common stock to be sold in this offering.

 

EXPERTS

 

The financial statements of Uppercut Brands, Inc. for the years ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018 have been included herein in reliance upon the reports of Salberg & Company, P.A., independent registered public accounting firm, upon the authority of said firm as experts in accounting and auditing.

 

WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

  

We have filed with the SEC a registration statement on Form S-1 under the Securities Act with respect to the Resale Shares being offered by this prospectus. This prospectus does not contain all of the information in the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part and the exhibits to such registration statement. For further information with respect to us the Resale Shares by this prospectus, we refer you to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part and the exhibits to such registration statement. Statements contained in this prospectus as to the contents of any contract or any other document are not necessarily complete, and in each instance, we refer you to the copy of the contract or other document incorporated by reference or filed as an exhibit to the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part. Each of these statements is qualified in all respects by this reference.

 

You may read and copy the registration statement of which this prospectus is a part, as well as our reports, proxy statements and other information, at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for more information about the operation of the Public Reference Room. The SEC maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC, including Silo Pharma, Inc.. The SEC’s Internet site can be found at http://www.sec.gov. You may also request a copy of these filings, at no cost, by writing us at Silo Pharma, Inc., 560 Sylvan Avenue, Suite 3160, Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632 or telephoning us at (718) 400-9031.

 

We are subject to the information and reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, and, in accordance with this law, file periodic reports, proxy statements and other information with the SEC. These periodic reports, proxy statements and other information are available for inspection and copying at the SEC’s public reference facilities and the website of the SEC referred to above. We also maintain a website at https://silopharma.com. You may access these materials free of charge as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC. Information contained on our website is not a part of this prospectus and the inclusion of our website address in this prospectus is an inactive textual reference only.

 

73

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

28,506,646 Shares of Common Stock

 

PROSPECTUS

 

                       , 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

  
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting FirmF-2
Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2019 and 2018F-3
Statement of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018F-4
Statements of Changes in Stockholders Equity (Deficit) for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018F-5
Statement of Cash Flows for the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018F-6
Notes to Financial StatementsF-7
  
Condensed Balance Sheets for September 30, 2020 (Unaudited) and December 31, 2019F-22
Condensed Statements of Operations for the Three and Nine Months Ended September 30, 2020 and 2019 (Unaudited)F-23
Condensed Statements of Changes in Stockholders Equity (Deficit) for the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2020 and 2019 (Unaudited)F-24
Condensed Statements of Cash Flows for the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2020 and 2019 (Unaudited)F-25
Notes to Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements (unaudited)F-26

 

F-1

 

 

 

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

To the Shareholders and the Board of Directors of:

Uppercut Brands, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying balance sheets of Uppercut Brands, Inc. (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the related statements of operations, changes in stockholders’ equity (deficit), and cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2019, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended December 31, 2019 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 2 to the financial statements, the Company has a net loss and cash used in operations of $1,013,294 and $794,324 for the year ended December 31, 2019, respectively, and has minimal revenues in 2019. Additionally, the Company has an accumulated deficit and stockholders’ deficit of $2,655,804 and $22,892 at December 31, 2019, respectively. These matters raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s Plans in regard to these matters, is also described in Note 2. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/S/ Salberg & Company, P.A.

 

SALBERG & COMPANY, P.A.

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2019.

Boca Raton, Florida

March 20, 2020

 

2295 NW Corporate Blvd., Suite 240 • Boca Raton, FL 33431-7328

Phone: (561) 995-8270 • Toll Free: (866) CPA-8500 • Fax: (561) 995-1920

www.salbergco.com • info@salbergco.com

Member National Association of Certified Valuation Analysts • Registered with the PCAOB

Member CPAConnect with Affiliated Offices Worldwide • Member AICPA Center for Audit Quality

 

F-2

 

  

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

BALANCE SHEETS

 

  December 31,  December 31, 
  2019  2018 
ASSETS      
CURRENT ASSETS:        
Cash and cash equivalents $111,752  $336,679 
Equity investments, at fair value (cost of $0 and $45,336 at December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively)  -   215,528 
Equity investments, at cost  9,394   12,766 
Notes receivable, net  200,000   - 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets  16,333   34,031 
Inventory  156,366   26,973 
         
Total Current Assets  493,845   625,977 
         
OTHER ASSETS:        
Notes receivable, net  -   200,000 
Intangible asset  -   29,440 
         
Total Other Assets  -   229,440 
         
Total Assets $493,845  $855,417 
         
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)        
         
CURRENT LIABILITIES:        
Convertible note payable, net of discount $61,875  $- 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses  54,862   25,631 
Insurance finance loan  -   22,344 
         
Total Current Liabilities  116,737   47,975 
         
Concentrations (see Note 12)        
         
Redeemable Series A, convertible preferred stock, $0.0001 par value, 1,000,000 shares designated; 4,000 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2019 and 2018 ($100 per share redemption and liquidation value)  400,000   400,000 
         
STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT):        
Preferred stock, $0.0001 par value, 5,000,000 shares authorized  -   - 
Series B convertible preferred stock, $0.0001 par value, 2,000 shares designated; 115 and 0 shares issued and outstanding at        
December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively ($1,000 per share liquidation value)  -   - 
Common stock, $0.0001 par value, 100,000,000 shares authorized; 23,604,207 and 23,417,450 shares issued and outstanding at        
December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively  2,361   2,342 
Additional paid-in capital  2,630,551   2,047,610 
Accumulated deficit  (2,655,804)  (1,642,510)
         
Total Stockholders' Equity (Deficit)  (22,892)  407,442 
         
Total Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity (Deficit) $493,845  $855,417 

 

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

 

F-3

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

  For the Years Ended 
  December 31, 
  2019  2018 
REVENUES $40,569  $- 
         
COST OF SALES  27,387   - 
         
GROSS PROFIT  13,182   - 
         
OPERATING EXPENSES:        
Compensation expense  319,587   145,000 
Professional fees  431,015   203,559 
Product development  63,465   - 
Insurance expense  26,565   35,195 
Bad debt (recovery) expense  (13,500)  35,000 
Selling, general and administrative expenses  87,013   76,076 
Impairment loss  29,440   99,412 
         
Total operating expenses  943,585   594,242 
         
LOSS FROM OPERATIONS  (930,403)  (594,242)
         
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE):        
Interest income  12,196   4,218 
Interest expense  (62,739)  - 
Interest expense - related party  (189)  - 
Net realized gain (loss) on equity investments (non-controlled/non-affiliated investments)  138,032   (100,759)
Net unrealized loss on equity investments (non-controlled/non-affiliated investments)  (170,191)  (278,680)
         
Total other expense, net  (82,891)  (375,221)
         
NET LOSS $(1,013,294) $(969,463)
         
NET LOSS PER COMMON SHARE:        
Basic and diluted $(0.04) $(0.02)
         
WEIGHTED AVERAGE COMMON SHARES OUTSTANDING:        
Basic and diluted  23,468,522   49,101,419 

 

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

 

F-4

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)

For the Years Ended December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

  Series B Preferred Stock  Common Stock  Additional
Paid In
  Accumulated
Net
Investment
  Accumulated
Undistributed
Net Realized
Gain (Loss)
  Unrealized
Appreciation
(Depreciation)
  Accumulated  Total Stockholders' 
  Shares  Amount  Shares  Amount  Capital  Loss  on Investments  on Investments  Deficit  Equity (Deficit) 
Balance, December 31, 2017  -  $         -   50,082,441  $5,009  $1,871,080  $(470,388) $(651,530) $448,871  $-  $1,203,042 
                                         
Common stock issued for asset acquisition  -   -   2,000,000   200   152,035   -   -   -   -   152,235 
                                         
Common stock issued for cash  -   -   70,000   7   24,493   -   -   -   -   24,500 
                                         
Common stock repurchased for cash and cancelled  -   -   (28,734,901)  (2,874)  2   -   -   -   -   (2,872)
                                         
Adoption of corporation accounting  -   -   -   -   -   470,388   651,530   (448,871)  (673,047)  - 
                                         
Net loss  -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   (969,463)  (969,463)
                                         
Balance, December 31, 2018  -   -   23,417,540   2,342   2,047,610   -   -   -   (1,642,510)  407,442 
                                         
Series B preferred stock issued for cash, net of costs  115   -   -   -   110,000   -   -   -   -   110,000 
                                         
Common stock issued for services  -   -   100,000   10   34,990   -   -   -   -   35,000 
                                         
Common stock issued for due diligence fee  -   -   86,667   9   41,991   -   -   -   -   42,000 
                                         
Accretion of stock options for services  -   -   -   -   142,960   -   -   -   -   142,960 
                                         
Warrants issued in connection with convertible debt  -   -   -   -   253,000   -   -   -   -   253,000 
                                         
Net loss  -   -   -   -   -   -   -   -   (1,013,294)  (1,013,294)
                                         
Balance, December 31, 2019  115  $-   23,604,207  $2,361  $2,630,551  $-  $-  $-  $(2,655,804) $(22,892)

 

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

 

F-5

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

  For the Years Ended 
  December 31, 
  2019  2018 
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:      
Net loss $(1,013,294) $(969,463)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash (used in) provided by operating activities        
Amortization  -   17,550 
Impairment loss  29,440   99,412 
Stock-based compensation  177,960   - 
Amortization of debt discount to interest expense  61,875   - 
Net realized (gain) loss on equity investments  (138,032)  100,759 
Net unrealized loss on equity investments  170,191   278,680 
Proceeds from sale of equity investments  -   727,496 
Bad debt expense  -   35,000 
Change in operating assets and liabilities:        
Increase in inventory  (129,393)  (26,973)
Decrease in prepaid expenses and other current assets  17,698   22,888 
Increase (decrease) in accounts payable and accrued expenses  29,231   (12,712)
         
NET CASH (USED IN) PROVIDED BY OPERATING ACTIVITIES  (794,324)  272,637 
         
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:        
Cash disbursements related to notes receivable  -   (250,000)
Purchase of equity investment  (5,197)  - 
Proceeds from sale of equity investments  191,938   - 
         
NET CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) INVESTING ACTIVITIES  186,741   (250,000)
         
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:        
Proceeds from sale of common stock  -   24,500 
Redemption of common stock  -   (2,872)
Proceeds from sale of series B preferred stock, net  110,000   - 
Net proceeds from convertible debt  295,000   - 
Proceeds from note payable - related party  25,000   - 
Repayment of note payable - related party  (25,000)    
Repayment of insurance finance loan  (22,344)  (2,177)
         
NET CASH PROVIDED BY FINANCING ACTIVITIES  382,656   19,451 
         
NET (DECREASE) INCREASE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS:  (224,927)  42,088 
         
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS - beginning of year  336,679   294,591 
         
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS - end of year $111,752  $336,679 
         
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION:        
Cash paid during the period for:        
Interest $-  $- 
Income taxes $-  $- 
         
Non-cash investing and financing activities:        
Common stock issued for acquisition of intangible assets and prepaid expenses $300,000  $152,235 
Increase in prepaid expenses and accrued expenses for insurance finance loan $-  $24,521 
Common stock issued for due diligence fee and related increase in debt discount $42,000  $- 
Warrants issued in connection with convertible debt and related increase in debt discount $253,000  $- 

 

See accompanying notes to financial statements.

 

F-6

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND BUSINESS

 

Uppercut Brands, Inc. (formerly Point Capital, Inc.) (the “Company”) was incorporated in the State of New York on July 13, 2010. On January 24, 2013, the Company changed its state of incorporation from New York to Delaware. On September 29, 2018, the Company entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement (“APA”) with Blind Faith Concepts Holdings, Inc. a Nevada corporation (the “Seller”) whereby the Company completed the acquisition of 100% of the assets of “NFID” from the Seller. The Company is developing NFID as an exclusive brand of apparel consisting initially of sweatshirts, hoodies, pants, t-shirts, jackets and hats.

 

On October 4, 2013, the Company filed a Form N-54A and elected to become a business development company (“BDC”) under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”). In addition, the Company previously elected to be treated for federal income tax purpose as a regulated investment company, or (“RIC”), under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, (the “Code”). At March 31, 2017, the Company determined that it failed the RIC diversification test since one of the Company’s investments accounted for approximately 78% of the Company’s total assets. The Company did not cure its failure to retain its status as a RIC and the Company will not seek to obtain RIC status again. Accordingly, the Company is subject to income taxes at corporate tax rates.

 

Through September 29, 2018, the Company met the definition of an investment company in accordance with the guidance under Accounting Standards Codification Topic 946 “Financial Services – Investment Companies”. On September 29, 2018, the Company filed Form N-54C, Notification of Withdrawal of election to be Subject to Section 55 through 65 of the Investment Company Act of 1940, whereas the Company has changed the nature of its business so as to cease to be a business development company (See Note 2 – Basis of Presentation). As a BDC, the Company’s investment activities were managed by Eric Weisblum, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer.

 

On May 21, 2019, the Company amended its articles of incorporation with the State of Delaware to change the Company’s name to Uppercut Brands, Inc.

 

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of presentation and principles of consolidation

 

Effective September 29, 2018, following authorization by its shareholders, the Company withdrew its previous election to be regulated as a BDC under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended, or the 1940 Act. Prior to such time, the Company was a closed-end, non-diversified management investment company that had elected to be treated as a BDC under the 1940 Act.

 

The Company discontinued applying the guidance in FASB Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 946 - Financial Services – Investment Company and shall account for the change in its status prospectively by accounting for its equity investments in accordance with ASC Topics 320 - Investments—Debt and Equity Securities as of the date of the change in status. Additionally, the presentation of the financial statements will be that of a commercial company rather than that of an investment company.

 

In accordance with ASC 946, the Company is making this change to it financial reporting prospectively, and not restating periods prior to the Company’s change in status to a non-investment company effective September 29, 2018. Accordingly, in this report, the Company refers to both accounting in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) applicable to corporations (Corporation Accounting), which applies commencing September 29, 2018 and to that applicable to investment companies under the 1940 Act (Investment Company Accounting) which applies to prior periods. However, pursuant to ASC 205 – Presentation of Financial Statements, Section 205-10-50-1, “Changes Affecting Comparability”, certain amounts in the 2018 financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the 2019 presentation. These reclassifications primarily effect the presentation of revenues and expenses in the statements of operations. The schedules of investments are not presented for the year ended December 31, 2018. The Company determined that there is no cumulative effect of the change from Investment Company Accounting to Corporation Accounting on periods prior to those presented and that there is no effect on the Company’s financial position or results of operations as a result of this change.

 

In order to maintain its status as a non-investment company, the Company will now operate so as to fall outside the definition of an “Investment Company” or within an applicable exception. The Company expects to continue to operate outside the definition of an “Investment Company” as a company primarily engaged in the business of developing and selling apparel products.

 

F-7

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

Going Concern

 

These financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the settlement of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. As reflected in the accompanying financial statements, the Company had a net loss and cash used in operations of $1,013,294 and $794,324 for the year ended December 31, 2019.  Additionally, the Company had an accumulated deficit and a stockholders’ deficit of $2,655,804 and $22,892 at December 31, 2019, and has generated minimal revenues under its new business plan. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern for a period of twelve months from the issuance date of this report. Management cannot provide assurance that the Company will ultimately achieve profitable operations or become cash flow positive, or raise additional debt and/or equity capital. The Company is seeking to raise capital through additional debt and/or equity financings to fund its operations in the future. If the Company is unable to raise additional capital or secure additional lending in the near future to fund its business plan, management expects that the Company will need to curtail its operations. These financial statements do not include any adjustments related to the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Making estimates requires management to exercise significant judgment. It is at least reasonably possible that the estimate of the effect of a condition, situation or set of circumstances that existed at the date of the financial statements, which management considered in formulating its estimate could change in the near term due to one or more future confirming events. Accordingly, the actual results could differ significantly from estimates. Significant estimates during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 include the collectability of notes receivable, the valuation of the Company’s equity investments, amortization period and valuation of intangibles, estimates for obsolete inventory, assumptions used in assessing impairment of long-term assets, valuation allowances for deferred tax assets, the fair value of warrants issued with debt, and the fair value of shares issued for services.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with a maturity of three months or less when acquired to be cash equivalents. The Company places its cash with high credit quality financial institutions. The Company’s accounts at these institutions are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) up to $250,000 or by the Securities Investor Protection Corporation (“SIPC”) up to $250,000. During 2019 and 2018, the Company had cash balances exceeding the FDIC and SIPC insurance limit on interest bearing accounts. To reduce its risk associated with the failure of such financial institutions, the Company evaluates at least annually the rating of the financial institutions in which it holds deposits. At December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company had approximately $0 and $86,700 cash in excess of FDIC limits, respectively.

 

Notes Receivable

 

The Company recognizes an allowance for losses on notes receivable in an amount equal to the estimated probable losses net of recoveries. The allowance is based on an analysis of historical bad debt experience, current note receivable aging, and expected future write-offs, as well as an assessment of specific identifiable accounts considered at risk or uncollectible. The expense associated with the allowance for doubtful accounts is recognized as general and administrative expense. No allowance was required for 2019 and 2018.

  

Inventory

 

Inventory, consisting of raw materials and finished goods, are stated at the lower of cost and net realizable value utilizing the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method. A reserve is established when management determines that certain inventories may not be saleable. If inventory costs exceed expected net realizable value due to obsolescence or quantities in excess of expected demand, the Company will record reserves for the difference between the cost and the net realizable value. These reserves shall be recorded based on estimates and included in cost of sales. No allowance was required for 2019 and 2018.

 

F-8

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

Securities Transactions

 

Securities transactions are recorded on a trade date basis. Securities transactions outside conventional channels, such as private transactions, are recorded as of the date the Company obtains the right to demand the securities purchased or to collect the proceeds from a sale and incurs an obligation to pay for securities purchased or to deliver securities sold, respectively. The Company records interest and dividend income on an accrual basis to the extent that the Company expects to collect such amounts. Commissions and other costs associated with transactions involving securities, including legal costs, are included in the cost basis of purchases and deducted from the proceeds of sales.

 

Equity Investments, at Cost

 

Equity investments, at cost comprised mainly of non-marketable capital stock and stock warrants, are recorded at cost, as adjusted for other than temporary impairment write-downs and are evaluated for impairment periodically. Prior to September 29, 2018, equity investments, at cost were recorded at fair value, represented as cost, plus or minus unrealized appreciation or depreciation. The fair value of equity investments, at cost that had no ready market were determined in good faith by the Board of Directors, based upon the financial condition and operating performance of the underlying investee companies as well as general market trends for businesses in the same industry.

 

Equity Investments, at Fair Value

 

Through September 29, 2018, on a quarterly basis, the Board of Directors of the Company (the “Board”), in good faith, determined the fair value of equity investments, at fair value in the following manner:

 

Equity securities which are listed on a recognized stock exchange were valued at the adjusted closing trade price on the last trading day of the valuation period. For equity securities that carry a restriction inherent to the security, a restriction discount was applied, as appropriate. Investments in warrants were valued at fair value using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. Investments in securities, which were convertible at a date in the future, were valued assuming a full conversion into common shares and valued based on the methodology for equity securities described above, or at the respective investment’s face value, whichever is a better indicator of fair value. Investments in unlisted securities were valued using a market approach net of the appropriate discount for lack of marketability.

 

Investments without a readily determined market value were primarily valued using a market approach, an income approach, or both approaches, as appropriate. The market approach uses prices and other relevant information generated by market transactions involving identical or comparable assets or liabilities (including a business). The income approach uses valuation techniques to convert future amounts (for example, cash flows or earnings) to a single present amount (discounted). The measurement is based on the value indicated by current market expectations about those future amounts. In following these approaches, the types of factors that the Company took into account in fair value pricing the Company’s investments included, as relevant: available current market data, including relevant and applicable market trading and transaction comparables, applicable market yields and multiples, security covenants, call protection provisions, information rights, the nature and realizable value of any collateral, the portfolio company’s ability to make payments, its earnings and discounted cash flows, the markets in which the portfolio company does business, comparisons of financial ratios of peer companies that are public, M&A comparables, and enterprise values, among other factors.

 

Because there was not a readily available market value for some of the investments in its portfolio, the Company valued certain of its portfolio investments at fair value as determined in good faith by the Board, as described herein. Due to the inherent uncertainty of determining the fair value of investments that do not have a readily available market value, the fair value of the Company’s investments fluctuated from period to period. Additionally, the fair value of the Company’s investments differed significantly from the values that would have been used had a readily available market existed for such investments and may differ materially from the values that the Company may ultimately realize. Further, such investments are generally subject to legal and other restrictions on resale or otherwise are less liquid than publicly traded securities. If the Company was required to liquidate a portfolio investment in a forced or liquidation sale, the Company could realize significantly less than the value at which the Company has recorded it.

 

Subsequent to September 29, 2018, pursuant to ASC 320 – Investments – Debt and Equity Securities, the Company categorizes its equity investments, fair value as an available for sale security since there is an active market in such equity investments. Available for sale securities are carried at fair value with unrealized gains or losses included in income (expense). Realized gains and losses are determined on a specific identification basis and are included in other income (expense). The Company reviews equity investments for impairment whenever circumstances and situations change such that there is an indication that the carrying amounts may not be recovered.

 

F-9

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

Intangible Assets

 

Intangible assets are carried at cost less accumulated amortization, computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives. Intangible assets consisted of a brand ambassador agreement which were being amortized over a period of one year and trademarks which were recorded at cost and have an indefinite useful life and were not amortized.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company recorded an impairment loss of $87,745 related to the impairment of the brand ambassador agreement. For the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company recorded an impairment loss of $29,440 related to the impairment of trademarks. Management determined that there was a significant adverse change in the extent or manner in which these long-lived assets were being used.

 

Impairment of Long-lived Assets

 

In accordance with ASC Topic 360, the Company reviews long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the assets may not be fully recoverable, or at least annually. The Company recognizes an impairment loss when the sum of expected undiscounted future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the asset. The amount of impairment is measured as the difference between the asset’s estimated fair value and its book value.

 

Net Realized Gain or Loss and Net Change in Unrealized Appreciation or Depreciation of Equity Investments, at Fair Value

 

Realized gain or loss is recognized when an investment is disposed of and is computed as the difference between the Company’s cost basis and the net proceeds received from such disposition.  Realized gains and losses on investment transactions are determined by specific identification. Net change in unrealized appreciation or depreciation is computed as the difference between the fair value of the investment and the cost basis of such investment, including any reversal of previously recorded unrealized appreciation/depreciation when gains or losses are realized.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company applies ASC Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (“ASC 606”). ASC 606 establishes a single comprehensive model for entities to use in accounting for revenue arising from contracts with customers and supersedes most of the existing revenue recognition guidance. This standard requires an entity to recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services and also requires certain additional disclosures. The Company adopted this standard using the modified retrospective approach, which requires applying the new standard to all existing contracts not yet completed as of the effective date and recording a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings as of the date of adoption. The adoption of ASC 606 on January 1, 2018 did not have any impact on the process for, timing of, and presentation and disclosure of revenue recognition from contracts and there was no cumulative effect adjustment.

 

The Company records interest and dividend income on an accrual basis to the extent that the Company expects to collect such amounts.

 

Product sales are recognized when the product is shipped to the customer and title is transferred and are recorded net of any discounts or allowances.

 

Stock-based compensation

 

Stock-based compensation is accounted for based on the requirements of ASC 718 – “Compensation–Stock Compensation”, which requires recognition in the financial statements of the cost of employee and director services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments over the period the employee or director is required to perform the services in exchange for the award (presumptively, the vesting period). The ASC also requires measurement of the cost of employee and director services received in exchange for an award based on the grant-date fair value of the award. The Company utilizes the Black-Sholes option pricing model and uses the simplified method to determine expected term because of lack of sufficient exercise history.

 

F-10

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

Effective January 1, 2017, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-09 (“ASU 2016-09”), Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting. ASU 2016-09 permits the election of an accounting policy for forfeitures of share-based payment awards, either to recognize forfeitures as they occur or estimate forfeitures over the vesting period of the award. The Company has elected to recognize forfeitures as they occur, and the cumulative impact of this change did not have any effect on the Company’s financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-07, Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting, which simplifies several aspects of the accounting for nonemployee share-based payment transactions by expanding the scope of the stock-based compensation guidance in ASC 718 to include share-based payment transactions for acquiring goods and services from non-employees. ASU No. 2018-07 is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those annual periods. Early adoption is permitted, but entities may not adopt prior to adopting the new revenue recognition guidance in ASC 606. The Company adopted ASU No. 2018-07 on January 1, 2019 and there was no cumulative effect of adoption.

 

Upon exercise of the stock options by the holder using the exercise methods delineated in the option contract, the Company issues new shares from its unissued authorized shares.

 

Income Taxes

 

Deferred income tax assets and liabilities arise from temporary differences between the financial statements and tax basis of assets and liabilities, as measured by the enacted tax rates, which are expected to be in effect when these differences reverse. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are classified as current or non-current, depending upon the classification of the asset or liabilities to which they relate. Deferred tax assets and liabilities not related to an asset or liability are classified as current or non-current depending on the periods in which the temporary differences are expected to reverse. Valuation allowances are established when necessary to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized.

 

The Company follows the provisions of FASB ASC 740-10, “Uncertainty in Income Taxes”. Certain recognition thresholds must be met before a tax position is recognized in the financial statements. An entity may only recognize or continue to recognize tax positions that meet a “more-likely-than-not” threshold. The Company does not believe it has any uncertain tax positions as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 that would require either recognition or disclosure in the accompanying financial statements.

 

Net Loss per Common Share

 

Basic loss per share is computed by dividing net loss allocable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during each period. Diluted earnings per share is computed by dividing net income available to common shareholders by the weighted average number of shares of common stock, common stock equivalents and potentially dilutive securities outstanding during the period using the as-if converted method. Potentially dilutive securities which included convertible preferred shares and stock options are excluded from the computation of diluted shares outstanding if they would have an anti-dilutive impact on the Company’s net losses. The following potentially dilutive shares have been excluded from the calculation of diluted net loss per share as their effect would be anti-dilutive for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

  December 31,
2019
  December 31,
2018
 
Series A convertible preferred stock  2,000,000   2,000,000 
Series B convertible preferred stock  575,000   - 
Convertible notes  1,650,000   - 
Stock options  300,000   - 
Warrants  2,225,000   - 

 

New Accounting Pronouncements

 

Accounting standards that have been issued or proposed by FASB that do not require adoption until a future date are not expected to have a material impact on the financial statements upon adoption. The Company does not discuss recent pronouncements that are not anticipated to have an impact on or are unrelated to its financial condition, results of operations, cash flows or disclosures.

 

F-11

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

NOTE 3 – ACQUISITION

 

On September 29, 2018 (the “Closing Date”), the Company entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement (“APA”) with Blind Faith Concepts Holdings, Inc. a Nevada Corporation (the “Seller”) whereby the Company completed the acquisition of 100% of the assets of “NFID” from the Seller which consisted of three trademarks related to the NFID brand, the NFID website, shoe designs and samples, and the assumption of a one-year Brand Ambassador Agreement in exchange for 2,000,000 shares of common capital stock of the Company. NFID is a recently developed unisex apparel brand. The Company plans on continuing product development to fully launch the product. The Company’s acquisition of the NFID assets gives the Company access to the growing market for unisex products. 

 

As a result of the APA, the Company has elected to no longer be deemed a “Business Development Company” as defined by the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended from time to time (the “Act”). The withdrawal was generally approved by the shareholders of the Company on April 11, 2017, as evidenced on the Definitive Information Statement pursuant to Section 14(c) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 filed on June 5, 2017. The Board, under authority granted by the shareholders, approved the withdrawal on September 27, 2018. On September 28, 2018, the Company filed Form N-54C, officially withdrawing its election to be subject to sections 55 through 65 of the Act.

 

Pursuant to ASU 2017-01 and ASC 805, the Company analyzed the ASA to determine if the Company acquired a business or acquired assets. Based on this analysis, it was determined that the Company acquired assets. Pursuant to the terms of the APA, the Company issued 2,000,000 shares of common capital stock of the Company in exchange for 100% of the NFID assets. The shares were valued at $152,235, or $0.08 per share, the fair value of the Company’s common stock based on the fair value of assets acquired. No goodwill should be recorded since the APA was accounted for as an asset purchase.

 

The relative fair value of the assets acquired were based on management’s estimates of the fair values on September 29, 2018. Based upon the purchase price allocation, the following table summarizes the estimated relative fair value of the assets acquired at the date of acquisition: 

 

Prepaid expenses $17,500 
Intangible assets  134,735 
Total assets acquired at fair value  152,235 
Total purchase consideration $152,235 

 

The Company valued the three trademarks acquired at their historical cost of $29,440 which approximates fair market value. The Company valued the Brand Ambassador Agreement at $105,295 using the estimated fair value of required social media posts by the artist/singer Max Schneider, known as Max (“MAX”). MAX is considered a social media influencer with over 600,000 Instagram followers and over 1.5 million YouTube subscribers.

 

Pursuant to the Brand Ambassador Agreement, the Company was to incur a minimum cash payment of $35,000 related to a minimum royalty payment of which $17,500 was paid prior to the Closing Date. The remaining $17,500 was due on January 27, 2019 and was not paid due to cancellation of the agreement.

 

At December 31, 2018, based on management’s impairment analysis, the Company recorded an impairment loss of $99,412 due to the write off the remaining unamortized carrying value of its intangible asset of $87,745 and the remaining prepaid expense of $11,667 related to the brand ambassador agreements.

 

NOTE 4 – FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS AND FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

 

The Company uses the guidance of ASC Topic 820 for fair value measurements which clarifies the definition of fair value, prescribes methods for measuring fair value, and establishes a fair value hierarchy to classify the inputs used in measuring fair value as follows:

 

Level 1- Inputs are unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities available at the measurement date.

 

Level 2- Inputs are unadjusted quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets and liabilities in markets that are not active, inputs other than quoted prices that are observable, and inputs derived from or corroborated by observable market data.

 

Level 3- Inputs are unobservable inputs which reflect the reporting entity’s own assumptions on what assumptions the market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability based on the best available information.

 

F-12

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

The carrying amounts reported in the balance sheets for cash, inventory, prepaid expenses and other current assets, accounts payable and accrued expenses, and insurance finance loan approximate their fair market value based on the short-term maturity of these instruments.

 

Equity investments, at fair value

 

The Company accounted for certain equity investments at fair value using level 1, level 2 and level 3 valuations. Assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis are as follows at December 31, 2019 and 2018:

 

  At December 31, 2019  At December 31, 2018 
Description Level 1  Level 2  Level 3  Level 1  Level 2  Level 3 
Equity investments, at fair value $        $215,528       

 

ASC 825-10 “Financial Instruments”, allows entities to voluntarily choose to measure certain financial assets and liabilities at fair value (fair value option). The fair value option may be elected on an instrument-by-instrument basis and is irrevocable, unless a new election date occurs. If the fair value option is elected for an instrument, unrealized gains and losses for that instrument should be reported in earnings at each subsequent reporting date. The Company did not elect to apply the fair value option to any outstanding instruments.

  

At December 31, 2018, equity investments, at fair value consisted of common equity securities of one entity.

 

Equity investments, at fair value are treated as available for sale securities and are carried at fair value with unrealized gains or losses included in income (expense). Realized gains and losses are determined on a specific identification basis and are included in other income (expense). The Company reviews equity investments, at fair value for impairment whenever circumstances and situations change such that there is an indication that the carrying amounts may not be recovered.

 

The following are the Company’s equity investments, at fair value owned by levels within the fair value hierarchy at December 31, 2018: 

 

  Level 1  Level 2  Level 3  Total 
Common Stock $215,528  $-  $-  $215,528 
Total Investments $215,528  $-  $-  $215,528 

  

At December 31, 2019 and 2018, equity investments, at fair value consisted of the following components:

  

  

December 31,

2019

  

December 31,

2018

 
Equity investments, at original cost $-  $45,336 
Gross unrealized appreciation  -   170,192 
Equity investments, at fair market value $-  $215,528 

 

The following additional disclosures relate to the changes in fair value of the Company’s Level 3 investments during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018: 

 

  Years Ended
December 31,
 
  2019  2018 
Balance at beginning of year $-  $464,466 
Net change in unrealized depreciation on investments  -   (414,730)
Net transfers out of Level 3  -   (49,736)
Balance at end of year $-  $- 

 

F-13

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

Equity investments, at cost

 

At December 31, 2019 and 2018, equity investments, at cost of $9,394 and $12,766, respectively, comprised mainly of non-marketable capital stock, are recorded at cost, as adjusted for other than temporary impairment write-downs and are evaluated for impairment periodically.

 

NOTE 5 – INVENTORY

 

At December 31, 2019 and 2018, inventory, including leather footwear finished goods, fabric, jackets. t-shirts and hats and fabric, consisted of the following:

 

  December 31,
2019
  December 31,
2018
 
Raw materials $41,231  $- 
Finished goods  115,135   26,973 
Inventory $156,366  $26,973 

 

NOTE 6 – NOTES RECEIVABLE

 

On September 28, 2018, the Company and the Seller executed a two-year promissory note receivable agreement with a principal balance of $200,000 of which $100,000 was funded to the Seller in September 2018 and the remaining $100,000 was funded in October 2018. The terms of the promissory note include an interest rate of 6% and the Company shall be repaid in interest only payments on a quarterly basis, until the maturity date of September 27, 2020, at which time the full principal and any interest payments will be due to the Company. At the time the promissory note receivable agreement was executed, the Company also executed a Security Interest and Pledge Agreement with the borrower. Pursuant to the Security Interest and Pledge Agreement, the borrower has pledged all of the assets of its company as security for the performance of the note obligations.

 

On November 2, 2018, the Company and Seller entered into a Promissory Note Agreement with a principal balance of $50,000. Pursuant to the Promissory Note, the $50,000 note was a deposit and credit towards the acquisition of the assets of Lust for Life Group such as inventory, trademarks and logos. Pursuant to this promissory note agreement, since the purchase did not close within 30 days from the note date, the note receivable became immediately due. Through the date of default, the outstanding principal balance bore interest at an annual interest rate of 10% payable on a monthly basis. Upon default, the interest rate increased to 18% per annum. As of December 31, 2018, the Company determined that this note receivable was doubtful and accordingly, recorded an allowance for doubtful account and bad debt expense of $50,000.

 

In December 2019, pursuant to Claim Purchase Agreements, the Company sold its notes receivable and related interest receivable balances in the aggregate amount of $277,305 to an investor. Pursuant to the Claim Purchase Agreements, the investor shall pay the Company the purchase price of $277,305 on the earlier of the payment of six-monthly installments or upon the liquidation of settlement securities of the Seller pursuant to Section 3(a)(10) of the Securities Act, whichever occurs first. The first installment shall be made following entry and full effectuation of a court order approving the settlement of the claim which occurred on March 6, 2020 in the United States district court for the District of Maryland Northern Division. Additionally, effective January 6, 2020, the Company entered into a settlement agreement with the Seller (see Note 12 – Subsequent Events).

 

At December 31, 2019 and 2018, notes receivable, net consisted of the following:

 

  

December 31,

2019

  

December 31,

2018

 
Principal amounts of notes receivable $250,000  $250,000 
Less: allowance for doubtful accounts  (50,000)  (50,000)
Notes receivable, net $200,000  $200,000 

 

F-14

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

NOTE 7 – INTANGIBLE ASSETS

 

In connection with an APA (See Note 3), the Company valued the three trademarks acquired at their historical cost of $29,440 which approximated fair market value. The Company valued the Brand Ambassador Agreement at $105,295 using the estimated fair value of required social media posts by the artist/singer Max Schneider, known as Max (“MAX”).

 

At December 31, 2018, based on management’s impairment analysis, the Company wrote off the remaining unamortized carrying value of its intangible asset related to the brand ambassador agreement and recorded an impairment loss of $87,745. Management determined that there was a significant adverse change in the extent or manner in which this long-lived asset was being used. For the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company recorded an impairment loss of $29,440 related to the impairment of its trademarks. Management determined that there was a significant adverse change in the extent or manner in which its trademarks were being used. Trademarks were treated as indefinite long-lived assets and therefore were not amortized.

 

At December 31, 2019 and 2018, intangible assets consisted of the following:

 

  Useful life December 31,
2019
  December 31,
2018
 
Trademarks N/A $       -  $29,440 

 

For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, amortization of intangible assets amounted to $0 and $17,550, respectively. 

 

NOTE 8 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE

 

In October 2019, the Company entered into Securities Purchase Agreements (the “Purchase Agreements”) with accredited investors. Pursuant to the terms of the Purchase Agreements, the Company issued and sold to investors convertible promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $330,000 (the “Notes”) and warrants to purchase up to 1,650,000 shares of the Company’s common stock (the “Warrants”). The Company received net proceeds of $295,000, net of origination issue discount of $30,000 and fees of $5,000. The Notes are due and payable in October 2020. Prior to an Event of Default, no interest shall accrue on these Notes.

 

At any time after the Original Issue Date, until the respective Note is no longer outstanding, the Notes shall be convertible, in whole or in part, into shares of the Company’s common stock at the option of the Holder, at any time and from time to time. In accordance with the Purchase Agreements and the Notes, subject to adjustments as defined in the Purchase Agreements and Notes. The conversion price (the “Conversion Price”) shall be equal to $0.20. The Company may prepay the Notes at any time prior to its six-month anniversary, subject to pre-payment charges as detailed in the Note. Upon every conversion, the Company shall deliver an additional $1,250 worth of shares (as calculated by the Conversion Price in effect on the conversion notice being honored) to cover the Holder’s expenses and deposit fees associated with each notice of conversion.

 

The Purchase Agreements and Notes contain customary representations, warranties and covenants, including certain restrictions on the Company’s ability to sell, lease or otherwise dispose of any significant portion of its assets. The Investor also will be entitled to acquire, upon the terms applicable to such purchase rights, the aggregate purchase rights that the Holder could have acquired if the Holder had held the number of shares of common stock acquirable upon complete conversion of the Note. The Investor’s also has the right of first refusal with respect to any future equity (or debt with an equity component) offerings conducted by the Company until the 12-month anniversary of the Closing. The Purchase Agreements and the Notes also provide for certain events of default, including, among other things, payment defaults, breaches of representations and warranties, bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings, and delinquency in periodic report filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Upon the occurrence of an event of default, the Investor’s may declare the outstanding obligations due and payable at significant applicable default rates and take such other actions as set forth in the Note.

 

The Company shall issue to each investor at the closing, that number of shares of its common stock equal to 14% of the aggregate amount paid by the Investor for the Notes purchased, priced at the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the day prior to the closing, as a due diligence fee. In connection with due diligence fee, the Company shall issue 86,667 shares of its common stock to the investors. These shares were valued at $42,000 using the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the day prior to the closing which ranged from $0.35 to $0.60 per share, and the amount was recorded as a debt discount and an increase in equity.

 

F-15

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

The Warrants are exercisable at any time on or after the date of the issuance and entitles the investors to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock for a period of five years from the initial date the warrants become exercisable. Under the terms of the Warrant, the holders are entitled to exercise the Warrant to purchase up to 1,650,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.20, subject to customary adjustments as detailed in the Warrant.

 

This Note and related Warrants include a down-round provision under which the Note conversion price and warrant exercise price could be affected on a full-ratchet basis by future equity offerings undertaken by the Company.

 

In connection with the issuance of the Note and Warrants, the Company determined that the terms of the Notes and Warrants contain terms that are fixed monetary amounts at inception and accordingly, were not considered derivatives. The fair value of the warrants was determined using the Binomial valuation model. In connection with the issuance of the warrants, on the measurement date, the relative fair value of the warrants and the beneficial conversion feature of $253,000 was recorded as a debt discount and an increase in paid-in capital.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the fair value of the warrants was estimated using the Binomial valuation model with the following assumptions: 

  2019 
Dividend rate  %
Term (in years)  5.00 years 
Volatility  158.6%
Risk—free interest rate  1.48% to 1.66%

 

For the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, interest expense related to convertible notes and warrants amounted to $61,875 and $0, which consisted of amortization of debt discount.

 

At December 31, 2019 and 2018, convertible notes payable consisted of the following:

 

  December 31,
2019
  December 31,
2018
 
Principal amount $330,000  $       - 
Less: unamortized debt discount  (268,125)  - 
Convertible notes payable, net $61,875  $- 

 

NOTE 9 - NOTE PAYABLE – RELATED PARTY

 

On September 16, 2019, the Company entered into a Promissory Note Agreement (the “Note”) with the Company’s chief executive officer in the amount of $25,000. The Note bearing at 6% per annum, was unsecured, and all principal and interest amounts outstanding was repaid in November 2019. For the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, interest expense related to this Note amounted to $189 and $0, respectively.

 

NOTE 10 – STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

 

Preferred stock

 

The Company has authorized the issuance of 5,000,000 shares of preferred stock, $0.0001 par value. The Company’s board of directors is authorized at any time, and from time to time, to provide for the issuance of shares of Preferred Stock in one or more series, and to determine the designations, preferences, limitations and relative or other rights of the Preferred Stock or any series thereof. In April 2013, 1,000,000 shares were designated as Series A Convertible Preferred Stock and in November 2019, 2,000 shares were designated as Series B Convertible Preferred Stock.

 

F-16

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

Series A redeemable convertible preferred stock

 

In April 2013, pursuant to a Series A Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement (the “Preferred Stock Agreement”), the Company issued 4,000 shares of Series A Convertible Preferred Stock (the “Series A Preferred Stock”) for $400,000. Holders of Series A Preferred Stock vote together with holders of Common Stock on an as-converted basis. Each share of Series A Preferred Stock is currently convertible into 500 shares of common stock at the option of the holder (subject to a 9.99% beneficial ownership limitation) based on a conversion formula (the Stated Value, currently $100, divided by the Conversion Rate, currently $0.20). The Conversion Rate may be adjusted upon the occurrence of stock dividends or stock splits or subsequent equity sales at a price lower than the current conversion rate. Each share has a $100 liquidation value. The holders of Series A Preferred Stock are entitled to receive dividends on an as-converted basis if paid on Common Stock.

 

The Series A Convertible Preferred Stock is redeemable at the option of the holder upon the occurrence of certain “triggering events.” In case of a triggering event, the holder has the right to redeem each share held for cash (currently $100/share) or impose a dividend rate on all of the outstanding Preferred Stock at 6% per annum thereafter. A triggering event occurs if the Company fails to deliver certificates representing conversion shares, fails to pay the amount due pursuant to a Buy-In, fails to have available a sufficient number of authorized shares, fails to observe any covenant in the Certificate of Designation unless cured within 30 calendar days, shall be party to a Change in Control Transaction, sustains a bankruptcy event, fails to list or quote its common stock for more than 20 trading days in a twelve-month period, sustains any monetary judgment, writ or similar final process filed against the Company for more than $100,000 and such judgment writ or similar final process shall remain unvacated, unbonded or unstayed for a period of 45 calendar days, or fails to comply with the Asset Coverage requirement.

 

Because certain of these “triggering events” are outside the control of the Company, the Preferred Stock is classified within the temporary equity section of the accompanying balance sheets.

 

The Series A Preferred Stock has forced conversion rights where the Company may force the conversion of the Series A Preferred Stock if certain conditions are met. Additionally, the Company may elect to redeem some or all of the outstanding Series A Preferred Stock for the Stated Value (currently $100/share) provided that proper notice is provided to the holders and that a number of conditions (the “Equity Conditions”) have been met.

 

The Company believes the carrying amount reported in the balance sheets for the Series A Preferred Stock of $400,000 approximates the fair market value of such Preferred Stock based on the short-term maturity of these instruments which also equals the redemption value reflected as on the balance sheets.

 

On March 31, 2017, the Board approved the amendment and restatement of the original Certificate of Designation in order to expressly ensure that holders of the Company’s Series A Preferred Stock have the right to elect at least two directors at all times, have complete priority over any other class as to distribution of assets and payments of dividends, and have equal voting rights with every other outstanding voting stock. On May 11, 2017, the Company filed the amendment and restatement with the State of Delaware.

 

Series B convertible preferred stock

 

In November 2019, the Company filed an Amendment to its Articles of Incorporation to designate a series of preferred stock, the Series B Convertible Preferred Stock, with the Secretary of State of the State of Delaware.

 

The Certificate of Designations established 2,000 shares of the Series B Preferred Stock, par value $0.0001, having such designations, preferences, and rights as determined by the Company’s Board of Directors in its sole discretion, in accordance with the Company’s Articles of Incorporation and Amended and Restated Bylaws. The Certificate of Designations, Preferences, Rights, and Limitations of Series B Convertible Preferred Stock (“Certificate of Designations”) provides that the Series B Convertible Preferred Stock shall have no right to vote on any matters on which the common shareholders are permitted to vote. However, as long as any shares of Series B Preferred Stock are outstanding, the Company shall not, without the affirmative vote of the Holders of a majority of the then outstanding shares of the Series B Preferred Stock, (a) alter or change adversely the powers, preferences or rights given to the Series B Preferred Stock or alter or amend this Certificate of Designation, (b) authorize or create any class of stock ranking as to dividends, redemption or distribution of assets upon a liquidation senior to, or otherwise pari passu with, the Series B Preferred Stock, (c) amend its certificate of incorporation or other charter documents in any manner that adversely affects any rights of the Holders, (d) increase the number of authorized shares of Series B Preferred Stock, or (e) enter into any agreement with respect to any of the foregoing. The Series B Convertible Preferred Stock ranks senior with respect to dividends and right of liquidation to the Company’s common stock and junior with respect to dividends and right of liquidation to all existing and future indebtedness of the Company and existing and outstanding preferred stock of the Company. Each share of Series B Preferred Stock shall have a stated value of $1,000 (the “Stated Value”).

 

F-17

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

Except for stock dividends or distributions for which adjustments are to be made pursuant to the certificate of designation, Holders shall be entitled to receive, and the Company shall pay, dividends on shares of Series B Preferred Stock equal (on an as-if-converted-to-Common-Stock basis) to and in the same form as dividends actually paid on shares of the Company’s common stock when, as and if such dividends are paid on shares of the common stock. No other dividends shall be paid on shares of Series B Preferred Stock.

  

The Holder of Series B Preferred stock shall have the right from time to time, and at any time after the original issue date, to convert all or any part of the outstanding Series B Preferred Stock into the Company’s common stock. The conversion price (the “Conversion Price”) shall equal $0.20 per share (subject to equitable adjustments by the Company relating to the Company’s securities or the securities of any subsidiary of the Company, combinations, recapitalization, reclassifications, extraordinary distributions and similar events).

 

If, at any time while the Series B Preferred Stock is outstanding, the Company sells or grants any option to purchase or sells or grants any right to reprice, or otherwise disposes of or issues (or announces any sale, grant or any option to purchase or other disposition), any common stock or common stock equivalents entitling any Person to acquire shares of common stock at an effective price per share that is lower than the then Conversion Price (such lower price, the "Base Conversion Price" and such issuances, collectively, a "Dilutive Issuance"), then simultaneously with the consummation (or, if earlier, the announcement) of each Dilutive Issuance the Conversion Price shall be reduced to equal the Base Conversion Price. In addition, if at any time the Company grants, issues or sells any common stock equivalents or rights to purchase stock, warrants, securities or other property pro rata to the record holders of any class of shares of common stock (the "Purchase Rights"), then the Holder will be entitled to acquire, upon the terms applicable to such Purchase Rights, the aggregate Purchase Rights which the Holder could have acquired if the Holder had held the number of shares of common stock acquirable upon complete conversion of such Holder's Series A Preferred Stock.

 

On November 29, 2019, the Company entered into Series B Preferred Stock Purchase Agreements with accredited investors whereby the investors agreed to purchase an aggregate of 115 unregistered shares of the Company’s Series B Preferred stock for $115,000, or $1,000 per share. In November 2019, the Company received the cash proceeds of $110,000, net of fees of $5,000 which was charged to additional paid in capital. In connection with the sale of Series B preferred shares, the Company issued 575,000 warrants to purchase 575,000 common shares at $0.20 per share. subject to adjustment on terms similar to the Series B preferred shares.

 

In connection with the issuance of these Series B preferred shares and Warrants, the Company determined that the terms of the Series B preferred shares and related warrants contain terms that are fixed monetary amounts at inception and accordingly, were not considered derivatives.

 

Common stock

 

Common stock issued for asset acquisition

 

On September 29, 2018 (the “Closing Date”), pursuant to an APA (See Note 3), the Company issued 2,000,000 shares of common stock of the Company.

 

Common stock issued for cash

 

On December 4, 2018, the Company issued 70,000 shares of its common stock for cash proceeds of $24,500, or $0.35 per share.

 

Common stock redemption

 

In December 2018, the Company executed 14 separate Return to Treasury Agreements, whereby certain shareholders holding an aggregate of 28,734,901 shares of common stock of the Company agreed to return a portion of their respective holdings to treasury in exchange for cash payments aggregating $2,872. As a result, the total issued and outstanding number of shares of common stock of the Company was reduced by 28,734,901.

 

F-18

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

Common stock issued for services

 

On January 22, 2019, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with a consultant in connection with the Company’s marketing and branding of its NFID products. The agreement ended on December 31, 2019. For services rendered, the Company paid the consultant an initial payment of $25,000 and, beginning on April 1, 2019, the Company paid the consultant $5,000 per month through December 2019. Additionally, the Company issued 100,000 shares of common stock of the Company to the consultant on a quarterly basis in tranches of 25,000 shares per quarter, commencing on March 31, 2019, and continuing on to the last day of each subsequent quarter in the year 2019. These shares were valued on the January 22, 2019 grant date at $35,000, or $0.35 per common share, based on recent common share sales which shall be amortized over the vesting period. For the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company recorded stock-based professional fees of $35,000. Through December 31, 2019, the Company issued 100,000 shares of its common stock to the consultant.

 

Stock options

 

Pursuant to a six month employment agreement with the Company’s chief executive officer (the “Executive”) dated April 15, 2019 (the “Effective Date”), the Company agreed to grant to Executive an option (the “Option’’) to purchase up to 200,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price equal to par value of the Company’s common stock of $0.0001 per share, of which 100,000 vested on April 15, 2019 and 100,000 vested on July 15, 2019. On October 15, 2019, the Company granted to this same Executive an option to purchase 100,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price equal to par value of the Company’s common stock of $0.0001 per share. Should the Company terminate this employment agreement, the right to purchase shares shall cease as of the date of termination.

 

Pursuant to a six month employment agreement dated April 15, 2019 (the “Effective Date”), the Company agreed that an executive officer of the Company will be granted an option (the “Option’’) to purchase up to 100,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price equal to par value of the Company’s common stock of $0.0001 per share, of which 50,000 vested on April 15, 2019 and 50,000 vested on July 15, 2019. Should the Company terminate this agreement, the right to purchase shares shall cease as of the date of termination. This employment was terminated in October 2019 and accordingly, the 100,000 stock options were forfeited.

 

The options were valued at the grant date using a Black-Scholes option pricing model with the following assumptions; risk-free interest rate of 2.37%, expected dividend yield of 0%, expected option term of 5 years using the simplified method and expected volatility ranging from 74% to 158.6% based on comparable and calculated volatility. The aggregate grant date fair value of these awards amounted to $142,960 as of December 31, 2019.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company recorded $142,960 of compensation expense related these stock options. Total unrecognized compensation expense related to stock options at December 31, 2019 amounted to $0.

 

The Company did not have any outstanding options during the year ended December 31, 2018. Stock option activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 are summarized as follows: 

 

  Number of Options  Weighted Average Exercise Price  Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Term (Years)  Aggregate Intrinsic Value 
Balance Outstanding, December 31, 2018  -   -         
Granted  400,000   0.0001         
Forfeited  (100,000)  (0.0001)        
Balance Outstanding, December 31, 2019  300,000  $0.0001   4.5  $104,970 
Exercisable, December 31, 2019  300,000  $0.0001   4.5  $104,970 

 

F-19

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

Warrants

 

In October 2019, in connection with the convertible notes Securities Purchase Agreements with accredited investors (see Note 8), the Company issued five-year warrants to purchase up to 1,650,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at $0.20 per share.

 

In connection with the sale of Series B preferred shares as discussed above, the Company issued 575,000 warrants to purchase 575,000 common shares at $0.20 per share. subject to adjustment on terms similar to the Series B preferred shares.

 

Warrant activities for the year ended December 31, 2019 are summarized as follows:

 

  Number of Options  Weighted Average Exercise Price  Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Term (Years)  Aggregate Intrinsic Value 
Balance Outstanding, December 31, 2018  -   -         
Granted  2,225,000   0.20         
Forfeited  -   -         
Balance Outstanding, December 31, 2019  2,225,000  $0.20   4.8  $333,750 
Exercisable, December 31, 2019  2,225,000  $0.20   4.8  $333,750 

 

NOTE 11 - INCOME TAXES

 

Through March 31, 2017, the Company elected to be treated as a RIC under Subchapter M of the Code and operated in a manner so as to qualify for the tax treatment applicable to RICs. Since March 31, 2017, the Company failed a diversification test since the Company’s investment in one stock accounted for over 25% of the Company’s total assets. This discrepancy was not caused by the acquisition of any security. The failure was not a result of willful neglect. As of December 31, 2017, the Company had not cured its failure to retain its status as a RIC and the Company does not intend to retain its RIC status. Accordingly, since 2017, the Company did not qualify as a RIC and is subject to income taxes at corporate tax rates. The loss of the Company’s status as a RIC did not have any impact on the Company’s financial position or results of operations. 

  

The Company evaluates tax positions taken or expected to be taken in the course of preparing its tax returns to determine whether the tax positions are “more-likely-than-not” to be sustained by the applicable tax authority. Tax positions not deemed to meet the “more-likely-than-not” threshold are reversed and recorded as a tax benefit or expense in the current year. All penalties and interest associated with income taxes are included in income tax expense. Conclusions regarding tax positions are subject to review and may be adjusted at a later date based on factors including, but not limited to, on-going analyses of tax laws, regulations and interpretations thereof. As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company had not recorded a liability for any unrecognized tax positions.

 

Taxable income (loss) generally differs from the change in net income (loss) for financial reporting purposes due to temporary and permanent differences in the recognition of income and expenses, and generally excludes net unrealized appreciation or depreciation, as unrealized gains or losses are not included in taxable income (loss) until they are realized. 

 

Effective in 2017, the Company accounts for income taxes pursuant to ASC 740 “Accounting for Income Taxes” that requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the differences between the financial statements and the tax basis of assets and liabilities, and for the expected future tax benefit to be derived from tax losses and tax credit carry forwards. Additionally, the accounting standards require the establishment of a valuation allowance to reflect the likelihood of realization of deferred tax assets. Realization of deferred tax assets, including those related to the net operating loss carry forwards for income tax purposes as compared to financial statement purposes, are dependent upon future taxable income and timing of reversals of future taxable differences along with any other positive and negative evidence during the periods in which those temporary differences become deductible or are utilized. The deferred tax assets at December 31, 2019 and 2018 consist of net operating and capital loss carryforwards. The net deferred tax asset has been fully offset by a valuation allowance because of the uncertainty of the attainment of future taxable income and capital gains.

 

F-20

 

 

UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

December 31, 2019 and 2018

 

The items accounting for the difference between income taxes at the effective statutory rate and the provision for income taxes for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was as follows:

 

  Year Ended  Year Ended 
  December 31,
2019
  December 31,
2018
 
Income tax benefit at U.S. statutory rate $(212,792) $(203,587)
Income tax benefit – state  (65,864)  (63,015)
Permanent differences  103,132   76,637 
True up  59,266   - 
Change in valuation allowance  116,258   189,965 
Total provision for income tax $-  $- 

 

The Company’s approximate net deferred tax asset as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 was as follows:

 

  December 31,
2019
  December 31,
2018
 
Deferred Tax Asset:      
Net operating loss carryforward $490,819  $291,614 
Net capital loss carryforward  123,932   206,879 
Total deferred tax asset before valuation allowance  614,751   498,493 
Valuation allowance  (614,751)  (498,493)
Net deferred tax asset $-  $- 

 

At December 31, 2019, the Company had a net capital loss carryforward of approximately $450,663, which can be used to offset future capital gains for a period of four years.

 

Due to the loss of its RIC status in 2017, any net tax operating losses generated as a RIC cannot be used to offset any future taxable income. As of December 31, 2019, the Company incurred an aggregate estimated net operating loss of approximately $1,785,000 for income taxes, respectively. These net operating loss carries forwards may be available to reduce future years’ taxable income. The 2017 carryforward will expire, if not utilized, through 2037. The 2019 and 2018 carryforwards shall be carried over indefinitely, subject to annual usage limits.

 

Management believes that it appears more likely than not that the Company will not realize these tax benefits due to the Company’s continuing losses for income taxes purposes. Accordingly, the Company has provided a 100% valuation allowance on the deferred tax asset benefit related to the U.S. net operating loss and capital loss carry forwards to reduce the asset to zero. Management will review this valuation allowance periodically and make adjustments as necessary.

 

NOTE 12 – CONCENTRATIONS

 

Customer concentration

 

For the year ended December 31, 2019, one customer accounted for approximately 98.6% of total sales and consisted of the sales of its inventory of shoes. The Company does not expect any sales from this customer in the future and is no longer selling shoes. A reduction in future sales from this customer will have a material adverse effect on the Company’s results of operations and financial condition.

 

Vendor concentrations

 

Generally, the Company purchases substantially all of its raw materials and inventory from two suppliers. The loss of these suppliers may have a material adverse effect on the Company’s results of operations and financial condition. However, the Company believes that, if necessary, alternate vendors could supply similar products in adequate quantities to avoid material disruptions to operations.

 

NOTE 13 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

On January 6, 2020, the Company and the Seller entered into a Settlement Agreement related to notes receivable (See Note 6). In lieu of the Company seeking default and foreclosure against the Seller pursuant to the Note agreements, the Company received 10,420 shares of the Seller’s convertible Series B preferred stock.

 

F-21

 

 

SILO Pharma, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

CONDENSED BALANCE SHEETS

 

  September 30,  December 31, 
  2020  2019 
  (Unaudited)    
ASSETS      
CURRENT ASSETS:      
Cash and cash equivalents $1,645,712  $111,752 
Equity investments, at cost  9,394   9,394 
Notes receivable, net  90,000   200,000 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets  310,984   16,333 
Inventory - current  30,744   156,366 
         
Total Current Assets  2,086,834   493,845 
         
Inventory - non-current  117,347   - 
         
Total Assets $2,204,181  $493,845 
         
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)        
CURRENT LIABILITIES:        
Convertible note payable, net of discount $-  $61,875 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses  114,772   54,862 
Note payable - current portion  7,258   - 
         
Total Current Liabilities  122,030   116,737 
         
LONG TERM LIABILITIES:        
Note payable - long-term portion  11,642   - 
         
Total Long Term Liabilities  11,642   - 
         
Total Liabilities  133,672   116,737 
         
Commitment and Contingencies (see Note 9)        
         
Redeemable Series A, Convertible Preferred stock, $0.0001 par value, 1,000,000 shares designated;        
None and  4,000 shares issued and outstanding at September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively ($100 per share redemption value)  -   400,000 
         
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT):        
Preferred stock, $0.0001 par value, 5,000,000 shares authorized        
Series B convertible preferred stock, $0.0001 par value, 2,000 shares designated; none and 115 shares issued and outstanding at September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively ($1,000 per share liquidation value)  -   - 
Common stock, $0.0001 par value, 100,000,000 shares authorized; 85,141,956 and 23,604,207 shares issued and outstanding at September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively  8,514   2,361 
Additional paid-in capital  7,034,502   2,630,551 
Accumulated deficit  (4,972,507)  (2,655,804)
         
Total Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)  2,070,509   (22,892)
         
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit) $2,204,181  $493,845 

 

See accompanying unaudited notes to condensed financial statements.

 

F-22

 

 

SILO Pharma, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(Unaudited)

 

  For the Three Months Ended  For the Nine Months Ended 
  September 30,  September 30, 
  2020  2019  2020  2019 
             
SALES $16,285  $268  $18,795  $268 
                 
COST OF SALES  29,449   82   30,866   82 
                 
GROSS PROFIT (LOSS)  (13,164)  186   (12,071)  186 
                 
OPERATING EXPENSES:                
Compensation expense  37,308   87,485   717,198   203,722 
Professional fees  441,409   108,481   831,665   314,702 
Product development  17,364   -   53,689   - 
Insurance expense  13,578   8,174   17,560   24,521 
Bad debt (recovery)  85,000   (6,000)  84,000   (11,500)
Selling, general and administrative expenses  28,397   44,553   76,088   75,687 
                 
Total operating expenses  623,056   242,693   1,780,200   607,132 
                 
LOSS FROM OPERATIONS  (636,220)  (242,507)  (1,792,271)  (606,946)
                 
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE):                
Interest income  2,818   3,083   8,788   9,129 
Other income  -   -   3,000   - 
Interest expense  (393)  (94)  (268,996)  (864)
Interest expense - related party  -   (375)  (224)  (375)
Loss on debt extinguishment  -   -   (198,000)  - 
Net realized gain on equity investments (non-controlled/non-affiliated investments)  -   92,264   -   138,032 
Net unrealized loss on equity investments (non-controlled/non-affiliated investments)  -   (117,852)  -   (170,191)
                 
Total other expense, net  2,425   (22,974)  (455,432)  (24,269)
                 
NET LOSS  (633,795)  (265,481)  (2,247,703)  (631,215)
                 
Deemed dividend  -   -   (69,000)  - 
                 
NET LOSS AVAILABLE TO COMMON STOCKHOLDERS $(633,795) $(265,481) $(2,316,703) $(631,215)
                 
NET LOSS PER COMMON SHARE:                
Basic and diluted $(0.01) $(0.01) $(0.04) $(0.03)
                 
WEIGHTED AVERAGE COMMON SHARES OUTSTANDING:                
Basic and diluted  84,416,681   23,467,632   59,512,252   23,442,998 

 

See accompanying unaudited notes to condensed financial statements.

 

F-23

 

 

SILO Pharma, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

For the Nine Months Ended September 30, 2020 and 2019

(Unaudited)

 

              Additional     Total
Stockholders’
 
  Series B Preferred Stock  Common Stock  Paid In  Accumulated  Equity 
  Shares  Amount  Shares  Amount  Capital  Deficit  (Deficit) 
                      
Balance, December 31, 2019  115  $-   23,604,207  $2,361  $2,630,551  $(2,655,804) $(22,892)
                             
Net loss  -   -   -   -   -   (238,877)  (238,877)
                             
Balance, March 31, 2020  115   -   23,604,207   2,361   2,630,551   (2,894,681)  (261,769)
                             
Common Stock issued for cash, net of offering cost  -   -   37,758,116   3,775   2,111,958   -   2,115,733 
                             
Common Stock issued for future services  -   -   8,586,184   859   686,036   -   686,895 
                             
Preferred Shares Exchanged for Common Stock  (115)      1,437,500   144   (144)  -   - 
                             
Common Stock issued in connection with employment agreement  -   -   7,630,949   763   609,713   -   610,476 
                             
Common Stock issued for Exchange of Notes  -   -   4,125,000   412   527,588   -   528,000 
                             
Deemed dividend on Preferred Stock Exchange  -   -   -   -   69,000   (69,000)  - 
                             
Net loss  -   -   -   -   -   (1,375,031)  (1,375,031)
                             
Balance, June 30, 2020  -   -   83,141,956   8,314   6,634,702   (4,338,712)  2,304,304 
                             
Common Stock issued for conversion of Redeemable Series A Preferred stock  -   -   2,000,000   200   399,800   -   400,000 
                    ��        
Net loss  -   -   -   -   -   (633,795)  (633,795)
Balance, September 30, 2020  -  $-   85,141,956  $8,514  $7,034,502  $(4,972,507) $2,070,509 

 

              Additional     Total
Stockholders’
 
  Series B Preferred Stock  Common Stock  Paid In  Accumulated  Equity 
  Shares  Amount  Shares  Amount  Capital  Deficit  (Deficit) 
                      
Balance, December 31, 2018  -  $-   23,417,540  $2,342  $2,047,610  $(1,642,510) $407,442 
                             
Common stock issued for services  -   -   25,000   2   8,748   -   8,750 
                             
Net loss  -   -   -   -   -   (123,523)  (123,523)
                             
Balance, March 31, 2019  -   -   23,442,540   2,344   2,056,358   (1,766,033)  292,669 
                             
Common stock issued for services  -   -   25,000   3   8,747   -   8,750 
                             
Accretion of stock options for services  -   -   -   -   43,737   -   43,737 
                             
Net loss  -   -   -   -   -   (242,211)  (242,211)
                             
Balance, June 30, 2019  -   -   23,467,540   2,347   2,108,842   (2,008,244)  102,945 
                             
Common stock issued for services  -   -   25,000   2   8,748   -   8,750 
                             
Accretion of stock options for services  -   -   -   -   52,485   -   52,485 
                             
Net loss  -   -   -   -   -   (265,481)  (265,481)
Balance, September 30, 2019  -  $-   23,492,540  $2,349  $2,170,075  $(2,273,725) $(101,301)

 

See accompanying unaudited notes to condensed financial statements.

 

F-24

 

 

SILO Pharma, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

 

  For the Nine Months Ended 
  September 30, 
  2020  2019 
       
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:      
Net loss $(2,247,703) $(631,215)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities        
Bad debt expense  90,000   - 
Stock-based compensation  610,476   122,472 
Amortization of prepaid stock-based expense  460,289   - 
Amortization of debt discount to interest expense  268,125   - 
Inventory write-down  19,879   - 
Net realized gain on equity investments  -   (138,032)
Net unrealized loss on equity investments  -   170,191 
Loss from debt extinguishment  198,000   - 
Change in operating assets and liabilities:        
         
(Increase) decrease in inventory - current  105,743   (72,607)
(Increase) decrease in prepaid expenses and other current assets  (68,045)  10,471 
(Increase) in inventory - non-current  (117,347)  - 
Increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses  59,910   36,825 
Increase in accrued interest payable - related party  -   375 
NET CASH USED IN OPERATING ACTIVITIES  (620,673)  (501,520)
         
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:        
Proceeds from sale of equity investments  -   191,938 
Purchase of equity investment  -   (5,197)
Collection on note receivable  20,000   - 
NET CASH PROVIDED BY INVESTING ACTIVITIES  20,000   186,741 
         
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:        
Proceeds from note payable - related party  35,000   25,000 
Proceeds from note payable  18,900   - 
Repayment of note payable - related party  (35,000)  - 
Net proceeds from sale of common stock  2,115,733   - 
Repayment of insurance finance loan  -   (22,344)
         
NET CASH PROVIDED BY FINANCING ACTIVITIES  2,134,633   2,656 
NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS:  1,533,960   (312,123)
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS - beginning of period  111,752   336,679 
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS - end of period $1,645,712  $24,556 
         
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION:        
Cash paid during the period for:        
Interest $224  $- 
Income taxes $-  $- 
         
Non-Cash investing and financing activities:        
Common stock issued for prepaid services $686,895  $- 
Common Stock issued for Exchange of Notes $528,000  $- 
Common Stock issued for conversion of Redeemable Series A Preferred stock $400,000  $- 

 

See accompanying unaudited notes to condensed financial statements.

 

F-25

 

  

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION AND BUSINESS

 

Silo Pharma, Inc. (formerly Uppercut Brands, Inc.) (the “Company”) was incorporated in the State of New York on July 13, 2010. On January 24, 2013, the Company changed its state of incorporation from New York to Delaware. On September 29, 2018, the Company entered into an Asset Purchase Agreement (“APA”) with Blind Faith Concepts Holdings, Inc. a Nevada corporation (the “Seller”) whereby the Company completed the acquisition of 100% of the assets of “NFID” from the Seller. The Company is developing NFID as an exclusive brand of apparel consisting initially of sweatshirts, hoodies, pants, t-shirts, jackets and hats.

 

On October 4, 2013, the Company filed a Form N-54A and elected to become a business development company (“BDC”) under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”). In addition, the Company previously elected to be treated for federal income tax purpose as a regulated investment company, or (“RIC”), under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, (the “Code”). Through September 29, 2018, the Company met the definition of an investment company in accordance with the guidance under Accounting Standards Codification Topic 946 “Financial Services – Investment Companies”. On September 29, 2018, the Company filed Form N-54C, Notification of Withdrawal of election to be Subject to Section 55 through 65 of the Investment Company Act of 1940, whereas the Company has changed the nature of its business so as to cease to be a business development company (See Note 2 – Basis of Presentation). Additionally, since 2017, the Company is subject to income taxes at corporate tax rates.

 

On May 21, 2019, the Company had amended its articles of incorporation with the State of Delaware to change the Company’s name to Uppercut Brands, Inc. On September 24, 2020, the Company amended its articles of incorporation with the State of Delaware to change the Company’s name to Silo Pharma, Inc.

 

On April 8, 2020, the Company incorporated a new wholly owned subsidiary, Silo Pharma Inc., in the State of Florida. The Company has also secured the domain name www.silopharma.com. In July 2020, through the Company’s newly formed subsidiary, the Company entered into a commercial evaluation license and option agreement with a university (see Note 9). Recently, management has been exploring opportunities to expand the Company’s business by seeking to acquire and/or develop intellectual property or technology rights from leading universities and researchers to treat rare diseases, including the use of psychedelic drugs, such as psilocybin, and the potential benefits they may have in certain cases involving depression, mental health issues and neurological disorders. The new subsidiary had no operations during the nine months ended September 30, 2020.

 

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of presentation

 

Management acknowledges its responsibility for the preparation of the accompanying unaudited condensed financial statements which reflect all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring adjustments, considered necessary in its opinion for a fair statement of its financial position and the results of its operations for the periods presented. The accompanying unaudited condensed financial statements of the Company have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (the “U.S. GAAP”) for interim financial information and with the instructions Article 8-03 of Regulation S-X. Operating results for interim periods are not necessarily indicative of results that may be expected for the fiscal year as a whole. Certain information and note disclosure normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP has been condensed or omitted from these statements pursuant to such accounting principles and, accordingly, they do not include all the information and notes necessary for comprehensive financial statements These unaudited condensed financial statements should be read in conjunction with the summary of significant accounting policies and notes to the financial statements for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 of the Company which were included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 20, 2020.

 

F-26

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

Going Concern

 

These financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the settlement of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. As reflected in the accompanying financial statements, the Company had a net loss and cash used in operations of $2,247,703 and $620,673 for the nine months ended September 30, 2020.  Additionally, the Company had an accumulated deficit of $4,972,507 at September 30, 2020 and has generated minimal revenues under its new business plan. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern for a period of twelve months from the issuance date of this report. Management cannot provide assurance that the Company will ultimately achieve profitable operations or become cash flow positive or raise additional debt and/or equity capital. The Company is seeking to raise additional capital through additional debt and/or equity financings to fund its operations in the future. If the Company is unable to raise additional capital or secure additional lending in the near future to fund its business plan, management expects that the Company will need to curtail its operations. Between April 9, 2020 to April 18, 2020, the Company received gross proceeds of $75,644 and subscription receivable of $2,000 (collected in July 2020) or $0.01 per share from the sale of an aggregate of 7,764,366 shares of the Company’s common stock. Additionally, on April 28, 2020, the Company received gross proceeds of $2,399,500, before deducting placement agent and other offering expenses of $361,410, from the sale of an aggregate of 29,993,750 shares of the Company’s common stock at a price of approximately $0.08 per share (see Note 7). These financial statements do not include any adjustments related to the recoverability and classification of assets or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Making estimates requires management to exercise significant judgment. It is at least reasonably possible that the estimate of the effect of a condition, situation or set of circumstances that existed at the date of the financial statements, which management considered in formulating its estimate could change in the near term due to one or more future confirming events. Accordingly, the actual results could differ significantly from estimates. Significant estimates during the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019 include the collectability of notes receivable, the valuation of the Company’s equity investments, amortization period and valuation of intangibles, estimates for obsolete and slow moving inventory, assumptions used in assessing impairment of long-term assets, valuation allowances for deferred tax assets, the fair value of warrants issued with debt, and the fair value of shares issued for services and in settlements.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments and Fair Value Measurements

 

The Company uses the guidance of ASC Topic 820 for fair value measurements which clarifies the definition of fair value, prescribes methods for measuring fair value, and establishes a fair value hierarchy to classify the inputs used in measuring fair value as follows:

 

Level 1- Inputs are unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities available at the measurement date.

 

Level 2- Inputs are unadjusted quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets and liabilities in markets that are not active, inputs other than quoted prices that are observable, and inputs derived from or corroborated by observable market data.

 

Level 3- Inputs are unobservable inputs which reflect the reporting entity’s own assumptions on what assumptions the market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability based on the best available information. 

 

F-27

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

The carrying amounts reported in the balance sheets for cash, notes receivable, inventory, prepaid expenses and other current assets, accounts payable and accrued expenses, notes payable – related party and accrued interest – related party approximate their fair market value based on the short-term maturity of these instruments.

 

ASC 825-10 “Financial Instruments”, allows entities to voluntarily choose to measure certain financial assets and liabilities at fair value (fair value option). The fair value option may be elected on an instrument-by-instrument basis and is irrevocable, unless a new election date occurs. If the fair value option is elected for an instrument, unrealized gains and losses for that instrument should be reported in earnings at each subsequent reporting date. The Company did not elect to apply the fair value option to any outstanding instruments.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with a maturity of three months or less when acquired to be cash equivalents. The Company places its cash with high credit quality financial institutions. The Company’s accounts at these institutions are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) up to $250,000 or by the Securities Investor Protection Corporation (“SIPC”) up to $250,000. To reduce its risk associated with the failure of such financial institutions, the Company evaluates at least annually the rating of the financial institutions in which it holds deposits. At September 30, 2020, the Company had cash in excess of FDIC limits of approximately $1,396,000 and at December 31, 2019, the Company had no cash in excess of FDIC limits.

 

Notes Receivable

 

The Company recognizes an allowance for losses on notes receivable in an amount equal to the estimated probable losses net of recoveries. The allowance is based on an analysis of historical bad debt experience, current note receivable aging, and expected future write-offs, as well as an assessment of specific identifiable accounts considered at risk or uncollectible. The expense associated with the allowance for doubtful accounts is recognized as general and administrative expense.

 

Prepaid Expenses and Other Current Assets

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets of $310,984 and $16,333 at September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively, consist primarily of costs paid for future services which will occur within a year. Prepaid expenses may include prepayments in cash and equity instruments for consulting, business advisory, legal services, and insurance which are being amortized over the terms of their respective agreements.

 

Inventory

 

Inventory, consisting of raw materials and finished goods, are stated at the lower of cost and net realizable value utilizing the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method. A reserve is established when management determines that certain inventories may not be saleable. If inventory costs exceed expected net realizable value due to obsolescence or quantities in excess of expected demand, the Company will record reserves for the difference between the cost and the net realizable value. These reserves shall be recorded based on estimates and included in cost of sales. The Company recorded an inventory write-down of its raw material of $19,879 during the nine months ended September 30, 2020 and was included in cost of sales as reflected in the accompanying unaudited condensed statements of operations. No allowance was required at September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019. Additionally, the Company shall make an analysis of its inventory for any slow-moving inventory. Accordingly, the Company shall reclass sellable inventories that may not be sold within one year to non-current assets (see Note 3).

 

F-28

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

Equity Investments, at Cost

 

Equity investments, at cost comprised mainly of non-marketable capital stock and stock warrants, are recorded at cost, as adjusted for other than temporary impairment write-downs and are evaluated for impairment periodically. Prior to September 29, 2018, equity investments, at cost were recorded at fair value, represented as cost, plus or minus unrealized appreciation or depreciation. The fair value of equity investments, at cost that had no ready market were determined in good faith by the Board of Directors, based upon the financial condition and operating performance of the underlying investee companies as well as general market trends for businesses in the same industry. At September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, equity investments, at cost of $9,394 and $9,394, respectively, comprised mainly of non-marketable capital stock, are recorded at cost, as adjusted for other than temporary impairment write-downs and are evaluated for impairment periodically.

 

Impairment of Long-lived Assets

 

In accordance with ASC Topic 360, the Company reviews long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the assets may not be fully recoverable, or at least annually. The Company recognizes an impairment loss when the sum of expected undiscounted future cash flows is less than the carrying amount of the asset. The amount of impairment is measured as the difference between the asset’s estimated fair value and its book value.

 

Net Realized Gain or Loss and Net Change in Unrealized Appreciation or Depreciation of Equity Investments, at Fair Value

 

Realized gain or loss is recognized when an investment is disposed of and is computed as the difference between the Company’s cost basis and the net proceeds received from such disposition.  Realized gains and losses on investment transactions are determined by specific identification. Net change in unrealized appreciation or depreciation is computed as the difference between the fair value of the investment and the cost basis of such investment, including any reversal of previously recorded unrealized appreciation/depreciation when gains or losses are realized.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company applies ASC Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (“ASC 606”). ASC 606 establishes a single comprehensive model for entities to use in accounting for revenue arising from contracts with customers and supersedes most of the existing revenue recognition guidance. This standard requires an entity to recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services and also requires certain additional disclosures. The Company adopted this standard using the modified retrospective approach, which requires applying the new standard to all existing contracts not yet completed as of the effective date and recording a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings as of the date of adoption. The adoption of ASC 606 on January 1, 2018 did not have any impact on the process for, timing of, and presentation and disclosure of revenue recognition from contracts and there was no cumulative effect adjustment.

 

The Company records interest and dividend income on an accrual basis to the extent that the Company expects to collect such amounts.

 

Product sales are recognized when the product is shipped to the customer and title is transferred and are recorded net of any discounts or allowances.

 

Cost of Sales

 

The primary components of cost of sales include the cost of the product, production costs, warehouse storage costs and shipping fees.

 

Stock-based Compensation

 

Stock-based compensation is accounted for based on the requirements of ASC 718 – “Compensation – Stock Compensation”, which requires recognition in the financial statements of the cost of employee, director, and non-employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments over the period the employee, director , or non-employee is required to perform the services in exchange for the award (presumptively, the vesting period). The ASC also requires measurement of the cost of employee, director, and non-employee services received in exchange for an award based on the grant-date fair value of the award. The Company has elected to recognize forfeitures as they occur as permitted under ASU 2016-09 Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment.

 

F-29

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

Income Taxes

 

Deferred income tax assets and liabilities arise from temporary differences between the financial statements and tax basis of assets and liabilities, as measured by the enacted tax rates, which are expected to be in effect when these differences reverse. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are classified as current or non-current, depending upon the classification of the asset or liabilities to which they relate. Deferred tax assets and liabilities not related to an asset or liability are classified as current or non-current depending on the periods in which the temporary differences are expected to reverse. Valuation allowances are established when necessary to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized.

 

The Company follows the provisions of FASB ASC 740-10, “Uncertainty in Income Taxes”. Certain recognition thresholds must be met before a tax position is recognized in the financial statements. An entity may only recognize or continue to recognize tax positions that meet a “more-likely-than-not” threshold. The Company does not believe it has any uncertain tax positions as of September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 that would require either recognition or disclosure in the accompanying financial statements.

 

Net Loss per Common Share

 

Basic loss per share is computed by dividing net loss allocable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during each period. Diluted earnings per share is computed by dividing net income available to common shareholders by the weighted average number of shares of common stock, common stock equivalents and potentially dilutive securities outstanding during the period using the as-if converted method. Potentially dilutive securities which included convertible preferred shares and stock options are excluded from the computation of diluted shares outstanding if they would have an anti-dilutive impact on the Company’s net losses. The following potentially dilutive shares have been excluded from the calculation of diluted net loss per share as their effect would be anti-dilutive for the six months ended September 30, 2020 and 2019:

 

  September 30,
2020
  September 30,
2019
 
Series A convertible preferred stock  -   2,000,000 
Stock options  300,000   300,000 

 

Leases

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, “Leases (Topic 842)”. ASU 2016-02 sets out the principles for the recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of leases for both parties to a contract (i.e., lessees and lessors). The new standard requires lessees to apply a dual approach, classifying leases as either finance or operating leases based on the principle of whether or not the lease is effectively a financed purchase by the lessee. This classification will determine whether lease expense is recognized based on an effective interest method or on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease. A lessee is also required to recognize a right-of-use asset and a lease liability for all leases with a term of greater than 12 months regardless of their classification.

 

Leases with a term of 12 months or less will be accounted for similar to existing guidance for operating leases today. The new standard requires lessors to account for leases using an approach that is substantially equivalent to existing guidance for sales-type leases, direct financing leases and operating leases. The pronouncement requires a modified retrospective method of adoption and is effective on January 1, 2019, with early adoption permitted. For the Company’s administrative office lease, the Company analyzed if it would be required to record a lease liability and a right of use asset on its consolidated balance sheets at fair value upon adoption of ASU 2016-02. The Company has elected not to recognize right-of-use assets and lease liabilities for short-term leases that have a term of 12 months or less. 

 

F-30

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

New Accounting Pronouncements

 

Accounting standards that have been issued or proposed by FASB that do not require adoption until a future date are not expected to have a material impact on the financial statements upon adoption. The Company does not discuss recent pronouncements that are not anticipated to have an impact on or are unrelated to its financial condition, results of operations, cash flows or disclosures.

 

NOTE 3 – INVENTORY

 

At September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, inventory, including jackets, t-shirts, sweatshirts, hats and fabric, consisted of the following:

 

  September 30,
2020
  December 31,
2019
 
  (Unaudited)    
Raw materials $23,705  $41,231 
Finished goods  124,386   115,135 
Total  148,091   156,366 
Less: inventory – current  (30,744)  - 
Inventory – non-current $117,347  $- 

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2020, the Company made an analysis of its inventory and determined that certain sellable inventories may not be sold within one year. Accordingly, the Company reclass such slow moving inventory to non-current assets.

 

NOTE 4 – NOTES RECEIVABLE

 

On September 28, 2018, the Company and the Seller executed a two-year promissory note receivable agreement with a principal balance of $200,000 of which $100,000 was funded to the Seller in September 2018 and the remaining $100,000 was funded in October 2018. The terms of the promissory note include an interest rate of 6% and the Company shall be repaid in interest only payments on a quarterly basis, until the maturity date of September 27, 2020, at which time the full principal and any interest payments will be due to the Company. At the time the promissory note receivable agreement was executed, the Company also executed a Security Interest and Pledge Agreement with the borrower. Pursuant to the Security Interest and Pledge Agreement, the borrower has pledged all of the assets of its company as security for the performance of the note obligations.

 

On November 2, 2018, the Company and Seller entered into a Promissory Note Agreement with a principal balance of $50,000. Pursuant to the Promissory Note, the $50,000 note was a deposit and credit towards the acquisition of the assets of Lust for Life Group such as inventory, trademarks and logos. Pursuant to this promissory note agreement, since the purchase did not close within 30 days from the note date, the note receivable became immediately due. Through the date of default, the outstanding principal balance bore interest at an annual interest rate of 10% payable on a monthly basis. Upon default, the interest rate increased to 18% per annum. As of December 31, 2018, the Company determined that this note receivable was doubtful and accordingly, recorded an allowance for doubtful account and bad debt expense of $50,000.

 

F-31

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

In December 2019, pursuant to Claim Purchase Agreements, the Company sold its notes receivable and related interest receivable balances in the aggregate amount of $277,305 to an investor. Pursuant to the Claim Purchase Agreements, the investor shall pay the Company the purchase price of $277,305 on the earlier of the payment of six-monthly installments or upon the liquidation of settlement securities of the Seller pursuant to Section 3(a)(10) of the Securities Act, whichever occurs first. The first installment shall be made following entry and full effectuation of a court order approving the settlement of the claim which occurred on March 6, 2020 in the United States district court for the District of Maryland Northern Division. Additionally, on January 6, 2020, the Company and the Seller entered into a Settlement Agreement related to notes receivable. In lieu of the Company seeking default and foreclosure against the Seller pursuant to the Note agreements, the Company received 10,420 shares of the Seller’s convertible Series B preferred stock. Since these Series B preferred shares have limited marketability, no value was placed on these shares. Between April 2020 and September 2020, the Company collected an aggregate of $20,000 on the notes receivable balance. During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, the Company recorded an allowance for doubtful account and bad debt expense of $90,000 due to slow collection of the installment payments pursuant to the agreement.

 

At September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, notes receivable, net consisted of the following:

 

  September 30,
2020
  December 31,
2019
 
  (Unaudited)    
Principal amounts of notes receivable $230,000  $250,000 
Less: allowance for doubtful accounts  (140,000)  (50,000)
Notes receivable, net $90,000  $200,000 

 

NOTE 5 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE

 

In October 2019, the Company entered into Securities Purchase Agreements (the “Purchase Agreements”) with accredited investors. Pursuant to the terms of the Purchase Agreements, the Company issued and sold to investors convertible promissory notes in the aggregate principal amount of $330,000 (the “Notes”) and warrants to purchase up to 1,650,000 shares of the Company’s common stock (the “Warrants”). The Company received net proceeds of $295,000, net of origination issue discount of $30,000 and fees of $5,000. The Notes are due and payable in October 2020. Prior to an Event of Default, no interest shall accrue on these Notes.

 

At any time after the Original Issue Date, until the respective Note is no longer outstanding, the Notes were convertible, in whole or in part, into shares of the Company’s common stock at the option of the Holder, at any time and from time to time. In accordance with the Purchase Agreements and the Notes, subject to adjustments as defined in the Purchase Agreements and Notes. The conversion price (the “Conversion Price”) was equal to $0.20. The Company may prepay the Notes at any time prior to its six-month anniversary, subject to pre-payment charges as detailed in the Note. Upon every conversion, the Company would deliver an additional $1,250 worth of shares (as calculated by the Conversion Price in effect on the conversion notice being honored) to cover the Holder’s expenses and deposit fees associated with each notice of conversion.

 

The Purchase Agreements and Notes contain customary representations, warranties and covenants, including certain restrictions on the Company’s ability to sell, lease or otherwise dispose of any significant portion of its assets. The Investor also was entitled to acquire, upon the terms applicable to such purchase rights, the aggregate purchase rights that the Holder could have acquired if the Holder had held the number of shares of common stock acquirable upon complete conversion of the Note. The Investor’s also had the right of first refusal with respect to any future equity (or debt with an equity component) offering conducted by the Company until the 12-month anniversary of the Closing. The Purchase Agreements and the Notes also provided for certain events of default, including, among other things, payment defaults, breaches of representations and warranties, bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings, and delinquency in periodic report filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Upon the occurrence of an event of default, the Investor’s may declare the outstanding obligations due and payable at significant applicable default rates and take such other actions as set forth in the Note.

 

F-32

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

The Company would issue to each investor at the closing, that number of shares of its common stock equal to 14% of the aggregate amount paid by the Investor for the Notes purchased, priced at the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the day prior to the closing, as a due diligence fee. In connection with due diligence fee, during 2019, the Company shall issue 86,667 shares of its common stock to the investors. These shares were valued at $42,000 using the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the day prior to the closing which ranged from $0.35 to $0.60 per share, and the amount was recorded as a debt discount and an increase in equity.

 

The Warrants were exercisable at any time on or after the date of the issuance and entitles the investors to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock for a period of five years from the initial date the warrants become exercisable. Under the terms of the Warrant, the holders are entitled to exercise the Warrant to purchase up to 1,650,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.20, subject to customary adjustments as detailed in the Warrant.

 

This Note and related Warrants included a down-round provision under which the Note conversion price and warrant exercise price could be affected on a full-ratchet basis by future equity offerings undertaken by the Company.

 

In connection with the issuance of the Note and Warrants, the Company determined that the terms of the Notes and Warrants contain terms that are fixed monetary amounts at inception and accordingly, were not considered derivatives. The fair value of the warrants was determined using the Binomial valuation model. In connection with the issuance of the warrants, on the measurement date, the relative fair value of the warrants and the beneficial conversion feature of $253,000 was recorded as a debt discount and an increase in paid-in capital.

 

On April 15, 2020, the Company entered into Exchange Agreements with the holders of these convertible promissory notes. Pursuant to these Exchange Agreements, the holders agreed to exchange their convertible promissory notes of $330,000 and 1,650,000 warrants issued in connection with this debt for an aggregate of 4,125,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. at a price of $0.08 per share. After the exchanges, there are no convertible notes outstanding. The Company issued 4,125,000 shares of common stock which was more than the shares that would have been issued at the original conversion price of $0.20 per share or 1,650,000 shares of common stock, an excess of 2,475,000 shares of common stock. The excess shares were valued at a price of $0.08 per share. Consequently, the Company recorded a loss on debt extinguishment of $198,000 during the nine months ended September 30, 2020.

 

For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, interest expense related to convertible notes and warrants amounted to $268,125 and $185,625, which consisted of amortization of debt discount, respectively. There was no amortization of debt discount during the prior period.

 

At September 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, convertible notes payable consisted of the following:

 

  September 30,
2020
  December 31,
2019
 
Principal amount $     -  $330,000 
Less: unamortized debt discount  -   (268,125)
Convertible notes payable, net $-  $61,875 

 

F-33

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

NOTE 6 - NOTE PAYABLE

 

Note payable- related party

 

On March 11, 2020, the Company entered into a Promissory Note Agreement (the “Note”) with the Company’s chief executive officer in the amount of $15,000. The Note bearing at 6% per annum, was unsecured, and all principal and interest amounts outstanding was due on April 10, 2020. In April 2020, this Note and related accrued interest of $126 was repaid. At September 30, 2020, notes payable – related party amounted to $0. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, interest expense related to this Note amounted to $0 and $126, respectively.

 

On April 1, 2020, the Company entered into a Promissory Note Agreement (the “Note”) with a company owned by the Company’s chief executive officer in the amount of $20,000. The Note bearing at 6% per annum, was unsecured, and all principal and interest amounts outstanding was due on September 30, 2020. On April 30, 2020, the Company repaid this note payable – related party and all interest due. For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, interest expense related to this Note amounted to $0 and $99, respectively.

 

Note payable- unrelated party

 

Paycheck Protection Program Funding

 

On April 30, 2020, the Company received federal funding in the amount of $18,900 through the Paycheck Protection Program (the “PPP”). PPP funds have certain restrictions on use of the funding proceeds, and generally must be repaid within two (2) years at 1% interest. The PPP loan may, under circumstances, be forgiven. There shall be no payment due by the Company during the nine months period beginning on the date of this note (“Deferral Period”). Commencing one month after the expiration of the Deferral Period, the Company shall pay the lender monthly payments of principal and interest, each in equal amount required to fully amortize by the maturity date. If a payment on this note is more than ten days late, the lender shall charge a late fee of up to 5% of the unpaid portion of the regularly scheduled payment. As of September 30, 2020, the principal balance of this note amounted to $18,900 and accrued interest of $80. During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, the Company recognized $48 and $80 of interest expense, respectively.

 

  As of
September 30,
2020
  As of December 31,
2019
 
  (Unaudited)    
Principal amount $18,900  $        - 
Less: current portion  (7,258)  - 
Note payable - long term portion $11,642  $- 

 

Minimum principal payments under note payable to unrelated parties at September 30, 2020 are as follows:

 

Year ended December 31, 2020 $2,001 
Year ended December 31, 2021  12,653 
Year ended December 31, 2022  4,246 
Total principal payments $18,900 

 

F-34

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

NOTE 7 – STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

 

Preferred stock

 

The Company has authorized the issuance of 5,000,000 shares of preferred stock, $0.0001 par value. The Company’s board of directors is authorized at any time, and from time to time, to provide for the issuance of shares of Preferred Stock in one or more series, and to determine the designations, preferences, limitations and relative or other rights of the Preferred Stock or any series thereof. In April 2013, 1,000,000 shares were designated as Series A Convertible Preferred Stock and in November 2019, 2,000 shares were designated as Series B Convertible Preferred Stock.

 

Series A redeemable convertible preferred stock

 

In April 2013, pursuant to a Series A Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement (the “Preferred Stock Agreement”), the Company issued 4,000 shares of Series A Convertible Preferred Stock (the “Series A Preferred Stock”) for $400,000. Holders of Series A Preferred Stock vote together with holders of Common Stock on an as-converted basis. Each share of Series A Preferred Stock was currently convertible into 500 shares of common stock at the option of the holder (subject to a 9.99% beneficial ownership limitation) based on a conversion formula (the Stated Value, currently $100, divided by the Conversion Rate, currently $0.20). The Conversion Rate may be adjusted upon the occurrence of stock dividends or stock splits or subsequent equity sales at a price lower than the current conversion rate. Each share had a $100 liquidation value. The holders of Series A Preferred Stock were entitled to receive dividends on an as-converted basis if paid on Common Stock.

 

The Series A Convertible Preferred Stock was redeemable at the option of the holder upon the occurrence of certain “triggering events.” In case of a triggering event, the holder had the right to redeem each share held for cash (currently $100/share) or impose a dividend rate on all of the outstanding Preferred Stock at 6% per annum thereafter. A triggering event occurs if the Company fails to deliver certificates representing conversion shares, fails to pay the amount due pursuant to a Buy-In, fails to have available a sufficient number of authorized shares, fails to observe any covenant in the Certificate of Designation unless cured within 30 calendar days, shall be party to a Change in Control Transaction, sustains a bankruptcy event, fails to list or quote its common stock for more than 20 trading days in a twelve-month period, sustains any monetary judgment, writ or similar final process filed against the Company for more than $100,000 and such judgment writ or similar final process shall remain unvacated, unbonded or unstayed for a period of 45 calendar days, or fails to comply with the Asset Coverage requirement.

 

Because certain of these “triggering events” were outside the control of the Company, the Preferred Stock was classified within the temporary equity section of the accompanying balance sheets.

 

The Series A Preferred Stock has forced conversion rights where the Company may force the conversion of the Series A Preferred Stock if certain conditions are met. Additionally, the Company may elect to redeem some or all of the outstanding Series A Preferred Stock for the Stated Value (currently $100/share) provided that proper notice is provided to the holders and that a number of conditions (the “Equity Conditions”) have been met.

 

The Company believes the carrying amount reported in the balance sheets for the Series A Preferred Stock of $400,000 approximates the fair market value of such Preferred Stock based on the short-term maturity of these instruments which also equals the redemption value reflected as on the balance sheets as of December 31, 2019.

 

On March 31, 2017, the Board approved the amendment and restatement of the original Certificate of Designation in order to expressly ensure that holders of the Company’s Series A Preferred Stock have the right to elect at least two directors at all times, have complete priority over any other class as to distribution of assets and payments of dividends, and have equal voting rights with every other outstanding voting stock. On May 11, 2017, the Company filed the amendment and restatement with the State of Delaware.

 

F-35

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

Conversion of Series A Preferred Stock into common shares

 

On August 3, 2020, at the request of the investor, the Company converted 4,000 Series A Preferred Stock into 2,000,000 shares of common stock. After such conversion, the Company reclassed the $400,000 redemption value of the Series A preferred stock to additional paid in capital. Accordingly, there are no shares of Series A preferred stock issued and outstanding as of September 30, 2020.   

 

Series B convertible preferred stock

 

In November 2019, the Company filed an Amendment to its Articles of Incorporation to designate a series of preferred stock, the Series B Convertible Preferred Stock, with the Secretary of State of the State of Delaware.

 

The Certificate of Designations established 2,000 shares of the Series B Preferred Stock, par value $0.0001, having such designations, preferences, and rights as determined by the Company’s Board of Directors in its sole discretion, in accordance with the Company’s Articles of Incorporation and Amended and Restated Bylaws. The Certificate of Designations, Preferences, Rights, and Limitations of Series B Convertible Preferred Stock (“Certificate of Designations”) provides that the Series B Convertible Preferred Stock shall have no right to vote on any matters on which the common shareholders are permitted to vote. However, as long as any shares of Series B Preferred Stock are outstanding, the Company shall not, without the affirmative vote of the Holders of a majority of the then outstanding shares of the Series B Preferred Stock, (a) alter or change adversely the powers, preferences or rights given to the Series B Preferred Stock or alter or amend this Certificate of Designation, (b) authorize or create any class of stock ranking as to dividends, redemption or distribution of assets upon a liquidation senior to, or otherwise pari passu with, the Series B Preferred Stock, (c) amend its certificate of incorporation or other charter documents in any manner that adversely affects any rights of the Holders, (d) increase the number of authorized shares of Series B Preferred Stock, or (e) enter into any agreement with respect to any of the foregoing. The Series B Convertible Preferred Stock ranks senior with respect to dividends and right of liquidation to the Company’s common stock and junior with respect to dividends and right of liquidation to all existing and future indebtedness of the Company and existing and outstanding preferred stock of the Company. Each share of Series B Preferred Stock shall have a stated value of $1,000 (the “Stated Value”).

 

Except for stock dividends or distributions for which adjustments are to be made pursuant to the certificate of designation, Holders shall be entitled to receive, and the Company shall pay, dividends on shares of Series B Preferred Stock equal (on an as-if-converted-to-Common-Stock basis) to and in the same form as dividends actually paid on shares of the Company’s common stock when, as and if such dividends are paid on shares of the common stock. No other dividends shall be paid on shares of Series B Preferred Stock.

 

The Holder of Series B Preferred stock shall have the right from time to time, and at any time after the original issue date, to convert all or any part of the outstanding Series B Preferred Stock into the Company’s common stock. The conversion price (the “Conversion Price”) shall equal $0.20 per share (subject to equitable adjustments by the Company relating to the Company’s securities or the securities of any subsidiary of the Company, combinations, recapitalization, reclassifications, extraordinary distributions and similar events).

 

If, at any time while the Series B Preferred Stock is outstanding, the Company sells or grants any option to purchase or sells or grants any right to reprice, or otherwise disposes of or issues (or announces any sale, grant or any option to purchase or other disposition), any common stock or common stock equivalents entitling any Person to acquire shares of common stock at an effective price per share that is lower than the then Conversion Price (such lower price, the “Base Conversion Price” and such issuances, collectively, a “Dilutive Issuance”), then simultaneously with the consummation (or, if earlier, the announcement) of each Dilutive Issuance the Conversion Price shall be reduced to equal the Base Conversion Price. In addition, if at any time the Company grants, issues or sells any common stock equivalents or rights to purchase stock, warrants, securities or other property pro rata to the record holders of any class of shares of common stock (the “Purchase Rights”), then the Holder will be entitled to acquire, upon the terms applicable to such Purchase Rights, the aggregate Purchase Rights which the Holder could have acquired if the Holder had held the number of shares of common stock acquirable upon complete conversion of such Holder’s Series A Preferred Stock.

 

F-36

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

On November 29, 2019, the Company entered into Series B Preferred Stock Purchase Agreements with accredited investors whereby the investors agreed to purchase an aggregate of 115 unregistered shares of the Company’s Series B Preferred stock for $115,000, or $1,000 per share. In November 2019, the Company received the cash proceeds of $110,000, net of fees of $5,000 which was charged to additional paid in capital. In connection with the sale of Series B preferred shares, the Company issued 575,000 warrants to purchase 575,000 common shares at $0.20 per share. subject to adjustment on terms similar to the Series B preferred shares.

 

In connection with the issuance of these Series B preferred shares and Warrants, the Company determined that the terms of the Series B preferred shares and related warrants contain terms that were fixed monetary amounts at inception and accordingly, were not considered derivatives.

 

On April 15, 2020, the Company entered into Exchange Agreements with the holders of its Series B Convertible Preferred Stock, which shares of Series B Convertible Preferred Stock were originally issued in November 2019. Pursuant to the Exchange Agreements, the holders agreed to exchange their 115 shares of Series B Convertible Preferred Stock with a stated value of $115,000 and 575,000 warrants issued in connection with the Series B convertible preferred stock for an aggregate of 1,437,500 shares of the Company’s common stock at a price of $0.08 per share. After the exchanges, there are no shares of the Company’s Series B Convertible Preferred Stock outstanding. The Company issued 1,437,500 shares of common stock which was more than the shares that would have been issued at the original conversion price of $0.20 per share or 575,000 shares of common stock, an excess of 862,500 shares of common stock. The excess shares were valued at a price of $0.08 per share. Consequently, in connection with this share exchange, the Company recorded a deemed dividend on this extinguishment of $69,000.

 

Common stock

 

Sale of common stock

 

Between April 9, 2020 to April 18, 2020, the Company entered into subscription agreements with certain accredited investors pursuant to which it issued an aggregate of 7,764,366 shares of the Company’s common stock for proceeds of $75,644, and subscription receivable of $2,000 or $0.01 per share, for a total of $77,644. The Company collected the subscription receivable of $2,000 on July 6, 2020.

 

On April 28, 2020 (the “Closing Date”), the Company entered into securities purchase agreements (collectively, the “Purchase Agreement”) with certain institutions and accredited investors (each an “Investor” and collectively, the “Investors”) for the sale of an aggregate 29,993,750 shares of the Company’s common stock at a price of $0.08 per share for gross proceeds of $2,399,500, before deducting placement agent fees of $242,950 and other offering expenses of $118,460 (the “Private Placement”) for total net proceeds of $2,038,090. The Purchase Agreement contains customary representations, warranties and covenants of the parties, and the closing was subject to customary closing conditions.

 

The Purchase Agreement also provides that until the six (6) month anniversary of the date of the Purchase Agreement, in the event of a subsequent financing (except for certain exempt issuances as provided in the Purchase Agreement) by the Company, each Investor that invested over $100,000 pursuant to the Purchase Agreement will have the right to participate in such subsequent financing up to an amount equal to 50% of the subsequent financing on the same terms, conditions and price provided for in the subsequent financing.

 

In connection with the Private Placement, the Company entered into separate Registration Rights Agreements with the Investors, pursuant to which the Company agreed to undertake to file a registration statement to register the resale of the shares underlying the Registrable Securities (as defined therein) within thirty (30) calendar days following the Closing Date, and to maintain the effectiveness of the registration statement until all of such shares of common stock have been sold or are otherwise able to be sold pursuant to Rule 144. If the Company fails to file the registration statement or have it declared effective by the dates set forth above, amongst other things, the Company is obligated to pay the investors liquidated damages in the amount of 1% of their subscription amount, per month, until such events are satisfied, subject to a cap of 6%.

 

F-37

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

In conjunction with the Private Placement, all officers and directors of the Company have entered into lock-up agreements pursuant to which they have agreed not to sell their shares of common stock or common stock equivalents in the Company until the twelve-month anniversary of the Closing Date.

 

Common stock issued for future services 

 

On April 17, 2020, the Company entered into one-year advisory agreements with certain accredited investors pursuant to which it agreed to issue an aggregate of 5,117,343 shares of the Company’s common stock to the advisors for advisory services to be rendered. These shares were valued at $409,387, or $0.08 per common share, based on contemporaneous common share sales which are being amortized over the term of the agreements.

 

On April 17, 2020, the Company entered into a six-month consulting agreement with an accredited investor pursuant to which it agreed to issue an aggregate of 3,468,841 shares of the Company’s common stock to the consultant for consulting services to be rendered. These shares were valued at $277,508, or $0.08 per common share, based on contemporaneous common share sales which is being amortized over the term of the agreement.

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2020, the Company recognized stock-based consulting of $460,289 and prepaid expense of $226,806 to be amortized over the remaining service period.

   

Common stock issued for employment agreement

 

On April 17, 2020, the Company entered into an Employment Agreement with the Company’s chief executive officer (“CEO”) pursuant to which CEO will continue to serve as chief executive officer and chief financial officer of the Company. In connection with this employment agreement, the CEO was granted 7,630,949 shares of the Company’s common stock. These shares were valued at $610,476, or $0.08 per common share, based on contemporaneous common share sales. During the nine months ended September 30, 2020, the Company recognized stock-based compensation of $610,476.

 

Common stock issued for conversion of Series A Preferred Stock

 

On August 3, 2020, at the request of the investor, the Company converted 4,000 Series A Preferred Stock into 2,000,000 shares of common stock. After such conversion, the Company reclassed the $400,000 redemption value of the Series A preferred stock to additional paid in capital.

 

Stock options

 

Stock option activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 are summarized as follows:

 

  Number
of Options
  Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
  Weighted
Average
Remaining
Contractual
Term
(Years)
  Aggregate
Intrinsic
Value
 
Balance Outstanding, December 31, 2019  300,000  $0.0001   4.5     
Granted  -   -         
Forfeited  -   -         
Balance Outstanding, September 30, 2020  300,000  $0.0001   3.79  $104,970 
Exercisable, September 30, 2020  300,000  $0.0001   4.79  $104,970 

 

F-38

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

Warrants

 

Warrant activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 are summarized as follows:

 

  Number
of Warrants
  Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
  Weighted
Average
Remaining
Contractual
Term
(Years)
  Aggregate
Intrinsic
Value
 
Balance Outstanding, December 31, 2019  2,225,000   0.20   4.8         
Granted  -   -         
Cancelled  (2,225,000)  0.20         
Balance Outstanding, September 30, 2020  -  $-   -  $- 
Exercisable, September 30, 2020  -  $-   -  $- 

 

On April 15, 2020, the Company entered into Exchange Agreements with the holders of convertible promissory notes (see Note 5). Pursuant to these Exchange Agreements, the noteholders agreed to exchange their convertible promissory notes of $330,000 and 1,650,000 warrants issued in connection with this debt for an aggregate of 4,125,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at a price of $0.08 per share. After the exchanges, there are no convertible notes outstanding. The Company issued 4,125,000 shares of common stock which was more than the shares that would have been issued at the original conversion price of $0.20 per share or 1,650,000 shares of common stock, an excess of 2,475,000 shares of common stock. The excess shares were valued at a price of $0.08 per share. Consequently, the Company recorded a loss on debt extinguishment of $198,000 during the nine months ended September 30, 2020.

 

NOTE 8 – CONCENTRATIONS

 

Customer concentration

 

For the nine months ended September 30, 2020, no customer accounted for over 10% of total sales.

 

Vendor concentrations

 

Generally, the Company purchases substantially all of its raw materials and inventory from two suppliers. The loss of these suppliers may have a material adverse effect on the Company’s results of operations and financial condition. However, the Company believes that, if necessary, alternate vendors could supply similar products in adequate quantities to avoid material disruptions to operations.

 

NOTE 9 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Employment Agreement

 

On April 17, 2020, the Company entered into an Employment Agreement with the Company’s chief executive officer (“CEO”) pursuant to which CEO will continue to serve as chief executive officer and chief financial officer of the Company. The term of the agreement will continue for a period of one year from the date of execution and automatically renews for successive one-year periods at the end of each term until either party delivers written notice of their intent not to review at least 6 months prior to the expiration of the then effective term. Pursuant to the terms of the agreement, CEO’s base salary was increased to $120,000, and the CEO shall continue be entitled to earn a bonus, subject to the sole discretion of the Company’s Board. In addition, CEO was granted 7,630,949 vested shares of the Company’s common stock (see Note 7).

 

F-39

 

 

SILO PHARMA, INC.

(FORMERLY KNOWN AS UPPERCUT BRANDS, INC.)

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2020

(Unaudited)

 

The agreement may be terminated by either the Company or CEO at any time and for any reason upon 60 days prior written notice. Upon termination of the agreement, CEO shall be entitled to (i) any equity award that has vested prior to the termination date, (ii) reimbursement of expenses incurred on or prior to such termination date and (iii) such employee benefits to which CEO may be entitled as of the termination date (collectively, the “Accrued Amounts”). The agreement shall also terminate upon CEO’s death or the Company may terminate CEO’s employment upon his disability (as defined in the agreement). Upon the termination of CEO’s employment for death or disability, CEO shall be entitled to receive the Accrued Amounts. The agreement also contains covenants prohibiting CEO from disclosing confidential information with respect to the Company.

 

Commercial Evaluation License and Option Agreement with the University of Baltimore, Maryland

 

Recently, management has been exploring opportunities to expand its business by seeking to acquire and/or develop intellectual property or technology rights from leading universities and researchers. Effective as of July 15, 2020, through the Company’s subsidiary, Silo Pharma Inc. (see Note 1), the Company entered into a commercial evaluation license and option agreement with the University of Maryland, Baltimore (“UMD”), pursuant to which, UMD has granted the Company an exclusive, non-sublicenseable, non-transferable license to with respect to the exploration of the potential use of central nervous system-homing peptides in vivo and their use for the investigation and treatment of multiple sclerosis and other neuroinflammatory pathology. In addition, UMB granted the Company an exclusive, option to negotiate and obtain an exclusive, sublicenseable, royalty-bearing license to with respect to the subject technology. This agreement shall be effective on the effective date and shall expire six months from July 15, 2020 unless sooner terminated. Both parties may terminate this agreement within thirty days by giving a written notice. Pursuant to the agreement, the Company paid the initial fee of $10,000 to UMD in July 2020 which was recorded in professional fees during the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020 since the Company could not conclude that such costs would be recoverable for this early stage venture.

 

F-40

 

 

PART II- INFORMATION NOT REQUIRED IN PROSPECTUS

 

Item 13. Other Expenses of Issuance and Distribution.

 

The following table sets forth the costs and expenses payable by the Company in connection with the issuance and distribution of the securities being registered hereunder. All amounts are estimates except the SEC registration fee.

 

SEC registration fees $995.22 
Printing expenses $5,000 
Accounting fees and expenses $5,000 
Legal fees and expenses $25,000 
Miscellaneous $2,004.78 
Total $38,000 

 

Item 14. Indemnification of Directors and Officers.

 

The Company’s Certificate of Incorporation and Bylaws (collectively, the “Charter Documents”) provide that, to the fullest extent permitted under the DGCL, no director of the Company shall be personally liable to the Company or its stockholders for monetary damages for breach of fiduciary duty as a director. In addition, the Company’s Charter Documents provide that the Company shall indemnify and hold harmless, to the fullest extent permitted by applicable law, any person (a “Covered Person”) who was or is made or is threatened to be made a party or is otherwise involved in any action, suit or proceeding, whether civil, criminal, administrative or investigative (a “Proceeding”) by reason of the fact that he or she, or a person for whom he or she is the legal representative, is or was a director or officer of the Company or, while a director or officer of the Company, is or was serving at the request of the Company as a director, officer, employee or agent of another corporation or of a partnership, joint venture, trust, enterprise or nonprofit entity against all liability and loss suffered and expenses (including attorneys’ fees) reasonably incurred by such Covered Person. Pursuant to the Company’s Charter Documents, the Company shall pay the expenses (including attorneys’ fees) incurred by a Covered Person in defending any Proceeding in advance of its final disposition; provided, however, that, to the extent required by applicable law, such payment of expenses in advance of the final disposition of the Proceeding shall be made only upon receipt of an undertaking by the Covered Person to repay all amounts advanced if it should be ultimately determined that the Covered Person is not entitled to be indemnified pursuant to the Company’s Certificate of Incorporation. 

 

Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act may be permitted to directors, officers or persons controlling us pursuant to the foregoing provisions, we have been informed that, in the opinion of the SEC, this indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is therefore unenforceable

 

Item 15. Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities. 

 

The following is a list of unregistered sales of our equity securities during the prior three years.

 

On September 29, 2018, pursuant to an Asset Purchase Agreement, we issued 2,000,000 shares of common stock of the Company to acquire assets.

 

On December 4, 2018, we issued 70,000 shares of our common stock for cash proceeds of $24,500, or $0.35 per share.

 

II-1

 

On January 22, 2019, we entered into a consulting agreement with a consultant in connection with our marketing and branding of our NFID products. The agreement ended on December 31, 2019. For services rendered, we issued 100,000 shares of common stock of the Company to the consultant on a quarterly basis in tranches of 25,000 shares per quarter, commencing on March 31, 2019, and continuing on to the last day of each subsequent quarter in the year 2019. These shares were valued on the January 22, 2019 grant date at $35,000, or $0.35 per common share, based on recent common share sales which was amortized over the vesting period. Through December 31, 2019, the Company issued 100,000 shares of its common stock to the consultant.

 

On April 7, 2020, we entered into advisory agreements with certain accredited investors pursuant to which we agreed to issue an aggregate of 5,117,343 shares of our common stock to the advisors for advisory services to be rendered.

 

On April 10, 2020, we entered into a consulting agreement with an accredited investor pursuant to which we agreed to issue an aggregate of 3,468,841 shares of our common stock, to the consultant for consulting services to be rendered.

 

On April 15, 2020, we entered into exchange agreements with holders of our convertible promissory notes, which notes were originally issued in October 2019. Pursuant to the exchange agreements, the holders agreed to exchange their convertible promissory notes and related warrants for an aggregate of 4,125,000 shares of our common stock at a price of $0.08 per share.

 

On April 15, 2020, we entered into exchange agreements with the holders of our Series B Convertible Preferred Stock, which shares of Series B Convertible Preferred Stock were originally issued in November 2019. Pursuant to the exchange agreements, the holders agreed to exchange their Series B Convertible Preferred Stock and related warrants for an aggregate of 1,437,500 shares of our common stock at a price of $0.08 per share.

 

Between April 9,, 2020 and April 18, 2020, we entered into subscription agreements with certain accredited investors pursuant to which we issued an aggregate of 7,764,366 shares of the our common stock for an aggregate of $75,644.

 

On April 17, 2020, in connection with an Employment Agreement with the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, we issued 7,630,949 shares of our common stock.

 

On April 28, 2020 we entered into securities purchase agreements with certain institutions and accredited investors for the sale of an aggregate 29,993,750 shares of the Company’s common stock for gross proceeds of $2,399,500.

 

On January 18, 2021, we issued a service provider warrants to purchase up to 250,000 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.20 per share.

 

On February 12, 2021, we sold an aggregate of 4,276 shares of Series C Preferred Stock and Warrants to purchase up to 14,253,323 shares of our common stock for gross proceeds of approximately $4,276,000, before deducting placement agent and other offering expenses. Pursuant to the terms of the offering, we also issued the placement agents warrants to purchase up to an aggregate of 2,850,664 shares of our common stock.

 

Unless otherwise indicated, the foregoing securities were offered and issued in reliance on the exemption from registration requirements under the Securities Act afforded by Section 4(a)(2) thereof and/or Rule 506 of Regulation D promulgated thereunder.

 

II-2

 

Item 16. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules. 

 

(a)Exhibits.

 

  Description 
3.1 Certificate of Incorporation of Point Capital, Inc., filed as an exhibit to the Definitive Information Statement on Schedule 14C, filed with the Commission on December 28, 2012 and incorporated herein by reference.
3.2 Bylaws of Point Capital, Inc., filed as an exhibit to the Definitive Information Statement on Schedule 14C, filed with the Commission on December 28, 2012 and incorporated herein by reference.
3.3 Certificate of Designation of the Series A Convertible Preferred Stock, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the Commission on April 30, 2013 and incorporated herein by reference.
3.4 Amended and Restated Certificate of Designation of Preferences, Rights and Limitations of Series A Convertible Preferred Stock, filed as an exhibit to the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, filed with the Commission on May 17, 2017 and incorporated herein by reference.
3.5 Amendment to Certificate of Incorporation for name change dated May 20, 2019, filed as an appendix to the Definitive Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A, filed with the Commission on May 1, 2019 and incorporated herein by reference.
3.6 Certificate of Designation of the Series B Convertible Preferred Stock, filed as an exhibit to the Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Commission on March 20, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
3.7 

Certificate of Amendment filed with the Delaware Secretary of State on September 24, 2020, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on October 6, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.

3.8 Certificate of Designations of Preferences, Rights and Limitations of Series C Convertible Preferred Stock (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 10, 2021)
5.1* Opinion of Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton, LLP
10.1 Stock Purchase Agreement dated April 24, 2013 between Point Capital, Inc. and Alpha Capital Anstalt, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the Commission on April 30, 2013 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.2 Corrected Asset Purchase Agreement with Blind Faith Concepts Holdings, Inc. dated September 28, 2018, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the Commission on December 20, 2018 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.3 Form of Return to Treasury Agreement, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the Commission on December 20, 2018 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.4 Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated October 2019, between Uppercut Brands, Inc., and Investors, filed as an exhibit to the Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Commission on March 20, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.5 Form of convertible note agreement with Investors dated October 2019, filed as an exhibit to the Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Commission on March 20, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.6 Form of Warrant, dated October 2019, filed as an exhibit to the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed with the Commission on November 13, 2019 and incorporated herein by reference.

 

II-3

 

10.7 Form of Securities Purchase Agreement for the purchase of Series B preferred shares, dated November 2019, between Uppercut Brands, Inc., and Investors, filed as an exhibit to the Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Commission on March 20, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.8 Form of Warrant related to Series B preferred shares, dated November 2019, between Uppercut Brands, Inc., and Investors, filed as an exhibit to the Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed with the Commission on March 20, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.9 Form of registration rights agreement related to Series B preferred shares, dated November 2019, between Uppercut Brands, Inc., and Investors, filed as an exhibit to the Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Commission on March 20, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.10 Form of Exchange Agreement for Convertible Notes, dated as of April 15, 2020, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K/A, filed with the Commission on April 22, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.11 Form of Exchange Agreement for Series B Preferred Stock, dated as of April 15, 2020, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K/A, filed with the Commission on April 22, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.12 Form of Subscription Agreement, dated as of April 17, 2020, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K/A, filed with the Commission on April 22, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.13 Form of Consulting Agreement, dated as of April 17, 2020, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K/A, filed with the Commission on April 22, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.14 Form of Advisory Agreement, dated as of April 17, 2020, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K/A, filed with the Commission on April 22, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.15+ Employment Agreement by and between the Company and Eric Weisblum, dated as of April 17, 2020, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K/A, filed with the Commission on April 22, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.16 Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated as of April 28, 2020, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the Commission on April 28, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.17 Form of Registration Rights Agreement, dated as of April 28, 2020, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the Commission on April 28, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.18 Form of Lock-Up Agreement, dated as of April 28, 2020, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K, filed with the Commission on April 28, 2020 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.19 Patent License Agreement by and among the Company and Silo Pharma, Inc., a Florida corporation and their affiliates and subsidiaries and AIkido Pharma Inc., filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on January 11, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.20 Sponsored Research Agreement by and between the Company and the University of Maryland, Baltimore, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on January 11, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.21+ Silo Pharma, Inc. 2020 Omnibus Equity Incentive Plan, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on January 28, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.22+ First Amendment to Employment Agreement, dated January 18, 2021, by and between the Company and Eric Weisblum, filed as an exhibit to the Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Commission on January 28, 2021 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.23 Form of Securities Purchase Agreement, dated as of February 9, 2021, between Silo Pharma, Inc. and the signatories thereto (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 10, 2021)
10.24 Form of Warrant (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 10, 2021)
10.25 Form of Registration Rights Agreement, dated as of February 9, 2021, between Silo Pharma, Inc. and the signatories thereto (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 10, 2021)
10.26 Form of Lock-Up Agreement, dated as of February 9, 2021 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 10, 2021)
10.27 Form of Placement Agent Warrant (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K/A filed on February 12, 2021)
10.28# Master License Agreement, dated February 12, 2021, by and between the Company and the University of Maryland, Baltimore (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 16, 2021)
10.29# Letter of Intent, dated February 12, 2021, by and between the Company and Aikido Pharma, Inc. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 16, 2021)
21.1* Subsidiaries
23.1* Consent of Salberg & Company, P.A.
23.2* Consent of Sheppard, Mullin, Richter & Hampton, LLP (included in Exhibit 5.1)
24.1 Power of Attorney (included on signature page)
101.INS* XBRL INSTANCE DOCUMENT
101.SCH* XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION SCHEMA
101.CAL* XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION CALCULATION LINKBASE
101.DEF* XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION DEFINITION LINKBASE
101.LAB* XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION LABEL LINKBASE
101.PRE* XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION PRESENTATION LINKBASE

 

 *Filed herewith.
   
 #

Portions of this exhibit (indicated by asterisks) have been redacted in compliance with Regulation S-K Item 601(b)(10)(iv).

 

 (b)Financial Statement Schedule

 

All schedules have been omitted because the required information is included in the consolidated financial statements or the note thereto or is not applicable or required.

 

II-4

 

ITEM 17. UNDERTAKINGS.

 

The undersigned registrant hereby undertakes:

 

 (1)To file, during any period in which offers or sales are being made, a post-effective amendment to this registration statement:

 

  (i)To include any prospectus required by section 10(a)(3) of the Securities Act;
    
  (ii)To reflect in the prospectus any facts or events arising after the effective date of the registration statement (or the most recent post-effective amendment thereof) which, individually or in the aggregate, represent a fundamental change in the information set forth in the registration statement. Notwithstanding the foregoing, any increase or decrease in volume of securities offered (if the total dollar value of securities offered would not exceed that which was registered) and any deviation from the low or high end of the estimated maximum offering range may be reflected in the form of prospectus filed with the Commission pursuant to Rule 424(b) if, in the aggregate, the changes in volume and price represent no more than 20% change in the maximum aggregate offering price set forth in the “Calculation of Registration Fee” table in the effective registration statement.
    
  (iii)To include any material information with respect to the plan of distribution not previously disclosed in the registration statement or any material change to such information in the registration statement;

 

 (2)That, for the purpose of determining any liability under the Securities Act, each such post-effective amendment shall be deemed to be a new registration statement relating to the securities offered therein, and the offering of such securities at that time shall be deemed to be the initial bona fide offering thereof.

 

 (3)To remove from registration by means of a post-effective amendment any of the securities being registered which remain unsold at the termination of the offering.

 

 (4)That, for the purpose of determining liability under the Securities Act of 1933 to any purchaser, if the registrant is subject to Rule 430C, each prospectus filed pursuant to Rule 424(b) as part of a registration statement relating to an offering, other than registration statements relying on Rule 430B or other than prospectuses filed in reliance on Rule 430A, shall be deemed to be part of and included in the registration statement as of the date it is first used after effectiveness. Provided, however, that no statement made in a registration statement or prospectus that is part of the registration statement or made in a document incorporated or deemed incorporated by reference into the registration statement or prospectus that is part of the registration statement will, as to a purchaser with a time of contract of sale prior to such first use, supersede or modify any statement that was made in the registration statement or prospectus that was part of the registration statement or made in any such document immediately prior to such date of first use.

 

 (5)That, for the purpose of determining liability of the registrant under the Securities Act to any purchaser in the initial distribution of the securities, the undersigned registrant undertakes that in a primary offering of securities of the undersigned registrant pursuant to this registration statement, regardless of the underwriting method used to sell the securities to the purchaser, if the securities are offered or sold to such purchaser by means of any of the following communications, the undersigned registrant will be a seller to the purchaser and will be considered to offer or sell such securities to such purchaser:

 

  (i)Any preliminary prospectus or prospectus of the undersigned registrant relating to the offering required to be filed pursuant to Rule 424;

 

  (ii)Any free writing prospectus relating to the offering prepared by or on behalf of the undersigned registrant or used or referred to by the undersigned registrant;

 

  (iii)The portion of any other free writing prospectus relating to the offering containing material information about the undersigned registrant or its securities provided by or on behalf of the undersigned registrant; and

 

  (iv)Any other communication that is an offer in the offering made by the undersigned registrant to the purchaser.

 

II-5

 

Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act may be permitted to directors, officers and controlling persons of the registrant pursuant to the foregoing provisions, or otherwise, the registrant has been advised that in the opinion of the SEC such indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Act and is, therefore, unenforceable. In the event that a claim for indemnification against such liabilities (other than the payment by the registrant of expenses incurred or paid by a director, officer or controlling person of the registrant in the successful defense of any action, suit or proceeding) is asserted by such director, officer or controlling person in connection with the securities being registered, the registrant will, unless in the opinion of its counsel the matter has been settled by controlling precedent, submit to a court of appropriate jurisdiction the question whether such indemnification by it is against public policy as expressed in the Act and will be governed by the final adjudication of such issue.

 

The undersigned registrant hereby undertakes to provide to the underwriter at the closing specified in the underwriting agreements certificates in such denominations and registered in such names as required by the underwriter to permit prompt delivery to each purchaser.

 

The undersigned registrant hereby undertakes that:

 

 (1)For purposes of determining any liability under the Securities Act, the information omitted from the form of prospectus filed as part of this registration statement in reliance upon Rule 430A and contained in a form of prospectus filed by the registrant pursuant to Rule 424(b) (1) or (4) or 497(h) under the Securities Act shall be deemed to be part of this registration statement as of the time it was declared effective.

 

 (2)For the purpose of determining any liability under the Securities Act, each post-effective amendment that contains a form of prospectus shall be deemed to be a new registration statement relating to the securities offered therein, and the offering of such securities at that time shall be deemed to be the initial bona fide offering thereof.

 

II-6

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, the registrant has duly caused this Registration Statement on Form S-1 to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized in the Englewood Cliffs, State of New Jersey, on the 16th day of February, 2021.

 

 SILO PHARMA, INC.
   
 By:/s/ Eric Weisblum
  Eric Weisblum
  

Chief Executive Officer and

Chief Financial Officer

 

SIGNATURES AND POWER OF ATTORNEY

 

Each of the undersigned officers and directors of Silo Pharma, Inc. hereby constitutes and appoints Eric Weisblum the individual’s true and lawful attorneys-in-fact and agents, each with full power of substitution and resubstitution, for the person and in his or her name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to sign this registration statement of Silo Pharma, Inc. on Form S-1, and any other registration statement relating to the same offering (including any registration statement, or amendment thereto, that is to become effective upon filing pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended), and any and all amendments thereto (including post-effective amendments to the registration statement), and to file the same, with all exhibits thereto, and all other documents in connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange Commission, granting unto said attorney-in-fact and agent, full power and authority to do and perform each and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done in connection therewith, as fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute, may lawfully do or cause to be done by virtue hereof.

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, this Registration Statement has been signed by the following persons in the capacities held and on the dates indicated.

 

Signature Title Date
     
/s/ Eric Weisblum Chairman, Chief Executive Officer,
Chief Financial Officer and President
 February 16, 2021
Eric Weisblum (Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)  
     
/s/ Wayne D. Linsley Director February 16, 2021
Wayne D. Linsley    
     
/s/ Dr. Kevin Muñoz  Director February 16, 2021
Dr. Kevin Muñoz     

 

 

II-7