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RSTRF Restaurant Brands International Limited Partnership

Cover Page

Cover Page - CAD ($)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Feb. 15, 2021Jun. 30, 2020
Document Information [Line Items]
Document Type10-K
Document Annual Reporttrue
Document Period End DateDec. 31,
2020
Current Fiscal Year End Date--12-31
Document Transition Reportfalse
Entity File Number001-36787
Entity Registrant NameRESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP
Entity Incorporation, State or Country CodeZ4
Entity Tax Identification Number98-1206431
Entity Address, Address Line One130 King Street West, Suite 300
Entity Address, City or TownToronto,
Entity Address, State or ProvinceON
Entity Address, Postal Zip CodeM5X 1E1
City Area Code905
Local Phone Number339-6011
Title of 12(b) SecurityClass B Exchangeable Limited Partnership Units
Trading SymbolQSP
Entity Well-known Seasoned IssuerYes
Entity Voluntary FilersNo
Entity Current Reporting StatusYes
Entity Interactive Data CurrentYes
Entity Filer CategoryLarge Accelerated Filer
Entity Small Businessfalse
Entity Emerging Growth Companyfalse
ICFR Auditor Attestation Flagtrue
Entity Shell Companyfalse
Entity Public Float $ 902,302,015
Documents Incorporated by ReferencePortions of the definitive proxy statement of Restaurant Brands International Inc., the registrant’s general partner, for the 2021 Annual General Meeting of Shareholders of Restaurant Brands International Inc., which is to be filed no later than 120 days after December 31, 2020, are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K.
Amendment Flagfalse
Document Fiscal Year Focus2020
Document Fiscal Period FocusFY
Entity Central Index Key0001618755
Partnership exchangeable units
Document Information [Line Items]
Entity Common Stock, Shares Outstanding155,113,338
Class A common units
Document Information [Line Items]
Entity Common Stock, Shares Outstanding202,006,067

Consolidated Balance Sheets

Consolidated Balance Sheets - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Current assets:
Cash and cash equivalents $ 1,560 $ 1,533
Accounts and notes receivable, net of allowance of $42 and $13, respectively536 527
Inventories, net96 84
Prepaids and other current assets72 52
Total current assets2,264 2,196
Property and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation and amortization of $879 and $746, respectively2,031 2,007
Operating lease assets, net1,152 1,176
Intangible assets, net10,701 10,563
Goodwill5,739 5,651
Net investment in property leased to franchisees66 48
Other assets, net824 719
Total assets22,777 22,360
Current liabilities:
Accounts and drafts payable464 644
Other accrued liabilities835 790
Gift card liability191 168
Current portion of long-term debt and finance leases111 101
Total current liabilities1,601 1,703
Long-term debt, net of current portion12,397 11,759
Long-term portion of lease obligations315 288
Operating lease liabilities, net of current portion1,082 1,089
Other liabilities, net2,236 1,698
Deferred income taxes, net1,425 1,564
Total liabilities19,056 18,101
Commitments and contingencies (Note 18)
Partners’ capital:
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)(1,275)(1,178)
Total Partners’ capital3,717 4,255
Noncontrolling interests4 4
Total equity3,721 4,259
Total liabilities and equity22,777 22,360
Class A common units
Partners’ capital:
Class A common units7,994 7,786
Total equity7,994 7,786
Partnership exchangeable units
Partners’ capital:
Partnership exchangeable units - 155,113,338 units issued and outstanding at December 31, 2020; 165,507,199 units issued and outstanding at December 31, 2019(3,002)(2,353)
Total equity $ (3,002) $ (2,353)

Consolidated Balance Sheets (Pa

Consolidated Balance Sheets (Parenthetical) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Allowance for credit loss $ 42 $ 13
Accumulated depreciation and amortization $ 879 $ 746
Class A common units
Class A common units, issued (in shares)202,006,067 202,006,067
Class A common units, outstanding (in shares)202,006,067 202,006,067
Partnership exchangeable units
Partnership exchangeable units, issued (in shares)155,113,338 165,507,199
Partnership exchangeable units, outstanding (in shares)155,113,338 165,507,199

Consolidated Statements of Oper

Consolidated Statements of Operations - USD ($) shares in Millions, $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Revenues:
Total revenues $ 4,968 $ 5,603 $ 5,357
Operating costs and expenses:
Cost of sales1,610 1,813 1,818
Franchise and property expenses528 540 422
Selling, general and administrative expenses1,264 1,264 1,214
(Income) loss from equity method investments39 (11)(22)
Other operating expenses (income), net105 (10)8
Total operating costs and expenses3,546 3,596 3,440
Income from operations1,422 2,007 1,917
Interest expense, net508 532 535
Loss on early extinguishment of debt98 23 0
Income before income taxes816 1,452 1,382
Income tax expense66 341 238
Net income750 1,111 1,144
Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests2 2 1
Net income attributable to common unitholders748 1,109 1,143
Class A common units
Operating costs and expenses:
Net income486 643 612
Net income attributable to common unitholders $ 486 $ 643 $ 612
Earnings per unit - basic and diluted:
Earnings per unit - basic and diluted (in dollars per share) $ 2.41 $ 3.18 $ 3.03
Weighted average units outstanding - basic and diluted (Note 3):
Weighted average units outstanding - basic and diluted (in shares)202 202 202
Partnership exchangeable units
Operating costs and expenses:
Net income $ 262 $ 466 $ 531
Net income attributable to common unitholders $ 262 $ 466 $ 531
Earnings per unit - basic and diluted:
Earnings per unit - basic and diluted (in dollars per share) $ 1.62 $ 2.40 $ 2.46
Weighted average units outstanding - basic and diluted (Note 3):
Weighted average units outstanding - basic and diluted (in shares)162 194 216
Sales
Revenues:
Sales $ 2,013 $ 2,362 $ 2,355
Franchise and property revenues
Revenues:
Total revenues $ 2,955 $ 3,241 $ 3,002

Consolidated Statements of Comp

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Statement of Comprehensive Income [Abstract]
Net income $ 750 $ 1,111 $ 1,144
Foreign currency translation adjustment332 409 (831)
Net change in fair value of net investment hedges, net of tax of $60, $32, and $(101)(242)(86)282
Net change in fair value of cash flow hedges, net of tax of $91, $29, and $7(244)(77)(19)
Amounts reclassified to earnings of cash flow hedges, net of tax of $(27), $(6), and $(5)73 15 14
Gain (loss) recognized on defined benefit pension plans and other items, net of tax of $3, $1, and $0(16)(2)1
Other comprehensive income (loss)(97)259 (553)
Comprehensive income (loss)653 1,370 591
Comprehensive income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests2 2 1
Comprehensive income (loss) attributable to common unitholders $ 651 $ 1,368 $ 590

Consolidated Statements of Co_2

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss) (Parenthetical) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Statement of Comprehensive Income [Abstract]
Net change in fair value of net investment hedges, tax $ 60 $ 32 $ (101)
Net change in fair value of cash flow hedges, tax91 29 7
Amounts reclassified to earnings of cash flow hedges, tax(27)(6)(5)
Gain (loss) recognized on defined benefit pension plans and other items, tax $ 3 $ 1 $ 0

Consolidated Statements of Equi

Consolidated Statements of Equity - USD ($) $ in MillionsTotalCumulative Effect, Period of Adoption, AdjustmentAccumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)Noncontrolling InterestsClass A common unitsClass A common unitsCumulative Effect, Period of Adoption, AdjustmentPartnership exchangeable unitsPartnership exchangeable unitsCumulative Effect, Period of Adoption, Adjustment
Class A beginning balance (in shares) at Dec. 31, 2017202,006,067
Beginning balance at Dec. 31, 2017 $ 4,561 $ (250) $ (884) $ 1 $ 4,168 $ (132) $ 1,276 $ (118)
Partnership exchangeable units beginning balance (in shares) at Dec. 31, 2017217,708,924
Increase (Decrease) in Stockholders' Equity [Roll Forward]
Accounting Standards Update [Extensible List]us-gaap:AccountingStandardsUpdate201409Member
Distributions declared on class A common units $ (452)(452)
Distributions declared on partnership exchangeable units(387) $ (387)
Exchange of Partnership exchangeable units for RBI common shares $ 0 11 $ (11)
Exchange of partnership exchange units for RBI common shares (in shares)(10,185,333)(185,333)
Repurchase of partnership exchangeable units (in shares)(10,000,000)
Repurchase of Partnership exchangeable units $ (561) $ (561)
Capital contribution from RBI Inc.116 116
Restaurant VIE distributions0
Net income1,144 1 $ 612 531
Other comprehensive income (loss)(553)(553)
Class A ending balance (in shares) at Dec. 31, 2018202,006,067
Ending balance at Dec. 31, 20183,618 $ 21 (1,437)2 $ 4,323 $ 12 $ 730 $ 9
Partnership exchangeable units ending balance (in shares) at Dec. 31, 2018207,523,591
Increase (Decrease) in Stockholders' Equity [Roll Forward]
Distributions declared on class A common units(545)(545)
Distributions declared on partnership exchangeable units(382) $ (382)
Exchange of Partnership exchangeable units for RBI common shares $ 0 3,176 $ (3,176)
Exchange of partnership exchange units for RBI common shares (in shares)(42,016,392)(42,016,392)
Capital contribution from RBI Inc. $ 177 177
Restaurant VIE distributions0
Net income1,111 2 $ 643 $ 466
Other comprehensive income (loss)259 259
Class A ending balance (in shares) at Dec. 31, 2019202,006,067
Ending balance at Dec. 31, 20194,259 (1,178)4 $ 7,786 $ (2,353)
Partnership exchangeable units ending balance (in shares) at Dec. 31, 2019165,507,199
Increase (Decrease) in Stockholders' Equity [Roll Forward]
Distributions declared on class A common units(631)(631)
Distributions declared on partnership exchangeable units(336) $ (336)
Exchange of Partnership exchangeable units for RBI common shares $ 0 195 $ (195)
Exchange of partnership exchange units for RBI common shares (in shares)(10,393,861)(3,636,169)
Repurchase of partnership exchangeable units (in shares)(6,757,692)
Repurchase of Partnership exchangeable units $ (380) $ (380)
Capital contribution from RBI Inc.158 158
Restaurant VIE distributions(2)(2)
Net income750 2 $ 486 262
Other comprehensive income (loss)(97)(97)
Class A ending balance (in shares) at Dec. 31, 2020202,006,067
Ending balance at Dec. 31, 2020 $ 3,721 $ (1,275) $ 4 $ 7,994 $ (3,002)
Partnership exchangeable units ending balance (in shares) at Dec. 31, 2020155,113,338

Consolidated Statements of Eq_2

Consolidated Statements of Equity (Parenthetical) - $ / shares12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Class A common units
Cash dividend declared by board (in dollars per share) $ 3.12 $ 2.70 $ 2.23
Partnership exchangeable units
Cash dividend declared by board (in dollars per share) $ 2.08 $ 2 $ 1.80

Consolidated Statements of Cash

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Cash flows from operating activities:
Net income $ 750 $ 1,111 $ 1,144
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization189 185 180
Premiums paid and non-cash loss on early extinguishment of debt97 16 0
Amortization of deferred financing costs and debt issuance discount26 29 29
(Income) loss from equity method investments39 (11)(22)
Loss (gain) on remeasurement of foreign denominated transactions100 (14)(33)
Net (gains) losses on derivatives32 (49)(40)
Share-based compensation expense74 68 48
Deferred income taxes(208)58 29
Other28 6 5
Changes in current assets and liabilities, excluding acquisitions and dispositions:
Accounts and notes receivable(30)(53)19
Inventories and prepaids and other current assets(10)(15)(7)
Accounts and drafts payable(183)112 41
Other accrued liabilities and gift card liability16 (51)(219)
Tenant inducements paid to franchisees(22)(54)(52)
Other long-term assets and liabilities23 138 43
Net cash provided by operating activities921 1,476 1,165
Cash flows from investing activities:
Payments for property and equipment(117)(62)(86)
Net proceeds from disposal of assets, restaurant closures and refranchisings12 8 8
Settlement/sale of derivatives, net33 24 17
Other investing activities, net(7)0 17
Net cash used for investing activities(79)(30)(44)
Cash flows from financing activities:
Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt5,235 2,250 75
Repayments of long-term debt and finance leases(4,708)(2,266)(74)
Payment of financing costs(43)(50)(3)
Distributions paid on Class A and Partnership exchangeable units(959)(901)(728)
Repurchase of Partnership exchangeable units(380)0 (561)
Capital contribution from RBI Inc.82 102 61
(Payments) proceeds from derivatives(46)
(Payments) proceeds from derivatives23 0
Other financing activities, net(2)0 (55)
Net cash used for financing activities(821)(842)(1,285)
Effect of exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents6 16 (20)
Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents27 620 (184)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period1,533 913 1,097
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period1,560 1,533 913
Supplemental cash flow disclosures:
Interest paid463 584 561
Income taxes paid $ 267 $ 248 $ 433

Description of Business and Org

Description of Business and Organization12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Organization, Consolidation and Presentation of Financial Statements [Abstract]
Description of Business and OrganizationDescription of Business and Organization Description of Business Restaurant Brands International Limited Partnership (“Partnership”, “we”, “us” or “our”) is a Canadian limited partnership. We franchise and operate quick service restaurants serving premium coffee and other beverage and food products under the Tim Hortons ® brand (“Tim Hortons” or “TH”), fast food hamburgers principally under the Burger King ® brand (“Burger King” or “BK”), and chicken under the Popeyes ® brand (“Popeyes” or “PLK”). We are one of the world’s largest quick service restaurant, or QSR, companies as measured by total number of restaurants. As of December 31, 2020, we franchised or owned 4,949 Tim Hortons restaurants, 18,625 Burger King restaurants, and 3,451 Popeyes restaurants, for a total of 27,025 restaurants, and operate in more than 100 countries. Approximately 100% of current system-wide restaurants are franchised. We are a subsidiary of Restaurant Brands International Inc. (“RBI”). RBI is our sole general partner, and as such, RBI has the exclusive right, power and authority to manage, control, administer and operate the business and affairs and to make decisions regarding the undertaking and business of Partnership in accordance with the partnership agreement of Partnership (“partnership agreement”) and applicable laws. All references to “$” or “dollars” are to the currency of the United States unless otherwise indicated. All references to “Canadian dollars” or “C$” are to the currency of Canada unless otherwise indicated. COVID-19 The global crisis resulting from the spread of coronavirus (“COVID-19”) has had a substantial impact on our global restaurant operations during 2020. During 2020, some TH, BK and PLK restaurants were temporarily closed in certain countries and many of the restaurants that remained open had limited operations, such as drive-thru, takeout and delivery (where applicable) and that currently remains the case. Our operating results substantially depend upon our franchisees’ sales volumes, restaurant profitability, and financial stability. The financial impact of COVID-19 has had, and is expected to continue for an uncertain period to have, an adverse effect on many of our franchisees’ liquidity and we have worked closely with our franchisees to monitor and assist them with access to appropriate sources of liquidity in order to sustain their businesses throughout this crisis, such as offering rent relief programs for eligible franchisees who lease property from us. See Note 9, Leases , for further information about the rent relief programs. Additionally, we provided cash flow support by extending loans to eligible BK franchisees in the U.S. during the second and third quarters of 2020, and by advancing certain cash payments to eligible TH franchisees in Canada during the second quarter of 2020. During 2020, we recorded bad debt expense of $33 million compared to insignificant bad debt expense during 2019 and 2018. While these receivables remain contractually due and payable to us, the certainty of the amount and timing of payments has been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, our bad debt expense during 2020 reflects an adjustment to our historical collections experience to incorporate an estimate of the impact of current economic conditions resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. Actual collections may be materially higher or lower than this estimate reflects since it is reasonably possible the duration and future impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our business or our franchisees may differ from our assumptions. Ongoing material adverse effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on our franchisees for an extended period could negatively affect our operating results, including reductions in revenue and cash flow and could impact our impairment assessments of accounts receivable, long-lived assets, intangible assets or goodwill.

Significant Accounting Policies

Significant Accounting Policies12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Accounting Policies [Abstract]
Significant Accounting PoliciesSignificant Accounting Policies Basis of Presentation The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) and related rules and regulations of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission requires our management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and the related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. Actual results could differ from these estimates. Principles of Consolidation The consolidated financial statements (the "Financial Statements") include our accounts and the accounts of entities in which we have a controlling financial interest, the usual condition of which is ownership of a majority voting interest. All material intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. Investments in other affiliates that are owned 50% or less where we have significant influence are accounted for by the equity method. We also consider for consolidation entities in which we have certain interests, where the controlling financial interest may be achieved through arrangements that do not involve voting interests. Such an entity, known as a variable interest entity (“VIE”), is required to be consolidated by its primary beneficiary. The primary beneficiary is the entity that possesses the power to direct the activities of the VIE that most significantly impact its economic performance and has the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive benefits from the VIE that are significant to it. Our maximum exposure to loss resulting from involvement with VIEs is attributable to accounts and notes receivable balances, outstanding loan guarantees and future lease payments, where applicable. As our franchise and master franchise arrangements provide the franchise and master franchise entities the power to direct the activities that most significantly impact their economic performance, we do not consider ourselves the primary beneficiary of any such entity that might be a VIE. Tim Hortons has historically entered into certain arrangements in which an operator acquires the right to operate a restaurant, but Tim Hortons owns the restaurant’s assets. In these arrangements, Tim Hortons has the ability to determine which operators manage the restaurants and for what duration. We perform an analysis to determine if the legal entity in which operations are conducted is a VIE and consolidate a VIE entity if we also determine Tim Hortons is the entity’s primary beneficiary (“Restaurant VIEs”). As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, we determined that we are the primary beneficiary of 38 and 35 Restaurant VIEs, respectively, and accordingly, have consolidated the results of operations, assets and liabilities, and cash flows of these Restaurant VIEs in our Financial Statements. Assets and liabilities related to consolidated VIEs are not significant to our total consolidated assets and liabilities. Liabilities recognized as a result of consolidating these VIEs do not necessarily represent additional claims on our general assets; rather, they represent claims against the specific assets of the consolidated VIEs. Conversely, assets recognized as a result of consolidating these VIEs do not represent additional assets that could be used to satisfy claims by our creditors as they are not legally included within our general assets. Reclassifications Certain prior year amounts in the accompanying consolidated financial statements and notes to the consolidated financial statements have been reclassified in order to be comparable with the current year classifications. Foreign Currency Translation and Transaction Gains and Losses Our functional currency is the U.S. dollar, since our term loans and senior secured notes are denominated in U.S. dollars. The functional currency of each of our operating subsidiaries is generally the currency of the economic environment in which the subsidiary primarily does business. Our foreign subsidiaries’ financial statements are translated into U.S. dollars using the foreign exchange rates applicable to the dates of the financial statements. Assets and liabilities are translated using the end-of-period spot foreign exchange rates. Income, expenses and cash flows are translated at the average foreign exchange rates for each period. Equity accounts are translated at historical foreign exchange rates. The effects of these translation adjustments are reported as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (“AOCI”) in the consolidated statements of equity. For any transaction that is denominated in a currency different from the entity’s functional currency, we record a gain or loss based on the difference between the foreign exchange rate at the transaction date and the foreign exchange rate at the transaction settlement date (or rate at period end, if unsettled) which is included within other operating expenses (income), net in the consolidated statements of operations. Cash and Cash Equivalents All highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less and credit card receivables are considered cash equivalents. Inventories Inventories are carried at the lower of cost or net realizable value and consist primarily of raw materials such as green coffee beans and finished goods such as new equipment, parts, paper supplies and restaurant food items. The moving average method is used to determine the cost of raw materials and finished goods inventories held for sale to Tim Hortons franchisees. Property and Equipment, net We record property and equipment at historical cost less accumulated depreciation and amortization, which is recognized using the straight-line method over the following estimated useful lives: (i) buildings and improvements – up to 40 years; (ii) restaurant equipment – up to 17 years; (iii) furniture, fixtures and other – up to 10 years; and (iv) manufacturing equipment – up to 25 years. Leasehold improvements to properties where we are the lessee are amortized over the lesser of the remaining term of the lease or the estimated useful life of the improvement. Major improvements are capitalized, while maintenance and repairs are expensed when incurred. Leases We transitioned to Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 842, Leases (“ASC 842”), from ASC Topic 840, Leases (the “Previous Standard”) on January 1, 2019. Our Financial Statements reflect the application of ASC 842 guidance beginning in 2019, while our Financial Statements for prior periods were prepared under the guidance of the Previous Standard. In all leases, whether we are the lessor or lessee, we define lease term as the noncancellable term of the lease plus any renewals covered by renewal options that are reasonably certain of exercise based on our assessment of the economic factors relevant to the lessee. The noncancellable term of the lease commences on the date the lessor makes the underlying property in the lease available to the lessee, irrespective of when lease payments begin under the contract. Lessor Accounting We recognize lease payments for operating leases as property revenue on a straight-line basis over the lease term, and property revenue is presented net of any related sales tax. Lease incentive payments we make to lessees are amortized as a reduction in property revenue over the lease term. In accordance with ASC 842, we account for reimbursements of maintenance and property tax costs paid to us by lessees as property revenue. These expenses and reimbursements were presented on a net basis under the Previous Standard. We also have net investments in properties leased to franchisees, which meet the criteria of sales-type leases under ASC 842 or met the criteria of direct financing leases under the Previous Standard. Investments in sales-type leases and direct financing leases are recorded on a net basis. Profit or loss on sales-type leases is recognized at lease commencement and recorded in other operating expenses (income), net. Unearned income on direct financing leases is deferred, included in the net investment in the lease, and recognized over the lease term yielding a constant periodic rate of return on the net investment in the lease. We recognize variable lease payment income in the period when changes in facts and circumstances on which the variable lease payments are based occur. Lessee Accounting In accordance with ASC 842, in leases where we are the lessee, we recognize a right-of-use (“ROU”) asset and lease liability at lease commencement, which are measured by discounting lease payments using our incremental borrowing rate as the discount rate. We determine the incremental borrowing rate applicable to each lease by reference to our outstanding secured borrowings and implied spreads over the risk-free discount rates that correspond to the term of each lease, as adjusted for the currency of the lease. Subsequent amortization of the ROU asset and accretion of the lease liability for an operating lease is recognized as a single lease cost, on a straight-line basis, over the lease term. Reductions of the ROU asset and the change in the lease liability are included in changes in Other long-term assets and liabilities in the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows. Under the Previous Standard, we did not recognize assets and liabilities for the rights and obligations created by operating leases and recorded rental expense for operating leases on a straight-line basis over the lease term, net of any applicable lease incentive amortization. A finance lease ROU asset is depreciated on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the useful life of the leased asset or lease term. Interest on each finance lease liability is determined as the amount that results in a constant periodic discount rate on the remaining balance of the liability. Operating lease and finance lease ROU assets are assessed for impairment in accordance with our long-lived asset impairment policy. We reassess lease classification and remeasure ROU assets and lease liabilities when a lease is modified and that modification is not accounted for as a separate contract or upon certain other events that require reassessment in accordance with ASC 842. Maintenance and property tax expenses are accounted for on an accrual basis as variable lease cost. We recognize variable lease cost in the period when changes in facts and circumstances on which the variable lease payments are based occur. Goodwill and Intangible Assets Not Subject to Amortization Goodwill represents the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed in connection with the acquisition of Popeyes in 2017, the acquisition of Tim Hortons in 2014 and the acquisition of Burger King Holdings, Inc. by 3G Capital Partners Ltd. in 2010. Our indefinite-lived intangible assets consist of the Tim Hortons brand, the Burger King brand, and the Popeyes brand (each a “Brand” and together, the “Brands”). Goodwill and the Brands are tested for impairment at least annually as of October 1 of each year and more often if an event occurs or circumstances change which indicate impairment might exist. Our annual impairment tests of goodwill and the Brands may be completed through qualitative assessments. We may elect to bypass the qualitative assessment and proceed directly to a quantitative impairment test for any reporting unit or Brand in any period. We can resume the qualitative assessment for any reporting unit or Brand in any subsequent period. Under a qualitative approach, our impairment review for goodwill consists of an assessment of whether it is more-likely-than-not that a reporting unit’s fair value is less than its carrying amount. If we elect to bypass the qualitative assessment for any reporting unit, or if a qualitative assessment indicates it is more-likely-than-not that the estimated carrying value of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, we perform a quantitative goodwill impairment test that requires us to estimate the fair value of the reporting unit. If the fair value of the reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, we will measure any goodwill impairment loss as the amount by which the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the total amount of goodwill allocated to that reporting unit. Under a qualitative approach, our impairment review for the Brands consists of an assessment of whether it is more-likely-than-not that a Brand’s fair value is less than its carrying amount. If we elect to bypass the qualitative assessment for a Brand, or if a qualitative assessment indicates it is more-likely-than-not that the estimated carrying value of a Brand exceeds its fair value, we estimate the fair value of the Brand and compare it to its carrying amount. If the carrying amount exceeds fair value, an impairment loss is recognized in an amount equal to that excess. We completed our impairment tests for goodwill and the Brands as of October 1, 2020, 2019 and 2018 and no impairment resulted. Long-Lived Assets Long-lived assets, such as property and equipment, intangible assets subject to amortization and lease right-of-use assets, are tested for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset or asset group may not be recoverable. Some of the events or changes in circumstances that would trigger an impairment review include, but are not limited to, bankruptcy proceedings or other significant financial distress of a lessee; significant negative industry or economic trends; knowledge of transactions involving the sale of similar property at amounts below the carrying value; or our expectation to dispose of long-lived assets before the end of their estimated useful lives. The impairment test for long-lived assets requires us to assess the recoverability of long-lived assets by comparing their net carrying value to the sum of undiscounted estimated future cash flows directly associated with and arising from use and eventual disposition of the assets or asset group. Long-lived assets are grouped for recognition and measurement of impairment at the lowest level for which identifiable cash flows are largely independent of the cash flows of other assets. If the net carrying value of a group of long-lived assets exceeds the sum of related undiscounted estimated future cash flows, we record an impairment charge equal to the excess, if any, of the net carrying value over fair value. Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) Other comprehensive income (loss) (“OCI”) refers to revenues, expenses, gains and losses that are included in comprehensive income (loss), but are excluded from net income (loss) as these amounts are recorded directly as an adjustment to equity, net of tax. Our other comprehensive income (loss) is primarily comprised of unrealized gains and losses on foreign currency translation adjustments and unrealized gains and losses on hedging activity, net of tax. Derivative Financial Instruments We recognize and measure all derivative instruments as either assets or liabilities at fair value in the consolidated balance sheets. We may enter into derivatives that are not designated as hedging instruments for accounting purposes, but which largely offset the economic impact of certain transactions. Gains or losses resulting from changes in the fair value of derivatives are recognized in earnings or recorded in other comprehensive income (loss) and recognized in the consolidated statements of operations when the hedged item affects earnings, depending on the purpose of the derivatives and whether they qualify for, and we have applied, hedge accounting treatment. When applying hedge accounting, we designate at a derivative’s inception, the specific assets, liabilities or future commitments being hedged, and assess the hedge’s effectiveness at inception and on an ongoing basis. We discontinue hedge accounting when: (i) we determine that the cash flow derivative is no longer effective in offsetting changes in the cash flows of a hedged item; (ii) the derivative expires or is sold, terminated or exercised; (iii) it is no longer probable that the forecasted transaction will occur; or (iv) management determines that designation of the derivatives as a hedge instrument is no longer appropriate. We do not enter into or hold derivatives for speculative purposes. Disclosures about Fair Value Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants in the principal market, or if none exists, the most advantageous market, for the specific asset or liability at the measurement date (the exit price). The fair value is based on assumptions that market participants would use when pricing the asset or liability. The fair values are assigned a level within the fair value hierarchy, depending on the source of the inputs into the calculation, as follows: Level 1 Observable inputs that reflect quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets. Level 2 Inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability either directly or indirectly. Level 3 Unobservable inputs reflecting management’s own assumptions about the inputs used in pricing the asset or liability. The carrying amounts for cash and cash equivalents, accounts and notes receivable and accounts and drafts payable approximate fair value based on the short-term nature of these amounts. We carry all of our derivatives at fair value and value them using various pricing models or discounted cash flow analysis that incorporate observable market parameters, such as interest rate yield curves and currency rates, which are Level 2 inputs. Derivative valuations incorporate credit risk adjustments that are necessary to reflect the probability of default by the counterparty or us. For disclosures about the fair value measurements of our derivative instruments, see Note 11, Derivative Instruments . The following table presents the fair value of our variable rate term debt and senior notes, estimated using inputs based on bid and offer prices that are Level 2 inputs, and principal carrying amount (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Fair value of our variable term debt and senior notes $ 12,477 $ 12,075 Principal carrying amount of our variable term debt and senior notes 12,453 11,900 The determination of fair values of our reporting units and the determination of the fair value of the Brands for impairment testing using a quantitative approach during 2020, 2019 and 2018 were based upon Level 3 inputs. Revenue Recognition Sales Sales consist primarily of supply chain sales, which represent sales of products, supplies and restaurant equipment to franchisees, as well as sales to retailers and are presented net of any related sales tax. Orders placed by customers specify the goods to be delivered and transaction prices for supply chain sales. Revenue is recognized upon transfer of control over ordered items, generally upon delivery to the customer, which is when the customer obtains physical possession of the goods, legal title is transferred, the customer has all risks and rewards of ownership and an obligation to pay for the goods is created. Shipping and handling costs associated with outbound freight for supply chain sales are accounted for as fulfillment costs and classified as cost of sales. To a much lesser extent, sales also include Company restaurant sales (including Restaurant VIEs), which consist of sales to restaurant guests. Revenue from Company restaurant sales is recognized at the point of sale. Taxes assessed by a governmental authority that we collect are excluded from revenue. Franchise revenues Franchise revenues consist primarily of royalties, advertising fund contributions, initial and renewal franchise fees and upfront fees from development agreements and master franchise and development agreements (“MFDAs”). Under franchise agreements, we provide franchisees with (i) a franchise license, which includes a license to use our intellectual property and, in those markets where our subsidiaries manage an advertising fund, advertising and promotion management, (ii) pre-opening services, such as training and inspections, and (iii) ongoing services, such as development of training materials and menu items and restaurant monitoring and inspections. The services we provide under franchise agreements are highly interrelated and dependent upon the franchise license and we concluded the services do not represent individually distinct performance obligations. Consequently, we bundle the franchise license performance obligation and promises to provide services into a single performance obligation, which we satisfy by providing a right to use our intellectual property over the term of each franchise agreement. Royalties, including franchisee contributions to advertising funds managed by our subsidiaries, are calculated as a percentage of franchise restaurant sales over the term of the franchise agreement. Under our franchise agreements, advertising contributions paid by franchisees must be spent on advertising, product development, marketing and related activities. Initial and renewal franchise fees are payable by the franchisee upon a new restaurant opening or renewal of an existing franchise agreement. Our franchise agreement royalties, inclusive of advertising fund contributions, represent sales-based royalties that are related entirely to our performance obligation under the franchise agreement and are recognized as franchise sales occur. Additionally, initial and renewal franchise fees are recognized as revenue on a straight-line basis over the term of the respective agreement. Our performance obligation under development agreements other than MFDAs generally consists of an obligation to grant exclusive development rights over a stated term. These development rights are not distinct from franchise agreements, so upfront fees paid by franchisees for exclusive development rights are deferred and apportioned to each franchise restaurant opened by the franchisee. The pro rata amount apportioned to each restaurant is accounted for as an initial franchise fee. We have a distinct performance obligation under our MFDAs to grant subfranchising rights over a stated term. Under the terms of MFDAs, we typically either receive an upfront fee paid in cash and/or receive noncash consideration in the form of an equity interest in the master franchisee or an affiliate of the master franchisee. We account for noncash consideration as investments in the applicable equity method investee and recognize revenue in an amount equal to the fair value of the equity interest received. Upfront fees from master franchisees, including the fair value of noncash consideration, are deferred and amortized over the MFDA term on a straight-line basis. We may recognize unamortized upfront fees when a contract with a franchisee or master franchisee is modified and is accounted for as a termination of the existing contract. The portion of gift cards sold to customers which are never redeemed is commonly referred to as gift card breakage. We recognize gift card breakage income proportionately as each gift card is redeemed using an estimated breakage rate based on our historical experience. Property revenues Property revenues consists of rental income from properties we lease or sublease to franchisees. Property revenues are accounted for in accordance with applicable accounting guidance for leases and are excluded from the scope of revenue recognition guidance. Advertising and Promotional Costs Company restaurants and franchise restaurants contribute to advertising funds that our subsidiaries manage in the United States and Canada and certain other international markets. The advertising funds expense the production costs of advertising when the advertisements are first aired or displayed. All other advertising and promotional costs are expensed in the period incurred. Under our franchise agreements, advertising contributions received from franchisees must be spent on advertising, product development, marketing and related activities. Advertising contributions received from franchisees are included in franchise and property revenues and advertising expenses are included as selling, general and administrative expenses. Advertising expenses included in selling, general and administrative expenses totaled $857 million for 2020, $858 million for 2019 and $793 million for 2018. The advertising contributions by Company restaurants (including Restaurant VIEs) are eliminated in consolidation. Deferred Financing Costs Deferred financing costs are amortized over the term of the related debt agreement into interest expense using the effective interest method. Income Taxes Amounts in the Financial Statements related to income taxes are calculated using the principles of ASC Topic 740, Income Taxes . Under these principles, deferred tax assets and liabilities reflect the impact of temporary differences between the amounts of assets and liabilities recognized for financial reporting purposes and the amounts recognized for tax purposes, as well as tax credit carry-forwards and loss carry-forwards. These deferred taxes are measured by applying currently enacted tax rates. A deferred tax asset is recognized when it is considered more-likely-than-not to be realized. The effects of changes in tax rates on deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized in income in the year in which the law is enacted. A valuation allowance reduces deferred tax assets when it is more-likely-than-not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. We recognize positions taken or expected to be taken in a tax return in the Financial Statements when it is more-likely-than-not (i.e., a likelihood of more than 50%) that the position would be sustained upon examination by tax authorities. A recognized tax position is then measured at the largest amount of benefit with greater than 50% likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. Translation gains and losses resulting from the remeasurement of foreign deferred tax assets or liabilities denominated in a currency other than the functional currency are classified as other operating expenses (income), net in the consolidated statements of operations. Share-based Compensation Compensation expense related to the issuance of share-based awards to our employees is measured at fair value on the grant date. We use the Black-Scholes option pricing model to value stock options. The compensation expense for awards that vest over a future service period is recognized over the requisite service period on a straight-line basis, adjusted for estimated forfeitures of awards that are not expected to vest. We use historical data to estimate forfeitures for share-based awards. Upon the end of the service period, compensation expense is adjusted to account for the actual forfeiture rate. The compensation expense for awards that contain performance conditions is recognized when it is probable that the performance conditions will be achieved. New Accounting Pronouncements Credit Losses – In June 2016, the FASB issued guidance that requires companies to measure and recognize lifetime expected credit losses for certain financial instruments, including trade accounts receivable and net investments in direct financing and sales-type leases. Expected credit losses are estimated using relevant information about past events, including historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts that affect the collectability of the reported amount. This amendment was effective commencing in 2020, using a modified retrospective approach. The adoption of this new guidance did not have a material impact on our Financial Statements. Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes – In December 2019, the FASB issued guidance which simplifies the accounting for income taxes by removing certain exceptions and by clarifying and amending existing guidance applicable to accounting for income taxes. The amendment is effective commencing in 2021 with early adoption permitted. We do not anticipate the adoption of this new guidance will have a material impact on our Financial Statements. Accounting Relief for the Transition Away from LIBOR and Certain other Reference Rates – In March 2020 and as clarified in January 2021, the FASB issued guidance which provides optional expedients and exceptions for applying U.S. GAAP to contracts, hedging relationships, and other transactions that reference LIBOR or another reference rate expected to be discontinued because of reference rate reform. This amendment is effective as of March 12, 2020 through December 31, 2022. The expedients and exceptions provided by this new guidance do not apply to contract modifications made and hedging relationships entered into or evaluated after December 31, 2022, except for hedging relationships existing as of December 31, 2022, that an entity has elected certain optional expedients for and that are retained through the end of the hedging relationships. We are currently evaluating the impact that the adoption of this new guidance will have on our Financial Statements and have not adopted any of the transition relief available under the new guidance as of December 31, 2020.

Earnings Per Unit

Earnings Per Unit12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Earnings Per Share [Abstract]
Earnings Per UnitEarnings Per Unit Partnership uses the two-class method in the computation of earnings per unit. Pursuant to the terms of the partnership agreement, RBI, as the holder of the Class A common units, is entitled to receive distributions from Partnership in an amount equal to the aggregate dividends payable by RBI to holders of RBI common shares, and the holders of Class B exchangeable limited partnership units (the “Partnership exchangeable units”) are entitled to receive distributions from Partnership in an amount per unit equal to the dividends payable by RBI on each RBI common share. Partnership’s net income available to common unitholders is allocated between the Class A common units and Partnership exchangeable units on a fully-distributed basis and reflects residual net income after noncontrolling interests. Basic and diluted earnings per Class A common unit is determined by dividing net income allocated to Class A common unitholders by the weighted average number of Class A common units outstanding for the period. Basic and diluted earnings per Partnership exchangeable unit is determined by dividing net income allocated to the Partnership exchangeable units by the weighted average number of Partnership exchangeable units outstanding during the period. There are no dilutive securities for Partnership as the exercise of stock options will not affect the numbers of Class A common units or Partnership exchangeable units outstanding. However, the issuance of shares by RBI in future periods will affect the allocation of net income attributable to common unitholders between Partnership’s Class A common units and Partnership exchangeable units. The following table summarizes the basic and diluted earnings per unit calculations (in millions, except per unit amounts): 2020 2019 2018 Allocation of net income among partner interests: Net income allocated to Class A common unitholders $ 486 $ 643 $ 612 Net income allocated to Partnership exchangeable unitholders 262 466 531 Net income attributable to common unitholders $ 748 $ 1,109 $ 1,143 Denominator - basic and diluted partnership units: Weighted average Class A common units 202 202 202 Weighted average Partnership exchangeable units 162 194 216 Earnings per unit - basic and diluted: Class A common units (a) $ 2.41 $ 3.18 $ 3.03 Partnership exchangeable units (a) $ 1.62 $ 2.40 $ 2.46

Property and Equipment, net

Property and Equipment, net12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Property, Plant and Equipment [Abstract]
Property and Equipment, netProperty and Equipment, net Property and equipment, net, consist of the following (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Land $ 1,007 $ 1,006 Buildings and improvements 1,192 1,148 Restaurant equipment 163 109 Furniture, fixtures, and other 242 210 Finance leases 289 245 Construction in progress 17 35 2,910 2,753 Accumulated depreciation and amortization (879) (746) Property and equipment, net $ 2,031 $ 2,007 Depreciation and amortization expense on property and equipment totaled $140 million for 2020, $136 million for 2019 and $148 million for 2018. Included in our property and equipment, net at December 31, 2020 and 2019 are $238 million and $222 million, respectively, of assets leased under finance leases (mostly buildings and improvements), net of accumulated depreciation and amortization of $51 million and $23 million, respectively.

Intangible Assets, net and Good

Intangible Assets, net and Goodwill12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Goodwill and Intangible Assets Disclosure [Abstract]
Intangible Assets, net and GoodwillIntangible Assets, net and Goodwill Intangible assets, net and goodwill consist of the following (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Gross Accumulated Amortization Net Gross Accumulated Amortization Net Identifiable assets subject to amortization: Franchise agreements $ 735 $ (264) $ 471 $ 720 $ (225) $ 495 Favorable leases 117 (66) 51 127 (65) 62 Subtotal 852 (330) 522 847 (290) 557 Indefinite-lived intangible assets: Tim Hortons brand $ 6,650 $ — $ 6,650 $ 6,534 $ — $ 6,534 Burger King brand 2,174 — 2,174 2,117 — 2,117 Popeyes brand 1,355 — 1,355 1,355 — 1,355 Subtotal 10,179 — 10,179 10,006 — 10,006 Intangible assets, net $ 10,701 $ 10,563 Goodwill Tim Hortons segment $ 4,279 $ 4,207 Burger King segment 614 598 Popeyes segment 846 846 Total $ 5,739 $ 5,651 Amortization expense on intangible assets totaled $43 million for 2020, $44 million for 2019, and $70 million for 2018. The change in the brands and goodwill balances during 2020 was due to the impact of foreign currency translation. As of December 31, 2020, the estimated future amortization expense on identifiable assets subject to amortization is as follows (in millions): Twelve-months ended December 31, Amount 2021 $ 41 2022 40 2023 38 2024 37 2025 35 Thereafter 331 Total $ 522

Equity Method Investments

Equity Method Investments12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Equity Method Investments and Joint Ventures [Abstract]
Equity Method InvestmentsEquity Method Investments The aggregate carrying amount of our equity method investments was $205 million and $266 million as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, and is included as a component of Other assets, net in our consolidated balance sheets. TH and BK both have equity method investments. PLK did not have any equity method investments as of December 31, 2020 and 2019. With respect to our TH business, the most significant equity method investment is our 50.0% joint venture interest with The Wendy’s Company (the “TIMWEN Partnership”), which jointly holds real estate underlying Canadian combination restaurants. Distributions received from this joint venture were $8 million, $13 million and $13 million during 2020, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Except for the following equity method investments, no quoted market prices are available for our other equity method investments. The aggregate market value of our 15.3% equity interest in Carrols Restaurant Group, Inc. (“Carrols”) based on the quoted market price on December 31, 2020 is approximately $59 million. The aggregate market value of our 9.4% equity interest in BK Brasil Operação e Assessoria a Restaurantes S.A. based on the quoted market price on December 31, 2020 is approximately $47 million. As of December 31, 2020, the fair value of these equity method investments exceeds the carrying amount. We have equity interests in entities that own or franchise Tim Hortons or Burger King restaurants. Franchise and property revenue recognized from franchisees that are owned or franchised by entities in which we have an equity interest consist of the following (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Revenues from affiliates: Royalties $ 289 $ 345 $ 310 Property revenues 32 33 36 Franchise fees and other revenue 14 10 11 Total $ 335 $ 388 $ 357 We recognized rent expense associated with the TIMWEN Partnership of $15 million, $19 million, and $20 million during 2020, 2019 and 2018, respectively. At December 31, 2020 and 2019, we had $52 million and $47 million, respectively, of accounts receivable, net from our equity method investments which were recorded in accounts and notes receivable, net in our consolidated balance sheets. (Income) loss from equity method investments reflects our share of investee net income or loss, non-cash dilution gains or losses from changes in our ownership interests in equity method investees and basis difference amortization. We recorded increases to the carrying value of our equity method investment balances and non-cash dilution gains in the amounts of $11 million and $20 million during 2019 and 2018, respectively. No non-cash dilution gains were recorded during 2020. The dilution gains resulted from the issuance of capital stock by our equity method investees, which reduced our ownership interests in these equity method investments. The dilution gains we recorded in connection with the issuance of capital stock reflect adjustments to the differences between the amount of underlying equity in the net assets of equity method investees before and after their issuance of capital stock.

Other Accrued Liabilities and O

Other Accrued Liabilities and Other Liabilities12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Other Liabilities Disclosure [Abstract]
Other Accrued Liabilities and Other LiabilitiesOther Accrued Liabilities and Other Liabilities Other accrued liabilities (current) and other liabilities, net (non-current) consist of the following (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Current: Dividend payable $ 239 $ 232 Interest payable 66 71 Accrued compensation and benefits 78 57 Taxes payable 122 126 Deferred income 42 35 Accrued advertising expenses 59 40 Restructuring and other provisions 12 8 Current portion of operating lease liabilities 137 126 Other 80 95 Other accrued liabilities $ 835 $ 790 Non-current: Taxes payable $ 626 $ 579 Contract liabilities (see Note 14) 528 541 Derivatives liabilities 865 341 Unfavorable leases 81 103 Accrued pension 70 65 Deferred income 28 25 Other 38 44 Other liabilities, net $ 2,236 $ 1,698

Long-Term Debt

Long-Term Debt12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Debt Disclosure [Abstract]
Long-Term DebtLong-Term Debt Long-term debt consist of the following (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Term Loan B (due November 19, 2026) $ 5,297 $ 5,350 Term Loan A (due October 7, 2024) 731 750 2017 4.25% Senior Notes (due May 15, 2024) 775 1,500 2019 3.875% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028) 750 750 2020 5.75% Senior Notes (due April 15, 2025) 500 — 2020 3.50% Senior Notes (due February 15, 2029) 750 — 2017 5.00% Senior Notes (due October 15, 2025) — 2,800 2019 4.375% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028) 750 750 2020 4.00% Senior Notes (due October 15, 2030) 2,900 — TH Facility and other 178 81 Less: unamortized deferred financing costs and deferred issuance discount (155) (148) Total debt, net 12,476 11,833 Less: current maturities of debt (79) (74) Total long-term debt $ 12,397 $ 11,759 Credit Facilities On September 6, 2019, two of our subsidiaries (the "Borrowers") entered into a fourth incremental facility amendment (the "Fourth Incremental Amendment") to the credit agreement governing our senior secured term loan facilities (the "Term Loan Facilities") and our senior secured revolving credit facility (including revolving loans, swingline loans and letters of credit) (the "Revolving Credit Facility" and together with the Term Loan Facilities, the "Credit Facilities"). Under the Fourth Incremental Amendment, (i) we obtained a new term loan in the aggregate principal amount of $750 million (the "Term Loan A") with a maturity date of October 7, 2024 (subject to earlier maturity in specified circumstances), (ii) the interest rate applicable to the Term Loan A and Revolving Credit Facility is, at our option, either (a) a base rate, subject to a floor of 1.00%, plus an applicable margin varying from 0.00% to 0.50%, or (b) a Eurocurrency rate, subject to a floor of 0.00%, plus an applicable margin varying between 0.75% and 1.50%, in each case, determined by reference to a net first lien leverage based pricing grid, (iii) the aggregate principal amount of the commitments under our Revolving Credit Facility was increased to $1,000 million, (iv) the maturity date of the Revolving Credit Facility was extended from October 13, 2022 to October 7, 2024 (subject to earlier maturity in specified circumstances), and (v) the commitment fee on the unused portion of the Revolving Credit Facility was decreased from 0.25% to 0.15%. At December 31, 2020, the interest rate on the Term Loan A was 1.40%. The principal amount of the Term Loan A amortizes in quarterly installments equal to $5 million until October 7, 2022 and thereafter in quarterly installments equal to $9 million until maturity, with the balance payable at maturity. The Term Loan A will require compliance with a net first lien leverage ratio (described below). Except as described herein, the Fourth Incremental Amendment did not materially change the terms of the Credit Facilities. In connection with the Fourth Incremental Amendment, we capitalized approximately $7 million in debt issuance costs. Our Credit Facilities also include a senior secured term loan B facility (the "Term Loan B"). In September 2019, we voluntarily prepaid $235 million principal amount of our Term Loan B and, in connection with this prepayment, we recorded a loss on early extinguishment of debt of $4 million that primarily reflects the write-off of related unamortized debt issuance costs and discounts. On November 19, 2019, the Borrowers entered into a fourth amendment (the "Fourth Amendment") to the credit agreement governing our Credit Facilities. Under the Fourth Amendment, (i) the outstanding aggregate principal amount under our Term Loan B was decreased to $5,350 million as a result of a repayment of $720 million from a portion of the net proceeds of the 2019 4.375% Senior Notes (defined below), (ii) the interest rate applicable to our Term Loan B was reduced to, at our option, either (a) a base rate, subject to a floor of 1.00%, plus an applicable margin of 0.75%, or (b) a Eurocurrency rate, subject to a floor of 0.00%, plus an applicable margin of 1.75%, and (iii) the maturity date of our Term Loan B was extended from February 17, 2024 to November 19, 2026. At December 31, 2020, the interest rate on the Term Loan B was 1.90%. The principal amount of the Term Loan B amortizes in quarterly installments equal to $13 million until maturity, with the balance payable at maturity. Except as described herein, the Fourth Amendment did not materially change the terms of the Credit Facilities. In connection with the Fourth Amendment, we capitalized approximately $24 million in debt issuance costs and original issue discount and recorded a loss on early extinguishment of debt of $16 million that primarily reflects the write-off of related unamortized debt issuance costs and discounts and fees incurred. On April 2, 2020, the Borrowers entered into a fifth amendment (the “Fifth Amendment”) to the credit agreement governing our Credit Facilities. The Fifth Amendment provides the Borrowers with the option to comply with a $1,000 million minimum liquidity covenant in lieu of the 6.50:1.00 net first lien senior secured leverage ratio financial maintenance covenant for the period after June 30, 2020 and prior to September 30, 2021. Additionally, for the periods ending September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2021, to determine compliance with the net first lien senior secured leverage ratio, we are permitted to annualize the Adjusted EBITDA (as defined in the Credit Agreement) for the three months ending September 30, 2021 and six months ending December 31, 2021, respectively, in lieu of calculating the ratio based on Adjusted EBITDA for the prior four quarters. There were no other material changes to the terms of the Credit Agreement. Revolving Credit Facility As of December 31, 2020, we had no amounts outstanding under our Revolving Credit Facility. Funds available under the Revolving Credit Facility may be used to repay other debt, finance debt or RBI share repurchases, to fund acquisitions or capital expenditures and for other general corporate purposes. We have a $125 million letter of credit sublimit as part of the Revolving Credit Facility, which reduces our borrowing availability thereunder by the cumulative amount of outstanding letters of credit. Under the Fourth Incremental Amendment, the interest rate applicable to amounts drawn under each letter of credit decreased from a range of 1.25% to 2.00% to a range of 0.75% to 1.50%, depending on our net first lien leverage ratio. As of December 31, 2020, we had $2 million of letters of credit issued against the Revolving Credit Facility, and our borrowing availability was $998 million. Obligations under the Credit Facilities are guaranteed on a senior secured basis, jointly and severally, by the direct parent company of one of the Borrowers and substantially all of its Canadian and U.S. subsidiaries, including The TDL Group Corp., Burger King Corporation, Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, Inc. and substantially all of their respective Canadian and U.S. subsidiaries (the “Credit Guarantors”). Amounts borrowed under the Credit Facilities are secured on a first priority basis by a perfected security interest in substantially all of the present and future property (subject to certain exceptions) of each Borrower and Credit Guarantor. 2017 4.25% First Lien Senior Notes During 2017, the Borrowers entered into an indenture (the “2017 4.25% Senior Notes Indenture”) in connection with the issuance of $1,500 million of 4.25% first lien senior notes due May 15, 2024 (the “2017 4.25% Senior Notes”). No principal payments are due until maturity and interest is paid semi-annually. The net proceeds from the offering of the 2017 4.25% Senior Notes, together with other sources of liquidity, were used to redeem all of the outstanding RBI Class A 9.0% cumulative compounding perpetual voting preferred shares and for other general corporate purposes. In connection with the issuance of the 2017 4.25% Senior Notes, we capitalized approximately $13 million in debt issuance costs. As detailed below, during 2020 we redeemed $725 million of the 2017 4.25% Senior Notes. Obligations under the 2017 4.25% Senior Notes are guaranteed on a senior secured basis, jointly and severally, by the Borrowers and substantially all of the Borrowers' Canadian and U.S. subsidiaries, including The TDL Group Corp., Burger King Corporation, Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, Inc. and substantially all of their respective Canadian and U.S. subsidiaries (the “Note Guarantors”). The 2017 4.25% Senior Notes are first lien senior secured obligations and rank equal in right of payment with all of the existing and future senior debt of the Borrowers and Note Guarantors, including borrowings and guarantees of the Credit Facilities. Our 2017 4.25% Senior Notes may be redeemed in whole or in part, on or after May 15, 2020 at the redemption prices set forth in the 2017 4.25% Senior Notes Indenture, plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, at the date of redemption. The 2017 4.25% Senior Notes Indenture also contains redemption provisions related to tender offers, change of control and equity offerings, among others. 2019 3.875% First Lien Senior Notes On September 24, 2019, the Borrowers entered into an indenture (the "2019 3.875% Senior Notes Indenture") in connection with the issuance of $750 million of 3.875% first lien senior notes due January 15, 2028 (the "2019 3.875% Senior Notes"). No principal payments are due until maturity and interest is paid semi-annually. The net proceeds from the offering of the 2019 3.875% Senior Notes and a portion of the net proceeds from the Term Loan A were used to redeem the entire outstanding principal balance of $1,250 million of 4.625% first lien secured notes due January 15, 2022 (the "2015 4.625% Senior Notes") and to pay related fees and expenses. In connection with the issuance of the 2019 3.875% Senior Notes, we capitalized approximately $10 million in debt issuance costs. In connection with the redemption of the entire outstanding principal balance of the 2015 4.625% Senior Notes, we recorded a loss on early extinguishment of debt of $3 million that primarily reflects the write-off of related unamortized debt issuance costs. Obligations under the 2019 3.875% Senior Notes are guaranteed on a senior secured basis, jointly and severally, by the Note Guarantors. The 2019 3.875% Senior Notes are first lien senior secured obligations and rank equal in right of payment with all of the existing and future first lien senior debt of the Borrowers and Note Guarantors, including borrowings and guarantees of the Credit Facilities. Our 2019 3.875% Senior Notes may be redeemed in whole or in part, on or after September 15, 2022 at the redemption prices set forth in the 2019 3.875% Senior Notes Indenture, plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, at the date of redemption. The 2019 3.875% Senior Notes Indenture also contains redemption provisions related to tender offers, change of control and equity offerings, among others. 2020 5.75% First Lien Senior Notes On April 7, 2020, the Borrowers entered into an indenture (the “2020 5.75% Senior Notes Indenture”) in connection with the issuance of $500 million of 5.75% first lien notes due April 15, 2025 (the “2020 5.75% Senior Notes”). No principal payments are due until maturity and interest is paid semi-annually. The net proceeds from the offering of the 2020 5.75% Senior Notes were used for general corporate purposes. In connection with the issuance of the 2020 5.75% Senior Notes, we capitalized approximately $10 million in debt issuance costs. Obligations under the 2020 5.75% Senior Notes are guaranteed on a senior secured basis, jointly and severally, by the Note Guarantors. The 2020 5.75% Senior Notes are first lien senior secured obligations and rank equal in right of payment with all of the existing and future first lien senior debt of the Borrowers and Note Guarantors, including borrowings and guarantees of the Credit Facilities. Our 2020 5.75% Senior Notes may be redeemed in whole or in part, on or after April 15, 2022 at the redemption prices set forth in the 2020 5.75% Senior Notes Indenture, plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, at the date of redemption. The 2020 5.75% Senior Notes Indenture also contains optional redemption provisions related to tender offers, change of control and equity offerings, among others. 2020 3.50% First Lien Senior Notes On November 9, 2020, the Borrowers entered into an indenture (the “2020 3.50% Senior Notes Indenture”) in connection with the issuance of $750 million of 3.50% first lien notes due February 15, 2029 (the “2020 3.50% Senior Notes”). No principal payments are due until maturity and interest is paid semi-annually. The proceeds from the offering of the 2020 3.50% Senior Notes, together with cash on hand, were used to redeem $725 million of the 2017 4.25% Senior Notes and pay related redemption premiums, fees and expenses. In connection with the issuance of the 2020 3.50% Senior Notes, we capitalized approximately $7 million in debt issuance costs. In connection with the redemption of the 2017 4.25% Senior Notes, we recorded a loss on early extinguishment of debt of $19 million that primarily reflects the payment of premiums to redeem the notes and the write-off of unamortized debt issuance costs. Obligations under the 2020 3.50% Senior Notes are guaranteed on a senior secured basis, jointly and severally, by the Note Guarantors. The 2020 3.50% Senior Notes are first lien senior secured obligations and rank equal in right of payment with all of the existing and future first lien senior debt of the Borrowers and Note Guarantors, including borrowings and guarantees of the Credit Facilities. Our 2020 3.50% Senior Notes may be redeemed in whole or in part, on or after February 15, 2024 at the redemption prices set forth in the 2020 3.50% Senior Notes Indenture, plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, at the date of redemption. The 2020 3.50% Senior Notes Indenture also contains optional redemption provisions related to tender offers, change of control and equity offerings, among others. 2017 5.00% Second Lien Senior Notes During 2017, the Borrowers entered into an indenture (the “2017 5.00% Senior Notes Indenture”) in connection with the issuance of $2,800 million of 5.00% second lien senior notes due October 15, 2025 (the “2017 5.00% Senior Notes”). During 2020, we redeemed the entire outstanding principal balance of $2,800 million of the 2017 5.00% Senior Notes using proceeds from the offering of the 2020 4.00% Senior Notes (defined below). 2019 4.375% Second Lien Senior Notes On November 19, 2019, the Borrowers entered into an indenture (the “2019 4.375% Senior Notes Indenture”) in connection with the issuance of $750 million of 4.375% second lien senior notes due January 15, 2028 (the “2019 4.375% Senior Notes”). No principal payments are due until maturity and interest is paid semi-annually. The net proceeds from the offering of the 2019 4.375% Senior Notes, together with cash on hand, were used to repay $720 million of the Term Loan B outstanding aggregate principal balance and to pay related fees and expenses in connection with the Fourth Amendment. In connection with the issuance of the 2019 4.375% Senior Notes, we capitalized approximately $6 million in debt issuance costs. Obligations under the 2019 4.375% Senior Notes are guaranteed on a second priority senior secured basis, jointly and severally, by the Note Guarantors. The 2019 4.375% Senior Notes are second lien senior secured obligations and rank equal in right of payment with all of the existing and future senior debt of the Borrowers and Note Guarantors, including borrowings and guarantees of the Credit Facilities, and effectively subordinated to all of the existing and future first lien senior debt of the Borrowers and Note Guarantors. Our 2019 4.375% Senior Notes may be redeemed in whole or in part, on or after November 15, 2022 at the redemption prices set forth in the 2019 4.375% Senior Notes Indenture, plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, at the date of redemption. The 2019 4.375% Senior Notes Indenture also contains redemption provisions related to tender offers, change of control and equity offerings, among others. 2020 4.00% Second Lien Senior Notes During 2020, the Borrowers entered into an indenture (the “2020 4.00% Senior Notes Indenture”) in connection with the issuance of $2,900 million of 4.00% second lien notes due October 15, 2030 (the “2020 4.00% Senior Notes”). No principal payments are due until maturity and interest is paid semi-annually. The proceeds from the offering of the 2020 4.00% Senior Notes were used to redeem the entire outstanding principal balance of $2,800 million of the 2017 5.00% Senior Notes, pay related redemption premiums, fees and expenses. In connection with the issuance of the 2020 4.00% Senior Notes, we capitalized approximately $26 million in debt issuance costs. In connection with the full redemption of the 2017 5.00% Senior Notes, we recorded a loss on early extinguishment of debt of $79 million that primarily reflects the payment of premiums to redeem the notes and the write-off of unamortized debt issuance costs. Obligations under the 2020 4.00% Senior Notes are guaranteed on a second priority senior secured basis, jointly and severally, by the Note Guarantors. The 2020 4.00% Senior Notes are second lien senior secured obligations and rank equal in right of payment will all of the existing and future senior debt of the Borrowers and Note Guarantors and effectively subordinated to all of the existing and future first lien senior debt of the Borrowers and Note Guarantors. Our 2020 4.00% Senior Notes may be redeemed in whole or in part, on or after October 15, 2025 at the redemption prices set forth in the 2020 4.00% Senior Notes Indenture, plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, at the date of redemption. The 2020 4.00% Senior Notes Indenture also contains optional redemption provisions related to tender offers, change of control and equity offerings, among others. Restrictions and Covenants Our Credit Facilities, as well as the 2017 4.25% Senior Notes Indenture, 2019 3.875% Senior Notes Indenture, 2020 5.75% Senior Notes Indenture, 2020 3.50% Senior Notes Indenture, 2019 4.375% Senior Notes Indenture and 2020 4.00% Senior Notes Indenture (all together the “Senior Notes Indentures”) contain a number of customary affirmative and negative covenants that, among other things, limit or restrict our ability and the ability of certain of our subsidiaries to: incur additional indebtedness; incur liens; engage in mergers, consolidations, liquidations and dissolutions; sell assets; pay dividends and make other payments in respect of capital stock; make investments, loans and advances; pay or modify the terms of certain indebtedness; and engage in certain transactions with affiliates. In addition, under the Credit Facilities, the Borrowers are not permitted to exceed a first lien senior secured leverage ratio of 6.50 to 1.00 when, as of the end of any fiscal quarter beginning with the first fiscal quarter of 2020, (1) any amounts are outstanding under the Term Loan A and/or (2) the sum of (i) the amount of letters of credit outstanding exceeding $50 million (other than those that are cash collateralized); (ii) outstanding amounts under the Revolving Credit Facility and (iii) outstanding amounts of swing line loans, exceeds 30.0% of the commitments under the Revolving Credit Facility. As indicated above, the Fifth Amendment provides the Borrowers with the option to comply with a $1,000 million minimum liquidity covenant in lieu of the 6.50:1.00 net first lien senior secured leverage ratio financial maintenance covenant for the period after June 30, 2020 and prior to September 30, 2021. The restrictions under the Credit Facilities and the Senior Notes Indentures have resulted in substantially all of our consolidated assets being restricted. As of December 31, 2020, we were in compliance with applicable financial debt covenants under the Credit Facilities and the Senior Notes Indentures and there were no limitations on our ability to draw on the remaining availability under our Revolving Credit Facility. TH Facility One of our subsidiaries entered into a non-revolving delayed drawdown term credit facility in a total aggregate principal amount of C$225 million with a maturity date of October 4, 2025 (the “TH Facility”). The interest rate applicable to the TH Facility is the Canadian Bankers’ Acceptance rate plus an applicable margin equal to 1.40% or the Prime Rate plus an applicable margin equal to 0.40%, at our option. Obligations under the TH Facility are guaranteed by four of our subsidiaries, and amounts borrowed under the TH Facility are secured by certain parcels of real estate. During 2020, we drew down the remaining availability of C$125 million under the TH Facility and, as of December 31, 2020, we had outstanding C$222 million under the TH Facility with a weighted average interest rate of 1.86%. Debt Issuance Costs During 2020 and 2019, we incurred aggregate deferred financing costs of $43 million and $50 million, respectively. No significant deferred financing costs were incurred in 2018. Loss on Early Extinguishment of Debt During 2020, we recorded a $98 million loss on early extinguishment of debt that primarily reflects the payment of premiums and the write-off of unamortized debt issuance costs in connection with the full redemption of the 2017 5.00% Senior Notes and the partial redemption of the 2017 4.25% Senior Notes. During 2019, we recorded a $23 million loss on early extinguishment of debt, which primarily reflects the write-off of unamortized debt issuance costs and discounts in connection with the prepayment and refinancing of the Term Loan B and the redemption of our 2015 4.625% Senior Notes. Maturities The aggregate maturities of our long-term debt as of December 31, 2020 are as follows (in millions): Year Ended December 31, Principal Amount 2021 $ 79 2022 86 2023 102 2024 1,499 2025 686 Thereafter 10,179 Total $ 12,631 Interest Expense, net Interest expense, net consists of the following (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Debt (a) $ 471 $ 503 $ 498 Finance lease obligations 20 20 23 Amortization of deferred financing costs and debt issuance discount 26 29 29 Interest income (9) (20) (15) Interest expense, net $ 508 $ 532 $ 535 (a) Amount includes $69 million, $70 million and $60 million benefit during 2020, 2019 and 2018, respectively, related to the amortization of the Excluded Component as defined in Note 11, Derivatives .

Leases

Leases12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Leases [Abstract]
LeasesLeases As of December 31, 2020, we leased or subleased 5,116 restaurant properties to franchisees and 171 non-restaurant properties to third parties under operating leases, direct financing leases and sales-type leases where we are the lessor. Initial lease terms generally range from 10 to 20 years. Most leases to franchisees provide for fixed monthly payments and many provide for future rent escalations and renewal options. Certain leases also include provisions for variable rent, determined as a percentage of sales, generally when annual sales exceed specific levels. Lessees typically bear the cost of maintenance, insurance and property taxes. We lease land, buildings, equipment, office space and warehouse space from third parties. Land and building leases generally have an initial term of 10 to 20 years, while land-only lease terms can extend longer, and most leases provide for fixed monthly payments. Many of these leases provide for future rent escalations and renewal options. Certain leases also include provisions for variable rent payments, determined as a percentage of sales, generally when annual sales exceed specified levels. Most leases also obligate us to pay, as lessee, variable lease cost related to maintenance, insurance and property taxes. We transitioned to ASC 842 on January 1, 2019 on a modified retrospective basis using the effective date transition method. Our transition to ASC 842 represents a change in accounting principle. The $21 million cumulative effect of our transition to ASC 842 is reflected as an adjustment to January 1, 2019 Partners' capital. Partnership as Lessor Assets leased to franchisees and others under operating leases where we are the lessor and which are included within our property and equipment, net are as follows (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Land $ 892 $ 905 Buildings and improvements 1,146 1,142 Restaurant equipment 19 18 2,057 2,065 Accumulated depreciation and amortization (534) (472) Property and equipment leased, net $ 1,523 $ 1,593 Our net investment in direct financing and sales-type leases is as follows (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Future rents to be received: Future minimum lease receipts $ 87 $ 49 Contingent rents (a) 12 19 Estimated unguaranteed residual value 7 15 Unearned income (34) (26) 72 57 Current portion included within accounts receivables (6) (9) Net investment in property leased to franchisees $ 66 $ 48 (a) Amounts represent estimated contingent rents recorded in connection with the acquisition method of accounting. During 2020, we offered rent relief programs for eligible TH and BK franchisees who lease property from us, under which we temporarily converted the rent structure from a combination of fixed plus variable rent to 100% variable rent (the “rent relief programs”). The rent relief program concluded for BK franchisees during the three months ended September 30, 2020 and the rent relief program was extended through the end of 2021 for eligible TH franchisees. In April 2020, the FASB staff issued interpretive guidance that permits entities to make an election to account for lease concessions related to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic consistent with how those concessions would be accounted for under ASC 842, as though enforceable rights and obligations for those concessions existed. We elected to apply this interpretive guidance to the rent relief programs while in effect. As such, reductions in rents arising from the rent relief programs are recognized as reductions in variable lease payments. Property revenues are comprised primarily of rental income from operating leases and earned income on direct financing leases with franchisees as follows (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 ASC 842 ASC 842 Previous Standard Rental income: Minimum lease payments $ 445 $ 448 $ 454 Variable lease payments 262 370 273 Amortization of favorable and unfavorable income lease contracts, net 6 7 8 Subtotal - lease income from operating leases 713 825 735 Earned income on direct financing and sales-type leases 5 8 9 Total property revenues $ 718 $ 833 $ 744 Partnership as Lessee Lease cost, rent expense and other information associated with these lease commitments is as follows (in millions): Lease Cost (Income) 2020 2019 ASC 842 ASC 842 Operating lease cost $ 199 $ 210 Operating lease variable lease cost 177 198 Finance lease cost: Amortization of right-of-use assets 29 27 Interest on lease liabilities 20 20 Sublease income (534) (631) Total lease cost (income) $ (109) $ (176) Rent Expense 2018 Previous Standard Rental expense: Minimum $ 201 Contingent 71 Amortization of favorable and unfavorable payable lease contracts, net 9 Total rental expense (a) $ 281 (a) Amounts include rental expense related to properties subleased to franchisees of $263 million for 2018. Lease Term and Discount Rate as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 As of December 31, 2020 2019 Weighted-average remaining lease term (in years): Operating leases 10.5 years 10.9 years Finance leases 11.3 years 11.2 years Weighted-average discount rate: Operating leases 5.9 % 6.2 % Finance leases 6.5 % 7.1 % Other Information for 2020 and 2019 2020 2019 Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities: Operating cash flows from operating leases $ 200 $ 194 Operating cash flows from finance leases $ 20 $ 20 Financing cash flows from finance leases $ 29 $ 26 Supplemental noncash information on lease liabilities arising from obtaining right-of-use assets: Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new finance lease obligations $ 59 $ 18 Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new operating lease obligations $ 118 $ 163 As of December 31, 2020, future minimum lease receipts and commitments are as follows (in millions): Lease Receipts Lease Commitments (a) Direct Operating Finance Operating 2021 $ 8 $ 419 $ 50 $ 198 2022 7 397 49 188 2023 6 373 46 173 2024 6 340 44 159 2025 6 305 42 144 Thereafter 54 1,533 257 815 Total minimum receipts / payments $ 87 $ 3,367 488 1,677 Less amount representing interest (141) (458) Present value of minimum lease payments 347 1,219 Current portion of lease obligations (32) (137) Long-term portion of lease obligations $ 315 $ 1,082 (a) Minimum lease payments have not been reduced by minimum sublease rentals of $2,193 million due in the future under non-cancelable subleases
LeasesLeases As of December 31, 2020, we leased or subleased 5,116 restaurant properties to franchisees and 171 non-restaurant properties to third parties under operating leases, direct financing leases and sales-type leases where we are the lessor. Initial lease terms generally range from 10 to 20 years. Most leases to franchisees provide for fixed monthly payments and many provide for future rent escalations and renewal options. Certain leases also include provisions for variable rent, determined as a percentage of sales, generally when annual sales exceed specific levels. Lessees typically bear the cost of maintenance, insurance and property taxes. We lease land, buildings, equipment, office space and warehouse space from third parties. Land and building leases generally have an initial term of 10 to 20 years, while land-only lease terms can extend longer, and most leases provide for fixed monthly payments. Many of these leases provide for future rent escalations and renewal options. Certain leases also include provisions for variable rent payments, determined as a percentage of sales, generally when annual sales exceed specified levels. Most leases also obligate us to pay, as lessee, variable lease cost related to maintenance, insurance and property taxes. We transitioned to ASC 842 on January 1, 2019 on a modified retrospective basis using the effective date transition method. Our transition to ASC 842 represents a change in accounting principle. The $21 million cumulative effect of our transition to ASC 842 is reflected as an adjustment to January 1, 2019 Partners' capital. Partnership as Lessor Assets leased to franchisees and others under operating leases where we are the lessor and which are included within our property and equipment, net are as follows (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Land $ 892 $ 905 Buildings and improvements 1,146 1,142 Restaurant equipment 19 18 2,057 2,065 Accumulated depreciation and amortization (534) (472) Property and equipment leased, net $ 1,523 $ 1,593 Our net investment in direct financing and sales-type leases is as follows (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Future rents to be received: Future minimum lease receipts $ 87 $ 49 Contingent rents (a) 12 19 Estimated unguaranteed residual value 7 15 Unearned income (34) (26) 72 57 Current portion included within accounts receivables (6) (9) Net investment in property leased to franchisees $ 66 $ 48 (a) Amounts represent estimated contingent rents recorded in connection with the acquisition method of accounting. During 2020, we offered rent relief programs for eligible TH and BK franchisees who lease property from us, under which we temporarily converted the rent structure from a combination of fixed plus variable rent to 100% variable rent (the “rent relief programs”). The rent relief program concluded for BK franchisees during the three months ended September 30, 2020 and the rent relief program was extended through the end of 2021 for eligible TH franchisees. In April 2020, the FASB staff issued interpretive guidance that permits entities to make an election to account for lease concessions related to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic consistent with how those concessions would be accounted for under ASC 842, as though enforceable rights and obligations for those concessions existed. We elected to apply this interpretive guidance to the rent relief programs while in effect. As such, reductions in rents arising from the rent relief programs are recognized as reductions in variable lease payments. Property revenues are comprised primarily of rental income from operating leases and earned income on direct financing leases with franchisees as follows (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 ASC 842 ASC 842 Previous Standard Rental income: Minimum lease payments $ 445 $ 448 $ 454 Variable lease payments 262 370 273 Amortization of favorable and unfavorable income lease contracts, net 6 7 8 Subtotal - lease income from operating leases 713 825 735 Earned income on direct financing and sales-type leases 5 8 9 Total property revenues $ 718 $ 833 $ 744 Partnership as Lessee Lease cost, rent expense and other information associated with these lease commitments is as follows (in millions): Lease Cost (Income) 2020 2019 ASC 842 ASC 842 Operating lease cost $ 199 $ 210 Operating lease variable lease cost 177 198 Finance lease cost: Amortization of right-of-use assets 29 27 Interest on lease liabilities 20 20 Sublease income (534) (631) Total lease cost (income) $ (109) $ (176) Rent Expense 2018 Previous Standard Rental expense: Minimum $ 201 Contingent 71 Amortization of favorable and unfavorable payable lease contracts, net 9 Total rental expense (a) $ 281 (a) Amounts include rental expense related to properties subleased to franchisees of $263 million for 2018. Lease Term and Discount Rate as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 As of December 31, 2020 2019 Weighted-average remaining lease term (in years): Operating leases 10.5 years 10.9 years Finance leases 11.3 years 11.2 years Weighted-average discount rate: Operating leases 5.9 % 6.2 % Finance leases 6.5 % 7.1 % Other Information for 2020 and 2019 2020 2019 Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities: Operating cash flows from operating leases $ 200 $ 194 Operating cash flows from finance leases $ 20 $ 20 Financing cash flows from finance leases $ 29 $ 26 Supplemental noncash information on lease liabilities arising from obtaining right-of-use assets: Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new finance lease obligations $ 59 $ 18 Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new operating lease obligations $ 118 $ 163 As of December 31, 2020, future minimum lease receipts and commitments are as follows (in millions): Lease Receipts Lease Commitments (a) Direct Operating Finance Operating 2021 $ 8 $ 419 $ 50 $ 198 2022 7 397 49 188 2023 6 373 46 173 2024 6 340 44 159 2025 6 305 42 144 Thereafter 54 1,533 257 815 Total minimum receipts / payments $ 87 $ 3,367 488 1,677 Less amount representing interest (141) (458) Present value of minimum lease payments 347 1,219 Current portion of lease obligations (32) (137) Long-term portion of lease obligations $ 315 $ 1,082 (a) Minimum lease payments have not been reduced by minimum sublease rentals of $2,193 million due in the future under non-cancelable subleases
LeasesLeases As of December 31, 2020, we leased or subleased 5,116 restaurant properties to franchisees and 171 non-restaurant properties to third parties under operating leases, direct financing leases and sales-type leases where we are the lessor. Initial lease terms generally range from 10 to 20 years. Most leases to franchisees provide for fixed monthly payments and many provide for future rent escalations and renewal options. Certain leases also include provisions for variable rent, determined as a percentage of sales, generally when annual sales exceed specific levels. Lessees typically bear the cost of maintenance, insurance and property taxes. We lease land, buildings, equipment, office space and warehouse space from third parties. Land and building leases generally have an initial term of 10 to 20 years, while land-only lease terms can extend longer, and most leases provide for fixed monthly payments. Many of these leases provide for future rent escalations and renewal options. Certain leases also include provisions for variable rent payments, determined as a percentage of sales, generally when annual sales exceed specified levels. Most leases also obligate us to pay, as lessee, variable lease cost related to maintenance, insurance and property taxes. We transitioned to ASC 842 on January 1, 2019 on a modified retrospective basis using the effective date transition method. Our transition to ASC 842 represents a change in accounting principle. The $21 million cumulative effect of our transition to ASC 842 is reflected as an adjustment to January 1, 2019 Partners' capital. Partnership as Lessor Assets leased to franchisees and others under operating leases where we are the lessor and which are included within our property and equipment, net are as follows (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Land $ 892 $ 905 Buildings and improvements 1,146 1,142 Restaurant equipment 19 18 2,057 2,065 Accumulated depreciation and amortization (534) (472) Property and equipment leased, net $ 1,523 $ 1,593 Our net investment in direct financing and sales-type leases is as follows (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Future rents to be received: Future minimum lease receipts $ 87 $ 49 Contingent rents (a) 12 19 Estimated unguaranteed residual value 7 15 Unearned income (34) (26) 72 57 Current portion included within accounts receivables (6) (9) Net investment in property leased to franchisees $ 66 $ 48 (a) Amounts represent estimated contingent rents recorded in connection with the acquisition method of accounting. During 2020, we offered rent relief programs for eligible TH and BK franchisees who lease property from us, under which we temporarily converted the rent structure from a combination of fixed plus variable rent to 100% variable rent (the “rent relief programs”). The rent relief program concluded for BK franchisees during the three months ended September 30, 2020 and the rent relief program was extended through the end of 2021 for eligible TH franchisees. In April 2020, the FASB staff issued interpretive guidance that permits entities to make an election to account for lease concessions related to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic consistent with how those concessions would be accounted for under ASC 842, as though enforceable rights and obligations for those concessions existed. We elected to apply this interpretive guidance to the rent relief programs while in effect. As such, reductions in rents arising from the rent relief programs are recognized as reductions in variable lease payments. Property revenues are comprised primarily of rental income from operating leases and earned income on direct financing leases with franchisees as follows (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 ASC 842 ASC 842 Previous Standard Rental income: Minimum lease payments $ 445 $ 448 $ 454 Variable lease payments 262 370 273 Amortization of favorable and unfavorable income lease contracts, net 6 7 8 Subtotal - lease income from operating leases 713 825 735 Earned income on direct financing and sales-type leases 5 8 9 Total property revenues $ 718 $ 833 $ 744 Partnership as Lessee Lease cost, rent expense and other information associated with these lease commitments is as follows (in millions): Lease Cost (Income) 2020 2019 ASC 842 ASC 842 Operating lease cost $ 199 $ 210 Operating lease variable lease cost 177 198 Finance lease cost: Amortization of right-of-use assets 29 27 Interest on lease liabilities 20 20 Sublease income (534) (631) Total lease cost (income) $ (109) $ (176) Rent Expense 2018 Previous Standard Rental expense: Minimum $ 201 Contingent 71 Amortization of favorable and unfavorable payable lease contracts, net 9 Total rental expense (a) $ 281 (a) Amounts include rental expense related to properties subleased to franchisees of $263 million for 2018. Lease Term and Discount Rate as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 As of December 31, 2020 2019 Weighted-average remaining lease term (in years): Operating leases 10.5 years 10.9 years Finance leases 11.3 years 11.2 years Weighted-average discount rate: Operating leases 5.9 % 6.2 % Finance leases 6.5 % 7.1 % Other Information for 2020 and 2019 2020 2019 Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities: Operating cash flows from operating leases $ 200 $ 194 Operating cash flows from finance leases $ 20 $ 20 Financing cash flows from finance leases $ 29 $ 26 Supplemental noncash information on lease liabilities arising from obtaining right-of-use assets: Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new finance lease obligations $ 59 $ 18 Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new operating lease obligations $ 118 $ 163 As of December 31, 2020, future minimum lease receipts and commitments are as follows (in millions): Lease Receipts Lease Commitments (a) Direct Operating Finance Operating 2021 $ 8 $ 419 $ 50 $ 198 2022 7 397 49 188 2023 6 373 46 173 2024 6 340 44 159 2025 6 305 42 144 Thereafter 54 1,533 257 815 Total minimum receipts / payments $ 87 $ 3,367 488 1,677 Less amount representing interest (141) (458) Present value of minimum lease payments 347 1,219 Current portion of lease obligations (32) (137) Long-term portion of lease obligations $ 315 $ 1,082 (a) Minimum lease payments have not been reduced by minimum sublease rentals of $2,193 million due in the future under non-cancelable subleases
LeasesLeases As of December 31, 2020, we leased or subleased 5,116 restaurant properties to franchisees and 171 non-restaurant properties to third parties under operating leases, direct financing leases and sales-type leases where we are the lessor. Initial lease terms generally range from 10 to 20 years. Most leases to franchisees provide for fixed monthly payments and many provide for future rent escalations and renewal options. Certain leases also include provisions for variable rent, determined as a percentage of sales, generally when annual sales exceed specific levels. Lessees typically bear the cost of maintenance, insurance and property taxes. We lease land, buildings, equipment, office space and warehouse space from third parties. Land and building leases generally have an initial term of 10 to 20 years, while land-only lease terms can extend longer, and most leases provide for fixed monthly payments. Many of these leases provide for future rent escalations and renewal options. Certain leases also include provisions for variable rent payments, determined as a percentage of sales, generally when annual sales exceed specified levels. Most leases also obligate us to pay, as lessee, variable lease cost related to maintenance, insurance and property taxes. We transitioned to ASC 842 on January 1, 2019 on a modified retrospective basis using the effective date transition method. Our transition to ASC 842 represents a change in accounting principle. The $21 million cumulative effect of our transition to ASC 842 is reflected as an adjustment to January 1, 2019 Partners' capital. Partnership as Lessor Assets leased to franchisees and others under operating leases where we are the lessor and which are included within our property and equipment, net are as follows (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Land $ 892 $ 905 Buildings and improvements 1,146 1,142 Restaurant equipment 19 18 2,057 2,065 Accumulated depreciation and amortization (534) (472) Property and equipment leased, net $ 1,523 $ 1,593 Our net investment in direct financing and sales-type leases is as follows (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Future rents to be received: Future minimum lease receipts $ 87 $ 49 Contingent rents (a) 12 19 Estimated unguaranteed residual value 7 15 Unearned income (34) (26) 72 57 Current portion included within accounts receivables (6) (9) Net investment in property leased to franchisees $ 66 $ 48 (a) Amounts represent estimated contingent rents recorded in connection with the acquisition method of accounting. During 2020, we offered rent relief programs for eligible TH and BK franchisees who lease property from us, under which we temporarily converted the rent structure from a combination of fixed plus variable rent to 100% variable rent (the “rent relief programs”). The rent relief program concluded for BK franchisees during the three months ended September 30, 2020 and the rent relief program was extended through the end of 2021 for eligible TH franchisees. In April 2020, the FASB staff issued interpretive guidance that permits entities to make an election to account for lease concessions related to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic consistent with how those concessions would be accounted for under ASC 842, as though enforceable rights and obligations for those concessions existed. We elected to apply this interpretive guidance to the rent relief programs while in effect. As such, reductions in rents arising from the rent relief programs are recognized as reductions in variable lease payments. Property revenues are comprised primarily of rental income from operating leases and earned income on direct financing leases with franchisees as follows (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 ASC 842 ASC 842 Previous Standard Rental income: Minimum lease payments $ 445 $ 448 $ 454 Variable lease payments 262 370 273 Amortization of favorable and unfavorable income lease contracts, net 6 7 8 Subtotal - lease income from operating leases 713 825 735 Earned income on direct financing and sales-type leases 5 8 9 Total property revenues $ 718 $ 833 $ 744 Partnership as Lessee Lease cost, rent expense and other information associated with these lease commitments is as follows (in millions): Lease Cost (Income) 2020 2019 ASC 842 ASC 842 Operating lease cost $ 199 $ 210 Operating lease variable lease cost 177 198 Finance lease cost: Amortization of right-of-use assets 29 27 Interest on lease liabilities 20 20 Sublease income (534) (631) Total lease cost (income) $ (109) $ (176) Rent Expense 2018 Previous Standard Rental expense: Minimum $ 201 Contingent 71 Amortization of favorable and unfavorable payable lease contracts, net 9 Total rental expense (a) $ 281 (a) Amounts include rental expense related to properties subleased to franchisees of $263 million for 2018. Lease Term and Discount Rate as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 As of December 31, 2020 2019 Weighted-average remaining lease term (in years): Operating leases 10.5 years 10.9 years Finance leases 11.3 years 11.2 years Weighted-average discount rate: Operating leases 5.9 % 6.2 % Finance leases 6.5 % 7.1 % Other Information for 2020 and 2019 2020 2019 Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities: Operating cash flows from operating leases $ 200 $ 194 Operating cash flows from finance leases $ 20 $ 20 Financing cash flows from finance leases $ 29 $ 26 Supplemental noncash information on lease liabilities arising from obtaining right-of-use assets: Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new finance lease obligations $ 59 $ 18 Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new operating lease obligations $ 118 $ 163 As of December 31, 2020, future minimum lease receipts and commitments are as follows (in millions): Lease Receipts Lease Commitments (a) Direct Operating Finance Operating 2021 $ 8 $ 419 $ 50 $ 198 2022 7 397 49 188 2023 6 373 46 173 2024 6 340 44 159 2025 6 305 42 144 Thereafter 54 1,533 257 815 Total minimum receipts / payments $ 87 $ 3,367 488 1,677 Less amount representing interest (141) (458) Present value of minimum lease payments 347 1,219 Current portion of lease obligations (32) (137) Long-term portion of lease obligations $ 315 $ 1,082 (a) Minimum lease payments have not been reduced by minimum sublease rentals of $2,193 million due in the future under non-cancelable subleases

Income Taxes

Income Taxes12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Income Tax Disclosure [Abstract]
Income TaxesIncome Taxes Income (loss) before income taxes, classified by source of income (loss), is as follows (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Canadian $ 200 $ 685 $ 1,111 Foreign 616 767 271 Income before income taxes $ 816 $ 1,452 $ 1,382 Income tax (benefit) expense attributable to income from continuing operations consists of the following (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Current: Canadian $ 45 $ 47 $ 25 U.S. Federal 125 122 95 U.S. state, net of federal income tax benefit 26 20 17 Other Foreign 78 94 72 $ 274 $ 283 $ 209 Deferred: Canadian $ (67) $ 43 $ 78 U.S. Federal (82) 8 (65) U.S. state, net of federal income tax benefit (27) — 13 Other Foreign (32) 7 3 $ (208) $ 58 $ 29 Income tax expense (benefit) $ 66 $ 341 $ 238 The statutory rate reconciles to the effective income tax rate as follows: 2020 2019 2018 Statutory rate 26.5 % 26.5 % 26.5 % Costs and taxes related to foreign operations 9.6 4.7 4.2 Foreign exchange gain (loss) 0.5 0.1 (0.1) Foreign tax rate differential (15.6) (10.8) (6.1) Change in valuation allowance 1.2 0.5 3.2 Change in accrual for tax uncertainties 3.9 5.0 0.1 Intercompany financing (6.1) (2.4) (4.4) Impact of Tax Act (7.8) (0.1) (1.9) Swiss Tax Reform (5.1) 1.1 — Benefit from stock option exercises (0.3) (2.2) (5.0) Other 1.2 1.1 0.7 Effective income tax rate 8.0 % 23.5 % 17.2 % In December 2017, the U.S. government enacted comprehensive tax legislation commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”) that significantly revised the U.S. tax code. During 2020, various guidance was issued by the U.S. tax authorities relating to the Tax Act and, after review of such guidance, we recorded a favorable adjustment to our deferred tax assets of $64 million related to a tax attribute carryforward, which decreased our 2020 effective tax rate by 7.8%. In 2018, favorable adjustments of $9 million as a result of the remeasurement of net deferred tax liabilities, $3 million related to certain deductions allowed to be carried forward before the Tax Act, and $15 million related to transitional repatriation tax on unremitted foreign earnings were recorded, which decreased our 2018 effective tax rate by 1.9%. In a referendum held on May 19, 2019, Swiss voters adopted the Federal Act on Tax Reform and AVS Financing (“TRAF”), under which certain long-standing preferential cantonal tax regimes were abolished effective January 1, 2020, which the canton of Zug formally adopted in November 2019. Partnership subsidiaries in the canton of Zug were subjected to TRAF and therefore the TRAF impacted our consolidated results of operations during 2020 and 2019. In 2020, a deferred tax asset was recorded due to an election made under TRAF by one of our Swiss subsidiaries and, in 2019, our Swiss company subsidiaries remeasured their deferred tax assets and liabilities based on new future tax rates expected under TRAF. The amounts impacting income tax expense for the effects of the changes from the TRAF were approximately $41 million in 2020 which decreased our 2020 effective tax rate by approximately 5.1%, and approximately $16 million in 2019 which increased our 2019 effective tax rate by approximately 1.1%. Companies subject to the Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income provision (GILTI) have the option to account for the GILTI tax as a period cost if and when incurred, or to recognize deferred taxes for outside basis temporary differences expected to reverse as GILTI. We have elected to account for GILTI as a period cost. Income tax (benefit) expense allocated to continuing operations and amounts separately allocated to other items was (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Income tax (benefit) expense from continuing operations $ 66 $ 341 $ 238 Cash flow hedge in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (64) (23) (2) Net investment hedge in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (60) (32) 101 Foreign Currency Translation in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) 12 — — Pension liability in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (3) (1) — Total $ (49) $ 285 $ 337 The significant components of deferred income tax (benefit) expense attributable to income from continuing operations are as follows (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Deferred income tax (benefit) expense $ (230) $ 30 $ (14) Change in valuation allowance 22 7 43 Change in effective Canadian income tax rate — (1) (3) Change in effective U.S. federal income tax rate — — (8) Change in effective U.S. state income tax rate 1 6 15 Change in effective foreign income tax rate (1) 16 (4) Total $ (208) $ 58 $ 29 The tax effects of temporary differences that give rise to significant portions of the deferred tax assets and deferred tax liabilities are presented below (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Deferred tax assets: Accounts and notes receivable $ 6 $ 4 Accrued employee benefits 54 48 Leases 114 99 Operating lease liabilities 323 332 Liabilities not currently deductible for tax 310 198 Tax loss and credit carryforwards 547 493 Derivatives 225 83 Other 9 3 Total gross deferred tax assets 1,588 1,260 Valuation allowance (364) (329) Net deferred tax assets 1,224 931 Less deferred tax liabilities: Property and equipment, principally due to differences in depreciation 35 40 Intangible assets 1,747 1,792 Leases 114 88 Operating lease assets 311 325 Statutory impairment 30 28 Outside basis difference 46 42 Total gross deferred tax liabilities 2,283 2,315 Net deferred tax liability $ 1,059 $ 1,384 The valuation allowance had a net increase of $35 million during 2020 primarily due to the change in estimates related to derivatives and the utilization of foreign tax credits. This increase was partially offset by the utilization of capital losses that had been previously valued. Changes in the valuation allowance are as follows (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Beginning balance $ 329 $ 325 $ 282 Change in estimates recorded to deferred income tax expense 19 8 43 Changes in losses and credits 3 (2) — Additions related to other comprehensive income 13 (2) — Ending balance $ 364 $ 329 $ 325 The gross amount and expiration dates of operating loss and tax credit carry-forwards as of December 31, 2020 are as follows (in millions): Amount Expiration Date Canadian net operating loss carryforwards $ 866 2036-2040 Canadian capital loss carryforwards 930 Indefinite U.S. state net operating loss carryforwards 639 2021-2043 U.S. state net operating loss carryforwards 1 Indefinite U.S. foreign tax credits 100 2021-2030 Other foreign net operating loss carryforwards 212 Indefinite Other foreign net operating loss carryforwards 70 2021-2039 Other foreign capital loss carryforward 31 Indefinite Foreign credits 5 2023-2039 Total $ 2,854 We are generally permanently reinvested on any potential outside basis differences except for unremitted earnings and profits. A determination of the deferred tax liability on this amount is not practicable due to the complexities, variables and assumptions inherent in the hypothetical calculations. Thus we have not provided taxes, including U.S. federal and state income, foreign income, or foreign withholding taxes, for any outside basis differences that we believe are permanently invested. We will continue to monitor available evidence and our plans for foreign earnings and expect to continue to provide any applicable deferred taxes based on the tax liability or withholding taxes that would be due upon repatriation of amounts not considered permanently reinvested. We had $497 million and $506 million of unrecognized tax benefits at December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively, which if recognized, would favorably affect the effective income tax rate. A reconciliation of the beginning and ending amounts of unrecognized tax benefits is as follows (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Beginning balance $ 506 $ 441 $ 461 Additions for tax positions related to the current year 9 9 1 Additions for tax positions of prior years 7 56 18 Reductions for tax positions of prior year (25) — (18) Reductions for settlement — — (18) Reductions due to statute expiration — — (3) Ending balance $ 497 $ 506 $ 441 During the twelve months beginning January 1, 2021, it is reasonably possible we will reduce unrecognized tax benefits by approximately $90 million, primarily as a result of the expiration of certain statutes of limitations and the resolution of audits in multiple taxing jurisdictions. We recognize interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits in income tax expense. The total amount of accrued interest and penalties was $123 million and $92 million at December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. Potential interest and penalties associated with uncertain tax positions in various jurisdictions recognized was $31 million during 2020, $41 million during 2019 and $14 million during 2018. To the extent interest and penalties are not assessed with respect to uncertain tax positions, amounts accrued will be reduced and reflected as a reduction of the overall income tax provision. We file income tax returns with Canada and its provinces and territories. Generally we are subject to routine examinations by the Canada Revenue Agency (“CRA”). The CRA is conducting examinations of the 2014 through 2016 taxation years. Additionally, income tax returns filed with various provincial jurisdictions are generally open to examination for periods up to six years subsequent to the filing of the respective return. We also file income tax returns, including returns for our subsidiaries, with U.S. federal, U.S. state, and other foreign jurisdictions. We are subject to routine examination by taxing authorities in the U.S. jurisdictions, as well as other foreign tax jurisdictions. None of the other foreign jurisdictions have been individually material. We expect the taxable years 2014, 2015 and 2016 for our U.S. companies for U.S. federal income tax purposes to close in 2021 without material adjustments. Prior taxable years of such U.S. companies are closed for U.S. federal income tax purposes. We have various U.S. state and other foreign income tax returns in the process of examination. From time to time, these audits result in proposed assessments where the ultimate resolution may result in owing additional taxes. We believe that our tax positions comply with applicable tax law and that we have adequately provided for these matters.

Derivative Instruments

Derivative Instruments12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosure [Abstract]
Derivative InstrumentsDerivative Instruments Disclosures about Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities We enter into derivative instruments for risk management purposes, including derivatives designated as cash flow hedges, derivatives designated as net investment hedges and those utilized as economic hedges. We use derivatives to manage our exposure to fluctuations in interest rates and currency exchange rates. Interest Rate Swaps At December 31, 2020, we had outstanding receive-variable, pay-fixed interest rate swaps with a total notional value of $3,500 million to hedge the variability in the interest payments on a portion of our Term Loan Facilities beginning October 31, 2019 through the termination date of November 19, 2026. Additionally, at December 31, 2020, we also had outstanding receive-variable, pay-fixed interest rate swaps with a total notional value of $500 million to hedge the variability in the interest payments on a portion of our Term Loan Facilities effective September 30, 2019 through the termination date of September 30, 2026. At inception, all of these interest rate swaps were designated as cash flow hedges for hedge accounting. The unrealized changes in market value are recorded in AOCI and reclassified into earnings during the period in which the hedged forecasted transaction affects earnings. During 2019, we extended the term of our previous $3,500 million receive-variable, pay-fixed interest rate swaps to align the maturity date of the new interest rate swaps with the maturity date of our Term Loan B under the Fourth Amendment. The extension of the term resulted in a de-designation and re-designation of the interest rate swaps and the swaps continue to be accounted for as a cash flow hedge for hedge accounting. In connection with the de-designation, we recognized a net unrealized loss of $213 million in AOCI and this amount gets reclassified into Interest expense, net as the original hedged forecasted transaction affects earnings. The amount of pre-tax losses in AOCI as of December 31, 2020 that we expect to be reclassified into interest expense within the next 12 months is $50 million. During 2015, we entered into a series of receive-variable, pay-fixed interest rate swaps with a notional value of $2,500 million to hedge the variability in the interest payments on a portion of our Term Loan Facilities beginning May 28, 2015. All of these interest rate swaps were settled on April 26, 2018 for an insignificant cash receipt. At inception, these interest rate swaps were designated as cash flow hedges for hedge accounting. The unrealized changes in market value were recorded in AOCI and reclassified into earnings during the period in which the hedged forecasted transaction affects earnings. During 2015, we settled certain interest rate swaps and recognized a net unrealized loss of $85 million in AOCI at the date of settlement. This amount gets reclassified into Interest expense, net as the original hedged forecasted transaction affects earnings. The amount of pre-tax losses in AOCI as of December 31, 2020 that we expect to be reclassified into interest expense within the next 12 months is $11 million. Cross-Currency Rate Swaps To protect the value of our investments in our foreign operations against adverse changes in foreign currency exchange rates, we hedge a portion of our net investment in one or more of our foreign subsidiaries by using cross-currency rate swaps. At December 31, 2020, we had outstanding cross-currency rate swap contracts between the Canadian dollar and U.S. dollar and the Euro and U.S. dollar that have been designated as net investment hedges of a portion of our equity in foreign operations in those currencies. The component of the gains and losses on our net investment in these designated foreign operations driven by changes in foreign exchange rates are economically partly offset by movements in the fair value of our cross-currency swap contracts. The fair value of the swaps is calculated each period with changes in fair value reported in AOCI, net of tax. Such amounts will remain in AOCI until the complete or substantially complete liquidation of our investment in the underlying foreign operations. At December 31, 2020, we had outstanding fixed-to-fixed cross-currency rate swaps to partially hedge the net investment in our Canadian subsidiaries. At inception, these cross-currency rate swaps were designated as a hedge and are accounted for as net investment hedges. These swaps are contracts to exchange quarterly fixed-rate interest payments we make on the Canadian dollar notional amount of C$6,754 million for quarterly fixed-rate interest payments we receive on the U.S. dollar notional amount of $5,000 million through the maturity date of June 30, 2023. At December 31, 2020, we had outstanding cross-currency rate swaps in which we pay quarterly fixed-rate interest payments on the Euro notional amount of €1,108 million and receive quarterly fixed-rate interest payments on the U.S. dollar notional amount of $1,200 million. At inception, these cross-currency rate swaps were designated as a hedge and are accounted for as a net investment hedge. During 2018, we extended the term of the swaps from March 31, 2021 to the maturity date of February 17, 2024. The extension of the term resulted in a re-designation of the hedge and the swaps continue to be accounted for as a net investment hedge. Additionally, at December 31, 2020, we also had outstanding cross-currency rate swaps in which we receive quarterly fixed-rate interest payments on the U.S. dollar notional value of $400 million, entered during 2018, and $500 million, entered during 2019, through the maturity date of February 17, 2024. At inception, these cross-currency rate swaps were designated as a hedge and are accounted for as a net investment hedge. The fixed to fixed cross-currency rate swaps hedging Canadian dollar and Euro net investments utilized the forward method of effectiveness assessment prior to March 15, 2018. On March 15, 2018, we de-designated and subsequently re-designated the outstanding fixed to fixed cross-currency rate swaps to prospectively use the spot method of hedge effectiveness assessment. Additionally, as a result of adopting new hedge accounting guidance during 2018, we elected to exclude the interest component (the "Excluded Component") from the accounting hedge without affecting net investment hedge accounting and elected to amortize the Excluded Component over the life of the derivative instrument. The amortization of the Excluded Component is recognized in Interest expense, net in the consolidated statement of operations. The change in fair value that is not related to the Excluded Component is recorded in AOCI and will be reclassified to earnings when the foreign subsidiaries are sold or substantially liquidated. Foreign Currency Exchange Contracts We use foreign exchange derivative instruments to manage the impact of foreign exchange fluctuations on U.S. dollar purchases and payments, such as coffee purchases made by our Canadian Tim Hortons operations. At December 31, 2020, we had outstanding forward currency contracts to manage this risk in which we sell Canadian dollars and buy U.S. dollars with a notional value of $122 million with maturities to January 2022. We have designated these instruments as cash flow hedges, and as such, the unrealized changes in market value of effective hedges are recorded in AOCI and are reclassified into earnings during the period in which the hedged forecasted transaction affects earnings. Credit Risk By entering into derivative contracts, we are exposed to counterparty credit risk. Counterparty credit risk is the failure of the counterparty to perform under the terms of the derivative contract. When the fair value of a derivative contract is in an asset position, the counterparty has a liability to us, which creates credit risk for us. We attempt to minimize this risk by selecting counterparties with investment grade credit ratings and regularly monitoring our market position with each counterparty. Credit-Risk Related Contingent Features Our derivative instruments do not contain any credit-risk related contingent features. Quantitative Disclosures about Derivative Instruments and Fair Value Measurements The following tables present the required quantitative disclosures for our derivative instruments, including their estimated fair values (all estimated using Level 2 inputs) and their location on our consolidated balance sheets (in millions): Gain or (Loss) Recognized in 2020 2019 2018 Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges (1) Interest rate swaps $ (333) $ (102) $ (37) Forward-currency contracts $ (2) $ (4) $ 11 Derivatives designated as net investment hedges Cross-currency rate swaps $ (302) $ (118) $ 383 (1) We did not exclude any components from the cash flow hedge relationships presented in this table. Location of Gain or (Loss) Reclassified from AOCI into Earnings Gain or (Loss) Reclassified from AOCI into 2020 2019 2018 Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges Interest rate swaps Interest expense, net $ (102) $ (26) $ (19) Forward-currency contracts Cost of sales $ 2 $ 5 $ (1) Location of Gain or (Loss) Recognized in Earnings Gain or (Loss) Recognized in Earnings (Amount Excluded from Effectiveness Testing) 2020 2019 2018 Derivatives designated as net investment hedges Cross-currency rate swaps Interest expense, net $ 69 $ 70 $ 60 Fair Value as of 2020 2019 Balance Sheet Location Assets: Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges Interest rate $ — $ 7 Other assets, net Derivatives designated as net investment hedges Foreign currency — 22 Other assets, net Total assets at fair value $ — $ 29 Liabilities: Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges Interest rate $ 430 $ 175 Other liabilities, net Foreign currency 5 2 Other accrued liabilities Derivatives designated as net investment hedges Foreign currency 434 166 Other liabilities, net Total liabilities at fair value $ 869 $ 343

Equity

Equity12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Equity [Abstract]
EquityEquity Pursuant to the terms of the partnership agreement, RBI, as the holder of Class A common units, is entitled to distributions from Partnership in an amount equal to the aggregate dividends payable by RBI to holders of RBI common shares, and the holders of Partnership exchangeable units are entitled to receive distributions from Partnership in an amount per unit equal to the dividend payable by RBI on each RBI common share. Additionally, if RBI proposes to redeem, repurchase or otherwise acquire any RBI common shares, the partnership agreement requires that Partnership, immediately prior to such redemption, repurchase or acquisition, make a distribution to RBI on the Class A common units in an amount sufficient for RBI to fund such redemption, repurchase or acquisition, as the case may be. Each holder of a Partnership exchangeable unit is entitled to vote in respect of matters on which holders of RBI common shares are entitled to vote through one special voting share of RBI. Since December 12, 2015, a holder of a Partnership exchangeable unit may require Partnership to exchange all or any portion of such holder’s Partnership exchangeable units for RBI common shares at a ratio of one common share for each Partnership exchangeable unit, subject to RBI’s right as the general partner of Partnership, in its sole discretion, to deliver a cash payment in lieu of RBI common shares. If RBI elects to make a cash payment in lieu of issuing common shares, the amount of the payment will be the weighted average trading price of the RBI common shares on the New York Stock Exchange for the 20 consecutive trading days ending on the last business day prior to the exchange date. During 2020, Partnership exchanged 10,393,861 Partnership exchangeable units, pursuant to exchange notices received. In accordance with the terms of the partnership agreement, Partnership satisfied the exchange notices by repurchasing 6,757,692 Partnership exchangeable units for approximately $380 million in cash and exchanging 3,636,169 Partnership exchangeable units for the same number of newly issued RBI common shares. During 2019, Partnership exchanged 42,016,392 Partnership exchangeable units, pursuant to exchange notices received. In accordance with the terms of the partnership agreement, Partnership satisfied the exchange notices by exchanging 42,016,392 Partnership exchangeable units for the same number of newly issued RBI common shares. During 2018, Partnership exchanged 10,185,333 Partnership exchangeable units, pursuant to exchange notices received. In accordance with the terms of the partnership agreement, Partnership satisfied the exchange notices by repurchasing 10,000,000 Partnership exchangeable units for approximately $561 million in cash and exchanging 185,333 Partnership exchangeable units for the same number of newly issued RBI common shares. The exchanges of Partnership exchangeable units were recorded as increases to the Class A common units balance within partner’s capital in our consolidated balance sheets in an amount equal to the market value of the newly issued RBI common shares and a reduction to the Partnership exchangeable units balance within partner’s capital of our consolidated balance sheets in an amount equal to the cash paid by Partnership and the market value of the newly issued RBI common shares. Pursuant to the terms of the partnership agreement, upon the exchange of Partnership exchangeable units, each such Partnership exchangeable unit was cancelled concurrently with the exchange. Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) The following table displays the change in the components of AOCI (in millions): Derivatives Pensions Foreign Accumulated Balances at December 31, 2017 $ 177 $ (28) $ (1,033) $ (884) Foreign currency translation adjustment — — (831) (831) Net change in fair value of derivatives, net of tax 263 — — 263 Amounts reclassified to earnings of cash flow hedges, net of tax 14 — — 14 Pension and post-retirement benefit plans, net of tax — 1 — 1 Balances at December 31, 2018 $ 454 $ (27) $ (1,864) $ (1,437) Foreign currency translation adjustment — — 409 409 Net change in fair value of derivatives, net of tax (163) — — (163) Amounts reclassified to earnings of cash flow hedges, net of tax 15 — — 15 Pension and post-retirement benefit plans, net of tax — (2) — (2) Balances at December 31, 2019 $ 306 $ (29) $ (1,455) $ (1,178) Foreign currency translation adjustment — — 332 332 Net change in fair value of derivatives, net of tax (486) — — (486) Amounts reclassified to earnings of cash flow hedges, net of tax 73 — — 73 Pension and post-retirement benefit plans, net of tax — (16) — (16) Balances at December 31, 2020 $ (107) $ (45) $ (1,123) $ (1,275)

Share-based Compensation

Share-based Compensation12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Share-based Payment Arrangement [Abstract]
Share-based CompensationShare-based Compensation Share-based compensation expense associated with the participation of Partnership and its subsidiaries in RBI’s share-based compensation plans is recognized in Partnership’s Financial Statements. RBI's Amended and Restated 2014 Omnibus Incentive Plan (the “Omnibus Plan”) provides for the grant of awards to employees, directors, consultants and other persons who provide services to RBI and its affiliates. RBI also has some outstanding awards under legacy plans for BK and TH, that were assumed in connection with the merger and amalgamation of those entities within the RBI group. No new awards may be granted under these legacy BK plans or legacy TH plans. RBI is currently issuing awards under the Omnibus Plan and the number of shares available for issuance under such plan as of December 31, 2020 was 11,591,247. The Omnibus Plan permits the grant of several types of awards with respect to RBI common shares, including stock options, time-vested RSUs, and performance-based RSUs, which may include RBI and/or individual performance based-vesting conditions. Under the terms of the Omnibus Plan, RSUs are entitled to dividend equivalents, unless otherwise noted. Dividend equivalents are not distributed unless the related awards vest. Upon vesting, the amount of the dividend equivalent, which is distributed in additional RSUs, except in the case of RSUs awarded to non-management members of RBI's board of directors, is equal to the equivalent of the aggregate dividends declared on common shares during the period from the date of grant of the award compounded until the date the shares underlying the award are delivered. Stock option awards are granted with an exercise price or market value equal to the closing price of RBI's common shares on the trading day preceding the date of grant. RBI satisfies stock option exercises through the issuance of authorized but previously unissued common shares. New stock option grants generally cliff vest 5 years from the original grant date, provided the employee is continuously employed by RBI or one of our affiliates, and the stock options expire 10 years following the grant date. Additionally, if RBI terminates the employment of a stock option holder without cause prior to the vesting date, or if the employee retires or becomes disabled, the employee will become vested in the number of stock options as if the stock options vested 20% on each anniversary of the grant date. If the employee dies, the employee will become vested in the number of stock options as if the stock options vested 20% on the first anniversary of the grant date, 40% on the second anniversary of the grant date and 100% on the third anniversary of the grant date. If an employee is terminated with cause or resigns before vesting, all stock options are forfeited. If there is an event such as a return of capital or dividend that is determined to be dilutive, the exercise price of the awards will be adjusted accordingly. Share-based compensation expense consists of the following for the periods presented (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Stock options and RSUs (a) $ 74 $ 68 $ 48 Total share-based compensation expense (b) $ 74 $ 68 $ 48 (a) Includes $3 million, $4 million, and $2 million due to modification of awards in 2020, 2019 and 2018, respectively. (b) Generally classified as selling, general and administrative expenses in the consolidated statements of operations. As of December 31, 2020, total unrecognized compensation cost related to share-based compensation arrangements was $192 million and is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of approximately 3.3 years. The following assumptions were used in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to determine the fair value of stock option awards at the grant date: 2020 2019 2018 Risk-free interest rate 1.29% 1.82% 2.13% Expected term (in years) 5.88 6.19 6.39 Expected volatility 23.9% 25.5% 25.2% Expected dividend yield 3.14% 3.09% 3.08% The risk-free interest rate was based on the U.S. Treasury or Canadian Sovereign bond yield with a remaining term equal to the expected option life assumed at the date of grant. The expected term was calculated based on the analysis of a five-year vesting period coupled with RBI's expectations of exercise activity. Expected volatility was based on the historical and implied equity volatility of RBI and a review of the equity volatilities of publicly-traded guideline companies. The expected dividend yield is based on the annual dividend yield at the time of grant. The following is a summary of stock option activity under our plans for the year ended December 31, 2020: Total Number of Weighted Aggregate Weighted Outstanding at January 1, 2020 9,758 $ 45.29 Granted 1,626 $ 66.47 Exercised (2,448) $ 33.57 Forfeited (734) $ 58.60 Outstanding at December 31, 2020 8,202 $ 51.86 $ 88,022 6.3 Exercisable at December 31, 2020 2,281 $ 39.71 $ 48,816 3.8 Vested or expected to vest at December 31, 2020 7,491 $ 51.22 $ 84,558 6.2 (a) The intrinsic value represents the amount by which the fair value of RBI's stock exceeds the option exercise price at December 31, 2020. The weighted-average grant date fair value per stock option granted was $10.38, $11.83, and $10.82 during 2020, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The total intrinsic value of stock options exercised was $55 million during 2020, $200 million during 2019, and $371 million during 2018. The fair value of the time-vested RSUs and performance-based RSUs is based on the closing price of RBI’s common shares on the trading day preceding the date of grant. New grants generally cliff vest five years from the original grant date. RBI has awarded a limited number of time-vested RSUs and performance-based RSUs that proportionally vest over a period shorter than five years. Time-vested RSUs are expensed over the vesting period. Performance-based RSUs are expensed over the vesting period, based upon the probability that the performance target will be met. RBI grants fully vested RSUs, with dividend equivalent rights that accrue in cash, to non-employee members of RBI's board of directors in lieu of a cash retainer and committee fees. All such RSUs will settle and common shares of RBI will be issued upon termination of service by the board member. The time-vested RSUs generally cliff vest five years from December 31 st of the year preceding the grant date and performance-based RSUs generally cliff vest five years from the grant date (the starting date for the applicable five year vesting period is referred to as the “Anniversary Date”). If the employee is terminated for any reason within the first two years of the Anniversary Date, 100% of the time-vested RSUs granted will be forfeited. If RBI terminates the employment of a time-vested RSU holder without cause two years after the Anniversary Date, or if the employee retires, the employee will become vested in the number of time-vested RSUs as if the time-vested RSUs vested 20% for each year after the Anniversary Date. If the employee is terminated for any reason within the first three years of the Anniversary Date, 100% of the performance-based RSUs granted will be forfeited. If RBI terminates the employment of a performance-based RSU holder without cause between three The following is a summary of time-vested RSUs and performance-based RSUs activity for the year ended December 31, 2020: Time-vested RSUs Performance-based RSUs Total Number of Weighted Average Total Number of Weighted Average Outstanding at January 1, 2020 1,752 $ 46.50 4,066 $ 53.78 Granted 337 $ 65.20 1,291 $ 62.69 Vested and settled (217) $ 40.42 (164) $ 47.32 Dividend equivalents granted 56 $ — 182 $ — Forfeited (167) $ 47.69 (506) $ 32.91 Outstanding at December 31, 2020 1,761 $ 49.99 4,869 $ 56.96 The weighted-average grant date fair value of time-vested RSUs granted was $64.82 and $57.68 during 2019 and 2018, respectively. The weighted-average grant date fair value of performance-based RSUs granted was $65.54 and $58.49 during 2019 and 2018, respectively. The total fair value, determined as of the date of vesting, of RSUs vested and converted to common shares of RBI during 2020, 2019 and 2018 was $21 million, $8 million and $7 million, respectively.

Revenue Recognition

Revenue Recognition12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Revenue from Contract with Customer [Abstract]
Revenue RecognitionRevenue Recognition Revenue from Contracts with Customers We transitioned to ASC 606 on January 1, 2018 using the modified retrospective transition method. Our transition to ASC 606 represented a change in accounting principle. The $250 million cumulative effect of our transition to ASC 606 is reflected as an adjustment to January 1, 2018 Partners' capital, and relates primarily to changes in accounting for franchise fees, advertising funds, gift card breakage and related tax effects under ASC 606. Contract Liabilities Contract liabilities consist of deferred revenue resulting from initial and renewal franchise fees paid by franchisees, as well as upfront fees paid by master franchisees, which are generally recognized on a straight-line basis over the term of the underlying agreement. We classify these contract liabilities as Other liabilities, net in our consolidated balance sheets. The following table reflects the change in contract liabilities by segment and on a consolidated basis between December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2020 (in millions): Contract Liabilities TH BK PLK Consolidated Balance at December 31, 2019 $ 64 $ 449 $ 28 $ 541 Recognized during period and included in the contract liability balance at the beginning of the year (10) (62) (2) (74) Increase, excluding amounts recognized as revenue during the period 7 25 13 45 Impact of foreign currency translation 1 15 — 16 Balance at December 31, 2020 $ 62 $ 427 $ 39 $ 528 The following table illustrates estimated revenues expected to be recognized in the future related to performance obligations that are unsatisfied (or partially unsatisfied) by segment and on a consolidated basis as of December 31, 2020 (in millions): Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in TH BK PLK Consolidated 2021 $ 9 $ 35 $ 3 $ 47 2022 8 34 3 45 2023 8 33 3 44 2024 7 32 2 41 2025 6 31 2 39 Thereafter 24 262 26 312 Total $ 62 $ 427 $ 39 $ 528 Disaggregation of Total Revenues Total revenues consist of the following (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Sales $ 2,013 $ 2,362 $ 2,355 Royalties 2,161 2,319 2,165 Property revenues 718 833 744 Franchise fees and other revenue 76 89 93 Total revenues $ 4,968 $ 5,603 $ 5,357

Other Operating Expenses (Incom

Other Operating Expenses (Income), net12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Other Income and Expenses [Abstract]
Other Operating Expenses (Income), netOther Operating Expenses (Income), net Other operating expenses (income), net, consist of the following (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Net losses (gains) on disposal of assets, restaurant closures and refranchisings $ 6 $ 7 $ 19 Litigation settlements and reserves, net 7 2 11 Net losses (gains) on foreign exchange 100 (15) (33) Other, net (8) (4) 11 Other operating expenses (income), net $ 105 $ (10) $ 8 Net losses (gains) on disposal of assets, restaurant closures, and refranchisings represent sales of properties and other costs related to restaurant closures and refranchisings. Gains and losses recognized in the current period may reflect certain costs related to closures and refranchisings that occurred in previous periods. Litigation settlements and reserves, net primarily reflects accruals and payments made and proceeds received in connection with litigation matters. Net losses (gains) on foreign exchange is primarily related to revaluation of foreign denominated assets and liabilities.

Commitments and Contingencies

Commitments and Contingencies12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Commitments and Contingencies Disclosure [Abstract]
Commitments and ContingenciesCommitments and Contingencies Letters of Credit As of December 31, 2020, we had $13 million in irrevocable standby letters of credit outstanding, which were issued primarily to certain insurance carriers to guarantee payments of deductibles for various insurance programs, such as health and commercial liability insurance. Of these letters of credit outstanding, $2 million are secured by the collateral under our Revolving Credit Facility and the remainder are secured by cash collateral. As of December 31, 2020, no amounts had been drawn on any of these irrevocable standby letters of credit. Purchase Commitments We have arrangements for information technology and telecommunication services with an aggregate contractual obligation of $43 million over the next three years, some of which have early termination fees. We also enter into commitments to purchase advertising. As of December 31, 2020, these commitments totaled $186 million and run through 2024. Litigation From time to time, we are involved in legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business relating to matters including, but not limited to, disputes with franchisees, suppliers, employees and customers, as well as disputes over our intellectual property. On October 5, 2018, a class action complaint was filed against Burger King Worldwide, Inc. (“BKW”) and Burger King Corporation (“BKC”) in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida by Jarvis Arrington, individually and on behalf of all others similarly situated. On October 18, 2018, a second class action complaint was filed against RBI, BKW and BKC in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida by Monique Michel, individually and on behalf of all others similarly situated. On October 31, 2018, a third class action complaint was filed against BKC and BKW in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida by Geneva Blanchard and Tiffany Miller, individually and on behalf of all others similarly situated. On November 2, 2018, a fourth class action complaint was filed against RBI, BKW and BKC in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida by Sandra Muster, individually and on behalf of all others similarly situated. These complaints have been consolidated and allege that the defendants violated Section 1 of the Sherman Act by incorporating an employee no-solicitation and no-hiring clause in the standard form franchise agreement all Burger King franchisees are required to sign. Each plaintiff seeks injunctive relief and damages for himself or herself and other members of the class. On March 24, 2020, the Court granted BKC’s motion to dismiss for failure to state a claim and on April 20, 2020 the plaintiffs filed a motion for leave to amend their complaint. On April 27, 2020, BKC filed a motion opposing the motion for leave to amend. The court denied the plaintiffs motion for leave to amend their complaint in August 2020 and the plaintiffs are appealing this ruling. While we currently believe these claims are without merit, we are unable to predict the ultimate outcome of this case or estimate the range of possible loss, if any. In July 2019, a class action complaint was filed against The TDL Group Corp. (“TDL”) in the Supreme Court of British Columbia by Samir Latifi, individually and on behalf of all others similarly situated. The complaint alleges that TDL violated the Canadian Competition Act by incorporating an employee no-solicitation and no-hiring clause in the standard form franchise agreement all Tim Hortons franchisees are required to sign. The plaintiff seeks damages and restitution, on behalf of himself and other members of the class. While we currently believe this claim is without merit, we are unable to predict the ultimate outcome of this case or estimate the range of possible loss, if any. On June 30, 2020, a class action complaint was filed against Restaurant Brands International Inc., Restaurant Brands International Limited Partnership and The TDL Group Corp. in the Quebec Superior Court by Steve Holcman, individually and on behalf of all Quebec residents who downloaded the Tim Hortons mobile application. On July 2, 2020, a Notice of Action related to a second class action complaint was filed against Restaurant Brands International Inc., in the Ontario Superior Court by Ashley Sitko and Ashley Cadeau, individually and on behalf of all Canadian residents who downloaded the Tim Hortons mobile application. On August 31, 2020, a notice of claim was filed against Restaurant Brands International Inc. in the Supreme Court of British Columbia by Wai Lam Jacky Law on behalf of all persons in Canada who downloaded the Tim Hortons mobile application or the Burger King mobile application. On September 30, 2020, a notice of action was filed against Restaurant Brands International Inc., Restaurant Brands International Limited Partnership, The TDL Group Corp., Burger King Worldwide, Inc. and Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen, Inc. in the Ontario Superior Court of Justice by William Jung on behalf of a to be determined class. All of the complaints allege that the defendants violated the plaintiff’s privacy rights, the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act, consumer protection and competition laws or app-based undertakings to users, in each case in connection with the collection of geolocation data through the Tim Hortons mobile application, and in certain cases, the Burger King and Popeyes mobile applications. Each plaintiff seeks injunctive relief and monetary damages for himself or herself and other members of the class. These cases are in preliminary stages and we intend to vigorously defend against these lawsuits, but we are unable to predict the ultimate outcome of any of these cases or estimate the range of possible loss, if any. On October 26, 2020, City of Warwick Municipal Employees Pension Fund, a purported stockholder of Restaurant Brands International Inc., individually and putatively on behalf of all other stockholders similarly situated, filed a lawsuit in the Supreme Court of the State of New York County of New York naming RBI and certain of its officers, directors and shareholders as defendants alleging violations of Sections 11, 12(a)(2) and 15 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, in connection with certain offerings of securities by an affiliate in August and September 2019. The complaint alleges that the shelf registration statement used in connection with such offering contained certain false and/or misleading statements or omissions. The complaint seeks, among other relief, class certification of the lawsuit, unspecified compensatory damages, rescission, pre-judgement and post-judgement interest, costs and expenses. On December 18, 2020 the plaintiffs filed an amended complaint and on February 16, 2021 RBI filed a motion to dismiss the complaint. RBI intends to vigorously defend. While we believe these claims are without merit, we are unable to predict the ultimate outcome of this case or estimate the range of possible loss, if any.

Segment Reporting and Geographi

Segment Reporting and Geographical Information12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Segment Reporting [Abstract]
Segment Reporting and Geographical InformationSegment Reporting and Geographical Information As stated in Note 1, Description of Business and Organization , we manage three brands. Under the Tim Hortons brand, we operate in the donut/coffee/tea category of the quick service segment of the restaurant industry. Under the Burger King brand, we operate in the fast food hamburger restaurant category of the quick service segment of the restaurant industry. Under the Popeyes brand, we operate in the chicken category of the quick service segment of the restaurant industry. Our business generates revenue from the following sources: (i) franchise revenues, consisting primarily of royalties based on a percentage of sales reported by franchise restaurants and franchise fees paid by franchisees; (ii) property revenues from properties we lease or sublease to franchisees; and (iii) sales at restaurants owned by us (“Company restaurants”). In addition, our TH business generates revenue from sales to franchisees related to our supply chain operations, including manufacturing, procurement, warehousing and distribution, as well as sales to retailers. Our management structure and financial reporting is organized around our three brands, including the information regularly reviewed by our Chief Executive Officer, who is our Chief Operating Decision Maker. Therefore, we have three operating segments: (1) TH, which includes all operations of our Tim Hortons brand, (2) BK, which includes all operations of our Burger King brand, and (3) PLK, which includes all operations of our Popeyes brand. Our three operating segments represent our reportable segments. As stated in Note 9, Leases , we transitioned to ASC 842 from the Previous Standard on January 1, 2019. Our Financial Statements reflect the application of ASC 842 guidance beginning in 2019, while our Financial Statements for prior periods were prepared under the guidance of the Previous Standard. The following tables present revenues, by segment and by country, depreciation and amortization, (income) loss from equity method investments, and capital expenditures by segment (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Revenues by operating segment: TH $ 2,810 $ 3,344 $ 3,292 BK 1,602 1,777 1,651 PLK 556 482 414 Total $ 4,968 $ 5,603 $ 5,357 Revenues by country (a): Canada $ 2,546 $ 3,037 $ 2,984 United States 1,889 1,930 1,785 Other 533 636 588 Total $ 4,968 $ 5,603 $ 5,357 Depreciation and amortization: TH $ 119 $ 112 $ 108 BK 62 62 61 PLK 8 11 11 Total $ 189 $ 185 $ 180 (Income) loss from equity method investments: TH $ (4) $ (7) $ (6) BK 43 (4) (16) Total $ 39 $ (11) $ (22) Capital expenditures: TH $ 92 $ 37 $ 59 BK 18 20 25 PLK 7 5 2 Total $ 117 $ 62 $ 86 (a) Only Canada and the United States represented 10% or more of our total revenues in each period presented. Total assets by segment, and long-lived assets by segment and country are as follows (in millions): Assets Long-Lived Assets As of December 31, As of December 31, 2020 2019 2020 2019 By operating segment: TH $ 13,963 $ 13,894 $ 1,990 $ 1,972 BK 5,334 5,149 1,128 1,130 PLK 2,525 2,490 131 129 Unallocated 955 827 — — Total $ 22,777 $ 22,360 $ 3,249 $ 3,231 By country: Canada $ 1,685 $ 1,665 United States 1,539 1,542 Other 25 24 Total $ 3,249 $ 3,231 Long-lived assets include property and equipment, net, finance and operating lease right of use assets, net and net investment in property leased to franchisees. Only Canada and the United States represented 10% or more of our total long-lived assets as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019. Our measure of segment income is Adjusted EBITDA. Adjusted EBITDA represents earnings (net income or loss) before interest expense, net, loss on early extinguishment of debt, income tax expense, and depreciation and amortization, adjusted to exclude (i) the non-cash impact of share-based compensation and non-cash incentive compensation expense, (ii) (income) loss from equity method investments, net of cash distributions received from equity method investments, (iii) other operating expenses (income), net and, (iv) income/expenses from non-recurring projects and non-operating activities. For the periods referenced, this included costs incurred in connection with the centralization and relocation of our Canadian and U.S. restaurant support centers to new offices in Toronto, Ontario, and Miami, Florida, respectively, (“Office centralization and relocation cost”) professional advisory and consulting services associated with certain transformational corporate restructuring initiatives that rationalize our structure and optimize cash movements, including consulting services related to the interpretation of final and proposed regulations and guidance under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“Corporate restructuring and tax advisory fees”) and professional fees and compensation related expenses in connection with the Popeyes Acquisition (“PLK Transaction costs”). 2020 2019 2018 Segment income: TH $ 823 $ 1,122 $ 1,127 BK 823 994 928 PLK 218 188 157 Adjusted EBITDA 1,864 2,304 2,212 Share-based compensation and non-cash incentive compensation expense 84 74 55 PLK Transaction costs — — 10 Corporate restructuring and tax advisory fees 16 31 25 Office centralization and relocation costs — 6 20 Impact of equity method investments (a) 48 11 (3) Other operating expenses (income), net 105 (10) 8 EBITDA 1,611 2,192 2,097 Depreciation and amortization 189 185 180 Income from operations 1,422 2,007 1,917 Interest expense, net 508 532 535 Loss on early extinguishment of debt 98 23 — Income tax expense 66 341 238 Net income $ 750 $ 1,111 $ 1,144 (a) Represents (i) (income) loss from equity method investments and (ii) cash distributions received from our equity method investments. Cash distributions received from our equity method investments are included in segment income.

Quarterly Financial Data (Unaud

Quarterly Financial Data (Unaudited)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Quarterly Financial Information Disclosure [Abstract]
Quarterly Financial Data (Unaudited)Quarterly Financial Data (Unaudited) Summarized unaudited quarterly financial data (in millions, except per unit data) was as follows: Quarters Ended March 31, June 30, September 30, December 31, 2020 2019 2020 2019 2020 2019 2020 2019 Total revenues $ 1,225 $ 1,266 $ 1,048 $ 1,400 $ 1,337 $ 1,458 $ 1,358 $ 1,479 Income from operations $ 389 $ 434 $ 243 $ 491 $ 417 $ 571 $ 373 $ 511 Net income $ 224 $ 246 $ 164 $ 257 $ 223 $ 351 $ 139 $ 257 Basic and diluted earnings per unit Class A common units $ 0.71 $ 0.67 $ 0.52 $ 0.70 $ 0.72 $ 1.00 $ 0.45 $ 0.81 Partnership exchangeable units $ 0.48 $ 0.53 $ 0.35 $ 0.55 $ 0.48 $ 0.76 $ 0.30 $ 0.55

Supplemental Financial Informat

Supplemental Financial Information12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Organization, Consolidation and Presentation of Financial Statements [Abstract]
Supplemental Financial InformationSupplemental Financial Information On February 17, 2017, 1011778 B.C. Unlimited Liability Company (the “Parent Issuer”) and New Red Finance Inc. (the “Co-Issuer” and together with the Parent Issuer, the “Issuers”) entered into an amended credit agreement, as amended from time to time, that provides for obligations under the Credit Facilities. On November 9, 2020 the Issuers entered into the 2020 3.50% Senior Notes Indenture with respect to the 2020 3.50% Senior Notes. On October 5, 2020, the Issuers entered into the 2020 4.00% Senior Notes Indenture with respect to the 2020 4.00% Senior Notes. On April 7, 2020, the Issuers entered into the 2020 5.75% Senior Notes Indenture with respect to the 2020 5.75% Senior Notes. On November 19, 2019, the Issuers entered into the 2019 4.375% Senior Notes Indenture with respect to the 2019 4.375% Senior Notes. On September 24, 2019, the Issuers entered into the 2019 3.875% Senior Notes Indenture with respect to the 2019 3.875% Senior Notes. On May 17, 2017, the Issuers entered into the 2017 4.25% Senior Notes Indenture with respect to the 2017 4.25% Senior Notes. The agreement governing our Credit Facilities, the 2020 3.50% the Senior Notes Indenture, the 2020 4.00% Senior Notes Indenture, the 2020 5.75% Senior Notes Indenture, the 2019 4.375% Senior Notes Indenture, the 2019 3.875% Senior Notes Indenture, and the 2017 4.25% Senior Notes Indenture allow the financial reporting obligation of the Parent Issuer to be satisfied through the reporting of Partnership’s consolidated financial information, provided that the consolidated financial information of the Parent Issuer and its restricted subsidiaries is presented on a standalone basis. The following represents the condensed consolidating financial information for the Parent Issuer and its restricted subsidiaries (“Consolidated Borrowers”) on a consolidated basis, together with eliminations, as of and for the periods indicated. The condensed consolidating financial information of Partnership is combined with the financial information of its wholly-owned subsidiaries that are also parent entities of the Parent Issuer and presented in a single column under the heading “RBILP”. The consolidating financial information may not necessarily be indicative of the financial position, results of operations or cash flows had the Issuers and Partnership operated as independent entities. RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Balance Sheets (In millions of U.S. dollars) As of December 31, 2020 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated ASSETS Current assets: Cash and cash equivalents $ 1,560 $ — $ — $ 1,560 Accounts and notes receivable, net 536 — — 536 Inventories, net 96 — — 96 Prepaids and other current assets 72 — — 72 Total current assets 2,264 — — 2,264 Property and equipment, net 2,031 — — 2,031 Operating lease assets, net 1,152 — — 1,152 Intangible assets, net 10,701 — — 10,701 Goodwill 5,739 — — 5,739 Net investment in property leased to franchisees 66 — — 66 Intercompany receivable — 239 (239) — Investment in subsidiaries — 3,721 (3,721) — Other assets, net 824 — — 824 Total assets $ 22,777 $ 3,960 $ (3,960) $ 22,777 LIABILITIES AND EQUITY Current liabilities: Accounts and drafts payable $ 464 $ — $ — $ 464 Other accrued liabilities 596 239 — 835 Gift card liability 191 — — 191 Current portion of long term debt and finance leases 111 — — 111 Total current liabilities 1,362 239 — 1,601 Term debt, net of current portion 12,397 — — 12,397 Finance leases, net of current portion 315 — — 315 Operating lease liabilities, net of current portion 1,082 — — 1,082 Other liabilities, net 2,236 — — 2,236 Payables to affiliates 239 — (239) — Deferred income taxes, net 1,425 — — 1,425 Total liabilities 19,056 239 (239) 19,056 Partners’ capital: Class A common units — 7,994 — 7,994 Partnership exchangeable units — (3,002) — (3,002) Common shares 3,026 — (3,026) — Retained earnings 1,966 — (1,966) — Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (1,275) (1,275) 1,275 (1,275) Total Partners’ capital/shareholders’ equity 3,717 3,717 (3,717) 3,717 Noncontrolling interests 4 4 (4) 4 Total equity 3,721 3,721 (3,721) 3,721 Total liabilities and equity $ 22,777 $ 3,960 $ (3,960) $ 22,777 RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Balance Sheets (In millions of U.S. dollars) As of December 31, 2019 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated ASSETS Current assets: Cash and cash equivalents $ 1,533 $ — $ — $ 1,533 Accounts and notes receivable, net 527 — — 527 Inventories, net 84 — — 84 Prepaids and other current assets 52 — — 52 Total current assets 2,196 — — 2,196 Property and equipment, net 2,007 — — 2,007 Operating lease assets, net 1,176 — — 1,176 Intangible assets, net 10,563 — — 10,563 Goodwill 5,651 — — 5,651 Net investment in property leased to franchisees 48 — — 48 Intercompany receivable — 232 (232) — Investment in subsidiaries — 4,259 (4,259) — Other assets, net 719 — — 719 Total assets $ 22,360 $ 4,491 $ (4,491) $ 22,360 LIABILITIES AND EQUITY Current liabilities: Accounts and drafts payable $ 644 $ — $ — $ 644 Other accrued liabilities 558 232 — 790 Gift card liability 168 — — 168 Current portion of long term debt and finance leases 101 — — 101 Total current liabilities 1,471 232 — 1,703 Term debt, net of current portion 11,759 — — 11,759 Finance leases, net of current portion 288 — — 288 Operating lease liabilities, net of current portion 1,089 — — 1,089 Other liabilities, net 1,698 — — 1,698 Payables to affiliates 232 — (232) — Deferred income taxes, net 1,564 — — 1,564 Total liabilities 18,101 232 (232) 18,101 Partners’ capital: Class A common units — 7,786 — 7,786 Partnership exchangeable units — (2,353) — (2,353) Common shares 3,248 — (3,248) — Retained earnings 2,185 — (2,185) — Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (1,178) (1,178) 1,178 (1,178) Total Partners’ capital/shareholders’ equity 4,255 4,255 (4,255) 4,255 Noncontrolling interests 4 4 (4) 4 Total equity 4,259 4,259 (4,259) 4,259 Total liabilities and equity $ 22,360 $ 4,491 $ (4,491) $ 22,360 RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Statements of Operations (In millions of U.S. dollars) 2020 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated Revenues: Sales $ 2,013 $ — $ — $ 2,013 Franchise and property revenues 2,955 — — 2,955 Total revenues 4,968 — — 4,968 Operating costs and expenses: Cost of sales 1,610 — — 1,610 Franchise and property expenses 528 — — 528 Selling, general and administrative expenses 1,264 — — 1,264 (Income) loss from equity method investments 39 — — 39 Other operating expenses (income), net 105 — — 105 Total operating costs and expenses 3,546 — — 3,546 Income from operations 1,422 — — 1,422 Interest expense, net 508 — — 508 Loss on early extinguishment of debt 98 — — 98 Income before income taxes 816 — — 816 Income tax expense (benefit) 66 — — 66 Net income 750 — — 750 Equity in earnings of consolidated subsidiaries — 750 (750) — Net income (loss) 750 750 (750) 750 Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests 2 2 (2) 2 Net income (loss) attributable to common unitholders $ 748 $ 748 $ (748) $ 748 Total comprehensive income (loss) $ 653 $ 653 $ (653) $ 653 RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Statements of Operations (In millions of U.S. dollars) 2019 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated Revenues: Sales $ 2,362 $ — $ — $ 2,362 Franchise and property revenues 3,241 — — 3,241 Total revenues 5,603 — — 5,603 Operating costs and expenses: Cost of sales 1,813 — — 1,813 Franchise and property expenses 540 — — 540 Selling, general and administrative expenses 1,264 — — 1,264 (Income) loss from equity method investments (11) — — (11) Other operating expenses (income), net (10) — — (10) Total operating costs and expenses 3,596 — — 3,596 Income from operations 2,007 — — 2,007 Interest expense, net 532 — — 532 Loss on early extinguishment of debt 23 — — 23 Income before income taxes 1,452 — — 1,452 Income tax expense (benefit) 341 — — 341 Net income 1,111 — — 1,111 Equity in earnings of consolidated subsidiaries — 1,111 (1,111) — Net income (loss) 1,111 1,111 (1,111) 1,111 Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests 2 2 (2) 2 Net income (loss) attributable to common unitholders $ 1,109 $ 1,109 $ (1,109) $ 1,109 Total comprehensive income (loss) $ 1,370 $ 1,370 $ (1,370) $ 1,370 RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Statements of Operations (In millions of U.S. dollars) 2018 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated Revenues: Sales $ 2,355 $ — $ — $ 2,355 Franchise and property revenues 3,002 — — 3,002 Total revenues 5,357 — — 5,357 Operating costs and expenses: Cost of sales 1,818 — — 1,818 Franchise and property expenses 422 — — 422 Selling, general and administrative expenses 1,214 — — 1,214 (Income) loss from equity method investments (22) — — (22) Other operating expenses (income), net 8 — — 8 Total operating costs and expenses 3,440 — — 3,440 Income from operations 1,917 — — 1,917 Interest expense, net 535 — — 535 Income before income taxes 1,382 — — 1,382 Income tax expense (benefit) 238 — — 238 Net income 1,144 — — 1,144 Equity in earnings of consolidated subsidiaries — 1,144 (1,144) — Net income (loss) 1,144 1,144 (1,144) 1,144 Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests 1 1 (1) 1 Net income (loss) attributable to common unitholders $ 1,143 $ 1,143 $ (1,143) $ 1,143 Total comprehensive income (loss) $ 591 $ 591 $ (591) $ 591 RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Statements of Cash Flows (In millions of U.S. dollars) 2020 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated Cash flows from operating activities: Net income $ 750 $ 750 $ (750) $ 750 Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities: Equity in loss (earnings) of consolidated subsidiaries — (750) 750 — Depreciation and amortization 189 — — 189 Premiums paid and non-cash loss on early extinguishment of debt 97 — — 97 Amortization of deferred financing costs and debt issuance discount 26 — — 26 (Income) loss from equity method investments 39 — — 39 Loss (gain) on remeasurement of foreign denominated transactions 100 — — 100 Net (gains) losses on derivatives 32 — — 32 Share-based compensation expense 74 — — 74 Deferred income taxes (208) — — (208) Other 28 — — 28 Changes in current assets and liabilities, excluding acquisitions and dispositions: Accounts and notes receivable (30) — — (30) Inventories and prepaids and other current assets (10) — — (10) Accounts and drafts payable (183) — — (183) Other accrued liabilities and gift card liability 16 — — 16 Tenant inducements paid to franchisees (22) — — (22) Other long-term assets and liabilities 23 — — 23 Net cash provided by operating activities 921 — — 921 Cash flows from investing activities: Payments for property and equipment (117) — — (117) Net proceeds from disposal of assets, restaurant closures and refranchisings 12 — — 12 Settlement/sale of derivatives, net 33 — — 33 Other investing activities, net (7) — — (7) Net cash used for investing activities (79) — — (79) Cash flows from financing activities: Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt 5,235 — — 5,235 Repayments of long-term debt and finance leases (4,708) — — (4,708) Payment of financing costs (43) — — (43) Distributions paid on Class A and Partnership exchangeable units — (959) — (959) Repurchase of Partnership exchangeable units — (380) — (380) Capital contribution from RBI Inc. 82 — — 82 Distributions from subsidiaries (1,339) 1,339 — — (Payments) proceeds from derivatives (46) — — (46) Other financing activities, net (2) — — (2) Net cash used for financing activities (821) — — (821) Effect of exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents 6 — — 6 Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents 27 — — 27 Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 1,533 — — 1,533 Cash and cash equivalents at end of period $ 1,560 $ — $ — $ 1,560 RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Statements of Cash Flows (In millions of U.S. dollars) 2019 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated Cash flows from operating activities: Net income $ 1,111 $ 1,111 $ (1,111) $ 1,111 Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities: Equity in loss (earnings) of consolidated subsidiaries — (1,111) 1,111 — Depreciation and amortization 185 — — 185 Premiums paid and non-cash loss on early extinguishment of debt 16 — — 16 Amortization of deferred financing costs and debt issuance discount 29 — — 29 (Income) loss from equity method investments (11) — — (11) Loss (gain) on remeasurement of foreign denominated transactions (14) — — (14) Net (gains) losses on derivatives (49) — — (49) Share-based compensation expense 68 — — 68 Deferred income taxes 58 — — 58 Other 6 — — 6 Changes in current assets and liabilities, excluding acquisitions and dispositions: Accounts and notes receivable (53) — — (53) Inventories and prepaids and other current assets (15) — — (15) Accounts and drafts payable 112 — — 112 Other accrued liabilities and gift card liability (51) — — (51) Tenant inducements paid to franchisees (54) — — (54) Other long-term assets and liabilities 138 — — 138 Net cash provided by operating activities 1,476 — — 1,476 Cash flows from investing activities: Payments for property and equipment (62) — — (62) Net proceeds from disposal of assets, restaurant closures and refranchisings 8 — — 8 Settlement/sale of derivatives, net 24 — — 24 Net cash used for investing activities (30) — — (30) Cash flows from financing activities: Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt 2,250 — — 2,250 Repayments of long-term debt and finance leases (2,266) — — (2,266) Payment of financing costs (50) — — (50) Distributions paid on Class A and Partnership exchangeable units — (901) — (901) Capital contribution from RBI Inc. 102 — — 102 Distributions from subsidiaries (901) 901 — — Proceeds from derivatives 23 — — 23 Net cash used for financing activities (842) — — (842) Effect of exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents 16 — — 16 Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents 620 — — 620 Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 913 — — 913 Cash and cash equivalents at end of period $ 1,533 $ — $ — $ 1,533 RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Statements of Cash Flows (In millions of U.S. dollars) 2018 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated Cash flows from operating activities: Net income $ 1,144 $ 1,144 $ (1,144) $ 1,144 Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities: Equity in loss (earnings) of consolidated subsidiaries — (1,144) 1,144 — Depreciation and amortization 180 — — 180 Amortization of deferred financing costs and debt issuance discount 29 — — 29 (Income) loss from equity method investments (22) — — (22) Loss (gain) on remeasurement of foreign denominated transactions (33) — — (33) Net (gains) losses on derivatives (40) — — (40) Share-based compensation expense 48 — — 48 Deferred income taxes 29 — — 29 Other 5 — — 5 Changes in current assets and liabilities, excluding acquisitions and dispositions: Accounts and notes receivable 19 — — 19 Inventories and prepaids and other current assets (7) — — (7) Accounts and drafts payable 41 — — 41 Other accrued liabilities and gift card liability (219) — — (219) Tenant inducements paid to franchisees (52) — — (52) Other long-term assets and liabilities 43 — — 43 Net cash provided by operating activities 1,165 — — 1,165 Cash flows from investing activities: Payments for property and equipment (86) — — (86) Net proceeds from disposal of assets, restaurant closures and refranchisings 8 — — 8 Settlement/sale of derivatives, net 17 — — 17 Other investing activities, net 17 — — 17 Net cash used for investing activities (44) — — (44) Cash flows from financing activities: Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt 75 — — 75 Repayments of long-term debt and finance leases (74) — — (74) Payment of financing costs (3) — — (3) Distributions paid on Class A and Partnership exchangeable units — (728) — (728) Repurchase of Partnership exchangeable units — (561) — (561) Capital contribution from RBI Inc. 61 — — 61 Distributions from subsidiaries (1,289) 1,289 — — Other financing activities, net (55) — — (55) Net cash used for financing activities (1,285) — — (1,285) Effect of exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents (20) — — (20) Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents (184) — — (184) Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 1,097 — — 1,097 Cash and cash equivalents at end of period $ 913 $ — $ — $ 913

Subsequent Events

Subsequent Events12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Subsequent Events [Abstract]
Subsequent EventsSubsequent Events Dividends On January 5, 2021, RBI paid a cash dividend of $0.52 per RBI common share to common shareholders of record on December 21, 2020. Partnership made a distribution to RBI as holder of Class A common units in the amount of the aggregate dividends declared and paid by RBI on RBI common shares and also made a distribution in respect of each Partnership exchangeable unit in the amount of $0.52 per exchangeable unit to holders of record on December 21, 2020. On February 11, 2021, we announced that the RBI board of directors had declared a cash dividend of $0.53 per RBI common share for the first quarter of 2020. The dividend will be paid on April 6, 2021 to RBI common shareholders of record on March 23, 2021. Partnership will make a distribution to RBI as holder of Class A common units in the amount of the aggregate dividends declared and paid by RBI on RBI common shares. Partnership will also make a distribution in respect of each Partnership exchangeable unit in the amount of $0.53 per Partnership exchangeable unit, and the record date and payment date for such distribution will be the same as the record date and payment date for the cash dividend per RBI common share set forth above.

Significant Accounting Polici_2

Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Accounting Policies [Abstract]
Basis of PresentationBasis of Presentation The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) and related rules and regulations of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission requires our management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and the related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. Actual results could differ from these estimates.
Principles of ConsolidationPrinciples of Consolidation The consolidated financial statements (the "Financial Statements") include our accounts and the accounts of entities in which we have a controlling financial interest, the usual condition of which is ownership of a majority voting interest. All material intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. Investments in other affiliates that are owned 50% or less where we have significant influence are accounted for by the equity method. We also consider for consolidation entities in which we have certain interests, where the controlling financial interest may be achieved through arrangements that do not involve voting interests. Such an entity, known as a variable interest entity (“VIE”), is required to be consolidated by its primary beneficiary. The primary beneficiary is the entity that possesses the power to direct the activities of the VIE that most significantly impact its economic performance and has the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive benefits from the VIE that are significant to it. Our maximum exposure to loss resulting from involvement with VIEs is attributable to accounts and notes receivable balances, outstanding loan guarantees and future lease payments, where applicable. As our franchise and master franchise arrangements provide the franchise and master franchise entities the power to direct the activities that most significantly impact their economic performance, we do not consider ourselves the primary beneficiary of any such entity that might be a VIE. Tim Hortons has historically entered into certain arrangements in which an operator acquires the right to operate a restaurant, but Tim Hortons owns the restaurant’s assets. In these arrangements, Tim Hortons has the ability to determine which operators manage the restaurants and for what duration. We perform an analysis to determine if the legal entity in which operations are conducted is a VIE and consolidate a VIE entity if we also determine Tim Hortons is the entity’s primary beneficiary (“Restaurant VIEs”). As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, we determined that we are the primary beneficiary of 38 and 35 Restaurant VIEs, respectively, and accordingly, have consolidated the results of operations, assets and liabilities, and cash flows of these Restaurant VIEs in our Financial Statements. Assets and liabilities related to consolidated VIEs are not significant to our total consolidated assets and liabilities. Liabilities recognized as a result of consolidating these VIEs do not necessarily represent additional claims on our general assets; rather, they represent claims against the specific assets of the consolidated VIEs. Conversely, assets recognized as a result of consolidating these VIEs do not represent additional assets that could be used to satisfy claims by our creditors as they are not legally included within our general assets.
ReclassificationsReclassificationsCertain prior year amounts in the accompanying consolidated financial statements and notes to the consolidated financial statements have been reclassified in order to be comparable with the current year classifications.
Foreign Currency Translation and Transaction Gains and LossesForeign Currency Translation and Transaction Gains and Losses Our functional currency is the U.S. dollar, since our term loans and senior secured notes are denominated in U.S. dollars. The functional currency of each of our operating subsidiaries is generally the currency of the economic environment in which the subsidiary primarily does business. Our foreign subsidiaries’ financial statements are translated into U.S. dollars using the foreign exchange rates applicable to the dates of the financial statements. Assets and liabilities are translated using the end-of-period spot foreign exchange rates. Income, expenses and cash flows are translated at the average foreign exchange rates for each period. Equity accounts are translated at historical foreign exchange rates. The effects of these translation adjustments are reported as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (“AOCI”) in the consolidated statements of equity. For any transaction that is denominated in a currency different from the entity’s functional currency, we record a gain or loss based on the difference between the foreign exchange rate at the transaction date and the foreign exchange rate at the transaction settlement date (or rate at period end, if unsettled) which is included within other operating expenses (income), net in the consolidated statements of operations.
Cash and Cash EquivalentsCash and Cash Equivalents All highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less and credit card receivables are considered cash equivalents.
InventoriesInventories Inventories are carried at the lower of cost or net realizable value and consist primarily of raw materials such as green coffee beans and finished goods such as new equipment, parts, paper supplies and restaurant food items. The moving average method is used to determine the cost of raw materials and finished goods inventories held for sale to Tim Hortons franchisees.
Property and Equipment, netProperty and Equipment, net We record property and equipment at historical cost less accumulated depreciation and amortization, which is recognized using the straight-line method over the following estimated useful lives: (i) buildings and improvements – up to 40 years; (ii) restaurant equipment – up to 17 years; (iii) furniture, fixtures and other – up to 10 years; and (iv) manufacturing equipment – up to 25 years. Leasehold improvements to properties where we are the lessee are amortized over the lesser of the remaining term of the lease or the estimated useful life of the improvement. Major improvements are capitalized, while maintenance and repairs are expensed when incurred.
LeasesLeases We transitioned to Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 842, Leases (“ASC 842”), from ASC Topic 840, Leases (the “Previous Standard”) on January 1, 2019. Our Financial Statements reflect the application of ASC 842 guidance beginning in 2019, while our Financial Statements for prior periods were prepared under the guidance of the Previous Standard. In all leases, whether we are the lessor or lessee, we define lease term as the noncancellable term of the lease plus any renewals covered by renewal options that are reasonably certain of exercise based on our assessment of the economic factors relevant to the lessee. The noncancellable term of the lease commences on the date the lessor makes the underlying property in the lease available to the lessee, irrespective of when lease payments begin under the contract. Lessor Accounting We recognize lease payments for operating leases as property revenue on a straight-line basis over the lease term, and property revenue is presented net of any related sales tax. Lease incentive payments we make to lessees are amortized as a reduction in property revenue over the lease term. In accordance with ASC 842, we account for reimbursements of maintenance and property tax costs paid to us by lessees as property revenue. These expenses and reimbursements were presented on a net basis under the Previous Standard. We also have net investments in properties leased to franchisees, which meet the criteria of sales-type leases under ASC 842 or met the criteria of direct financing leases under the Previous Standard. Investments in sales-type leases and direct financing leases are recorded on a net basis. Profit or loss on sales-type leases is recognized at lease commencement and recorded in other operating expenses (income), net. Unearned income on direct financing leases is deferred, included in the net investment in the lease, and recognized over the lease term yielding a constant periodic rate of return on the net investment in the lease. We recognize variable lease payment income in the period when changes in facts and circumstances on which the variable lease payments are based occur. Lessee Accounting In accordance with ASC 842, in leases where we are the lessee, we recognize a right-of-use (“ROU”) asset and lease liability at lease commencement, which are measured by discounting lease payments using our incremental borrowing rate as the discount rate. We determine the incremental borrowing rate applicable to each lease by reference to our outstanding secured borrowings and implied spreads over the risk-free discount rates that correspond to the term of each lease, as adjusted for the currency of the lease. Subsequent amortization of the ROU asset and accretion of the lease liability for an operating lease is recognized as a single lease cost, on a straight-line basis, over the lease term. Reductions of the ROU asset and the change in the lease liability are included in changes in Other long-term assets and liabilities in the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows. Under the Previous Standard, we did not recognize assets and liabilities for the rights and obligations created by operating leases and recorded rental expense for operating leases on a straight-line basis over the lease term, net of any applicable lease incentive amortization. A finance lease ROU asset is depreciated on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the useful life of the leased asset or lease term. Interest on each finance lease liability is determined as the amount that results in a constant periodic discount rate on the remaining balance of the liability. Operating lease and finance lease ROU assets are assessed for impairment in accordance with our long-lived asset impairment policy. We reassess lease classification and remeasure ROU assets and lease liabilities when a lease is modified and that modification is not accounted for as a separate contract or upon certain other events that require reassessment in accordance with ASC 842. Maintenance and property tax expenses are accounted for on an accrual basis as variable lease cost. We recognize variable lease cost in the period when changes in facts and circumstances on which the variable lease payments are based occur.
LeasesLeases We transitioned to Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 842, Leases (“ASC 842”), from ASC Topic 840, Leases (the “Previous Standard”) on January 1, 2019. Our Financial Statements reflect the application of ASC 842 guidance beginning in 2019, while our Financial Statements for prior periods were prepared under the guidance of the Previous Standard. In all leases, whether we are the lessor or lessee, we define lease term as the noncancellable term of the lease plus any renewals covered by renewal options that are reasonably certain of exercise based on our assessment of the economic factors relevant to the lessee. The noncancellable term of the lease commences on the date the lessor makes the underlying property in the lease available to the lessee, irrespective of when lease payments begin under the contract. Lessor Accounting We recognize lease payments for operating leases as property revenue on a straight-line basis over the lease term, and property revenue is presented net of any related sales tax. Lease incentive payments we make to lessees are amortized as a reduction in property revenue over the lease term. In accordance with ASC 842, we account for reimbursements of maintenance and property tax costs paid to us by lessees as property revenue. These expenses and reimbursements were presented on a net basis under the Previous Standard. We also have net investments in properties leased to franchisees, which meet the criteria of sales-type leases under ASC 842 or met the criteria of direct financing leases under the Previous Standard. Investments in sales-type leases and direct financing leases are recorded on a net basis. Profit or loss on sales-type leases is recognized at lease commencement and recorded in other operating expenses (income), net. Unearned income on direct financing leases is deferred, included in the net investment in the lease, and recognized over the lease term yielding a constant periodic rate of return on the net investment in the lease. We recognize variable lease payment income in the period when changes in facts and circumstances on which the variable lease payments are based occur. Lessee Accounting In accordance with ASC 842, in leases where we are the lessee, we recognize a right-of-use (“ROU”) asset and lease liability at lease commencement, which are measured by discounting lease payments using our incremental borrowing rate as the discount rate. We determine the incremental borrowing rate applicable to each lease by reference to our outstanding secured borrowings and implied spreads over the risk-free discount rates that correspond to the term of each lease, as adjusted for the currency of the lease. Subsequent amortization of the ROU asset and accretion of the lease liability for an operating lease is recognized as a single lease cost, on a straight-line basis, over the lease term. Reductions of the ROU asset and the change in the lease liability are included in changes in Other long-term assets and liabilities in the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows. Under the Previous Standard, we did not recognize assets and liabilities for the rights and obligations created by operating leases and recorded rental expense for operating leases on a straight-line basis over the lease term, net of any applicable lease incentive amortization. A finance lease ROU asset is depreciated on a straight-line basis over the lesser of the useful life of the leased asset or lease term. Interest on each finance lease liability is determined as the amount that results in a constant periodic discount rate on the remaining balance of the liability. Operating lease and finance lease ROU assets are assessed for impairment in accordance with our long-lived asset impairment policy. We reassess lease classification and remeasure ROU assets and lease liabilities when a lease is modified and that modification is not accounted for as a separate contract or upon certain other events that require reassessment in accordance with ASC 842. Maintenance and property tax expenses are accounted for on an accrual basis as variable lease cost. We recognize variable lease cost in the period when changes in facts and circumstances on which the variable lease payments are based occur.
Goodwill and Intangible Assets Not Subject to AmortizationGoodwill and Intangible Assets Not Subject to Amortization Goodwill represents the excess of the purchase price over the fair value of assets acquired and liabilities assumed in connection with the acquisition of Popeyes in 2017, the acquisition of Tim Hortons in 2014 and the acquisition of Burger King Holdings, Inc. by 3G Capital Partners Ltd. in 2010. Our indefinite-lived intangible assets consist of the Tim Hortons brand, the Burger King brand, and the Popeyes brand (each a “Brand” and together, the “Brands”). Goodwill and the Brands are tested for impairment at least annually as of October 1 of each year and more often if an event occurs or circumstances change which indicate impairment might exist. Our annual impairment tests of goodwill and the Brands may be completed through qualitative assessments. We may elect to bypass the qualitative assessment and proceed directly to a quantitative impairment test for any reporting unit or Brand in any period. We can resume the qualitative assessment for any reporting unit or Brand in any subsequent period. Under a qualitative approach, our impairment review for goodwill consists of an assessment of whether it is more-likely-than-not that a reporting unit’s fair value is less than its carrying amount. If we elect to bypass the qualitative assessment for any reporting unit, or if a qualitative assessment indicates it is more-likely-than-not that the estimated carrying value of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, we perform a quantitative goodwill impairment test that requires us to estimate the fair value of the reporting unit. If the fair value of the reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, we will measure any goodwill impairment loss as the amount by which the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the total amount of goodwill allocated to that reporting unit. Under a qualitative approach, our impairment review for the Brands consists of an assessment of whether it is more-likely-than-not that a Brand’s fair value is less than its carrying amount. If we elect to bypass the qualitative assessment for a Brand, or if a qualitative assessment indicates it is more-likely-than-not that the estimated carrying value of a Brand exceeds its fair value, we estimate the fair value of the Brand and compare it to its carrying amount. If the carrying amount exceeds fair value, an impairment loss is recognized in an amount equal to that excess.
Long-Lived AssetsLong-Lived Assets Long-lived assets, such as property and equipment, intangible assets subject to amortization and lease right-of-use assets, are tested for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset or asset group may not be recoverable. Some of the events or changes in circumstances that would trigger an impairment review include, but are not limited to, bankruptcy proceedings or other significant financial distress of a lessee; significant negative industry or economic trends; knowledge of transactions involving the sale of similar property at amounts below the carrying value; or our expectation to dispose of long-lived assets before the end of their estimated useful lives. The impairment test for long-lived assets requires us to assess the recoverability of long-lived assets by comparing their net carrying value to the sum of undiscounted estimated future cash flows directly associated with and arising from use and eventual disposition of the assets or asset group. Long-lived assets are grouped for recognition and measurement of impairment at the lowest level for which identifiable cash flows are largely independent of the cash flows of other assets. If the net carrying value of a group of long-lived assets exceeds the sum of related undiscounted estimated future cash flows, we record an impairment charge equal to the excess, if any, of the net carrying value over fair value.
Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) Other comprehensive income (loss) (“OCI”) refers to revenues, expenses, gains and losses that are included in comprehensive income (loss), but are excluded from net income (loss) as these amounts are recorded directly as an adjustment to equity, net of tax. Our other comprehensive income (loss) is primarily comprised of unrealized gains and losses on foreign currency translation adjustments and unrealized gains and losses on hedging activity, net of tax.
Derivative Financial InstrumentsDerivative Financial Instruments We recognize and measure all derivative instruments as either assets or liabilities at fair value in the consolidated balance sheets. We may enter into derivatives that are not designated as hedging instruments for accounting purposes, but which largely offset the economic impact of certain transactions. Gains or losses resulting from changes in the fair value of derivatives are recognized in earnings or recorded in other comprehensive income (loss) and recognized in the consolidated statements of operations when the hedged item affects earnings, depending on the purpose of the derivatives and whether they qualify for, and we have applied, hedge accounting treatment. When applying hedge accounting, we designate at a derivative’s inception, the specific assets, liabilities or future commitments being hedged, and assess the hedge’s effectiveness at inception and on an ongoing basis. We discontinue hedge accounting when: (i) we determine that the cash flow derivative is no longer effective in offsetting changes in the cash flows of a hedged item; (ii) the derivative expires or is sold, terminated or exercised; (iii) it is no longer probable that the forecasted transaction will occur; or (iv) management determines that designation of the derivatives as a hedge instrument is no longer appropriate. We do not enter into or hold derivatives for speculative purposes.
Disclosures about Fair ValueDisclosures about Fair Value Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants in the principal market, or if none exists, the most advantageous market, for the specific asset or liability at the measurement date (the exit price). The fair value is based on assumptions that market participants would use when pricing the asset or liability. The fair values are assigned a level within the fair value hierarchy, depending on the source of the inputs into the calculation, as follows: Level 1 Observable inputs that reflect quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets. Level 2 Inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability either directly or indirectly. Level 3 Unobservable inputs reflecting management’s own assumptions about the inputs used in pricing the asset or liability. The carrying amounts for cash and cash equivalents, accounts and notes receivable and accounts and drafts payable approximate fair value based on the short-term nature of these amounts.
Revenue RecognitionRevenue Recognition Sales Sales consist primarily of supply chain sales, which represent sales of products, supplies and restaurant equipment to franchisees, as well as sales to retailers and are presented net of any related sales tax. Orders placed by customers specify the goods to be delivered and transaction prices for supply chain sales. Revenue is recognized upon transfer of control over ordered items, generally upon delivery to the customer, which is when the customer obtains physical possession of the goods, legal title is transferred, the customer has all risks and rewards of ownership and an obligation to pay for the goods is created. Shipping and handling costs associated with outbound freight for supply chain sales are accounted for as fulfillment costs and classified as cost of sales. To a much lesser extent, sales also include Company restaurant sales (including Restaurant VIEs), which consist of sales to restaurant guests. Revenue from Company restaurant sales is recognized at the point of sale. Taxes assessed by a governmental authority that we collect are excluded from revenue. Franchise revenues Franchise revenues consist primarily of royalties, advertising fund contributions, initial and renewal franchise fees and upfront fees from development agreements and master franchise and development agreements (“MFDAs”). Under franchise agreements, we provide franchisees with (i) a franchise license, which includes a license to use our intellectual property and, in those markets where our subsidiaries manage an advertising fund, advertising and promotion management, (ii) pre-opening services, such as training and inspections, and (iii) ongoing services, such as development of training materials and menu items and restaurant monitoring and inspections. The services we provide under franchise agreements are highly interrelated and dependent upon the franchise license and we concluded the services do not represent individually distinct performance obligations. Consequently, we bundle the franchise license performance obligation and promises to provide services into a single performance obligation, which we satisfy by providing a right to use our intellectual property over the term of each franchise agreement. Royalties, including franchisee contributions to advertising funds managed by our subsidiaries, are calculated as a percentage of franchise restaurant sales over the term of the franchise agreement. Under our franchise agreements, advertising contributions paid by franchisees must be spent on advertising, product development, marketing and related activities. Initial and renewal franchise fees are payable by the franchisee upon a new restaurant opening or renewal of an existing franchise agreement. Our franchise agreement royalties, inclusive of advertising fund contributions, represent sales-based royalties that are related entirely to our performance obligation under the franchise agreement and are recognized as franchise sales occur. Additionally, initial and renewal franchise fees are recognized as revenue on a straight-line basis over the term of the respective agreement. Our performance obligation under development agreements other than MFDAs generally consists of an obligation to grant exclusive development rights over a stated term. These development rights are not distinct from franchise agreements, so upfront fees paid by franchisees for exclusive development rights are deferred and apportioned to each franchise restaurant opened by the franchisee. The pro rata amount apportioned to each restaurant is accounted for as an initial franchise fee. We have a distinct performance obligation under our MFDAs to grant subfranchising rights over a stated term. Under the terms of MFDAs, we typically either receive an upfront fee paid in cash and/or receive noncash consideration in the form of an equity interest in the master franchisee or an affiliate of the master franchisee. We account for noncash consideration as investments in the applicable equity method investee and recognize revenue in an amount equal to the fair value of the equity interest received. Upfront fees from master franchisees, including the fair value of noncash consideration, are deferred and amortized over the MFDA term on a straight-line basis. We may recognize unamortized upfront fees when a contract with a franchisee or master franchisee is modified and is accounted for as a termination of the existing contract.
Revenue Recognition - Property RevenuesProperty revenues Property revenues consists of rental income from properties we lease or sublease to franchisees. Property revenues are accounted for in accordance with applicable accounting guidance for leases and are excluded from the scope of revenue recognition guidance.
Advertising and Promotional CostsAdvertising and Promotional CostsCompany restaurants and franchise restaurants contribute to advertising funds that our subsidiaries manage in the United States and Canada and certain other international markets. The advertising funds expense the production costs of advertising when the advertisements are first aired or displayed. All other advertising and promotional costs are expensed in the period incurred. Under our franchise agreements, advertising contributions received from franchisees must be spent on advertising, product development, marketing and related activities. Advertising contributions received from franchisees are included in franchise and property revenues and advertising expenses are included as selling, general and administrative expenses. Advertising expenses included in selling, general and administrative expenses totaled $857 million for 2020, $858 million for 2019 and $793 million for 2018. The advertising contributions by Company restaurants (including Restaurant VIEs) are eliminated in consolidation.
Deferred Financing CostsDeferred Financing Costs Deferred financing costs are amortized over the term of the related debt agreement into interest expense using the effective interest method.
Income TaxesIncome Taxes Amounts in the Financial Statements related to income taxes are calculated using the principles of ASC Topic 740, Income Taxes . Under these principles, deferred tax assets and liabilities reflect the impact of temporary differences between the amounts of assets and liabilities recognized for financial reporting purposes and the amounts recognized for tax purposes, as well as tax credit carry-forwards and loss carry-forwards. These deferred taxes are measured by applying currently enacted tax rates. A deferred tax asset is recognized when it is considered more-likely-than-not to be realized. The effects of changes in tax rates on deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized in income in the year in which the law is enacted. A valuation allowance reduces deferred tax assets when it is more-likely-than-not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. We recognize positions taken or expected to be taken in a tax return in the Financial Statements when it is more-likely-than-not (i.e., a likelihood of more than 50%) that the position would be sustained upon examination by tax authorities. A recognized tax position is then measured at the largest amount of benefit with greater than 50% likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement. Translation gains and losses resulting from the remeasurement of foreign deferred tax assets or liabilities denominated in a currency other than the functional currency are classified as other operating expenses (income), net in the consolidated statements of operations.
Share-based CompensationShare-based Compensation Compensation expense related to the issuance of share-based awards to our employees is measured at fair value on the grant date. We use the Black-Scholes option pricing model to value stock options. The compensation expense for awards that vest over a future service period is recognized over the requisite service period on a straight-line basis, adjusted for estimated forfeitures of awards that are not expected to vest. We use historical data to estimate forfeitures for share-based awards. Upon the end of the service period, compensation expense is adjusted to account for the actual forfeiture rate. The compensation expense for awards that contain performance conditions is recognized when it is probable that the performance conditions will be achieved.
New Accounting PronouncementsNew Accounting Pronouncements Credit Losses – In June 2016, the FASB issued guidance that requires companies to measure and recognize lifetime expected credit losses for certain financial instruments, including trade accounts receivable and net investments in direct financing and sales-type leases. Expected credit losses are estimated using relevant information about past events, including historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts that affect the collectability of the reported amount. This amendment was effective commencing in 2020, using a modified retrospective approach. The adoption of this new guidance did not have a material impact on our Financial Statements. Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes – In December 2019, the FASB issued guidance which simplifies the accounting for income taxes by removing certain exceptions and by clarifying and amending existing guidance applicable to accounting for income taxes. The amendment is effective commencing in 2021 with early adoption permitted. We do not anticipate the adoption of this new guidance will have a material impact on our Financial Statements. Accounting Relief for the Transition Away from LIBOR and Certain other Reference Rates – In March 2020 and as clarified in January 2021, the FASB issued guidance which provides optional expedients and exceptions for applying U.S. GAAP to contracts, hedging relationships, and other transactions that reference LIBOR or another reference rate expected to be discontinued because of reference rate reform. This amendment is effective as of March 12, 2020 through December 31, 2022. The expedients and exceptions provided by this new guidance do not apply to contract modifications made and hedging relationships entered into or evaluated after December 31, 2022, except for hedging relationships existing as of December 31, 2022, that an entity has elected certain optional expedients for and that are retained through the end of the hedging relationships. We are currently evaluating the impact that the adoption of this new guidance will have on our Financial Statements and have not adopted any of the transition relief available under the new guidance as of December 31, 2020.

Significant Accounting Polici_3

Significant Accounting Policies (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Accounting Policies [Abstract]
Schedule of Fair Value MeasurementsThe following table presents the fair value of our variable rate term debt and senior notes, estimated using inputs based on bid and offer prices that are Level 2 inputs, and principal carrying amount (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Fair value of our variable term debt and senior notes $ 12,477 $ 12,075 Principal carrying amount of our variable term debt and senior notes 12,453 11,900

Earnings Per Unit (Tables)

Earnings Per Unit (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Earnings Per Share [Abstract]
Basic and Diluted Earnings Per UnitThe following table summarizes the basic and diluted earnings per unit calculations (in millions, except per unit amounts): 2020 2019 2018 Allocation of net income among partner interests: Net income allocated to Class A common unitholders $ 486 $ 643 $ 612 Net income allocated to Partnership exchangeable unitholders 262 466 531 Net income attributable to common unitholders $ 748 $ 1,109 $ 1,143 Denominator - basic and diluted partnership units: Weighted average Class A common units 202 202 202 Weighted average Partnership exchangeable units 162 194 216 Earnings per unit - basic and diluted: Class A common units (a) $ 2.41 $ 3.18 $ 3.03 Partnership exchangeable units (a) $ 1.62 $ 2.40 $ 2.46

Property and Equipment, net (Ta

Property and Equipment, net (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Property, Plant and Equipment [Abstract]
Summary of Property and Equipment, NetProperty and equipment, net, consist of the following (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Land $ 1,007 $ 1,006 Buildings and improvements 1,192 1,148 Restaurant equipment 163 109 Furniture, fixtures, and other 242 210 Finance leases 289 245 Construction in progress 17 35 2,910 2,753 Accumulated depreciation and amortization (879) (746) Property and equipment, net $ 2,031 $ 2,007

Intangible Assets, net and Go_2

Intangible Assets, net and Goodwill (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Goodwill and Intangible Assets Disclosure [Abstract]
Schedule of Intangible Assets, Net and GoodwillIntangible assets, net and goodwill consist of the following (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Gross Accumulated Amortization Net Gross Accumulated Amortization Net Identifiable assets subject to amortization: Franchise agreements $ 735 $ (264) $ 471 $ 720 $ (225) $ 495 Favorable leases 117 (66) 51 127 (65) 62 Subtotal 852 (330) 522 847 (290) 557 Indefinite-lived intangible assets: Tim Hortons brand $ 6,650 $ — $ 6,650 $ 6,534 $ — $ 6,534 Burger King brand 2,174 — 2,174 2,117 — 2,117 Popeyes brand 1,355 — 1,355 1,355 — 1,355 Subtotal 10,179 — 10,179 10,006 — 10,006 Intangible assets, net $ 10,701 $ 10,563 Goodwill Tim Hortons segment $ 4,279 $ 4,207 Burger King segment 614 598 Popeyes segment 846 846 Total $ 5,739 $ 5,651
Schedule of Estimated Future Amortization Expenses on Intangible AssetsAs of December 31, 2020, the estimated future amortization expense on identifiable assets subject to amortization is as follows (in millions): Twelve-months ended December 31, Amount 2021 $ 41 2022 40 2023 38 2024 37 2025 35 Thereafter 331 Total $ 522

Equity Method Investments (Tabl

Equity Method Investments (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Equity Method Investments and Joint Ventures [Abstract]
Summary of Franchise and Property RevenueFranchise and property revenue recognized from franchisees that are owned or franchised by entities in which we have an equity interest consist of the following (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Revenues from affiliates: Royalties $ 289 $ 345 $ 310 Property revenues 32 33 36 Franchise fees and other revenue 14 10 11 Total $ 335 $ 388 $ 357

Other Accrued Liabilities and_2

Other Accrued Liabilities and Other Liabilities (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Other Liabilities Disclosure [Abstract]
Schedule of Other Accrued Liabilities (Current) and Other Liabilities (Non-Current), NetOther accrued liabilities (current) and other liabilities, net (non-current) consist of the following (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Current: Dividend payable $ 239 $ 232 Interest payable 66 71 Accrued compensation and benefits 78 57 Taxes payable 122 126 Deferred income 42 35 Accrued advertising expenses 59 40 Restructuring and other provisions 12 8 Current portion of operating lease liabilities 137 126 Other 80 95 Other accrued liabilities $ 835 $ 790 Non-current: Taxes payable $ 626 $ 579 Contract liabilities (see Note 14) 528 541 Derivatives liabilities 865 341 Unfavorable leases 81 103 Accrued pension 70 65 Deferred income 28 25 Other 38 44 Other liabilities, net $ 2,236 $ 1,698

Long-Term Debt (Tables)

Long-Term Debt (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Debt Disclosure [Abstract]
Summary of Long-Term DebtLong-term debt consist of the following (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Term Loan B (due November 19, 2026) $ 5,297 $ 5,350 Term Loan A (due October 7, 2024) 731 750 2017 4.25% Senior Notes (due May 15, 2024) 775 1,500 2019 3.875% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028) 750 750 2020 5.75% Senior Notes (due April 15, 2025) 500 — 2020 3.50% Senior Notes (due February 15, 2029) 750 — 2017 5.00% Senior Notes (due October 15, 2025) — 2,800 2019 4.375% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028) 750 750 2020 4.00% Senior Notes (due October 15, 2030) 2,900 — TH Facility and other 178 81 Less: unamortized deferred financing costs and deferred issuance discount (155) (148) Total debt, net 12,476 11,833 Less: current maturities of debt (79) (74) Total long-term debt $ 12,397 $ 11,759
Summary of Aggregate Maturities of Long-Term DebtThe aggregate maturities of our long-term debt as of December 31, 2020 are as follows (in millions): Year Ended December 31, Principal Amount 2021 $ 79 2022 86 2023 102 2024 1,499 2025 686 Thereafter 10,179 Total $ 12,631
Schedule of Interest Expense, NetInterest expense, net consists of the following (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Debt (a) $ 471 $ 503 $ 498 Finance lease obligations 20 20 23 Amortization of deferred financing costs and debt issuance discount 26 29 29 Interest income (9) (20) (15) Interest expense, net $ 508 $ 532 $ 535 (a) Amount includes $69 million, $70 million and $60 million benefit during 2020, 2019 and 2018, respectively, related to the amortization of the Excluded Component as defined in Note 11, Derivatives .

Leases (Tables)

Leases (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Leases [Abstract]
Summary of Assets Leased, Property and Equipment, NetAssets leased to franchisees and others under operating leases where we are the lessor and which are included within our property and equipment, net are as follows (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Land $ 892 $ 905 Buildings and improvements 1,146 1,142 Restaurant equipment 19 18 2,057 2,065 Accumulated depreciation and amortization (534) (472) Property and equipment leased, net $ 1,523 $ 1,593
Summary of Net Investment, Direct Financing Leases As of December 31, 2020 2019 Future rents to be received: Future minimum lease receipts $ 87 $ 49 Contingent rents (a) 12 19 Estimated unguaranteed residual value 7 15 Unearned income (34) (26) 72 57 Current portion included within accounts receivables (6) (9) Net investment in property leased to franchisees $ 66 $ 48 (a) Amounts represent estimated contingent rents recorded in connection with the acquisition method of accounting.
Summary of Property RevenueProperty revenues are comprised primarily of rental income from operating leases and earned income on direct financing leases with franchisees as follows (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 ASC 842 ASC 842 Previous Standard Rental income: Minimum lease payments $ 445 $ 448 $ 454 Variable lease payments 262 370 273 Amortization of favorable and unfavorable income lease contracts, net 6 7 8 Subtotal - lease income from operating leases 713 825 735 Earned income on direct financing and sales-type leases 5 8 9 Total property revenues $ 718 $ 833 $ 744
Schedule of Lease CostLease cost, rent expense and other information associated with these lease commitments is as follows (in millions): Lease Cost (Income) 2020 2019 ASC 842 ASC 842 Operating lease cost $ 199 $ 210 Operating lease variable lease cost 177 198 Finance lease cost: Amortization of right-of-use assets 29 27 Interest on lease liabilities 20 20 Sublease income (534) (631) Total lease cost (income) $ (109) $ (176)
Summary of Rent Expense Associated with Lease Commitments2018 Previous Standard Rental expense: Minimum $ 201 Contingent 71 Amortization of favorable and unfavorable payable lease contracts, net 9 Total rental expense (a) $ 281 (a) Amounts include rental expense related to properties subleased to franchisees of $263 million for 2018.
Schedule of Lease Terms and Discount RatesAs of December 31, 2020 2019 Weighted-average remaining lease term (in years): Operating leases 10.5 years 10.9 years Finance leases 11.3 years 11.2 years Weighted-average discount rate: Operating leases 5.9 % 6.2 % Finance leases 6.5 % 7.1 %
Schedule of Other Lease Information2020 2019 Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities: Operating cash flows from operating leases $ 200 $ 194 Operating cash flows from finance leases $ 20 $ 20 Financing cash flows from finance leases $ 29 $ 26 Supplemental noncash information on lease liabilities arising from obtaining right-of-use assets: Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new finance lease obligations $ 59 $ 18 Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new operating lease obligations $ 118 $ 163
Summary of Future Minimum Lease Receipts and CommitmentsAs of December 31, 2020, future minimum lease receipts and commitments are as follows (in millions): Lease Receipts Lease Commitments (a) Direct Operating Finance Operating 2021 $ 8 $ 419 $ 50 $ 198 2022 7 397 49 188 2023 6 373 46 173 2024 6 340 44 159 2025 6 305 42 144 Thereafter 54 1,533 257 815 Total minimum receipts / payments $ 87 $ 3,367 488 1,677 Less amount representing interest (141) (458) Present value of minimum lease payments 347 1,219 Current portion of lease obligations (32) (137) Long-term portion of lease obligations $ 315 $ 1,082 (a) Minimum lease payments have not been reduced by minimum sublease rentals of $2,193 million due in the future under non-cancelable subleases

Income Taxes (Tables)

Income Taxes (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Income Tax Disclosure [Abstract]
Income Before Income TaxesIncome (loss) before income taxes, classified by source of income (loss), is as follows (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Canadian $ 200 $ 685 $ 1,111 Foreign 616 767 271 Income before income taxes $ 816 $ 1,452 $ 1,382
Income Tax Expense (Benefit) Attributable to Income from Continuing OperationsIncome tax (benefit) expense attributable to income from continuing operations consists of the following (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Current: Canadian $ 45 $ 47 $ 25 U.S. Federal 125 122 95 U.S. state, net of federal income tax benefit 26 20 17 Other Foreign 78 94 72 $ 274 $ 283 $ 209 Deferred: Canadian $ (67) $ 43 $ 78 U.S. Federal (82) 8 (65) U.S. state, net of federal income tax benefit (27) — 13 Other Foreign (32) 7 3 $ (208) $ 58 $ 29 Income tax expense (benefit) $ 66 $ 341 $ 238
Schedule of Statutory Rate Reconciles to Effective Income Tax RateThe statutory rate reconciles to the effective income tax rate as follows: 2020 2019 2018 Statutory rate 26.5 % 26.5 % 26.5 % Costs and taxes related to foreign operations 9.6 4.7 4.2 Foreign exchange gain (loss) 0.5 0.1 (0.1) Foreign tax rate differential (15.6) (10.8) (6.1) Change in valuation allowance 1.2 0.5 3.2 Change in accrual for tax uncertainties 3.9 5.0 0.1 Intercompany financing (6.1) (2.4) (4.4) Impact of Tax Act (7.8) (0.1) (1.9) Swiss Tax Reform (5.1) 1.1 — Benefit from stock option exercises (0.3) (2.2) (5.0) Other 1.2 1.1 0.7 Effective income tax rate 8.0 % 23.5 % 17.2 %
Schedule of Income Tax Expense Benefit Allocated to Continuing Operations and Amounts Separately Allocated to Other ItemsIncome tax (benefit) expense allocated to continuing operations and amounts separately allocated to other items was (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Income tax (benefit) expense from continuing operations $ 66 $ 341 $ 238 Cash flow hedge in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (64) (23) (2) Net investment hedge in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (60) (32) 101 Foreign Currency Translation in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) 12 — — Pension liability in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (3) (1) — Total $ (49) $ 285 $ 337
Schedule of Deferred Income Tax Expense (Benefit) Attributable to Income from Continuing OperationsThe significant components of deferred income tax (benefit) expense attributable to income from continuing operations are as follows (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Deferred income tax (benefit) expense $ (230) $ 30 $ (14) Change in valuation allowance 22 7 43 Change in effective Canadian income tax rate — (1) (3) Change in effective U.S. federal income tax rate — — (8) Change in effective U.S. state income tax rate 1 6 15 Change in effective foreign income tax rate (1) 16 (4) Total $ (208) $ 58 $ 29
Schedule of the Deferred Tax Assets and Deferred Tax LiabilitiesThe tax effects of temporary differences that give rise to significant portions of the deferred tax assets and deferred tax liabilities are presented below (in millions): As of December 31, 2020 2019 Deferred tax assets: Accounts and notes receivable $ 6 $ 4 Accrued employee benefits 54 48 Leases 114 99 Operating lease liabilities 323 332 Liabilities not currently deductible for tax 310 198 Tax loss and credit carryforwards 547 493 Derivatives 225 83 Other 9 3 Total gross deferred tax assets 1,588 1,260 Valuation allowance (364) (329) Net deferred tax assets 1,224 931 Less deferred tax liabilities: Property and equipment, principally due to differences in depreciation 35 40 Intangible assets 1,747 1,792 Leases 114 88 Operating lease assets 311 325 Statutory impairment 30 28 Outside basis difference 46 42 Total gross deferred tax liabilities 2,283 2,315 Net deferred tax liability $ 1,059 $ 1,384
Summary of Changes in Valuation AllowanceChanges in the valuation allowance are as follows (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Beginning balance $ 329 $ 325 $ 282 Change in estimates recorded to deferred income tax expense 19 8 43 Changes in losses and credits 3 (2) — Additions related to other comprehensive income 13 (2) — Ending balance $ 364 $ 329 $ 325
Summary of Amount and Expiration Dates of Operating Loss and Tax Credit Carry-forwardsThe gross amount and expiration dates of operating loss and tax credit carry-forwards as of December 31, 2020 are as follows (in millions): Amount Expiration Date Canadian net operating loss carryforwards $ 866 2036-2040 Canadian capital loss carryforwards 930 Indefinite U.S. state net operating loss carryforwards 639 2021-2043 U.S. state net operating loss carryforwards 1 Indefinite U.S. foreign tax credits 100 2021-2030 Other foreign net operating loss carryforwards 212 Indefinite Other foreign net operating loss carryforwards 70 2021-2039 Other foreign capital loss carryforward 31 Indefinite Foreign credits 5 2023-2039 Total $ 2,854
A Reconciliation of Beginning and Ending Amounts of Unrecognized Tax BenefitsA reconciliation of the beginning and ending amounts of unrecognized tax benefits is as follows (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Beginning balance $ 506 $ 441 $ 461 Additions for tax positions related to the current year 9 9 1 Additions for tax positions of prior years 7 56 18 Reductions for tax positions of prior year (25) — (18) Reductions for settlement — — (18) Reductions due to statute expiration — — (3) Ending balance $ 497 $ 506 $ 441

Derivative Instruments (Tables)

Derivative Instruments (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosure [Abstract]
Quantitative Disclosures of Derivative Instruments Including Estimated Fair ValuesThe following tables present the required quantitative disclosures for our derivative instruments, including their estimated fair values (all estimated using Level 2 inputs) and their location on our consolidated balance sheets (in millions): Gain or (Loss) Recognized in 2020 2019 2018 Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges (1) Interest rate swaps $ (333) $ (102) $ (37) Forward-currency contracts $ (2) $ (4) $ 11 Derivatives designated as net investment hedges Cross-currency rate swaps $ (302) $ (118) $ 383 (1) We did not exclude any components from the cash flow hedge relationships presented in this table. Location of Gain or (Loss) Reclassified from AOCI into Earnings Gain or (Loss) Reclassified from AOCI into 2020 2019 2018 Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges Interest rate swaps Interest expense, net $ (102) $ (26) $ (19) Forward-currency contracts Cost of sales $ 2 $ 5 $ (1) Location of Gain or (Loss) Recognized in Earnings Gain or (Loss) Recognized in Earnings (Amount Excluded from Effectiveness Testing) 2020 2019 2018 Derivatives designated as net investment hedges Cross-currency rate swaps Interest expense, net $ 69 $ 70 $ 60
Summary of Financial Assets and Liabilities Measured at Fair Value on Recurring Basis Fair Value as of 2020 2019 Balance Sheet Location Assets: Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges Interest rate $ — $ 7 Other assets, net Derivatives designated as net investment hedges Foreign currency — 22 Other assets, net Total assets at fair value $ — $ 29 Liabilities: Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges Interest rate $ 430 $ 175 Other liabilities, net Foreign currency 5 2 Other accrued liabilities Derivatives designated as net investment hedges Foreign currency 434 166 Other liabilities, net Total liabilities at fair value $ 869 $ 343

Equity (Tables)

Equity (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Equity [Abstract]
Summary of Change in the Components of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)The following table displays the change in the components of AOCI (in millions): Derivatives Pensions Foreign Accumulated Balances at December 31, 2017 $ 177 $ (28) $ (1,033) $ (884) Foreign currency translation adjustment — — (831) (831) Net change in fair value of derivatives, net of tax 263 — — 263 Amounts reclassified to earnings of cash flow hedges, net of tax 14 — — 14 Pension and post-retirement benefit plans, net of tax — 1 — 1 Balances at December 31, 2018 $ 454 $ (27) $ (1,864) $ (1,437) Foreign currency translation adjustment — — 409 409 Net change in fair value of derivatives, net of tax (163) — — (163) Amounts reclassified to earnings of cash flow hedges, net of tax 15 — — 15 Pension and post-retirement benefit plans, net of tax — (2) — (2) Balances at December 31, 2019 $ 306 $ (29) $ (1,455) $ (1,178) Foreign currency translation adjustment — — 332 332 Net change in fair value of derivatives, net of tax (486) — — (486) Amounts reclassified to earnings of cash flow hedges, net of tax 73 — — 73 Pension and post-retirement benefit plans, net of tax — (16) — (16) Balances at December 31, 2020 $ (107) $ (45) $ (1,123) $ (1,275)

Share-based Compensation (Table

Share-based Compensation (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Share-based Payment Arrangement [Abstract]
Summary of Share-based Compensation ExpenseShare-based compensation expense consists of the following for the periods presented (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Stock options and RSUs (a) $ 74 $ 68 $ 48 Total share-based compensation expense (b) $ 74 $ 68 $ 48 (a) Includes $3 million, $4 million, and $2 million due to modification of awards in 2020, 2019 and 2018, respectively. (b) Generally classified as selling, general and administrative expenses in the consolidated statements of operations.
Summary of the Significant Assumptions Used During the Year to Estimate the Fair Value of Stock OptionsThe following assumptions were used in the Black-Scholes option-pricing model to determine the fair value of stock option awards at the grant date: 2020 2019 2018 Risk-free interest rate 1.29% 1.82% 2.13% Expected term (in years) 5.88 6.19 6.39 Expected volatility 23.9% 25.5% 25.2% Expected dividend yield 3.14% 3.09% 3.08%
Summary of Option Activity under the Various PlanThe following is a summary of stock option activity under our plans for the year ended December 31, 2020: Total Number of Weighted Aggregate Weighted Outstanding at January 1, 2020 9,758 $ 45.29 Granted 1,626 $ 66.47 Exercised (2,448) $ 33.57 Forfeited (734) $ 58.60 Outstanding at December 31, 2020 8,202 $ 51.86 $ 88,022 6.3 Exercisable at December 31, 2020 2,281 $ 39.71 $ 48,816 3.8 Vested or expected to vest at December 31, 2020 7,491 $ 51.22 $ 84,558 6.2 (a) The intrinsic value represents the amount by which the fair value of RBI's stock exceeds the option exercise price at December 31, 2020.
Summary of Time-vested RSUs and Performance-based RSUs ActivityThe following is a summary of time-vested RSUs and performance-based RSUs activity for the year ended December 31, 2020: Time-vested RSUs Performance-based RSUs Total Number of Weighted Average Total Number of Weighted Average Outstanding at January 1, 2020 1,752 $ 46.50 4,066 $ 53.78 Granted 337 $ 65.20 1,291 $ 62.69 Vested and settled (217) $ 40.42 (164) $ 47.32 Dividend equivalents granted 56 $ — 182 $ — Forfeited (167) $ 47.69 (506) $ 32.91 Outstanding at December 31, 2020 1,761 $ 49.99 4,869 $ 56.96

Revenue Recognition (Tables)

Revenue Recognition (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Revenue from Contract with Customer [Abstract]
Change in contract liabilitiesWe classify these contract liabilities as Other liabilities, net in our consolidated balance sheets. The following table reflects the change in contract liabilities by segment and on a consolidated basis between December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2020 (in millions): Contract Liabilities TH BK PLK Consolidated Balance at December 31, 2019 $ 64 $ 449 $ 28 $ 541 Recognized during period and included in the contract liability balance at the beginning of the year (10) (62) (2) (74) Increase, excluding amounts recognized as revenue during the period 7 25 13 45 Impact of foreign currency translation 1 15 — 16 Balance at December 31, 2020 $ 62 $ 427 $ 39 $ 528
Schedule of estimated revenues expected to be recognizedThe following table illustrates estimated revenues expected to be recognized in the future related to performance obligations that are unsatisfied (or partially unsatisfied) by segment and on a consolidated basis as of December 31, 2020 (in millions): Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in TH BK PLK Consolidated 2021 $ 9 $ 35 $ 3 $ 47 2022 8 34 3 45 2023 8 33 3 44 2024 7 32 2 41 2025 6 31 2 39 Thereafter 24 262 26 312 Total $ 62 $ 427 $ 39 $ 528
Disaggregation of total revenuesTotal revenues consist of the following (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Sales $ 2,013 $ 2,362 $ 2,355 Royalties 2,161 2,319 2,165 Property revenues 718 833 744 Franchise fees and other revenue 76 89 93 Total revenues $ 4,968 $ 5,603 $ 5,357

Other Operating Expenses (Inc_2

Other Operating Expenses (Income), net (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Other Income and Expenses [Abstract]
Other Operating Expenses (Income), NetOther operating expenses (income), net, consist of the following (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Net losses (gains) on disposal of assets, restaurant closures and refranchisings $ 6 $ 7 $ 19 Litigation settlements and reserves, net 7 2 11 Net losses (gains) on foreign exchange 100 (15) (33) Other, net (8) (4) 11 Other operating expenses (income), net $ 105 $ (10) $ 8

Segment Reporting and Geograp_2

Segment Reporting and Geographical Information (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Segment Reporting [Abstract]
Schedule of revenue by segment and countryThe following tables present revenues, by segment and by country, depreciation and amortization, (income) loss from equity method investments, and capital expenditures by segment (in millions): 2020 2019 2018 Revenues by operating segment: TH $ 2,810 $ 3,344 $ 3,292 BK 1,602 1,777 1,651 PLK 556 482 414 Total $ 4,968 $ 5,603 $ 5,357 Revenues by country (a): Canada $ 2,546 $ 3,037 $ 2,984 United States 1,889 1,930 1,785 Other 533 636 588 Total $ 4,968 $ 5,603 $ 5,357
Schedule of segment related depreciation and amortization expenseDepreciation and amortization: TH $ 119 $ 112 $ 108 BK 62 62 61 PLK 8 11 11 Total $ 189 $ 185 $ 180
Schedule of segment related income (loss) from equity method investments(Income) loss from equity method investments: TH $ (4) $ (7) $ (6) BK 43 (4) (16) Total $ 39 $ (11) $ (22)
Schedule of segment related capital expenditureCapital expenditures: TH $ 92 $ 37 $ 59 BK 18 20 25 PLK 7 5 2 Total $ 117 $ 62 $ 86
Schedule of segment related assets and long lived assetsTotal assets by segment, and long-lived assets by segment and country are as follows (in millions): Assets Long-Lived Assets As of December 31, As of December 31, 2020 2019 2020 2019 By operating segment: TH $ 13,963 $ 13,894 $ 1,990 $ 1,972 BK 5,334 5,149 1,128 1,130 PLK 2,525 2,490 131 129 Unallocated 955 827 — — Total $ 22,777 $ 22,360 $ 3,249 $ 3,231 By country: Canada $ 1,685 $ 1,665 United States 1,539 1,542 Other 25 24 Total $ 3,249 $ 3,231
Reconciliation of segment income to net income (loss)2020 2019 2018 Segment income: TH $ 823 $ 1,122 $ 1,127 BK 823 994 928 PLK 218 188 157 Adjusted EBITDA 1,864 2,304 2,212 Share-based compensation and non-cash incentive compensation expense 84 74 55 PLK Transaction costs — — 10 Corporate restructuring and tax advisory fees 16 31 25 Office centralization and relocation costs — 6 20 Impact of equity method investments (a) 48 11 (3) Other operating expenses (income), net 105 (10) 8 EBITDA 1,611 2,192 2,097 Depreciation and amortization 189 185 180 Income from operations 1,422 2,007 1,917 Interest expense, net 508 532 535 Loss on early extinguishment of debt 98 23 — Income tax expense 66 341 238 Net income $ 750 $ 1,111 $ 1,144 (a) Represents (i) (income) loss from equity method investments and (ii) cash distributions received from our equity method investments. Cash distributions received from our equity method investments are included in segment income.

Quarterly Financial Data (Una_2

Quarterly Financial Data (Unaudited) (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Quarterly Financial Information Disclosure [Abstract]
Summarized Unaudited Quarterly Financial DataSummarized unaudited quarterly financial data (in millions, except per unit data) was as follows: Quarters Ended March 31, June 30, September 30, December 31, 2020 2019 2020 2019 2020 2019 2020 2019 Total revenues $ 1,225 $ 1,266 $ 1,048 $ 1,400 $ 1,337 $ 1,458 $ 1,358 $ 1,479 Income from operations $ 389 $ 434 $ 243 $ 491 $ 417 $ 571 $ 373 $ 511 Net income $ 224 $ 246 $ 164 $ 257 $ 223 $ 351 $ 139 $ 257 Basic and diluted earnings per unit Class A common units $ 0.71 $ 0.67 $ 0.52 $ 0.70 $ 0.72 $ 1.00 $ 0.45 $ 0.81 Partnership exchangeable units $ 0.48 $ 0.53 $ 0.35 $ 0.55 $ 0.48 $ 0.76 $ 0.30 $ 0.55

Supplemental Financial Inform_2

Supplemental Financial Information (Tables)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Organization, Consolidation and Presentation of Financial Statements [Abstract]
Schedule of Condensed Consolidating Financial StatementsRESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Balance Sheets (In millions of U.S. dollars) As of December 31, 2020 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated ASSETS Current assets: Cash and cash equivalents $ 1,560 $ — $ — $ 1,560 Accounts and notes receivable, net 536 — — 536 Inventories, net 96 — — 96 Prepaids and other current assets 72 — — 72 Total current assets 2,264 — — 2,264 Property and equipment, net 2,031 — — 2,031 Operating lease assets, net 1,152 — — 1,152 Intangible assets, net 10,701 — — 10,701 Goodwill 5,739 — — 5,739 Net investment in property leased to franchisees 66 — — 66 Intercompany receivable — 239 (239) — Investment in subsidiaries — 3,721 (3,721) — Other assets, net 824 — — 824 Total assets $ 22,777 $ 3,960 $ (3,960) $ 22,777 LIABILITIES AND EQUITY Current liabilities: Accounts and drafts payable $ 464 $ — $ — $ 464 Other accrued liabilities 596 239 — 835 Gift card liability 191 — — 191 Current portion of long term debt and finance leases 111 — — 111 Total current liabilities 1,362 239 — 1,601 Term debt, net of current portion 12,397 — — 12,397 Finance leases, net of current portion 315 — — 315 Operating lease liabilities, net of current portion 1,082 — — 1,082 Other liabilities, net 2,236 — — 2,236 Payables to affiliates 239 — (239) — Deferred income taxes, net 1,425 — — 1,425 Total liabilities 19,056 239 (239) 19,056 Partners’ capital: Class A common units — 7,994 — 7,994 Partnership exchangeable units — (3,002) — (3,002) Common shares 3,026 — (3,026) — Retained earnings 1,966 — (1,966) — Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (1,275) (1,275) 1,275 (1,275) Total Partners’ capital/shareholders’ equity 3,717 3,717 (3,717) 3,717 Noncontrolling interests 4 4 (4) 4 Total equity 3,721 3,721 (3,721) 3,721 Total liabilities and equity $ 22,777 $ 3,960 $ (3,960) $ 22,777 RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Balance Sheets (In millions of U.S. dollars) As of December 31, 2019 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated ASSETS Current assets: Cash and cash equivalents $ 1,533 $ — $ — $ 1,533 Accounts and notes receivable, net 527 — — 527 Inventories, net 84 — — 84 Prepaids and other current assets 52 — — 52 Total current assets 2,196 — — 2,196 Property and equipment, net 2,007 — — 2,007 Operating lease assets, net 1,176 — — 1,176 Intangible assets, net 10,563 — — 10,563 Goodwill 5,651 — — 5,651 Net investment in property leased to franchisees 48 — — 48 Intercompany receivable — 232 (232) — Investment in subsidiaries — 4,259 (4,259) — Other assets, net 719 — — 719 Total assets $ 22,360 $ 4,491 $ (4,491) $ 22,360 LIABILITIES AND EQUITY Current liabilities: Accounts and drafts payable $ 644 $ — $ — $ 644 Other accrued liabilities 558 232 — 790 Gift card liability 168 — — 168 Current portion of long term debt and finance leases 101 — — 101 Total current liabilities 1,471 232 — 1,703 Term debt, net of current portion 11,759 — — 11,759 Finance leases, net of current portion 288 — — 288 Operating lease liabilities, net of current portion 1,089 — — 1,089 Other liabilities, net 1,698 — — 1,698 Payables to affiliates 232 — (232) — Deferred income taxes, net 1,564 — — 1,564 Total liabilities 18,101 232 (232) 18,101 Partners’ capital: Class A common units — 7,786 — 7,786 Partnership exchangeable units — (2,353) — (2,353) Common shares 3,248 — (3,248) — Retained earnings 2,185 — (2,185) — Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (1,178) (1,178) 1,178 (1,178) Total Partners’ capital/shareholders’ equity 4,255 4,255 (4,255) 4,255 Noncontrolling interests 4 4 (4) 4 Total equity 4,259 4,259 (4,259) 4,259 Total liabilities and equity $ 22,360 $ 4,491 $ (4,491) $ 22,360 RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Statements of Operations (In millions of U.S. dollars) 2020 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated Revenues: Sales $ 2,013 $ — $ — $ 2,013 Franchise and property revenues 2,955 — — 2,955 Total revenues 4,968 — — 4,968 Operating costs and expenses: Cost of sales 1,610 — — 1,610 Franchise and property expenses 528 — — 528 Selling, general and administrative expenses 1,264 — — 1,264 (Income) loss from equity method investments 39 — — 39 Other operating expenses (income), net 105 — — 105 Total operating costs and expenses 3,546 — — 3,546 Income from operations 1,422 — — 1,422 Interest expense, net 508 — — 508 Loss on early extinguishment of debt 98 — — 98 Income before income taxes 816 — — 816 Income tax expense (benefit) 66 — — 66 Net income 750 — — 750 Equity in earnings of consolidated subsidiaries — 750 (750) — Net income (loss) 750 750 (750) 750 Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests 2 2 (2) 2 Net income (loss) attributable to common unitholders $ 748 $ 748 $ (748) $ 748 Total comprehensive income (loss) $ 653 $ 653 $ (653) $ 653 RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Statements of Operations (In millions of U.S. dollars) 2019 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated Revenues: Sales $ 2,362 $ — $ — $ 2,362 Franchise and property revenues 3,241 — — 3,241 Total revenues 5,603 — — 5,603 Operating costs and expenses: Cost of sales 1,813 — — 1,813 Franchise and property expenses 540 — — 540 Selling, general and administrative expenses 1,264 — — 1,264 (Income) loss from equity method investments (11) — — (11) Other operating expenses (income), net (10) — — (10) Total operating costs and expenses 3,596 — — 3,596 Income from operations 2,007 — — 2,007 Interest expense, net 532 — — 532 Loss on early extinguishment of debt 23 — — 23 Income before income taxes 1,452 — — 1,452 Income tax expense (benefit) 341 — — 341 Net income 1,111 — — 1,111 Equity in earnings of consolidated subsidiaries — 1,111 (1,111) — Net income (loss) 1,111 1,111 (1,111) 1,111 Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests 2 2 (2) 2 Net income (loss) attributable to common unitholders $ 1,109 $ 1,109 $ (1,109) $ 1,109 Total comprehensive income (loss) $ 1,370 $ 1,370 $ (1,370) $ 1,370 RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Statements of Operations (In millions of U.S. dollars) 2018 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated Revenues: Sales $ 2,355 $ — $ — $ 2,355 Franchise and property revenues 3,002 — — 3,002 Total revenues 5,357 — — 5,357 Operating costs and expenses: Cost of sales 1,818 — — 1,818 Franchise and property expenses 422 — — 422 Selling, general and administrative expenses 1,214 — — 1,214 (Income) loss from equity method investments (22) — — (22) Other operating expenses (income), net 8 — — 8 Total operating costs and expenses 3,440 — — 3,440 Income from operations 1,917 — — 1,917 Interest expense, net 535 — — 535 Income before income taxes 1,382 — — 1,382 Income tax expense (benefit) 238 — — 238 Net income 1,144 — — 1,144 Equity in earnings of consolidated subsidiaries — 1,144 (1,144) — Net income (loss) 1,144 1,144 (1,144) 1,144 Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests 1 1 (1) 1 Net income (loss) attributable to common unitholders $ 1,143 $ 1,143 $ (1,143) $ 1,143 Total comprehensive income (loss) $ 591 $ 591 $ (591) $ 591 RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Statements of Cash Flows (In millions of U.S. dollars) 2020 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated Cash flows from operating activities: Net income $ 750 $ 750 $ (750) $ 750 Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities: Equity in loss (earnings) of consolidated subsidiaries — (750) 750 — Depreciation and amortization 189 — — 189 Premiums paid and non-cash loss on early extinguishment of debt 97 — — 97 Amortization of deferred financing costs and debt issuance discount 26 — — 26 (Income) loss from equity method investments 39 — — 39 Loss (gain) on remeasurement of foreign denominated transactions 100 — — 100 Net (gains) losses on derivatives 32 — — 32 Share-based compensation expense 74 — — 74 Deferred income taxes (208) — — (208) Other 28 — — 28 Changes in current assets and liabilities, excluding acquisitions and dispositions: Accounts and notes receivable (30) — — (30) Inventories and prepaids and other current assets (10) — — (10) Accounts and drafts payable (183) — — (183) Other accrued liabilities and gift card liability 16 — — 16 Tenant inducements paid to franchisees (22) — — (22) Other long-term assets and liabilities 23 — — 23 Net cash provided by operating activities 921 — — 921 Cash flows from investing activities: Payments for property and equipment (117) — — (117) Net proceeds from disposal of assets, restaurant closures and refranchisings 12 — — 12 Settlement/sale of derivatives, net 33 — — 33 Other investing activities, net (7) — — (7) Net cash used for investing activities (79) — — (79) Cash flows from financing activities: Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt 5,235 — — 5,235 Repayments of long-term debt and finance leases (4,708) — — (4,708) Payment of financing costs (43) — — (43) Distributions paid on Class A and Partnership exchangeable units — (959) — (959) Repurchase of Partnership exchangeable units — (380) — (380) Capital contribution from RBI Inc. 82 — — 82 Distributions from subsidiaries (1,339) 1,339 — — (Payments) proceeds from derivatives (46) — — (46) Other financing activities, net (2) — — (2) Net cash used for financing activities (821) — — (821) Effect of exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents 6 — — 6 Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents 27 — — 27 Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 1,533 — — 1,533 Cash and cash equivalents at end of period $ 1,560 $ — $ — $ 1,560 RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Statements of Cash Flows (In millions of U.S. dollars) 2019 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated Cash flows from operating activities: Net income $ 1,111 $ 1,111 $ (1,111) $ 1,111 Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities: Equity in loss (earnings) of consolidated subsidiaries — (1,111) 1,111 — Depreciation and amortization 185 — — 185 Premiums paid and non-cash loss on early extinguishment of debt 16 — — 16 Amortization of deferred financing costs and debt issuance discount 29 — — 29 (Income) loss from equity method investments (11) — — (11) Loss (gain) on remeasurement of foreign denominated transactions (14) — — (14) Net (gains) losses on derivatives (49) — — (49) Share-based compensation expense 68 — — 68 Deferred income taxes 58 — — 58 Other 6 — — 6 Changes in current assets and liabilities, excluding acquisitions and dispositions: Accounts and notes receivable (53) — — (53) Inventories and prepaids and other current assets (15) — — (15) Accounts and drafts payable 112 — — 112 Other accrued liabilities and gift card liability (51) — — (51) Tenant inducements paid to franchisees (54) — — (54) Other long-term assets and liabilities 138 — — 138 Net cash provided by operating activities 1,476 — — 1,476 Cash flows from investing activities: Payments for property and equipment (62) — — (62) Net proceeds from disposal of assets, restaurant closures and refranchisings 8 — — 8 Settlement/sale of derivatives, net 24 — — 24 Net cash used for investing activities (30) — — (30) Cash flows from financing activities: Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt 2,250 — — 2,250 Repayments of long-term debt and finance leases (2,266) — — (2,266) Payment of financing costs (50) — — (50) Distributions paid on Class A and Partnership exchangeable units — (901) — (901) Capital contribution from RBI Inc. 102 — — 102 Distributions from subsidiaries (901) 901 — — Proceeds from derivatives 23 — — 23 Net cash used for financing activities (842) — — (842) Effect of exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents 16 — — 16 Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents 620 — — 620 Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 913 — — 913 Cash and cash equivalents at end of period $ 1,533 $ — $ — $ 1,533 RESTAURANT BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED PARTNERSHIP AND SUBSIDIARIES Condensed Consolidating Statements of Cash Flows (In millions of U.S. dollars) 2018 Consolidated RBILP Eliminations Consolidated Cash flows from operating activities: Net income $ 1,144 $ 1,144 $ (1,144) $ 1,144 Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities: Equity in loss (earnings) of consolidated subsidiaries — (1,144) 1,144 — Depreciation and amortization 180 — — 180 Amortization of deferred financing costs and debt issuance discount 29 — — 29 (Income) loss from equity method investments (22) — — (22) Loss (gain) on remeasurement of foreign denominated transactions (33) — — (33) Net (gains) losses on derivatives (40) — — (40) Share-based compensation expense 48 — — 48 Deferred income taxes 29 — — 29 Other 5 — — 5 Changes in current assets and liabilities, excluding acquisitions and dispositions: Accounts and notes receivable 19 — — 19 Inventories and prepaids and other current assets (7) — — (7) Accounts and drafts payable 41 — — 41 Other accrued liabilities and gift card liability (219) — — (219) Tenant inducements paid to franchisees (52) — — (52) Other long-term assets and liabilities 43 — — 43 Net cash provided by operating activities 1,165 — — 1,165 Cash flows from investing activities: Payments for property and equipment (86) — — (86) Net proceeds from disposal of assets, restaurant closures and refranchisings 8 — — 8 Settlement/sale of derivatives, net 17 — — 17 Other investing activities, net 17 — — 17 Net cash used for investing activities (44) — — (44) Cash flows from financing activities: Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt 75 — — 75 Repayments of long-term debt and finance leases (74) — — (74) Payment of financing costs (3) — — (3) Distributions paid on Class A and Partnership exchangeable units — (728) — (728) Repurchase of Partnership exchangeable units — (561) — (561) Capital contribution from RBI Inc. 61 — — 61 Distributions from subsidiaries (1,289) 1,289 — — Other financing activities, net (55) — — (55) Net cash used for financing activities (1,285) — — (1,285) Effect of exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents (20) — — (20) Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents (184) — — (184) Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period 1,097 — — 1,097 Cash and cash equivalents at end of period $ 913 $ — $ — $ 913

Description of Business and O_2

Description of Business and Organization - Additional Information (Details) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020USD ($)restaurantcountry
Basis of Presentation [Line Items]
Number of franchised or owned restaurants27,025
Number of countries in which company and franchise restaurants operated (more than) | country100
Percentage of franchised restaurants100.00%
Bad debt expense | $ $ 33
Tim Hortons
Basis of Presentation [Line Items]
Number of franchised or owned restaurants4,949
Burger King
Basis of Presentation [Line Items]
Number of franchised or owned restaurants18,625
Popeyes
Basis of Presentation [Line Items]
Number of franchised or owned restaurants3,451

Significant Accounting Polici_4

Significant Accounting Policies - Additional Information (Details)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020USD ($)restaurantDec. 31, 2019USD ($)restaurantDec. 31, 2018USD ($)
Summary Of Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Investment in other affiliates50.00%
Goodwill and brand impairment $ 0 $ 0 $ 0
Advertising expense, net of franchisee contributions $ 857,000,000 $ 858,000,000 $ 793,000,000
Buildings and improvements
Summary Of Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Estimated useful life of assets (up to)40 years
Restaurant equipment
Summary Of Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Estimated useful life of assets (up to)17 years
Furniture, fixtures, and other
Summary Of Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Estimated useful life of assets (up to)10 years
Manufacturing equipment
Summary Of Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Estimated useful life of assets (up to)25 years
Restaurant VIEs
Summary Of Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Number of consolidated restaurants | restaurant38 35

Significant Accounting Polici_5

Significant Accounting Policies - Schedule of Fair Value Measurements (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Fair Value, Balance Sheet Grouping, Financial Statement Captions [Line Items]
Principal carrying amount of our variable term debt and senior notes $ 12,476 $ 11,833
Variable Term Debt and Senior Notes
Fair Value, Balance Sheet Grouping, Financial Statement Captions [Line Items]
Fair value of our variable term debt and senior notes12,477 12,075
Principal carrying amount of our variable term debt and senior notes $ 12,453 $ 11,900

Earnings Per Unit - Basic and D

Earnings Per Unit - Basic and Diluted Earnings Per Unit (Details) - USD ($) $ / shares in Units, shares in Millions, $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Sep. 30, 2020Jun. 30, 2020Mar. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Sep. 30, 2019Jun. 30, 2019Mar. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Allocation of net income among partner interests:
Net income attributable to common unitholders $ 748 $ 1,109 $ 1,143
Class A common units
Allocation of net income among partner interests:
Net income attributable to common unitholders $ 486 $ 643 $ 612
Denominator - basic and diluted partnership units:
Total weighted average basic and diluted units outstanding (in shares)202 202 202
Earnings per unit - basic and diluted:
Earnings per unit - basic and diluted (in dollars per share) $ 0.45 $ 0.72 $ 0.52 $ 0.71 $ 0.81 $ 1 $ 0.70 $ 0.67 $ 2.41 $ 3.18 $ 3.03
Partnership exchangeable units
Allocation of net income among partner interests:
Net income attributable to common unitholders $ 262 $ 466 $ 531
Denominator - basic and diluted partnership units:
Total weighted average basic and diluted units outstanding (in shares)162 194 216
Earnings per unit - basic and diluted:
Earnings per unit - basic and diluted (in dollars per share) $ 0.30 $ 0.48 $ 0.35 $ 0.48 $ 0.55 $ 0.76 $ 0.55 $ 0.53 $ 1.62 $ 2.40 $ 2.46

Property and Equipment, net - S

Property and Equipment, net - Summary of Property and Equipment, Net (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Property and equipment, including finance leases, gross $ 2,910 $ 2,753
Accumulated depreciation and amortization(879)(746)
Property and equipment, net2,031 2,007
Land
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Property and equipment, gross1,007 1,006
Buildings and improvements
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Property and equipment, gross1,192 1,148
Restaurant equipment
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Property and equipment, gross163 109
Furniture, fixtures, and other
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Property and equipment, gross242 210
Finance leases
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Finance leases289 245
Construction in progress
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Property and equipment, gross $ 17 $ 35

Property and Equipment, net - A

Property and Equipment, net - Additional Information (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Depreciation and amortization expense on property and equipment $ 140 $ 136 $ 148
Accumulated depreciation and amortization, finance leases51 23
Buildings and improvements
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Assets leased under finance leases $ 238 $ 222

Intangible Assets, net and Go_3

Intangible Assets, net and Goodwill - Schedule of Intangible Assets, Net and Goodwill (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Finite And Indefinite Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]
Identifiable assets, gross $ 852 $ 847
Identifiable assets, accumulated amortization(330)(290)
Total522 557
Indefinite-lived intangible assets:10,179 10,006
Intangible assets, net10,701 10,563
Goodwill5,739 5,651
Tim Hortons
Finite And Indefinite Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]
Goodwill4,279 4,207
Tim Hortons | Trade Names
Finite And Indefinite Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]
Indefinite-lived intangible assets:6,650 6,534
Burger King
Finite And Indefinite Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]
Goodwill614 598
Burger King | Trade Names
Finite And Indefinite Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]
Indefinite-lived intangible assets:2,174 2,117
Popeyes
Finite And Indefinite Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]
Goodwill846 846
Popeyes | Trade Names
Finite And Indefinite Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]
Indefinite-lived intangible assets:1,355 1,355
Franchise agreements
Finite And Indefinite Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]
Identifiable assets, gross735 720
Identifiable assets, accumulated amortization(264)(225)
Total471 495
Favorable leases
Finite And Indefinite Lived Intangible Assets [Line Items]
Identifiable assets, gross117 127
Identifiable assets, accumulated amortization(66)(65)
Total $ 51 $ 62

Intangible Assets, net and Go_4

Intangible Assets, net and Goodwill - Additional Information (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Goodwill and Intangible Assets Disclosure [Abstract]
Amortization expense on intangible assets $ 43 $ 44 $ 70

Intangible Assets, net and Go_5

Intangible Assets, net and Goodwill - Schedule of the Estimated Future Amortization Expenses on Intangible Assets (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Goodwill and Intangible Assets Disclosure [Abstract]
2021 $ 41
202240
202338
202437
202535
Thereafter331
Total $ 522 $ 557

Equity Method Investments - Add

Equity Method Investments - Additional Information (Details) - USD ($)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Schedule of Equity Method Investments [Line Items]
Investment in subsidiaries $ 0 $ 0
Equity method investment ownership percentage50.00%
Increase to carrying value of equity method investment $ 0 11,000,000 $ 20,000,000
Equity method investee
Schedule of Equity Method Investments [Line Items]
Accounts receivable from equity method investments52,000,000 47,000,000
Carrols Restaurant Group, Inc.
Schedule of Equity Method Investments [Line Items]
Quoted market price $ 59,000,000
BK Brasil
Schedule of Equity Method Investments [Line Items]
Equity method investment ownership percentage9.40%
Quoted market price $ 47,000,000
Tim Hortons | Wendy's Company TIMWEN Partnership
Schedule of Equity Method Investments [Line Items]
Cash distributions8,000,000 13,000,000 13,000,000
Rent expense $ 15,000,000 19,000,000 $ 20,000,000
Canadian | Wendy's Company TIMWEN Partnership
Schedule of Equity Method Investments [Line Items]
Equity method investment ownership percentage50.00%
United States | Carrols Restaurant Group, Inc.
Schedule of Equity Method Investments [Line Items]
Equity method investment ownership percentage15.30%
Other assets, net
Schedule of Equity Method Investments [Line Items]
Investment in subsidiaries $ 205,000,000 $ 266,000,000

Equity Method Investments - Sum

Equity Method Investments - Summary of Franchise and Property Revenue (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Sep. 30, 2020Jun. 30, 2020Mar. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Sep. 30, 2019Jun. 30, 2019Mar. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Revenues from affiliates:
Property revenues $ 718 $ 833 $ 744
Total revenues $ 1,358 $ 1,337 $ 1,048 $ 1,225 $ 1,479 $ 1,458 $ 1,400 $ 1,266 4,968 5,603 5,357
Affiliates
Revenues from affiliates:
Property revenues32 33 36
Total revenues335 388 357
Royalties
Revenues from affiliates:
Sales2,161 2,319 2,165
Royalties | Affiliates
Revenues from affiliates:
Sales289 345 310
Franchise fees and other revenue
Revenues from affiliates:
Sales76 89 93
Franchise fees and other revenue | Affiliates
Revenues from affiliates:
Sales $ 14 $ 10 $ 11

Other Accrued Liabilities and_3

Other Accrued Liabilities and Other Liabilities - Schedule of Other Accrued Liabilities (Current) and Other Liabilities (Non-Current), Net (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Current:
Dividend payable $ 239 $ 232
Interest payable66 71
Accrued compensation and benefits78 57
Taxes payable122 126
Deferred income42 35
Accrued advertising expenses59 40
Restructuring and other provisions12 8
Current portion of operating lease liabilities $ 137 $ 126
Operating Lease, Liability, Current, Statement of Financial Position [Extensible List]us-gaap:AccountsPayableAndAccruedLiabilitiesCurrentus-gaap:AccountsPayableAndAccruedLiabilitiesCurrent
Other $ 80 $ 95
Other accrued liabilities835 790
Non-current:
Taxes payable626 579
Contract liabilities (see Note 14)528 541
Derivatives liabilities865 341
Unfavorable leases81 103
Accrued pension70 65
Deferred income28 25
Other38 44
Other liabilities, net $ 2,236 $ 1,698

Long-Term Debt - Summary of Lon

Long-Term Debt - Summary of Long-Term Debt (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Nov. 09, 2020Apr. 07, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Nov. 19, 2019Sep. 24, 2019Dec. 31, 2017May 17, 2017
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
TH Facility and other $ 178 $ 81
Less: unamortized deferred financing costs and deferred issuance discount(155)(148)
Total debt, net12,476 11,833
Less: current maturities of debt(79)(74)
Total long-term debt12,397 11,759
Term Loan B (due November 19, 2026)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Term loan facility5,297 5,350
Term Loan A (due October 7, 2024)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Term loan facility731 750
2017 4.25% Senior Notes (due May 15, 2024) | Senior notes
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Senior notes $ 775 1,500
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.25%4.25%4.25%
2019 3.875% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028) | Senior notes
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Senior notes $ 750 750
Stated interest rate (as a percent)3.875%3.875%
2020 5.75% Senior Notes (due April 15, 2025) | Senior notes
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Senior notes $ 500 0
Stated interest rate (as a percent)5.75%5.75%
2020 3.50% Senior Notes (due February 15, 2029) | Senior notes
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Senior notes $ 750 0
Stated interest rate (as a percent)3.50%3.50%
2017 5.00% Senior Notes (due October 15, 2025) | Senior notes
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Senior notes $ 0 2,800
Stated interest rate (as a percent)5.00%5.00%
2019 4.375% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.375%
2019 4.375% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028) | Senior notes
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Senior notes $ 750 750
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.375%4.375%
2020 4.00% Senior Notes (due October 15, 2030) | Senior notes
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Senior notes $ 2,900 $ 0
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.00%

Long-Term Debt - Credit Facilit

Long-Term Debt - Credit Facilities (Details)Nov. 19, 2019USD ($)Sep. 06, 2019USD ($)Sep. 30, 2019USD ($)Dec. 31, 2020USD ($)Dec. 31, 2019USD ($)Dec. 31, 2018USD ($)Apr. 02, 2020USD ($)Dec. 31, 2018CAD ($)
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Capitalized debt issuance costs $ 43,000,000 $ 50,000,000 $ 0
Loss on early extinguishment of debt $ 98,000,000 $ 23,000,000 $ 0
Term Loan A (due October 7, 2024)
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Aggregate principal amount of debt issued $ 750,000,000
Interest rate, base rate floor1.00%
Interest rate, eurocurrency rate floor0.00%
Effective interest rate1.40%
Fourth Incremental Amendment
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Capitalized debt issuance costs $ 24,000,000 $ 7,000,000
Loss on early extinguishment of debt16,000,000
Term Loan B (due November 19, 2026)
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Aggregate principal amount of debt issued $ 5,350,000,000
Interest rate, base rate floor1.00%
Interest rate, eurocurrency rate floor0.00%
Effective interest rate1.90%
Repayment of outstanding term loan facility $ 235,000,000
Loss on early extinguishment of debt $ 4,000,000
Term Loan B (due November 19, 2026) | Base rate
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt instrument floor rate0.75%
Term Loan B (due November 19, 2026) | Eurocurrency Rate
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt instrument floor rate1.75%
2019 4.375% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028)
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Repayments of debt $ 720,000,000
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.375%
Minimum | Term Loan A (due October 7, 2024) | Base rate
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt instrument floor rate0.00%
Minimum | Term Loan A (due October 7, 2024) | Eurocurrency Rate
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt instrument floor rate0.75%
Maximum | Term Loan A (due October 7, 2024) | Base rate
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt instrument floor rate0.50%
Maximum | Term Loan A (due October 7, 2024) | Eurocurrency Rate
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt instrument floor rate1.50%
Revolving credit facility
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Senior secured revolving credit facility $ 1,000,000,000
Minimum liquidity covenant $ 1,000,000,000
First lien senior secured leverage ratio limit6.50
Amount of letter of credit outstanding $ 0
Letter of credit sublimit as part of revolving credit facility125,000,000
Revolving Credit Facility (October 7, 2024)2,000,000
Remaining borrowing capacity $ 998,000,000
Revolving credit facility | Minimum
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt instrument floor rate1.25%
Commitment fee percentage0.25%
Revolving credit facility | Minimum | Fourth Incremental Amendment
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt instrument floor rate0.75%
Revolving credit facility | Maximum
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt instrument floor rate2.00%
Commitment fee percentage0.15%
Revolving credit facility | Maximum | Fourth Incremental Amendment
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt instrument floor rate1.50%
Senior notes | 2019 4.375% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028)
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Aggregate principal amount of debt issued $ 750,000,000
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.375%4.375%
Debt Instrument, Redemption, Period One | Term Loan A (due October 7, 2024)
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Quarterly installment payment $ 5,000,000
Debt Instrument, Redemption, Period One | Term Loan B (due November 19, 2026)
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Quarterly installment payment $ 13,000,000
Debt Instrument, Redemption, Period Two | Term Loan A (due October 7, 2024)
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Quarterly installment payment $ 9,000,000

Long-Term Debt - Senior Notes (

Long-Term Debt - Senior Notes (Details)Nov. 09, 2020USD ($)Apr. 07, 2020USD ($)Nov. 19, 2019USD ($)Oct. 07, 2019USD ($)Sep. 24, 2019USD ($)Dec. 31, 2020USD ($)Dec. 31, 2019USD ($)Dec. 31, 2018USD ($)Dec. 31, 2017USD ($)Oct. 20, 2020USD ($)Dec. 31, 2018CAD ($)May 17, 2017
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Capitalized debt issuance costs $ 43,000,000 $ 50,000,000 $ 0
Loss on early extinguishment of debt $ 98,000,000 $ 23,000,000 $ 0
2017 4.25% Senior Notes (due May 15, 2024)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Principal amount redeemed $ 725,000,000
2019 3.875% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Capitalized debt issuance costs $ 10,000,000
2015 4.625% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2022)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.625%
Loss on early extinguishment of debt $ 3,000,000
2017 5.00% Senior Notes (due October 15, 2025)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Principal amount redeemed $ 2,800,000,000
2019 4.375% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.375%
Repayments of debt $ 720,000,000
Senior notes | 2017 4.25% Senior Notes (due May 15, 2024)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.25%4.25%4.25%
Aggregate principal amount of debt issued $ 1,500,000,000
Principal payments0
Debt issuance costs, net $ 13,000,000
Loss on early extinguishment of debt $ 19,000,000
Senior notes | 2019 3.875% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)3.875%3.875%
Aggregate principal amount of debt issued $ 750,000,000
Principal payments $ 0
Senior notes | 2015 4.625% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2022)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Principal amount redeemed $ 1,250,000,000
Senior notes | 2020 5.75% Senior Notes (due April 15, 2025)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)5.75%5.75%
Aggregate principal amount of debt issued $ 500,000,000
Principal payments0
Capitalized debt issuance costs $ 10,000,000
Senior notes | 2020 3.50% Senior Notes (due February 15, 2029)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)3.50%3.50%
Aggregate principal amount of debt issued $ 750,000,000
Principal payments $ 0
Capitalized debt issuance costs $ 7,000,000
Senior notes | 2017 5.00% Senior Notes (due October 15, 2025)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)5.00%5.00%
Aggregate principal amount of debt issued $ 2,800,000,000
Loss on early extinguishment of debt $ 79,000,000
Senior notes | 2019 4.375% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.375%4.375%
Aggregate principal amount of debt issued $ 750,000,000
Principal payments0
Debt issuance costs, net $ 6,000,000
Senior notes | 2020 4.00% Senior Notes (due October 15, 2030)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.00%
Aggregate principal amount of debt issued $ 2,900,000,000
Principal payments0
Capitalized debt issuance costs $ 26,000,000
Preferred Share
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Preferred stock dividend rate percentage9.00%

Long-Term Debt - Restrictions a

Long-Term Debt - Restrictions and Covenants (Details)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020CAD ($)Dec. 31, 2020USD ($)Dec. 31, 2020CAD ($)Apr. 02, 2020USD ($)Nov. 19, 2019Sep. 24, 2019Sep. 06, 2019USD ($)Dec. 31, 2017May 17, 2017
2019 4.375% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028)
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.375%
2011 Amended Credit Agreement
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
First lien senior secured leverage ratio limit6.506.50
Amount of letter of credit outstanding $ 50,000,000
Swingline loans outstanding percentage30.00%30.00%
Senior notes | 2017 4.25% Senior Notes (due May 15, 2024)
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.25%4.25%4.25%4.25%
Senior notes | 2019 3.875% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028)
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)3.875%3.875%3.875%
Senior notes | 2020 4.00% Senior Notes (due October 15, 2030)
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.00%4.00%
Senior notes | 2019 4.375% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028)
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.375%4.375%4.375%
Senior notes | 2017 5.00% Senior Notes (due October 15, 2025)
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)5.00%5.00%5.00%
New Facility
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Maximum borrowing capacity $ 225,000,000
Remaining borrowing capacity $ 125,000,000
Amount drawn $ 222,000,000
Effective interest rate1.86%1.86%
Revolving credit facility
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
First lien senior secured leverage ratio limit6.50
Amount of letter of credit outstanding $ 0
Minimum liquidity covenant $ 1,000,000,000
Maximum borrowing capacity $ 1,000,000,000
Remaining borrowing capacity $ 998,000,000
Canadian Bankers' Acceptance rate | New Facility
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt instrument floor rate1.40%
Prime rate | New Facility
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt instrument floor rate0.40%

Long-Term Debt - Debt Issuance

Long-Term Debt - Debt Issuance Costs and Loss on Early Extinguishment of Debt (Details) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020USD ($)Dec. 31, 2019USD ($)Dec. 31, 2018USD ($)Dec. 31, 2018CAD ($)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Capitalized debt issuance costs $ 43 $ 50 $ 0
Loss on early extinguishment of debt $ 98 $ 23 $ 0

Long-Term Debt - Summary of Agg

Long-Term Debt - Summary of Aggregate Maturities of Long-Term Debt (Details) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020USD ($)
Debt Disclosure [Abstract]
2021 $ 79
202286
2023102
20241,499
2025686
Thereafter10,179
Total $ 12,631

Long-Term Debt - Schedule of In

Long-Term Debt - Schedule of Interest Expense, Net (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
New Accounting Pronouncements or Change in Accounting Principle [Line Items]
Debt $ 471 $ 503 $ 498
Finance lease obligations20 20
Finance lease obligations23
Amortization of deferred financing costs and debt issuance discount26 29 29
Interest income(9)(20)(15)
Interest expense, net508 532 535
Derivatives designated as net investment hedges | Interest expense, net | Cross-currency rate swaps
New Accounting Pronouncements or Change in Accounting Principle [Line Items]
Gain (loss) recognized in earnings (excluded from effectiveness testing) $ 69 $ 70 $ 60

Leases - Additional Information

Leases - Additional Information (Details) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020USD ($)propertyrestaurantDec. 31, 2019USD ($)Dec. 31, 2018USD ($)Dec. 31, 2017USD ($)
Lessor, Lease, Description [Line Items]
Restaurant properties to franchisees leased or subleased | restaurant5,116
Non restaurant properties to third parties under capital and operating leases | property171
Minimum lease term for assets given on lease10 years
Maximum lease term for assets given on lease20 years
Minimum lease term for assets taken on lease10 years
Maximum lease term for assets taken on lease20 years
Total shareholders' equity $ 3,721 $ 4,259 $ 3,618 $ 4,561
Variable rent, percentage100.00%
Cumulative Effect, Period of Adoption, Adjustment
Lessor, Lease, Description [Line Items]
Total shareholders' equity $ 21 $ (250)

Leases - Summary of Assets Leas

Leases - Summary of Assets Lease, Property and Equipment, Net (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Property Subject to or Available for Operating Lease [Line Items]
Property and equipment, net $ 2,031 $ 2,007
Assets Leased to Others
Property Subject to or Available for Operating Lease [Line Items]
Property and equipment, gross2,057 2,065
Accumulated depreciation and amortization(534)(472)
Property and equipment, net1,523 1,593
Land | Assets Leased to Others
Property Subject to or Available for Operating Lease [Line Items]
Property and equipment, gross892 905
Buildings and improvements | Assets Leased to Others
Property Subject to or Available for Operating Lease [Line Items]
Property and equipment, gross1,146 1,142
Restaurant equipment | Assets Leased to Others
Property Subject to or Available for Operating Lease [Line Items]
Property and equipment, gross $ 19 $ 18

Leases - Summary of Net Investm

Leases - Summary of Net Investment, Direct Financing Leases (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Direct Financing Lease, Net Investment in Leases [Abstract]
Future minimum lease receipts $ 87 $ 49
Contingent rents12 19
Estimated unguaranteed residual value7 15
Unearned income(34)(26)
Net investment, direct financing leases72 57
Current portion included within accounts receivables(6)(9)
Net investment in property leased to franchisees $ 66 $ 48

Leases - Summary of Property Re

Leases - Summary of Property Revenue (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Lease Disclosure [Line Items]
Subtotal - lease income from operating leases $ 718 $ 833 $ 744
Franchise and property revenues
Lease Disclosure [Line Items]
Minimum lease payments445 448
Minimum lease payments454
Variable lease payments262 370
Variable lease payments273
Amortization of favorable and unfavorable income lease contracts, net6 7
Amortization of favorable and unfavorable income lease contracts, net8
Subtotal - lease income from operating leases713 825 735
Earned income on direct financing and sales-type leases5 8
Earned income on direct financing and sales-type leases9
Total property revenues $ 718 $ 833
Total property revenues $ 744

Leases - Lease Cost (Details)

Leases - Lease Cost (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Leases [Abstract]
Operating lease cost $ 199 $ 210
Operating lease variable lease cost177 198
Finance lease cost:
Amortization of right-of-use assets29 27
Interest on lease liabilities20 20
Sublease income(534)(631)
Total lease cost (income) $ (109) $ (176)

Leases - Summary of Rent Expens

Leases - Summary of Rent Expense Associated with Lease Commitments (Details) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2018USD ($)
Leases [Abstract]
Minimum $ 201
Contingent71
Amortization of favorable and unfavorable payable lease contracts, net9
Total rental expense281
Rental expense from properties subleased to franchisees $ 263

Leases - Lease Term and Discoun

Leases - Lease Term and Discount Rate (Details)Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Leases [Abstract]
Weighted-average remaining lease term (in years): operating leases10 years 6 months10 years 10 months 24 days
Weighted-average remaining lease term (in years): finance leases11 years 3 months 18 days11 years 2 months 12 days
Weighted-average discount rate: operating leases5.90%6.20%
Weighted-average discount rate: finance leases6.50%7.10%

Leases - Other Information Asso

Leases - Other Information Associated With Leases (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Leases [Abstract]
Operating cash flows from operating leases $ 200 $ 194
Operating cash flows from finance leases20 20
Financing cash flows from finance leases29 26
Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new finance lease obligations59 18
Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for new operating lease obligations $ 118 $ 163

Leases - Summary of Future Mini

Leases - Summary of Future Minimum Lease Receipts and Commitments (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Direct Financing and Sales-Type Leases
2021 $ 8
20227
20236
20246
20256
Thereafter54
Total minimum receipts / payments87
Operating Leases
2021419
2022397
2023373
2024340
2025305
Thereafter1,533
Total minimum receipts / payments3,367
Finance Leases
202150
202249
202346
202444
202542
Thereafter257
Total minimum receipts / payments488
Less amount representing interest(141)
Present value of minimum lease payments347
Current portion of lease obligations(32)
Long-term portion of lease obligations315 $ 288
Operating Leases
2021198
2022188
2023173
2024159
2025144
Thereafter815
Total minimum receipts / payments1,677
Less amount representing interest(458)
Present value of minimum lease payments1,219
Current portion of lease obligations(137)(126)
Long-term portion of lease obligations1,082 $ 1,089
Minimum sublease rentals $ 2,193

Income Taxes - Income Before In

Income Taxes - Income Before Income Taxes (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Income Tax [Line Items]
Foreign $ 616 $ 767 $ 271
Income before income taxes816 1,452 1,382
Canadian
Income Tax [Line Items]
Foreign $ 200 $ 685 $ 1,111

Income Taxes - Income Tax (Bene

Income Taxes - Income Tax (Benefit) Expense Attributable to Income from Continuing Operations (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Current:
Current Income Tax Expense (Benefit) $ 274 $ 283 $ 209
Deferred:
Total(208)58 29
Income tax expense (benefit)66 341 238
Canadian
Current:
Canadian45 47 25
Deferred:
Canadian(67)43 78
United States
Current:
U.S. Federal125 122 95
U.S. state, net of federal income tax benefit26 20 17
Deferred:
U.S. Federal(82)8 (65)
U.S. state, net of federal income tax benefit(27)0 13
Other Foreign
Current:
Canadian78 94 72
Deferred:
Canadian $ (32) $ 7 $ 3

Income Taxes - Schedule of US F

Income Taxes - Schedule of US Federal Tax Statutory Rate Reconciles to Effective Income Tax Rate (Details)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Income Tax Disclosure [Abstract]
Statutory rate26.50%26.50%26.50%
Costs and taxes related to foreign operations9.60%4.70%4.20%
Foreign exchange gain (loss)0.50%0.10%(0.10%)
Foreign tax rate differential(15.60%)(10.80%)(6.10%)
Change in valuation allowance1.20%0.50%3.20%
Change in accrual for tax uncertainties3.90%5.00%0.10%
Intercompany financing(6.10%)(2.40%)(4.40%)
Impact of Tax Act(7.80%)(0.10%)(1.90%)
Swiss Tax Reform(5.10%)1.10%0.00%
Benefit from stock option exercises(0.30%)(2.20%)(5.00%)
Other1.20%1.10%0.70%
Effective income tax rate8.00%23.50%17.20%

Income Taxes - Additional Infor

Income Taxes - Additional Information (Details) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020USD ($)Dec. 31, 2019USD ($)Dec. 31, 2018USD ($)Dec. 31, 2017USD ($)
Income Tax [Line Items]
Impact from TCJA $ (64)
Increase (decrease) in effective tax rate0.078 0.019
Favorable adjustment as a result of remeasurement of net deferred tax liabilities $ (9)
Favorable adjustment related to certain deductions allowed to be carried forward(3)
Favorable adjustment related to utilization of foreign tax credits15
Federal act on tax reform and AVS financing, change in tax rate, provisional income tax expense $ (41) $ 16
Federal act on tax reform and AVS financing, increase (decrease) in effective rate(5.10%)1.10%
Increase in valuation allowance $ 35
Unrecognized tax benefits497 $ 506 441 $ 461
Possible reduction in unrecognized tax benefits in the next twelve months90
Total amount of accrued interest and penalties123 92
Potential interest and penalties associated with uncertain tax positions $ 31 $ 41 $ 14
Maximum
Income Tax [Line Items]
Income tax returns period subject to examination6 years

Income Taxes - Schedule of Inco

Income Taxes - Schedule of Income Tax (Benefit) Expense Allocated to Continuing Operations and Amounts Separately Allocated to Other Items (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Income Tax Disclosure [Abstract]
Income tax expense (benefit) $ 66 $ 341 $ 238
Cash flow hedge in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)(64)(23)(2)
Net investment hedge in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)(60)(32)101
Foreign Currency Translation in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)12 0 0
Pension liability in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)(3)(1)0
Total $ (49) $ 285 $ 337

Income Taxes - Schedule of Defe

Income Taxes - Schedule of Deferred Income Tax (Benefit) Expense Attributable to Income from Continuing Operations (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Income Tax Disclosure [Abstract]
Deferred income tax (benefit) expense $ (230) $ 30 $ (14)
Change in valuation allowance22 7 43
Change in effective Canadian income tax rate0 (1)(3)
Change in effective U.S. federal income tax rate0 0 (8)
Change in effective U.S. state income tax rate1 6 15
Change in effective foreign income tax rate(1)16 (4)
Total $ (208) $ 58 $ 29

Income Taxes - Schedule of the

Income Taxes - Schedule of the Deferred Tax Assets and Deferred Tax Liabilities (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018Dec. 31, 2017
Deferred tax assets:
Accounts and notes receivable $ 6 $ 4
Accrued employee benefits54 48
Leases114 99
Operating lease liabilities323 332
Liabilities not currently deductible for tax310 198
Tax loss and credit carryforwards547 493
Derivatives225 83
Other9 3
Total gross deferred tax assets1,588 1,260
Valuation allowance(364)(329) $ (325) $ (282)
Net deferred tax assets1,224 931
Less deferred tax liabilities:
Property and equipment, principally due to differences in depreciation35 40
Intangible assets1,747 1,792
Leases114 88
Operating lease assets311 325
Statutory impairment30 28
Outside basis difference46 42
Total gross deferred tax liabilities2,283 2,315
Net deferred tax liability $ 1,059 $ 1,384

Income Taxes - Summary of Chang

Income Taxes - Summary of Changes in Valuation Allowance (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
SEC Schedule, 12-09, Movement in Valuation Allowances and Reserves [Roll Forward]
Valuation Allowance, beginning balance $ 329 $ 325 $ 282
Change in estimates recorded to deferred income tax expense19 8 43
Changes in losses and credits3 (2)0
Additions related to other comprehensive income13 (2)0
Valuation Allowance, ending balance $ 364 $ 329 $ 325

Income Taxes - Summary of Amoun

Income Taxes - Summary of Amount and Expiration Dates of Operating Loss and Tax Credit Carry-forwards (Details) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020USD ($)
Operating Loss And Tax Credit Carryforwards [Line Items]
Total $ 2,854
Canadian net operating loss carryforwards
Operating Loss And Tax Credit Carryforwards [Line Items]
Operating loss carryforwards866
Canadian capital loss carryforwards
Operating Loss And Tax Credit Carryforwards [Line Items]
Capital loss carryforwards930
U.S. state net operating loss carryforwards
Operating Loss And Tax Credit Carryforwards [Line Items]
Operating loss carryforwards639
U.S. state net operating loss carryforwards
Operating Loss And Tax Credit Carryforwards [Line Items]
Operating loss carryforwards1
U.S. foreign tax credits
Operating Loss And Tax Credit Carryforwards [Line Items]
U.S. foreign tax credits100
Foreign tax
Operating Loss And Tax Credit Carryforwards [Line Items]
Operating loss carryforwards212
Capital loss carryforwards31
Foreign credits5
Other foreign net operating loss carryforwards
Operating Loss And Tax Credit Carryforwards [Line Items]
Operating loss carryforwards $ 70

Income Taxes - A Reconciliation

Income Taxes - A Reconciliation of Beginning and Ending Amounts of Unrecognized Tax Benefits (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Reconciliation of Unrecognized Tax Benefits, Excluding Amounts Pertaining to Examined Tax Returns [Roll Forward]
Beginning balance $ 506 $ 441 $ 461
Additions for tax positions related to the current year9 9 1
Additions for tax positions of prior years7 56 18
Reductions for tax positions of prior year(25)0 (18)
Reductions for settlement0 0 (18)
Reductions due to statute expiration0 0 (3)
Ending balance $ 497 $ 506 $ 441

Derivative Instruments - Additi

Derivative Instruments - Additional Information (Details) € in Millions, $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020USD ($)Dec. 31, 2019USD ($)Dec. 31, 2018USD ($)Dec. 31, 2015USD ($)Dec. 31, 2020EUR (€)Dec. 31, 2017USD ($)Dec. 31, 2017CAD ($)
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Derivative, notional amount $ 500,000,000
Net unrealized loss in AOCI244,000,000 $ 77,000,000 $ 19,000,000
Maximum
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Derivative, notional amount122,000,000
Interest expense, net
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Amount of pre-tax losses in AOCI expect to be reclassified into interest expense11,000,000
Interest Rate Swap - Period One
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Derivative, notional amount3,500,000,000
Interest Rate Swap - Period Two
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Derivative, notional amount500,000,000
Interest rate
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Derivative, notional amount3,500,000,000 $ 2,500,000,000
Interest rate | Interest expense, net
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Net unrealized loss in AOCI213,000,000 $ 85,000,000
Amount of pre-tax losses in AOCI expect to be reclassified into interest expense50,000,000
Cross currency interest rate contract | Fixed income interest rate
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Derivative, notional amount400,000,000 $ 5,000,000,000 $ 6,754
Hedge Funds | Cross currency interest rate contract | Fixed income interest rate
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Derivative, notional amount $ 1,200,000,000 € 1,108

Derivative Instruments - Quanti

Derivative Instruments - Quantitative Disclosures of Derivative Instruments Including Estimated Fair Values (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges | Interest rate swaps
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Gain or (Loss) Recognized in Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) $ (333) $ (102) $ (37)
Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges | Interest rate swaps | Interest expense, net
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Gain or (Loss) Reclassified from AOCI into Earnings(102)(26)(19)
Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges | Forward-currency contracts
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Gain or (Loss) Recognized in Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)(2)(4)11
Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges | Forward-currency contracts | Cost of sales
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Gain or (Loss) Reclassified from AOCI into Earnings2 5 (1)
Derivatives designated as net investment hedges | Cross-currency rate swaps
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Gain or (Loss) Recognized in Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)(302)(118)383
Derivatives designated as net investment hedges | Cross-currency rate swaps | Interest expense, net
Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities Disclosures [Line Items]
Gain or (Loss) Recognized in Earnings (Amount Excluded from Effectiveness Testing) $ 69 $ 70 $ 60

Derivative Instruments - Summar

Derivative Instruments - Summary of Financial Assets and Liabilities Measured at Fair Value on Recurring Basis (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]
Derivative assets designated as cash flow hedges and net investment hedges $ 0 $ 29
Derivative liabilities designated as cash flow hedges and net investment hedges869 343
Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges | Interest rate | Other assets, net
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]
Derivative assets designated as cash flow hedges and net investment hedges0 7
Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges | Interest rate | Other liabilities, net
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]
Derivative liabilities designated as cash flow hedges and net investment hedges430 175
Derivatives designated as cash flow hedges | Foreign currency | Other accrued liabilities
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]
Derivative liabilities designated as cash flow hedges and net investment hedges5 2
Derivatives designated as net investment hedges | Foreign currency | Other assets, net
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]
Derivative assets designated as cash flow hedges and net investment hedges0 22
Derivatives designated as net investment hedges | Foreign currency | Other liabilities, net
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring and Nonrecurring Basis [Line Items]
Derivative liabilities designated as cash flow hedges and net investment hedges $ 434 $ 166

Equity - Additional Information

Equity - Additional Information (Details) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020USD ($)daysharesDec. 31, 2019sharesDec. 31, 2018USD ($)shares
Stockholders Equity [Line Items]
Number of consecutive trading days | day20
Exchange of partnership exchange units for RBI common shares (in shares)10,393,861 42,016,392 10,185,333
Partners capital account exchanges and conversions (in shares)6,757,692 10,000,000
Partners capital account converted units, amount | $ $ 380 $ 561
Partnership exchangeable units
Stockholders Equity [Line Items]
Exchange of partnership exchange units for RBI common shares (in shares)3,636,169 42,016,392 185,333

Equity - Summary of Change in t

Equity - Summary of Change in the Components of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
AOCI Attributable to Parent, Net of Tax [Roll Forward]
Foreign currency translation adjustment $ 332 $ 409 $ (831)
Net change in fair value of derivatives, net of tax(486)(163)263
Amounts reclassified to earnings of cash flow hedges, net of tax73 15 14
Pension and post-retirement benefit plans, net of tax(16)(2)1
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
AOCI Attributable to Parent, Net of Tax [Roll Forward]
Beginning balances(1,178)(1,437)(884)
Ending balances(1,275)(1,178)(1,437)
Derivatives
AOCI Attributable to Parent, Net of Tax [Roll Forward]
Beginning balances306 454 177
Net change in fair value of derivatives, net of tax(486)(163)263
Amounts reclassified to earnings of cash flow hedges, net of tax73 15 14
Ending balances(107)306 454
Pensions
AOCI Attributable to Parent, Net of Tax [Roll Forward]
Beginning balances(29)(27)(28)
Pension and post-retirement benefit plans, net of tax(16)(2)1
Ending balances(45)(29)(27)
Foreign Currency Translation
AOCI Attributable to Parent, Net of Tax [Roll Forward]
Beginning balances(1,455)(1,864)(1,033)
Foreign currency translation adjustment332 409 (831)
Ending balances $ (1,123) $ (1,455) $ (1,864)

Share-based Compensation - Addi

Share-based Compensation - Additional Information (Details) - USD ($) $ / shares in Units, $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
New awards granted (in shares)1,626,000
Portion of options vesting on each anniversary date, vesting percentage20.00%
Unrecognized compensation cost, recognition period6 years 3 months 18 days
Expected term of grant options5 years 10 months 17 days6 years 2 months 8 days6 years 4 months 20 days
Fair value of options granted (in usd per share) $ 10.38 $ 11.83 $ 10.82
Total intrinsic value of stock options exercised $ 55 $ 200 $ 371
Legacy Burger King Plans
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
New awards granted (in shares)0
Legacy Tim Hortons Plans
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
New awards granted (in shares)0
Maximum | United States Treasury yield
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Expected term of grant options5 years
First anniversary
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Portion of options vesting on each anniversary date, vesting percentage20.00%
Second anniversary
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Portion of options vesting on each anniversary date, vesting percentage40.00%
Third anniversary
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Portion of options vesting on each anniversary date, vesting percentage100.00%
Share-based Payment Arrangement, Option
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Vesting period5 years
Stock options, expiration period10 years
2016 Omnibus Incentive Plan
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Shares available for issuance under the Plan (in shares)11,591,247
Stock Compensation Plan
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Unrecognized compensation cost $ 192
Unrecognized compensation cost, recognition period3 years 3 months 18 days
Restricted Stock Units (RSUs)
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Vesting period5 years
Portion of options vesting on each anniversary date, vesting percentage20.00%
Total intrinsic value of vested RSU's $ 21 $ 8 $ 7
Time-vested RSUs and Performance-based RSUs | Maximum
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Vesting period5 years
Time-vested RSUs
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Vesting period5 years
Employee service period2 years
Percentage of RSU forfeited100.00%
Weighted average grant date fair value, over period of time (in usd per share) $ 64,820,000 $ 57,680,000
Performance-based RSUs
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Vesting period5 years
Portion of options vesting on each anniversary date, vesting percentage100.00%
Employee service period3 years
Weighted average grant date fair value, over period of time (in usd per share) $ 65,540,000 $ 58,490,000
Performance-based RSUs | Minimum
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Employee service period3 years
Performance-based RSUs | Maximum
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Employee service period5 years
Performance-based RSUs | Fourth anniversary
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Portion of options vesting on each anniversary date, vesting percentage50.00%

Share-based Compensation - Summ

Share-based Compensation - Summary of Share-based Compensation Expense (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Share-based Payment Arrangement [Abstract]
Stock options and RSUs $ 74 $ 68 $ 48
Total share-based compensation expense74 68 48
Modification of awards $ 3 $ 4 $ 2

Share-based Compensation - Su_2

Share-based Compensation - Summary of the Significant Assumptions Used During the Year to Estimate the Fair Value of Stock Options (Details)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Share-based Payment Arrangement [Abstract]
Risk-free interest rate1.29%1.82%2.13%
Expected term (in years)5 years 10 months 17 days6 years 2 months 8 days6 years 4 months 20 days
Expected volatility23.90%25.50%25.20%
Expected dividend yield3.14%3.09%3.08%

Share-based Compensation - Su_3

Share-based Compensation - Summary of Option Activity under the Various Plan (Details) $ / shares in Units, shares in Thousands, $ in Thousands12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020USD ($)$ / sharesshares
Total Number of Options
Outstanding beginning balance (in shares) | shares9,758
Granted (in shares) | shares1,626
Exercised (in shares) | shares(2,448)
Forfeited (in shares) | shares(734)
Outstanding ending balance (in shares) | shares8,202
Total number of options, exercisable (in shares) | shares2,281
Total number of options, vested or expected to vest (in shares) | shares7,491
Weighted  Average Exercise Price
Outstanding beginning balance (in dollars per share) | $ / shares $ 45.29
Granted (in dollars per share) | $ / shares66.47
Exercised (in dollars per share) | $ / shares33.57
Forfeited (in dollars per share) | $ / shares58.60
Outstanding ending balance (in dollars per share) | $ / shares51.86
Weighted average exercise price, exercisable (in dollars per share) | $ / shares39.71
Weighted average exercise price, vested or expected to vest (in dollars per share) | $ / shares $ 51.22
Stock Option Activity, Additional Disclosures
Aggregate intrinsic value, outstanding | $ $ 88,022
Weighted average remaining contractual term6 years 3 months 18 days
Aggregate intrinsic value, exercisable | $ $ 48,816
Weighted average remaining contractual term, exercisable3 years 9 months 18 days
Aggregate intrinsic value, vested or expected to vest | $ $ 84,558
Weighted average remaining contractual term, vested or expected to vest6 years 2 months 12 days

Share-based Compensation - Su_4

Share-based Compensation - Summary of Time-vested RSUs and Performance-based RSUs Activity (Details) shares in Thousands12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020$ / sharesshares
Time-vested RSUs
Total Number of Shares (in 000’s)
Outstanding, beginning balance (in shares) | shares1,752
Granted (in shares) | shares337
Vested and settled (in shares) | shares(217)
Dividend equivalents granted (in shares) | shares56
Forfeited (in shares) | shares(167)
Outstanding, ending balance (in shares) | shares1,761
Weighted Average Grant Date Fair Value
Outstanding, beginning balance (in dollars per share) | $ / shares $ 46.50
Granted (in dollars per share) | $ / shares65.20
Vested and settled (in dollars per share) | $ / shares40.42
Dividend equivalents granted (in dollars per share) | $ / shares0
Forfeited (in dollars per share) | $ / shares47.69
Outstanding, ending balance (in dollars per share) | $ / shares $ 49.99
Performance-based RSUs
Total Number of Shares (in 000’s)
Outstanding, beginning balance (in shares) | shares4,066
Granted (in shares) | shares1,291
Vested and settled (in shares) | shares(164)
Dividend equivalents granted (in shares) | shares182
Forfeited (in shares) | shares(506)
Outstanding, ending balance (in shares) | shares4,869
Weighted Average Grant Date Fair Value
Outstanding, beginning balance (in dollars per share) | $ / shares $ 53.78
Granted (in dollars per share) | $ / shares62.69
Vested and settled (in dollars per share) | $ / shares47.32
Dividend equivalents granted (in dollars per share) | $ / shares0
Forfeited (in dollars per share) | $ / shares32.91
Outstanding, ending balance (in dollars per share) | $ / shares $ 56.96

Revenue Recognition - Additiona

Revenue Recognition - Additional Information (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018Dec. 31, 2017
Deferred Revenue Arrangement [Line Items]
Total shareholders' equity $ (3,721) $ (4,259) $ (3,618) $ (4,561)
Cumulative Effect, Period of Adoption, Adjustment
Deferred Revenue Arrangement [Line Items]
Total shareholders' equity $ (21) $ 250

Revenue Recognition - Change in

Revenue Recognition - Change in Contract Liabilities (Details) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020USD ($)
Change In Contract With Customer Liability [Roll Forward]
Beginning balance $ 541
Recognized during period and included in the contract liability balance at the beginning of the year(74)
Increase, excluding amounts recognized as revenue during the period45
Impact of foreign currency translation16
Ending balance528
Tim Hortons
Change In Contract With Customer Liability [Roll Forward]
Beginning balance64
Recognized during period and included in the contract liability balance at the beginning of the year(10)
Increase, excluding amounts recognized as revenue during the period7
Impact of foreign currency translation1
Ending balance62
Burger King
Change In Contract With Customer Liability [Roll Forward]
Beginning balance449
Recognized during period and included in the contract liability balance at the beginning of the year(62)
Increase, excluding amounts recognized as revenue during the period25
Impact of foreign currency translation15
Ending balance427
Popeyes
Change In Contract With Customer Liability [Roll Forward]
Beginning balance28
Recognized during period and included in the contract liability balance at the beginning of the year(2)
Increase, excluding amounts recognized as revenue during the period13
Impact of foreign currency translation0
Ending balance $ 39

Revenue Recognition - Estimated

Revenue Recognition - Estimated Revenue Recognition (Details) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020USD ($)
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in $ 528
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2021-01-01
Revenue from Contract with Customer [Abstract]
Revenue, remaining performance obligation, expected timing of satisfaction, period1 year
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in $ 47
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2022-01-01
Revenue from Contract with Customer [Abstract]
Revenue, remaining performance obligation, expected timing of satisfaction, period1 year
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in $ 45
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2023-01-01
Revenue from Contract with Customer [Abstract]
Revenue, remaining performance obligation, expected timing of satisfaction, period1 year
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in $ 44
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2024-01-01
Revenue from Contract with Customer [Abstract]
Revenue, remaining performance obligation, expected timing of satisfaction, period1 year
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in $ 41
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2025-01-01
Revenue from Contract with Customer [Abstract]
Revenue, remaining performance obligation, expected timing of satisfaction, period1 year
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in $ 39
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2026-01-01
Revenue from Contract with Customer [Abstract]
Revenue, remaining performance obligation, expected timing of satisfaction, period
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in $ 312
Tim Hortons
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in62
Tim Hortons | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2021-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in9
Tim Hortons | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2022-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in8
Tim Hortons | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2023-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in8
Tim Hortons | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2024-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in7
Tim Hortons | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2025-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in6
Tim Hortons | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2026-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in24
Burger King
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in427
Burger King | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2021-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in35
Burger King | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2022-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in34
Burger King | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2023-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in33
Burger King | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2024-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in32
Burger King | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2025-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in31
Burger King | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2026-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in262
Popeyes
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in39
Popeyes | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2021-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in3
Popeyes | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2022-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in3
Popeyes | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2023-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in3
Popeyes | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2024-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in2
Popeyes | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2025-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in2
Popeyes | Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction, Start Date [Axis]: 2026-01-01
Revenue, Remaining Performance Obligation, Expected Timing of Satisfaction [Line Items]
Contract liabilities expected to be recognized in $ 26

Revenue Recognition - Disaggreg

Revenue Recognition - Disaggregation of Total Revenues (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Sep. 30, 2020Jun. 30, 2020Mar. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Sep. 30, 2019Jun. 30, 2019Mar. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Revenue Recognition, Multiple-deliverable Arrangements [Line Items]
Property revenues $ 718 $ 833 $ 744
Total revenues $ 1,358 $ 1,337 $ 1,048 $ 1,225 $ 1,479 $ 1,458 $ 1,400 $ 1,266 4,968 5,603 5,357
Sales
Revenue Recognition, Multiple-deliverable Arrangements [Line Items]
Sales2,013 2,362 2,355
Royalties
Revenue Recognition, Multiple-deliverable Arrangements [Line Items]
Sales2,161 2,319 2,165
Franchise fees and other revenue
Revenue Recognition, Multiple-deliverable Arrangements [Line Items]
Sales $ 76 $ 89 $ 93

Other Operating Expenses (Inc_3

Other Operating Expenses (Income), net - Other Operating Expenses (Income), Net (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Other Income and Expenses [Abstract]
Net losses (gains) on disposal of assets, restaurant closures and refranchisings $ 6 $ 7 $ 19
Litigation settlements and reserves, net7 2 11
Net losses (gains) on foreign exchange100 (15)(33)
Other, net(8)(4)11
Other operating expenses (income), net $ 105 $ (10) $ 8

Commitments and Contingencies -

Commitments and Contingencies - Additional Information (Details) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020USD ($)
Commitments Contingencies And Litigation [Line Items]
Litigation settlement $ 43
Standby letters of credit
Commitments Contingencies And Litigation [Line Items]
Amount withdrawn from standby letter of credit13
Letter of credit secured by collateral $ 2
Purchase commitment
Commitments Contingencies And Litigation [Line Items]
Contractual obligation related with telecommunication3 years
Purchase of advertising $ 186

Segment Reporting and Geograp_3

Segment Reporting and Geographical Information - Additional Information (Details)12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020segmentbrandDec. 31, 2019
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
Number of brands | brand3
Tim Hortons, Burger King, and Popeyes brand
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
Number of operating segments3
Number of reportable segments3
United States
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
Percentage of long lived assets by segment10.00%10.00%
Canadian
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
Percentage of long lived assets by segment10.00%10.00%

Segment Reporting and Geograp_4

Segment Reporting and Geographical Information - Revenues by Geographic Segment (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Sep. 30, 2020Jun. 30, 2020Mar. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Sep. 30, 2019Jun. 30, 2019Mar. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Revenue, Major Customer [Line Items]
Total revenues $ 1,358 $ 1,337 $ 1,048 $ 1,225 $ 1,479 $ 1,458 $ 1,400 $ 1,266 $ 4,968 $ 5,603 $ 5,357
Canadian
Revenue, Major Customer [Line Items]
Total revenues2,546 3,037 2,984
United States
Revenue, Major Customer [Line Items]
Total revenues1,889 1,930 1,785
Other
Revenue, Major Customer [Line Items]
Total revenues533 636 588
Tim Hortons
Revenue, Major Customer [Line Items]
Total revenues2,810 3,344 3,292
Burger King
Revenue, Major Customer [Line Items]
Total revenues1,602 1,777 1,651
Popeyes
Revenue, Major Customer [Line Items]
Total revenues $ 556 $ 482 $ 414
Sales revenue | Geographic concentration risk | Canadian
Revenue, Major Customer [Line Items]
Revenues percentage10.00%
Sales revenue | Geographic concentration risk | United States
Revenue, Major Customer [Line Items]
Revenues percentage10.00%

Segment Reporting and Geograp_5

Segment Reporting and Geographical Information - Depreciation and Amortization Expense (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
Depreciation and amortization $ 189 $ 185 $ 180
Tim Hortons
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
Depreciation and amortization119 112 108
Burger King
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
Depreciation and amortization62 62 61
Popeyes
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
Depreciation and amortization $ 8 $ 11 $ 11

Segment Reporting and Geograp_6

Segment Reporting and Geographical Information - (Income) Loss from Equity Method Investments (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
(Income) loss from equity method investments $ 39 $ (11) $ (22)
Tim Hortons
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
(Income) loss from equity method investments(4)(7)(6)
Burger King
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
(Income) loss from equity method investments $ 43 $ (4) $ (16)

Segment Reporting and Geograp_7

Segment Reporting and Geographical Information - Capital Expenditure (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Revenues from External Customers and Long-Lived Assets [Line Items]
Capital expenditures: $ 117 $ 62 $ 86
Tim Hortons
Revenues from External Customers and Long-Lived Assets [Line Items]
Capital expenditures:92 37 59
Burger King
Revenues from External Customers and Long-Lived Assets [Line Items]
Capital expenditures:18 20 25
Popeyes
Revenues from External Customers and Long-Lived Assets [Line Items]
Capital expenditures: $ 7 $ 5 $ 2

Segment Reporting and Geograp_8

Segment Reporting and Geographical Information - Schedule of Segment Related Assets and Long Lived Assets (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019
Long Lived Assets Held-for-sale [Line Items]
Total assets $ 22,777 $ 22,360
Long-lived assets3,249 3,231
Operating segments | Tim Hortons
Long Lived Assets Held-for-sale [Line Items]
Total assets13,963 13,894
Long-lived assets1,990 1,972
Operating segments | Burger King
Long Lived Assets Held-for-sale [Line Items]
Total assets5,334 5,149
Long-lived assets1,128 1,130
Operating segments | Popeyes
Long Lived Assets Held-for-sale [Line Items]
Total assets2,525 2,490
Long-lived assets131 129
Unallocated
Long Lived Assets Held-for-sale [Line Items]
Total assets955 827
Long-lived assets0 0
Canadian
Long Lived Assets Held-for-sale [Line Items]
Long-lived assets1,685 1,665
United States
Long Lived Assets Held-for-sale [Line Items]
Long-lived assets1,539 1,542
Other
Long Lived Assets Held-for-sale [Line Items]
Long-lived assets $ 25 $ 24

Segment Reporting and Geograp_9

Segment Reporting and Geographical Information - Reconciliation of Segment Income to Net Income (Loss) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Sep. 30, 2020Jun. 30, 2020Mar. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Sep. 30, 2019Jun. 30, 2019Mar. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
Adjusted EBITDA $ 1,864 $ 2,304 $ 2,212
(Income) loss from equity method investments39 (11)(22)
Other operating expenses (income), net105 (10)8
EBITDA1,611 2,192 2,097
Depreciation and amortization189 185 180
Income from operations $ 373 $ 417 $ 243 $ 389 $ 511 $ 571 $ 491 $ 434 1,422 2,007 1,917
Interest expense, net508 532 535
Loss on early extinguishment of debt98 23 0
Income tax expense66 341 238
Net income750 1,111 1,144
Tim Hortons
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
(Income) loss from equity method investments(4)(7)(6)
Burger King
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
(Income) loss from equity method investments43 (4)(16)
Operating segments | Tim Hortons
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
Adjusted EBITDA823 1,122 1,127
Operating segments | Burger King
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
Adjusted EBITDA823 994 928
Operating segments | Popeyes
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
Adjusted EBITDA218 188 157
Unallocated management G&A
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
Share-based compensation and non-cash incentive compensation expense84 74 55
Corporate restructuring and tax advisory fees16 31 25
Office centralization and relocation costs0 6 20
(Income) loss from equity method investments48 11 (3)
Other operating expenses (income), net105 (10)8
PLK Transaction costs
Segment Reporting, Revenue Reconciling Item [Line Items]
PLK Transaction costs $ 0 $ 0 $ 10

Quarterly Financial Data (Una_3

Quarterly Financial Data (Unaudited) - Summarized Unaudited Quarterly Financial Data (Details) - USD ($) $ / shares in Units, $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020Sep. 30, 2020Jun. 30, 2020Mar. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Sep. 30, 2019Jun. 30, 2019Mar. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018
Schedule Of Computation Of Basic And Diluted Earnings Per Common Share [Line Items]
Total revenues $ 1,358 $ 1,337 $ 1,048 $ 1,225 $ 1,479 $ 1,458 $ 1,400 $ 1,266 $ 4,968 $ 5,603 $ 5,357
Income from operations373 417 243 389 511 571 491 434 $ 1,422 $ 2,007 $ 1,917
Net income $ 139 $ 223 $ 164 $ 224 $ 257 $ 351 $ 257 $ 246
Class A common units
Schedule Of Computation Of Basic And Diluted Earnings Per Common Share [Line Items]
Earnings per unit - basic and diluted (in dollars per share) $ 0.45 $ 0.72 $ 0.52 $ 0.71 $ 0.81 $ 1 $ 0.70 $ 0.67 $ 2.41 $ 3.18 $ 3.03
Partnership exchangeable units
Schedule Of Computation Of Basic And Diluted Earnings Per Common Share [Line Items]
Earnings per unit - basic and diluted (in dollars per share) $ 0.30 $ 0.48 $ 0.35 $ 0.48 $ 0.55 $ 0.76 $ 0.55 $ 0.53 $ 1.62 $ 2.40 $ 2.46

Supplemental Financial Inform_3

Supplemental Financial Information Additional Information (Details)Dec. 31, 2020Nov. 09, 2020Apr. 07, 2020Nov. 19, 2019Sep. 24, 2019Dec. 31, 2017May 17, 2017
2020 3.50% Senior Notes (due February 15, 2029) | Senior notes
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)3.50%3.50%
2020 4.00% Senior Notes (due October 15, 2030) | Senior notes
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.00%
2020 5.75% Senior Notes (due April 15, 2025) | Senior notes
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)5.75%5.75%
2019 4.375% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028)
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.375%
2019 4.375% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028) | Senior notes
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.375%4.375%
2019 3.875% Senior Notes (due January 15, 2028) | Senior notes
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)3.875%3.875%
2017 4.25% Senior Notes (due May 15, 2024) | Senior notes
Debt Instrument [Line Items]
Stated interest rate (as a percent)4.25%4.25%4.25%

Supplemental Financial Inform_4

Supplemental Financial Information - Condensed Consolidating Balance Sheets (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsDec. 31, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Dec. 31, 2018Dec. 31, 2017
Current assets:
Cash and cash equivalents $ 1,560 $ 1,533 $ 913 $ 1,097
Accounts and notes receivable, net536 527
Inventories, net96 84
Prepaids and other current assets72 52
Total current assets2,264 2,196
Property and equipment leased, net2,031 2,007
Operating lease assets, net1,152 1,176
Intangible assets, net10,701 10,563
Goodwill5,739 5,651
Net investment in property leased to franchisees66 48
Intercompany receivable0 0
Investment in subsidiaries0 0
Other assets, net824 719
Total assets22,777 22,360
Current liabilities:
Accounts and drafts payable464 644
Other accrued liabilities835 790
Gift card liability191 168
Current portion of long-term debt and finance leases111 101
Total current liabilities1,601 1,703
Long-term debt, net of current portion12,397 11,759
Long-term portion of lease obligations315 288
Operating lease liabilities, net of current portion1,082 1,089
Other liabilities, net2,236 1,698
Payables to affiliates0 0
Deferred income taxes, net1,425 1,564
Total liabilities19,056 18,101
Partners’ capital:
Common shares0 0
Retained earnings0 0
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)(1,275)(1,178)
Total Partners’ capital3,717 4,255
Noncontrolling interests4 4
Total equity3,721 4,259 3,618 4,561
Total liabilities and equity22,777 22,360
Class A common units
Partners’ capital:
Class A common units7,994 7,786
Total equity7,994 7,786 4,323 4,168
Partnership exchangeable units
Partners’ capital:
Partnership exchangeable units(3,002)(2,353)
Total equity(3,002)(2,353)730 1,276
Eliminations
Current assets:
Cash and cash equivalents0 0 0 0
Accounts and notes receivable, net0 0
Inventories, net0 0
Prepaids and other current assets0 0
Total current assets0 0
Property and equipment leased, net0 0
Operating lease assets, net0 0
Intangible assets, net0 0
Goodwill0 0
Net investment in property leased to franchisees0 0
Intercompany receivable(239)(232)
Investment in subsidiaries(3,721)(4,259)
Other assets, net0 0
Total assets(3,960)(4,491)
Current liabilities:
Accounts and drafts payable0 0
Other accrued liabilities0 0
Gift card liability0 0
Current portion of long-term debt and finance leases0 0
Total current liabilities0 0
Long-term debt, net of current portion0 0
Long-term portion of lease obligations0 0
Operating lease liabilities, net of current portion0 0
Other liabilities, net0 0
Payables to affiliates(239)(232)
Deferred income taxes, net0 0
Total liabilities(239)(232)
Partners’ capital:
Common shares(3,026)(3,248)
Retained earnings(1,966)(2,185)
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)1,275 1,178
Total Partners’ capital(3,717)(4,255)
Noncontrolling interests(4)(4)
Total equity(3,721)(4,259)
Total liabilities and equity(3,960)(4,491)
Eliminations | Class A common units
Partners’ capital:
Class A common units0 0
Eliminations | Partnership exchangeable units
Partners’ capital:
Partnership exchangeable units0 0
Consolidated Borrowers | Reportable Legal Entities
Current assets:
Cash and cash equivalents1,560 1,533 913 1,097
Accounts and notes receivable, net536 527
Inventories, net96 84
Prepaids and other current assets72 52
Total current assets2,264 2,196
Property and equipment leased, net2,031 2,007
Operating lease assets, net1,152 1,176
Intangible assets, net10,701 10,563
Goodwill5,739 5,651
Net investment in property leased to franchisees66 48
Intercompany receivable0 0
Investment in subsidiaries0 0
Other assets, net824 719
Total assets22,777 22,360
Current liabilities:
Accounts and drafts payable464 644
Other accrued liabilities596 558
Gift card liability191 168
Current portion of long-term debt and finance leases111 101
Total current liabilities1,362 1,471
Long-term debt, net of current portion12,397 11,759
Long-term portion of lease obligations315 288
Operating lease liabilities, net of current portion1,082 1,089
Other liabilities, net2,236 1,698
Payables to affiliates239 232
Deferred income taxes, net1,425 1,564
Total liabilities19,056 18,101
Partners’ capital:
Common shares3,026 3,248
Retained earnings1,966 2,185
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)(1,275)(1,178)
Total Partners’ capital3,717 4,255
Noncontrolling interests4 4
Total equity3,721 4,259
Total liabilities and equity22,777 22,360
Consolidated Borrowers | Reportable Legal Entities | Class A common units
Partners’ capital:
Class A common units0 0
Consolidated Borrowers | Reportable Legal Entities | Partnership exchangeable units
Partners’ capital:
Partnership exchangeable units0 0
RBILP | Reportable Legal Entities
Current assets:
Cash and cash equivalents0 0 $ 0 $ 0
Accounts and notes receivable, net0 0
Inventories, net0 0
Prepaids and other current assets0 0
Total current assets0 0
Property and equipment leased, net0 0
Operating lease assets, net0 0
Intangible assets, net0 0
Goodwill0 0
Net investment in property leased to franchisees0 0
Intercompany receivable239 232
Investment in subsidiaries3,721 4,259
Other assets, net0 0
Total assets3,960 4,491
Current liabilities:
Accounts and drafts payable0 0
Other accrued liabilities239 232
Gift card liability0 0
Current portion of long-term debt and finance leases0 0
Total current liabilities239 232
Long-term debt, net of current portion0 0
Long-term portion of lease obligations0 0
Operating lease liabilities, net of current portion0 0
Other liabilities, net0 0
Payables to affiliates0 0
Deferred income taxes, net0 0
Total liabilities239 232
Partners’ capital:
Common shares0 0
Retained earnings0 0
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)(1,275)(1,178)
Total Partners’ capital3,717 4,255
Noncontrolling interests4 4
Total equity3,721