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PSX Phillips 66

Filed: 3 Aug 21, 5:01pm
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period endedJune 30, 2021
or
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period fromto
Commission file number:001-35349

Phillips 66
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter) 
Delaware 45-3779385
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

2331 CityWest Blvd., Houston, Texas 77042
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
281-293-6600
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each classTrading Symbol(s)Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, $0.01 Par ValuePSXNew York Stock Exchange
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.     Yes      No  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).     Yes      No  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filerAccelerated filerNon-accelerated filer
Smaller reporting companyEmerging growth company
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.     
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes      No  
The registrant had 437,989,408 shares of common stock, $0.01 par value, outstanding as of June 30, 2021.


PHILLIPS 66

TABLE OF CONTENTS
 



PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
Consolidated Statement of OperationsPhillips 66

 Millions of Dollars
 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021 2020 2021 2020 
Revenues and Other Income
Sales and other operating revenues$27,002 10,913 48,629 31,791 
Equity in earnings of affiliates830 157 1,115 522 
Net gain on dispositions2 85 2 86 
Other income51 28 66 28 
Total Revenues and Other Income27,885 11,183 49,812 32,427 
Costs and Expenses
Purchased crude oil and products25,218 9,608 45,283 28,048 
Operating expenses1,175 1,026 2,555 2,367 
Selling, general and administrative expenses433 409 841 728 
Depreciation and amortization364 343 720 685 
Impairments0 198 3,006 
Taxes other than income taxes119 114 258 271 
Accretion on discounted liabilities6 12 11 
Interest and debt expense143 117 289 228 
Foreign currency transaction (gains) losses(9)(9)
Total Costs and Expenses27,449 11,628 50,147 35,350 
Income (loss) before income taxes436 (445)(335)(2,923)
Income tax expense (benefit)62 (378)(70)(429)
Net Income (Loss)374 (67)(265)(2,494)
Less: net income attributable to noncontrolling interests78 74 93 143 
Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Phillips 66$296 (141)(358)(2,637)
Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Phillips 66 Per Share of Common Stock (dollars)
Basic$0.66 (0.33)(0.83)(6.00)
Diluted0.66 (0.33)(0.83)(6.00)
Weighted-Average Common Shares Outstanding (thousands)
Basic439,940 438,756 439,722 440,050 
Diluted440,396 438,756 439,722 440,050 
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
1

Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income (Loss)Phillips 66
 
 Millions of Dollars
 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021 2020 2021 2020 
Net Income (Loss)$374 (67)(265)(2,494)
Other comprehensive income (loss)
Defined benefit plans
Net actuarial gain (loss) arising during the period210 (300)210 (300)
Amortization of net actuarial loss, prior service credit and settlements47 55 69 78 
Plans sponsored by equity affiliates23 29 
Income taxes on defined benefit plans(68)59 (74)54 
Defined benefit plans, net of income taxes212 (183)234 (163)
Foreign currency translation adjustments19 26 4 (196)
Income taxes on foreign currency translation adjustments0 0 
Foreign currency translation adjustments, net of income taxes19 26 4 (195)
Cash flow hedges1 3 (9)
Income taxes on hedging activities(1)(1)
Hedging activities, net of income taxes0 2 (7)
Other Comprehensive Income (Loss), Net of Income Taxes231 (157)240 (365)
Comprehensive Income (Loss)605 (224)(25)(2,859)
Less: comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interests78 74 93 143 
Comprehensive Income (Loss) Attributable to Phillips 66$527 (298)(118)(3,002)
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
2

Consolidated Balance SheetPhillips 66
 
 Millions of Dollars
 June 30
2021
December 31
2020
Assets
Cash and cash equivalents$2,207 2,514 
Accounts and notes receivable (net of allowances of $46 million in 2021 and $37 million in 2020)6,627 5,688 
Accounts and notes receivable—related parties1,435 834 
Inventories4,752 3,893 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets759 347 
Total Current Assets15,780 13,276 
Investments and long-term receivables13,520 13,624 
Net properties, plants and equipment23,688 23,716 
Goodwill1,425 1,425 
Intangibles825 843 
Other assets1,739 1,837 
Total Assets$56,977 54,721 
Liabilities
Accounts payable$8,066 5,171 
Accounts payable—related parties879 378 
Short-term debt2,489 987 
Accrued income and other taxes1,362 1,351 
Employee benefit obligations412 573 
Other accruals1,343 1,058 
Total Current Liabilities14,551 9,518 
Long-term debt12,924 14,906 
Asset retirement obligations and accrued environmental costs694 657 
Deferred income taxes5,879 5,644 
Employee benefit obligations1,148 1,341 
Other liabilities and deferred credits1,179 1,132 
Total Liabilities36,375 33,198 
Equity
Common stock (2,500,000,000 shares authorized at $0.01 par value)
     Issued (2021—649,761,235 shares; 2020—648,643,223 shares)
Par value6 
Capital in excess of par20,463 20,383 
Treasury stock (at cost: 2021 and 2020—211,771,827 shares)(17,116)(17,116)
Retained earnings15,345 16,500 
Accumulated other comprehensive loss(549)(789)
Total Stockholders’ Equity18,149 18,984 
Noncontrolling interests2,453 2,539 
Total Equity20,602 21,523 
Total Liabilities and Equity$56,977 54,721 
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
3

Consolidated Statement of Cash FlowsPhillips 66
 Millions of Dollars
 Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021 2020 
Cash Flows From Operating Activities
Net loss$(265)(2,494)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash provided by operating activities
Depreciation and amortization720 685 
Impairments198 3,006 
Accretion on discounted liabilities12 11 
Deferred income taxes163 (21)
Undistributed equity earnings(1)298 
Net gain on dispositions(2)(86)
Other258 
Working capital adjustments
Accounts and notes receivable(1,518)3,814 
Inventories(821)(1,416)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets(413)(126)
Accounts payable3,482 (3,121)
Taxes and other accruals201 424 
Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities2,014 981 
Cash Flows From Investing Activities
Capital expenditures and investments(711)(1,862)
Return of investments in equity affiliates158 88 
Proceeds from asset dispositions24 
Advances/loans—related parties(245)(231)
Collection of advances/loans—related parties0 44 
Other(45)(64)
Net Cash Used in Investing Activities(819)(2,024)
Cash Flows From Financing Activities
Issuance of debt465 3,230 
Repayment of debt(979)(541)
Issuance of common stock24 
Repurchase of common stock0 (443)
Dividends paid on common stock(788)(789)
Distributions to noncontrolling interests(158)(127)
Repurchase of noncontrolling interests(24)
Other(27)(13)
Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Financing Activities(1,487)1,323 
Effect of Exchange Rate Changes on Cash and Cash Equivalents(15)(4)
Net Change in Cash and Cash Equivalents(307)276 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period2,514 1,614 
Cash and Cash Equivalents at End of Period$2,207 1,890 
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
4

Consolidated Statement of Changes in EquityPhillips 66

Millions of Dollars
Three Months Ended June 30
 Attributable to Phillips 66 
 Common Stock   
 Par ValueCapital in Excess of ParTreasury StockRetained EarningsAccum. Other Comprehensive LossNoncontrolling InterestsTotal
March 31, 2021$20,420 (17,116)15,449 (780)2,478 20,457 
Net income   296  78 374 
Other comprehensive income    231  231 
Dividends paid on common stock ($0.90 per share)   (394)  (394)
Benefit plan activity 43  (4)  39 
Distributions to noncontrolling interests     (82)(82)
Repurchase of noncontrolling interests   (2) (21)(23)
June 30, 2021$6 20,463 (17,116)15,345 (549)2,453 20,602 
March 31, 2020$20,305 (17,116)19,168 (991)2,267 23,639 
Net income (loss)— — — (141)— 74 (67)
Other comprehensive loss— — — — (157)— (157)
Dividends paid on common stock ($0.90 per share)— — — (393)— — (393)
Benefit plan activity— 37 — (3)— — 34 
Transfer of equity interest— — — — — 305 305 
Distributions to noncontrolling interests— — — — — (66)(66)
June 30, 2020$20,342 (17,116)18,631 (1,148)2,580 23,295 


Shares
Three Months Ended June 30
 Common Stock IssuedTreasury Stock
March 31, 2021649,638,881 211,771,827 
Repurchase of common stock 0 
Shares issued—share-based compensation122,354  
June 30, 2021649,761,235 211,771,827 
March 31, 2020648,446,534 211,771,827 
Repurchase of common stock— 
Shares issued—share-based compensation21,953 — 
June 30, 2020648,468,487 211,771,827 
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.





5

Consolidated Statement of Changes in EquityPhillips 66
Millions of Dollars
Six Months Ended June 30
Attributable to Phillips 66
Common Stock
Par ValueCapital in Excess of ParTreasury StockRetained EarningsAccum. Other Comprehensive LossNoncontrolling InterestsTotal
December 31, 2020$20,383 (17,116)16,500 (789)2,539 21,523 
Net income (loss)   (358) 93 (265)
Other comprehensive income    240  240 
Dividends paid on common stock ($1.80 per share)   (788)  (788)
Benefit plan activity 80  (7)  73 
Distributions to noncontrolling interests     (158)(158)
Repurchase of noncontrolling interests   (2) (21)(23)
June 30, 2021$6 20,463 (17,116)15,345 (549)2,453 20,602 
December 31, 2019$20,301 (16,673)22,064 (788)2,259 27,169 
Net income (loss)— — — (2,637)— 143 (2,494)
Other comprehensive loss— — — — (365)— (365)
Dividends paid on common stock ($1.80 per share)— — — (789)— — (789)
Repurchase of common stock— — (443)— — — (443)
Benefit plan activity— 41 — (5)— — 36 
Transfer of equity interest— — — — — 305 305 
Distributions to noncontrolling interests— — — — — (127)(127)
Other— — — (2)— 
June 30, 2020$20,342 (17,116)18,631 (1,148)2,580 23,295 

Shares
Six Months Ended June 30
Common Stock IssuedTreasury Stock
December 31, 2020648,643,223 211,771,827 
Repurchase of common stock 0 
Shares issued—share-based compensation1,118,012  
June 30, 2021649,761,235 211,771,827 
December 31, 2019647,416,633 206,390,806 
Repurchase of common stock— 5,381,021 
Shares issued—share-based compensation1,051,854 — 
June 30, 2020648,468,487 211,771,827 
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

6

Notes to Consolidated Financial StatementsPhillips 66

Note 1—Interim Financial Information

The unaudited interim financial information presented in the financial statements included in this report is prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (GAAP) and includes all known accruals and adjustments necessary, in the opinion of management, for a fair presentation of the consolidated financial position of Phillips 66 and its results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented. Unless otherwise specified, all such adjustments are of a normal and recurring nature. Certain notes and other information have been condensed or omitted from the interim financial statements included in this report. Therefore, these interim financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes included in our 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K. The results of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, are not necessarily indicative of the results expected for the full year.


Note 2—Sales and Other Operating Revenues

Disaggregated Revenues
The following tables present our disaggregated sales and other operating revenues:

 Millions of Dollars
 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021 2020 2021 2020 
Product Line and Services
Refined petroleum products$21,876 8,701 38,219 24,858 
Crude oil resales3,204 1,490 6,393 4,367 
Natural gas liquids (NGL)1,943 700 3,717 1,679 
Services and other*
(21)22 300 887 
Consolidated sales and other operating revenues$27,002 10,913 48,629 31,791 
Geographic Location**
United States$21,297 8,377 37,909 24,087 
United Kingdom2,835 972 5,122 3,281 
Germany1,038 613 1,855 1,471 
Other foreign countries1,832 951 3,743 2,952 
Consolidated sales and other operating revenues$27,002 10,913 48,629 31,791 
* Includes derivatives-related activities. See Note 12—Derivatives and Financial Instruments, for additional information.
** Sales and other operating revenues are attributable to countries based on the location of the operations generating the revenues.



7

Contract-Related Assets and Liabilities
At June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, receivables from contracts with customers were $5,948 million and $3,911 million, respectively. Significant noncustomer balances, such as buy/sell receivables and excise tax receivables, were excluded from these amounts.

Our contract-related assets also include payments we make to our marketing customers related to incentive programs. An incentive payment is initially recognized as an asset and subsequently amortized as a reduction to revenue over the contract term, which generally ranges from 5 to 15 years. At June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, our asset balances related to such payments were $426 million and $404 million, respectively.

Our contract liabilities represent advances from our customers prior to product or service delivery. At June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, contract liabilities were immaterial.

Remaining Performance Obligations
Most of our contracts with customers are spot contracts or term contracts with only variable consideration. We do not disclose remaining performance obligations for these contracts as the expected duration is one year or less or because the variable consideration has been allocated entirely to the unsatisfied performance obligations. We also have certain contracts in our Midstream segment that include minimum volume commitments with fixed pricing. At June 30, 2021, the remaining performance obligations related to these minimum volume commitment contracts were immaterial.


Note 3—Credit Losses

We are exposed to credit losses primarily through our sales of refined petroleum products, crude oil and NGL. We assess each counterparty’s ability to pay for the products we sell by conducting a credit review. The credit review considers our expected billing exposure and timing for payment and the counterparty’s established credit rating or our assessment of the counterparty’s creditworthiness based on our analysis of their financial statements when a credit rating is not available. We also consider contract terms and conditions, country and political risk, and business strategy in our evaluation. A credit limit is established for each counterparty based on the outcome of this review. We may require collateralized asset support or a prepayment to mitigate credit risk.

We monitor our ongoing credit exposure through active review of counterparty balances against contract terms and due dates. Our activities include timely account reconciliations, dispute resolution and payment confirmations. We may employ collection agencies and legal counsel to pursue recovery of defaulted receivables.

The negative economic impacts associated with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) have increased the probability that certain of our counterparties may not be able to completely fulfill their obligations in a timely manner. In response, we have enhanced our credit monitoring, sought collateral to support some transactions, and required prepayments from higher-risk counterparties.

At June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, we reported $8,062 million and $6,522 million of accounts and notes receivable, net of allowances of $46 million and $37 million, respectively. Based on an aging analysis at June 30, 2021, more than 95% of our accounts receivable were outstanding less than 60 days.

We are also exposed to credit losses from off-balance sheet exposures, such as guarantees of joint venture debt and standby letters of credit. See Note 10—Guarantees, and Note 11—Contingencies and Commitments, for more information on these off-balance sheet exposures.


8

Note 4—Inventories

Inventories consisted of the following:

 Millions of Dollars
 June 30
2021
December 31
2020
Crude oil and petroleum products$4,365 3,536 
Materials and supplies387 357 
$4,752 3,893 


Inventories valued on the last-in, first-out (LIFO) basis totaled $4,170 million and $3,368 million at June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively. The estimated excess of current replacement cost over LIFO cost of inventories amounted to approximately $5.8 billion and $2.7 billion at June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively.

Certain planned reductions in inventory that are not expected to be replaced by the end of the year cause liquidations of LIFO inventory values. LIFO inventory liquidations decreased our net income by $54 million in the second quarter of 2021, and increased our net loss by $82 million in the first six months of 2021. The impact was immaterial for the corresponding periods of 2020.


9

Note 5—Investments, Loans and Long-Term Receivables

Equity Investments

Dakota Access, LLC (Dakota Access) and Energy Transfer Crude Oil Company, LLC (ETCO)
In 2020, the trial court presiding over litigation regarding the Dakota Access Pipeline ordered the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) relating to an easement under Lake Oahe in North Dakota and later vacated the easement. Although the easement has been vacated, the USACE has indicated that it will not take action to stop pipeline operations while it proceeds with the EIS, which is expected to be completed in 2022. In May 2021, the court denied a request for an injunction to shut down the pipeline while the EIS is being prepared and in June 2021, dismissed the litigation. It is possible that the litigation could be reopened or new litigation challenging the EIS, once completed, could be filed.

Dakota Access and ETCO have guaranteed repayment of $2.5 billion aggregate principal amount of senior unsecured notes issued by a wholly owned subsidiary of Dakota Access. In addition, Phillips 66 Partners LP (Phillips 66 Partners) and its co-venturers in Dakota Access provided a Contingent Equity Contribution Undertaking (CECU) in conjunction with the notes offering. Under the CECU, the co-venturers may be severally required to make proportionate equity contributions to Dakota Access in certain circumstances relating to the litigation described above. At June 30, 2021, Phillips 66 Partners’ share of the maximum potential equity contributions under the CECU was approximately $631 million.

If the pipeline is required to cease operations, and should Dakota Access and ETCO not have sufficient funds to pay ongoing expenses, Phillips 66 Partners also could be required to support its share of the ongoing expenses, including scheduled interest payments on the notes of approximately $25 million annually, in addition to the potential obligations under the CECU.

At June 30, 2021, the aggregate book value of Phillips 66 Partners’ investments in Dakota Access and ETCO was $577 million.

CF United LLC (CF United)
We hold a 50% voting interest and a 48% economic interest in CF United, a retail marketing joint venture with operations primarily on the U.S. West Coast. CF United is considered a variable interest entity (VIE) because our co-venturer has an option to require us to purchase its interest based on a fixed multiple. The put option becomes effective July 1, 2023, and expires on March 31, 2024. The put option is viewed as a variable interest as the purchase price on the exercise date may not represent the then-current fair value of CF United. We have determined that we are not the primary beneficiary because we and our co-venturer jointly direct the activities of CF United that most significantly impact economic performance. At June 30, 2021, our maximum exposure to loss was comprised of our $267 million investment in CF United, and any potential future loss resulting from the put option should the purchase price based on a fixed multiple exceed the then-current fair value of CF United.

OnCue Holdings, LLC (OnCue)
We hold a 50% interest in OnCue, a joint venture that owns and operates retail convenience stores. We fully guaranteed various debt agreements of OnCue and our co-venturer did not participate in the guarantees. This entity is considered a VIE because our debt guarantees resulted in OnCue not being exposed to all potential losses. We have determined we are not the primary beneficiary because we do not have the power to direct the activities that most significantly impact economic performance. At June 30, 2021, our maximum exposure to loss was $184 million, which represented the book value of our investment in OnCue of $106 million and guaranteed debt obligations of $78 million.

10

Liberty Pipeline LLC (Liberty)
In the first quarter of 2021, Phillips 66 Partners’ decision to exit the Liberty Pipeline project resulted in a $198 million before-tax impairment of its investment in Liberty. The impairment is included in the “Impairments” line item on our consolidated statement of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2021. See Note 7—Impairments, and Note 13—Fair Value Measurements, for additional information regarding the impairment and the techniques used to determine the fair value of Phillips 66 Partners’ investment in Liberty. In April 2021, Phillips 66 Partners transferred its ownership interest in Liberty to its co-venturer for cash and certain pipeline assets with a value that approximated its book value of $46 million at March 31, 2021.

Related Party Loans
We and our co-venturer provided member loans to WRB Refining LP (WRB). At June 30, 2021, our 50% share of the outstanding member loan balance, including accrued interest, was $525 million.


Note 6—Properties, Plants and Equipment

Our gross investment in properties, plants and equipment (PP&E) and the associated accumulated depreciation and amortization (Accum. D&A) balances were as follows:

 Millions of Dollars
 June 30, 2021December 31, 2020
 Gross
PP&E
Accum.
D&A
  Net
PP&E
Gross
PP&E
Accum.
D&A
Net
PP&E
Midstream$12,289 2,885 9,404 12,313 2,815 9,498 
Chemicals0 0 0 
Refining25,293 12,569 12,724 24,647 12,019 12,628 
Marketing and Specialties1,805 1,023 782 1,815 1,007 808 
Corporate and Other1,485 707 778 1,448 666 782 
$40,872 17,184 23,688 40,223 16,507 23,716 


11

Note 7—Impairments

Millions of Dollars
 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021202020212020
Midstream$0 198 1,161 
Refining0 0 1,845 
Total impairments$0 198 3,006 


Equity Investments

Liberty
In the first quarter of 2021, Phillips 66 Partners decided to exit the Liberty Pipeline project, which had previously been deferred due to the challenging business environment caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, Phillips 66 Partners recorded a $198 million before-tax impairment to reduce the book value of its investment in Liberty at March 31, 2021, to estimated fair value.

DCP Midstream, LLC (DCP Midstream)
In the first quarter of 2020, the market value of DCP Partners, LP (DCP Partners) common units declined by approximately 85%. As a result, at March 31, 2020, the fair value of our investment in DCP Midstream was significantly lower than its book value. We concluded this difference was not temporary primarily due to its magnitude, and we recorded a $1,161 million before-tax impairment of our investment in the first quarter of 2020.

Goodwill
Our stock price declined significantly in the first quarter of 2020, mainly due to the disruption in global commodity and equity markets related to the COVID-19 pandemic. We assessed our goodwill for impairment due to the decline in our market capitalization and concluded that the carrying value of our Refining reporting unit at March 31, 2020, was greater than its fair value by an amount in excess of its goodwill balance. Accordingly, we recorded a before-tax goodwill impairment charge of $1,845 million in our Refining segment during the first quarter of 2020.

These impairment charges are included within the “Impairments” line item on our consolidated statement of operations. See Note 13—Fair Value Measurements, for additional information on the determination of fair value used to record these impairments.

Outlook
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to disrupt economic activities globally. Reduced demand for refined petroleum products resulted in low refining margins and decreased volumes through refineries and logistics infrastructure in 2020. Since the beginning of 2021, demand for refined petroleum products has started to recover following the administration of COVID-19 vaccines and the easing of pandemic restrictions. Consequently, refining margins have improved, as has volume throughput. However, refining profitability remains challenged. The depth and duration of the economic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic remain uncertain and we continue to monitor our asset and investment portfolio. The consequences of the sustained disruption of economic activities by the pandemic may include additional asset impairments and portfolio rationalization in the future.


12

Note 8—Earnings (Loss) Per Share

The numerator of basic earnings (loss) per share (EPS) is net income (loss) attributable to Phillips 66, adjusted for noncancelable dividends paid on unvested share-based employee awards during the vesting period (participating securities) and the premium paid for the repurchase of noncontrolling interests. The denominator of basic EPS is the sum of the daily weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the periods presented and fully vested stock and unit awards that have not yet been issued as common stock. The numerator of diluted EPS is also based on net income (loss) attributable to Phillips 66, which is reduced by dividend equivalents paid on participating securities for which the dividends are more dilutive than the participation of the awards in the earnings (loss) of the periods presented, and the premium paid for the repurchase of noncontrolling interests. To the extent unvested stock, unit or option awards and vested unexercised stock options are dilutive, they are included with the weighted-average common shares outstanding in the denominator. Treasury stock is excluded from the denominator in both basic and diluted EPS.

 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021202020212020
BasicDilutedBasicDilutedBasicDilutedBasicDiluted
Amounts Attributed to Phillips 66 Common Stockholders (millions):
Net income (loss) attributable to Phillips 66$296 296 (141)(141)(358)(358)(2,637)(2,637)
Income allocated to participating securities(3)(3)(2)(2)(6)(6)(4)(4)
Premium paid for the repurchase of noncontrolling interests(2)(2)(2)(2)
Net income (loss) available to common stockholders$291 291 (143)(143)(366)(366)(2,641)(2,641)
Weighted-average common shares outstanding (thousands):
437,909 439,940 436,688 438,756 437,639 439,722 437,851 440,050 
Effect of share-based compensation2,031 456 2,068 2,083 0 2,199 
Weighted-average common shares
    outstanding—EPS
439,940 440,396 438,756 438,756 439,722 439,722 440,050 440,050 
Earnings (Loss) Per Share of Common Stock (dollars)
$0.66 0.66 (0.33)(0.33)(0.83)(0.83)(6.00)(6.00)


Note 9—Debt

2021 Debt Issuances and Repayments
At June 30, 2021, borrowings of $15 million were outstanding and $1 million in letters of credit had been drawn under Phillips 66 Partners’ $750 million revolving credit facility, compared with outstanding borrowings of $415 million and $1 million in letters of credit drawn under the facility at December 31, 2020.

In April 2021, Phillips 66 Partners entered into a $450 million term loan agreement and borrowed the full amount. The term loan agreement has a maturity date of April 5, 2022, and the outstanding borrowings can be repaid at any time and from time to time, in whole or in part, without premium or penalty. Borrowings bear interest at a floating rate based on either a Eurodollar rate or a reference rate, plus a margin of 0.875%. Proceeds were primarily used to repay amounts borrowed under Phillips 66 Partners’ $750 million revolving credit facility.

In April 2021, Phillips 66 Partners repaid $50 million of its tax-exempt bonds upon maturity.

In February 2021, Phillips 66 repaid $500 million outstanding principal balance of its floating-rate senior notes due February 2021.


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2020 Debt Issuances and Repayments

Senior Unsecured Notes
On June 10, 2020, Phillips 66 closed its public offering of $1 billion aggregate principal amount of senior unsecured notes consisting of:

$150 million aggregate principal amount of 3.850% Senior Notes due 2025.
$850 million aggregate principal amount of 2.150% Senior Notes due 2030.

On April 9, 2020, Phillips 66 closed its public offering of $1 billion aggregate principal amount of senior unsecured notes consisting of:

$500 million aggregate principal amount of 3.700% Senior Notes due 2023.
$500 million aggregate principal amount of 3.850% Senior Notes due 2025.

Interest on the Senior Notes due 2023 is payable semiannually on April 6 and October 6 of each year, commencing on October 6, 2020. The Senior Notes due 2025 issued on June 10, 2020, constitute a further issuance of the Senior Notes due 2025 originally issued on April 9, 2020. The $650 million in aggregate principal amount of Senior Notes due 2025 is treated as a single class of debt securities. Interest on the Senior Notes due 2025 is payable semiannually on April 9 and October 9 of each year, commencing on October 9, 2020. Interest on the Senior Notes due 2030 is payable semiannually on June 15 and December 15 of each year, commencing on December 15, 2020.

Proceeds received from the public offerings of senior unsecured notes on June 10, 2020, and April 9, 2020, were $1,008 million exclusive of accrued interest received, and $993 million, respectively, net of underwriters’ discounts or premiums and commissions, as well as debt issuance costs. These proceeds were used for general corporate purposes.

Term Loan Facility
On March 19, 2020, Phillips 66 entered into a $1 billion 364-day delayed draw term loan agreement (the Facility) and borrowed $1 billion under the Facility shortly thereafter. On April 6, 2020, Phillips 66 increased the size of the Facility to $2 billion, and in June 2020, the Facility was amended to extend the commitment period to September 19, 2020. We did not draw additional amounts under the Facility before the end of the commitment period or further extend the commitment period. In November 2020, we repaid $500 million of borrowings outstanding under the Facility, and the Facility was amended to extend the maturity date of the remaining $500 million outstanding borrowings from March 18, 2021, to November 20, 2023. Borrowings under the Facility bear interest at a floating rate based on either a Eurodollar rate or a reference rate, plus a margin determined by the credit rating of Phillips 66’s senior unsecured long-term debt. Phillips 66 used the proceeds for general corporate purposes.

Other Debt Repayments
In April 2020, Phillips 66 repaid $300 million outstanding principal balance of its floating-rate notes due April 2020 and the $200 million outstanding principal balance of its term loan facility due April 2020. Also in April 2020, Phillips 66 Partners repaid $25 million of its tax-exempt bonds upon maturity.


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Note 10—Guarantees

At June 30, 2021, we were liable for certain contingent obligations under various contractual arrangements as described below. We recognize a liability for the fair value of our obligation as a guarantor for newly issued or modified guarantees. Unless the carrying amount of the liability is noted below, we have not recognized a liability either because the guarantees were issued prior to December 31, 2002, or because the fair value of the obligation is immaterial. In addition, unless otherwise stated, we are not currently performing with any significance under the guarantees and expect future performance to be either immaterial or have only a remote chance of occurrence.

Lease Residual Value Guarantees
Under the operating lease agreement for our headquarters facility in Houston, Texas, we have the option, at the end of the lease term in September 2025, to request to renew the lease, purchase the facility or assist the lessor in marketing it for resale. We have a residual value guarantee associated with the operating lease agreement with a maximum potential future exposure of $514 million at June 30, 2021. We also have residual value guarantees associated with railcar and airplane leases with maximum potential future exposures totaling $209 million. These leases have remaining terms of up to nine years.

Guarantees of Joint Venture and Other Obligations
In March 2019, Phillips 66 Partners and its co-venturers in Dakota Access provided a CECU in conjunction with a senior unsecured notes offering. See Note 5—Investments, Loans and Long-Term Receivables, for additional information on Dakota Access and the CECU.

At June 30, 2021, we also had other guarantees outstanding primarily for our portion of certain joint venture debt, which have remaining terms of up to seven years. The maximum potential future exposures under these guarantees were approximately $148 million. Payment would be required if a joint venture defaults on its obligations.

Indemnifications
Over the years, we have entered into various agreements to sell ownership interests in certain corporations, joint ventures and assets that gave rise to indemnification. Agreements associated with these sales include indemnifications for taxes, litigation, environmental liabilities, permits and licenses, employee claims, and real estate tenant defaults. The provisions of these indemnifications vary greatly. The majority of these indemnifications are related to environmental issues, which generally have indefinite terms and potentially unlimited exposure. At June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, the carrying amount of recorded indemnifications was $149 million and $145 million, respectively.

We amortize the indemnification liability over the relevant time period, if one exists, based on the facts and circumstances surrounding each type of indemnity. In cases where the indemnification term is indefinite, we will reverse the liability when we have information to support the reversal. Although it is reasonably possible future payments may exceed amounts recorded, due to the nature of the indemnifications, it is not possible to make a reasonable estimate of the maximum potential amount of future payments. At June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, environmental accruals for known contamination of $108 million and $104 million, respectively, were included in the carrying amount of the recorded indemnifications noted above. These environmental accruals were primarily included in the “Asset retirement obligations and accrued environmental costs” line item on our consolidated balance sheet. For additional information about environmental liabilities, see Note 11—Contingencies and Commitments.

Indemnification and Release Agreement
In 2012, in connection with our separation from ConocoPhillips, we entered into an Indemnification and Release Agreement. This agreement governs the treatment between ConocoPhillips and us of matters relating to indemnification, insurance, litigation responsibility and management, and litigation document sharing and cooperation arising in connection with the separation. Generally, the agreement provides for cross indemnities principally designed to place financial responsibility for the obligations and liabilities of our business with us and financial responsibility for the obligations and liabilities of ConocoPhillips’ business with ConocoPhillips. The agreement also establishes procedures for handling claims subject to indemnification and related matters.



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Note 11—Contingencies and Commitments

A number of lawsuits involving a variety of claims that arose in the ordinary course of business have been filed against us or are subject to indemnifications provided by us. We also may be required to remove or mitigate the effects on the environment of the placement, storage, disposal or release of certain chemical, mineral and petroleum substances at various active and inactive sites. We regularly assess the need for financial recognition or disclosure of these contingencies. In the case of all known contingencies (other than those related to income taxes), we accrue a liability when the loss is probable and the amount is reasonably estimable. If a range of amounts can be reasonably estimated and no amount within the range is a better estimate than any other amount, then the minimum of the range is accrued. We do not reduce these liabilities for potential insurance or third-party recoveries. If applicable, we accrue receivables for probable insurance or other third-party recoveries. In the case of income tax-related contingencies, we use a cumulative probability-weighted loss accrual in cases where sustaining a tax position is uncertain.

Based on currently available information, we believe it is remote that future costs related to known contingent liability exposures will exceed current accruals by an amount that would have a material adverse impact on our consolidated financial statements. As we learn new facts concerning contingencies, we reassess our position both with respect to accrued liabilities and other potential exposures. Estimates particularly sensitive to future changes include contingent liabilities recorded for environmental remediation, tax and legal matters. Estimated future environmental remediation costs are subject to change due to such factors as the uncertain magnitude of cleanup costs, the unknown time and extent of such remedial actions that may be required, and the determination of our liability in proportion to that of other potentially responsible parties. Estimated future costs related to tax and legal matters are subject to change as events evolve and as additional information becomes available during the administrative and litigation processes.

Environmental
We are subject to international, federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations. When we prepare our consolidated financial statements, we record accruals for environmental liabilities based on management’s best estimates, using information available at the time. We measure estimates and base contingent liabilities on currently available facts, existing technology and presently enacted laws and regulations, taking into account stakeholder and business considerations. When measuring contingent environmental liabilities, we also consider our prior experience in remediation of contaminated sites, other companies’ cleanup experience, and data released by the EPA or other organizations. We consider unasserted claims in our determination of environmental liabilities, and we accrue them in the period they are both probable and reasonably estimable.

Although liability for environmental remediation costs is generally joint and several for federal sites and frequently so for state sites, we are usually only one of many companies alleged to have liability at a particular site. Due to such joint and several liabilities, we could be responsible for all cleanup costs related to any site at which we have been designated as a potentially responsible party. We have been successful to date in sharing cleanup costs with other financially sound companies. Many of the sites for which we are potentially responsible are still under investigation by the EPA or the state agencies concerned. Prior to actual cleanup, those potentially responsible normally assess the site conditions, apportion responsibility and determine the appropriate remediation. In some instances, we may have no liability or may attain a settlement of liability. Where it appears that other potentially responsible parties may be financially unable to bear their proportional share, we consider this inability in estimating our potential liability, and we adjust our accruals accordingly. As a result of various acquisitions in the past, we assumed certain environmental obligations. Some of these environmental obligations are mitigated by indemnifications made by others for our benefit, although some of the indemnifications are subject to dollar and time limits.

We are currently participating in environmental assessments and cleanups at numerous federal Superfund and comparable state sites. After an assessment of environmental exposures for cleanup and other costs, we make accruals on an undiscounted basis (except those pertaining to sites acquired in a business combination, which we record on a discounted basis) for planned investigation and remediation activities for sites where it is probable future costs will be incurred and these costs can be reasonably estimated. At June 30, 2021, our total environmental accruals were $455 million, compared with $427 million at December 31, 2020. We expect to incur a substantial amount of these expenditures within the next 30 years. We have not reduced these accruals for possible insurance recoveries. In the future, we may be involved in additional environmental assessments, cleanups and proceedings.

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Legal Proceedings
Our legal organization applies its knowledge, experience and professional judgment to the specific characteristics of our cases, employing a litigation management process to manage and monitor the legal proceedings against us. Our process facilitates the early evaluation and quantification of potential exposures in individual cases and enables the tracking of those cases that have been scheduled for trial and/or mediation. Based on professional judgment and experience in using these litigation management tools and available information about current developments in all our cases, our legal organization regularly assesses the adequacy of current accruals and determines if adjustment of existing accruals, or establishment of new accruals, is required.

Other Contingencies
We have contingent liabilities resulting from throughput agreements with pipeline and processing companies not associated with financing arrangements. Under these agreements, we may be required to provide any such company with additional funds through advances and penalties for fees related to throughput capacity not utilized.

At June 30, 2021, we had performance obligations secured by letters of credit and bank guarantees of $883 million related to various purchase and other commitments incident to the ordinary conduct of business.


Note 12—Derivatives and Financial Instruments

Derivative Instruments
We use financial and commodity-based derivative contracts to manage exposures to fluctuations in commodity prices, interest rates and foreign currency exchange rates, or to capture market opportunities. Because we do not apply hedge accounting for commodity derivative contracts, all realized and unrealized gains and losses from commodity derivative contracts are recognized in our consolidated statement of operations. Gains and losses from derivative contracts held for trading not directly related to our physical business are reported net in the “Other income” line item on our consolidated statement of operations. Cash flows from all our derivative activity for the periods presented appear in the operating section on our consolidated statement of cash flows.

Purchase and sales contracts with firm minimum notional volumes for commodities that are readily convertible to cash are recorded on our consolidated balance sheet as derivatives unless the contracts are eligible for, and we elect, the normal purchases and normal sales exception, whereby the contracts are recorded on an accrual basis. We generally apply the normal purchases and normal sales exception to eligible crude oil, refined petroleum product, NGL, natural gas, renewable feedstock, and power commodity contracts to purchase or sell quantities we expect to use or sell in the normal course of business. All other derivative instruments are recorded at fair value on our consolidated balance sheet. For further information on the fair value of derivatives, see Note 13—Fair Value Measurements.

Commodity Derivative Contracts—We sell into or receive supply from the worldwide crude oil, refined petroleum product, NGL, natural gas, renewable feedstock, and electric power markets, exposing our revenues, purchases, cost of operating activities and cash flows to fluctuations in the prices for these commodities. Generally, our policy is to remain exposed to the market prices of commodities; however, we use futures, forwards, swaps and options in various markets to balance physical systems, meet customer needs, manage price exposures on specific transactions, and do a limited amount of trading not directly related to our physical business, all of which may reduce our exposure to fluctuations in market prices. We also use the market knowledge gained from these activities to capture market opportunities such as moving physical commodities to more profitable locations, storing commodities to capture seasonal or time premiums, and blending commodities to capture quality upgrades.

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The following table indicates the consolidated balance sheet line items that include the fair values of commodity derivative assets and liabilities. The balances in the following table are presented on a gross basis, before the effects of counterparty and collateral netting. However, we have elected to present our commodity derivative assets and liabilities with the same counterparty on a net basis on our consolidated balance sheet when the legal right of offset exists.

 Millions of Dollars
 June 30, 2021December 31, 2020
Commodity DerivativesEffect of Collateral NettingNet Carrying Value Presented on the Balance SheetCommodity DerivativesEffect of Collateral NettingNet Carrying Value Presented on the Balance Sheet
 AssetsLiabilitiesAssetsLiabilities
Assets
Prepaid expenses and other current assets$18 0 0 18 13 13 
Other assets6 (1)0 5 (4)
Liabilities
Other accruals1,703 (1,886)152 (31)665 (721)46 (10)
Other liabilities and deferred credits0 (1)0 (1)
Total$1,727 (1,888)152 (9)683 (725)46 

At June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, there was no material cash collateral received or paid that was not offset on our consolidated balance sheet.

The realized and unrealized gains (losses) incurred from commodity derivatives, and the line items where they appear on our consolidated statement of operations, were:
 
 Millions of Dollars
 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021 2020 2021 2020 
Sales and other operating revenues$(193)(180)(316)499 
Other income18 19 
Purchased crude oil and products(213)(124)(348)317 
Net gain (loss) from commodity derivative activity$(388)(298)(645)825 


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The following table summarizes our material net exposures resulting from outstanding commodity derivative contracts. These financial and physical derivative contracts are primarily used to manage price exposure on our underlying operations. The underlying exposures may be from nonderivative positions such as inventory volumes. Financial derivative contracts may also offset physical derivative contracts, such as forward purchase and sales contracts. The percentage of our derivative contract volumes expiring within the next 12 months was more than 95% at June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020.

 Open Position
Long / (Short)
 June 30
2021
December 31
2020
Commodity
Crude oil, refined petroleum products, NGL and renewable feedstocks (millions of barrels)
(35)(13)

Interest Rate Derivative Contracts—In 2016, we entered into interest rate swaps to hedge the variability of lease payments on our headquarters facility. These monthly lease payments vary based on monthly changes in the one-month London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) and changes, if any, in our credit rating. The pay-fixed, receive-floating interest rate swaps have an aggregate notional value of $650 million and ended in April 2021. These swaps were designated as cash flow hedges. We reported the mark-to-market gains or losses on our interest rate swaps designated as highly effective cash flow hedges as a component of other comprehensive income (loss), and reclassified such gains and losses into earnings (loss) in the same period during which the hedged transaction affected earnings (loss). Net realized gains and losses from settlements of the swaps were immaterial for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020.

Credit Risk from Derivative Instruments
The credit risk from our derivative contracts, such as forwards and swaps, derives from the counterparty to the transaction. Individual counterparty exposure is managed within predetermined credit limits and includes the use of cash-call margins when appropriate, thereby reducing the risk of significant nonperformance. We also use futures, swaps and option contracts that have a negligible credit risk because these trades are cleared with an exchange clearinghouse and subject to mandatory margin requirements, typically on a daily basis, until settled.

Certain of our derivative instruments contain provisions that require us to post collateral if the derivative exposure exceeds a threshold amount. We have contracts with fixed threshold amounts and other contracts with variable threshold amounts that are contingent on our credit rating. The variable threshold amounts typically decline for lower credit ratings, while both the variable and fixed threshold amounts typically revert to zero if our credit ratings fall below investment grade. Cash is the primary collateral in all contracts; however, many contracts also permit us to post letters of credit as collateral.

The aggregate fair values of all derivative instruments with such credit-risk-related contingent features that were in a liability position were immaterial at June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020.


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Note 13—Fair Value Measurements

Recurring Fair Value Measurements
We carry certain assets and liabilities at fair value, which we measure at the reporting date using the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability (i.e., an exit price), and disclose the quality of these fair values based on the valuation inputs used in these measurements under the following hierarchy:

Level 1: Fair value measured with unadjusted quoted prices from an active market for identical assets or liabilities.
Level 2: Fair value measured either with: (1) adjusted quoted prices from an active market for similar assets or liabilities; or (2) other valuation inputs that are directly or indirectly observable.
Level 3: Fair value measured with unobservable inputs that are significant to the measurement.

We classify the fair value of an asset or liability based on the significance of its observable or unobservable inputs to the measurement. However, the fair value of an asset or liability initially reported as Level 3 will be subsequently reported as Level 2 if the unobservable inputs become inconsequential to its measurement or corroborating market data becomes available. Conversely, an asset or liability initially reported as Level 2 will be subsequently reported as Level 3 if corroborating market data becomes unavailable.

We used the following methods and assumptions to estimate the fair value of financial instruments:

Cash and cash equivalents—The carrying amount reported on our consolidated balance sheet approximates fair value.
Accounts and notes receivable—The carrying amount reported on our consolidated balance sheet approximates fair value.
Derivative instruments—We fair value our exchange-traded contracts based on quoted market prices obtained from the New York Mercantile Exchange, the Intercontinental Exchange or other exchanges, and classify them as Level 1 in the fair value hierarchy. When exchange-cleared contracts lack sufficient liquidity, or are valued using either adjusted exchange-provided prices or nonexchange quotes, we classify those contracts as Level 2.
Physical commodity forward purchase and sales contracts and over-the-counter (OTC) financial swaps are generally valued using forward quotes provided by brokers and price index developers, such as Platts and Oil Price Information Service. We corroborate these quotes with market data and classify the resulting fair values as Level 2. When forward market prices are not available, we estimate fair value using the forward price of a similar commodity, adjusted for the difference in quality or location. In certain less liquid markets or for longer-term contracts, forward prices are not as readily available. In these circumstances, physical commodity purchase and sales contracts and OTC swaps are valued using internally developed methodologies that consider historical relationships among various commodities that result in management’s best estimate of fair value. We classify these contracts as Level 3. Physical and OTC commodity options are valued using industry-standard models that consider various assumptions, including quoted forward prices for commodities, time value, volatility factors and contractual prices for the underlying instruments, as well as other relevant economic measures. The degree to which these inputs are observable in the forward markets determines whether the options are classified as Level 2 or 3. We use a midmarket pricing convention (the midpoint between bid and ask prices). When appropriate, valuations are adjusted to reflect credit considerations, generally based on available market evidence.
We determine the fair value of our interest rate swaps based on observable market valuations for interest rate swaps that have notional amounts, terms and pay and reset frequencies similar to ours.
Rabbi trust assets—These deferred compensation investments are measured at fair value using unadjusted quoted prices available from national securities exchanges and are therefore categorized as Level 1 in the fair value hierarchy.
Debt—The carrying amount of our floating-rate debt approximates fair value. The fair value of our fixed-rate debt is estimated based on observable market prices.

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The following tables display the fair value hierarchy for our financial assets and liabilities either accounted for or disclosed at fair value on a recurring basis. These values are determined by treating each contract as the fundamental unit of account; therefore, derivative assets and liabilities with the same counterparty are shown on a gross basis in the hierarchy sections of these tables, before the effects of counterparty and collateral netting. The following tables also reflect the effect of netting derivative assets and liabilities with the same counterparty for which we have the legal right of offset and collateral netting.

The carrying values and fair values by hierarchy of our financial assets and liabilities, either carried or disclosed at fair value, including any effects of counterparty and collateral netting, were:

 Millions of Dollars
 June 30, 2021
Fair Value HierarchyTotal Fair Value of Gross Assets & LiabilitiesEffect of Counterparty NettingEffect of Collateral NettingDifference in Carrying Value and Fair ValueNet Carrying Value Presented on the Balance Sheet
 Level 1Level 2Level 3
Commodity Derivative Assets
Exchange-cleared instruments$878 832 0 1,710 (1,704)0 0 6 
Physical forward contracts0 17 0 17 0 0 0 17 
Rabbi trust assets155 0 0 155 N/AN/A0 155 
$1,033 849 0 1,882 (1,704)0 0 178 
Commodity Derivative Liabilities
Exchange-cleared instruments$1,040 816 0 1,856 (1,704)(152)0 0 
Physical forward contracts0 32 0 32 0 0 0 32 
Floating-rate debt0 1,440 0 1,440 N/AN/A0 1,440 
Fixed-rate debt, excluding finance leases0 15,546 0 15,546 N/AN/A(1,870)13,676 
$1,040 17,834 0 18,874 (1,704)(152)(1,870)15,148 


 Millions of Dollars
 December 31, 2020
Fair Value HierarchyTotal Fair Value of Gross Assets & LiabilitiesEffect of Counterparty NettingEffect of Collateral NettingDifference in Carrying Value and Fair ValueNet Carrying Value Presented on the Balance Sheet
 Level 1Level 2Level 3
Commodity Derivative Assets
Exchange-cleared instruments$314 356 670 (669)
Physical forward contracts13 13 13 
Rabbi trust assets143 143 N/AN/A143 
$457 369 826 (669)157 
Commodity Derivative Liabilities
Exchange-cleared instruments$351 364 715 (669)(46)
Physical forward contracts10 10 10 
Interest-rate derivatives
Floating-rate debt1,940 1,940 N/AN/A1,940 
Fixed-rate debt, excluding finance leases15,597 15,597 N/AN/A(1,927)13,670 
$351 17,914 18,265 (669)(46)(1,927)15,623 


The rabbi trust assets are recorded in the “Investments and long-term receivables” line item, and floating-rate and fixed-rate debt are recorded in the “Short-term debt” and “Long-term debt” line items on our consolidated balance sheet. See Note 12—Derivatives and Financial Instruments, for information regarding where the assets and liabilities related to our commodity derivatives are recorded on our consolidated balance sheet.

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Nonrecurring Fair Value Measurements
Equity Investments
In the first quarter of 2021, Phillips 66 Partners wrote down the book value of its investment in Liberty to estimated fair value using a Level 3 nonrecurring fair value measurement. This nonrecurring measurement was based on the estimated fair value of Phillip 66 Partners’ share of the joint venture’s pipeline assets and net working capital. See Note 5—Investments, Loans and Long-Term Receivables, for more information regarding Phillips 66 Partners’ transfer of its ownership in Liberty to its co-venturer in April 2021.

In the first quarter of 2020, the nonrecurring fair value measurement used to record an impairment of our DCP Midstream investment was the fair value of our share of DCP Midstream’s limited partner interest in DCP Partners, which was estimated based on average market prices of DCP Partners common units for a multi-day trading period encompassing March 31, 2020. This valuation resulted in a Level 2 nonrecurring fair value measurement.

Goodwill
The carrying value of the Refining reporting unit’s goodwill was remeasured to fair value on a nonrecurring basis in the first quarter of 2020.  The fair value of the Refining reporting unit was calculated by weighting the results from the income approach and the market approach.  The income approach used a discounted cash flow model that included various observable and nonobservable inputs, such as prices, volumes, expenses, capital expenditures, discount rates and projected long-term growth rates and terminal values. The market approach used peer company enterprise values relative to current and future net income (loss) before net interest expense, income taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) projections to arrive at an average multiple.  This multiple was applied to the reporting unit’s current and projected EBITDA, with consideration for an estimated market participant acquisition premium.  The resulting Level 3 fair value estimate was less than the Refining reporting unit’s carrying value by an amount that exceeded the existing goodwill balance of the reporting unit.  As a result, the Refining reporting unit’s goodwill was impaired to 0. As part of our impairment analysis, the fair value of all reporting units was reconciled to the company’s market capitalization.

See Note 7—Impairments, for additional information on the above impairments.


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Note 14—Pension and Postretirement Plans

The components of net periodic benefit cost for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, were as follows:
 Millions of Dollars
 Pension BenefitsOther Benefits
 202120202021 2020 
U.S.Int’l.U.S.Int’l.
Components of Net Periodic Benefit Cost
Three Months Ended June 30
Service cost$37 8 34 2 
Interest cost20 4 24 1 
Expected return on plan assets(41)(14)(42)(12)0 
Recognized net actuarial loss (gain)14 6 15 (1)
Settlements29 0 39 0 
Net periodic benefit cost*$59 4 70 2 
Six Months Ended June 30
Service cost$74 17 67 14 3 
Interest cost40 9 49 11 2 
Expected return on plan assets(82)(29)(83)(25)0 
Amortization of prior service credit0 0 (1)(1)
Recognized net actuarial loss (gain)29 12 29 (1)
Settlements29 0 39 0 
Net periodic benefit cost*$90 9 101 3 
* Included in the “Operating expenses” and “Selling, general and administrative expenses” line items on our consolidated statement of operations.


During the six months ended June 30, 2021, we contributed $10 million to our U.S. pension and other postretirement benefit plans and $13 million to our international pension plans. We currently expect to make additional contributions of approximately $35 million to our U.S. pension and other postretirement benefit plans and $15 million to our international pension plans during the remainder of 2021.

During the six months ended June 30, 2021, our lump-sum benefit payments exceeded the sum of service and interest costs for the plan year for our U.S. qualified and non-qualified pension plans. As a result, we recognized a portion of prior actuarial losses, or pension settlement expense, of $27 million related to our U.S. qualified pension plan and $2 million related to our U.S. non-qualified pension plan. In conjunction with the recognition of pension settlement expense, the plan assets and projected benefit obligation of our U.S. qualified pension plan were remeasured as of June 30, 2021. At the remeasurement date, the net pension liability decreased by $210 million resulting in a corresponding increase to other comprehensive income for the second quarter of 2021. The decrease in the net pension liability was primarily due to an increase in the discount rate used to value the projected benefit obligation from 2.5% to 2.9% and an increase in the fair value of plan assets from December 31, 2020, to June 30, 2021.


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Note 15—Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss

Changes in the balances of each component of accumulated other comprehensive loss were as follows:

 Millions of Dollars
 Defined Benefit PlansForeign Currency TranslationHedgingAccumulated Other Comprehensive Loss
December 31, 2020$(809)25 (5)(789)
Other comprehensive income before reclassifications181 4 1 186 
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss
Defined benefit plans*
Amortization of net actuarial loss, prior service credit and settlements53   53 
Foreign currency translation 0  0 
Hedging  1 1 
Net current period other comprehensive income234 4 2 240 
June 30, 2021$(575)29 (3)(549)
December 31, 2019$(656)(131)(1)(788)
Other comprehensive loss before reclassifications(223)(195)(8)(426)
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss
Defined benefit plans*
Amortization of net actuarial loss, prior service credit and settlements60 — — 60 
Foreign currency translation— — 
Hedging— — 
Net current period other comprehensive loss(163)(195)(7)(365)
Other
June 30, 2020$(819)(321)(8)(1,148)
* Included in the computation of net periodic benefit cost. See Note 14—Pension and Postretirement Plans, for additional information.

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Note 16—Related Party Transactions

Significant transactions with related parties were:

 Millions of Dollars
 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021 2020 2021 2020 
Operating revenues and other income (a)$959 353 1,729 887 
Purchases (b)3,452 1,130 5,809 3,256 
Operating expenses and selling, general and administrative expenses (c)67 55 135 106 

(a)We sold NGL, other petrochemical feedstocks and solvents to Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LLC (CPChem), NGL and certain feedstocks to DCP Midstream, gas oil and hydrogen feedstocks to Excel Paralubes (Excel), and refined petroleum products to several of our equity affiliates in the Marketing and Specialties segment, including OnCue and CF United. We also sold certain feedstocks and intermediate products to WRB and acted as an agent for WRB in supplying crude oil and other feedstocks for a fee. In addition, we charged several of our equity affiliates, including CPChem, for the use of common facilities, such as steam generators, waste and water treaters and warehouse facilities.

(b)We purchased crude oil, refined petroleum products, NGL and solvents from WRB. We also purchased natural gas and NGL from DCP Midstream and CPChem, as well as other feedstocks from various equity affiliates, for use in our refinery and fractionation processes. In addition, we purchased base oils and fuel products from Excel for use in our specialty and refining businesses. We paid NGL fractionation fees to CPChem. We also paid fees to various pipeline equity affiliates for transporting crude oil, refined petroleum products and NGL.

(c)We paid consignment fees to CF United, and utility and processing fees to various equity affiliates.


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Note 17—Segment Disclosures and Related Information

Our operating segments are:

1)Midstream—Provides crude oil and refined petroleum product transportation, terminaling and processing services, as well as natural gas and NGL transportation, storage, fractionation, processing, and marketing services, mainly in the United States. The Midstream segment includes our master limited partnership (MLP), Phillips 66 Partners, as well as our 50% equity investment in DCP Midstream.

2)Chemicals—Consists of our 50% equity investment in CPChem, which manufactures and markets petrochemicals and plastics on a worldwide basis.

3)Refining—Refines crude oil and other feedstocks into petroleum products, such as gasoline, distillates and aviation fuels, at 13 refineries in the United States and Europe.

4)Marketing and Specialties—Purchases for resale and markets refined petroleum products, mainly in the United States and Europe. In addition, this segment includes the manufacturing and marketing of specialty products.

Corporate and Other includes general corporate overhead, interest expense, our investment in new technologies, and various other corporate activities. Corporate assets include all cash, cash equivalents and income tax-related assets.

Intersegment sales are at prices that we believe approximate market.

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Analysis of Results by Operating Segment

 Millions of Dollars
 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021 2020 2021 2020 
Sales and Other Operating Revenues*
Midstream
Total sales$2,598 1,100 4,982 2,638 
Intersegment eliminations(709)(382)(1,336)(877)
Total Midstream1,889 718 3,646 1,761 
Chemicals1 2 
Refining
Total sales18,680 7,352 33,733 21,133 
Intersegment eliminations(11,517)(4,437)(19,973)(12,070)
Total Refining7,163 2,915 13,760 9,063 
Marketing and Specialties
Total sales18,504 7,493 32,102 21,742 
Intersegment eliminations(560)(220)(893)(790)
Total Marketing and Specialties17,944 7,273 31,209 20,952 
Corporate and Other5 12 13 
Consolidated sales and other operating revenues$27,002 10,913 48,629 31,791 
* See Note 2—Sales and Other Operating Revenues, for further details on our disaggregated sales and other operating revenues.
Income (Loss) Before Income Taxes
Midstream$312 324 388 (378)
Chemicals623 42 777 211 
Refining(729)(878)(1,769)(3,139)
Marketing and Specialties476 286 766 799 
Corporate and Other(246)(219)(497)(416)
Consolidated income (loss) before income taxes$436 (445)(335)(2,923)


 Millions of Dollars
 June 30
2021
December 31
2020
Total Assets
Midstream$15,190 15,596 
Chemicals6,454 6,183 
Refining22,437 20,404 
Marketing and Specialties8,672 7,180 
Corporate and Other4,224 5,358 
Consolidated total assets$56,977 54,721 

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Note 18—Income Taxes

Our effective income tax rate for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, was 14% and 21%, respectively, compared with 85% and 15%, respectively, for the corresponding periods of 2020. The decrease in our effective tax rate for the three months ended June 30, 2021, was primarily attributable to an adjustment required in the second quarter of 2020 related to a change in methodology used to calculate the provision for income taxes based on actual results and the ability provided under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) to carry back a 2020 net operating loss to a year with a 35% income tax rate. Also contributing to the decrease were enacted income tax rate changes and income attributable to noncontrolling interests, partially offset by state income taxes. The increase in our effective tax rate for the six months ended June 30, 2021, was primarily due to the impact of a prior-year nondeductible goodwill impairment and enacted income tax rate changes, partially offset by the ability provided under the CARES Act to carry back a 2020 net operating loss to a year with a 35% income tax rate, income attributable to noncontrolling interests and foreign operations.

The effective income tax rate for the three months ended June 30, 2021, varied from the U.S. federal statutory income tax rate of 21%, primarily due to income attributable to noncontrolling interests, foreign operations and enacted income tax rate changes.

We received a U.S. federal income tax refund of $1.1 billion in the second quarter of 2021. An income tax receivable of $657 million is included in the “Accounts and notes receivable” line item on our consolidated balance sheet as of June 30, 2021.


Note 19—Phillips 66 Partners LP

Phillips 66 Partners, headquartered in Houston, Texas, is a publicly traded MLP formed in 2013 to own, operate, develop and acquire primarily fee-based midstream assets. Phillips 66 Partners’ operations currently consist of crude oil, refined petroleum product and NGL transportation, fractionation, processing, terminaling, and storage assets.

We consolidate Phillips 66 Partners because we determined it is a VIE of which we are the primary beneficiary. As general partner of Phillips 66 Partners, we have the ability to control its financial interests, as well as the ability to direct the activities that most significantly impact its economic performance. As a result of this consolidation, the public common and perpetual convertible preferred unitholders’ ownership interests in Phillips 66 Partners are reflected as noncontrolling interests in our financial statements. In June 2021, Phillips 66 Partners repurchased 368,528 of its outstanding perpetual convertible preferred units for $24 million in cash. Upon the repurchase, these preferred units were canceled and are no longer outstanding. At June 30, 2021, we owned 170 million Phillips 66 Partners common units, representing a 74% limited partner interest in Phillips 66 Partners, while the public owned a 26% limited partner interest and 13.5 million perpetual convertible preferred units.

The most significant assets of Phillips 66 Partners that are available to settle only its obligations, along with its most significant liabilities for which its creditors do not have recourse to Phillips 66’s general credit, were:

 Millions of Dollars
 June 30
2021
December 31
2020
Equity investments*$2,962 3,244 
Net properties, plants and equipment3,653 3,639 
Short-term debt465 465 
Long-term debt3,445 3,444 
* Included in the “Investments and long-term receivables” line item on the Phillips 66 consolidated balance sheet.



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Gray Oak Pipeline, LLC was formed to develop and construct the Gray Oak Pipeline, which transports crude oil from the Permian and Eagle Ford to Texas Gulf Coast destinations that include Corpus Christi, Texas, and the Sweeny area, including our Sweeny Refinery. Phillips 66 Partners has a consolidated holding company that owns 65% of Gray Oak Pipeline, LLC. In December 2018, a third party acquired a 35% interest in the holding company. Because the holding company’s sole asset was its ownership interest in Gray Oak Pipeline, LLC, which was considered a financial asset, and because certain restrictions were placed on the third party’s ability to transfer or sell its interest in the holding company during the construction of the Gray Oak Pipeline, the legal sale of the 35% interest did not qualify as a sale under GAAP at that time. The Gray Oak Pipeline commenced full operations in the second quarter of 2020, and the restrictions placed on the co-venturer were lifted on June 30, 2020, resulting in the recognition of the sale under GAAP. Accordingly, at June 30, 2020, the co-venturer’s 35% interest in the holding company was recharacterized from a long-term obligation to a noncontrolling interest on our consolidated balance sheet, and the premium of $84 million previously paid by the co-venturer in 2019 was recharacterized from a long-term obligation to a gain in our consolidated statement of operations. For the six months ended June 30, 2020, the co-venturer contributed an aggregate of $61 million to the holding company to fund its portion of Gray Oak Pipeline, LLC’s cash calls. Phillips 66 Partners’ effective ownership interest in Gray Oak Pipeline, LLC is 42.25% , after considering the co-venturer’s 35% interest in the consolidated holding company.

See Note 5—Investments, Loans and Long-Term Receivables, for further discussion regarding Phillips 66 Partners’ investments in Dakota Access and ETCO, and Liberty.

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Item 2.    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Unless otherwise indicated, “the company,” “we,” “our,” “us” and “Phillips 66” are used in this report to refer to the businesses of Phillips 66 and its consolidated subsidiaries.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis is the company’s analysis of its financial performance, financial condition, and significant trends that may affect future performance. It should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes included elsewhere in this report. It contains forward-looking statements including, without limitation, statements relating to the company’s plans, strategies, objectives, expectations and intentions that are made pursuant to the “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. The words “anticipate,” “estimate,” “believe,” “budget,” “continue,” “could,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “potential,” “predict,” “seek,” “should,” “will,” “would,” “expect,” “objective,” “projection,” “forecast,” “goal,” “guidance,” “outlook,” “effort,” “target” and similar expressions often identify forward-looking statements, but the absence of these words does not mean a statement is not forward-looking. The company does not undertake to update, revise or correct any of the forward-looking information unless required to do so under the federal securities laws. Readers are cautioned that such forward-looking statements should be read in conjunction with the company’s disclosures under the heading: “CAUTIONARY STATEMENT FOR THE PURPOSES OF THE ‘SAFE HARBOR’ PROVISIONS OF THE PRIVATE SECURITIES LITIGATION REFORM ACT OF 1995.”

The terms “earnings” or “loss” as used in Management’s Discussion and Analysis refer to net income (loss) attributable to Phillips 66. The terms “results,” “before-tax income” or “before-tax loss” as used in Management’s Discussion and Analysis refer to income (loss) before income taxes.


EXECUTIVE OVERVIEW AND BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT

Phillips 66 is an energy manufacturing and logistics company with midstream, chemicals, refining, and marketing and specialties businesses. At June 30, 2021, we had total assets of $57 billion. Our common stock trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol PSX.

Executive Overview
The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continues to disrupt economic activities globally. Reduced demand for refined petroleum products resulted in low refining margins and decreased volumes through refineries and logistics infrastructure in 2020. Since the beginning of 2021, demand for refined petroleum products has started to recover following the administration of COVID-19 vaccines and the easing of pandemic restrictions. Consequently, refining margins have improved, as has volume throughput. However, refining profitability remains challenged. The depth and duration of the economic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic remain uncertain and we continue to monitor our asset and investment portfolio. The consequences of the sustained disruption of economic activities by the pandemic may include additional asset impairments and portfolio rationalization in the future.

In the second quarter of 2021, we reported earnings of $296 million and generated cash from operating activities of $1.7 billion, including a U.S. federal income tax refund of $1.1 billion. We used available cash for capital expenditures and investments of $380 million, dividend payments on our common stock of $394 million, and an additional member loan to an equity affiliate of $90 million. We ended the second quarter of 2021 with $2.2 billion of cash and cash equivalents and approximately $5.7 billion of total committed capacity available under our revolving credit facilities.



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Business Environment
The Midstream segment includes our Transportation and NGL businesses. Our Transportation business contains fee-based operations that are not directly exposed to commodity price risk. Our NGL business contains both fee-based operations and operations that are directly impacted by NGL prices. The Midstream segment also includes our 50% equity investment in DCP Midstream, LLC (DCP Midstream). During the second quarter of 2021, NGL prices increased significantly, compared with the second quarter of 2020, due to strong demand as economic activities gradually recovered following the administration of COVID-19 vaccines and the easing of pandemic restrictions.

The Chemicals segment consists of our 50% equity investment in Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LLC (CPChem). The chemicals and plastics industry is mainly a commodity-based industry where the margins for key products are based on supply and demand, as well as cost factors. During the second quarter of 2021, the benchmark high-density polyethylene chain margin increased significantly, compared with the second quarter of 2020. This significant increase was due to continued strong demand and tight supplies driven by the operational impacts caused by the winter storms that occurred in the Central and Gulf Coast regions in the first quarter of 2021.

Our Refining segment results are driven by several factors, including refining margins, refinery throughput, feedstock costs, product yields, turnaround activity, and other operating costs. The price of U.S. benchmark crude oil, West Texas Intermediate (WTI) at Cushing, Oklahoma, increased to an average of $66.09 per barrel during the second quarter of 2021, compared with an average of $27.80 per barrel in the second quarter of 2020. Market crack spreads are used as indicators of refining margins and measure the difference between market prices for refined petroleum products and crude oil. During the second quarter of 2021, worldwide market crack spreads were higher than the second quarter of 2020. The increases in crude oil prices and market crack spreads were mainly driven by a significant increase in demand for refined petroleum products, as economic activities gradually recovered following the administration of COVID-19 vaccines and the easing of pandemic restrictions, as well as a tightening supply. In addition, in the second quarter of 2021, renewable identification number (RIN) costs increased significantly, compared with the corresponding period of 2020.

Results for our Marketing and Specialties (M&S) segment depend largely on marketing fuel and lubricant margins, and sales volumes of our refined petroleum and other specialty products. While M&S margins are primarily driven by market factors, largely determined by the relationship between supply and demand, marketing fuel margins, in particular, are influenced by the trend in spot prices for refined petroleum products. Generally speaking, a downward trend of spot prices has a favorable impact on marketing fuel margins, while an upward trend of spot prices has an unfavorable impact on marketing fuel margins. The global disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in reduced demand for refined petroleum and specialty products since March 2020. Following the administration of COVID-19 vaccines in 2021 and the easing of pandemic restrictions, the global economy has begun to recover, and demand for refined petroleum and specialty products has significantly improved, compared with the second quarter of 2020.
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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Unless otherwise indicated, discussion of results for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, is based on a comparison with the corresponding periods of 2020.


Consolidated Results

A summary of income (loss) before income taxes by business segment with a reconciliation to net income (loss) attributable to Phillips 66 follows:

 Millions of Dollars
 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021 2020 2021 2020 
Midstream$312 324 388 (378)
Chemicals623 42 777 211 
Refining(729)(878)(1,769)(3,139)
Marketing and Specialties476 286 766 799 
Corporate and Other(246)(219)(497)(416)
Income (loss) before income taxes436 (445)(335)(2,923)
Income tax expense (benefit)62 (378)(70)(429)
Net income (loss)374 (67)(265)(2,494)
Less: net income attributable to noncontrolling interests78 74 93 143 
Net income (loss) attributable to Phillips 66$296 (141)(358)(2,637)


Our net income attributable to Phillips 66 in the second quarter of 2021 was $296 million, compared with a net loss attributable to Phillips 66 of $141 million in the second quarter of 2020. The improvement reflects increased equity earnings from affiliates in our Chemicals and M&S segments, improved realized marketing fuel margins and sales volumes and higher realized refining margins. These increases were partially offset by an increase in income taxes.

Our net loss attributable to Phillips 66 for the six months ended June 30, 2021, was $358 million, compared with $2,637 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020. The lower net loss attributable to Phillips 66 reflects a before-tax impairment of $198 million in the first quarter of 2021, compared with before-tax impairments of $3,006 million in the first quarter of 2020. Excluding these impairments, after-tax results for the six months ended June 30, 2021, decreased primarily due to a higher before-tax loss from our Refining segment and a lower income tax benefit, partially offset by higher equity earnings from our Chemicals segment.

See the “Segment Results” section for additional information on our segment performance and Note 18—Income Taxes, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, for additional information on income taxes.

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Statement of Operations Analysis

Sales and other operating revenues for the second quarter and six-month period of 2021 increased 147% and 53%, respectively, and purchased crude oil and products increased 162% and 61%, respectively. These increases were mainly due to higher prices for refined petroleum products, crude oil and NGL, as well as increased volumes.

Equity in earnings of affiliates increased $673 million and $593 million in the second quarter and six-month period of 2021, respectively. The increase in both periods was primarily due to higher equity earnings from CPChem. See Chemicals segment analysis in the “Segment Results” section for additional information on CPChem.

Net gain on dispositions decreased 98% in both the second quarter and six-month period of 2021, primarily due to a before-tax gain of $84 million recognized in the second quarter of 2020 associated with a co-venturer’s acquisition of an ownership interest in the consolidated holding company that owns an interest in Gray Oak Pipeline, LLC.

Operating expenses increased 15% and 8% in the second quarter and six-month period of 2021, respectively. The increase in the second quarter of 2021 was mainly due to higher refinery turnaround and maintenance expenses and increased utility costs. The increase in the six-month period of 2021 was primarily attributable to higher utility, maintenance and repair costs driven by the winter storms that occurred in the Central and Gulf Coast regions in February 2021.

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased 16% in the six-month period of 2021, primarily due to increased employee-related expenses and higher selling expenses due to rising refined petroleum product prices and demand, as well as a benefit received from a legal settlement in the first quarter of 2020.

Impairments decreased $2,808 million in the six-month period of 2021. During the first quarter of 2021, a before-tax impairment of $198 million was related to Phillips 66 Partners LP’s investment in the Liberty Pipeline project. In the first quarter of 2020, before-tax impairments of $3,006 million were recorded for our investment in DCP Midstream and goodwill in our Refining segment. See Note 7—Impairments, and Note 13—Fair Value Measurements, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, for additional information regarding these impairments.

Interest and debt expense increased 22% and 27% in the second quarter and six-month period of 2021, respectively. The increase in both periods was primarily driven by lower capitalized interest due to the completion of capital projects and the placement of assets into service, as well as higher average debt principal balances.

We had income tax expense of $62 million and an income tax benefit of $70 million in the second quarter and six-month period of 2021, respectively, compared with an income tax benefit of $378 million and $429 million in the corresponding periods of 2020, respectively, reflecting before-tax income in the second quarter of 2021, and before-tax losses in the second quarter and six-month period of 2020 and the six-month period of 2021. See Note 18—Income Taxes, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, for information regarding our effective income tax rates.

Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests decreased 35% in the six-month period of 2021, primarily due to lower net income from Phillips 66 Partners LP (Phillips 66 Partners) resulting from the before-tax impairment of $198 million associated with its investment in the Liberty Pipeline project described above.

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Segment Results

Midstream

 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021 2020 2021 2020 
Millions of Dollars
Income (Loss) Before Income Taxes
Transportation$224 214 231 414 
NGL and Other79 78 114 257 
DCP Midstream9 32 43 (1,049)
Total Midstream$312 324 388 (378)

 Thousands of Barrels Daily
Transportation Volumes
Pipelines*3,424 2,840 3,114 3,009 
Terminals2,786 2,883 2,731 3,016 
Operating Statistics
NGL fractionated**401 170 382 184 
NGL production***406 374 381 385 
* Pipelines represent the sum of volumes transported through each separately tariffed consolidated pipeline segment.
** Excludes DCP Midstream.
*** Includes 100% of DCP Midstream’s volumes.

Dollars Per Gallon
Weighted-Average NGL Price*
DCP Midstream$0.71 0.32 0.70 0.36 
* Based on index prices from the Mont Belvieu market hub, which are weighted by NGL component mix.


The Midstream segment provides crude oil and refined petroleum product transportation, terminaling and processing services, as well as natural gas and NGL transportation, storage, fractionation, processing and marketing services, mainly in the United States. This segment includes our master limited partnership (MLP), Phillips 66 Partners, as well as our 50% equity investment in DCP Midstream, which includes the operations of DCP Midstream, LP (DCP Partners), its MLP.

Results from our Midstream segment decreased $12 million in the second quarter of 2021 and increased $766 million in the six-month period of 2021.

Results from our Transportation business increased $10 million in the second quarter of 2021, and decreased $183 million in the six-month period of 2021. The increase in the second quarter of 2021 was mainly driven by higher pipeline volumes resulting from improved refinery utilization rates and increased earnings from equity affiliates. These increases were partially offset by a before-tax gain of $84 million recognized in the second quarter of 2020 associated with a co-venturer’s acquisition of an ownership interest in the consolidated holding company that owns an interest in Gray Oak Pipeline, LLC. The decrease in the six-month period of 2021 was primarily attributable to a before-tax impairment of $198 million associated with Phillips 66 Partners’ decision to exit the Liberty Pipeline project.


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Results from our NGL and Other business increased $1 million in the second quarter of 2021, and decreased $143 million in the six-month period of 2021. The decrease in the six-month period of 2021 was primarily due to higher operating expenses driven by the winter storms that occurred in the Gulf Coast region in February 2021, lower results from trading activities, reduced cargo margins at the Sweeny Hub, and decreased equity earnings. These decreases were partially offset by increased fractionation volumes from the startup of Fracs 2 and 3 at the Sweeny Hub in late 2020, leading to higher exported cargos.

Results from our investment in DCP Midstream decreased $23 million in the second quarter of 2021, and increased $1,092 million in the six-month period of 2021. The decrease in the second quarter of 2021 was primarily due to unfavorable impacts from DCP Midstream’s commodity price risk management activities. The increase in the six-month period of 2021 was primarily due to a $1,161 million before-tax impairment of our investment in DCP Midstream recorded in the first quarter of 2020.

See Note 7—Impairments, and Note 13—Fair Value Measurements, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, for additional information regarding impairments related to the Liberty Pipeline project and our investment in DCP Midstream.

See the “Executive Overview and Business Environment” section for information on market factors impacting this quarter’s results.


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Chemicals

 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021 2020 2021 2020 
Millions of Dollars
Income Before Income Taxes$623 42 777 211 
 
 Millions of Pounds
CPChem Externally Marketed Sales Volumes*
Olefins and Polyolefins4,778 5,378 9,348 10,491 
Specialties, Aromatics and Styrenics1,234 1,014 2,215 2,202 
6,012 6,392 11,563 12,693 
* Represents 100% of CPChem’s outside sales of produced petrochemical products, as well as commission sales from equity affiliates.

Olefins and Polyolefins Capacity Utilization (percent)102 %103 88 100 


The Chemicals segment consists of our 50% interest in CPChem, which we account for under the equity method. CPChem uses NGL and other feedstocks to produce petrochemicals. These products are then marketed and sold or used as feedstocks to produce plastics and other chemicals. We structure our reporting of CPChem’s operations around two primary business lines: Olefins and Polyolefins (O&P) and Specialties, Aromatics and Styrenics (SA&S).

Results from the Chemicals segment increased $581 million and $566 million in the second quarter and six-month period of 2021, respectively. The increase in both periods was primarily driven by higher margins reflecting strong demand, and tight supplies following the winter storms that occurred in the Central and Gulf Coast regions in February 2021.

See the “Executive Overview and Business Environment” section for information on market factors impacting this quarter’s results.
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Refining
 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021 2020 2021 2020 
Millions of Dollars
Loss Before Income Taxes
Atlantic Basin/Europe$(110)(227)(263)(864)
Gulf Coast(264)(365)(517)(1,208)
Central Corridor(82)(104)(330)(331)
West Coast(273)(182)(659)(736)
Worldwide$(729)(878)(1,769)(3,139)

Dollars Per Barrel
Loss Before Income Taxes
Atlantic Basin/Europe$(2.20)(5.80)(2.83)(10.74)
Gulf Coast(3.81)(5.98)(4.17)(9.66)
Central Corridor(3.49)(5.01)(7.64)(7.50)
West Coast(9.70)(7.07)(12.19)(13.73)
Worldwide(4.26)(5.99)(5.63)(10.35)
Realized Refining Margins*
Atlantic Basin/Europe$4.63 1.53 4.73 1.97 
Gulf Coast2.10 0.36 2.67 3.64 
Central Corridor6.40 5.78 6.21 10.03 
West Coast3.37 5.05 3.35 4.92 
Worldwide3.92 2.60 4.12 4.96 
* See the “Non-GAAP Reconciliations” section for a reconciliation of this non-GAAP measure to the most directly comparable measure under generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (GAAP), income (loss) before income taxes per barrel.
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Thousands of Barrels Daily
 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
Operating Statistics20212020 2021 2020 
Refining operations*
Atlantic Basin/Europe
Crude oil capacity537 537 537 537 
Crude oil processed513 402 476 420 
Capacity utilization (percent)96 %75 89 78 
Refinery production552 433 517 445 
Gulf Coast
Crude oil capacity784 769 784 769 
Crude oil processed687 609 620 627 
Capacity utilization (percent)88 %79 79 81 
Refinery production763 675 683 689 
Central Corridor
Crude oil capacity531 530 531 530 
Crude oil processed462 386 423 428 
Capacity utilization (percent)87 %73 80 81 
Refinery production475 396 436 442 
West Coast
Crude oil capacity364 364 364 364 
Crude oil processed286 263 278 271 
Capacity utilization (percent)79 %72 76 75 
Refinery production307 280 298 293 
Worldwide
Crude oil capacity2,216 2,200 2,216 2,200 
Crude oil processed1,948 1,660 1,797 1,746 
Capacity utilization (percent)88 %75 81 79 
Refinery production2,097 1,784 1,934 1,869 
* Includes our share of equity affiliates.



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The Refining segment refines crude oil and other feedstocks into petroleum products, such as gasoline, distillates and aviation fuels, at 13 refineries in the United States and Europe.

Results from our Refining segment improved by $149 million and $1,370 million, respectively, in the second quarter and six-month period of 2021. The improved results in the second quarter of 2021 were primarily attributable to increased realized refining margins and higher refinery production driven by improved market demand, partially offset by higher refinery turnaround and other operating expenses. The improved results in the six-month period reflect a $1,845 million before-tax goodwill impairment recorded in the first quarter of 2020. Excluding this impairment, results decreased in the six-month period of 2021, mainly due to lower realized refining margins, and higher utility costs primarily driven by the winter storms that occurred in the Central and Gulf Coast regions in February 2021. Realized refining margins were lower in the six-month period, as the benefit of improved market crack spreads was more than offset by higher RIN costs, lower clean product differentials and decreased secondary product margins.

Our worldwide refining crude oil capacity utilization rate was 88% and 81% in the second quarter and six-month period of 2021, respectively, compared with 75% and 79% in the second quarter and six-month period of 2020, respectively. The increase in both periods was primarily driven by improved market demand for refined petroleum products following the administration of COVID-19 vaccines and the easing of pandemic restrictions since the beginning of 2021.

See the “Executive Overview and Business Environment” section for information on market factors impacting this quarter’s results.

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Marketing and Specialties

 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
2021 2020 2021 2020 
Millions of Dollars
Income Before Income Taxes
Marketing and Other$389 255 600 726 
Specialties87 31 166 73 
Total Marketing and Specialties$476 286 766 799 

 Dollars Per Barrel
Income Before Income Taxes
U.S.$2.15 1.24 1.79 1.53 
International1.96 3.48 2.09 5.25 
Realized Marketing Fuel Margins*
U.S.$2.62 1.75 2.31 1.92 
International2.89 5.07 3.41 7.04 
* See the “Non-GAAP Reconciliations” section for a reconciliation of this non-GAAP measure to the most directly comparable GAAP measure, income before income taxes per barrel.

Dollars Per Gallon
U.S. Average Wholesale Prices*
Gasoline$2.44 1.26 2.24 1.53 
Distillates2.28 1.17 2.14 1.47 
* On third-party branded petroleum product sales, excluding excise taxes.

Thousands of Barrels Daily
Marketing Petroleum Products Sales Volumes
Gasoline1,176 941 1,100 1,003 
Distillates947 847 882 942 
Other18 15 18 18 
Total2,141 1,803 2,000 1,963 


The M&S segment purchases for resale and markets refined petroleum products, such as gasoline, distillates and aviation fuels, mainly in the United States and Europe. In addition, this segment includes the manufacturing and marketing of specialty products, such as base oils and lubricants.

Before-tax income from the M&S segment increased $190 million in the second quarter of 2021, and decreased $33 million in the six-month period of 2021.

The increase in the second quarter of 2021 was primarily due to higher realized U.S. marketing fuel margins driven by improved demand for refined petroleum products in key markets, as well as increased equity earnings from Excel Paralubes LLC due to improved base oil margins and volumes.


40

The decrease in the six-month period of 2021 was primarily driven by lower realized international marketing fuel margins from rising spot prices, decreased margins from chartered marine vessels and a benefit received from a legal settlement in the first quarter of 2020. These decreases were partially offset by higher realized U.S. marketing fuel margins and sales volumes, as well as increased equity earnings from Excel Paralubes LLC due to improved base oil margins and volumes.

See the “Executive Overview and Business Environment” section for information on marketing fuel margins and other market factors impacting this quarter’s results.


Corporate and Other

 Millions of Dollars
 Three Months Ended
June 30
Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021 2020 2021 2020 
Loss Before Income Taxes
Net interest expense$(141)(114)(284)(217)
Corporate overhead and other(105)(105)(213)(199)
Total Corporate and Other$(246)(219)(497)(416)


Net interest expense consists of interest and financing expense, net of interest income and capitalized interest. Corporate overhead and other includes general and administrative expenses, technology costs, environmental costs associated with sites no longer in operation, foreign currency transaction gains and losses, and other costs not directly associated with an operating segment.

Net interest expense increased $27 million and $67 million, respectively, in the second quarter and six-month period of 2021. The increase in both periods was primarily driven by lower capitalized interest due to the completion of capital projects and the placement of assets into service, as well as higher average debt principal balances.

Corporate overhead and other remained flat in the second quarter of 2021, and increased $14 million in the six-month period of 2021. The increase in the six-month period was primarily due to higher environmental costs.
41

CAPITAL RESOURCES AND LIQUIDITY

Financial Indicators

Millions of Dollars,
Except as Indicated
June 30
2021
December 31
2020
Cash and cash equivalents$2,2072,514 
Short-term debt2,489987 
Total debt15,41315,893 
Total equity20,60221,523 
Percent of total debt to capital*43%42 
Percent of floating-rate debt to total debt9%12 
* Capital includes total debt and total equity.


To meet our short- and long-term liquidity requirements, we use a variety of funding sources but rely primarily on cash generated from operating activities and debt financing. During the first six months of 2021, we generated $2.0 billion of cash from operations, including a U.S. federal income tax refund of $1.1 billion. We used available cash primarily for capital expenditures and investments of $711 million, dividend payments on our common stock of $788 million, repayment of $550 million of maturing debt, and an additional member loan to an equity affiliate of $245 million. During the first six months of 2021, cash and cash equivalents decreased $307 million to $2.2 billion.

Significant Sources of Capital

Operating Activities
During the first six months of 2021, cash generated by operating activities was $2,014 million, compared with $981 million for the first six months of 2020. The increase was primarily due to a U.S. federal income tax refund of $1.1 billion received in the second quarter of 2021.

Our short- and long-term operating cash flows are highly dependent upon refining and marketing margins, NGL prices and chemicals margins. Prices and margins in our industry are typically volatile, and are driven by market conditions over which we have little or no control. Absent other mitigating factors, as these prices and margins fluctuate, we would expect a corresponding change in our operating cash flows.

The level and quality of output from our refineries also impact our cash flows. Factors such as operating efficiency, maintenance turnarounds, market conditions, feedstock availability, and weather conditions can affect output. We actively manage the operations of our refineries, and any variability in their operations typically has not been as significant to cash flows as that caused by margins and prices.

Equity Affiliate Operating Distributions
Our operating cash flows are also impacted by distribution decisions made by our equity affiliates. During the first six months of 2021, cash from operations included distributions of $1,114 million from our equity affiliates, compared with $820 million during the same period of 2020. We cannot control the amount of future dividends from equity affiliates; therefore, future dividend payments by these equity affiliates are not assured.

Tax Refunds
We received a U.S. federal income tax refund of $1.1 billion in the second quarter of 2021.
42

Revolving Credit Facilities and Commercial Paper
At June 30, 2021, borrowings of $15 million were outstanding and $1 million in letters of credit had been drawn under Phillips 66 Partners’ $750 million revolving credit facility, compared with outstanding borrowings of $415 million and $1 million in letters of credit drawn under the facility at December 31, 2020. At both June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, no amount had been drawn under Phillips 66’s $5 billion revolving credit facility or uncommitted $5 billion commercial paper program.

Term Loan Agreement
On April 6, 2021, Phillips 66 Partners entered into a $450 million term loan agreement and borrowed the full amount. The term loan agreement has a maturity date of April 5, 2022, and the outstanding borrowings can be repaid at any time and from time to time, in whole or in part, without premium or penalty. Borrowings bear interest at a floating rate based on either a Eurodollar rate or a reference rate, plus a margin of 0.875%. Proceeds were primarily used to repay amounts borrowed under Phillips 66 Partners’ $750 million revolving credit facility.




43

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

Lease Residual Value Guarantees
Under the operating lease agreement for our headquarters facility in Houston, Texas, we have the option, at the end of the lease term in September 2025, to request to renew the lease, purchase the facility or assist the lessor in marketing it for resale. We have a residual value guarantee associated with the operating lease agreement with a maximum potential future exposure of $514 million at June 30, 2021. We also have residual value guarantees associated with railcar and airplane leases with maximum potential future exposures totaling $209 million. These leases have remaining terms of up to nine years.

Dakota Access, LLC (Dakota Access) and Energy Transfer Crude Oil Company, LLC (ETCO)
In 2020, the trial court presiding over litigation regarding the Dakota Access Pipeline ordered the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) relating to an easement under Lake Oahe in North Dakota and later vacated the easement. Although the easement has been vacated, the USACE has indicated that it will not take action to stop pipeline operations while it proceeds with the EIS, which is expected to be completed in 2022. In May 2021, the court denied a request for an injunction to shut down the pipeline while the EIS is being prepared and in June 2021, dismissed the litigation. It is possible that the litigation could be reopened or new litigation challenging the EIS, once completed, could be filed.

Dakota Access and ETCO have guaranteed repayment of $2.5 billion aggregate principal amount of senior unsecured notes issued by a wholly owned subsidiary of Dakota Access. In addition, Phillips 66 Partners and its co-venturers in Dakota Access provided a Contingent Equity Contribution Undertaking (CECU) in conjunction with the notes offering. Under the CECU, the co-venturers may be severally required to make proportionate equity contributions to Dakota Access in certain circumstances relating to the litigation described above. At June 30, 2021, Phillips 66 Partners’ share of the maximum potential equity contributions under the CECU was approximately $631 million.

If the pipeline is required to cease operations, and should Dakota Access and ETCO not have sufficient funds to pay ongoing expenses, Phillips 66 Partners also could be required to support its share of the ongoing expenses, including scheduled interest payments on the notes of approximately $25 million annually, in addition to the potential obligations under the CECU.

See Note 10—Guarantees, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, for additional information on our guarantees.

44

Capital Requirements

Capital Expenditures and Investments
For information about our capital expenditures and investments, see the “Capital Spending” section below.

Debt Financing
Our total debt balance at June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, was $15.4 billion and $15.9 billion, respectively. Our total debt-to-capital ratio was 43% and 42% at June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively.

In April 2021, Phillips 66 Partners repaid $50 million of its tax-exempt bonds upon maturity.

In February 2021, Phillips 66 repaid $500 million outstanding principal balance of its floating-rate senior notes due February 2021.

Joint Venture Loans
We and our co-venturer provided member loans to WRB. At June 30, 2021, our 50% share of the outstanding member loan balance, including accrued interest, was $525 million. The need for additional loans to WRB in the remainder of 2021, as well as WRB’s repayment schedule, will depend on market conditions.

Dividends
On May 12, 2021, our board of directors declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.90 per common share. The dividend was paid on June 1, 2021, to shareholders of record as of the close of business on May 24, 2021. On July 14, 2021, our board of directors declared a quarterly cash dividend of $0.90 per common share. This dividend is payable on September 1, 2021, to shareholders of record as of the close of business on August 18, 2021.

Share Repurchases
Since July 2012, our board of directors has authorized an aggregate of $15 billion of repurchases of our outstanding common stock. The authorizations do not have expiration dates. The share repurchases are expected to be funded primarily through available cash. We are not obligated to repurchase any shares of common stock pursuant to these authorizations and may commence, suspend or terminate repurchases at any time. Since the inception of our share repurchase program in 2012, we have repurchased 159 million shares at an aggregate cost of $12.5 billion. Shares of stock repurchased are held as treasury shares. We suspended share repurchases in mid-March 2020 to preserve liquidity in response to the global economic disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.
45

Capital Spending

Our capital expenditures and investments represent consolidated capital spending. Our adjusted capital spending is a non-GAAP financial measure that demonstrates our net share of capital spending, and reflects an adjustment for the portion of our consolidated capital spending funded by a joint venture partner.

 Millions of Dollars
 Six Months Ended
June 30
 2021 2020 
Capital Expenditures and Investments
Midstream$241 1,238 
Chemicals — 
Refining370 409 
Marketing and Specialties44 111 
Corporate and Other56 104 
Total Capital Expenditures and Investments711 1,862 
Less: capital spending funded by a joint venture partner* 61 
Adjusted Capital Spending$711 1,801 
Selected Equity Affiliates**
DCP Midstream$21 90 
CPChem151 139 
WRB106 71 
$278 300 
* Included in the Midstream segment.
** Our share of joint venture’s capital spending.


Midstream
During the first six months of 2021, capital spending in our Midstream segment included:

Construction activities on Phillips 66 Partners’ C2G Pipeline, a new 16-inch ethane pipeline that connects Phillips 66 Partners’ Clemens Caverns storage facility to petrochemical facilities in Gregory, Texas, near Corpus Christi, Texas.

Construction activities on a new 35-mile, 12-inch hydrogen gas pipeline connecting Alliance Refinery to hydrogen gas sources.

Contributions to Dakota Access by Phillips 66 Partners for a pipeline optimization project.

Investment in a renewable feedstock processing plant.

Contributions by Phillips 66 Partners to complete the South Texas Gateway Terminal development activities.

Continued development of additional Gulf Coast fractionation capacity at the Sweeny Hub.

Spending associated with other return, reliability, and maintenance projects in our Transportation and NGL businesses.


46

Chemicals
During the first six months of 2021, on a 100% basis, CPChem’s capital expenditures and investments were $301 million. The capital spending was primarily for optimization, debottlenecking and sustaining projects on existing assets. CPChem’s capital program was self-funded, and we expect CPChem to continue self-funding its capital program for the remainder of 2021.

Refining
Capital spending for the Refining segment during the first six months of 2021 was primarily for refinery upgrade projects to enhance the yield of high-value products, renewable diesel projects, improvements to the operating integrity of key processing units, and safety-related projects.

In the second quarter of 2021, we started up facilities to improve product value at the Ponca City Refinery and facilities to provide flexibility to produce renewable diesel at the San Francisco Refinery. Other major construction activities included installation of facilities to improve product value at the jointly owned Wood River Refinery.

Marketing and Specialties
Capital spending for the M&S segment during the first six months of 2021 was primarily for an investment in a retail marketing joint venture in the Central region and the development and enhancement of retail sites in Europe.

Corporate and Other
Capital spending for Corporate and Other during the first six months of 2021 was primarily for information technology and facilities.



47

Contingencies

A number of lawsuits involving a variety of claims that arose in the ordinary course of business have been filed against us or are subject to indemnifications provided by us. We also may be required to remove or mitigate the effects on the environment of the placement, storage, disposal, or release of certain chemical, mineral and petroleum substances at various active and inactive sites. We regularly assess the need for financial recognition or disclosure of these contingencies. In the case of all known contingencies (other than those related to income taxes), we accrue a liability when the loss is probable and the amount is reasonably estimable. If a range of amounts can be reasonably estimated and no amount within the range is a better estimate than any other amount, then the minimum of the range is accrued. We do not reduce these liabilities for potential insurance or third-party recoveries. If applicable, we accrue receivables for probable insurance or other third-party recoveries. In the case of income tax-related contingencies, we use a cumulative probability-weighted loss accrual in cases where sustaining a tax position is uncertain.

Based on currently available information, we believe it is remote that future costs related to known contingent liability exposures will exceed current accruals by an amount that would have a material adverse impact on our consolidated financial statements. As we learn new facts concerning contingencies, we reassess our position both with respect to accrued liabilities and other potential exposures. Estimates particularly sensitive to future changes include contingent liabilities recorded for environmental remediation, tax and legal matters. Estimated future environmental remediation costs are subject to change due to such factors as the uncertain magnitude of cleanup costs, the unknown time and extent of such remedial actions that may be required, and the determination of our liability in proportion to that of other potentially responsible parties. Estimated future costs related to tax and legal matters are subject to change as events evolve and as additional information becomes available during the administrative and litigation processes.

Legal and Tax Matters
Our legal and tax matters are handled by our legal and tax organizations. These organizations apply their knowledge, experience and professional judgment to the specific characteristics of our cases and uncertain tax positions. We employ a litigation management process to manage and monitor the legal proceedings. Our process facilitates the early evaluation and quantification of potential exposures in individual cases and enables the tracking of those cases that have been scheduled for trial and/or mediation. Based on professional judgment and experience in using these litigation management tools and available information about current developments in all our cases, our legal organization regularly assesses the adequacy of current accruals and determines if adjustment of existing accruals, or establishment of new accruals, is required. In the case of income tax-related contingencies, we monitor tax legislation and court decisions, the status of tax audits and the statute of limitations within which a taxing authority can assert a liability.

48

Environmental
Like other companies in our industry, we are subject to numerous international, federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations. For a discussion of the most significant international and federal environmental laws and regulations to which we are subject, see the “Environmental” section in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in our 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

We are required to purchase RINs in the open market to satisfy the portion of our obligation under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) that is not fulfilled by blending renewable fuels into the motor fuels we produce. For the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, we incurred expenses of $422 million and $147 million, respectively, associated with our obligation to purchase RINs in the open market to comply with the RFS for our wholly owned refineries. These expenses are included in the “Purchased crude oil and products” line item on our consolidated statement of operations. Our jointly owned refineries also incurred expenses associated with the purchase of RINs in the open market, of which our share was $178 million and $50 million for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively. These expenses are included in the “Equity in earnings of affiliates” line item on our consolidated statement of operations. The amount of these expenses and fluctuations between periods is primarily driven by the market price of RINs, refinery production and blending activities.

We occasionally receive requests for information or notices of potential liability from the EPA and state environmental agencies alleging that we are a potentially responsible party under the Federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) or an equivalent state statute. On occasion, we also have been made a party to cost recovery litigation by those agencies or by private parties. These requests, notices and lawsuits assert potential liability for remediation costs at various sites that typically are not owned by us, but allegedly contain wastes attributable to our past operations. At June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, we had been notified of potential liability under CERCLA and comparable state laws at 25 sites within the United States.

Notwithstanding any of the foregoing, and as with other companies engaged in similar businesses, environmental costs and liabilities are inherent concerns in certain of our operations and products, and those costs and liabilities could be material. However, we currently do not expect any material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial position as a result of compliance with current environmental laws and regulations.


49

Climate Change
There has been a broad range of proposed or promulgated state, national and international laws focusing on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction, including various regulations proposed or issued by the EPA. These proposed or promulgated laws apply or could apply in states and/or countries where we have interests or may have interests in the future. Laws regulating GHG emissions continue to evolve, and while it is not possible to accurately estimate either a timetable for implementation or our future compliance costs relating to implementation, such laws potentially could have a material impact on our results of operations and financial condition as a result of increasing costs of compliance, lengthening project implementation and agency reviews, or reducing demand for certain hydrocarbon products. We continue to monitor legislative and regulatory actions and legal proceedings globally relating to GHG emissions for potential impacts on our operations.

For examples of legislation and regulation or precursors for possible regulation that do or could affect our operations, see the “Climate Change” section in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in our 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

We consider and take into account anticipated future GHG emissions in designing and developing major facilities and projects, and implement energy efficiency initiatives to reduce GHG emissions. Data on our GHG emissions, legal requirements regulating such emissions, and the possible physical effects of climate change on our coastal assets are incorporated into our planning, investment, and risk management decision-making. We are working to continuously improve operational and energy efficiency through resource and energy conservation throughout our operations.

50

GUARANTOR FINANCIAL INFORMATION
At June 30, 2021, Phillips 66 had $10.8 billion of senior unsecured notes outstanding guaranteed by Phillips 66 Company, a direct, wholly owned operating subsidiary of Phillips 66. Phillips 66 conducts substantially all of its operations through subsidiaries, including Phillips 66 Company, and those subsidiaries generate substantially all of its operating income and cash flow. The guarantees (1) are unsecured obligations of Phillips 66 Company, (2) rank equally with all of Phillips 66 Company’s other unsecured and unsubordinated indebtedness, and (3) are full and unconditional.

Summarized financial information of Phillips 66 and Phillips 66 Company (the Obligor Group) is presented on a combined basis. Intercompany transactions among the members of the Obligor Group have been eliminated. The financial information of non-guarantor subsidiaries has been excluded from the summarized financial information. Significant intercompany transactions and receivable/payable balances between the Obligor Group and non-guarantor subsidiaries are presented separately in the summarized financial information.

The summarized results of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2021, and the summarized financial position at June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, for the Obligor Group on a combined basis were:


Summarized Combined Statement of OperationsMillions of Dollars
Six Months Ended June 30, 2021
Sales and other operating revenues$37,273 
Revenues and other income—non-guarantor subsidiaries2,371 
Purchased crude oil and products—third parties23,836 
Purchased crude oil and products—related parties5,710 
Purchased crude oil and products—non-guarantor subsidiaries7,921 
Loss before income taxes(639)
Net loss(494)


Millions of Dollars
Summarized Combined Balance SheetJune 30
2021
December 31
2020
Accounts and notes receivable—third parties$4,109 4,060 
Accounts and notes receivable—related parties1,389 804 
Due from non-guarantor subsidiaries, current604 288 
Total current assets11,538 8,965 
Investments and long-term receivables9,536 9,229 
Net properties, plants and equipment12,823 12,815 
Goodwill1,047 1,047 
Due from non-guarantor subsidiaries, noncurrent6,148 6,173 
Other assets associated with non-guarantor subsidiaries2,737 2,870 
Total noncurrent assets34,132 34,034 
Total assets45,670 42,999 
Due to non-guarantor subsidiaries, current$3,042 2,203 
Total current liabilities12,599 7,938 
Long-term debt9,327 11,330 
Due to non-guarantor subsidiaries, noncurrent9,965 9,316 
Total noncurrent liabilities24,828 26,044 
Total liabilities37,427 33,982 
Total equity8,243 9,017 
Total liabilities and equity45,670 42,999 
51

NON-GAAP RECONCILIATIONS

Refining

Our realized refining margins measure the difference between (a) sales and other operating revenues derived from the sale of petroleum products manufactured at our refineries and (b) costs of feedstocks, primarily crude oil, used to produce the petroleum products. The realized refining margins are adjusted to include our proportional share of our joint venture refineries’ realized margins, as well as to exclude those items that are not representative of the underlying operating performance of a period, which we call “special items.” The realized refining margins are converted to a per-barrel basis by dividing them by total refinery processed inputs (primarily crude oil) measured on a barrel basis, including our share of inputs processed by our joint venture refineries. Our realized refining margin per barrel is intended to be comparable with industry refining margins, which are known as “crack spreads.” As discussed in “Executive Overview and Business Environment—Business Environment,” industry crack spreads measure the difference between market prices for refined petroleum products and crude oil. We believe realized refining margin per barrel calculated on a similar basis as industry crack spreads provides a useful measure of how well we performed relative to benchmark industry refining margins.

The GAAP performance measure most directly comparable to realized refining margin per barrel is the Refining segment’s “income (loss) before income taxes per barrel.” Realized refining margin per barrel excludes items that are typically included in a manufacturer’s gross margin, such as depreciation and operating expenses, and other items used to determine income (loss) before income taxes, such as general and administrative expenses. It also includes our proportional share of joint venture refineries’ realized refining margins and excludes special items. Because realized refining margin per barrel is calculated in this manner, and because realized refining margin per barrel may be defined differently by other companies in our industry, it has limitations as an analytical tool. Following are reconciliations of loss before income taxes to realized refining margins:
52

Millions of Dollars, Except as Indicated
Realized Refining MarginsAtlantic Basin/
Europe
Gulf
Coast
Central
Corridor
West
Coast
Worldwide
Three Months Ended June 30, 2021
Loss before income taxes$(110)(264)(82)(273)(729)
Plus:
Taxes other than income taxes18 25 11 22 76 
Depreciation, amortization and impairments52 77 34 57 220 
Selling, general and administrative expenses18 14 7 10 49 
Operating expenses217 299 125 281 922 
Equity in losses of affiliates2  65  67 
Other segment income, net(8)(6)(8)(2)(24)
Proportional share of refining gross margins contributed by equity affiliates42  125  167 
Realized refining margins$231 145 277 95 748 
Total processed inputs (thousands of barrels)
49,979 69,364 23,466 28,158 170,967 
Adjusted total processed inputs (thousands of barrels)*
49,979 69,364 43,189 28,158 190,690 
Loss before income taxes per barrel (dollars per barrel)**
$(2.20)(3.81)(3.49)(9.70)(4.26)
Realized refining margins (dollars per barrel)***
4.63 2.10 6.40 3.37 3.92 
Three Months Ended June 30, 2020
Loss before income taxes$(227)(365)(104)(182)(878)
Plus:
Taxes other than income taxes15 25 14 22 76 
Depreciation, amortization and impairments49 75 33 63 220 
Selling, general and administrative expenses12 10 38 
Operating expenses190 277 120 216 803 
Equity in (earnings) losses of affiliates(1)79 — 81 
Other segment expense, net— 
Proportional share of refining gross margins contributed by equity affiliates16 — 92 — 108 
Special items:
Lower-of-cost-or-market inventory adjustments— — (35)— (35)
Realized refining margins$61 21 209 129 420 
Total processed inputs (thousands of barrels)
39,121 61,032 20,778 25,737 146,668 
Adjusted total processed inputs (thousands of barrels)*
39,121 61,032 36,067 25,737 161,957 
Loss before income taxes per barrel (dollars per barrel)**
$(5.80)(5.98)(5.01)(7.07)(5.99)
Realized refining margins (dollars per barrel)***
1.53 0.36 5.78 5.05 2.60 
    * Adjusted total processed inputs include our proportional share of processed inputs of an equity affiliate.
  ** Loss before income taxes divided by total processed inputs.
*** Realized refining margins per barrel, as presented, are calculated using the underlying realized refining margin amounts, in dollars, divided by adjusted total processed inputs, in barrels. As such, recalculated per barrel amounts using the rounded margins and barrels presented may differ from the presented per barrel amounts.
53

Millions of Dollars, Except as Indicated
Realized Refining MarginsAtlantic Basin/
Europe
Gulf
Coast
Central
Corridor
West
Coast
Worldwide
Six Months Ended June 30, 2021
Loss before income taxes$(263)(517)(330)(659)(1,769)
Plus:
Taxes other than income taxes38 52 26 45 161 
Depreciation, amortization and impairments104 154 68 111 437 
Selling, general and administrative expenses32 24 14 21 91 
Operating expenses447 620 330 663 2,060 
Equity in losses of affiliates4 3 182  189 
Other segment income, net(8)(6)(10) (24)
Proportional share of refining gross margins contributed by equity affiliates85  211  296 
Realized refining margins$439 330 491 181 1,441 
Total processed inputs (thousands of barrels)
92,805 123,924 43,220 54,075 314,024 
Adjusted total processed inputs (thousands of barrels)*
92,805 123,924 78,900 54,075 349,704 
Loss before income taxes per barrel (dollars per barrel)**
$(2.83)(4.17)(7.64)(12.19)(5.63)
Realized refining margins (dollars per barrel)***
4.73 2.67 6.21 3.35 4.12 
    * Adjusted total processed inputs include our proportional share of processed inputs of an equity affiliate.
  ** Loss before income taxes divided by total processed inputs.
*** Realized refining margins per barrel, as presented, are calculated using the underlying realized refining margin amounts, in dollars, divided by adjusted total processed inputs, in barrels. As such, recalculated per barrel amounts using the rounded margins and barrels presented may differ from the presented per barrel amounts.

54

Millions of Dollars, Except as Indicated
Realized Refining MarginsAtlantic Basin/
Europe
Gulf
Coast
Central
Corridor
West
Coast
Worldwide
Six Months Ended June 30, 2020
Loss before income taxes$(864)(1,208)(331)(736)(3,139)
Plus:
Taxes other than income taxes34 62 31 53 180 
Depreciation, amortization and impairments541 816 502 427 2,286 
Selling, general and administrative expenses25 17 13 19 74 
Operating expenses384 769 256 499 1,908 
Equity in (earnings) losses of affiliates(2)130 — 133 
Other segment expense, net— 
Proportional share of refining gross margins contributed by equity affiliates32 — 205 — 237 
Realized refining margins$158 455 806 264 1,683 
Total processed inputs (thousands of barrels)
80,456 125,098 44,123 53,614 303,291 
Adjusted total processed inputs (thousands of barrels)*
80,456 125,098 80,358 53,614 339,526 
Loss before income taxes per barrel (dollars per barrel)**
$(10.74)(9.66)(7.50)(13.73)(10.35)
Realized refining margins (dollars per barrel)***
1.97 3.64 10.03 4.92 4.96 
    * Adjusted total processed inputs include our proportional share of processed inputs of an equity affiliate.
  ** Loss before income taxes divided by total processed inputs.
*** Realized refining margins per barrel, as presented, are calculated using the underlying realized refining margin amounts, in dollars, divided by adjusted total processed inputs, in barrels. As such, recalculated per barrel amounts using the rounded margins and barrels presented may differ from the presented per barrel amounts.
55

Marketing

Our realized marketing fuel margins measure the difference between (a) sales and other operating revenues derived from the sale of fuels in our M&S segment and (b) costs of those fuels. The realized marketing fuel margins are adjusted to exclude those items that are not representative of the underlying operating performance of a period, which we call “special items.” The realized marketing fuel margins are converted to a per-barrel basis by dividing them by sales volumes measured on a barrel basis. We believe realized marketing fuel margin per barrel demonstrates the value uplift our marketing operations provide by optimizing the placement and ultimate sale of our refineries’ fuel production.

Within the M&S segment, the GAAP performance measure most directly comparable to realized marketing fuel margin per barrel is the marketing business’ “income before income taxes per barrel.” Realized marketing fuel margin per barrel excludes items that are typically included in gross margin, such as depreciation and operating expenses, and other items used to determine income before income taxes, such as general and administrative expenses. Because realized marketing fuel margin per barrel excludes these items, and because realized marketing fuel margin per barrel may be defined differently by other companies in our industry, it has limitations as an analytical tool. Following are reconciliations of income before income taxes to realized marketing fuel margins:


Millions of Dollars, Except as Indicated
Three Months Ended
June 30, 2021
Three Months Ended
June 30, 2020
U.S.InternationalU.S.International
Realized Marketing Fuel Margins
Income before income taxes$366 48 179 68 
Plus:
Taxes other than income taxes2 1 
Depreciation and amortization5 19 16 
Selling, general and administrative expenses198 60 151 57 
Equity in earnings of affiliates(15)(31)(11)(28)
Other operating revenues*(110)(10)(71)(4)
Other segment (income) expense, net (1)— 
Marketing margins446 86 253 112 
Less: margin for nonfuel related sales 15 — 13 
Realized marketing fuel margins$446 71 253 99 
Total fuel sales volumes (thousands of barrels)
170,228 24,539 144,517 19,583 
Income before income taxes per barrel (dollars per barrel)
$2.15 1.96 1.243.48 
Realized marketing fuel margins (dollars per barrel)**
2.62 2.89 1.755.07 
* Includes other nonfuel revenues.
  ** Realized marketing fuel margins per barrel, as presented, are calculated using the underlying realized marketing fuel margin amounts, in dollars, divided by sales volumes, in barrels. As such, recalculated per barrel amounts using the rounded margins and barrels presented may differ from the presented per barrel amounts.
56

Millions of Dollars, Except as Indicated
Six Months Ended
June 30, 2021
Six Months Ended
June 30, 2020
U.S.InternationalU.S.International
Realized Marketing Fuel Margins
Income before income taxes$565 96 478 239 
Plus:
Taxes other than income taxes6 3 
Depreciation and amortization8 38 33 
Selling, general and administrative expenses363 120 278 120 
Equity in earnings of affiliates(17)(55)(11)(50)
Other operating revenues*(196)(15)(155)(2)
Other segment (income) expense, net (2)— 
Marketing margins729 185 600 344 
Less: margin for nonfuel related sales 28 — 23 
Realized marketing fuel margins$729 157 600 321 
Total fuel sales volumes (thousands of barrels)
316,022 46,013 311,695 45,562 
Income before income taxes per barrel (dollars per barrel)
$1.79 2.09 1.53 5.25 
Realized marketing fuel margins (dollars per barrel)**
2.31 3.41 1.92 7.04 
* Includes other nonfuel revenues.
  ** Realized marketing fuel margins per barrel, as presented, are calculated using the underlying realized marketing fuel margin amounts, in dollars, divided by sales volumes, in barrels. As such, recalculated per barrel amounts using the rounded margins and barrels presented may differ from the presented per barrel amounts.
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CAUTIONARY STATEMENT FOR THE PURPOSES OF THE “SAFE HARBOR” PROVISIONS OF THE PRIVATE SECURITIES LITIGATION REFORM ACT OF 1995
This report includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. You can normally identify our forward-looking statements by the words “anticipate,” “estimate,” “believe,” “budget,” “continue,” “could,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “potential,” “predict,” “seek,” “should,” “will,” “would,” “expect,” “objective,” “projection,” “forecast,” “goal,” “guidance,” “outlook,” “effort,” “target” and similar expressions, but the absence of such words does not mean a statement is not forward-looking.
We based the forward-looking statements on our current expectations, estimates and projections about us, our operations, our joint ventures and entities in which we have equity interests, as well as the industries in which we and they operate in general. We caution you these statements are not guarantees of future performance as they involve assumptions that, while made in good faith, may prove to be incorrect, and involve risks and uncertainties we cannot predict. In addition, we based many of these forward-looking statements on assumptions about future events that may prove to be inaccurate. Accordingly, our actual outcomes and results may differ materially from what we have expressed or forecast in the forward-looking statements. Any differences could result from a variety of factors, including the following:
The continuing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and its negative impact on commercial activity and demand for refined petroleum products, as well as the extent and duration of recovery of economies and demand for our products after the pandemic subsides.
Fluctuations in NGL, crude oil, refined petroleum product and natural gas prices and refining, marketing and petrochemical margins.
Changes in governmental policies relating to NGL, crude oil, natural gas or refined petroleum products pricing, regulation or taxation, including exports.
Actions taken by OPEC and other countries impacting supply and demand and correspondingly, commodity prices.
Unexpected changes in costs or technical requirements for constructing, modifying or operating our facilities or transporting our products.
Unexpected technological or commercial difficulties in manufacturing, refining or transporting our products, including chemical products.
Lack of, or disruptions in, adequate and reliable transportation for our NGL, crude oil, natural gas and refined petroleum products.
The level and success of drilling and quality of production volumes around our Midstream assets.
The inability to timely obtain or maintain permits, including those necessary for capital projects.
The inability to comply with government regulations or make capital expenditures required to maintain compliance.
Changes to worldwide government policies relating to renewable fuels and greenhouse gas emissions that adversely affect programs like the renewable fuel standards program, low carbon fuel standards and tax credits for biofuels.
Failure to complete definitive agreements and feasibility studies for, and to complete construction of, announced and future capital projects on time and within budget.
Potential disruption or interruption of our operations due to accidents, weather events (including as a result of climate change), civil unrest, insurrections, political events, terrorism or cyberattacks.
General domestic and international economic and political developments including armed hostilities, expropriation of assets, and other political, economic or diplomatic developments, including those caused by public health issues, outbreaks of diseases and pandemics.
Failure of new products and services to achieve market acceptance.
International monetary conditions and exchange controls.
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Substantial investments required, or reduced demand for products, as a result of existing or future environmental rules and regulations, including reduced consumer demand for refined petroleum products.
Liability resulting from litigation or for remedial actions, including removal and reclamation obligations under environmental regulations.
Changes in tax, environmental and other laws and regulations (including alternative energy mandates) applicable to our business.
Changes in estimates or projections used to assess fair value of intangible assets, goodwill and property and equipment and/or strategic decisions with respect to our asset portfolio that cause impairment charges.
Limited access to capital or significantly higher cost of capital related to changes to our credit profile or illiquidity or uncertainty in the domestic or international financial markets.
The operation, financing and distribution decisions of our joint ventures that we do not control.
The factors generally described in Item 1A.—Risk Factors in our 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K.
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Item 3.   QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Our commodity price risk and interest rate risk at June 30, 2021, did not differ materially from the risks disclosed under Item 7A of our 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K.


Item 4.   CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in reports we file or submit under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the Act), is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to management, including our principal executive and principal financial officers, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. As of June 30, 2021, with the participation of management, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and our Executive Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer carried out an evaluation, pursuant to Rule 13a-15(b) of the Act, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) of the Act). Based upon that evaluation, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer and our Executive Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were operating effectively as of June 30, 2021.

There have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) of the Act, in the quarterly period ended June 30, 2021, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
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PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

Item 1.   LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

Although we may, from time to time, be involved in litigation and claims arising out of our operations in the normal course of business, we are not a party to any reportable litigation. Additionally, Item 103 of Regulation S-K promulgated by the SEC requires disclosure of certain environmental matters when a governmental authority is a party to the proceedings and such proceedings involve potential monetary sanctions that we reasonably believe will be in excess of $300,000. There were no such new matters that arose during the second quarter of 2021 and there were no material developments that occurred with respect to matters previously reported. We do not currently believe that the eventual outcome of any matters reported, individually or in the aggregate, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

Our U.S. refineries are implementing two separate consent decrees, regarding alleged violations of the Federal Clean Air Act, with the EPA, five states and one local air pollution agency. Some of the requirements and limitations contained in the decrees provide for stipulated penalties for violations. Stipulated penalties under the decrees are not automatic, but must be requested by one of the agency signatories. As part of periodic reports under the decrees or other reports required by permits or regulations, we occasionally report matters that could be subject to a request for stipulated penalties. If a specific request for stipulated penalties meeting the reporting threshold set forth in SEC rules is made pursuant to these decrees based on a given reported exceedance, we will separately report that matter and the amount of the proposed penalty.

See Note 11—Contingencies and Commitments, in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, for additional information.


Item 1A.   RISK FACTORS

There were no material changes from the risk factors disclosed in Item 1A of our 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K.


Item 2.   UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
In March 2020, we announced that we had temporarily suspended our share repurchases. As of June 30, 2021, we had $2,514 million remaining on our existing share repurchase authorization, which has no expiration date. Any future share repurchases will be made at the discretion of management and will depend on various factors including our share price, results of operations, financial condition and cash required for future business plans.

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Item 6. EXHIBITS
 
Exhibit
Number
Exhibit Description
101.INS*Inline XBRL Instance Document - the instance document does not appear in the Interactive Data File because its XBRL tags are embedded within the Inline XBRL document.
101.SCH*Inline XBRL Schema Document.
101.CAL*Inline XBRL Calculation Linkbase Document.
101.LAB*Inline XBRL Labels Linkbase Document.
101.PRE*Inline XBRL Presentation Linkbase Document.
101.DEF*Inline XBRL Definition Linkbase Document.
104*Cover Page Interactive Data File (formatted as Inline XBRL and contained in Exhibit 101).
* Filed herewith.
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SIGNATURES
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.
 
PHILLIPS 66
/s/ Chukwuemeka A. Oyolu
Chukwuemeka A. Oyolu
Vice President and Controller
(Chief Accounting and Duly Authorized Officer)

Date: August 3, 2021
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