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Synaptogenix (SNPX)

Filed: 5 Aug 22, 5:29pm

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2022

or

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from __________________ to __________________

Commission File Number: 001-40458

SYNAPTOGENIX, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware

46-1585656

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or

(I.R.S. Employer

organization)

Identification No.)

1185 Avenue of the Americas, 3rd Floor

New York, New York

10036

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip code)

(973) 242-0005

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class

    

Trading Symbol(s)

    

Name of each exchange on
which registered

Common Stock, $0.0001 par value per share

    

SNPX

    

The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒  No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☒  No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act) Yes  No ☒

As of August 5, 2022, there were 6,840,629 shares of the registrant’s common stock, $0.0001 par value per share, issued and outstanding.

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

Certain statements in this report contain or may contain forward-looking statements. These statements, identified by words such as “plan,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “should,” “expect” and similar expressions, include our expectations and objectives regarding our future financial position, operating results and business strategy. These statements are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements were based on various factors and were derived utilizing numerous assumptions and other factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements. These factors include, but are not limited to, the significant length of time associated with drug development and related insufficient cash flows and resulting illiquidity, our patent portfolio, our inability to expand our business, significant government regulation of pharmaceuticals and the healthcare industry, lack of product diversification, availability of our raw materials, existing or increased competition, stock volatility and illiquidity, and our failure to implement our business plans or strategies. Most of these factors are difficult to predict accurately and are generally beyond our control. You should consider the areas of risk described in connection with any forward-looking statements that may be made herein. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this report. You should carefully review this report in its entirety, including but not limited to our financial statements and the notes thereto and the risks described in Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on March 29, 2022. We advise you to carefully review the reports and documents we file from time to time with the SEC including our current reports on Form 8-K. Except for our ongoing obligations to disclose material information under securities laws, we undertake no obligation to publicly release any revisions to any forward-looking statements, to report events or to report the occurrence of unanticipated events.

1

PART I

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1. Financial Statements.

Synaptogenix, Inc.

Condensed Balance Sheets

(Unaudited)

June 30, 

December 31, 

    

2022

    

2021

ASSETS

CURRENT ASSETS

Cash and cash equivalents

$

28,754,621

$

34,213,989

Prepaid Clinical trial expenses

 

280,820

410,357

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

523,034

879,869

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS

 

29,558,475

 

35,504,215

 

 

Fixed assets, net of accumulated depreciation

 

20,777

 

20,445

 

 

TOTAL ASSETS

$

29,579,252

$

35,524,660

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

CURRENT LIABILITIES

 

  

 

  

Accounts payable

$

280,865

$

1,296,506

Accrued expenses

 

345,114

 

698,406

 

 

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES

 

625,979

 

1,994,912

 

  

 

  

Commitments and contingencies

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

Preferred stock - 1,000,000 shares authorized as of June 30, 2022, $0.0001 par value; 0 shares issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021

Common stock - 150,000,000 shares authorized as of March 31, 2022, $0.0001 par value; 6,810,326 shares issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2022 and 6,730,180 shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2021.

682

674

Additional paid-in capital

50,124,087

47,670,744

Accumulated deficit

(21,171,496)

(14,141,670)

TOTAL SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

28,953,273

 

33,529,748

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

$

29,579,252

$

35,524,660

See accompanying notes to condensed financial statements.

3

Synaptogenix, Inc.

Condensed Statements of Operations

(Unaudited)

    

Three Months Ended

    

Three Months Ended

    

Six Months Ended

    

Six Months Ended

June 30, 

June 30, 

June 30, 

June 30, 

2022

2021

2022

2021

OPERATING EXPENSES:

Research and development

 

$

1,941,101

$

986,280

$

3,427,175

$

2,138,060

General and administrative

 

1,855,290

 

1,308,893

 

3,651,748

 

3,312,306

 

  

 

 

  

 

TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES

 

3,796,391

 

2,295,173

 

7,078,923

 

5,450,366

 

  

 

 

  

 

OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE):

 

Interest income

 

44,487

 

1,331

 

49,097

 

2,147

Net loss before income taxes

 

3,751,904

 

2,293,842

 

7,029,826

 

5,448,219

 

 

 

  

 

Provision for income taxes

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

 

 

  

 

Net loss attributable to common shareholders

$

3,751,904

$

2,293,842

$

7,029,826

$

5,448,219

 

 

 

 

PER SHARE DATA:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted loss per common share

$

0.54

$

0.58

$

1.01

$

1.53

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted weighted average common shares outstanding

 

6,959,400

 

3,971,200

 

6,949,400

 

3,551,600

See accompanying notes to condensed financial statements.

4

Synaptogenix, Inc.

Condensed Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity

 

(Unaudited)

    

Three Months Ended June 30, 2021

Additional

Common Stock

Preferred Stock

Paid-In

Accumulated

   

Shares

   

Amount

   

Shares

   

Amount

   

Capital

   

Deficit

   

Total

Balance April 1, 2021

 

3,508,129

$

351

$

$

$

20,093,707

$

(4,684,850)

$

15,409,208

Reverse stock split rounding

 

(345)

 

 

 

 

(1,529)

 

 

(1,529)

Stock based compensation

 

 

 

 

 

151,552

 

 

151,552

Issuance of warrants for consulting fees

 

 

 

 

 

52,681

 

 

52,681

Issuance of common stock for consulting fees

 

2,590

 

 

 

 

18,156

 

 

18,156

Private placement of common stock and warrants

 

1,587,030

 

159

 

 

 

11,271,335

 

 

11,271,494

Exercise of common stock warrants

 

941,394

 

94

 

 

 

7,582,182

 

 

7,582,276

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

(2,293,842)

 

(2,293,842)

Balance June 30, 2021

6,038,798

$

604

$

$

$

39,168,084

$

(6,978,692)

$

32,189,996

    

Six Months Ended June 30, 2021

Additional

Common Stock

Preferred Stock

Paid-In

Accumulated

    

Shares

    

Amount

    

Shares

    

Amount

    

Capital

    

Deficit

    

Total

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Balance January 1, 2021

 

1,257,579

$

126

0

$

0

$

6,668,859

$

(1,530,473)

$

5,138,512

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

Reverse stock split rounding

(345)

0

0

0

(1,529)

0

(1,529)

Stock based compensation

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

719,791

 

0

 

719,791

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

Issuance of warrants for consulting fees

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

396,848

 

0

 

396,848

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

 

Issuance of common stock for consulting fees

2,590

0

0

0

18,156

18,156

Private placement of common stock and warrants

3,837,580

384

0

0

23,783,777

0

23,784,161

Exercise of common stock warrants

941,394

94

0

0

7,582,182

0

7,582,276

Net loss

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

(5,448,219)

 

(5,448,219)

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

Balance June 30, 2021

 

6,038,798

$

604

$

0

$

0

$

39,168,084

$

(6,978,692)

$

32,189,996

5

    

Three Months Ended June 30, 2022

Additional

Common Stock

Preferred Stock

Paid-In

Accumulated

    

Shares

    

Amount

    

Shares

    

Amount

    

Capital

    

Deficit

    

Total

Balance April 1, 2022

 

6,809,647

$

682

 

$

$

49,102,898

$

(17,419,592)

$

31,683,988

Stock based compensation

 

 

 

 

 

1,016,690

 

 

1,016,690

Issuance of warrants for consulting fees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issuance of common stock for consulting fees

 

679

 

 

 

 

4,499

 

 

4,499

Exercise of common stock warrants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

(3,751,904)

 

(3,751,904)

Balance June 30, 2022

6,810,326

$

682

$

$

50,124,087

$

(21,171,496)

$

28,953,273

    

Six Months Ended June 30, 2022

Additional

Common Stock

Preferred Stock

Paid-In

Accumulated

    

Shares

    

Amount

    

Shares

    

Amount

    

Capital

    

Deficit

    

Total

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Balance January 1, 2022

 

6,730,180

$

674

 

0

$

0

$

47,670,744

$

(14,141,670)

$

33,529,748

Stock based compensation

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

1,728,248

 

0

 

1,728,248

Issuance of warrants for consulting fees

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

71,603

 

0

 

71,603

Issuance of common stock for consulting fees

15,146

1

0

0

100,349

0

100,350

Exercise of common stock warrants

65,000

7

0

0

553,143

0

553,150

Net loss

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

0

 

(7,029,826)

 

(7,029,826)

Balance June 30, 2022

 

6,810,326

$

682

 

0

$

0

$

50,124,087

$

(21,171,496)

$

28,953,273

See accompanying notes to condensed financial statements.

6

Synaptogenix, Inc.

Condensed Statements of Cash Flows

(Unaudited)

    

Six Months Ended

    

Six Months Ended

June 30, 2022

June 30, 2021

CASH FLOW USED IN OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Net loss

$

(7,029,826)

$

(5,448,219)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used by operating activities

Stock based compensation

1,728,248

719,791

Consulting services paid by issuance of common stock

 

100,349

 

18,156

Consulting services paid by issuance of common stock warrants

71,603

396,848

Depreciation expense

 

2,697

 

2,487

Change in assets and liabilities

Decrease (Increase) in prepaid expenses

 

486,372

 

(431,869)

(Increase) in accounts payable

 

(1,015,640)

 

(612,171)

(Increase) in accrued expenses

 

(353,292)

 

(230,345)

Total adjustments

 

1,020,337

 

(137,103)

 

 

Net Cash Used in Operating Activities

 

(6,009,489)

 

(5,585,322)

CASH FLOWS USED IN INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Purchase of fixed assets

(3,029)

Net Cash Used in Investing Activities

(3,029)

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

 

 

Private placements of common stock and warrants

 

 

23,784,161

Proceeds from exercise of investor warrants

553,150

7,582,276

Grant funding received

 

 

127,445

Cash in lieu of shares for reverse stock split

(1,529)

 

 

Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities

 

553,150

 

31,492,353

 

 

NET (DECREASE) INCREASE IN CASH AND EQUIVALENTS

 

(5,459,368)

 

25,907,031

 

 

CASH AND EQUIVALENTS AT BEGINNING OF PERIOD

 

34,213,989

 

5,795,055

 

 

CASH AND EQUIVALENTS AT END OF PERIOD

$

28,754,621

$

31,702,086

See accompanying notes to condensed financial statements.

7

SYNAPTOGENIX, INC.

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

Unless the context otherwise indicates, references in these Notes to the accompanying financial statements to “we,” “us,” “our” and “the Company” refer to Synaptogenix, Inc. (formerly known as Neurotrope Bioscience, Inc.), a Delaware corporation. References to “Neurotrope”, “Parent Company” or “Parent” refer to Neurotrope, Inc., a Nevada corporation. Unless otherwise noted, all share and per share data give effect to the 1-for-4 reverse stock split of our common stock that was effected on May 19, 2021.

Note 1 – Organization, Business, Risks and Uncertainties:

Organization and Business

On May 17, 2020, Neurotrope, Inc. (“Neurotrope” or “the Parent”) announced plans for the complete legal and structural separation of its wholly owned subsidiary, Neurotrope Bioscience, Inc., from Neurotrope (the “Spin-Off”). Under the Separation and Distribution Agreement, Neurotrope planned to distribute all of its equity interest in this wholly owned subsidiary to Neurotrope’s stockholders. Following the Spin-Off, Neurotrope does not own any equity interest in the Company, and the Company operates independently from Neurotrope. On December 7, 2020, the Company became an independent company, Synaptogenix, Inc., a Delaware corporation (formerly known as Neurotrope Bioscience, Inc.) (the “Company” or “Synaptogenix”) when the Company filed an amended and restated certificate of incorporation which, among other things, changed its name to Synaptogenix, Inc. The Company’s shares of common stock, par value $0.0001 per share (the “Common Stock”), are listed on The Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol “SNPX.”

Neurotrope Bioscience, Inc. was incorporated in Delaware on October 31, 2012 to advance new therapeutic and diagnostic technologies in the field of neurodegenerative disease, primarily Alzheimer’s disease (“AD”). The Company is collaborating with Cognitive Research Enterprises, Inc. (formerly known as the Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute, or BRNI) (“CRE”), a related party, in this process. The exclusive rights to certain technology were licensed by CRE to the Company on February 28, 2013 (see Note 4 - Related Party Transactions and Licensing / Research Agreements).

In connection with the separation from Neurotrope, we entered into a Separation and Distribution Agreement and several other ancillary agreements. These agreements govern the relationship between the parties after the separation and allocate between the parties’ various assets, liabilities, rights and obligations following the separation, including employee benefits, intellectual property, information technology, insurance and tax-related liabilities.

Liquidity Uncertainties

As of June 30, 2022, the Company had approximately $28.8 million in cash and cash equivalents as compared to $34.2 million at December 31, 2021. The Company expects that its current cash and cash equivalents, approximately $27.4 million as of the date of this quarterly report, will be sufficient to support its projected operating requirements for at least the next 12 months from this date. The operating requirements include the current development plans for Bryostatin-1, our novel drug candidate targeting the activation of Protein Kinase C Epsilon and other development projects.

The Company expects to need additional capital in order to initiate and pursue potential additional development projects, including the continuing development beyond the ongoing Phase 2 trial of Bryostatin-1. Any additional equity financing, if available, may not be on favorable terms and would likely be significantly dilutive to the Company’s current stockholders, and debt financing, if available, may involve restrictive covenants. If the Company is able to access funds through collaborative or licensing arrangements, it may be required to relinquish rights to some of its technologies or product candidates that the Company would otherwise seek to develop or commercialize on its own, on terms that are not favorable to the Company. The Company’s ability to access capital when needed is not assured and, if not achieved on a timely basis, will likely have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

8

Other Risks and Uncertainties

 

The Company operates in an industry that is subject to rapid technological change, intense competition, and significant government regulation. The Company’s operations are subject to significant risk and uncertainties including financial, operational, technological and regulatory. Such factors include, but are not necessarily limited to, the results of clinical testing and trial activities, the ability to obtain regulatory approval, the limited supply of raw materials, the ability to obtain favorable licensing, manufacturing or other agreements, including risk associated with our CRE licensing agreement, and the ability to raise capital to achieve strategic objectives.

CRE has entered into a material transfer agreement with the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health (“NCI”), pursuant to which the NCI has agreed to supply bryostatin required for the Company’s pre-clinical research and clinical trials. This agreement does not provide for a sufficient amount of bryostatin to support the completion of all of the clinical trials that the Company is required to conduct in order to seek U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) approval. Therefore, CRE or the Company would have to enter into one or more subsequent agreements with the NCI for the supply of additional amounts of bryostatin. If CRE or the Company were unable to secure such additional agreements, or if the NCI otherwise discontinues the supply, the Company would have to either secure another source of bryostatin or discontinue its efforts to develop and commercialize Bryostatin-1 for the treatment of AD. In June 2020, the Company entered into a supply agreement (the “Supply Agreement”) with BryoLogyx Inc. (“BryoLogyx”), pursuant to which BryoLogyx agreed to be the Company’s exclusive supplier of synthetic bryostatin. Pursuant to the terms of the Supply Agreement, the Company received its initial order of one gram synthetic bryostatin. See Note 3.

The Company also faces the ongoing risk that the coronavirus pandemic may slow, for an unforeseeable period, the conduct of the Company’s trial. In order to prioritize patient health and that of the investigators at clinical trial sites, we will monitor enrollment of new patients in our current Phase 2 clinical trial. In addition, some patients may be unwilling to enroll in our trials or be unable to comply with clinical trial protocols if quarantines or travel restrictions impede patient movement or interrupt healthcare services. These and other factors outside of our control could delay our ability to conduct clinical trials or release clinical trial results. In addition, the effects of a pandemic resurgence may also increase non-trial costs such as insurance premiums, increase the demand for and cost of capital, increase loss of work time from key personnel, and negatively impact our key clinical trial vendors and suppliers.

Note 2 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies:

Basis of Presentation:

The accompanying unaudited condensed financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) for interim financial reporting and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. In the opinion of management, the unaudited condensed financial statements included herein contain all adjustments necessary to present fairly the Company’s financial position and the results of its operations and cash flows for the interim periods presented. Such adjustments are of a normal recurring nature. The results of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2022 may not be indicative of results for the full year. These unaudited condensed financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited condensed financial statements and the notes to those statements for the year ended December 31, 2021 included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC on March 29, 2022.

Use of Estimates:

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make significant estimates that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of expenses during the reporting period. Management evaluates its estimates on an ongoing basis using historical experience and other factors, including the general economic environment and actions it may take in the future. The Company adjusts such estimates when facts and circumstances dictate. However, these estimates may involve significant uncertainties and judgments and cannot be determined with precision. In addition, these estimates are based on management’s best judgment at a point in time and as such these estimates may ultimately differ from actual results.

9

Cash and Cash Equivalents and Concentration of Credit Risk:

The Company considers all highly liquid cash investments with an original maturity of three months or less when purchased to be cash equivalents. At June 30, 2022, the Company’s cash balances that exceed the current insured amounts under the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) were approximately $1.0 million. In addition, approximately $27.6 million included in cash and cash equivalents were invested in a money market fund, which is not insured under the FDIC.

Fixed Assets:

Fixed assets are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation is computed on a straight line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset, which is deemed to be between three and ten years.

Research and Development Costs:

All research and development costs, including costs to maintain or expand the Company’s patent portfolio licensed from CRE are expensed when incurred. Non-refundable advance payments for research and development are capitalized because the right to receive those services represents an economic benefit. Such capitalized advances will be expensed when the services occur and the economic benefit is realized. There were 0 capitalized research and development services, other than non-refundable advance payments as mentioned below for Worldwide Clinical Trials, at June 30, 2022 and December 31, 2021.

Income Taxes:

The Company accounts for income taxes using the asset and liability approach which requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the carrying amount of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and amounts reportable for income tax purposes under the “Separate return method.” Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance when, in the opinion of management, it is more-likely-than-not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

The Company applies the provisions for accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise’s financial statements and prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement process for financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. The Company has determined that there are no significant uncertain tax positions requiring recognition in the accompanying financial statements. The tax period that is subject to examination by major tax jurisdictions is generally three years from the date of filing.

The Company had federal and state net operating loss carryforwards for income tax purposes of approximately $84.4 million for the period from October 31, 2012 (inception) through June 30, 2022. The net operating loss carryforwards resulted in a deferred tax asset of approximately $17.7 million at June 30, 2022. Income tax effects of share-based payments are recognized in the financial statements for those awards that will normally result in tax deductions under existing tax law. The deferred tax asset is offset by a full valuation allowance.

The Company may be subject to significant U.S. federal income tax-related liabilities with respect to the Spin-Off if there is a determination that the Spin-Off is taxable for U.S. federal income tax purposes. In connection with the Spin-Off, the Company believes that, among other things, the Spin-Off should qualify as a tax-free transaction for U.S. federal income tax purposes under Section 355 and Section 368(a)(1)(D) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the “Code”). If the conclusions of the tax opinions are not correct, or if the Spin-Off is otherwise ultimately determined to be a taxable transaction, the Company would be liable for U.S. federal income tax related liabilities. Pursuant to the Separation and Distribution Agreement and the Tax Matters Agreement, Neurotrope agreed to indemnify Synaptogenix for certain liabilities, and Synaptogenix agreed to indemnify Neurotrope for certain liabilities, in each case for uncapped amounts. Indemnities that Synaptogenix may be required to provide Neurotrope are not subject to any cap, may be significant and could negatively impact Synaptogenix’s business, particularly with respect to indemnities provided in the Tax Matters Agreement. Third parties could also seek to hold Synaptogenix responsible for any of the liabilities that Neurotrope has agreed to retain. Further, the indemnity from Neurotrope may not be sufficient to protect Synaptogenix against the full amount of such liabilities, and Neurotrope may not be able to fully satisfy its indemnification obligations. Moreover, even if Synaptogenix ultimately succeeds in recovering from Neurotrope any amounts for which Synaptogenix is held liable, Synaptogenix may be temporarily required to bear these losses. At June 30, 2022 and as of the date of financial statement issuance date, the Company does not have any indemnification liabilities.

10

Under Section 382 of the Code, as amended, changes in the Company’s ownership may limit the amount of its net operating loss carryforwards that could be utilized annually to offset future taxable income, if any. This limitation would generally apply in the event of a cumulative change in ownership of the Company of more than 50% within a three-year period. In addition, the significant historical operating losses incurred by the Company may limit the amount of its net operating loss carryforwards that could be utilized annually to offset future taxable income, if any. The Company believes that operating loss carryforwards are limited under Section 382 limitations although Section 382 studies have not been conducted to determine the actual limitations.

Expense Reimbursement for Grant Award:

The Company reduces its research and development expenses by funding received or receivable from an NIH grant during the period that the expenses are incurred. The Company recognized grant related expense reductions during the three and six months ended June 30, 2022 of approximately $100,000 and $0, respectively, and $0 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, respectively. See Note 5, “Clinical Trial Services Agreements.”

Of the total $2.7 million available from the NIH grant, the Company has received the maximum reimbursements under the grant as of June 30, 2022.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements:

 In August 2020, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2020-06, which reduces the number of accounting models for convertible instruments, amends diluted earnings per share calculations for convertible instruments and allows more contracts to qualify for equity classification. ASU 2020-06 will be effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2021. Early adoption is permitted. The Company has evaluated the adoption of ASU 2020-06 and has concluded that it does not apply at this time.

Note 3– Collaborative Agreements and Commitments:

Stanford License Agreements

On May 12, 2014, the Company entered into a license agreement (the “Stanford Agreement”) with The Board of Trustees of The Leland Stanford Junior University (“Stanford”), pursuant to which Stanford has granted to the Company a revenue-bearing, world-wide right and exclusive license, with the right to grant sublicenses (on certain conditions), under certain patent rights and related technology for the use of bryostatin structural derivatives, known as “bryologs,” for use in the treatment of central nervous system disorders, lysosomal storage diseases, stroke, cardio protection and traumatic brain injury, for the life of the licensed patents. The Company is required to use commercially reasonable efforts to develop, manufacture and sell products (“Licensed Products”) in the Licensed Field of Use (as defined in the Stanford Agreement) during the term of the licensing agreement which expires upon the termination of the last valid claim of any licensed patent under this agreement. In addition, the Company must meet specific product development milestones, and upon meeting such milestones, make specific milestone payments to Stanford. The Company must also pay Stanford royalties of 3% of net sales, if any, of Licensed Products (as defined in the Stanford Agreement) and milestone payments of up to $3.7 million dependent upon stage of product development. As of June 30, 2022, 0 royalties nor milestone payments have been required.

On January 19, 2017, the Company entered into a second license agreement with Stanford, pursuant to which Stanford has granted to the Company a revenue-bearing, world-wide right and exclusive license, with the right to grant sublicenses (on certain conditions), under certain patent rights and related technology for the use of “Bryostatin Compounds and Methods of Preparing the Same,” or synthesized bryostatin, for use in the treatment of neurological diseases, cognitive dysfunction and psychiatric disorders, for the life of the licensed patents. The Company paid Stanford $70,000 upon executing the license and is obligated to pay an additional $10,000 annually as a license maintenance fee. In addition, based upon certain milestones that include product development and commercialization, the Company will be obligated to pay up to an additional $2.1 million and between 1.5% and 4.5% royalty payments on certain revenues generated by the Company relating to the licensed technology. On November 9, 2021, the Company revised the existing licensing agreement with Stanford. The revisions extended all the required future product development and commercialization milestones. The Company is currently in full compliance with the revised agreement and is moving forward on its commitments. As of the end of the period covered by this quarterly report, 0 royalties nor milestone payments have been earned or made.

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Mt. Sinai License Agreement

On July 14, 2014, the Company entered into an Exclusive License Agreement (the “Mount Sinai Agreement”) with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (“Mount Sinai”). Pursuant to the Mount Sinai Agreement, Mount Sinai granted the Company (a) a revenue-bearing, world-wide right and exclusive license, with the right to grant sublicenses (on certain conditions), under Mount Sinai’s interest in certain joint patents held by the Company and Mount Sinai (the “Joint Patents”) as well as in certain results and data (the “Data Package”) and (b) a non-exclusive license, with the right to grant sublicenses on certain conditions, to certain technical information, both relating to the diagnostic, prophylactic or therapeutic use for treating diseases or disorders in humans relying on activation of Protein Kinase C Epsilon (“PKC ε”), which includes Niemann-Pick Disease (the “Mount Sinai Field of Use”). The Mount Sinai Agreement allows the Company to research, discover, develop, make, have made, use, have used, import, lease, sell, have sold and offer certain products, processes or methods that are covered by valid claims of Mount Sinai’s interest in the Joint Patents or an Orphan Drug Designation Application covering the Data Package (“Mount Sinai Licensed Products”) in the Mount Sinai Field of Use (as such terms are defined in the Mount Sinai Agreement).

The Company is required to pay Mt. Sinai milestone payments of $2.0 million upon approval of a new drug applications (“NDA”) in the United States and an additional $1.5 million for an NDA approval in the European Union or Japan. In addition, the Company is required to pay Mt. Sinai royalties on net sales of licensed product of 2.0% for up to $250 million of net sales and 3.0% of net sales over $250 million. Since inception, the Company has paid Mt. Sinai approximately $180,000 consisting of licensing fees of $105,000 plus development costs and patent fees of approximately $75,000. As of June 30, 2022, 0 royalties 0r milestone payments have been required.

Agreements with BryoLogyx

On June 9, 2020, the Company entered into a supply agreement (the “Supply Agreement”) with BryoLogyx Inc. (“BryoLogyx”), pursuant to which BryoLogyx agreed to serve as the Company’s exclusive supplier of synthetic bryostatin. Pursuant to the terms of the Supply Agreement, the Company placed an initial order and subsequently received one gram of current good manufacturing practice (“cGMP”) synthetic bryostatin as an active pharmaceutical ingredient to be used in a drug product (“API”). The Company may place additional orders for API beyond the initial order by making a written request to BryoLogyx no later than six months prior to the requested delivery date. The Company is not currently using synthetic bryostatin for its current Phase 2 clinical trial and will determine when to incorporate the synthetic into the clinical trial process.

In connection with the Supply Agreement, on June 9, 2020, the Company entered into a transfer agreement (the “Transfer Agreement”) with BryoLogyx. Pursuant to the terms of the Transfer Agreement, the Company agreed to assign and transfer to BryoLogyx all of the Company’s right, title and interest in and to that certain Cooperative Research and Development Agreement, dated as of January 29, 2019 (the “CRADA”), by and between the Company and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, as represented by the NCI, under which Bryostatin-1’s ability to modulate CD22 in patients with relapsed/refractory CD22+ disease has been evaluated to date. Pursuant to guidance provided by NCI, the Company CRADA has been cancelled and BryoLogyx has initiated a request for a new CRADA in its name. BryoLogyx will be filing its own investigational new drug application (“IND”) for CD22 with the FDA. As consideration for the transfer of rights to the CRADA, BryoLogyx has agreed to pay to the Company 2% of the gross revenue received in connection with the sale of bryostatin products, up to an aggregate payment amount of $1 million. NaN such revenues have been earned as of June 30, 2022.

Nemours Agreement

On September 5, 2018, we announced a collaboration with Nemours A.I. DuPont Hospital (“Nemours”), a premier U.S. children’s hospital, to initiate a clinical trial in children with Fragile X syndrome, a genetic disorder. In addition to the primary objective of safety and tolerability, measurements will be made of working memory, language and other functional aspects such as anxiety, repetitive behavior, executive functioning, and social behavior. On August 5, 2021, the Company announced its memorandum of understanding with Nemours to initiate a clinical trial using Bryostatin-1, under Orphan Drug Status, to treat Fragile X. The Company intends to provide the Bryostatin-1 and obtain the investigational new drug documentation (“IND”) and Nemours intends to provide the clinical site and attendant support for the trial. The Company and Nemours, jointly, will develop the trial protocol. The Company estimates its total trial and IND cost to be approximately $700,000. As of the end of the period covered by this quarterly report, the Company has not incurred any expenses associated with this agreement.

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Cleveland Clinic

On February 23, 2022, the Company announced its collaboration with the Cleveland Clinic to pursue possible treatments for Multiple Sclerosis. The collaboration entails filing an IND and conducting initial clinical trials using Bryostatin-1. Future development work will be conducted pursuant to statements of work to be determined.

Cognitive Research Enterprises, Inc. (“CRE”)

Effective October 31, 2012, the Company executed a Technology License and Services Agreement (the “TLSA”) with CRE, a related party, and NRV II, LLC (“NRV II”), another affiliate of CRE, which was amended by Amendment No. 1 to the TLSA as of August 21, 2013, as amended and restated on February 4, 2015 (the “CRE License Agreement”). The CRE License Agreement provides research services and has granted the Company the exclusive and nontransferable world-wide, royalty-bearing right, with a right to sublicense (in accordance with the terms and conditions described below), under CRE’s and NRV II’s respective right, title and interest in and to certain patents and technology owned by CRE or licensed to NRV II by CRE as of or subsequent to October 31, 2012, to develop, use, manufacture, market, offer for sale, sell, distribute, import and export certain products or services for therapeutic applications for AD and other cognitive dysfunctions in humans or animals (the “Field of Use”). Additionally, the CRE License Agreement specifies that all patents that issue from a certain patent application shall constitute licensed patents and all trade secrets, know-how and other confidential information claimed by such patents constitute licensed technology under the CRE License. The CRE License Agreement terminates on the later of the date (a) the last of the licensed patent expires, is abandoned, or is declared unenforceable or invalid or (b) the last of the intellectual property enters the public domain.

After Neurotrope’s initial Series A Stock financing, the CRE License Agreement required the Company to enter into scope of work agreements with CRE as the preferred service provider for any research and development services or other related scientific assistance and support services. There were 0 such statements of work agreements entered into during the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, or during the three and six months ended June 30, 2022.

In addition, on November 10, 2018, the Company and CRE entered into a second amendment (the “Second Amendment”) to the TLSA pursuant to which CRE granted certain patent prosecution and maintenance rights to the Company. Under the Second Amendment, the Company will have the sole and exclusive right and the obligation, to apply for, file, prosecute and maintain patents and applications for the intellectual property licensed to the Company, and pay all fees, costs and expenses related to the licensed intellectual property.

Note 4- Related Party Transactions:

Related Party Agreements

On August 4, 2016, Neurotrope, Inc. entered into a consulting agreement with SM Capital Management, LLC (“SMCM”), a limited liability company owned and controlled by the Company’s Chairman of the Board, Mr. Joshua N. Silverman (the “Consulting Agreement”). Pursuant to the Consulting Agreement, SMCM shall provide consulting services which shall include, but not be limited to, providing business development, financial communications and management transition services, for a one-year period, subject to annual review thereafter. SMCM’s annual consulting fee is $120,000, payable by the Company in monthly installments of $10,000. This contract was assigned to Synaptogenix, Inc. as of December 1, 2020. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021, $30,000 and $60,000 is reflected in the Company’s statements of operations, respectively.

Note 5 – Other Commitments:

Clinical Trial Services Agreements

On July 23, 2020, the Company entered into the 2020 Services Agreement with Worldwide Clinical Trials, Inc. (“WCT”). The 2020 Services Agreement relates to services for the current Phase 2 clinical trial assessing the safety, tolerability and long-term efficacy of Bryostatin-1 in the treatment of moderately severe AD subjects not receiving memantine treatment (the “2020 Study”).

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Pursuant to the terms of the 2020 Services Agreement, WCT is providing services to enroll approximately one hundred (100) 2020 Study subjects, which enrollment is currently completed. The first 2020 Study site was initiated during the third quarter of 2020. On January 22, 2022, the Company executed a change order with WCT to accelerate trial subject recruitment totaling approximately $1.4 million. In addition, on February 10, 2022, the Company signed an additional agreement with a third-party vendor to assist with the increased trial recruitment retention totaling approximately $1.0 million. The updated total estimated budget for the services, including pass-through costs, is currently approximately $12.0 million. The Company may terminate the 2020 Services Agreement without cause upon sixty (60) days prior written notice.

The Company was awarded a $2.7 million grant from the NIH, which will be used to support the 2020 Study, resulting in an estimated net budgeted cost of the 2020 Study to the Company of $9.3 million. The NIH grant provides for funds in the first year, which began in April 2020, of approximately $1.0 million and funding in year two, which began April 2021, of approximately $1.7 million. As of February 22, 2022, virtually all of the NIH grant has been received and offset against the clinical trial costs. The Company incurred approximately $9.4 million of cumulative expenses associated with the current Phase 2 clinical trial as of June 30, 2022. Of the total $9.4 million incurred for the trial to date, approximately $1.2 million and $2.5 million is reflected in the statement of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively. As of June 30, 2022 included in the Company’s balance sheet, approximately $281,000 of WCT prepayments is included as a prepaid expense and other current assets. In addition, approximately $414,000 is included in accounts payable and accrued expenses.

On May 12, 2022, the Company entered into the 2022 Services Agreement with WCT. The 2022 Services Agreement relates to services for a Phase 2 “open label,” dose ranging study, clinical trial assessing the safety, tolerability and efficacy of Bryostatin-1 administered via infusion in the treatment of moderately severe to severe AD subjects not receiving memantine treatment (the “2022 Study”).

Pursuant to the terms of the 2022 Services Agreement, WCT is providing services to enroll approximately 12 2022 Study subjects, which enrollment is currently underway. The first 2022 Study site was initiated during the third quarter of 2022. The total estimated budget for the services, including pass-through costs, is currently approximately $2.0 million. Either party may terminate the 2022 Services Agreement without cause upon [ninety] days prior written notice. Furthermore, in the event of a material breach by the other party, which breach is not cured by the breaching party, the other party may terminate the agreement upon 30 days’ prior written notice.

On January 19, 2022, the Company issued a work order (the “Work Order”) to Cyprotex US, LLC (“Cyprotex”), pursuant to which Cyprotex will perform certain drug interaction services for the Company for an aggregate fee of $165,455. The Work Order is governed by the Cyprotex’s Standard Terms and Conditions for Discovery Services dated August 2, 2021. The Company incurred approximately $169,000 and $177,000 for this Work Order for the three and six months ended June 30, 2022, respectively.

On January 31, 2022, the Company entered into a Statement of Work (the “SOW”) with Charles River Laboratories, Inc. (“Charles River”). The Statement of Work is subject to the General Terms and Conditions of Charles River. Pursuant to the SOW, Charles River will conduct a certain pre-clinical animal study (the “Study”) relating to Bryostatin-1 pharmacodynamics and drug distribution, for an initial aggregate fee of $197,600. Either party may terminate the 2022 Services Agreement without cause upon ninety days prior written notice. Furthermore, in the event of a material breach by the other party, which breach is not cured by the breaching party, the other party may terminate the agreement upon 30 days’ prior written notice. The Company has not incurred any expense relating to this SOW as of June 30, 2022.

Other Consulting Agreements

Effective as of June 1, 2019, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with Katalyst Securities LLC (“Katalyst”), pursuant to which Katalyst provided investment banking consulting services to the Company and Neurotrope (the “Katalyst Agreement”). The term of the Katalyst Agreement continued until it was canceled. As consideration for its services under the Katalyst Agreement, the Company paid Katalyst $25,000 per month thru December 1, 2020, plus five-year warrants to purchase 4,500 shares of Neurotrope’s common stock on the effective date of the Katalyst Agreement and on each of the three-month anniversaries following the effective date with the last issuance on December 1, 2020.

14

Effective as of January 1, 2021, the Company entered into an amended consulting agreement with Katalyst reducing the cash payment to $20,000 per month. Effective as of January 1, 2022, the Company entered into an additional amended consulting agreement with Katalyst reducing the cash payment to $10,000 per month beginning February 1, 2022 thru December 31, 2022 and eliminating any further warrant issuances. In addition, on February 16, 2021, Katalyst was granted warrants to purchase 25,000 shares of Common Stock at $11.46 per share, on April 1, 2021, was granted warrants to purchase an additional 4,500 shares of Common Stock at $8.80 per share, on July 1, 2021, was granted warrants to purchase an additional 4,500 shares of Common Stock at $9.76 per share, on October 1, 2021, was granted warrants to purchase an additional 4,500 shares of Common Stock at $9.30 per share, and, on January 3, 2022, was granted warrants to purchase an additional 4,500 shares of Common Stock at $8.69 per share. Each of the warrants issued to Katalyst are exercisable for a period of five years from the date of issuance. For the three months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021, $30,000 and $93,687 is reflected in the Company’s statements of operations, respectively, and $111,283 and $399,700 is reflected in the Company’s statements of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively, pursuant to the consulting agreement.

Effective as of June 5, 2019, the Company entered into a consulting agreement with GP Nurmenkari, Inc. (“GPN”) (the “GPN Agreement”), pursuant to which GPN agreed to provide investment banking consulting services to the Company and Neurotrope. The term of the agreement continued until December 1, 2020. On February 1, 2020, the Company amended the GPN Agreement, increasing the cash compensation to $17,500 per month thru November 30, 2020 and increasing the number of warrants issued each three-month period to 2,500, with the last issuance on December 1, 2020.

Effective as of January 1, 2021, the Company entered into an amended consulting agreement with GPN reducing the cash payment to $12,000 per month. Effective as of July 1, 2021, the Company entered into a second amended consulting agreement with GPN increasing the cash payment to $20,000 per month and increasing warrant issued for each three-month period beginning July 1, 2021 to 5,800, with the last issuance on October 1, 2021. Effective as of January 1, 2022, the Company entered into an additional amended consulting agreement with GPN reducing the cash payment to $10,000 per month beginning February 1, 2022 thru December 31, 2022 and eliminating any further warrant issuances. In addition, on February 16, 2021, GPN was granted warrants to purchase 10,000 shares of Common Stock at $11.46 per share, on April 1, 2021, was granted warrants to purchase an additional 2,500 shares of Common Stock at $8.80 per share, on July 1, 2021, was granted warrants to purchase an additional 5,800 shares of Common Stock at $9.76 per share, on October 1, 2021, was granted warrants to purchase an additional 5,800 shares of Common Stock at $9.30 per share, and, on January 3, 2022, was granted warrants to purchase an additional 5,800 shares of Common Stock at $8.69 per share. Each of the warrants issued to GPN are exercisable for a period of five years from the date of issuance. For the three months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021, $30,000 and $54,815 is reflected in the Company’s statements of operations, and $120,320 and $189,148 is reflected in the Company’s statements of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively, pursuant to the GPN Agreement.

Employment Agreements

 

On December 7, 2020, the Company entered into an offer letter (the “Offer Letter”) with Alan J. Tuchman, M.D., pursuant to which Dr. Tuchman agreed to serve as the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, commencing on December 7, 2020. In addition, in connection with his appointment as the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Dr. Tuchman was appointed to the board of directors of the Company. Dr. Tuchman will receive an initial annual base salary of $222,000, with an annual discretionary bonus of up to 50% of his base salary then in effect. Dr. Tuchman also received an initial equity grant (subject to Board approval which was received in January 2021) of options to purchase a number of shares of Common Stock equal to at least 1% of the Company’s outstanding shares of Common Stock immediately following the Spin-Off. As of December 7, 2021, such options are fully vested.

The term of Dr. Tuchman’s employment pursuant to the Offer Letter is one year, which shall be extended automatically for six month periods unless either party gives timely written notice. Dr. Tuchman’s agreement was previously extended until December 7, 2022. On August 4, 2022, the Company entered into an amendment to the Offer Letter to extend the term of Dr. Tuchman’s employment through June 7, 2023, and such term shall be extended for an additional six months upon Dr. Tuchman’s written notice to the Company at least 30 days prior to June 7, 2023. Pursuant to the Amendment, if Dr. Tuchman is terminated without Cause, Dr. Tuchman shall be entitled to severance equal to six months of Dr. Tuchman’s annual base salary.

15

Other Commitments and Agreements

See Notes 3 and 4 for Collaboration and License Agreement related commitments. 

Pursuant to the Separation Agreement and Tax Matters Agreement with Neurotrope, Neurotrope agreed to indemnify Synaptogenix for certain liabilities, and Synaptogenix agreed to indemnify Neurotrope for certain liabilities, in each case for uncapped amounts. Indemnities that Synaptogenix may be required to provide Neurotrope are not subject to any cap, may be significant and could negatively impact Synaptogenix’s business, particularly with respect to indemnities provided in the Tax Matters Agreement. Third parties could also seek to hold Synaptogenix responsible for any of the liabilities that Neurotrope has agreed to retain. Further, the indemnity from Neurotrope may not be sufficient to protect Synaptogenix against the full amount of such liabilities, and Neurotrope may not be able to fully satisfy its indemnification obligations. Moreover, even if Synaptogenix ultimately succeeds in recovering from Neurotrope any amounts for which Synaptogenix is held liable, Synaptogenix may be temporarily required to bear these losses ourselves. As of the reporting date, there are no claims relating to the indemnification agreement. 

Note 6 – Stockholders’ Equity:

 

The Company’s certificate of incorporation authorizes it to issue 150,000,000 shares of Common Stock and 1,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $0.0001 per share.

 

The holders of Common Stock are entitled to receive dividends out of assets or funds legally available for the payment of dividends at such times and in such amounts as the Board from time to time may determine. To date, the Company has not paid dividends on its Common Stock. Holders of Common Stock are entitled to 1 vote for each share held on all matters submitted to a vote of stockholders. There is no cumulative voting of the election of directors then standing for election. The Common Stock is not entitled to pre-emptive rights and is not subject to conversion or redemption. Upon liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the Company, the assets legally available for distribution to stockholders are distributable ratably among the holders of Common Stock after payment of liabilities, accrued dividends and liquidation preferences, if any. Each outstanding share of Common Stock is duly and validly issued, fully paid and non-assessable.

January 2021 Private Placement

On January 21, 2021, the Company entered into Securities Purchase Agreements (the “Purchase Agreement”) with certain accredited investors (the “Purchasers”) to issue (a) an aggregate of 2,333,884 shares of Common Stock and/or prefunded warrants to purchase shares of Common Stock at an exercise price of $0.04 per share (the “Pre-Funded Warrants”), (b) Series E warrants to purchase 2,333,908 shares of Common Stock, with an exercise price of $8.51 per share (subject to adjustment), for a period of twelve months from the date of an effective registration statement (the “Series E Warrants”) and (c) Series F warrants to purchase up to an aggregate of 2,333,908 shares of Common stock, with an exercise price of $6.90 per share (subject to adjustment), for a period of five years from the date of issuance (the “Series F Warrants” and together with the Series E Warrants, the “Warrants”) at a combined purchase price of $6.00 per share of Common Stock and Warrants (the “Offering”). The Company received total gross proceeds of approximately $14,000,000 and net proceeds of approximately $12.5 million.

In connection with the Offering, we paid our placement agents Katalyst and GPN (i) a cash fee equal to ten percent (10%) of the gross proceeds from any sale of securities in the Offering sold to Purchasers introduced by the Placement Agent and (ii) 233,391 warrants to purchase 233,391 shares of Common Stock (equal to ten percent (10%) of the number of shares of Common Stock sold to Purchasers introduced by the placement agents), with an exercise price of $6.90 per share and a five-year term.

 

June 2021 Private Placement

On June 14, 2021, the Company entered into Securities Purchase Agreements (the “June Purchase Agreement”) with certain accredited investors (the “June Purchasers”) to issue (a) an aggregate of 1,653,281 shares of the Company’s Common Stock and/or prefunded warrants to purchase shares of Common Stock at an exercise price of $0.01 per share (the “June Pre-Funded Warrants”) and (b) Series G warrants to purchase up to an aggregate of 1,653,281 shares of Common stock, with an exercise price of $8.51 per share (subject to adjustment), for a period of five years from the date of issuance (the “June Warrants”) at a combined purchase price of $7.547 per share of Common Stock and June Warrant (the “June Offering”). The Company received total gross proceeds of approximately $12.5 million and net proceeds of approximately $11.2 million.

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In connection with the June Offering, pursuant to an Engagement Agreement, dated June 14, 2021 (the “June Engagement Agreement”), between the Company and Katalyst Securities LLC (the “June Placement Agent”), the Company paid the June Placement Agent (i) a cash fee equal to ten percent (10%) of the gross proceeds from the sale of securities in the June Offering sold to June Purchasers introduced by the June Placement Agent and (ii) 152,378 warrants to purchase 152,378 shares of Common Stock (equal to ten percent (10%) of the number of shares of Common Stock sold to June Purchasers introduced by the June Placement Agent), with an exercise price of $7.547 per share and a five-year term (the “June Broker Warrants”). Furthermore, the Company agreed to pay the June Placement Agent a warrant exercise fee equal to ten percent (10%) of the aggregate exercise price that is paid in connection with each exercise, if any, of the June Warrants initially held by June Purchasers introduced by the June Placement Agent. The total potential fee payable to the June Placement Agent if all Series G warrants are exercised is approximately $1.4 million. The June Placement Agent is also entitled to the foregoing fees with respect to any future financing or capital-raising transaction by the Company (a “Subsequent Financing”), to the extent such financing or capital is provided to the Company by investors whom the Placement Agent had introduced to the Company, in the event such Subsequent Financing is consummated within eighteen (18) months following the closing of the June Offering.

Adoption of a Shareholder Rights Plan

 

On January 13, 2021, the Company adopted a shareholder rights plan (the “Rights Plan”). The Rights Plan is intended to protect the interests of the Company’s stockholders and enable them to realize the full potential value of their investment by reducing the likelihood that any person or group gains control of the Company, through open market accumulation or other tactics, without appropriately compensating all stockholders. Pursuant to the Rights Plan, the Company will issue, by means of a dividend, 1 preferred share purchase right for each outstanding share of our Common Stock to shareholders of record on the close of business on January 25, 2021. Initially, these Rights will trade with, and be represented by, the shares of our Common Stock. The Rights will generally become exercisable only if any person (or any persons acting as a group) acquires 15% or more of our outstanding Common Stock (the “Acquiring Person”) in a transaction not approved by the Board, subject to certain exceptions, as explained below.

If the Rights become exercisable, all holders of Rights, other than the Acquiring Person, will be entitled to acquire shares of Common Stock at a 50% discount or the Company may exchange each Right held by such holders for 1 share of Common Stock. In such situation, Rights held by the Acquiring Person would become void and will not be exercisable. If any person at the time of the first public announcement of the Rights Plan owns more than the triggering percentage, then that stockholder’s existing ownership percentage will be grandfathered, although, with certain exceptions, the Rights will become exercisable if at any time after the announcement of the Rights Plan such stockholder increases its ownership of Common Stock.

On January 13, 2021, the board of directors of the Company (the “Board”)declared a dividend of one preferred share purchase right (a “Right”), payable on January 25, 2021, for each share of Common Stock outstanding on January 25, 2021 (the “Record Date”) to the stockholders of record on that date. In connection with the distribution of the Rights, the Company entered into a Rights Agreement (the “Rights Agreement”), dated as of January 19, 2021, between the Company and Philadelphia Stock Transfer, Inc., as rights agent. Each Right entitles the registered holder to purchase from the Company one one-thousandth of a share of Series A Preferred Stock, par value $0.001 per share (the “Preferred Shares”), of the Company at a price of $20 per 1 one-thousandth of a Preferred Share represented by a Right (the “Purchase Price”), subject to adjustment.

Unless earlier redeemed, terminated or exchanged pursuant to the terms of the Rights Plan, the Rights will expire at the close of business on January 13, 2023. The Board may terminate the Rights Plan before that date if the Board determines that there is no longer a threat to shareholder value.

Reverse Stock Split

At the Special Meeting (as defined below), the stockholders approved our proposal to effect one reverse stock split of the Company’s outstanding shares of Common stock, at any ratio between 1-for-1.5 and 1-for-20, at such time as the Company’s Board of Directors shall determine, in its sole discretion, before December 31, 2022. On May 19, 2021, the Company effected a 1-for-4 reverse stock split of its Common Stock. As a result of the reverse stock split, every four (4) shares of the Company’s pre-reverse split Common Stock was combined and reclassified into one share of Common Stock. These financial statements have been adjusted to retrospectively reflect this reverse stock split.

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Note 7 – Stock Based Compensation:

 

2020 Equity Incentive Plan

 

Upon completion of the Spin-Off, the Company’s 2020 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2020 Plan”) became effective on December 7, 2020. The total number of securities available for grant under the 2020 Plan was 250,000 shares of Common Stock, subject to adjustment. On April 7, 2021, the Company held a special meeting of stockholders (“Special Meeting”) in which the Company’s stockholders approved an amendment to the Company’s 2020 Plan to increase the total number of shares of Common Stock from 250,000 to an aggregate of 625,000 shares of Common Stock.

Stock and Option Grants

The following is a summary of stock option activity under the stock option plans for the six months ended June 30, 2022:

    

    

    

Weighted-

    

Average

Aggregate

Weighted-

Remaining

Intrinsic

Number

Average

Contractual

Value

of

Exercise

Term

(in

Shares

Price

(Years)

millions)

Options outstanding at January 1, 2022

 

123,850

$

9.84

 

9.00

$

0

Options granted

 

6,150

$

7.29

 

 

Less options forfeited

 

$

 

 

Less options expired/cancelled

 

$

 

 

Less options exercised

 

$

 

 

Options outstanding at June 30, 2022

 

130,000

$

9.72

 

8.60

$

0

Options exercisable at June 30, 2022

 

125,388

$

9.81

 

8.57

$

0

As of June 30, 2022, the Company had unrecognized stock option expense of approximately $16,900 and a remaining weighted average period for recognition of 0.63 years.

On February 16, 2022, pursuant to its 2020 Plan, the Company granted stock options to purchase an aggregate of 6,150 shares of Common Stock to its Chief Executive Officer. The stock options have an exercise price of $7.29 per share and an expiration date that is ten years from the date of issuance. 25% of the options vest each quarter over one year, with the initial 25% vesting on May 16, 2022.

On March 12, 2021, Synaptogenix adopted a new non-employee director compensation policy (the “Director Compensation Policy”). The Director Compensation Policy provides for the annual automatic grant of nonqualified stock options to purchase up to 1,500 shares of Synaptogenix’s Common Stock to each of Synaptogenix’s nonemployee directors. Such grants shall occur annually on the fifth business day after the filing of Synaptogenix’s Annual Report on Form 10-K and shall vest on the one-year anniversary from the date of grant subject to the director’s continued service on the Board of Directors on the vesting date. The Director Compensation Policy also provides for the automatic grant of nonqualified stock options to purchase up to 1,200 shares of Synaptogenix’s Common Stock, plus options to purchase an additional 300 shares of Common Stock for service on a committee of the Board of Directors, to each newly appointed director following the date of his or her appointment. Such options shall vest as follows: fifty percent (50%) on the date of the grant, twenty-five percent (25%) on the one year anniversary from the date of the grant, and twenty-five percent (25%) on the second year anniversary from the date of the grant, subject to the director’s continued service on the Board of Directors on the applicable vesting dates.

The Company recorded total expense relating to the outstanding stock options of $11,544 and $151,552 for the three months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively, and $47,918 and $719,791 for the six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021.

 

Restricted Stock Unit Grants

On July 13, 2021, the Company granted a total of 495,000 restricted stock units (RSUs), of which 425,000 were granted to 7 Board members (including 2 executives), 60,000 to the Company’s CFO and 10,000 to 2 employees. The RSUs were amended on January 12, 2022 to vest 100% on September 15, 2022 and then further amended on June 20, 2022 to vest 100% on the

18

earlier of release of Phase 2 clinical trial top line data or December 31, 2022. Top line data is expected to be announced during the fourth quarter of 2022.

As of June 30, 2022, the Company had unrecognized RSUs expense of approximately $885,000 and a remaining weighted average period for recognition of 0.44 years. The fair value of the RSUs issued was based upon the closing trading price of the Common Stock on the grant date of $9.75 per share. The grant date fair value of the RSUs granted was approximately $4.8 million. The Company recorded total expense of $1,005,146 and $1,680,331 relating to the outstanding RSUs for the three and six months ended June 30, 2022, respectively.

Restricted Stock Issuances

On February 15, 2022, the Company granted 13,775 shares of restricted stock to two consultants that were engaged to provide investor relations services with a total fair market value on date of issuance of $98,078. On March 14, 2022, the Company granted 692 shares of restricted stock to a consultant that was engaged to provide investor relations services with a total fair market value on date of issuance of $4,500. On June 7, 2022, the Company granted 679 shares of restricted stock to a consultant that was engaged to provide investor relations services with a total fair market value on date of issuance of $4,500. On July 8, 2022, the Company granted 30,303 shares of restricted stock to a consultant that was engaged to provide investor relations services with a total fair market value on date of issuance of $150,000 and warrants to purchase 21,067 shares of Common Stock with an exercise price of $9.90 per share for a period of five years from the date of issuance.

Stock Compensation Expense

Total stock-based compensation for the three and six months ended June 30, 2022 was $1,016,690 and $1,728,248, respectively of which $171,653 and $845,037 was classified as research and development expense, respectively, and $845,037 and $1,435,545 was classified as general and administrative expense. Total stock-based compensation for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 was $151,552 and $719,791, respectively, of which $35,763 and $209,465 was classified as research and development expense, respectively, and $115,789 and $510,326 was classified as general and administrative expense.

 

Note 8 – Common Stock Warrants:

 

As of June 30, 2022, the Company had warrants outstanding consisting of the following:

    

Number

of shares

Warrants outstanding January 1, 2022

 

6,265,525

Warrants issued

 

10,300

Warrants exercised

 

(65,000)

Warrants expired

(1,049,368)

Warrants outstanding June 30, 2022

 

5,161,457

On January 3, 2022, pursuant to its advisory agreements, the Company issued warrants to purchase 10,300 shares of Common Stock, with an exercise price of $8.96 per share, for a period of five years from the issuance date. The Company used the Black-Scholes valuation model to calculate the value of these warrants issued to advisors during the six months ended June 30, 2022. The fair value of the warrants was estimated at the date of issuance using the following weighted average assumptions: Dividend yield 0%; Expected term 5 years; volatility based upon a blend of the Parent company’s and guideline company historical volatility 112.9%; and Risk-free interest rate of 1.37%. The total expense recorded during the year period was approximately $72,000.

As of June 30, 2022, the weighted average exercise price and the weighted average remaining life of the total warrants were $13.34 per warrant and 3.7 years, respectively. The intrinsic value of the warrants as of June 30, 2022 was approximately $0.8 million.

During the six months ended June 30, 2022, 3 affiliated warrant holders exercised 50,000 Series E Warrants to purchase 50,000 shares of Common Stock at $8.51 per share and 1 holder exercised 15,000 Series G Warrants to purchase 15,000 shares of Common Stock at $8.51 per share. Total cash proceeds from these warrant exercises was approximately $600,000.

19

Note 9 – Subsequent Events

See Note 5 and Note 7 above.

20

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations together with our financial statements and the related notes appearing elsewhere in this report. In addition to historical information, this discussion and analysis contains forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Our actual results may differ materially from those discussed below. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, those identified below, and those discussed in the section titled “Risk Factors” included elsewhere in this report and our annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2021.

The following discussion highlights our results of operations and the principal factors that have affected our financial condition as well as our liquidity and capital resources for the periods described, and provides information that management believes is relevant for an assessment and understanding of the statements of financial condition and results of operations presented herein. The following discussion and analysis are based on the unaudited financial statements contained in this report, which we have prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles. You should read the discussion and analysis together with such financial statements and the related notes thereto.

Explanatory Note

On May 17, 2020, Neurotrope, Inc. (Neurotrope or Parent) announced plans for the complete legal and structural separation of us from Neurotrope, also known as the Spin-Off. Under the Separation and Distribution Agreement, Neurotrope planned to distribute all of its equity interest in us to Neurotrope’s stockholders. Following the Spin-Off, Neurotrope would not own any equity interest in us, and we would operate independently from Neurotrope. Neurotrope Bioscience, Inc. was a wholly-owned subsidiary of Neurotrope prior to the completion of the Spin-Off on December 7, 2020 (see below for description of Spin-Off). Neurotrope Bioscience, Inc. represented substantially all the business of Neurotrope.

On December 6, 2020, Neurotrope approved the final distribution ratio and holders of record of Neurotrope common stock, Neurotrope preferred stock and certain warrants as of November 30, 2020 received a pro rata distribution at the rate of (i) one share of our Common Stock for every five shares of Neurotrope common stock held, (ii) one share of our Common Stock for every five shares of Neurotrope common stock issuable upon conversion of Neurotrope preferred stock held and (iii) one share of our Common Stock for every five shares of Neurotrope common stock issuable upon exercise of certain Neurotrope warrants held that were entitled to participate in the Spin-Off pursuant to the terms thereof.

Basis of Presentation

The unaudited financial statements for the three and six months ended June 30,2022 and 2021 include a summary of our significant accounting policies and should be read in conjunction with the discussion below and our financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this quarterly report. In the opinion of management, all material adjustments necessary to present fairly the results of operations for such periods have been included in the financial statements. All such adjustments are of a normal recurring nature.

Overview

We are a biopharmaceutical company with product candidates in pre-clinical and clinical development. We began operations in October 2012. We are principally focused on developing a product platform based upon a drug candidate called Bryostatin-1 for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, which is in the clinical testing stage. We are also evaluating Bryostatin-1 for other neurodegenerative or cognitive diseases and dysfunctions, such as Fragile X syndrome, Multiple Sclerosis, and Niemann-Pick Type C disease, which have undergone pre-clinical testing.

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Neurotrope had been a party to a technology license and services agreement with the original Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences Institute (which has been known as Cognitive Research Enterprises, Inc. since October 2016), and its affiliate NRV II, LLC, which we collectively refer to herein as “CRE,” pursuant to which we now have an exclusive non-transferable license to certain patents and technologies required to develop our proposed products. We were formed for the primary purpose of commercializing the technologies initially developed by BRNI for therapeutic applications for AD or other cognitive dysfunctions. These technologies have been under development by BRNI since 1999 and, until March 2013, had been financed through funding from a variety of non-investor sources (which include not-for-profit foundations, the NIH, which is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and individual philanthropists). From March 2013 forward, development of the licensed technology has been funded principally through us in collaboration with CRE.

Reverse Stock Split

On April 7, 2021, our stockholders approved our proposal to effect one reverse stock split of our outstanding shares of Common Stock, at any ratio between 1-for-1.5 and 1-for-20, at such time as the Board shall determine, in its sole discretion, before December 31, 2022. On May 19, 2021, we effected a 1-for-4 reverse stock split of our shares of Common Stock. As a result of the reverse stock split, every four (4) shares of our pre-reverse split Common Stock was combined and reclassified into one share of Common Stock. All share and per share information herein has been adjusted to retrospectively reflect this reverse stock split.

Results of Most Recent Confirmatory Phase 2 Clinical Trial

On September 9, 2019, Neurotrope issued a press release announcing that the confirmatory Phase 2 study of Bryostatin-1 in moderate to severe AD did not achieve statistical significance on the primary endpoint, which was changed from baseline to Week 13 in the Severe Impairment Battery (“SIB”) total score.

An average increase in SIB total score of 1.3 points and 2.1 points was observed for the Bryostatin-1 and placebo groups, respectively, at Week 13. There were multiple secondary outcome measures in this trial, including the changes from baseline at Weeks 5, 9 and 15 in the SIB total score. No statistically significant difference was observed in the change from baseline in SIB total score between the Bryostatin -1 and placebo treatment groups.

The confirmatory Phase 2 multicenter trial was designed to assess the safety and efficacy of Bryostatin-1 as a treatment for cognitive deficits in patients with moderate to severe AD — defined as a MMSE-2 score of 4-15 – who are not currently taking memantine. Patients were randomized 1:1 to be treated with either Bryostatin-1 20μg or placebo, receiving 7 doses over 12 weeks. Patients on memantine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, were excluded unless they had been discontinued from memantine treatment for a 30-day washout period prior to study enrollment. The primary efficacy endpoint was the change in the SIB score between the baseline and week 13. Secondary endpoints included repeated SIB changes from baseline SIB at weeks 5, 9, 13 and 15.

On January 22, 2020, we announced the completion of an additional analysis in connection with the confirmatory Phase 2 study, which examined moderately severe to severe AD patients treated with Bryostatin-1 in the absence of memantine. To adjust for the baseline imbalance observed in the study, a post-hoc analysis was conducted using paired data for individual patients, with each patient as his/her own control. For the pre-specified moderate stratum (i.e., MMSE-2 baseline scores 10-15), the baseline value and the week 13 value were used, resulting in pairs of observations for each patient. The changes from baseline for each patient were calculated and a paired t-test was used to compare the mean change from baseline to week 13 for each patient. A total of 65 patients had both baseline and week 13 values, from which there were 32 patients in the Bryostatin-1 treatment group and 33 patients in the placebo group. There was a statistically significant improvement over baseline (4.8 points) in the mean SIB at week 13 for subjects in the Bryostatin-1 treatment group (32 subjects), paired t-test p < 0.0076, 2-tailed. In the placebo group (33 subjects), there was also a statistically significant increase from baseline in the mean SIB at week 13, for paired t-test p < 0.0144, consistent with the placebo effect seen in the overall 203 study. Although there was a signal of Bryostatin-1’s benefit for the moderately severe stratum, the difference between the Bryostatin-1 and placebo treatment groups was not statistically significant (p=0.2727). As a further test of the robustness of this Moderate Stratum benefit signal, a pre-specified trend analysis (measuring increase of SIB improvement as a function of successive drug doses) was performed on the repeated SIB measures over time (Weeks 0, 5, 9, and 13). These trend analyses showed a significant positive slope of improvement for the treatment groups in the 203 study that was significantly greater than for the placebo group (p<.01).

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In connection with the additional analysis, we also announced the approval of a $2.7 million award from the NIH to support an additional Phase 2 clinical study focused on the moderate stratum for which we saw improvement in the 203 study. The grant provides for funds in the first year of approximately $1.0 million and funding in year two of approximately $1.7 million subject to satisfactory progress of the project. We are planning to meet with the FDA to present the totality of the clinical data for Bryostatin-1.

On July 23, 2020, we entered into the 2020 Services Agreement with WCT. The 2020 Services Agreement relates to services for our Phase 2 clinical study assessing the safety, tolerability and long-term efficacy of Bryostatin-1 in the treatment of moderately severe AD subjects not receiving memantine treatment. On January 22, 2022, the Company executed a change order with WCT to accelerate trial subject recruitment totaling approximately $1.4 million. In addition, on February 10, 2022, the Company signed an additional agreement with a third-party vendor to assist with the increased trial recruitment retention totaling approximately $1.0 million. The updated total estimated budget for the services, including pass-through costs, is approximately $12.0 million. As previously disclosed, on January 22, 2020, we were granted a $2.7 million award from the NIH, which award is being used to support the 2020 Study, resulting in an estimated net budgeted cost of the 2020 Study to us of $9.3 million. Of the $2.7 million grant, virtually all has been received as of February 22, 2022.

As of June 30, 2022, we incurred cumulative expenses of approximately $9.4 million associated with services provided by WCT and certain pass thru expenses incurred by WCT, which was offset by NIH reimbursements recognized of $2.7 million and, for the three months ended June 30, 2022, we incurred expenses of approximately $1.3 million associated with services provided by WCT and certain pass thru expenses incurred by WCT.

Additional Phase 2 Clinical Trial

On May 12, 2022, the Company entered into the 2022 Services Agreement with WCT. The 2022 Services Agreement relates to services for a Phase 2 “open label,” dose ranging study, clinical trial assessing the safety, tolerability and efficacy of Bryostatin-1 administered via infusion in the treatment of moderately severe to severe AD subjects not receiving memantine treatment.

Pursuant to the terms of the 2022 Services Agreement, WCT is providing services to enroll approximately 12 2022 Study subjects, which enrollment is currently underway. The first 2022 Study site was initiated during the third quarter of 2022. The total estimated budget for the services, including pass-through costs, is currently approximately $2.0 million. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2022, the Company incurred a total of approximately $450,000 for this clinical trial and, as of June 30, 2022, recorded a payable of approximately $80,000 on its balance sheet. During July 2022, the Company paid WCT 20%, or approximately $400,000, as a prepayment for services, pass thru and site expenses to be incurred for the 2022 Services Agreement. Either party may terminate the 2022 Services Agreement without cause upon ninety days prior written notice. Furthermore, in the event of a material breach by the other party, which breach is not cured by the breaching party, the other party may terminate the agreement upon 30 days’ prior written notice.

Other Development Projects

To the extent resources permit, we may pursue development of selected technology platforms with indications related to the treatment of various disorders, including neurodegenerative disorders such as AD, based on our currently licensed technology and/or technologies available from third party licensors or collaborators.

Nemours Agreement

On September 5, 2018, we announced a collaboration with Nemours, a premier U.S. children’s hospital, to initiate a clinical trial in children with Fragile X. In addition to the primary objective of safety and tolerability, measurements will be made of working memory, language and other functional aspects such as anxiety, repetitive behavior, executive functioning, and social behavior. On August 5, 2021, the Company announced its memorandum of understanding with Nemours A.I. DuPont Hospital (“Nemours”) to initiate a clinical trial using Bryostatin-1, under Orphan Drug Status, to treat Fragile X. The Company intends to provide the Bryostatin-1 drug product candidate and obtain the investigational new drug documentation (“IND”) and Nemours intends to provide the clinical site and attendant support for the trial. The Company and Nemours, jointly, will develop the trial protocol. The Company estimates its total trial and IND cost to be approximately $700,000. The Company plans to initiate a Phase 1 clinical trial during the second half of 2022.

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Cleveland Clinic

On February 23, 2022, the Company announced its collaboration with the Cleveland Clinic to pursue possible treatments for Multiple Sclerosis. The collaboration entails filing an IND and conducting initial clinical trials using Bryostatin-1. Future development work will be conducted pursuant to statements of work to be determined.

Impact of COVID-19

We face the ongoing risk that the coronavirus pandemic may slow the conduct of our current trials. In order to prioritize patient health and that of the investigators at clinical trial sites, we will monitor enrollment of new patients in our Phase 2 clinical trials of Bryostatin-1 for the treatment of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, some patients may be unwilling to enroll in our trials or be unable to comply with clinical trial protocols if quarantines or travel restrictions impede patient movement or interrupt healthcare services. These and other factors outside of our control could delay our ability to conduct clinical trials or release clinical trial results. In addition, the effects of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic may also increase non-trial costs such as insurance premiums, increase the demand for and cost of capital, increase loss of work time from key personnel, and negatively impact our key clinical trial vendors and supplier of API.

In light of the COVID-19 outbreak, the FDA has issued a number of new guidance documents. Specifically, as a result of the potential effect of the COVID-19 outbreak on many clinical trial programs in the US and globally, the FDA issued guidance concerning potential impacts on clinical trial programs, changes that may be necessary to such programs if they proceed, considerations regarding trial suspensions and discontinuations, the potential need to consult with or make submissions to relevant ethics committees, Institutional Review Board (“IRBs”), and the FDA, the use of alternative drug delivery methods, and considerations with respect the outbreak’s impacts on endpoints, data collection, study procedures, and analysis. Such developments may result in delays in our development of Bryostatin-1.

Results of Operations

Comparison of the six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021

The following table summarizes our results of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021:

Six Months ended

 

June 30,

Dollar

 

    

2022

    

2021

    

Change

    

% Change

 

Revenue

$

$

$

0

%

Operating Expenses:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Research and development expenses

$

3,427,175

$

2,138,060

$

1,289,115

60.3

%

General and administrative expenses

$

3,651,748

$

3,312,306

$

339,442

10.2

%

Other income, net

$

49,097

$

2,147

$

46,950

2,186.8

%

Net loss

$

7,029,826

$

5,448,219

$

1,581,607

29.0

%

Revenues

We did not generate any revenues for the six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021.

Operating Expenses

Overview

Total operating expenses for the six months ended June 30, 2022 were $7,078,923 as compared to $5,450,366 for the six months ended June 30, 2021, an increase of approximately 29.9%. The increase in total operating expenses is due to the increase in research and development activities and general and administrative expenses.

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Research and Development Expenses

For the six months ended June 30, 2022, we incurred $3,427,175 in research and development expenses as compared to $2,138,060 for the six months ended June 30, 2021, an increase of approximately 60.3%. These expenses were incurred primarily pursuant to developing the potential AD therapeutic product, specifically expenses relating to our ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial for AD. Of these expenses, for the six months ended June 30, 2022, $2,943,402 was incurred principally relating to our current confirmatory clinical trial and related storage of drug product, $152,658 for clinical consulting services, $14,931 of amortization of prepaid licensing fees relating to the Stanford License Agreement and Mount Sinai Agreement, $23,481 for development of alternative drug supply with Stanford University and $292,703 of non-cash stock options compensation expense; comparatively, for the six months ended June 30, 2021, $1,732,669 was incurred principally relating to our confirmatory clinical trial and related storage of drug product, $156,853 for clinical consulting services, $14,876 of amortization of prepaid licensing fees relating to the Stanford License Agreement and Mount Sinai Agreement, $24,197 for development of alternative drug supply with Stanford University and $209,465 of non-cash stock options compensation expense.

We expect our research and development expenses to level off as we expect that our current Phase 2 clinical trial for AD will be materially concluded by the end of 2022 while, to a lesser extent, our Phase 2 dose ranging study activities increase. Other development expenses might increase, as our resources permit, in order to advance our potential products. We are continuing to determine how to proceed with respect to our other current development programs for Bryostatin-1.

General and Administrative Expenses

We incurred $3,651,748 and $3,312,306 of general and administrative expenses for the six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively, an increase of approximately 10.2%. During the six months ended June 30, 2022, $601,507 was incurred primarily for wages, bonuses, vacation pay, severance, taxes and insurance, versus $667,552 for the six months ended June 30, 2021. The decrease in wages is primarily attributable to the reduction of bonus accruals for our former Chief Executive Officer; $207,019 was incurred for legal expenses versus $468,406 for the 2021 comparable period. The decrease in legal fees for 2022 is based upon prior year’s increased fees for one-time work for fundraising planning in 2021; $589,454 was incurred for outside operations consulting services during the six months ended June 30, 2022, versus $956,530 for the comparable period in 2021 as, during such period in 2021, we incurred additional non-cash expenses associated with warrant issuances for investment banking consulting services; $39,131 was incurred for travel expenses during the six months ended June 30, 2022, versus $28,167 for the comparable period in 2021; $133,569 was incurred for investor relations services during the six months ended June 30, 2022, versus $156,528 for the comparable period in 2021; $109,725 was incurred for professional fees associated with auditing, financial, accounting and tax advisory services during the six months ended June 30, 2022, versus $88,163 for the comparable period in 2021; $365,544 was incurred for insurance during the six months ended June 30, 2022, versus $327,545 for the comparable period in 2021, which increase is primarily attributable to an increase in premiums; $170,254 was incurred for utilities, supplies, license fees, filing costs, rent, advertising and other during the six months ended June 30, 2022, versus $109,089 for the comparable period in 2021, with the increase for 2022 primary attributable to stock market up-listing fees to Nasdaq and rent expenses associated with our new Maryland laboratory facility; and $1,435,545 was recorded as non-cash stock options compensation expense during the six months ended June 30, 2022, versus $510,326 for the comparable period in 2021, which increase is primarily attributable to equity awards granted after June 30, 2021 expensed in 2022.

Other Income / Expense

We earned $49,097 of net interest income for the six months ended June 30, 2022 as compared to $2,147 for the six months ended June 30, 2021 on funds deposited in interest bearing money market accounts. The increase is primarily attributable to the increase in money market interest income rates and higher average cash balances in 2022 compared to the corresponding period in 2021.

Net loss

We incurred losses of $7,029,826 and $5,448,219 for the six months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively. The increased loss was primarily attributable to the increase in net research and development expenses associated with our current Phase 2 confirmatory clinical trial and an increase in general and administrative expenses.

25

Comparison of the three months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021

The following table summarizes our results of operations for the three months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021:

    

Three Months ended

    

    

    

    

 

June 30,

Dollar

 

2022

2021

Change

% Change

 

Revenue

$

$

$

 

0

%

Operating Expenses:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Research and development expenses

$

1,941,101

$

986,280

$

954,821

 

96.8

%

General and administrative expenses

$

1,855,290

$

1,308,893

$

546,397

 

41.7

%

Other income, net

$

44,487

$

1,331

$

43,156

 

3,242.4

%

Net loss

$

3,751,904

$

2,293,842

$

1,458,062

 

63.6

%

Revenues

We did not generate any revenues for the three months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021.

Operating Expenses

Overview

Total operating expenses for the three months ended June 30, 2022 were $3,796,391 as compared to $2,295,173 for the three months ended June 30, 2021, an increase of approximately 65.4%. The increase in total operating expenses is due to the increase in research and development and general and administrative expenses.

Research and Development Expenses

For the three months ended June 30, 2022, we incurred $1,832,792 in research and development expenses as compared to $986,280 for the three months ended June 30, 2021, an increase of approximately 85.8%. These expenses were incurred primarily pursuant to developing the potential AD therapeutic product, specifically expenses relating to our ongoing Phase 2 clinical trial for AD. Of these expenses, for the three months ended June 30, 2022, $1,680,918 was incurred principally relating to our current confirmatory clinical trial and related storage of drug product, $73,113 for clinical consulting services, $7,479 of amortization of prepaid licensing fees relating to the Stanford License Agreement and Mount Sinai Agreement, $7,938 for development of alternative drug supply with Stanford University and $171,653 of non-cash stock options compensation expense as compared to, for the three months ended June 30, 2021, $834,080 was incurred principally relating to our confirmatory clinical trial and related storage of drug product, $93,203 for clinical consulting services, $7,479 of amortization of prepaid licensing fees relating to the Stanford and Mount Sinai license agreements, $15,755 for development of alternative drug supply with Stanford University and $35,763 of non-cash stock options compensation expense.

We expect our research and development expenses to level off as our current Phase 2 clinical trial for AD will be materially concluded by the end of 2022 while, to a lesser extent, our Phase 2 dose ranging study activities increases. Other development expenses might increase, as our resources permit, in order to advance our potential products. We are continuing to determine how to proceed with respect to our other current development programs for Bryostatin-1.

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General and Administrative Expenses

We incurred $1,855,290 and $1,308,893 of general and administrative expenses for the three months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively, an increase of approximately 41.7%. Of the amounts for the three months ended June 30, 2022, as compared to the comparable 2021 period: $307,603 was incurred primarily for wages, bonuses, vacation pay, severance, taxes and insurance, versus $237,337 for the 2021 comparable period. The increase is primarily attributable to the reclassification of our former Chief Executive Officer’s compensation to consulting fees for the comparable 2021 period; $77,804 was incurred for legal expenses versus $233,822 for the 2021 comparable period. The decrease for 2022 is based upon prior year’s increased fees for one-time work for fundraising planning in 2021; $193,250 was incurred for outside operations consulting services during the three months ended June 30, 2022, versus $363,854 for the comparable period in 2021 as, during such period in 2021, we incurred additional non-cash expenses associated with warrant issuances for investment banking consulting services; $24,479 was incurred for travel expenses during the three months ended June 30, 2022, versus $17,417 for the comparable period in 2021; $61,355 was incurred for investor relations services during the three months ended June 30, 2022, versus $89,459 for the comparable period in 2021; $87,677 was incurred for professional fees associated with auditing, financial, accounting and tax advisory services during the three months ended June 30, 2022, versus $38,268 for the comparable period in 2021. The increase for 2022 is attributable to expensing the 2021 audit in the second quarter of 2022 versus during the first quarter in 2021; $181,236 was incurred for insurance during the three months ended June 30, 2022, versus $165,437 for the comparable period in 2021, which increase is primarily attributable to an increase in premiums; $76,849 was incurred for utilities, supplies, license fees, filing costs, rent, advertising and other during the three months ended June 30, 2022, versus $47,510 for the comparable period in 2021, with the increase for 2022 primary attributable to stock market up-listing fees to Nasdaq and rent expenses associated with our new Maryland laboratory facility; and $845,037 was recorded as non-cash stock options compensation expense during the three months ended June 30, 2022, versus $115,789 for the comparable period in 2021, which increase is primarily attributable to equity awards granted after June 30, 2021 expensed in 2022.

Other Income / Expense

We earned $44,487 of net interest income for the three months ended June 30, 2022 as compared to $1,331 for the three months ended June 30, 2021 on funds deposited in interest bearing money market accounts. The increase is primarily attributable to the increase in money market interest income rates and higher average cash balances in 2022 compared to the corresponding period in 2021.

Net loss

We incurred losses of $3,751,904 and $2,293,842 for the three months ended June 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively. The increased loss was primarily attributable to the increase in net research and development expenses associated with our current Phase 2 confirmatory clinical trial and the increase in general and administrative expenses.

Financial Condition, Liquidity and Capital Resources

Cash and Working Capital

Since inception, we have incurred negative cash flows from operations. As of June 30, 2022, we had working capital of $28,932,496 as compared to working capital of $33,509,303 as of December 31, 2021. The $4,576,807 decrease in working capital was primarily attributable to approximately $7.1 million of operating expenses partially offset by non-cash expenses of approximately $1.8 million and cash proceeds from warrant exercises of approximately $553,000.

We expect that our current cash and cash equivalents of approximately $27.4 million will be sufficient to support our projected operating requirements for at least the next 12 months from the Form 10-Q filing date, which would include the continuing development and current Phase 2 clinical trial, of Bryostatin-1, our novel drug candidate targeting the activation of PKC epsilon.

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We expect to require additional capital in order to initiate, pursue and complete all potential AD clinical trials and obtain regulatory approval of one or more therapeutic candidates. However, additional future funding may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all. If we are unable to access additional funds when needed, we may not be able to initiate, pursue and complete all planned clinical trials or continue the development of our product candidates or we could be required to delay, scale back or eliminate some or all of our development programs and operations. Any additional equity financing, if available, may not be available on favorable terms, would most likely be significantly dilutive to our current stockholders and debt financing, if available, and may involve restrictive covenants. If we are able to access funds through collaborative or licensing arrangements, we may be required to relinquish rights to some of our technologies or product candidates that we would otherwise seek to develop or commercialize on our own, on terms that are not favorable to us. Our ability to access capital when needed is not assured and, if not achieved on a timely basis, would likely materially harm our business and financial condition.

Sources and Uses of Liquidity

Since inception, we have satisfied our operating cash requirements from transfers of cash from Neurotrope, which was raised by Neurotrope through the private placement of equity securities sold principally to outside investors and through the Company’s two private placements. We expect to continue to incur expenses, resulting in losses and negative cash flows from operations, over at least the next several years as we continue to develop AD and other therapeutic products. We anticipate that this development may include clinical trials in addition to our current ongoing clinical trial and additional research and development expenditures.

Six Months Ended June 30,

    

2022

    

2021

Cash used in operating activities

$

6,009,489

$

5,585,322

Cash used in investing activities

3,029

Cash provided by financing activities

 

553,150

31,492,353

Net Cash Used in Operating Activities

Cash used in operating activities was $6,009,489 for the six months ended June 30, 2022, compared to $5,585,322 for the six months ended June 30, 2021. The $424,167 increase primarily resulted from the increase in net loss of approximately $1.6 million and the decrease in accounts payable of approximately $403,000 partially offset by a decrease in net of prepaid and accrued expenses of approximately $795,000 and an increase in non-cash stock-based compensation of approximately $765,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2022.

Net Cash Used in Investing Activities

Net cash used in investing activities was $3,029 for the six months ended June 30, 2022 compared to $0 for the six months ended June 30, 2021. The cash used in investing activities for the six months ended June 30, 2022 was for capital expenditures.

Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities

Net cash provided by financing activities was $553,150 for the six months ended June 30, 2022 compared to cash provided by financing activities of $31,492,353 for the six months ended June 30, 2021. The net cash provided by financing activities for 2022 resulted from the exercise of investor warrants issued in 2021. The net cash provided by financing activities in 2021 was primarily attributable to $23.7 million of net proceeds from our private placement offerings, $7.6 million from warrant exercises and $127,000 from NIH grant funding proceeds

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

Not applicable to a smaller reporting company.

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Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

An evaluation was performed under the supervision and with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer, our principal executive officer and principal financial and accounting officer, respectively, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) or 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended) as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based on their evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures are not effective due to: inadequate segregation of duties consistent with control objectives in the areas over certain payroll and banking systems and user access controls; ineffective processes over period end financial disclosure and reporting including documentation of GAAP disclosure and reporting reviews supporting the financial reporting process and changes to chart of accounts; and ineffective information technology (IT) general computing controls including lack of risk and design assessments supporting IT security policies and procedures, user access, and IT controls within third party contracts. These weaknesses may affect management’s ability to determine if errors or inappropriate actions have taken place. Management is required to apply its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible changes in our disclosure controls and procedures.

We previously disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021, that our management, including our Chairman of the Board, principal executive officer and principal financial and accounting officer, assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on the criteria for effective internal control over financial reporting established in the 2013 Internal Control— Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”) and SEC guidance on conducting such assessments. Based on that evaluation, they concluded that, during the period covered by the Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021, such internal controls and procedures were not effective to detect the inappropriate application of US generally accepted accounting principles.

Based on management’s review, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were ineffective as of June 30, 2022. Notwithstanding the material weaknesses described above, our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, has concluded that financial statements, and other financial information included in this quarterly report, fairly present in all material respects our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows as of and for the periods presented in this quarterly report.

Changes in Internal Controls over Financial Reporting

There was no change in our internal controls over financial reporting that occurred during the period covered by this report, which has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal controls over financial reporting.

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PART II

OTHER INFORMATION

Item 1. Legal Proceedings.

None.

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

You should carefully review and consider the information regarding certain factors that could materially affect our business, consolidated financial condition or results of operations set forth under Item 1A. Risk Factors in our 2021 Annual Report on Form 10-K. There have been no material changes from the risk factors disclosed in our 2021 Annual Report on Form 10-K. We may disclose changes to risk factors from time to time in our future filings with the SEC.

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.

On June 7, 2022, we issued 679 shares of Common Stock to Neil Cataldi in exchange for investor relations services.

The foregoing transaction did not involve any underwriters or any public offering. The sale of the above securities was deemed to be exempt from registration under the Securities Act in reliance on Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act (and Regulation D promulgated thereunder) or Rule 701 promulgated under Section 3(b) of the Securities Act as transactions by an issuer not involving any public offering. The recipients of the securities in the transaction represented their intentions to acquire the securities for investment only and not with a view to, or for sale in connection with, any distribution thereof, and appropriate legends were affixed to the securities issued in these transactions. All recipients received or had, through their relationships with us, adequate access to information about us.

Item 3. Defaults upon Senior Securities.

None.

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

Not applicable.

Item 5. Other Information.

As previously disclosed, the Company entered into an offer letter (the “Offer Letter”) with Alan J. Tuchman, M.D., pursuant to which Dr. Tuchman agreed to serve as the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, commencing on December 7, 2020. The term of Dr. Tuchman’s employment pursuant to the Offer Letter is one year, which shall be extended automatically for six month periods unless either party gives timely written notice. Dr. Tuchman’s agreement was previously extended until December 7, 2022. On August 4, 2022, the Company entered into an amendment to the Offer Letter (the “Amendment”) to extend the term of Dr. Tuchman’s employment through June 7, 2023, and such term shall be extended for an additional six months upon Dr. Tuchman’s written notice to the Company at least 30 days prior to June 7, 2023. Pursuant to the Amendment, if Dr. Tuchman is terminated without Cause, Dr. Tuchman shall be entitled to severance equal to six months of Dr. Tuchman’s annual base salary.

The foregoing description of the Amendment does not purport to be complete and is qualified in its entirety by reference to the full text of the Amendment, a copy of which is filed as Exhibit 10.2 to this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and incorporated herein by reference.

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Item 6. Exhibits.

Exhibit
Number

    

 

 

 

 

10.1

Master Services Agreement, between Synaptogenix, Inc. and Worldwide Clinical Trials, Inc., dated as of February 7, 2022 and Work Order, dated May 12, 2022.

10.2+

Amendment to the offer letter, dated August 4, 2022, by and between the Company and Alan J. Tuchman, M.D.

31.1

 

Certification of the President and Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

31.2

 

Certification of the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

32.1*

 

Certification of the President and Chief Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

32.2*

 

Certification of the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

101

 

The following financial information from this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the period ended June 30, 2022, formatted in iXBRL (Inline Extensible Business Reporting Language): (i) the Condensed Statements of Operations; (ii) the Condensed Balance Sheets; (iii) the Condensed Statements of Cash Flows; and (iv) the Notes to Financial Statements, tagged as blocks of text.

104

Cover Page Interactive Data File (Embedded within the Inline XBRL document and included in Exhibit)

* The certifications attached as Exhibit 32.1 and Exhibit 32.2 that accompany this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are not deemed filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and are not to be incorporated by reference into any filing of Synaptogenix, Inc. under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (whether made before or after the date of such Form 10-Q), irrespective of any general incorporation language contained in such filing.

+ Management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement.

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SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

Synaptogenix, Inc.

 

 

Date: August 5, 2022

By:

/s/ Alan J. Tuchman, M.D.

 

 

Alan J. Tuchman, M.D.

 

 

Chief Executive Officer

 

 

(principal executive officer)

 

 

Date: August 5, 2022

By:

/s/ Robert Weinstein

 

 

Robert Weinstein

 

 

Chief Financial Officer, Executive Vice President, Secretary and Treasurer

 

 

(principal financial officer)

32