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AREB American Rebel

Filed: 17 May 21, 5:30pm

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

[X] ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020

 

[   ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 

 

For the transition period from __________ to __________

 

Commission file number 000-55728

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

NEVADA

 

47-3892903

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

718 Thompson Lane, Suite 108-199

Nashville, Tennessee

 

37204

(Address of principal

executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (833) 267-3235

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: None

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

Common Stock, $0.001 par value

(Title of Class)

 

Copies of communications to:

Anthony N. DeMint, Esq.

DeMint Law, PLLC

3753 Howard Hughes Parkway

Second Floor, Suite 314

Las Vegas, Nevada 89169

(702) 714-0889

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes [   ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.

Yes [   ] No [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes [X] No[   ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes [X] No [   ]


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Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.Yes [X] No [   ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

[   ]

Large accelerated filer

[   ]

Accelerated filer

[X]

Non-accelerated filer

[X]

Smaller reporting company

 

 

[X]

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes [   ] No [X]

 

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by the price at which common equity was last sold: $2,940,998.74 as of June 30, 2020.

 

The number of shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding as of May 5, 2021 was 79,466,563 shares.

 

Documents incorporated by reference: None


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AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

PART II

 

ITEM 1.

Business

6

ITEM 1A.

Risk Factors 

14

ITEM 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

27

ITEM 2.

Properties

27

ITEM 3.

Legal Proceedings

28

ITEM 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

28

 

 

 

 

PART II

 

ITEM 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

29

ITEM 6.

Selected Financial Data

31

ITEM 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation

31

ITEM 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

35

ITEM 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

35

ITEM 9.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

36

ITEM 9A.

Controls and Procedures

36

ITEM 9B.

Other Information

37

 

 

 

 

PART III

 

ITEM 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

38

ITEM 11.

Executive Compensation

42

ITEM 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

45

ITEM 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

47

ITEM 14.

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

48

 

 

 

 

PART IV

 

ITEM 15.

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

49

ITEM 16.

Form 10-K Summary

52

 

 

 

 

SIGNATURES

53


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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K (“Annual Report”) contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). These forward-looking statements are not historical facts but rather are based on current expectations, estimates and projections. We may use words such as “anticipate,” “expect,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “foresee,” “estimate” and variations of these words and similar expressions to identify forward-looking statements. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to certain risks, uncertainties and other factors, some of which are beyond our control, are difficult to predict and could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or forecasted. These risks and uncertainties include the following:

 

·the risks and other factors described under the caption “Risk Factors” under Item 1A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K;  

 

·our ability to efficiently manage and repay our debt obligations; 

 

·our future operating results; 

 

·our inability to raise additional financing for working capital, especially related to purchasing critical inventory; 

 

·our ability to generate sufficient revenue in our targeted markets to support operations 

 

·significant dilution resulting from our financing activities: 

 

·actions and initiatives taken by both current and potential competitors; 

 

·supply chain disruptions for components used in our products; 

 

·manufacturers inability to deliver components or products on time; 

 

·our ability to diversify our operations; 

 

·the fact that our accounting policies and methods are fundamental to how we report our financial condition and results of operations, and they may require management to make estimates about matters that are inherently uncertain; 

 

·adverse state or federal legislation or regulation that increases the costs of compliance, or adverse findings by a regulator with respect to existing operations; 

 

·changes in U.S. GAAP or in the legal, regulatory and legislative environments in the markets in which we operate; 

 

·deterioration in general or global economic, market and political conditions; 

 

·inability to efficiently manage our operations; 

 

·inability to achieve future operating results; 

 

·the unavailability of funds for capital expenditures; 

 

·our ability to recruit and hire key employees; 

 

·the global impact of COVID-19 on the United States economy and our operations; 

 

·the inability of management to effectively implement our strategies and business plans; 

 

·our business prospects; 

 

·any contractual arrangements and relationships with third parties; 

 

·the dependence of our future success on the general economy; 


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·any possible financings; and 

 

·the adequacy of our cash resources and working capital. 

 

Because the factors referred to above could cause actual results or outcomes to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements made by us, you should not place undue reliance on any such forward-looking statements. New factors emerge from time to time, and their emergence is impossible for us to predict. In addition, we cannot assess the impact of each factor on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements.

 

This Annual Report should be read completely and with the understanding that actual future results may be materially different from what we expect. The forward looking statements included in this Annual Report are made as of the date of this Annual Report and should be evaluated with consideration of any changes occurring after the date of this Annual Report. We will not update forward-looking statements even though our situation may change in the future and we assume no obligation to update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

 

Except as otherwise indicated by the context, references in this report to “Company”, “American Rebel Holdings”, “American Rebel” “we”, “us” and “our” are references to American Rebel Holdings, Inc. and its wholly-owned operating subsidiary, American Rebel, Inc. All references to “USD” or United States Dollar refer to the legal currency of the United States of America.

 

AVAILABLE INFORMATION

 

We file annual, quarterly and special reports and other information with the SEC. You can read these SEC filings and reports over the Internet at the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. You can also obtain copies of the documents at prescribed rates by writing to the Public Reference Section of the SEC at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549 on official business days between the hours of 10:00 am and 3:00 pm. Please call the SEC at (800) SEC-0330 for further information on the operations of the public reference facilities. We will provide a copy of our annual report to security holders, including audited financial statements, at no charge upon receipt to of a written request to us at American Rebel Holdings, Inc., 718 Thompson Lane, Suite 108-199, Nashville, Tennessee 37204.


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PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS

 

Corporate Summary

 

American Rebel Holdings, Inc. was incorporated on December 15, 2014 in the State of Nevada and is authorized to issue 100,000,000 shares of Common Stock and 1,000,000 shares of Preferred Stock of $0.001 par value.

 

American Rebel is boldly positioning itself as “America’s Patriotic Brand” in a time when national spirit and American values are being rekindled and redefined. American Rebel is an advocate for the 2nd Amendment and conveys a sense of responsibility to teach and preach good common practices of gun ownership. American Rebel products keep you concealed and safe inside and outside the home. American Rebel Safes protect your firearms and valuables from children, theft, fire and natural disasters inside the home; and American Rebel Concealed Carry Products provide quick and easy access to your firearm utilizing American Rebel’s Proprietary Protection Pocket in its backpacks and apparel outside the home. The initial company product releases embrace the “concealed carry lifestyle” with a focus on concealed carry products, apparel, personal security and defense. “There’s a growing need to know how to protect yourself, your family, your neighbors or even a room full of total strangers,” says American Rebel’s CEO, Andy Ross. “That need is in the forethought of every product we design”

 

The “concealed carry lifestyle” refers to a set of products and a set of ideas around the emotional decision to carry a gun everywhere you go. The American Rebel brand strategy is similar to the successful Harley-Davidson Motorcycle philosophy, referenced in this quote from Richard F. Teerlink, Harley’s chairman and former chief executive, “It’s not hardware; it is a lifestyle, an emotional attachment. That’s what we have to keep marketing to.” As an American icon, Harley has come to symbolize freedom, rugged individualism, excitement and a sense of “bad boy rebellion.” American Rebel – America’s Patriotic Brand has significant potential for branded products as a lifestyle brand. Its innovative Concealed Carry Product line and Safe line serve a large and growing market segment; but it is important to note we have product opportunities beyond Concealed Carry Products and Safes.

 

We were initially incorporated under the laws of the State of Nevada on December 15, 2014 under the name CubeScape, Inc. On or about June 8, 2016, a change in control occurred with us pursuant to the terms of a Securities Purchase Agreement by and among us, David Estus, our then sole officer, director and majority stockholder and American Rebel, Inc., a Nevada corporation (“ARI”). Pursuant to the terms of the agreement, Estus, who owned 9,000,000 shares of our common stock representing 60% of our issued and outstanding common stock, sold such shares to ARI for aggregate consideration of $35,000, or approximately $0.00389 per share. In addition, certain stockholders of ARI purchased 6,000,000 shares of our common stock in a series of private transactions from nonaffiliates. Effective December 23, 2016 we changed our name to American Rebel Holdings, Inc.

 

On June 19, 2017, we entered into an Amended Stock Purchase and Reorganization Agreement with ARI and its former stockholders, whereby we acquired 100% of the outstanding common shares of ARI in exchange for the issuance of 17,421,000 shares of our common stock and warrants to purchase 500,000 shares of common stock at $0.50 per share. In addition, we cancelled the 9,000,000 shares of our common stock issued to ARI as part of the change of control transaction described above. Following the acquisition, there were approximately 23,421,000 shares of our common stock issued and outstanding, with pre-acquisition stockholders holding 6,000,000 shares of our common stock (held by some former ARI stockholders who acquired these shares in private transactions) and former ARI stockholders holding 17,421,000 shares of our common stock directly or 74.4% of our issued and outstanding equity.

 

After giving effect to this transaction, we commenced operations through ARI as our wholly-owned subsidiary.

 

American Rebel, Inc. was incorporated on December 15, 2014 in the state of Nevada and is a natural evolution of the vision of its founder and CEO Charles A. “Andy” Ross, Jr. Mr. Ross is a natural entrepreneur having successfully designed and delivered a new line of law enforcement/security products to market during his tenure as CEO of Digital Ally, a company he founded in 2004. Digital Ally successfully accessed the public market as a public company and Digital Ally continues to trade on the NASDAQ stock exchange. Andy also founded Ross Archery in 2006 and hosted an innovative television show called Maximum Archery that aired on the Outdoor Channel, Sportsman Channel, and the Pursuit Channel.


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The roots of American Rebel trace back to a song written and recorded by Andy Ross in response to the ongoing gun rights debate. Andy was completing his second CD and the dialog on television and online was suggesting that severe restrictions were needed in the right to bear arms. Andy reached out to his collaborators and wrote the song “Cold Dead Hand.” “Cold Dead Hand” harkens back to the iconic Charlton Heston public appearance where Charlton holds a rifle high over his head and proclaims, “Out of my cold dead hand….” This phrase has been a rallying cry for gun rights supporters ever since; but never has it been incorporated into such an effective song. Andy renamed his second CD Cold Dead Hand and the song was released nationally to country music radio stations. The song received significant airplay and an accompanying video to the song received hundreds of thousands of views. In addition to the country music radio station airplay, many talk radio stations picked up the song and promoted it as a 2nd Amendment anthem. Andy continues to conduct interviews on music and talk radio stations about the song and the gun rights debate.

 

It was the song “Cold Dead Hand” that inspired Danny “the Count” Koker to reach out to Andy to create the 2nd Amendment Muscle Car for his highly-rated Counting Cars television program on the History Channel. The story behind the creation, building, and presentation of the car to Andy is captured in the episode Rocked and Loaded which originally aired February 25, 2014 and continues to re-air and has appeared as a part of “best of” compilations of the show’s episodes. The enduring popularity of the 2nd Amendment Muscle Car was evidenced by the excitement shown by 2017 NRA Convention attendees when they reviewed the car in the American Rebel booth. In fact, the car is so popular that the Company is planning several collectible die-cast models of the car.

 

“Cold Dead Hand” placed Andy Ross directly in the public and political debate over gun rights and the right to bear arms as codified in the 2nd Amendment to the US Constitution. As Andy participated in the debate, he realized there was a market opportunity to provide innovative and effective designs for everyday use items that assisted the desire of customers to be concealed and safe during their normal course of everyday duties. The beginnings of American Rebel were starting to take shape and because Andy Ross’s music plays such an important part in the American Rebel story, it is helpful to trace the beginnings of Andy Ross’s music career.

 

After the airing of the Counting Cars episode that featured the building and presenting of the 2nd Amendment Muscle Car to Andy and the accompanying exposure from “Cold Dead Hand,” Andy began to imagine a product that would be perfect for everyday use while keeping the user concealed and safe. Range bags, bags and packs that were designed to carry firearms and ammo to the range, were on the market; but they weren’t versatile enough to satisfy everyday needs. These range bags were just that, range bags. Andy imagined a backpack that had designed areas to carry a laptop or tablet, a phone, sunglasses, files and important papers, chargers for electronics, anything needed in the normal course of the day, and an isolated patent-pending Protection Pocket that could effectively carry most handguns. The patent-pending Protection Pocket utilizes a sandwich method which holds the handgun in place and is accessed by a zipper on either side of the rear bottom of the backpack. If a user of one of Andy’s backpacks needed to get to their firearm, they could rest easy knowing the gun was in place and they could access it easily and quickly.

 

During the same time period Andy was beginning the design of the concealed carry backpack, Andy was writing a new opener song for his television show. He wanted the television show to expand beyond a show exclusively about archery, to be a show that could feature tactical shooting and personal safety information as well as continue to cover his passion for hunting. He wanted the show to include hunts with firearms in addition to hunts with his bow. Andy wrote and recorded “American Rebel” to be the new opener for his new show and the response to the new song and the new show was extremely positive. As the new show aired and Andy performed “American Rebel” during his musical appearances, a trusted business consultant suggested to Andy that his new company should be called American Rebel. Andy agreed that American Rebel captured the spirit of what his new company was about.

 

With the features and benefits of the American Rebel backpack identified, Andy set out to create the specific design of the American Rebel Concealed Carry Backpack. A supplier was selected and samples were created and evaluated. These samples were tested, changes were proposed and new samples created and tested. Response to the Extra-Large Double Compartment Backpack was very positive and the information gathered was incorporated into the final designs of the American Rebel Concealed Carry Backpacks. The patent-pending Protection Pocket utilizes a sandwich method which holds the handgun in place and is accessed by a zipper on either side of the rear bottom of the backpack. If a user of one of Andy’s backpacks needed to get to their firearm, they could rest easy knowing the gun was in place and they could access it easily and quickly.

 

The firearms and gun ownership market within the U.S.A continues to grow with no sign of decline. Since 2010, the market for new gun purchases has increased by 60%, and at the end of 2020, it has been estimated that there will be over 400 million guns in the US. There were 39,695,315 background checks through the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) in 2020, a 40% increase from the previous annual record for background checks in 2019. And 2021 shows no sign of slowing down evidenced by the 4,317,804 background checks for the month of January, a nearly 10% increase from the previous month’s monthly record.

 

Interest in gun ownership and tactical/concealed carry clothing, backpacks and accessories is exploding. A current market leader in the tactical products category has grown its revenue from $80 million in 2007 to $200 million in 2011 to $400 million in 2015. This is a strong heartbeat for gun rights, gun ownership, tactical/concealed-carry products and enhances our opportunity to build the American Rebel brand.


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The initial product offering introduced at the 2017 NRA show in Atlanta, GA includes four sizes and styles of concealed carry backpacks with a variety of available colors (25 SKUs), which include the Company’s patent-pending Protection Pocket and two styles of men’s overcoats. Products additionally released through 2018 and 2019 have included additional concealed carry jackets for men and women.

 

The addition of Nathan Findley to the American Rebel team presented an opportunity for American Rebel to launch American Rebel Safes in 2019. Nathan’s many years of experience with Liberty Safe and 9g Products are key assets for American Rebel to engineer, design, and manufacture its own line of gun safes and security products. American Rebel has the right products, marketing, and brand to capitalize on the unmet needs and opportunities identified by its CEO Andy Ross and the American Rebel Executive Team.

 

The Company will also pursue strategic alliances with other companies for goods and services that supplement or complement the internally developed products. These products may be in the personal protection category, or may be everyday products that embody the reliable, competent and confident spirit of the American Rebel brand.

 

To maintain quality, low cost of goods, and continuity of inventory American Rebel is pursuing strategic manufacturing alliances across the globe. Apparel labor costs in Mexico are almost equal to China, and offer quick response with lower transportation costs for smaller production runs. Additionally the impact of tariffs has transformed sourcing of goods and American Rebel seeks to be on the forefront of a reinvigorated United States manufacturing sector.

 

An early stage company such as American Rebel faces many risks that can impede its execution of its business plan. These risks include:

 

Undercapitalization: The Company is currently undercapitalized and intends to pursue the additional capital required to execute its business plan. Economic conditions beyond the Company’s control can change investor interest, and competitive entries could impact the probability of success.

 

Legislative and Government Intervention: The current legislative trends are favorable to the 2ndAmendment and personal protection, but a political movement, public opinion, or an unforeseen event could change the legislative’s stance, and restrict concealed-carry goods, negatively impacting sales. In addition, changes to international trade agreements and government imposed tariffs could impact prices, margins, and continuity of supply.

 

Personal Protection: The Company’s intended focus on the broader personal protection market could insulate the Company to some degree, or not. In addition, any trade agreements changes would impact most all competitors equally.

 

Key Man: Andy Ross has an established public personality and is currently instrumental to the Company. American Rebel intends to establish additional “faces” of the Company that will complement Andy Ross’s contributions.

 

Security: As an Internet-based retailer the Company will be subject to the risks all online retailers face. The Company employs third-party services for credit card transactions, and as operations continue the Company will continually harden its online assets and deploy additional layers of protection for its customers, its assets, and its continued operations.

 

Product Acceptance: Fashion trends, competitive entries, and pricing can negatively impact the brand with little to no warning and with few immediate cures. Focus groups, one-on-one interviews, and test marketing suggest that the product is attractive and sellable, the brand is adaptable, and it represents a brand ego that generates self-confidence in its patrons.

 

ERM: The current staffing and board participation is minimal, as such, until funding is complete there is no formal Enterprise Risk Management process in place.

 

Additional expertise and processes will be added as funding occurs and key outside board additions have been identified to add competence in governance, compliance, and audit.

 

American Rebel Safes

 

American Rebel Safes are a product of Nathan Findley’s years of experience engineering and designing gun safes at Liberty Safe and 9g Products combined with American Rebel style and innovation. Keeping your guns in a location only appropriate trusted members of the household can access should be one of the top priorities for every responsible gun owner. Whenever a new firearm is purchased, the owner should also look for a way to store and secure it. Storing the firearm in a gun safe will prevent it from being misused by young household members, and it will also prevent it from being stolen in a burglary or damaged in a fire or natural disaster. Gun safes may seem pricy at first glance, but once the consumer is educated on their role to protect expensive firearms and other valuables such as jewelry and important documents, the price is justified.


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American Rebel produces large floor safes in a variety of sizes as well as small portable keyed safes. Additional opportunities exist for the Company to develop Wall Safes and Handgun Boxes.

 

 

Reasons gun owners should own a gun safe:

 

·If you are a gun owner and you have children, many states have a law in place that you have to have your gun locked in a safe away from children. This will prevent your children from getting the gun and hurting themselves or someone else. 

 

·Some states have a law in place that you have to keep your gun locked away when it is not in use even if you don’t have children in your home. California has a law that you have to have your gun locked away by a firearms safety device that is considered safe by the California Department of Justice (DOJ). When you buy a safe, you should see if it has approval from the California DOJ. 

 

·Many gun owners own more guns than insurance will cover. Many insurance companies only cover $3,000 worth of guns. Are your weapons worth more? If so, you should invest in a gun safe to make sure your guns are protected from fire, water, and thieves. 

 

·Many insurance companies will give you a discount if you own a gun safe. If you own a gun safe or you purchase one, you should see if your insurance company is one that offers a discount for this. A safe can protect your guns and possibly save you money. 

 

·Do people know you own guns? You might not know that many burglaries are carried out by people they know. 

 

·If a person you know breaks into your home, steals your gun, and murders someone you could be charged with a crime you didn’t commit or the victim’s family could sue you. 

 

·Gun safes can protect your guns in the event your home goes up in flames. When buying a safe, you should see if it will protect your firearm or any other valuables from fire damage. 

 

·You might be the type of person that has a gun in your home for protection. A gun locked in a safe can still offer you protection. There are quick access gun safes on the market. With a quick access gun safe, you can still retrieve your gun in a few seconds but when it isn’t needed it will be protected. 

 

A gun safe is the best investment a gun owner can make because the safe can protect guns from thieves, fire, water, or accidents. This year, bills or ballot measures to require safe storage have been proposed in Delaware, Washington, Oregon, Missouri and Virginia; and various laws are on the books in California and Massachusetts. Even a figure as staunchly pro-gun as Texas’s Republican lieutenant governor, Dan Patrick, called on gun-owning parents to lock up their weapons after the Santa Fe shooting. The gun safe industry is experiencing rapid growth and innovation. American Rebel CEO Andy Ross, Nathan Findley and the rest of the American Rebel team are committed to fulfilling the opportunity in the gun safe market and filling the identified void with American Rebel Gun Safes.

 

Licensing

 

Management believes the American Rebel brand name may have significant licensing value to third parties that seek the American Rebel name to brand their products to market to the American Rebel target demographic. For example, a tool manufacturer that markets a line of tools under their own brand but wants to pursue an alternative marketing plan that might have a different look and feel could license the American Rebel brand name for their line of tools and market their tools under two distinct brands. The licensee would benefit from the strong American Rebel brand with their second line of tools as they would continue to sell both the line of tools under their brand and the line of tools under the American Rebel brand. Because of the strong brand identity of the American Rebel brand, the Company would generate licensing income created primarily by the marketing done to sell Company-owned American Rebel products in the marketplace.

 

American Rebel and the National Rifle Association (NRA) have entered into an agreement for American Rebel to design and create NRA branded products. Management anticipates these NRA branded products to be available for purchase in the second half of 2021.

 

Conversely, American Rebel can also benefit as a licensee of unique products. If American Rebel determines a third party has designed, engineered, and manufactured a product that would be a strong addition to the American Rebel catalog of products, American Rebel can license that product from the third party and sell the licensed product under the American Rebel brand.


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The key to successful licensing either as the licensee or licensor is a successful brand. By introducing American Rebel to the market with innovative concealed carry and gun safe products and by aggressively marketing the American Rebel brand, the Company has laid a solid foundation for future licensing income.

 

The Company maintains its warehouse and shipping operations at 3800 S Ross Lane, Chanute, KS 66720; but utilizes 718 Thompson Lane, Suite 108-199, Nashville, TN, 37204 as its primary address. The company has a sales office at 8460 Nieman Road, Lenexa, Kansas 66214. The lease agreement at 8460 Nieman Road, Lenexa, Kansas 66214 is in the name of American Rebel, Inc. and the lease agreement at 3800 S Ross Lane, Chanute, Kansas 66720, is in the name of American Rebel Holdings, Inc. The wholly-owned subsidiary American Rebel, Inc. maintains 718 Thompson Lane, Suite 108-199, Nashville, TN address. Our website address is www.americanrebel.com. The information on our website is not part of this Current Report, Form 10-K.

 

Description of Business

 

Company Overview

 

American Rebel is boldly positioning itself as America’s Patriotic Brand. The Company has identified the market opportunity to design, manufacture, and market innovative concealed carry products. American Rebel accesses its market uniquely through its positioning as America’s Patriotic Brand and the appeal of its products as well as through the profile and public persona of its founder and CEO Andy Ross. Andy has hosted his own television show for 12 years, has made multiple appearances over the years at trade shows, and is well-known in the archery world as the founder of Ross Archery, which was the world’s fastest growing bow company in 2007 and 2008. Andy has also released 3 CDs, done numerous radio and print interviews, and performed many concerts in front of thousands of people. Andy has the ability to present American Rebel to large numbers of potential customers through the appeal of his music and other supporting appearances. For example, his appearance on the History Channel hit show Counting Cars in February 2014 has been viewed by over 2 million people. Bringing innovative products that satisfy an existing demand to the market through exciting means is the American Rebel blueprint for success.

 

Market Overview

 

The Concealed Carry product market is estimated at over $1 billion in annual sales; but American Rebel’s market not only includes current consumers of concealed carry products but also includes anyone that has ever considered concealing and carrying a weapon. To many the Company’s products solve the problem of how to safely and responsibly carry a weapon. If they had our backpack, jacket or coat, they would then conceal and carry a gun.

 

The US firearms and gun ownership market continues to grow with no sign of abatement. Since 2010, the market for new gun purchases has increased by 60%, and by the end of 2020, there will be over 400 million guns in the US. There were 39,695,315 background checks through the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) in 2020, a 40% increase from the previous annual record for background checks in 2019. And 2021 shows no sign of slowing down evidenced by the 4,317,804 background checks for the month of January, a nearly 10% increase from the previous month’s monthly record.

 

Interest in gun ownership and tactical/concealed carry clothing, backpacks and accessories is exploding. A current market leader in the tactical products category has grown its revenue from $80 million in 2007 to $200 million in 2011 to $400 million in 2015. This all sends a strong signal for gun rights, gun ownership, tactical/concealed carry products, and our American Rebel brand.

 

The obvious customer base for American Rebel Concealed Carry products would be any customer that conceals a handgun and any concealed carry permit holders; but we believe the market is much larger than that. Interviews of potential customers have revealed that our customer base would include any person who has thought they might one day want to conceal and carry a firearm and the availability of the American Rebel product will initiate their taking action on their desire to conceal and carry a firearm. These potential customers aren’t comfortable carrying a firearm holstered on their hip and they haven’t been introduced to a product that conceals the firearm properly, allows easy access to the firearm, and also provides everyday value for their daily routine.

 

The Rise of The 'Concealed-Carry Lifestyle'

 

The "concealed-carry lifestyle" refers to a set of products and a set of ideas around the decision to carry a gun everywhere you go.

 

The concealed-carry movement is central to the gun-rights platform of organizations like the National Rifle Association. "The idea that you should be allowed, legally and constitutionally, to carry a gun almost anywhere ... is actually sort of the heart of what the gun rights movement believes is the future."


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Over the last 30 years, a deep change has happened in American law and in American habit where state by state, places that once prohibited or strictly controlled the ability to carry a gun in everyday life have systematically relaxed those rules to the point that concealed carry is now legal in all 50 states.

 

General Backpack Industry Trends

 

The backpack is back. Sales of backpacks grew 9% in the past 12 months to $1.6 billion, according to data collected for Yahoo Finance by the consumer tracking service NPD Group. Sales of backpacks for use by adults (ages 18 and up) grew even more – 16% – and it was adult purchases that accounted for 69% of the overall market. In other words: the adult backpack is very hot right now.

 

The category is so popular that in 2014, backpack sales growth (up 18% that year among adult men and adult women) kept the $12 billion US bag market steady in a year when women’s handbags, the largest category, declined. In the face of the purse drop, backpacks gained popularity among women that year, and are still gaining.

 

This kind of market upswing creates new room for small, scrappy entrants. And indeed, smaller backpack players are carving out strong corners of an industry in which one giant, VF Corporation (VFC), enjoys more than 50% market share thanks to owning Timberland, The North Face, and Eastpak.

 

Fashion and function must come together to appeal to today’s always on-the-go consumer,” said Marshal Cohen, chief industry analyst, The NPD Group, Inc. “Male or female, consumers are carrying a lot of things around with them, and want a bag that looks good while also meeting their multifunctional needs.”

 

Bags worn by men accounted for $2.3 billion in sales in 2014, nearly one quarter of total industry results. Last year’s double-digit unit and dollar sales increases clearly make the men’s segment the one to watch in 2015. Men are purchasing more bags than ever before, and wearing bags of all types.

 

“The bag industry has an opportunity to continue to capture and keep the attention of male and female consumers alike by emphasizing designs that accommodate their lifestyles in both form and function,” added Cohen.

 

Our Advantages

 

The American Rebel Concealed Carry patent-pending Protection Pocket is an innovative advantage over the competition. The patent-pending Protection Pocket utilizes a sandwich concept to hold the firearm in place and positioned properly for quick and effective access. American Rebel Concealed Carry products are designed for everyday use while keeping you concealed and safe. American Rebel Concealed Carry products enable easy access to your firearm while remaining discreet.

 

The key selling feature is innovation, style, and brand. Currently, innovation is the key selling feature as American Rebel enjoys a first-to-market status with its current assortment of Concealed Carry Backpacks.

 

Product innovations and first-to-market status currently insulate the Company from competitor’s influence. Changes in competition may influence pricing policies in the future.

 

American Rebel has applied for patent protection on several items of its products, including the patent-pending Protection Pocket.

 

Market Opportunity

 

The Company believes it has identified an unmet need – Customers aren’t comfortable carrying a firearm holstered on their hip and they haven’t been introduced to a product that conceals the firearm properly, allows easy access to the firearm, and provides everyday value and utility for their daily routine. In addition, many potential customers would be interested in carrying a concealed firearm if they knew about a product that conceals the firearm properly, allows easy access to the firearm, and was their primary backpack for everyday use. These potential customers need to know the availability of our product and the steps they need to take to protect themselves, their family, their neighbors, or even a room full of total strangers.

 

The American Rebel Concealed Carry product line’s key selling feature is innovation, style, and brand. Its patent-pending Protection Pocket is an innovative advantage over the competition. American Rebel enjoys a first-to-market status with its current assortment of Concealed Carry Backpacks designed for everyday use. Product innovations and first-to-market status currently insulate the Company from competitors’ influence. The Company believes contact with its customers through its direct sales initiatives, its social media, and its profile at consumer trade shows will increase the relevancy of American Rebel products in the lives of its customers. Contact with its customers will also provide an excellent source of information for product performance and improvement and innovation.


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Market Strategy

 

The American Rebel brand strategy includes multiple pathways to success, all of which focus back to the Company’s core mission of providing innovative products and promoting responsible gun ownership while celebrating “The American Rebel Spirit” in all of us.

 

Superior designs, proprietary technology, and a unique marketing approach put American Rebel in a position to dominate the rapidly growing tactical/concealed carry market. American Rebel strongly supports the 2nd Amendment, and conveys a sense of responsibility to teach and preach good common practices of gun ownership. American Rebel products are designed to keep people safe, keep them aware, and give them the tools to defend and protect. “There’s a growing need to know how to protect yourself, your family, your neighbors or even a room full of total strangers,” says American Rebel’s CEO Andy Ross. “That need is in the forethought of every product we design.”

 

American Rebel directly benefits from the awareness and persona that founder Andy Ross has cultivated his entire life. His outdoorsman and adventurer status will serve the brand well as it addresses the customer through television, radio, and data-driven digital marketing initiatives. In addition, Andy has assembled a brand development team to guide the Company in its infancy. The team members are all tenured in their respective fields, and in total bring hundreds of years of experience to the brand and the Company.

 

American Rebel Concealed Carry products were designed due to the popularity of Andy Ross’s song “Cold Dead Hand” and Andy’s music continues to be an important part of American Rebel’s marketing and its connection with its customers. American Rebel utilizes social media to put its products in front of its customers and Andy’s music and television persona provide organic content to keep our social media “fans” and “followers” engaged.

 

American Rebel has applied for patent protection on several items of its products, including the patent-pending Protection Pocket. Product innovations and first-to-market status currently insulate the Company from competitor’s influence. Potential customers aren’t comfortable carrying a firearm holstered on their hip and they haven’t been introduced to a product that conceals the firearm properly, allows easy access to the firearm, and also provides everyday value for their daily routine.

 

Product and Technology

 

The American Rebel patent-pending Protection Pocket utilizes a sandwich concept to hold the firearm in place and positioned properly for quick and effective access. American Rebel Concealed Carry products are designed for everyday use while keeping you concealed and safe. In addition to the patent-pending Protection Pocket, American Rebel Concealed Carry Backpacks employ the finest materials available – Ripstop water-resistance fabric, YKK zippers and branded pull tabs, UTX branded clips. Practical design provides properly sized pockets for laptops and tablets, felt-lined pocket for sunglasses, compartments for cell phones, chargers, water bottles, and other daily needed accessories. American Rebel Concealed Carry Backpacks also contain a protected area for extra magazines and ammunition.

 

Future Markets

 

American Rebel Concealed Carry Backpacks are designed for everyday use and the popularity of backpacks today make the American Rebel Concealed Carry Backpack an easy choice for most prospective customers interested in a backpack for everyday use that offers added features and benefits to keep them concealed and safe. For prospective customers interested in a traditional briefcase or computer bag, American Rebel will soon have a solution. The American Rebel Constitution line of products will include jackets, backpacks, briefcases and carry bags that provide concealed carry capabilities targeting business professionals and entrepreneurs in both a business and business casual setting. The Constitution line will feature traditional business stylings in appearance while providing the innovative American Rebel features and benefits that keep the user concealed and safe.

 

Intellectual Property

 

American Rebel has applied for patent protection for many of its proprietary features, including its patent-pending Protection Pocket and SmartPhone app. Company CEO Andy Ross has experience with intellectual property and values the protection and value IP can provide a company. We have and generally plan to continue to enter into non-disclosure, confidentially and intellectual property assignment agreements with all new employees as a condition of employment. In addition, we intend to also generally enter into confidentiality and non-disclosure agreements with consultants, manufacturers’ representatives, distributors, suppliers and others to attempt to limit access to, use and disclosure of our proprietary information. There can be no assurance, however, that these agreements will provide meaningful protection or adequate remedies for our trade secrets in the event of unauthorized use or disclosure of such information.


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We also may from time to time rely on other intellectual property developed or acquired, including patents, technical innovations, laws of unfair competition and various other licensing agreements to provide our future growth and to build our competitive position. However, we can give no assurance that competitors will not infringe on our patent or other rights or otherwise create similar or non-infringing competing products that are technically patentable in their own right.

 

Research and Development

 

Our research and development programs are generally pursued by engineers and scientists employed by us or hired as consultants or through partnerships with industry leaders in manufacturing and design and researchers and academia. We are also working with subcontractors in developing specific components of our technologies. The primary objective of our research and development program is to advance the development of our existing and proposed products, to enhance the commercial value of such products.

 

Government Regulation

 

General

 

The right to bear arms is stated as the Second Amendment to the US Constitution and the trend of current laws and regulations is to reduce the burden on citizens desiring to bear arms. In spite of years of journalistic and public attention and debate, the United States has instituted few substantive changes in firearms policy over the past century. Opponents to increased gun control diluted a brief push by the Roosevelt administration in the 1930s and resulted in two minimalist federal statutes. A second effort to limit citizen’s access to firearms in the wake of the assassinations of John and Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King produced the Gun Control Act of 1968, which largely remains the primary federal law. This modest control effort was subsequently diluted by the Firearms Owners Protection Act of 1986. The Clinton administration passed the Brady Act, requiring background checks on purchases from licensed firearms dealers, and a law directed at “assault weapons,” which sunset after ten years. For the past two decades, policy activity has shifted to the state legislatures and the courts, where concealed carry laws have granted more access to firearms and the Second Amendment has been recognized as an individual and fundamental right. Entrenched opposition to gun control in Congress and state legislatures, well-organized institutional opposition, and constitutional constraints have limited the risk of increased gun restrictions for the foreseeable future. It is important to note, though, that public sentiment is subject to change and voters could demand greater restrictions on access to firearms and influence Congress and state legislatures to enact tougher gun access legislation; but that is not the current mood or trend.

 

In addition to the above, the only regulations we encounter are the regulations that are common to all businesses, such as employment legislation, implied warranty laws, and environmental, health and safety standards, to the extent applicable. We could also encounter in the future industry-specific government regulations that would govern our products. It is highly unlikely but there is a remote chance that it may become the case that regulatory approvals will be required for the design and manufacture of our products and proposed products.

 

Foreign Regulation and Markets

 

The right to bear arms as stated in the Second Amendment to the US Constitution is uniquely American and American Rebel is uniquely “American,” especially considering the benefit of the concealed carry characteristics of our products. That being said, the Company has been approached by an exporter who believes because American Rebel products are uniquely “American” that they may have a receptive audience in Asia. The Company is not anticipating any revenue from foreign markets but will explore any proposals to partner with any companies specializing in foreign markets. If any substantive opportunities develop, American Rebel will address any foreign regulations that require the Company’s adherence.

 

Quality Management System

 

As the Company grows, we may also need to establish a suitable and effective quality management system, which establishes controlled processes for our product design, manufacturing, and distribution. We have a consultant with access to our current manufacturing facilities and the Company currently enjoys an excellent relationship with our manufacturing sources. Our products are not limited to a single source and the Company has access to a vast network of potential manufacturers.

 

Employees

 

The Company currently utilizes consultants and individual contractors to advance its business objectives and intends to hire full-time employees to oversee day-to-day operations of the Company and with the consultants, support management, engineering, manufacturing, and administration. The Company has no unionized employees.


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Based on funding ability, the Company currently plans to hire 5 to 10 additional full-time employees within the next 12 months, whose principal responsibilities will be the support of our sales, marketing, research and development, and operational activities.

 

We consider relations with our consultants and contractors to be satisfactory.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

The following risk factors should be considered in connection with an evaluation of our business:

 

In addition to other information in this Report, the following risk factors should be carefully considered in evaluating our business because such factors may have a significant impact on our business, operating results, liquidity and financial condition. As a result of the risk factors set forth below, actual results could differ materially from those projected in any forward-looking statements. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us, or that we currently consider to be immaterial, may also impact our business, result of operations, liquidity and financial condition. If any such risks occur, our business, operating results, liquidity and financial condition could be materially affected in an adverse manner. Under such circumstances, if and when a trading market for our securities is established, the trading price of our securities could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.

 

OUR SECURITIES INVOLVE A HIGH DEGREE OF RISK AND, THEREFORE, SHOULD BE CONSIDERED EXTREMELY SPECULATIVE. THEY SHOULD NOT BE PURCHASED BY PERSONS WHO CANNOT AFFORD THE POSSIBILITY OF THE LOSS OF THE ENTIRE INVESTMENT.

 

COVID-19

 

The past, current and potential effects of coronavirus and future coronavirus variants may impact our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Actual or threatened epidemics, pandemics, outbreaks, or other public health crises could materially and adversely impact or disrupt our operations, adversely affect the local economies where we operate and negatively impact our customers’ spending in the impacted regions or depending upon the severity, globally, which could materially and adversely impact our business, results of operations and financial condition. For example, a strain of novel coronavirus (causing “COVD-19”) surfaced in China and has spread into the United States, Europe and most other countries of the world, resulting in certain supply chain disruptions, volatilities in the stock market, lower oil and other commodity prices due to diminished demand, massive unemployment, and lockdown on international travels, all of which has had an adverse impact on the global economy. There is significant uncertainty around the breadth and duration of the business disruptions related to COVID-19 and its variant strains, as well as its impact on the U.S. economy. Moreover, an epidemic, pandemic, outbreak or other public health crisis, such as COVID-19, could adversely affect our ability to adequately staff and manage our business. The extent to which COVID-19 or variants of COVID-19 impact our business, results of operations and financial condition will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain, rapidly changing and cannot be predicted, including new information that may emerge concerning the severity of COVID-19 and the actions taken to contain it or treat it.

 

Risks Related to the Business

 

American Rebel has limited financial resources. Our independent registered auditors’ report includes an explanatory paragraph stating that there is substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

As a result of our deficiency in working capital at December 31, 2020 and other factors, our auditors have included a paragraph in their audit report regarding substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. Our plans in this regard are to increase product sales, increase production, obtain inventory financing, seek strategic alternatives and to seek additional capital through future equity private placements or debt facilities.

 

We have recorded net losses since inception and have significant accumulated deficits. We have relied upon loans and equity financings for operating capital. Total revenues will be insufficient to pay off existing debt and fund operations. We may be required to rely on further debt financing, further loans from related parties, and private placements of our common and preferred stock for our additional cash needs. Such funding sources may not be available, or the terms of such funding sources may not be acceptable to the Company.


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Our indebtedness could adversely affect our business and limit our ability to plan for or respond to changes in our business, and we may be unable to generate sufficient cash flow to satisfy significant debt service obligations.

 

As of December 31, 2020, our consolidated indebtedness was $6,133,800, with approximately $914,189 due to related parties. Our indebtedness could have important consequences, including the following:

 

·increasing our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions; 

 

·reducing the availability of our cash flow for other purposes; 

 

·limiting our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the industries in which we operate, which would place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that may have less debt; and 

 

·having a material adverse effect on our business if we fail to comply with the covenants in our debt agreements, because such failure could result in an event of default that, if not cured or waived, could result in all or a substantial amount of our indebtedness becoming immediately due and payable. 

 

Further, a significant portion of our current indebtedness is in default, which subjects us to potential litigation, increased fees and expenses, increased interest rates and other potential damages.

 

Our ability to repay our significant indebtedness will depend on our ability to generate cash, whether through cash from operations or cash raised through the issuance of additional equity-based securities. To a certain extent, our ability to generate cash is subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory, and other factors that are beyond our control. If our business does not generate sufficient cash flow from operations or if future equity financings are not available to us in amounts sufficient to enable us to fund our liquidity needs, our financial condition and operating results may be adversely affected. If we cannot make scheduled principal and interest payments on our debt obligations in the future, we may need to refinance all or a portion of our indebtedness on or before maturity, sell assets, delay capital expenditures, cease operations or seek additional equity.

 

Despite the Company’s indebtedness levels, we are able to incur substantially more debt. This could further increase the risks associated with its leverage.

 

The Company may incur substantial additional indebtedness in the future. Although, certain terms of current debt agreements do prohibit us from doing so. To the extent that the Company incurs additional indebtedness, the risks associated with its substantial indebtedness describe above, including its possible inability to service its debt, will increase.

 

A significant portion of our current debt is in default, which may subject us to litigation by the debt holders.

 

As of December 31, 2020, we only had cash and cash equivalents of $60,899 and had a significant amount of short-term debt in default. The short-term debt agreements provide legal remedies for satisfaction of defaults, including increased interest rates, default fees and other financial penalties. As of the date of this Annual Report none of the lenders have pursued their legal remedies, although a lender has sent us a demand letter and threatened litigation. Management’s plan is to raise additional funds in the form of debt or equity in order to continue to fund losses until such time as revenues are able to sustain the Company. To date, the main source of funding has been through the issuance of debt securities. There is no assurance that management will be successful in being able to continue to obtain additional funding or defend potential litigation by note holders.

 

We will need additional capital in the future to finance our planned growth, which we may not be able to raise or it may only be available on terms unfavorable to us or our stockholders, which may result in our inability to fund our working capital requirements and harm our operational results.

 

We have and expect to continue to have substantial working capital needs. Our cash on hand, together with cash generated from product sales, services, cash equivalents and short-term investments will not meet our working capital and capital expenditure requirements for the next twelve months. In fact, we will be required to raise additional funds throughout 2021 or we will need to limit operations until such time as we can raise substantial funds to meet our working capital needs. In addition, we will need to raise additional funds to fund our operations and implement our growth strategy, or to respond to competitive pressures and/or perceived opportunities, such as investment, acquisition, marketing and development activities.


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If we experience operating difficulties or other factors, many of which may be beyond our control, cause our revenues or cash flows from operations, if any, to decrease, we may be limited in our ability to spend the capital necessary to complete our development, marketing and growth programs. We require additional financing, in addition to anticipated cash generated from our operations, to fund our working capital requirements. Additional financing might not be available on terms favorable to us, or at all. If adequate funds were not available or were not available on acceptable terms, our ability to fund our operations, take advantage of unanticipated opportunities, develop or enhance our business or otherwise respond to competitive pressures would be significantly limited. In such a capital restricted situation, we may curtail our marketing, development, and operational activities or be forced to sell some of our assets on an untimely or unfavorable basis.

 

We are highly dependent on our officers and directors. The loss of any of them, whose knowledge, leadership and technical expertise upon which we rely, could harm our ability to execute our business plan.

 

Our success depends heavily upon the continued contributions of our current officers and directors, whose knowledge, leadership and technical expertise may be difficult to replace at this stage in our business development, and on our ability to retain and attract experienced experts, and other technical and professional staff. If we were to lose the services of our officers or directors, our ability to execute our business plan would be harmed and we may be forced to limit operations until such time as we could hire suitable replacements.

 

At this stage of our business operations, even with our good faith efforts, potential investors have an increased probability of losing their entire investment.

 

Because the nature of our business is expected to change as a result of shifts in the industries in which we operate, competition, and the development of new and improved technology, management forecasts are not necessarily indicative of future operations and should not be relied upon as an indication of future performance. Further, we have raised substantial debt and equity to fund our business operations, which to date have generated insufficient revenue to support our working capital needs.

 

While Management believes its estimates of projected occurrences and events are within the timetable of its business plan, our actual results may differ substantially from those that are currently anticipated. If our revenues do not increase to a level to support our working capital needs, we will be forced to seek equity capital to fund our operations and repay our substantial debt balances, which may not be available to us at all or on acceptable terms.

 

The Company has a limited operating history upon which investors can evaluate our future prospects.

 

The Company has a limited operating history upon which an evaluation of its business plan or performance and prospects can be made. The business and prospects of the Company must be considered in the light of the potential problems, delays, uncertainties and complications encountered in connection with a newly established business and creating a new line of products. The risks include, but are not limited to, the possibility that we will not be able to develop functional and scalable products, or that although functional and scalable, our products and will not be economical to market; that our competitors hold proprietary rights that preclude us from marketing such products; that our competitors market a superior or equivalent product; that our competitors have such a significant advantage in brand recognition that our products will not be considered by potential customers; that we are not able to upgrade and enhance our technologies and products to accommodate new features as the market evolves; or the failure to receive necessary regulatory clearances for our products. To successfully introduce and market our products at a profit, we must establish brand name recognition and competitive advantages for our products. There are no assurances that we can successfully address these challenges. If it is unsuccessful, we and our business, financial condition and operating results could be materially and adversely affected.

 

The current and future expense levels are based largely on estimates of planned operations and future revenues rather than experience. It is difficult to accurately forecast future revenues because our business is new and our market is rapidly developing. If our forecasts prove incorrect, the business, operating results and financial condition of the Company will be materially and adversely affected. Moreover, we may be unable to adjust our spending in a timely manner to compensate for any unanticipated reduction in revenue. As a result, any significant reduction in revenues would immediately and adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results.

 

We have had limited revenues since inception, and we cannot predict when we will achieve profitability.

 

American Rebel has not been profitable and cannot predict when or if we will achieve profitability. We have experienced net losses and have had limited revenues since our inception in December 2014. We do not anticipate generating significant revenues until we successfully develop, commercialize and sell our existing and proposed products, of which we can give no assurance. We are unable to determine when we will generate significant revenues, if any, from the sale of any of such products.


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We cannot predict when we will achieve profitability, if ever. Our inability to become profitable may force us to curtail or temporarily discontinue our research and development programs and our day-to-day operations. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that profitability, if achieved, can be sustained on an ongoing basis. As of December 31, 2020, we had an accumulated deficit of $20,870,713.

 

We may not meet our product development and commercialization milestones.

 

We have established milestones, based upon our expectations regarding our technologies at that time, which we use to assess our progress toward developing our products. These milestones relate to technology and design improvements as well as to dates for achieving development goals. If our products exhibit technical defects or are unable to meet cost or performance goals, our commercialization schedule could be delayed and potential purchasers of our initial commercial products may decline to purchase such products or may opt to pursue alternative products.

 

We may also experience shortages of raw materials and labor due to manufacturing difficulties. Our manufacturing operations could be disrupted by fire, earthquake or other natural disasters, a labor-related disruption, failure in supply or other logistical channels, electrical outages or other reasons. If there were a disruption to manufacturing facilities, we would be unable to manufacture products until we have restored and re-qualified our manufacturing capability or developed alternative manufacturing facilities.

 

Generally, we have made advances meeting our milestone schedules as our entire Concealed Carry product line was introduced at the 2017 NRA Convention. We can give no assurance that our commercialization schedule will continue to be met as we further develop other proposed products.

 

Our Business is dependent on introducing our products to potential customers interested in concealed carry goods and if we fail to properly introduce our products to these potential customers, our revenue could fail to grow and could decrease.

 

The Company enjoyed rapid acceptance of its brand and products during the 2017 NRA Convention, but a significant risk exists that the Company will be able to reach potential customers through the remainder of the year outside of the NRA Convention. To reach potential customers the Company will employ social media awareness campaigns and remarket the Company’s products to potential customers who show any interest in the Company’s goods. There can be no assurance the Company will effectively employ social media awareness campaigns to reach potential customers. The Company will also create video content to educate potential customers about its products. There can be no assurance the Company will be effective at creating effective video content and there can also be no assurance the Company will efficiently reach potential customers.

 

We are subject to potential governmental regulations relating to access to firearms.

 

Our products are designed to properly carry a concealed firearm. Federal or state laws and regulations could be adopted to limit our ability to sell our products. Our products may have to be altered or have features removed to obtain compliance with laws and regulations. There can be no assurance that the current trend that limits additional restrictions on access to firearms will continue.

 

If we are not able to both obtain and maintain adequate levels of investment, it would have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

A new business selling products requires capital investment to research and develop the new products. Capital investment is required to create awareness of the new business’s products and market the new business’s products. If the Company is unable to obtain and maintain adequate levels of capital investment, the Company will be unable to manufacture its inventory and market its inventory to grow its revenues and establish its brand.

 

Product defects could adversely affect the results of our operations.

 

The design, manufacture and marketing of our products involve certain inherent risks. Manufacturing or design defects, unanticipated use of our products, or inadequate disclosure of risks relating to the use of our products can lead to injury or other adverse events. The Company may not properly anticipate customer applications of our products and our products may fail to survive such unanticipated customer use. If the Company’s products fail to adequately perform to meet the customer’s expectations, the customer may demand refunds or replacements which will negatively affect the Company’s profitability.

 

We could be exposed to significant liability claims if we are unable to obtain insurance at acceptable costs and adequate levels or otherwise protect ourselves against potential product liability claims.

 

The Company’s products support the use and access to firearms and if the Company’s products are ineffective the Company could require protection against potential product liability claims.


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We require additional capital to support our present business plan and our anticipated business growth, and such capital may not be available on acceptable terms, or at all, which would adversely affect our ability to operate.

 

We will require additional funds to further develop our business plan. Based on our current operating plans, we require a minimum of $6 million to fund our planned operations necessary to effectively introduce our brand and products into the market. We can give no assurance that we will be successful in raising any funds. Additionally, if we are unable to generate sufficient revenues from our operating activities, we may need to raise additional funds through equity offerings or otherwise in order to meet our expected future liquidity requirements, including to introduce our other planned products or to pursue new product opportunities. Any such financing that we undertake will likely be dilutive to current stockholders and you.

 

We intend to continue to make investments to support our business growth, including patent or other intellectual property asset creation. In addition, we may also need additional funds to respond to business opportunities and challenges, including our ongoing operating expenses, protecting our intellectual property, satisfying debt payment obligations, developing new lines of business and enhancing our operating infrastructure. While we may need to seek additional funding for such purposes, we may not be able to obtain financing on acceptable terms, or at all. In addition, the terms of our financings may be dilutive to, or otherwise adversely affect, holders of its common stock. We may also seek additional funds through arrangements with collaborators or other third parties. We may not be able to negotiate any such arrangements on acceptable terms, if at all. If we are unable to obtain additional funding on a timely basis, we may be required to curtail or terminate some or all of our business plans.

 

We cannot predict our future capital needs and we may not be able to secure additional financing.

 

We will need to raise additional funds in the future to fund our working capital needs and to fund further expansion of our business. We may require additional equity or debt financings, collaborative arrangements with corporate partners or funds from other sources for these purposes. No assurance can be given that necessary funds will be available for us to finance our development on acceptable terms, if at all. Furthermore, such additional financings may involve substantial dilution of our stockholders or may require that we relinquish rights to certain of our technologies or products. In addition, we may experience operational difficulties and delays due to working capital restrictions. If adequate funds are not available from operations or additional sources of financing, we may have to delay or scale back our growth plans.

 

The results of our research and development efforts are uncertain and there can be no assurance of the commercial success of our products.

 

We believe that we will need to incur additional research and development expenditures to continue development of our existing proposed products as well as research and development expenditures to develop new products. The products we are developing and may develop in the future may not be successful. In addition, the length of our product and service development cycle may be greater than we originally expected and we may experience delays in product development. If our resulting products and services are not technologically successful, they may not achieve market acceptance or compete effectively with our competitors’ products and services.

 

If we fail to retain certain of our key personnel and attract and retain additional qualified personnel, we might not be able to pursue our growth strategy.

 

Our future success will depend upon the continued service of Andy Ross, our President and Chief Executive Officer. Although we believe that our relationship with him is positive, there can be no assurance that his services will continue to be available to us in the future. We do not carry key man life insurance policies on Mr. Ross at this time.

 

The impact of our patent applications may be limited.

 

There can be no assurance that we will be successful at obtaining patent protection for our features for which we have applied for patent protection. If we are unsuccessful at obtaining patent protection, we may suffer from competitors copying our features that distinguish our products.


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We will not be profitable unless we can demonstrate that our products can be manufactured at low prices.

 

To date, we have manufactured our products in limited volume. As the Company creates demand for its products, our projections require the benefit of volume discounts as we increase the size of our order. We can offer no assurance that either we or our manufacturing partners will develop efficient, automated, low-cost manufacturing capabilities and processes to meet the quality, price, engineering, design and production standards or production volumes required to successfully mass market our products. Even if we or our manufacturing partners are successful in developing such manufacturing capability and processes, we do not know whether we or they will be timely in meeting our product commercialization schedule or the production and delivery requirements of potential customers. A failure to develop such manufacturing processes and capabilities could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial results.

 

Our profitability in part is dependent on material and other manufacturing costs. We are unable to offer any assurance that either we or a manufacturing partner will be able to reduce costs to a level which will allow production of a competitive product or that any product produced using lower cost materials and manufacturing processes will not suffer from a reduction in performance, reliability and longevity.

 

Our dependence on a limited number of suppliers may prevent us from delivering our devices on a timely basis.

 

We currently rely on a limited number of suppliers of our products. If these suppliers became unable to provide products in the volumes needed or at an acceptable price, we would have to identify and qualify acceptable replacements from alternative sources of supply. The process of qualifying suppliers is lengthy. Delays or interruptions in the supply of our requirements could limit or stop our ability to provide sufficient quantities of products on a timely basis, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our financial results may be affected by tariffs or border adjustment taxes or other import restrictions.

 

Our current supplier has facilities both in China and Mexico and the imposition of tariffs or border adjustment taxes may affect our financial results. The current political climate is hostile to companies manufacturing goods outside of the US. At the current manufacturing levels, it is impractical to seek manufacturing facilities in the US as US manufacturers are unable to meet or even approach the cost of manufacturing small quantities of custom-made goods. American Rebel is searching for a US-based manufacturer that can produce its goods once higher quantity orders are required by product demand.

 

We may not be successful in hiring personnel because of the competitive market for qualified people.

 

The Company's future success depends largely on its ability to attract, hire, train and retain highly qualified personnel to provide the Company's services. Competition for such personnel may be intense. There can be no assurance that the Company will be successful in attracting and retaining the specific personnel it requires to conduct and expand its operations successfully or to differentiate itself from its competitors. The Company's results of operations and growth prospects could be materially adversely affected if the Company was unable to attract, hire, train and retain such qualified personnel.

 

Fluctuations in our financial results make quarterly comparisons and financial forecasting difficult.

 

The Company's future or projected quarterly operating results may vary and reduced levels of earnings or continued losses may be experienced in one or more quarters. Fluctuations in the Company's quarterly operating results could result from a variety of factors, including changes in the levels of revenues, the size and timing of orders, changes in the mix of future products, the timing of new offerings by the Company or its competitors, changes in pricing policies by the Company or its competitors, market acceptance of new and enhanced products or services offered by the Company or its competitors, changes in operating expenses, availability of qualified personnel, disruption in sources of related product and services, the effect of potential acquisitions and industry and general economic factors. The Company will have limited or no control over many of these factors. The Company's expenses we believe will be based upon, in part, on its expectation as to future or projected revenues. If revenue levels are below expectations, operating results are likely to be adversely affected.

 

Because of these fluctuations and uncertainties, our future operating results may fail to meet the expectations of investors. If this happens, any trading price of our common stock could be materially adversely affected.


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We are subject to the periodic reporting requirements of Section 15(d) and 12(g) of the Exchange Act that require us to incur audit fees and legal fees in connection with the preparation of such reports. These additional costs could reduce or eliminate our ability to earn a profit.

 

We are required to file periodic reports with the SEC pursuant to the Exchange Act and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder. In order to comply with these requirements, our independent registered public accounting firm will have to review our financial statements on a quarterly basis and audit our financial statements on an annual basis. Moreover, our legal counsel will have to review and assist in the preparation of such reports. The costs charged by these professionals for such services cannot be accurately predicted at this time because factors such as the number and type of transactions that we engage in and the complexity of our reports cannot be determined at this time and will affect the amount of time to be spent by our auditors and attorneys. However, the incurrence of such costs will obviously be an expense to our operations and thus have a negative effect on our ability to meet our overhead requirements and earn a profit.

 

However, for as long as we remain an “emerging growth company” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or JOBS Act, we may take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not “emerging growth companies” including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements of holding an annual nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and seeking nonbinding stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. We may take advantage of these reporting exemptions until we are no longer an “emerging growth company.”

 

We will remain an “emerging growth company” for up to five years, although we would cease to be an “emerging growth company” prior to such time if we have more than $1.0 billion in annual revenue, more than $700 million in market value of our common stock is held by non-affiliates or we issue more than $1.0 billion of non-convertible debt over a three-year period.

 

If we cannot provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, our business and operating results could be harmed, investors could lose confidence in our reported financial information, and the trading price of our common stock, if a market ever develops, could drop significantly.

 

Our internal controls may be inadequate, which could cause our financial reporting to be unreliable and lead to misinformation being disseminated to the public.

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over our financial reporting. As defined in Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(f), internal control over financial reporting is a process designed by, or under the supervision of, the principal executive and principal financial officer and effected by the Board of Directors, management and other personnel, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and includes those policies and procedures that:

 

·pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the Company; 

 

·provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and that receipts and expenditures of the Company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and/or directors of the Company; and 

 

·provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the Company's assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements. 

 

Our internal controls may be inadequate or ineffective, which could cause financial reporting to be unreliable and lead to misinformation being disseminated to the public. Investors relying upon this misinformation may make an uninformed investment decision.

 

Failure to achieve and maintain an effective internal control environment could cause us to face regulatory action and also cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information, either of which could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, results of operations and future prospects.

 

However, our auditors will not be required to formally attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 until we are no longer an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS Act if we take advantage of the exemptions available to us through the JOBS Act.


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The costs of being a public company could result in us being unable to continue as a going concern.

 

As a public company, we are required to comply with numerous financial reporting and legal requirements, including those pertaining to audits and internal control. The costs of maintaining public company reporting requirements could be significant and may preclude us from seeking financing or equity investment on terms acceptable to us and our shareholders. We estimate these costs to be in excess of $100,000 per year and may be higher if our business volume or business activity increases significantly. Our current estimate of costs does not include the necessary expenses associated with compliance, documentation and specific reporting requirements of Section 404 as we will not be subject to the full reporting requirements of Section 404 until we exceed $700 million in market capitalization or we decide to opt-out of the “emerging growth company” as defined under the JOBS Act. This exemption is available to us under the JOBS Act or until we have been public for more than five years.

 

If our revenues are insufficient or non-existent, and/or we cannot satisfy many of these costs through the issuance of shares or debt, we may be unable to satisfy these costs in the normal course of business. This would certainly result in our being unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Risks Related to our Common Stock

 

Persons who purchase shares of our common stock may lose their money without us ever being able to develop a market.

 

In the event that no market to purchase our common shares is ever created, it is likely that the entire investment of a purchaser in our common stock would be lost.

 

Shareholders may be diluted significantly through our efforts to obtain financing and satisfy obligations through issuance of additional shares.

 

We do not have any committed sources of financing. Our Board of Directors has authority, without action or vote of the shareholders, to issue all or part of the authorized (100,000,000) shares but unissued (20,533,437) shares. In addition, if a trading market ever develops for our common stock, we may attempt to raise additional capital by selling shares, possibly at a deep discount to market. These actions will result in dilution of the ownership interests of existing shareholders, further dilute common stock book value, and that dilution may be material.

 

The interests of shareholders may be hurt because we can issue shares to individuals or entities that support existing management with such issuances serving to enhance existing management’s ability to maintain control of our company.

 

Our Board of Directors has authority, without action or vote of the shareholders, to issue all or part of the authorized but unissued common shares. Such issuances may be issued to parties or entities committed to supporting existing management and the interests of existing management which may not be the same as the interests of other shareholders. Our ability to issue shares without shareholder approval serves to enhance existing management’s ability to maintain control of our company.

 

Our articles of incorporation provide for indemnification of officers and directors at our expense and limit their liability that may result in a major cost to us and hurt the interests of our shareholders because corporate resources may be expended for the benefit of officers and directors.

 

Our Articles of Incorporation at Article XI provide for indemnification as follows: “No director or officer of the corporation shall be personally liable to the corporation or any of its stockholders for damages for breach of fiduciary duty as a director or officer; provided, however, that the foregoing provision shall not eliminate or limit the liability of a director or officer: (i) for acts or omissions which involve intentional misconduct, fraud or knowing violation of law; or (ii) the payment of dividends in violation of Section 78.300 of the Nevada Revised Statutes. Any repeal or modification of an Article by the stockholders of the corporation shall be prospective only, and shall not adversely affect any limitation of the personal liability of a director or officer of the corporation for acts or omissions prior to such repeal or modification”.

 

We have been advised that, in the opinion of the SEC, indemnification for liabilities arising under federal securities laws is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act of 1933 and is, therefore, unenforceable. In the event that a claim for indemnification for liabilities arising under federal securities laws, other than the payment by us of expenses incurred or paid by a director, officer or controlling person in the successful defense of any action, suit or proceeding, is asserted by a director, officer or controlling person in connection with our activities, we will (unless in the opinion of our counsel, the matter has been settled by controlling precedent) submit to a court of appropriate jurisdiction, the question whether indemnification by us is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and will be governed by the final adjudication of such issue. The legal process relating to this matter if it were to occur is likely to be very costly and may result in us receiving negative publicity, either of which factors is likely to materially reduce the market and price for our shares, if such a market ever develops.


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There is a limited trading market for our shares of common stock on the OTC Market. You may not be able to sell your shares of common stock if you need money.

 

Our common stock is traded on the OTC Market, an inter-dealer automated quotation system for equity securities. There has been limited trading activity in our common stock, and when it has traded, the price has fluctuated widely. We consider our common stock to be “thinly traded” and any last reported sale prices might not be a true market-based valuation of the common stock. Stockholders may experience difficulty selling their shares if they choose to do so because of the illiquid market and limited public float for our common stock.

 

Because our common stock is deemed a low-priced “Penny” stock, an investment in our common stock should be considered high risk and subject to marketability restrictions.

 

Since our common stock is a penny stock, as defined in Rule 3a51-1 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, it will be more difficult for investors to liquidate their investment even if and when a market develops for the common stock. Until the trading price of the common stock rises above $5.00 per share, if ever, trading in the common stock is subject to the penny stock rules of the Securities Exchange Act specified in rules 15g-1 through 15g-10. Those rules require broker-dealers, before effecting transactions in any penny stock, to:

 

·Deliver to the customer, and obtain a written receipt for, a disclosure document; 

 

·Disclose certain price information about the stock; 

 

·Disclose the amount of compensation received by the broker-dealer or any associated person of the broker-dealer; 

 

·Send monthly statements to customers with market and price information about the penny stock; and 

 

·In some circumstances, approve the purchaser’s account under certain standards and deliver written statements to the customer with information specified in the rules. 

 

Consequently, the penny stock rules may restrict the ability or willingness of broker-dealers to sell the common stock and may affect the ability of holders to sell their common stock in the secondary market and the price at which such holders can sell any such securities. These additional procedures could also limit our ability to raise additional capital in the future.

 

Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”) sales practice requirements may limit a shareholder’s ability to buy and sell our common shares.

 

In addition to the “penny stock” rules described above, FINRA has adopted rules that require that in recommending an investment to a customer, a broker-dealer must have reasonable grounds for believing that the investment is suitable for that customer. Prior to recommending speculative low-priced securities to their non-institutional customers, broker-dealers must make reasonable efforts to obtain information about the customer’s financial status, tax status, investment objectives and other information. Under interpretations of these rules, FINRA believes that there is a high probability that speculative low-priced securities will not be suitable for at least some customers. FINRA requirements make it more difficult for broker-dealers to recommend that their customers buy our common stock, which may limit your ability to buy and sell our stock and have an adverse effect on the market for our shares.

 

If we fail to maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting, then the price of our common stock may be adversely affected.

 

Our internal control over financial reporting may have weaknesses and conditions that could require correction or remediation, the disclosure of which may have an adverse impact on the price of our common stock. We are required to establish and maintain appropriate internal controls over financial reporting. Failure to establish those controls, or any failure of those controls once established, could adversely affect our public disclosures regarding our business, prospects, financial condition or results of operations. In addition, management’s assessment of internal controls over financial reporting may identify weaknesses and conditions that need to be addressed in our internal controls over financial reporting or other matters that may raise concerns for investors. Any actual or perceived weaknesses and conditions that need to be addressed in our internal control over financial reporting or disclosure of management’s assessment of our internal controls over financial reporting may have an adverse impact on the price of our common stock.

 


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Transfers of our securities may be restricted by virtue of state securities “blue sky” laws that prohibit trading absent compliance with individual state laws. These restrictions may make it difficult or impossible to sell shares in those states.

 

Transfers of our common stock may be restricted under the securities or securities regulation laws promulgated by various states and foreign jurisdictions, commonly referred to as “blue sky” laws. Absent compliance with such individual state laws, our common stock may not be traded in such jurisdictions. Because the securities registered hereunder have not been registered for resale under the blue sky laws of any state, the holders of such shares and persons who desire to purchase them should be aware that there may be significant state blue sky law restrictions upon the ability of investors to sell the securities and of purchasers to purchase the securities. These restrictions may prohibit the secondary trading of our common stock. Investors should consider the secondary market for our securities to be a limited one.

 

The market for penny stocks has experienced numerous frauds and abuses that could adversely impact investors in our stock.

 

Company management believes that the market for penny stocks has suffered from patterns of fraud and abuse. Such patterns include:

 

·Control of the market for the security by one or a few broker-dealers that are often related to the promoter or issuer; 

 

·Manipulation of prices through prearranged matching of purchases and sales and false and misleading press releases; 

 

·“Boiler room” practices involving high-pressure sales tactics and unrealistic price projections by sales- persons; 

 

·Excessive and undisclosed bid-ask differentials and markups by selling broker-dealers; and 

 

·Wholesale dumping of the same securities by promoters and broker-dealers after prices have been manipulated to a desired level, along with the inevitable collapse of those prices with consequent investor losses. 

 

Our board of directors has the authority, without stockholder approval, to issue preferred stock with terms that may not be beneficial to common stockholders and with the ability to affect adversely stockholder voting power and perpetuate their control over us.

 

Our Articles of Incorporation allow us to issue shares of preferred stock without any vote or further action by our stockholders. Our Board of Directors has the authority to fix and determine the relative rights and preferences of preferred stock. Our Board of Directors has the authority to issue preferred stock without further stockholder approval, including large blocks of preferred stock. As a result, our Board of Directors could authorize the issuance of a series of preferred stock that would grant to holders the preferred right to our assets upon liquidation, the right to receive dividend payments before dividends are distributed to the holders of common stock and the right to the redemption of the shares, together with a premium, prior to the redemption of our common stock. We do not expect to pay cash dividends in the foreseeable future.

 

We have never paid cash dividends on our common stock. We do not expect to pay cash dividends on our common stock at any time in the foreseeable future. The future payment of dividends directly depends upon our future earnings, capital requirements, financial requirements and other factors that our Board of Directors will consider. Since we do not anticipate paying cash dividends on our common stock, return on your investment, if any, will depend solely on an increase, if any, in the market value of our common stock.

 

We are an “emerging growth company” and cannot be certain whether the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to emerging growth companies will make our common stock less attractive to investors.

 

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act, and we may take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not “emerging growth companies” including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements of holding an annual non-binding advisory vote on executive compensation and nonbinding stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. We cannot predict if investors will find our common stock less attractive because we will rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our common stock and our stock price may be more volatile.


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In addition, Section 107 of the JOBS Act provides that an “emerging growth company” can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. In other words, an “emerging growth company” can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. However, we are choosing to “opt out” of such extended transition period, and as a result, we will comply with new or revised accounting standards on the relevant dates on which adoption of such standards is required for non-emerging growth companies. Section 107 of the JOBS Act provides that our decision to opt out of the extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards is irrevocable.

 

Because we are not subject to compliance with rules requiring the adoption of certain corporate governance measures, our stockholders have limited protection against interested director transactions, conflicts of interest and similar matters.

 

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as well as rule changes proposed and enacted by the SEC, the New York and American Stock Exchanges and the NASDAQ Stock Market, as a result of Sarbanes-Oxley, require the implementation of various measures relating to corporate governance. These measures are designed to enhance the integrity of corporate management and the securities markets and apply to securities that are listed on those exchanges or the NASDAQ Stock Market. Because we are not presently required to comply with many of the corporate governance provisions and because we chose to avoid incurring the substantial additional costs associated with such compliance any sooner than legally required, we have not yet adopted these measures.

 

Because only one of our directors is independent, we do not currently have independent audit or compensation committees. As a result, our directors have the ability, among other things, to determine their own level of compensation. Until we comply with such corporate governance measures, regardless of whether such compliance is required, the absence of such standards of corporate governance may leave our stockholders without protections against interested director transactions, conflicts of interest, if any, and similar matters and investors may be reluctant to provide us with funds necessary to expand our operations.

 

We intend to comply with all corporate governance measures relating to director independence as and when required. However, we may find it very difficult or be unable to attract and retain qualified officers, directors and members of board committees required to provide for our effective management as a result of Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. The enactment of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 has resulted in a series of rules and regulations by the SEC that increase responsibilities and liabilities of directors and executive officers. The perceived increased personal risk associated with these recent changes may make it more costly or deter qualified individuals from accepting these roles. The perceived increased personal risk associated with these recent changes may make it more costly or deter qualified individuals from accepting these roles. Some of these corporate governance measures have been metered by the JOBS Act of 2012.

 

We have the ability to issue additional shares of our common stock and shares of preferred stock without obtaining stockholder approval, which could cause your investment to be diluted.

 

Our Articles of incorporation authorizes the Board of Directors to issue up to 100,000,000 shares of common stock and up to 1,000,000 shares of preferred stock, of which we have designated 100,000 shares as Series A. The power of the Board of Directors to issue shares of common stock, preferred stock or warrants or options to purchase shares of common stock or preferred stock is generally not subject to stockholder approval. Accordingly, any additional issuance of our common stock, or preferred stock that may be convertible into common stock, may have the effect of diluting your investment. Along these lines, at December 31, 2019 we had approximately 43.1 million shares of common stock outstanding and ended 2020 with approximately 72.8 million shares outstanding, an increase of 1.7 times. In addition, as of March 31, 2021 we had approximately 76.7 million shares outstanding.

 

Our Board of Directors has issued Series B Preferred Stock with voting terms that may not be beneficial to common stockholders and has the ability to affect adversely stockholder voting power and allows our current management to perpetuate their control over us.

 

Our Articles of Incorporation allow us to issue shares of preferred stock without any vote or further action by our stockholders. Along these lines, our Board of Directors authorized 100,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock, which were issued to two members of our current management (Messrs. Ross and Grau). These shares have superior voting rights (1,000 to 1) over shares of our Common Stock. Further, our Board of Directors has the ability to fix and determine the relative rights and preferences of additional series of preferred stock. Our Board of Directors has the authority to issue additional series of preferred stock without further stockholder approval, including large blocks of preferred stock that would grant to the holders the preferred right to our assets upon liquidation, the right to receive dividend payments before dividends are distributed to the holders of common stock, superior voting or conversion rights and the right to the redemption of the shares, together with a premium, prior to the redemption of our common stock.


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By issuing preferred stock, we may be able to delay, defer or prevent a change of control.

 

We are authorized to issue a total of 1,000,000 shares of “blank check” preferred stock and have issued: 100,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock (which contain voting rights of 1,000-to-1). Our Board of Directors can determine the rights, preferences, privileges, and restrictions granted to, or imposed upon, the shares of preferred stock and to fix the number of shares constituting any series and the designation of such series. It is possible that our Board of Directors, in determining the rights, preferences and privileges to be granted when the preferred stock is issued, may include provisions that have the effect of delaying, deferring, or preventing a change in control, discouraging bids for our common stock at a premium over the market price, or that adversely affect the market price of and the voting and other rights of the holders of our common stock.

 

Future sales of our common stock may result in a decrease in the market price of our common stock, even if our business is doing well.

 

The market price of our common stock could drop due to sales of a large number of shares of our common stock in the market or the perception that such sales could occur. This could make it more difficult to raise funds through future offerings of common stock.

 

Our articles of incorporation and bylaws contain provisions that could discourage an acquisition or change of control of us.

 

Our articles of incorporation authorize our Board of Directors to issue preferred stock and common stock without stockholder approval. If our board of directors’ elects to issue preferred stock, it could be more difficult for a third party to acquire control of us. In addition, provisions of the articles of incorporation and bylaws could also make it more difficult for a third party to acquire control of us.

 

Increased dealer compensation could adversely affect our stock price.

 

The dealer’s spread (the difference between the bid and ask prices) may be large and may result in substantial losses to the seller of shares of our common stock may incur an immediate “paper” loss due to the price spread. Moreover, dealers trading on the OTC Market may not have a bid price for shares of our common stock on the OTC Market. Due to the foregoing, demand for shares of our common stock on the OTC Market may be decreased or eliminated.

 

Risks Related to Our Industry

 

The industry in which we operate is competitive, price sensitive and subject to risks of governmental regulations or laws. If our competitors are better able to develop and market products that are more effective, less costly, easier to use, or are otherwise more attractive, we may be unable to compete effectively with other companies.

 

The concealed carry and tactical goods industry is characterized by intense competition. We will face competition on the basis of product features, price, services, apparent value, and other factors. Competitors may include large apparel makers and other companies, some of which have significantly greater financial and marketing resources than we do, and firms that are more specialized than we are with respect to particular markets. Our competition may respond more quickly to new or emerging styles, undertake more extensive marketing campaigns, have greater financial, marketing and other resources than ours or may be more successful in attracting potential customers, employees and strategic partners.

 

Our competitive position will depend on multiple, complex factors, including our ability to achieve market acceptance for our products, develop new products, implement production and marketing plans, and protect our intellectual property. The development of new or improved products, processes or technologies by other companies may render our products or proposed products obsolete or less competitive. The entry into the market of manufacturers located in low-cost manufacturing locations may also create pricing pressure, particularly in developing markets. Our future success depends, among other things, upon our ability to compete effectively against current providers, as well as to respond effectively to changes in popular styles and customer requirements, and upon our ability to successfully implement our marketing strategies and execute our research and development plan. Our research and development efforts are aimed, in part, at solving increasingly complex opportunities, as well as creating new products, and we do not expect that all of our projects will be successful. If our research and development efforts are unsuccessful, our future results of operations could be materially harmed.


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We face competition from other accessory and apparel manufacturers that focus on similar markets.

 

We face competition from companies that also focus on the concealed carry and tactical market that we have chosen to enter. These companies have longer operating histories and may have greater name recognition and substantially greater financial, technical and marketing resources than us. Many of these companies also have existing and established products, and more extensive customer bases, broader customer relationships and broader industry alliances than us, including relationships with many of our potential customers. Increased competition from any of these sources could result in our failure to achieve and maintain an adequate level of customers and market share to support the cost of our operations.

 

Our industry could experience greater scrutiny and regulation by governmental authorities, which may lead to greater governmental regulation in the future.

 

There is such rapid interest in new concealed carry products that this rapidly growing market may get the attention of government regulators and legislators. The current trend in legislation is to roll back or minimize access to firearms restrictions, but there can be no assurance that this trend will continue.

 

Unsuccessful product launches could have a material adverse effect on our prospects.

 

New businesses have a disproportionate risk that each product launch will be successful in the early days of the new business. Mature companies can better absorb the negative effects of a disappointing product launch as the mature company can be supported by their existing successful products. A new business is critically establishing their base of successful products to support their need to establish revenue, reach profitability, and satisfy their investors.

 

Intellectual property litigation and infringement claims could cause us to incur significant expenses or prevent us from selling certain of our products.

 

Extensive intellectual property litigation may be necessary to protect our patents and, from time to time, we might be the subject of claims by third parties of potential infringement or misappropriation. Regardless of outcome, such claims are expensive to prosecute and defend and divert the time and effort of our management and operating personnel from other business issues. A successful claim or claims of patent or other intellectual property infringement against us could result in our payment of significant monetary damages and/or royalty payments or negatively impact our ability to sell current or future products in the affected category and could have a material adverse effect on its business, cash flows, financial condition or results of operations.

 

If we are unable to protect the confidentiality of our trade secrets, our business and competitive position would be harmed.

 

We plan on relying on trade secrets, including unpatented know-how, technology and other proprietary information, to maintain our competitive position. We will seek to protect these trade secrets, in part, by entering into non-disclosure and confidentiality agreements with parties who have access to them, such as our employees, corporate collaborators, outside scientific collaborators, contract manufacturers, consultants, advisors and other third parties. We will seek to protect our confidential proprietary information, in part, by entering into confidentiality and invention or patent assignment agreements with our employees and consultants. Moreover, to the extent we enter into such agreements, any of these parties may breach the agreements and disclose our proprietary information, including our trade secrets, and we may not be able to obtain adequate remedies for such breaches. Enforcing a claim that a party illegally disclosed or misappropriated a trade secret is difficult, expensive and time-consuming, and the outcome is unpredictable. In addition, some courts inside and outside the United States are less willing or unwilling to protect trade secrets. If any of our trade secrets were to be lawfully obtained or independently developed by a competitor, we would have no right to prevent them, or those to whom they communicate it, from using that technology or information to compete with us. If any of our trade secrets were to be disclosed to or independently developed by a competitor, our competitive position would be harmed. In general, any loss of trade secret protection or other unpatented proprietary rights could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

If we are unable to protect our patents or other proprietary rights, or if we infringe on the patents or proprietary rights of others, our competitiveness and business prospects may be materially damaged.

 

We have filed for patent protection for our proprietary Protection Pocket and our SmartPhone app. We may continue to seek patent protection for our proprietary technology. Seeking patent protection is a lengthy and costly process, and there can be no assurance that patents will be issued from any pending applications, or that any claims allowed from existing or pending patents will be sufficiently broad or strong to protect our proprietary technology. There is also no guarantee that any patents we hold will not be challenged, invalidated or circumvented, or that the patent rights granted will provide competitive advantages to us. Our competitors have developed and may continue to develop and obtain patents for technologies that are similar or superior to our technologies. In addition, the laws of foreign jurisdictions in which we develop, manufacture or sell our products may not protect our intellectual property rights to the same extent, as do the laws of the United States.


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Adverse outcomes in current or future legal disputes regarding patent and other intellectual property rights could result in the loss of our intellectual property rights, subject us to significant liabilities to third parties, require us to seek licenses from third parties on terms that may not be reasonable or favorable to us, prevent us from manufacturing, importing or selling our products, or compel us to redesign our products to avoid infringing third parties’ intellectual property. As a result, we may be required to incur substantial costs to prosecute, enforce or defend our intellectual property rights if they are challenged. Any of these circumstances could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and resources or results of operations.

 

Dependence on patent and other proprietary rights and failing to protect such rights or to be successful in litigation related to such rights may result in our payment of significant monetary damages or impact offerings in our product portfolios.

 

Our long-term success largely depends on our ability to market innovative and appealing competitive products. If we fail to obtain or maintain adequate intellectual property protection, we may not be able to prevent third parties from using our proprietary technologies or may lose access to technologies and features critical to our products. Also, our currently pending or future patents applications may not result in issued patents, and issued patents are subject to claims concerning priority, scope and other issues.

 

Furthermore, to the extent we do not file applications for patents domestically or internationally, we may not be able to prevent third parties from using our proprietary technologies or may lose access to technologies critical to our products in other countries.

 

 

As a direct-to-consumer Internet-based retailer, the Company will be subject to the risks all online retailers face.

 

The Company employs third-party services for credit card transactions, and as operations continue the Company will continually harden its online assets and deploy additional layers of protection for its customers, its assets, and its continued operations. Consumers who are comfortable purchasing online are increasing as new consumers’ age into technology they have grown up with. Consumers who are not comfortable purchasing online are a decreasing number. There can be no assurance that consumers will continue to be comfortable with purchasing online and that the number of consumers comfortable with purchasing online will continue to increase.

 

The Company does not have Enterprise Risk Management controls in place.

 

The Company does not have the benefit of having Enterprise Risk Management controls in place and its operations and execution may suffer from the lack of such controls. Currently the Company has the benefit of its sole officer and director, CEO Andy Ross.

 

IN ADDITION TO THE ABOVE RISKS, BUSINESSES ARE OFTEN SUBJECT TO RISKS NOT FORESEEN OR FULLY APPRECIATED BY MANAGEMENT. IN REVIEWING THIS CURRENT REPORT ON FORM 10-K, POTENTIAL INVESTORS SHOULD KEEP IN MIND THAT THERE MAY BE OTHER POSSIBLE RISKS THAT COULD BE IMPORTANT.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

Description of Property

 

The Company maintains its warehouse and shipping operations at 3800 S Ross Lane, Chanute, Kansas 66720; but utilizes 718 Thompson Lane, Suite 108-199, Nashville, TN 37204 as its primary address. The Company also operates a sales office at 8460 Nieman Road, Lenexa, Kansas 66214. The lease agreement at 3800 S Ross Lane, Chanute, Kansas 66720, is in the name of American Rebel Holdings, Inc. The lease agreement at 8460 Nieman Road, Lenexa, Kansas 66214 is in the name of the wholly owned subsidiary American Rebel, Inc. American Rebel, Inc. maintains 718 Thompson Lane, Suite 108-199, Nashville, TN address. The Company believes these facilities are adequate for our needs, including providing the space and infrastructure to accommodate our development work based on our current operating plan.


27


 

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

From time to time, we may become involved in various lawsuits and legal proceedings, which arise in the ordinary course of business. However, litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties, and an adverse result in these or other matters may arise from time to time that may harm business.

 

We are not currently a party in any legal proceeding or governmental regulatory proceeding nor are we currently aware of any pending or potential legal proceeding or governmental regulatory proceeding proposed to be initiated against us that would have a material adverse effect on us or our business.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

Not applicable.


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PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Market for our Common Stock

 

Our common stock is quoted on the OTC Market under the symbol “AREB.” Our common stock has traded infrequently on the OTC, which limits our ability to locate accurate high and low bid prices for each quarter during the last two fiscal years. Therefore, the following table lists the available quotations for the high and low closing prices for fiscal 2019 and 2020 obtained through Yahoo! Finance. The quotations reflect inter-dealer prices without retail mark-up, markdown, or commissions and may not represent actual transactions.

 

 

2019

2020

 

HIGH

LOW

HIGH

LOW

1st Quarter

$0.92

$0.55

$0.285

$0.12

2nd Quarter

$0.95

$0.92

$0.15

$0.09

3rd Quarter

$0.95

$0.30

$0.123

$0.05

4th Quarter

$0.50

$0.171

$0.12

$0.05

 

On May 5, 2021, the closing price of shares of common stock of the Company was $0.069. However, we consider our common stock to be thinly traded and, as a result, any reported sales prices may not be a true market-based valuation of the common stock.

 

Shareholders of Record

 

As of May 5, 2021, an aggregate of 79,466,563 shares of our common stock were issued and outstanding and owned by 135 shareholders of record.

 

Dividends

 

We have not since December 15, 2014 (date of inception) declared or paid any cash dividends on our common stock and currently do not anticipate paying such cash dividends. We currently anticipate that we will retain all of our future earnings for use in the development and expansion of our business and for general corporate purposes. Any determination to pay dividends in the future will be at the discretion of our Board of Directors (the “Board”) and will depend upon our results of operations, financial condition, tax laws and other factors as the Board, in its discretion, deems relevant.

 

Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

 

During the year ended December 31, 2020 we did not have any equity compensation plans. On January 1, 2021, our board of directors approved the establishment of the 2021 Long-Term Equity Incentive Plan (“LTIP”). The LTIP is intended to enable us to continue to attract able directors, employees, and consultants and to provide a means whereby those individuals upon whom the responsibilities rest for successful administration and management of the Company, and whose present and potential contributions are of importance, can acquire and maintain Common Stock ownership, thereby strengthening their concern for our welfare. The aggregate maximum number of shares of Common Stock (including shares underlying options) that may be issued under the LTIP pursuant to awards of Restricted Shares or Options will be limited to 10% of the outstanding shares of Common Stock, which calculation shall be made on the first trading day of each new fiscal year. For fiscal year 2021, up to 7,549,725 shares of Common Stock are available for participants under the LTIP. The number of shares of Common Stock that are the subject of awards under the LTIP which are forfeited or terminated, are settled in cash in lieu of shares of Common Stock or in a manner such that all or some of the shares covered by an award are not issued to a participant or are exchanged for awards that do not involve shares will again immediately become available to be issued pursuant to awards granted under the LTIP. If shares of Common Stock are withheld from payment of an award to satisfy tax obligations with respect to the award, those shares of Common Stock will be treated as shares that have been issued under the LTIP and will not again be available for issuance under the LTIP. In March of 2021, we authorized the grant and issuance of 4,290,000 shares of common stock under the LTIP.

 

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

 

The Company entered into an amortized one-year promissory note on August 5, 2020, to a lender for $150,000 at 12% interest. A component of the note included 230,769 shares of common stock valued at $0.065. Additionally, the Company has issued 1,153,846 shares of common stock, valued at $0.065. Upon full repayment of the loan, 1,153,846 shares of common stock will be returned to the Company.


29


 

 

On September 30, 2020, the Company entered into an amortized one-year promissory note to a lender for $350,000 at 12% interest. A stipulation of this promissory note was that the Company pay in full the July 31, 2020, $150,000 promissory note. A component of the note included 1,458,333 shares of common stock valued at $0.035. Additionally, the Company has issued 1,605,475 shares of common stock, valued at $0.035. Upon full repayment of the loan, 1,605,475 shares will be returned to the Company.

 

On October 1, 2020, the Company entered into a three-month promissory note with a lender for $250,000 at 8% interest. A component of the note is the issuance of 1,250,000 five-year warrants to purchase the Company’s common stock at $0.10 per share.

 

On October 6, 2020, the Company entered into a one-year note with a lender for $100,000 at 12% interest. A component of the note was the issuance of 1,000,000 shares of common stock of the Company valued at $0.10 per share.

 

On October 13, 2020, the Company refinanced an existing note into a one-year note with a lender for $200,000 at 12% interest. A component of the note was the issuance of 2,000,000 shares of common stock of the Company valued at $0.10 per share.

 

On October 13, 2020, the Company issued 300,000 shares of common stock of the Company valued at $0.10 per share as an interest payment on an outstanding note.

 

On October 21, 2020, the Company entered into a six-month promissory note with a lender for $250,000 at 8% interest. A component of the note is the issuance of 1,250,000 five-year warrants to purchase the Company’s common stock at $0.10 per share.

 

On November 5, 2020, the Company issued 310,000 shares of common stock of the Company valued at $0.10 per share as an interest payment on an outstanding note.

 

On November 25, 2020, the Company issued 4,000,000 shares of common stock of the Company valued at $0.10 per share as components of promissory notes.

 

On November 25, 2020, the Company issued 1,500,000 shares of common stock of the Company valued at $0.10 per share as a component of a consulting agreement.

 

On December 4, 2020, the Company issued 300,000 shares of common stock of the Company valued at $0.10 per share as an interest payment on an outstanding note.

 

Subsequent Issuances after Year-End

 

On January 5, 2021, the Company issued 310,000 shares of common stock of the Company valued at $0.06 per share as an interest payment on an outstanding note.

 

On January 12, 2021, the Company sold 833,333 shares of common stock for $50,000, $0.06 per share, to a third-party accredited investor.

 

On March 4, 2021, the Company entered into a one-year promissory note in the amount of $50,000 and issued the noteholder 600,000 shares of common stock.

 

On March 5, 2021, the Company sold 1,666,667 shares of common stock for $100,000, $0.06 per share, to a third-party accredited investor.

 

On March 10, 2021, the Company issued 319,313 shares of common stock of the Company valued at $0.06 per share as payment for services rendered.

 

On March 10, 2021, the Company issued 280,000 shares of common stock of the Company valued at $0.06 per share as an interest payment on an outstanding note.

 

On March 10, 2021, the Company issued 310,000 shares of common stock of the Company valued at $0.06 per share as an interest payment on an outstanding note.

 

On March 24, 2021, pursuant to our 2021 Long-Term Incentive Plan, we authorized the issuance of 2,145,000 shares of common stock to Doug E. Grau, our president, for services. Such shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock.


30


 

 

On March 24, 2021, pursuant to our 2021 Long-Term Incentive Plan, we authorized the issuance of 2,145,000 shares of common stock to Charles A. Ross, Jr., our CEO, for services. 2,045,000 of such shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock.

 

On March 24, 2021, we authorized the issuance of 2,500,000 shares of common stock to Gurkha Consulting, a company controlled by Rocco LaVista, our newly appointed VP of Business Development, as consideration of the termination of such consultant’s services and to relieve us from certain ongoing compensation commitments. Such shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock.

 

On April 9, 2021, in connection with a $1,000,000 bridge loan, we issued Ronald A. Smith, our COO and chairman, a warrant to purchase 2,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.10 per share with a five-year term.

 

On April 9, 2021, we entered into an employment agreement with Ronald A. Smith, our COO and chairman, and authorized the issuance of 4,750,000 shares of common stock to Mr. Smith. Such shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock.

 

On April 9, 2021, we entered into an employment agreement with Rocco LaVista, our VP of Business Development, and authorized the issuance of 4,000,000 shares of common stock to Mr. LaVista. Such shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock.

 

On April 9, 2021, we entered into an amendment to the employment agreement with Charles A. Ross, Jr., our CEO, and authorized the issuance of 4,000,000 shares of common stock to Mr. Ross. Such shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock.

 

On April 9, 2021, we entered into an amendment to the employment agreement with Doug E. Grau, our President, and authorized the issuance of 4,000,000 shares of common stock to Mr. Grau. Such shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock.

 

On April 20, 2021, the Company issued 50,000 shares of common stock valued at $0.06 per share as payment for services rendered.

 

On April 22, 2021, we issued 2,000,000 shares of common stock, with a stated value of $100,687.97, as part of the settlement of a secured note.

 

All of the above-described issuances were exempt from registration pursuant to Section 4(a)(2) and/or Regulation D of the Securities Act as transactions not involving a public offering. With respect to each transaction listed above, no general solicitation was made by either the Company or any person acting on its behalf. All such securities issued pursuant to such exemptions are restricted securities as defined in Rule 144(a)(3) promulgated under the Securities Act, appropriate legends have been placed on the documents evidencing the securities, and may not be offered or sold absent registration or pursuant to an exemption there from.

 

Repurchase of Equity Securities

 

We have no plans, programs or other arrangements in regards to repurchases of our common stock. Further, we did not repurchase any of our equity securities during the year ended December 31, 2020

 

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

Not applicable to smaller reporting companies.

 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Forward-looking statements: Statements about our future expectations are “forward-looking statements” and are not guarantees of future performance. When used herein, the words “may,” “should,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “appear,” “intend,” “plan,” “expect,” “estimate,” “approximate,” and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. These statements involve risks and uncertainties inherent in our business, including those set forth under the caption “Risk Factors,” in this Report, and are subject to change at any time. Our actual results could differ materially from these forward-looking statements. This Annual Report on Form 10-K does not have any statutory safe harbor for this forward-looking statement. We undertake no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements.


31


 

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis should be read in conjunction with the financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K (the “Financial Statements”). The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting policies in the United States (“GAAP”). Except as otherwise disclosed, all dollar figures included therein and in the following management discussion and analysis are quoted in United States dollars.

 

The following discussion of the Company’s financial condition and the results of operations should be read in conjunction with the Financial Statements and footnotes thereto appearing elsewhere in this Report.

 

The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 provides a safe harbor for forward-looking statements. In order to comply with the terms of the safe harbor, the Company notes that in addition to the description of historical facts contained herein, this report contains certain forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties as detailed herein and from time to time in the Company’s other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission and elsewhere. Such statements are based on management’s current expectations and are subject to a number of factors and uncertainties, which could cause actual results to differ materially from those, described in the forward-looking statements. These factors include, among others: (a) the Company’s fluctuations in sales and operating results; (b) risks associated with international operations; (c) regulatory, competitive and contractual risks; (d) development risks; (e) the ability to achieve strategic initiatives, including but not limited to the ability to achieve sales growth across the business segments through a combination of enhanced sales force, new products, and customer service; and (f) pending litigation.

 

Operations

 

On June 9, 2016 a change in control occurred, a sixty percent (60%) ownership interest was obtained by American Rebel, Inc. from our former officer and director and founder. On June 17, 2017, the Company acquired the business of its control stockholder accounted for and presented financially as a reverse merger transaction. Our majority stockholder, American Rebel, Inc. became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company and we distributed shares to the stockholders of American Rebel, Inc. As a result of this reverse merger, the reported operating history of the Company is now the operating history of American Rebel, Inc. Financial statements of both companies are now consolidated and all material intercompany transactions and balances are eliminated.

 

We are a development stage company and have limited financial resources. We have not established a firm source of equity or debt financing. Our independent registered public accounting firm has included an explanatory paragraph in their report filed on March, 2021 and included with our Form 10-K emphasizing the uncertainty of our ability to remain as a going concern. An investor or financial statement reader should read our Risk Factors in full.

 

Description of Business

 

Company Overview

 

American Rebel is boldly positioning itself as America’s Patriotic Brand. The Company has identified the market opportunity to design, manufacture, and market innovative concealed carry products and safes. American Rebel accesses its market uniquely through its positioning as America’s Patriotic Brand and the appeal of its products as well as through the profile and public persona of its founder and CEO, Andy Ross. Andy hosted his own television show for 12 years, has made multiple appearances over the years at trade shows, and is well-known in the archery world as the founder of Ross Archery, which was the world’s fastest-growing bow company in 2007 and 2008. Andy has also released 3 CDs, done numerous radio and print interviews, and performed many concerts in front of thousands of people. Andy has the ability to present American Rebel to large numbers of potential customers through the appeal of his music and other supporting appearances. For example, his appearance on the History Channel hit show Counting Cars in February 2014 has been viewed by over 2 million people. Bringing innovative products that satisfy an existing demand to the market through exciting means is the American Rebel blueprint for success.

 

Other

 

As a corporate policy, we will not incur any cash obligations that we cannot satisfy with known resources, of which there are currently none except as described in “Liquidity” below or elsewhere in this report. We believe that the perception that many people have of a public company makes it more likely that they will accept restricted securities from a public company as consideration for indebtedness to them than they would from a private company. We have not performed any studies of this matter. Our conclusion is based on our own observations. Additionally, the issuance of restricted shares will dilute the percentage of ownership interest of our stockholders.


32


 

 

Results of Operations for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020

 

Revenue and cost of goods sold

 

For the year ended December 31, 2020, we reported Sales of $1,255,703, compared to Sales of $535,109 for the year ended December 31, 2019. For the year ended December 31, 2020, we reported Cost of Sales of $952,511, compared to Cost of Sales of $379,079 for the year ended December 31, 2019. For the year ended December 31, 2020, we reported Gross Profit of $303,192, compared to Gross Profit of $156,033 for the year ended December 31, 2019. Sales of our products began during the fourth quarter of 2016.

 

Expenses

 

Total operating expenses for the year ended December 31, 2020 were $3,075,113 compared to $6,156,254 for the year ended December 31, 2019 as further described below.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2020, we incurred consulting and business development expenses of $529,094, compared to consulting and business development expenses of $3,809,291 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The decrease in consulting and business development expenses relates primarily to not having the expansion of activities in preparation of a 2019 product launch.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2020, we incurred product development expenses of $320,472, compared to product development expenses of $309,061 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The decrease in product development expenses is due to the fact that 2019 was a year of releasing product to the marketplace.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2020, we incurred marketing and brand development expenses of $390,294, compared to marketing and brand development expenses of $632,522 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The decrease in marketing and brand development expenses relates primarily to the benefit of the prior year’s investment in the marketing of the American Rebel brand.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2020, we incurred general and administrative expenses of $1,773,529, compared to general and administrative expenses of $1,343,352 for the year ended December 31, 2019. The increase relates primarily to an increase in professional, consulting and operating fees necessary to manage the growing business.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2020, we incurred depreciation expense of $61,724, compared to depreciation expense of $62,028 for the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Other income and expenses

 

For the year ended December 31, 2020, we incurred interest expense of $2,292,957, compared to interest expense of $1,601,851 for the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

Net Loss

 

Net loss for the year ended December 31, 201920 amounted to $5,981,082, resulting in a loss per share of $0.10, compared to $7,602,072 for the year ended December 31, 2019, resulting in a loss per share of $0.25. The decrease in the net loss from the year ended December 31, 2019 to the year ended December 31, 2020 is primarily due to the investment in compensation that occurred in September 2019.

 

Liquidity

 

We are a development stage company and realized minimal but growing revenue from our planned operations. We have a working capital deficit of $888,280 at December 31, 2018 and $2,812,957 at December 31, 2019, and have incurred a deficit of $20,870,713 from inception to December 31, 2020. We have funded operations primarily through the issuance of capital stock, convertible debt and other securities.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2020, we raised net cash of $- by issuance of common shares, as compared to $3,500 for the year ended December 31, 2019. During the year ended December 31, 2020, we raised net cash of $2,869,171 through the issuance of promissory notes secured by specific inventory, as compared to $3,105,441 for the year ended December 31, 2019. During the year ended December 31, 2020, we repaid $0 on loans received from our CEO, as compared to $12,092 that we repaid on loans from our CEO during the year ended December 31, 2019.

 

As we proceed with the launch of our American Rebel concealed carry product and safe lines we have devoted and expect to continue to devote significant resources in the areas of capital expenditures and marketing, sales, and operational expenditures.


33


 

 

We expect to require additional funds to further develop our business plan, including the anticipated launch of additional products in addition to the launch of our concealed carry product line. Since it is impossible to predict with certainty the timing and amount of funds required to establish profitability, we anticipate that we will need to raise additional funds through equity or debt offerings or otherwise in order to meet our expected future liquidity requirements. Any such financing that we undertake will likely be dilutive to existing stockholders.

 

In addition, we expect to also need additional funds to respond to business opportunities and challenges, including our ongoing operating expenses, protecting our intellectual property, developing or acquiring new lines of business and enhancing our operating infrastructure. While we may need to seek additional funding for such purposes, we may not be able to obtain financing on acceptable terms, or at all. In addition, the terms of our financings may be dilutive to, or otherwise adversely affect, holders of our common stock. We may also seek additional funds through arrangements with collaborators or other third parties. We may not be able to negotiate any such arrangements on acceptable terms, if at all. If we are unable to obtain additional funding on a timely basis, we may be required to curtail or terminate some or all of our product lines.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

The preparation of financial statements and related footnotes requires us to make judgments, estimates, and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities.

 

An accounting policy is considered to be critical if it requires an accounting estimate to be made based on assumptions about matters that are highly uncertain at the time the estimate is made, and if different estimates that reasonably could have been used, or changes in the accounting estimates that are reasonably likely to occur periodically, could materially impact the financial statements.

 

Financial Reporting Release No. 60 requires all companies to include a discussion of critical accounting policies or methods used in the preparation of financial statements. There are no critical policies or decisions that rely on judgments that are based on assumptions about matters that are highly uncertain at the time the estimate is made. Note 1 to the financial statements, included elsewhere in this report, includes a summary of the significant accounting policies and methods used in the preparation of our financial statements.

 

Emerging Growth Company - We qualify as an “emerging growth company” under the recently enacted Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”). As a result, we are permitted to, and intend to, rely on exemptions from certain disclosure requirements. For so long as we are an emerging growth company, among other things, we will not be required to:

 

·Have an auditor report on our internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act; 

 

·Submit certain executive compensation matters to shareholder advisory votes, such as “say-on-pay” and “say-on-frequency” 

 

·Obtain shareholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved; and 

 

·Disclose certain executive compensation related items such as the correlation between executive compensation and performance and comparisons of the Chief Executives compensation to median employee compensation. 

 

In addition, Section 107 of the JOBS Act also provides that an emerging growth company can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. In other words, an emerging growth company can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. We have elected to take advantage of the benefits of this extended transition period. Our financial statements may therefore not be comparable to those of companies that comply with such new or revised accounting standards.

 

We will remain an “emerging growth company” until the earliest of (i) the last day of the first fiscal year in which our total annual gross revenues exceed $1 billion; (ii) the fifth anniversary of our first sale of common equity pursuant to an effective registration statement; (iii) the date that we become a “large accelerated filer” as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which would occur if the market value of our ordinary shares that are held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the last business day of our most recently completed third fiscal quarter; or (iv) the date on which we have issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt during the preceding three-year period.


34


 

 

Recent Pronouncements

 

The Company evaluated recent accounting pronouncements through December 31, 2020 and believes that none have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements except for the following.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). The objective of ASU 2016-02 is to recognize lease assets and lease liabilities by lessees for those leases classified as operating leases under previous U.S. GAAP. ASU 2016-02 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption of ASU 2016-02 is permitted. The Company is evaluating the effects adoption of this guidance will have on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In July 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-11, Earnings Per Share (Topic 260)-Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity (Topic 480); Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): (Part I) Accounting for Certain Financial Instruments with Down Round Features, (Part II) Replacement of the Indefinite Deferral for Mandatorily Redeemable Financial Instruments of Certain Nonpublic Entities and Certain Mandatorily Redeemable Noncontrolling Interests with a Scope Exception. The amendments in Part I of the ASU change the classification analysis of certain equity-linked financial instruments (or embedded features) with down round features. When determining whether certain financial instruments should be classified as liabilities or equity instruments a down round feature no longer precludes equity classification when assessing whether the instrument is indexed to an entity’s own stock. The amendments in Part II recharacterize the indefinite deferral of certain provisions of Topic 480 with a scope exception and do not have an accounting effect. The ASU is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those annual periods. The Company is evaluating the effects adoption of this guidance will have on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-12, Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815)-Targeted Improvements to Accounting for Hedging Activities. The new guidance is intended to more closely align hedge accounting with entities’ hedging strategies, simplify the application of hedge accounting, and increase the transparency of hedging programs. The ASU is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those annual periods. The Company is evaluating the effects adoption of this guidance will have on its consolidated financial statements.

 

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and are not required to provide the information under this item.

 

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

 

Page

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

F-1

Financial Statements for the years ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019

 

Balance Sheets

F-2

Statements of Operations

F-3

Statement of Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)

F-4

Statements of Cash Flows

F-5

Notes to the Financial Statements

F-6


35


 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

To the shareholders and the board of directors of American Rebel Holdings, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of American Rebel Holdings, Inc. as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, the related statements of operations, stockholders' equity (deficit), and cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the "financial statements"). In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.

 

Substantial Doubt about the Company’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 2 to the financial statements, the Company has suffered recurring losses from operations and has a significant accumulated deficit. In addition, the Company continues to experience negative cash flows from operations. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern. Management's plans in regard to these matters are also described in Note 2. The financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company's financial statements based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) ("PCAOB") and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audit included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audit also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/S/ BF Borgers CPA PC

BF Borgers CPA PC

 

We have served as the Company's auditor since 2020

Lakewood, CO

May 17, 2021


F-1


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

 

 

December 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

2020

 

2019

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT ASSETS:

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

$

60,899

$

131,656

Accounts Receivable

 

176,844

 

228,890

Prepaid expense

 

48,640

 

542,800

Inventory

 

681,709

 

805,845

Inventory deposits

 

141,164

 

91,641

Total Current Assets

 

1,109,256

 

1,800,832

 

 

 

 

 

Property and Equipment, net

 

5,266

 

66,990

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER ASSETS:

 

 

 

 

Lease Deposit

 

6,841

 

6,841

Investment

 

-

 

-

Total Other Assets

 

6,841

 

6,841

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL ASSETS

$

1,121,363

$

1,874,663

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT LIABILITIES:

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable and accrued expense

$

540,168

$

684,126

Accrued Interest – Convertible Debenture – Related Party

 

603,471

 

303,860

Loan – Officer - Related party

 

4,526

 

4,496

Loan – Working Capital

 

4,672,096

 

3,595,561

Loans - Nonrelated parties

 

15,649

 

25,746

Total Current Liabilities

 

5,835,910

 

4,613,789

 

 

 

 

 

Convertible Debenture –Related party

 

297,890

 

207,890

TOTAL LIABILITIES

 

6,133,800

 

4,821,679

 

 

 

 

 

STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT):

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 1,000,000 shares authorized; none issued or outstanding

 

-

 

-

Common stock, $0.001 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized;

72,807,979 and 43,062,058 issued and outstanding, respectively at

December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019

 

72,808

 

43,062

Additional paid in capital

 

15,785,468

 

11,899,553

Accumulated deficit

 

(20,870,713)

 

(14,889,631)

TOTAL STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

 

(5,012,437)

 

(2,947,016)

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

$

1,121,363

$

1,874,663

 

 

 

 

 

 

See Notes to Financial Statements.


F-2


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

 

 

For the year ended

 

For the year ended

 

 

December 31, 2020

 

December 31, 2019

Revenue

$

1,255,703

$

535,109

Cost of goods sold

 

952,511

 

379,076

Gross margin

 

303,192

 

156,033

 

 

 

 

 

Expenses:

 

 

 

 

Consulting – business development

 

529,094

 

3,809,291

Product development costs

 

320,472

 

309,061

Marketing and brand development costs

 

390,294

 

632,522

Administrative and other

 

1,773,529

 

1,343,352

Depreciation expense

 

61,724

 

62,028

 

 

3,075,113

 

6,156,254

Operating income (loss)

 

(2,771,921)

 

(6,000,221)

 

 

 

 

 

Other Income (Expense)

 

 

 

 

Interest expense

 

(2,292,957)

 

(1,601,851)

Loss on Extinguishment of Debt

 

(916,204)

 

-

Net income (loss) before income tax provision

 

(5,981,082)

 

(7,602,072)

Provision for income tax

 

-

 

-

Net income (loss)

$

(5,981,082)

$

(7,602,072)

Basic and diluted income (loss) per share

$

(0.10)

$

(0.25)

Weighted average common shares outstanding - basic and diluted

 

61,109,000

 

33,541,000

 

See Notes to Financial Statements.


F-3


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF STOCKHOLDERS' DEFICIT

 

 

 

 

Common

 

Additional

 

 

 

 

 

Common

 

Stock

 

Paid-in

 

Accumulated

 

 

 

Stock

 

Amount

 

Capital

 

Deficit

 

Total

Balance – December 31, 2015

13,455,000

$

13,455

$

1,100,295

$

(979,511)

$

134,239

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sale of Common stock

1,166,000

 

1,166

 

581,834

 

-

 

583,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

-

 

-

 

-

 

(1,363,506)

 

(1,363,506)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance – December 31, 2016

14,621,000

$

14,621

$

1,682,129

$

(2,343,017)

$

(646,267)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Stock issued as compensation.

3,150,000

 

3,150

 

1,571,850

 

-

 

1,575,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reverse Acquisition of American Rebel, Inc.

6,000,000

 

6,000

 

(231,032)

 

-

 

(225,032)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

-

 

-

 

-

 

(2,942,838)

 

(2,942,838)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance – December 31, 2017

23,771,000

$

23,771

$

3,022,947

$

(5,285,855)

$

(2,239,137)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Stock issued as compensation.

800,000

 

800

 

429,200

 

-

 

430,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Convertible Debenture Discount

-

 

-

 

270,000

 

-

 

270 ,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conversion of Convertible Debentures

4,681,058

 

4,681

 

2,335,848

 

-

 

2,340,529

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercise of Warrants.

660,000

 

660

 

329,340

 

-

 

330,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

-

 

-

 

-

 

(2,001,704)

 

(2,001,704)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance – December 31, 2018-

29,912,058

$

29,912

$

6,387,336

$

(7,287,559)

$

(870,312)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Stock issued as compensation.

13,050,000

 

13,050

 

5,344,950

 

-

 

5,358,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Convertible Debenture Discount

-

 

-

 

166,368

 

-

 

166,368

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sale of Common Stock

100,000

 

100

 

900

 

-

 

1,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

-

 

-

 

-

 

(7,602,072)

 

(7,602,072)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance – December 31, 2019-

43,062,058

$

43,062

$

11,899,553

$

(14,889,631)

$

(2,947,016)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Stock issued as compensation.

29,745,921

 

29,746

 

3,885,915

 

-

 

3,915,661

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

-

 

-

 

-

 

(5,981,082)

 

(5,981,082)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance – December 31, 2020-

72,807,979

$

72,808

$

15,785,468

$

(20,870,713)

$

(5,012,437)

 

See Notes to Financial Statements.


F-4


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

 

 

 

For the year ended

 

For the year ended

 

 

December 31, 2020

 

December 31, 2019

CASH FLOW FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

Net income (loss)

$

(5,981,082)

$

(7,602,072)

Depreciation

 

61,724

 

62,028

Compensation paid through issuance of common stock

 

2,786,931

 

3,486,500

Amortization of loan discount

 

708,975

 

2,014,784

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to cash (used in) operating activities:

 

 

 

 

Change in Accounts Receivable

 

54,938

 

(229,166)

Change in prepaid expenses

 

254,160

 

(425,500)

Change in inventory

 

124,137

 

(36,961)

Change in inventory deposits

 

(49,524)

 

(91,640)

Change in accounts payable and accrued expense

 

65,102

 

643,413

Net Cash (Used in) Operating Activities

 

(1,974,639)

 

(2,178,614)

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOW FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

Property and equipment purchased

 

-

 

-

Net Cash (Used in) Investing Activities

 

-

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOW FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from sale of common stock

 

-

 

3,500

Proceeds (repayments) of loans – officer - related party

 

51,083

 

(12,092)

Proceeds of working capital loan

 

2,869,171

 

2,474,560

Repayment of loans – nonrelated party

 

(1,016,372)

 

(175,329)

Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities

 

1,903,882

 

2,290,639

 

 

 

 

 

CHANGE IN CASH

 

(70,757)

 

112,025

 

 

 

 

 

CASH AT BEGINNING OF PERIOD

 

131,656

 

19,631

 

 

 

 

 

CASH AT END OF PERIOD

$

60,899

$

131,656

 

 

 

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

Cash paid for:

 

 

 

 

Interest

$

168,834

$

45,565

Income taxes

$

-

$

-

 

 

 

 

 

Non-cash investing and financing activities:

 

 

 

 

Conversion of Debentures to common stock

$

-

$

-

 

See Notes to Financial Statements.


F-5


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 1 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Organization

 

The “Company” was incorporated on December 15, 2014 (date of inception) under the laws of the State of Nevada, as CubeScape, Inc. Effective January 5, 2017, the Company amended its articles of incorporation and changed its name to American Rebel Holdings, Inc. The Company completed a business combination with its majority stockholder, American Rebel, Inc. on June 19, 2017. As a result, American Rebel, Inc. became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company.

 

The acquisition of American Rebel, Inc. was accounted for as a reverse merger. The Company issued 17,421,000 shares of its common stock and issued warrants to purchase 500,000 shares of common stock to shareholders of American Rebel, Inc. and cancelled 9,000,000 shares of common stock owned by American Rebel, Inc.

 

The Company filed a registration statement on Form S-1 which was declared effective by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on October 14, 2015. Twenty six (26) investors invested at a price of $0.01 per share for a total of $60,000. The direct public offering closed on December 11, 2015.

 

Nature of operations

 

The Company is developing branded products in the self-defense, safe storage and patriotic product areas that are promoted and sold using personal appearance, music, internet and television avenues. The Company’s products will be under the American Rebel Brand and imprinted.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The Consolidated Financial Statements include the accounts of the Company and its majority-owned subsidiary. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated.

 

Year end

 

The Company’s year-end is December 31.

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

For the purpose of the statements of cash flows, all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less are considered to be cash equivalents. The carrying value of these investments approximates fair value.

 

Inventory and Inventory Deposits

 

Inventory consists of safes, backpacks, jackets and accessories manufactured to our design and held for resale and are carried at the lower of cost (First-in, First-out Method) or market value. The Company determines the estimate for the reserve for slow moving or obsolete inventories by regularly evaluating individual inventory levels, projected sales and current economic conditions. The Company also makes deposit payments on inventory to be manufactured that are carried separately until the goods are received into inventory.

 

Fixed assets and depreciation

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost net of accumulated depreciation. Additions and improvements are capitalized while ordinary maintenance and repair expenditures are charged to expense as incurred. Depreciation is recorded by the straight-line method over the estimated useful life of the asset, which ranges from five to seven years.

 

Revenue recognition

 

In accordance with ASC Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers ("ASC 606"), revenues are recognized when control of the promised goods or services is transferred to our clients, in an amount that reflects the consideration to which we expect to be entitled in exchange for those goods and services. To achieve this core principle, we apply the following five steps: 1) Identify the contract with a client; (2) Identify the performance obligations in the contract; (3) Determine the transaction price; (4) Allocate the transaction price to performance obligations in the contract; and (5) Recognize revenues when or as the company satisfies a performance obligation.


F-6


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 1 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

We adopted this ASC on January 1, 2018. Although the new revenue standard is expected to have an immaterial impact, if any, on our ongoing net income, we did implement changes to our processes related to revenue recognition and the control activities within them.

 

Advertising costs

 

Advertising costs are expensed as incurred; Marketing costs incurred were $390,294 and $632,522 for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

Fair value of financial instruments

 

Fair value estimates discussed herein are based upon certain market assumptions and pertinent information available to management as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively. The respective carrying value of certain on-balance-sheet financial instruments approximated their fair values. These financial instruments include cash, and accounts payable. Fair values were assumed to approximate carrying values for cash and payables because they are short-term in nature and their carrying amounts approximate fair values or they are payable on demand.

 

Level 1: The preferred inputs to valuation efforts are “quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities,” with the caveat that the reporting entity must have access to that market. Information at this level is based on direct observations of transactions involving the same assets and liabilities, not assumptions, and thus offers superior reliability. However, relatively few items, especially physical assets, actually trade in active markets.

 

Level 2: FASB acknowledged that active markets for identical assets and liabilities are relatively uncommon and, even when they do exist, they may be too thin to provide reliable information. To deal with this shortage of direct data, the board provided a second level of inputs that can be applied in three situations.

 

Level 3: If inputs from levels 1 and 2 are not available, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) acknowledges that fair value measures of many assets and liabilities are less precise. The board describes Level 3 inputs as “unobservable,” and limits their use by saying they “shall be used to measure fair value to the extent that observable inputs are not available.” This category allows “for situations in which there is little, if any, market activity for the asset or liability at the measurement date”. Earlier in the standard, FASB explains that “observable inputs” are gathered from sources other than the reporting company and that they are expected to reflect assumptions made by market participants.

 

Stock-based compensation

 

The Company records stock-based compensation in accordance with the guidance in ASC Topic 505 and 718 which requires the Company to recognize expense related to the fair value of its employee stock option awards. This eliminates accounting for share-based compensation transactions using the intrinsic value and requires instead that such transactions be accounted for using a fair-value-based method. The Company recognizes the cost of all share-based awards on a graded vesting basis over the vesting period of the award. 

 

The Company accounts for equity instruments issued in exchange for the receipt of goods or services from other than employees in accordance with FASB ASC 718-10 and the conclusions reached by the FASB ASC 505-50. Costs are measured at the estimated fair market value of the consideration received or the estimated fair value of the equity instruments issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The value of equity instruments issued for consideration other than employee services is determined on the earliest of a performance commitment or completion of performance by the provider of goods or services as defined by FASB ASC 505-50.

 

In January 2018, the Company agreed to issue and subsequently issued a total of 500,000 shares of common stock as compensation for professional services to be performed during 2018. The common stock was valued at a price of $0.50 per share consistent with earlier sales of common stock by American Rebel, Inc. as well as the present conversion price of the Company’s convertible debentures. In January, 2018, the Company issued 300,000 shares of common stock as compensation in settlement of professional services billed at $180,000.

 

During January 2018, the Company recorded $157,483 in compensation expense, increased prepaid expense $31,251, and reduced Accrued expense $74,600 with the issuance of 466,667 shares of common stock. The common stock was valued at prices of $0.50 and $0.60 per share consistent with earlier sales of common stock by American Rebel, Inc. as well as the present conversion price of the Company’s convertible debentures and negotiation with a vendor.


F-7


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 1 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

During January 2019, the Company recorded $178,505 in compensation expense, increased prepaid expense $160,000, and increased Discount on debt $57,467 with the issuance of 400,000 shares of common stock and 175,000 warrants to purchase common stock. The common stock was valued at prices of $0.65 to $0.76 per share consistent with market prices at the date of the transaction.

 

During September 2019, the Company recorded $3,432,000 in compensation expense and increased Discount on debt $819,500 with the issuance of 11,000,000 shares of common stock and 50,000 warrants to purchase common stock. The common stock was valued at prices of $0.70 to $0.30 per share consistent with market prices at the dates of the transactions.

 

During October and November 2019, the Company recorded $330,000 in compensation expense and increased Discount on debt $86,000 with the issuance of 1,650,000 shares of common stock. The common stock was valued at prices of $0.22 to $0.30 per share consistent with market prices at the dates of the transactions.

 

In February 2020, the Company issued 1,200,000 shares of its Common Stock to pay professional and consulting fees. Total fair value of $240,000 was recorded as an expense. In June 2020, the Company issued 810,000 shares of its Common Stock to pay consulting fees and interest expense. Total fair value of $95,000 was recorded as an expense. In August 2020, the Company issued 4,839,871 shares of its Common Stock to pay consulting fees and interest expense. Total fair value of $489,462 was recorded as an expense. In October 2020, the Company issued 6,410,000 shares of its Common Stock to pay consulting fees and interest expense. Total fair value of $553,820 was recorded as an expense. During May 2020, the Company issued 70,000 shares of its Common Stock in exchange for a debt reduction of $7,000.

 

Earnings per share

 

The Company follows ASC Topic 260 to account for earnings per share. Basic earnings per common share (“EPS”) calculations are determined by dividing net income by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the year. Diluted earnings per common share calculations are determined by dividing net income by the weighted average number of common shares and dilutive common share equivalents outstanding. During periods when common stock equivalents, if any, are anti-dilutive they are not considered in the computation.

 

Income taxes

 

The Company follows ASC Topic 740 for recording provision for income taxes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are computed based upon the difference between the financial statement and income tax basis of assets and liabilities using the enacted marginal tax rate applicable when the related asset or liability is expected to be realized or settled. Deferred income tax expense or benefit is based on the changes in the asset or liability for each period. If available evidence suggests that it is more likely than not that some portion or the entire deferred tax asset will not be realized, a valuation allowance is required to reduce the deferred tax asset to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. Future changes in such valuation allowance are included in the provision for deferred income tax in the period of change.

 

Deferred income tax may arise from temporary differences resulting from income and expense items reported for financial accounting and tax purposes in different periods. Deferred taxes are classified as current or non-current, depending on the classification of assets and liabilities to which they relate. Deferred taxes arising from temporary differences that are not related to an asset or liability are classified as current or non-current depending on the periods in which the temporary differences are expected to reverse.

 

The Company applies a more-likely-than-not recognition threshold for all tax uncertainties. ASC Topic 740 only allows the recognition of tax benefits that have a greater than fifty percent likelihood of being sustained upon examination by taxing authorities. As of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Company reviewed its tax positions and determined there were no outstanding, or retroactive tax positions with less than a 50% likelihood of being sustained upon examination by the taxing authorities, therefore this standard has not had a material effect on the Company.

 

The Company does not anticipate any significant changes to its total unrecognized tax benefits within the next 12 months. 

 

The Company classifies tax-related penalties and net interest as income tax expense. For the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, no income tax expense has been recorded.


F-8


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 1 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED)

 

Use of estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ significantly from those estimates.

 

Right of Use Assets and Lease Liabilities

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). The standard requires lessees to recognize almost all leases on the balance sheet as a Right-of-Use (“ROU”) asset and a lease liability and requires leases to be classified as either an operating or a finance type lease. The standard excludes leases of intangible assets or inventory. The standard became effective for the Company beginning January 1, 2019. The Company adopted ASC 842 using the modified retrospective approach, by applying the new standard to all leases existing at the date of initial application. Results and disclosure requirements for reporting periods beginning after January 1, 2019 are presented under ASC 842, while prior period amounts have not been adjusted and continue to be reported in accordance with our historical accounting under ASC 840. The Company elected the package of practical expedients permitted under the standard, which also allowed the Company to carry forward historical lease classifications. The Company also elected the practical expedient related to treating lease and non-lease components as a single lease component for all equipment leases as well as electing a policy exclusion permitting leases with an original lease term of less than one year to be excluded from the ROU assets and lease liabilities.

 

Under ASC 842, the Company determines if an arrangement is a lease at inception. ROU assets and liabilities are recognized at commencement date based on the present value of remaining lease payments over the lease term. For this purpose, the Company considers only payments that are fixed and determinable at the time of commencement. As most of the Company's leases do not provide an implicit rate, the Company estimated the incremental borrowing rate in determining the present value of lease payments. The ROU asset also includes any lease payments made prior to commencement and is recorded net of any lease incentives received. The Company’ lease terms may include options to extend or terminate the lease when it is reasonably certain that the Company will exercise such options.

 

Operating leases are included in operating lease Right-of-Use assets and operating lease liabilities, current and non-current, on the Company's consolidated balance sheets.

 

Recent pronouncements

 

The Company evaluated recent accounting pronouncements through December 31, 2020 and believes that none have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements.

 

Concentration Risk

 

In 2020, the Company purchased a substantial portion (over 20%) of inventory from two third-party vendors. As of December 31, 2020, the net amount due to the vendors (accounts payable and accrued expense) was $0. In 2019, the Company purchased substantially all of inventory from one third-party vendor. As of December 31, 2019, the net amount due to the vendor (accounts payable and accrued expense) was $221,920. The loss of these manufacturing vendor relationships could have a material effect on the Company, but the Company believes there are numerous other suppliers that could be substituted should these suppliers become unavailable or non-competitive.


F-9


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 2 – GOING CONCERN

 

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates the recoverability of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. As noted above, the Company is in the development stage and, accordingly, has not yet generated significant revenues from operations. Since inception, the Company has been engaged in financing activities and executing its business plan of operations and incurring costs and expenses related to developing products and market identity, obtaining inventory and preparing for public product launch. As a result, the Company incurred net income (losses) for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 of ($5,981,082) and ($7,602,072), respectively. The Company’s accumulated deficit was ($20,870,713) as of December 31, 2020 and ($14,889,631) as of December 31, 2019. The Company’s working capital deficit was ($4,726,654) as of December 31, 2020 and a deficit of ($2,812,957) as of December 31, 2019. In addition, the Company’s development activities since inception have been sustained through equity and debt financing and the deferral of payments on accounts payable and other expenses.

 

The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent upon its ability to raise capital from the sale of its equity and, ultimately, the achievement of operating revenues. Management believes holders of its warrants will execute their outstanding warrants generating investment capital for the Company. Management is also in discussion with several investment banks and broker dealers regarding the initiation of a capital campaign.

 

Management believes sufficient funding can be secured through the obtaining of loans, as well as future offerings of its preferred and common stock to institutional and other financial sources. However, no assurance can be given that the Company will obtain this additional working capital, or if obtained, that such funding will not cause substantial dilution its stockholders. If the Company is unable to secure such additional funds from these sources, it may be forced to change or delay its business plan rollout.

 

These financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts, or amounts and classification of liabilities that might result from this uncertainty.

 

NOTE 3 - INVENTORY AND DEPOSITS

 

Inventory and deposits includes the following:

 

 

 

December 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

2020

 

2019

Inventory - Finished goods

$

681,709

$

805,845

Inventory deposits

 

141,164

 

91,641

 

 

822,873

 

897,486

Less: Reserve for excess and obsolete

 

-

 

-

Net inventory and deposits

$

822,873

$

897,486

 

NOTE 4 – PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT

 

Property and equipment includes the following:

 

 

 

 

 

 

December 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

2020

 

2019

Marketing equipment

$

32,261

$

32,261

Vehicles

 

277,886

 

277,886

 

 

310,147

 

310,147

Less: Accumulated depreciation

 

(304,881)

 

(243,157)

Net property and equipment

$

5,266

$

66,990

 

For the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 we recognized $61,724 and $62,028 in depreciation expense, respectively. We depreciate these assets over a period of sixty (60) months which has been deemed their useful life. In January, 2016 we acquired three vehicles from related parties and assumed the debt secured by the vehicles as described at Note 7 – Notes Payable. Accordingly, the recorded cost of each vehicle is the amount of debt assumed under each related loan, or a total of $277,886.


F-10


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 5 –RELATED PARTY NOTE PAYABLE AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

For the year ended December 31, 2016, the Company received loans from its sole officer and director at the time totaling $221,155. The balance at December 31, 2019 was $4,496. During the year ended December 31, 2020, the Company repaid $0 of these loans resulting in a balance at December 31, 2020 of $4,526. These loans are due on demand and carry no interest.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company entered into several convertible debt instruments with stockholders in the amount of $270,000, for a total of $345,000. The Company accrued interest expense on this convertible debt of $41,288, for a total of $113,178 at December 31, 2020. Since public trading of the Company’s common stock began in 2018, the Company determined a Beneficial Conversion Discount of $270,000 applied to the 2018 sales the Convertible Debentures. The discount reduced the liability balance of the debentures to $0 when the debentures were issued and recorded the proceeds of the sale as Additional paid in Capital. The discount will be amortized over the three year term of the debentures. The discounted balance of the convertible debentures at December 31, 2020 was $297,890.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2016, the Company acquired three vehicles from various related parties and assumed the debt secured by each one of the vehicles. Accordingly, the recorded value for each vehicle is the total debt assumed under each related loan, or a total of $277,886. (See Note 7 – Notes Payable.)

 

Charles A. Ross, Jr. serves as the Company’s CEO and director. Compensation for Mr. Ross was $180,250 and $200,000, respectively for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019. Mr. Ross received a grant of 1,000,000 shares of American Rebel, Inc. common stock, valued at $0.50 per share in June 2017, prior to the acquisition. These shares were part of the 6,500,000 shares that Mr. Ross exchanged for Company common stock in the acquisition of American Rebel, Inc. completed on June 19, 2017. In September 2019, Mr. Ross received a grant of 2,725,000 shares of common stock, valued at $0.30 per share.

 

NOTE 6 – NOTES PAYABLE – NONRELATED PARTIES

 

Effective January 1, 2016, the Company acquired three vehicles from various related parties in exchange for the assumption of the liabilities related to those vehicles. The liabilities assumed are as follows at December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018.

 

 

 

December 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

2020

 

2019

Loan secured by a tour bus, payable in monthly payments of $2,710 including interest at 12% per annum through July 2020 when the remaining balance is payable.

$

15,649

$

25,746

 

 

 

 

 

Total recorded as current liability

$

15,649

$

25,746

 

Current and long-term portion. Total loan balance is reported as current because loans are past due, become due within one year or are expected to be repaid within one year.


F-11


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 7 – NOTES PAYABLE – WORKING CAPITAL

 

On July 6, 2017, the Company’s wholly-owned operating subsidiary completed the sale of a secured promissory note in the principal amount of $250,000 with an interest rate of 12% per annum to a private investor, and current stockholder. In April, 2018 the Company’s wholly-owned operating subsidiary completed the sale of additional notes under similar terms in the additional principal amount totaling $250,000. In July, 2018 the Company’s wholly-owned operating subsidiary completed the sale of additional notes under similar terms in the additional principal amount totaling $300,000. In October and December, 2018 the Company’s wholly-owned operating subsidiary completed the sale of additional notes under similar terms in the additional principal amount totaling $425,000. The notes are secured by a pledge of certain of the Company’s current inventory and the chief executive officer’s personal guaranty. These working capital notes require payments equal to 75-100% of current sales of that specific secured inventory and mature in 180 days. In connection with the original note, the Company issued 250,000 shares of its common stock to the noteholder valued at $0.50 per share for a total of $125,000. The fair value of the common stock issued was recorded as a discount to the note payable and the discount was amortized over the term of that agreement to interest expense using the straight-line method that approximates the effective interest method.

 

During the year ending December 31, 2019, the Company and the Company’s wholly-owned operating subsidiary completed the sale of additional short term notes under similar terms in the additional principal amount totaling $3,104,441. The notes are secured by a pledge of certain of the Company’s current inventory and the chief executive officer’s personal guaranty. These short term working capital notes mature in 30-180 days. In connection with these notes, the Company issued 1,550,000 shares of its common stock, warrants to purchase 125,000 shares of its common stock and a conversion feature for 300,000 shares at $0.50 per share. The fair value of these share incentives was calculated to be $1,134,368. The fair value of the share incentives was recorded as a discount to the note payable and the discount was amortized over the term of those agreements to interest expense using the straight-line method that approximates the effective interest method. Interest expense recorded as a result of amortization of discount for the year ended December 31, 2019 is $1,068,784.

 

During the year ending December 31, 2020, the Company and the Company’s wholly-owned operating subsidiary completed the sale of additional short term notes and extensions of short term notes under similar terms in the additional principal amount totaling $2,869,171. The notes are secured by a pledge of certain of the Company’s current inventory and the chief executive officer’s personal guaranty. These short term working capital notes mature in 30-180 days. In connection with these notes, the Company issued 17,275,871 shares of its common stock, warrants to purchase 2,550,000 shares of its common stock. The fair value of these share incentives was calculated to be $1,660,112. The fair value of the share incentives was recorded as a discount to the note payable and the discount was amortized over the term of those agreements to interest expense using the straight-line method that approximates the effective interest method. Interest expense recorded as a result of amortization of discount for the year ended December 31, 2020 is $1,411,203.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2020, the Company and the Company’s wholly-owned operating subsidiary completed the conversion of short term notes with a face value of $1,080,000 and accrued interest to 9,700,000 shares of Common Stock with a fair value of $1,651,900, resulting in a Loss on Extinguishment of Debt of $916,204.

 

As of December 31, 2020, and 2019, the outstanding balance due on the working capital notes was $4,672,096 and $3,595,561, respectively.


F-12


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 7 – NOTES PAYABLE – WORKING CAPITAL (CONTINUED)

 

NOTE PAYABLE SCHEDULE

 

Type

Original Amount

Origination Date

Maturity Date

Effective

Annual

Interest

Rate

Balance at

December 31, 2020

Balance at

December 31, 2019

Note Payable (a)

$200,000

3/4/2018

12/31/2018

12%

$200,000

$200,000

Note Payable (b)

$7,000

1/9/2019

 

 

$9,073

$8,689

Note Payable (c)

$400,000

11/1/2018

5/1/2019

12%

$400,000

$400,000

Note Payable (d)

$300,000

12/31/2018

12/31/2020

 

 

$300,000

Note Payable (e)

$55,000

1/14/2019

3/15/2019

15%

$30,000

$30,000

Note Payable (f)

$150,000

3/1/2019

9/30/2019

20%

$0

$0

Note Payable (g)

$450,000

5/1/2019

5/1/2020

18%

$0

$450,000

Note Payable (h)

$180,000

7/5/2019

1/1/2020

18%

$0

$180,000

Note Payable (i)

$180,000

7/15/2019

1/11/2020

18%

$0

$180,000

Note Payable (j)

$225,000

8/22/2019

3/31/2020

 

$225,000

$165,000

Note Payable (k)

$180,000

8/26/2019

2/22/2020

18%

$0

$180,000

Note Payable (l)

$180,000

9/5/2019

3/3/2020

18%

$0

$180,000

Note Payable (m)

$90,000

9/13/2019

3/11/2020

18%

$0

$90,000

Note Payable (n)

$180,000

9/13/2019

3/11/2020

18%

$0

$180,000

Note Payable (o)

$90,000

9/23/2019

3/21/2020

18%

$0

$90,000

Note Payable (p)

$150,000

9/30/2019

3/31/2020

20%

$0

$150,000

Note Payable (q)

$180,000

10/15/2019

4/12/2020

18%

$95,000

$180,000

Note Payable (r)

$180,000

11/5/2019

5/3/2020

18%

$0

$180,000

Note Payable (s)

$90,000

11/12/2019

5/10/2020

18%

$0

$90,000

Note Payable (t)

$100,000

11/19/2019

11/19/2020

18%

$0

$50,000

Note Payable (u)

$75,000

11/20/2019

5/20/2020

16%

$0

$75,000

Note Payable (v)

$455,670

12/17/2019

6/4/2022

12%

$408,875

$455,670

Note Payable (w)

$134,386

12/20/2019

 

 

 

$134,386

Note Payable (x)

 

12/31/2019

 

 

$12,219

$17,400

Note Payable (y)

$201,000

1/30/2020

6/1/2020

12%

$183,000

 

Note Payable (z)

$125,000

1/31/2020

1/31/2021

7.5%

$0

 

Note Payable (aa)

$225,000

2/14/2020

1/14/2021

25%

$18,750

 

Note Payable (ab)

$90,000

2/18/2020

2/18/2021

18%

$0

 

Note Payable (ac)

$180,000

2/20/2020

2/20/2021

18%

$0

 

Note Payable (ad)

$200,000

3/6/2020

7/6/2021

12%

$200,000

 

Note Payable (ae)

$722,422

3/10/2020

2/8/2024

11.5%

$679,609

 

Note Payable (af)

$90,000

3/11/2020

9/11/2020

18%

$0

 

Note Payable (ag)

$300,000

3/26/2020

3/26/2021

6%

$300,000

 

Note Payable (ah)

$150,000

4/1/2020

10/1/2020

20%

$0

 

Note Payable (ai)

$8,000

4/15/2020

5/15/2021

 

$8,000

 

Note Payable (aj)

$18,343

4/15/2020

5/15/2021

 

$18,343

 

Note Payable (ak)

$180,000

4/25/2020

10/25/2020

18%

$0

 

Note Payable (al)

$450,000

5/1/2020

10/31/2020

18%

$0

 

Note Payable (bn)

$100,000

5/20/2020

11/20/2020

18%

$0

 

Note Payable (am)

$100,000

6/10/2020

12/10/2020

 

$100,000

 

Note Payable (an)

$75,000

6/15/2020

6/15/2021

18%

$75,000

 

Note Payable (ao)

$101,000

6/18/2020

12/18/2020

 

$101,000

 

Note Payable (ap)

$50,000

6/29/2020

9/29/2020

 

$0

 

Note Payable (aq)

$102,000

7/3/2020

10/3/2020

 

$72,188

 

Note Payable (ar)

$150,000

7/31/2020

7/31/2021

12%

$0

 


F-13


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 7 – NOTES PAYABLE – WORKING CAPITAL (CONTINUED)

 

NOTE PAYABLE SCHEDULE (CONTINUED)

 

Type

Original Amount

Origination Date

Maturity Date

Effective

Annual

Interest

Rate

Balance at

December 31, 2020

Balance at

December 31, 2019

Note Payable (as)

$150,000

8/5/2020

8/5/2021

12%

$134,400

 

Note Payable (at)

$350,000

9/3/2020

9/3/2021

12%

$392,000

 

Note Payable (au)

$100,000

9/10/2020

9/10/2021

12%

$100,000

 

Note Payable (av)

$250,000

10/1/2020

1/2/2021

8%

$250,000

 

Note Payable (aw)

$100,000

10/6/2020

10/6/2021

12%

$100,000

 

Note Payable (ax)

$200,000

10/13/2020

10/13/2021

12%

$200,000

 

Note Payable (ay)

$250,000

10/21/2020

4/21/2021

8%

$250,000

 

Note Payable (az)

$450,000

11/01/2020

4/30/2021

20%

$450,000

 

Note Payable (ba)

$150,000

11/1/2020

4/30/2021

20%

$150,000

 

Note Payable (bb)

$118,049

11/19/2020

11/19/2021

18%

$118,049

 

Note Payable (bc)

$109,200

11/20/2020

5/21/2021

18%

$109,200

 

Note Payable (bd)

$60,000

12/16/2020

12/16/2021

18%

$60,000

 

Note Payable (be)

$40,000

1/6/2021

1/7/2022

18%

 

 

Note Payable (bf)

$117,600

3/1/2021

4/21/2021

8%

 

 

Note Payable (bg)

$50,000

3/4/2021

3/4/2022

12%

 

 

Note Payable (bh)

$273,187

3/31/2021

12/1/2021

 

 

 

Note Payable (bi)

$1,000,000

4/9/2021

10/6/2021

8%

 

 

Note Payable (bj)

$591,000

4/18/2021

9/1/2023

 

 

 

Note Payable (bk)

$639,956

4/21/2021

4/22/2021

8%

 

 

Note Payable (bl)

$151,688

4/22/2021

5/1/2021

 

 

 

Note Payable (bm)

$190,000

4/30/2021

10/30/2021

 

 

 

Unamortized Discount

 

 

 

 

$(777,610)

$(370,584)

Total

 

 

 

 

$4,672,096

$3,595,561

 

(a)On March 4, 2018, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party to develop a new product. The new product has yet to be produced. The Company and the unrelated party are in discussions to consolidate this note which is in default into a new current note or convert the note balance into equity. 

 

(b)On January 9, 2019, the Company accepted a loan from Amazon Lending for $7,000 that was extended to $11,000 on July 11, 2019 and to $26,000 on January 10, 2020. This loan is paid in full. 

 

(c)On November 1, 2018, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party for working capital. The Company and the unrelated party are in discussions to consolidate this note which is in default into a new current note or convert the note balance into equity. 

 

(d)On December 31, 2018, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party for working capital. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated March 10, 2020, with the unrelated party. 

 

(e)On January 14, 2019, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party for working capital. The Company and the unrelated party are in discussions to consolidate this note which is in default into a new current note, pay the balance on the note, or convert the note balance into equity. 

 

(f)On March 1, 2019, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party for working capital. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated September 30, 2019. 

 

(g)On May 1, 2019, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party for working capital. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated May 1, 2020. 


F-14


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 7 – NOTES PAYABLE – WORKING CAPITAL (CONTINUED)

 

(h)On July 5, 2019, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to manufacture inventory. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated February 14, 2020. 

 

(i)On July 15, 2019, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to manufacture inventory. The balance of the note was converted into shares of the Company’s common stock at $0.10 per share. 

 

(j)On August 22, 2019, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The note, which is in default, requires the Company to issue 10,000 shares of common stock to the unrelated party each day the note is in default. 

 

(k)On August 26, 2019, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to manufacture inventory. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated February 20, 2020. 

 

(l)On September 5, 2019, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to manufacture inventory. The balance of the note was consolidated into shares of the Company’s common stock at $0.10 per share. 

 

(m)On September 13, 2019, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to manufacture inventory. The balance of the note was consolidated into shares of the Company’s common stock at $0.10 per share. 

 

(n)On September 13, 2019, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to manufacture inventory. The balance of the note was consolidated into shares of the Company’s common stock at $0.10 per share. 

 

(o)On September 23, 2019, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to manufacture inventory. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated March 11, 2020. 

 

(p)On September 30, 2019, the Company entered into a promissory note. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated April 1, 2020. 

 

(q)On October 15, 2019, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to manufacture inventory. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated April 22, 2021. 

 

(r)On November 5, 2019, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to manufacture inventory. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated April 25, 2021. 

 

(s)On November 12, 2019, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to manufacture inventory. The balance of the note was consolidated into shares of the Company’s common stock at $0.067 per share. 

 

(t)On November 19, 2019, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated November 19, 2020. 

 

(u)On November 20, 2019, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated November 20, 2020. 

 

(v)On December 17, 2019, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated April 18, 2021. 

 

(w)On December 20, 2019, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to manufacture inventory. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated March 10, 2020. 

 

(x)On December 20, 2018, the Company entered into a loan agreement with American Express. The Company makes monthly payments to satisfy the loan agreement. 

 

(y)On January 30, 2020, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to manufacture inventory. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated April 18, 2021. 


F-15


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 7 – NOTES PAYABLE – WORKING CAPITAL (CONTINUED)

 

(z)On January 31, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The note was paid in full. 

 

(aa)On February 14, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The note was paid in full. 

 

(ab)On February 18, 2020, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party. The balance of the note was converted into shares of the Company’s common stock at $0.10 per share. 

 

(ac)On February 20, 2020, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party. The balance of the note was converted into shares of the Company’s common stock at $0.10 per share. 

 

(ad)On March 6, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The Company and the unrelated party are in discussions regarding the note, which is in default. 

 

(ae)On March 10, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The Company and the unrelated party are in discussions regarding the note, which is in default. 

 

(af)On March 11, 2020, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to manufacture inventory. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated September 10, 2020. 

 

(ag)On March 26, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. 

 

(ah)On April 1, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated November 1, 2020. 

 

(ai)On April 15, 2020, the Company received an Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL). The loan has been forgiven. 

 

(aj)On April 15, 2020, the Company received a Paycheck Protection Program Loan. The loan has been forgiven. 

 

(ak)On April 25, 2020, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to manufacture inventory. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated October 13, 2020. 

 

(al)On May 1, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated October 31, 2020. 

 

(am)On June 10, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated March 31, 2021. 

 

(an)On June 15, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. 

 

(ao)On June 18, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated March 31, 2021. 

 

(ap)On June 29, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated March 31, 2021. 

 

(aq)On July 3, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated March 31, 2021. 

 

(ar)On July 31, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The note was paid in full. 

 

(as)On August 5, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The Company and the unrelated party are in discussions regarding the note, which is in default. 

 

(at)On September 3, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The Company and the unrelated party are in discussions regarding the note, which is in default. 


F-16


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 7 – NOTES PAYABLE – WORKING CAPITAL (CONTINUED)

 

(au)On September 10, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The Company and the unrelated party are in discussions regarding the note, which is in default. 

 

(av)On October 1, 2020, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with a related party. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated April 21, 2021. 

 

(aw)On October 6, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The Company and the unrelated party are in discussions regarding the note, which is in default. 

 

(ax)On October 13, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The Company and the unrelated party are in discussions regarding the note, which is in default. 

 

(ay)On October 21, 2020, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with a related party. The balance of the note was consolidated into a new note dated April 21, 2021. 

 

(az)On November 1, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. 

 

(ba)On November 1, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. 

 

(bb)On November 19, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. 

 

(bc)On November 20, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. 

 

(bd)On December 16, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. 

 

(be)On January 6, 2021, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. 

 

(bf)On March 1, 2021, a related party advanced money that was consolidated into a new note dated April 21, 2021. 

 

(bg)On March 4, 2021, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The Company and unrelated party are in discussions regarding the note, which is in default. 

 

(bh)On March 31, 2021, the Company entered into a forbearance agreement with an unrelated party to refinance existing loan amounts of $273,187. 

 

(bi)On April 9, 2021, the Company entered into a bridge loan agreement with an related party. 

 

(bj)On April 18, 2021, the Company entered into a secured promissory note with an unrelated party to refinance existing loan amounts of $408,875 and $183,000. 

 

(bk)On April 21, 2021, the Company entered into a settlement agreement with a related party and paid off $617,600 of principal plus interest. 

 

(bl)On April 22, 2021, the Company entered into a settlement agreement with an unrelated party and paid off $95,000 of principal plus interest. 

 

(bm)On April 30, 2021, an officer of the Company loaned $190,000 to the Company. 

 

(bn)On May 20, 2020, the Company entered into a promissory note with an unrelated party. The balance of the note and the earned interest was rolled into a new note dated November 20, 2020. 


F-17


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 8- CONVERTIBLE DEBENTURE – RELATED PARTY

 

Since September 16, 2016, the Company sold convertible debentures in the amount of $2,405,000 in the form of 12% three-year convertible term notes. Interest is accrued at an annual rate of 12% and is payable in common stock at maturity. Both principal and interest may be converted into common stock at a price of $0.50 per share after the passage of 181 days. The Company may redeem the debenture at its option or force conversion after common stock trades at a price in excess of $1.00 per share for five days. The Holder may force redemption after the Company raises $3 million dollars in equity. The holders of the convertible debentures were issued three year warrants to purchase 2,405,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at $1.00 per share. As of December 31, 2018, the Company received $2,405,000 under this convertible debenture. In April and November, 2018, debentures with face value of $2,060,000 plus accrued interest of $280,529 were converted into 4,681,058 shares of common stock. As of December 31, 2019, the Company had a face value of $345,000 due under this convertible debenture.

 

The convertible debenture holder, based on its agreement, with maturities beginning September 16, 2019 has the option to convert their principal and interest into 690,000 (plus 60,980 for accrued interest) shares of common stock. The fair value of the embedded beneficial conversion feature resulted in a discount of $227,110 to the convertible debenture – related party at December 31, 2019 and a discount of $137,110 at December 31, 2020.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company sold convertible debt instruments in the amount of $270,000. Since public trading of the Company’s common stock began in 2018, the Company determined a beneficial conversion discount of $270,000 applied to the 2018 sales the convertible debt instruments. The discount reduced the liability balance of the debentures to $0 when the debentures were issued and recorded the proceeds of the sale as Additional paid in Capital. The discount will be amortized over the three year term of the debentures. The discounted balance of the convertible debentures at December 31, 2020 was $297,890.

 

The Company analyzed the conversion option for derivative accounting consideration under ASC 815-15 “Derivatives and Hedging” and fair value measurement under ASC 820 and determined that the beneficial conversion feature under the convertible debenture should be recorded as a discount to debt if market was more than the conversion feature.

 

The convertible debenture - related party is measured at fair value at the end of each reporting period or termination of the debenture agreement with the change in fair value recorded to earnings. The fair value of the embedded beneficial conversion feature did not result in a discount to the convertible debenture - related party. The discount if and when we have one will be amortized over the term of agreement or modification to the agreement to interest expense using the straight-line method that approximates the effective interest method.

 

The Company used the eight steps to determine fair value under ASC 820. (1) Identify the item to be valued and the unit of account. (2) Determine the principal or most advantageous market and the relevant market participants. (3) Select the valuation premise to be used for asset measurements. (4) Consider the risk assumptions applicable to liability measurements. (5) Identify available inputs. (6) Select the appropriate valuation technique(s). (7) Make the measurement. (8) Determine amounts to be recognized and information to be disclosed.

 

Fair value was determined by the market price of the Company’s publicly traded stock with no discount allowed. This was determined as of the effective date of the agreement entered convertible debenture - related party. The conversion price was then compared to fair value, determined by market price and the difference between the two multiplied by the number of shares that would be issued upon conversion. The Company has not had any market activity within its public market. Private transactions between willing buyers and willing sellers have ranged from $0.02 to $0.50 per share. These transactions were not conducted through a broker-dealer network. Since public trading of the common stock began in 2018, market price of the Company’s traded stock has ranged from $0.05 to $2.50 per share.


F-18


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 9 – EMBEDDED DERIVATIVES – FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

 

Since September 2016 the Company entered into a financial instrument, which consists of a convertible debenture, containing a conversion feature. Generally financial instruments are convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock; at prices that are either marked to the volume weighted average price of the Company’s publicly traded stock or a static price determinative from each financial instrument agreement. These prices may be at a significant discount to market as determined overall by the volume weighted average price of the Company’s publicly traded common stock. The Company for all intent and purposes considers these discounts to be fair market value as would be determined in an arm’s length transaction with a willing buyer and the restrictive nature of the common stock issued, unless issued pursuant to a registration or some other registered shares with the SEC.

 

The Company accounts for the fair value of the conversion feature in accordance with ASC 815-15, Derivatives and Hedging; Embedded Derivatives, which requires the Company to bifurcate and separately account for the conversion features as an embedded derivative contained in the Company’s convertible debt and original issue discount notes payable. The Company is required to carry the embedded derivative on its balance sheet at fair value and account for any unrealized change in fair value as a component in its results of operations. The Company valued the embedded derivatives using eight steps to determine fair value under ASC 820. (1) Identify the item to be valued and the unit of account. (2) Determine the principal or most advantageous market and the relevant market participants. (3) Select the valuation premise to be used for asset measurements. (4) Consider the risk assumptions applicable to liability measurements. (5) Identify available inputs. (6) Select the appropriate valuation technique(s). (7) Make the measurement. (8) Determine amounts to be recognized and information to be disclosed.

 

The fair value of the conversion feature of the financial instrument as of December 31, 2018 was $0. The Company did not record any expense associated with the embedded derivatives at December 31, 2018. No embedded derivative expense was realized as there was no change in the conversion price. The conversion price for this financial instrument was $0.50 per share which is higher than market as there have been no sales of the Company’s common stock.

 

NOTE 10 – INCOME TAXES

 

At December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, the Company had a net operating loss carryforward of $20,870,713 and $14,889,631, respectively, which begins to expire in 2034.

 

Components of net deferred tax asset, including a valuation allowance, are as follows:

 

 

 

December 31,

2020

 

December 31,

2019,

Deferred tax asset:

 

 

 

 

Net operating loss carryforward

$

4,382,850

$

3,126,823

Total deferred tax asset

 

4,382,850

 

3,126,823

Less: Valuation allowance

 

(4,382,850)

 

(3,126,823)

Net deferred tax asset

$

-

$

-

 

Valuation allowance for deferred tax assets as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 was $4,382,850 and $3,126,823, respectively. In assessing the recovery of the deferred tax asset, management considers whether it is more likely than not that some portion or the entire deferred tax asset will not be realized. The ultimate realization of the deferred tax asset is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income in the periods in which those temporary differences become deductible. Management considers the scheduled reversals of future deferred tax assets, projected future taxable income, and tax planning strategies in making this assessment. As a result, management determined it was more likely than not deferred tax assets will not be realized as of December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 and recognized 100% valuation allowance for each period.

 

Reconciliation between statutory rate and the effective tax rate for and as of December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

Federal statutory rate

 

(21.0)%

State taxes, net of federal benefit

 

(0.00)%

Change in valuation allowance

 

21.0%

Effective tax rate

 

0.0%


F-19


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 11 – SHARE CAPITAL

 

The Company is authorized to issue 100,000,000 shares of its $0.001 par value common stock and 1,000,000 shares of its $0.001 par value preferred stock.

 

Common stock

 

On December 15, 2014, the Company issued to its founder, then an officer and director of the Company, 6,000,000 shares of its $0.001 par value common stock at a price of $0.001 per share for services provided upon organization. The services were valued at $6,000.

 

On January 15, 2015, the Company issued to its founder 3,000,000 shares of its $0.001 par value common stock at a price of $0.008 per share for certain intangible assets and tangible assets (see Note 3 - Intangible Assets). Mr. David Estus, then our sole officer and director, incurred more than $50,000 in developing or acquiring the intangible and tangible assets for which the Company valued at $24,000.

 

The Company filed a registration statement on Form S-1 which was declared effective by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on October 14, 2015. The Form S-1 allowed the Company to solicit investors for investment in a direct public offering of $60,000. Twenty six (26) investors invested at a price of $0.01 per share for the entire offering which closed on December 11, 2015.

 

The Company issued 17,421,000 shares of its common stock and issued warrants to purchase 500,000 shares of common stock to shareholders of American Rebel, Inc. and cancelled 9,000,000 shares of common stock owned by American Rebel, Inc. to complete the acquisition of American Rebel, Inc. which was accounted for as a reverse merger.

 

During June 2017, prior to the merger, American Rebel, Inc issued 2,800,000 shares of common stock as compensation and recorded an expense based on fair market value of $0.50 per share for a total expense of $1,400,000. On June 19, 2017, in connection with the merger and acquisition of the subsidiary, the Company exchanged 17,421,000 shares of common stock with stockholders of American Rebel, Inc. and cancelled 9,000,000 shares of common stock held by American Rebel, Inc. American Rebel, Inc. became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company upon completion of the exchange.

 

On July 6, 2017, the Company’s wholly-owned operating subsidiary completed the sale of a secured promissory note in the principal amount of $250,000 with an interest rate of 12% per annum to a private investor, and current stockholder. The note is secured by a pledge of all of the Company’s current inventory and the chief executive officer’s personal guaranty. This working capital note requires payments equal to 75% of current sales and matures in 180 days. In connection with this note, the Company issued 250,000 shares of its common stock to the noteholder.

 

On August 6, 2017, the Company’s wholly-owned subsidiary completed an agreement to acquire a right to a trade show booth location early in 2018. In connection with this acquisition, the Company issued 100,000 shares of its common stock to the seller.

 

In January 2018, the Company’s wholly owned subsidiary completed an agreement to acquire professional services during 2018 in exchange for 500,000 shares of the Company’s common stock. The common stock is to be issued in three stages, 166,667 shares in January 2018, 166,667 shares in May 2018 and the remainder in September 2018. The shares were valued at $.50 per share consistent with valuation of other share issues.

 

In January 2018, the Company issued 300,000 shares of common stock to settle a liability for professional services billed in the amount of $180,000.

 

In January 2019, the Company issued a 30 day warrant to purchase 250,000 shares of its common stock at a price of $0.01 per share to pay consulting fees. Total fair value of $160,000 was recorded as an expense of $160,000 at June 30, 2019. The warrants were exercised and 250,000 shares of common stock were issued.

 

In January 2019, the Company’s wholly-owned operating subsidiary completed the sale of a secured promissory note in the principal amount of $300,000 with an interest rate of 16.66% per annum to a private investor. The note is secured by a pledge of all of the Company’s current inventory and the chief executive officer’s personal guaranty. This working capital note matures in 120 days. In connection with this note, the Company issued 100,000 shares of its common stock to the note holder.

 

In May 2019, the Company identified 50,000 shares of common stock in its subsidiary that had been awarded at date of incorporation but not recorded by the Company. The share count was corrected to include these shares valued at Par value of $0.001.


F-20


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 11 – SHARE CAPITAL (CONTINUED)

 

In September 2019, the Company issued 1,400,000 shares of its common stock in conjunction with notes payable and recorded loan discount of $812,000 based on fair market value of $0.30 and $0.95 per share. Of the loan discount recorded, the amount that had been amortized to interest expense at September 30, 2019 was $228,460.

 

In September 2019, the Company issued 9,700,000 shares of its common stock to pay professional and consulting fees and recorded an expense based on fair market value of $0.30 and $0.95 per share for a total expense of $3,432,000, and recorded prepaid expense of $675,750.

 

In November 2019, the Company issued 150,000 shares of its common stock in conjunction with notes payable and recorded loan discount of $86,000 based on fair market value of $0.30 and $0.22 per share. Of the loan discount recorded, the amount that had been amortized to interest expense at December 31, 2019 was $25,744.

 

In December 2019, the Company issued 1,500,000 shares of its common stock to pay professional and consulting fees and recorded an expense based on fair market value of $0.22 per share for a total expense of $330,000.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2020, the Company issued 17,275,871 shares of its Common Stock and issued five year warrants to sell 2,500,000 shares of common stock in connection with issue of short-term loans. The fair value of these share incentives was calculated to be $1,881,761 which was recorded as a discount to the notes payable and amortized to interest expense over the term of those loan agreements. Interest expense recorded as a result of amortization of discount for the year ended December 31, 2020 is $1,411,203.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2020, the Company issued 9,700,000 shares of its Common Stock and completed the conversion of short-term notes with a face value of $1,080,000 and accrued interest. The fair value of these shares was calculated to be $1,651,900, resulting in a Loss on Extinguishment of Debt of $916,242.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2020, the Company issued 2,700,000 shares of its Common Stock to pay professional and consulting fees. Total fair value of $375,000 was recorded as an expense.

 

At December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, there were 72,808,058 and 43,062,058 shares of common stock issued and outstanding, respectively.

 

NOTE 12 – WARRANTS AND OPTIONS

 

Since September 16, 2016, in connection with the convertible debenture –related party (see Note 8 – Convertible Debenture – Related Party) the Company issued three-year warrants to purchase 2,405,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at $1.00 per share. In conjunction with the conversion of convertible debt at April 30, 2018, the Company agreed to reduce the exercise price of the Warrants to $.50 per share.

 

On June 19, 2017, the Company issued five-year warrants to purchase 500,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at $0.50 per share as compensation.

 

In October 2020, the Company issued five-year warrants to purchase 2.500,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at $0.10 per share in connection with short term financing. In November 2020, the Company issued two-year warrants to purchase 50,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at $1.00 per share in connection with short term financing.

 

As of December 31, 2018, there were 2,245,000 warrants issued and outstanding. As of December 31, 2020, there were 3,395,000 warrants outstanding to acquire additional shares of common stock.

 

The Company evaluates outstanding warrants as derivative liabilities and will recognize any changes in the fair value through earnings. The Company determined that the Warrants have an immaterial fair value at December 31, 2020. The warrants do not trade in a highly active securities market, and as such, the Company estimated the fair value of these common stock equivalents using Black-Scholes and the following assumptions:

 


F-21


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 12 – WARRANTS AND OPTIONS (CONTINUED)

 

Expected volatility was based primarily on historical volatility. Historical volatility was computed using daily pricing observations for recent periods. The Company’s common stock has not traded so the volatility computation was based on other similarly situated companies. The Company believes this method produced an estimate that was representative of the Company’s expectations of future volatility over the expected term which due to their maturity period as expiry, it was three years. The Company had no reason to believe future volatility over the expected remaining life of these common stock equivalents was likely to differ materially from historical volatility. Expected life was based on three years due to the expiry of maturity. The risk-free rate was based on the U.S. Treasury rate that corresponded to the expected term of the common stock equivalents.

 

 

 

December 31,

2020

 

December 31,

2019

Stock Price

$

0.104

$

0.285

Exercise Price

$

0.26

$

1.00

Term (expected in years)

 

4.73

 

3.00

Volatility

 

259.2%

 

262.4%

Annual Rate of Dividends

 

0.0%

 

0.0%

Risk-Free Rate

 

0.18%

 

1.92%

 

Stock Purchase Warrant

 

The following table summarizes all warrant activity for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019.

 

 

 

 

Weighted-Average

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercise Price

 

Remaining

 

Intrinsic

 

Shares

 

Per Share

 

term

 

value

Outstanding, December 31, 2018

2,245,000

$

0.57

 

1.05 years

 

-

Granted

425,000

$

0.41

 

1.34 years

 

-

Exercised

250,000

$

0.01

 

-

 

-

Expired

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

Outstanding and Exercisable at December 31, 2019

2,420,000

$

0.61

 

.73 years

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Granted

2,550,000

$

0.12

 

4.75 years

 

-

Exercised

 

 

 

 

-

 

-

Expired

(1,475,000)

 

-

 

-

 

-

Outstanding and Exercisable at December 31, 2020

3,495,000

$

0.26

 

4.73 years

 

-

 

NOTE 13 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Rental Payments under Non-cancelable Operating Leases

 

The Company has a lease for warehouse and shipping space in Lenexa, Kansas which expires in January 2026. And an annually renewable lease for manufacturing and warehouse space in Chanute, Kansas. The following is a schedule, by year, of the future minimum rental payments under the lease:

 

Year ended December 31,

 

 

2021

 

158,029

2022

 

72,638

2023

 

74,112

2024

 

75,362

2025

 

76,390

Subsequent

 

19,162

Total

$

$475,693

 

Rent costs totaled approximately $159,120 and $121,992 for years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.


F-22


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 14 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

The Company evaluated all events that occurred after the balance sheet date of December 31, 2020 through the date the financial statements were issued and determined that there were the following subsequent events.

 

Subsequent to December 31, 2020, the Company entered into a one-year promissory note dated January 6, 2021, in the amount of $40,000 paying 18% interest. Interest and principal are due at maturity.

 

Subsequent to December 31, 2020, the Company received an equity investment of $50,000 on January 12, 2021, to purchase 833,333 shares of the Company’s common stock by Subscription Agreement at $0.06 per share..

 

Subsequent to December 31, 2020, the Company entered into a one-year promissory note dated March 4, 2021 in the amount of $50,000. The Company will pay monthly interest payments at 12% per annum to the holder of the note. A component of the note issued 600,000 shares of common stock to the note holder.

 

Subsequent to December 31, 2020, the Company received an equity investment of $100,000 on March 5, 2021, to purchase 1,666,667 shares of the Company’s common stock by Subscription Agreement at $0.06 per share.

 

On March 1, 2021, a related party advanced the Company $117,600 to make outstanding note payments.

 

On March 10, 2021, the Company issued 280,000 shares of common stock to pay interest on an outstanding note.

 

On March 10, 2021, the Company issued 310,000 shares of common stock to pay interest on an outstanding note.

 

On March 24, 2021, the Company authorized the issuance of 2,500,000 shares of common stock to a consulting company controlled by an officer, as consideration of the termination of such consultant’s services and to relieve the Company from certain ongoing compensation commitments. Such shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock.

 

On March 24, 2021, the Company authorized the issuance of 2,145,000 shares of common stock to its CEO and 2,145,000 shares of common stock to its President. 4,190,000 of such shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock

 

Effective March 31, 2021, the Company entered into a forbearance agreement with a current debt holder, whereby the Company agreed to repay four notes owed to such holder with an initial payment of $100,000 and eight monthly installment payments totaling $173,187.50.

 

On April 9, 2021, the Company received a $1,000,000 bridge loan from a current officer/director. As part of the bridge loan, the Company issued the officer/director a five-year warrant to purchase 2,000,000 shares of common stock at $0.10 per share and pledged 2,000,000 shares of common stock as security for the bridge loan.

 

On April 9, 2021, the Company entered into two employment agreements with recently appointed officers, whereby it agreed to issue 8,750,000 shares of common stock to such officers. In addition, the Company entered into amendments to the current employment agreements with its CEO and President, whereby it agreed to issue 8,000,000 shares of common stock. All of these shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock.

 

On April 18, 2021, the Company executed a $591,000 secured replacement promissory note with a current debt holder, whereby the Company agreed to consolidate and repay two notes owed to such holder with an initial payment of $100,000 and monthly installment payments for the balance of the note.

 

On April 20, 2021, the Company issued 50,000 shares of common stock in return for services rendered.

 

On April 21, 2021, the Company entered into a settlement agreement with a current debt holder, whereby the Company agreed to repay two notes and an advancement from such holder, including accrued interest at 8% per annum, with a payment of $639,955.64.


F-23


 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

 

NOTE 14 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS (CONTINUED)

 

On April 22, 2021, the Company entered into a settlement agreement with a current debt holder, whereby the Company agreed to repay the $151,687.97 balance owing on the note owed to such holder with a cash payment of $50,000 and the issuance of 2,000,000 shares of common stock, with a stated value of $100,687.97.

 

On April 30, 2021, the Company received a $190,000 six-month loan from a current officer/director.


F-24


 

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

We have had no disagreements with accountants on accounting and financial disclosure.

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

The Company maintains disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the Company's Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time communicated to the Company's management, including its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure based closely on the definition of “disclosure controls and procedures” in Rule 13a-15(e). The Company's disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide a reasonable level of assurance of reaching the Company's desired disclosure control objectives. In designing periods specified in the SEC's rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and evaluating the disclosure controls and procedures, management recognized that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives, and management necessarily was required to apply its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures. The Company's certifying officer, Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and Principal Accounting Officer, has concluded that the Company's disclosure controls and procedures are effective in reaching that level of assurance.

 

Our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer, Charles A. Ross, Jr., evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended) as of the end of the period covered by this Report. Based on the evaluation, Mr. Ross concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures are effective in timely alerting him to material information relating to us required to be included in our periodic SEC filings. The Company hired a financial expert with the experience in creating and managing internal control systems as well as to continue to improve the effectiveness of our internal controls and financial disclosure controls.

 

Management's Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended). Management conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on the criteria set forth in the 2013 Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission ("COSO"). Based on this evaluation, management has concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2020. 

 

This annual report does not include an attestation report of our registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. As we are a non-accelerated filer, management's report is not subject to attestation by our registered public accounting firm.

 

This report shall not be deemed to be filed for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or otherwise subject to the liabilities of that section , and is not incorporated by reference into any filing of the Company, whether made before or after the date hereof, regardless of any general incorporation language in such filing. 

 

Limitations on the Effectiveness of Controls

 

Management has confidence in its internal controls and procedures. The Company’s management believes that a control system, no matter how well designed and operated can provide only reasonable assurance and cannot provide absolute assurance that the objectives of the internal control system are met, and no evaluation of internal controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within a company have been detected. Further, the design of an internal control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitation in all internal control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issuers and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected.

 

Changes in Internal Controls

 

There were no changes in the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2020 that have materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal controls over financial reporting.

 

Internal control systems, no matter how well designed and operated, have inherent limitations. Therefore, even a system which is determined to be effective cannot provide absolute assurance that all control issues have been detected or prevented. Our systems of internal controls are designed to provide reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation.


36


 

 

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

 

Current Indebtedness – Note Defaults

 

We have entered into a number of promissory notes, some of which are in default as of December 31, 2020, or went into default before the filing of this Annual Report (See Notes 5, 6, 7 and 8 to the financial statements).

 

As of December 30, 2020, we only had cash and cash equivalents of $60,899 and had a significant amount of short-term debt in default. The short-term debt agreements provide legal remedies for satisfaction of defaults, including increased interest rates, default fees and other financial penalties. As of the date of this Annual Report none of the lenders have pursued their legal remedies. Management’s plan is to raise additional funds in the form of debt or equity in order to continue to fund losses until such time as revenues are able to sustain the Company. To date, the main source of funding has been through the issuance of debt securities. There is no assurance that management will be successful in being able to continue to obtain additional funding or defend potential litigation by note holders.

 

Bridge Loan Agreement and Promissory Note

 

On April 9, 2021, the Company received a six-month secured bridge loan for $1,000,000 from Ronald A. Smith, a stockholder and recently appointed Chief Operating Officer and chairman. The loan bears interest at 8% and is to be prepaid from any financing in excess of $2,000,000. If the Company is unable to raise $2,000,000 by the original six-month maturity date, the loan will be extended to a 36-month term at 12% with varied principal and interest payments during such extended term. Such note is secured by all the tangible and intangible assets of the Company that are not currently secured by other indebtedness or that become unencumbered through the repayment of other indebtedness. As part of the loan, the Company issued the lender a warrant to purchase 2,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $0.10 per share with a five-year term. In addition, the Company pledged 2,000,000 shares of common stock as security for the loan. A copy of the bridge loan agreement is attached hereto as Exhibit 4.13 and the bridge loan note is attached as Exhibit 10.33.

 

On April 30, 2021, the Company received another six-month loan from Mr. Smith for $190,000. The loan bears interest at 1% and is to be prepaid from any financing in excess of $500,000 during the term. A copy of the term note is attached hereto as Exhibit 10.39.

 

Employment Agreements and Amendments

 

On April 9, 2021, we entered into employment agreements with Ronald A. Smith, COO, and Rocco LaVista, VP of Business Development. Pursuant to the agreements, we agreed to issue Mr. Smith 4,750,000 shares of common stock and Mr. LaVista 4,000,000 shares of common stock once we amend our articles of incorporation to increase our shares of authorized common stock. Each of these employment agreements are described in detail in Item 11 below. Copies of the employment agreements are attached hereto as Exhibit 10.34 and 10.35.

 

On April 9, 2021, we entered into amendments to the employment agreements with Charles A. Ross, Jr., CEO, and Doug Grau, President. Pursuant to the agreements, we agreed to issue each of Messrs. Ross and Grau 4,000,000 shares of common stock once we amend our articles of incorporation to increase our shares of authorized common stock. Each of these amendments are described in detail in Item 11 below. Copies of the amendments are attached hereto as Exhibit 10.36 and 10.37.

 

Debt Settlements and Revisions

 

On October 1, 2020, the Company borrowed $250,000 from Digital Ally, Inc. (“Digital”) pursuant to an 8% Secured Promissory Note. In addition, on October 21, 2020, the Company borrowed an additional $250,000 from Digital pursuant to an 8% Secured Promissory Note. Further, Digital advanced the Company an additional $117,600 in March of 2021. On April 21, 2021, the Company entered into a settlement agreement with Digital, whereby the Company agreed to repay the two notes and advancement, including accrued interest at 8% per annum, with a payment of $639,955.64 to Digital.

 

Effective March 31, 2021, the Company entered into a forbearance agreement with a current debt holder, whereby the Company agreed to repay four notes owed to such holder with an initial payment of $100,000 and eight monthly installment payments totaling $173,187.50. A copy of the forbearance agreement is attached hereto as Exhibit 10.32.

 

On April 18, 2021, the Company executed a $591,000 secured replacement promissory note with a current debt holder, whereby the Company agreed to consolidate and repay two notes owed to such holder with an initial payment of $100,000 and monthly installment payments for the balance of the note. A copy of the secured replacement promissory note is attached hereto as Exhibit 10.38.

 

On April 22, 2021, the Company entered into a settlement agreement with a current debt holder, whereby the Company agreed to repay the $151,687.97 balance owing on the note owed to such holder with a cash payment of $50,000 and the issuance of 2,000,000 shares of common stock, with a stated value of $100,687.97.


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PART III

 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Directors and Executive Officers

 

The following table sets forth certain information regarding the executive officers and directors of American Rebel Holdings, Inc. as of December 31, 2020 and newly appointed officer and director after year-end. In addition, the table sets forth significant employees of the Company and its wholly-owned operating subsidiary, American Rebel, Inc.

 

All directors of the Company hold office until the next annual meeting of the security holders or until their successors have been elected and qualified. Officers of the Company are appointed by our Board and hold office until their death, resignation or removal from office. Our directors and executive officers, their ages, positions held, and duration as such, are as follows:

 

Name

 

Positions Held with the Company

 

Age

 

Date First Elected or Appointed

Charles A. Ross, Jr.

 

CEO, principal executive officer, treasurer,

principal financial officer and principal accounting officer

 

54

 

June 9, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Doug E. Grau

 

President and Director

 

58

 

February 12, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corey Lambrecht

 

Director

 

51

 

February 12, 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ronald A. Smith

 

Newly appointed Chief Operating Officer and

Chairman of the Board

 

60

 

April 9, 2021

 

SIGNIFICANT EMPLOYEES

 

Name

 

Positions Held with the Company

 

Age

Nathan Findley

 

President, American Rebel Safes

 

44

 

 

 

 

 

Brett Lafferty

 

National Sales Manager, American Rebel Safes

 

37

 

 

 

 

 

Jordan Bath

 

Director of Operations, American Rebel Safes

 

28

 

 

 

 

 

Rocco LaVista

 

Newly appointed VP of Business Development

 

49

 

Charles A. Ross, Jr., CEO, CFO

 

Mr. Ross is currently the Company’s CEO, CFO, and a Director. He has held these positions since June 20, 2016. He is responsible for all duties required of a corporate officer and the development of the business. From December 15, 2014 through April 9, 2021, Mr. Ross served as the sole officer and director of American Rebel, Inc. He know serves as Secretary/Treasurer and a director. American Rebel, Inc. has developed a product line of concealed carry products that officially launch at the 2017 NRA Convention April 27 – 30 in Atlanta, GA. Prior to founding American Rebel, Inc. Mr. Ross founded many companies including Digital Ally, Inc., which he established in 2004. In addition to his entrepreneurial accomplishments, Mr. Ross served as host for ten years of his own television show, Maximum Archery, where he bow hunted all over the world including traditional hunts and some of the world’s most dangerous game. Maximum Archery evolved into his new show, American Rebel, which features Mr. Ross’s music, patriotism, his support of the 2nd Amendment and celebrates the “American Rebel Spirit” in all of us. Mr. Ross has released three CDs and the current single off his third CD, Time to Fight, is a duet with country supergroup Little Texas entitled “Back on the Backroads.” “Back on the Backroads” has received airplay on radio stations across the United States and internationally. Previous singles released by Mr. Ross include “Cold Dead Hand,” “Rebel,” and “What We Do For Fun Around Here.”

 

Doug E. Grau, President

 

Mr. Grau is currently our president and a director. He also serves as a director of American Rebel, Inc., our wholly-owned operating subsidiary. Mr. Grau has produced CEO Andy Ross’s three CDs and has worked with Andy in various capacities for eleven years. Mr. Grau worked as an executive at Warner Bros. Records in Nashville for fifteen years, developing the talents of Travis Tritt, Little Texas, David Ball, Jeff Foxworthy, Bill Engvall, Larry the Cable Guy, Ron White, and others. Mr. Grau graduated from Belmont University in Nashville, TN in 1985 with a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration.


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Corey Lambrecht, Director

 

Mr. Lambrecht is a 20+ year public company executive with broad experience in strategic acquisitions, corporate turnarounds, new business development, pioneering consumer products, corporate licensing, interactive technology services in addition to holding public company executive roles with responsibilities including day-to-day business operations, management, raising capital, board communication and investor relations. He is a Certified Director from the UCLA Anderson Graduate School of Management accredited Directors program. Since 2007 he has been a Director of CUI Global, Inc. (NASDAQ: CUI) and has served multiple terms on the Audit Committee and currently serves as the Compensation Committee Chairman. Mr. Lambrecht served on the Board of ORHub, Inc. (OTC: ORHB) from July 2016 through December 2019. On January 17, 2020, Mr. Lambrecht was appointed to serve as the Chief Financial Officer for Singlepoint Inc. (OTC: SING) and he previously served as a Board Member for Lifestyle Wireless, Inc. which, in 2012 merged into Singlepoint. In December 2011 he joined the Board of Guardian 8 Holdings, a leading non-lethal security product company, serving until early 2016. He most recently served as the President and Chief Operating Officer at Earth911 Inc., a subsidiary of Infinity Resources Holdings Company (OTC: IRHC) from January 2010 to July 2013.

 

NEWLY APPOINTED OFFICER AND DIRECTOR

 

Ronald A. Smith, COO and Chairman

 

Mr. Smith was appointed as Chief Operating Officer and chairman on April 9, 2021. He also serves as CEO/President and a director of American Rebel, Inc., our wholly-owned operating subsidiary. Ronald Smith brings nearly 40 years of experience in company management to his position as CEO of American Rebel. For more than 23 years, he was the Owner/President of LADS Pet Supplies, a premium pet supplies wholesale distributor in the northeastern US that his parents founded in 1963. His role consisted of overseeing all facets of the business including sales and marketing, warehouse operations and shipping, and accounting and finance. Ronald provided a vision for growth and development of the business in a competitive, rapidly growing marketplace. It was Ronald’s leadership that helped guide their team to successfully grow and develop many start-up products into brand leaders in their category and vastly expand the business his parents had founded. As a respected distributor in the industry, he was able to foster business relationships with hundreds of business partners, including Proctor & Gamble, Mars and Bayer. After his nearly 40 years of experiencing the industry evolve into one of the largest and fastest growing sectors, Ronald sold his business to a national distribution company and retired from the pet supplies industry. His passion is developing strong relationships with brands that fall in the independent retail channel and Ronald is excited to use his experience and passion to help build the American Rebel brand into a category leader in the independent channel.

 

SIGNIFICANT EMPLOYEES

 

Nathan Findley, President, American Rebel Safes

 

Nathan joins American Rebel with 10+ years of outdoor and firearms industries experience. Most recently, he served as Director of Sales and Product Development with Liberty Safe. That opportunity stemmed from the acquisition of 9g Products by Liberty Safe where Nathan had a wide range of responsibilities including Product Development, Sourcing and Procurement, and New Dealer Business. education background includes engineering at Kansas State University and business at Johnson County Community College.

 

Brett Lafferty, National Sales Manager, American Rebel Safes

 

Prior to joining American Rebel in January 2019, Brett was Regional Sales Manager for Liberty Safe, responsible for sales in AR, KY, LA, MS, TN. Brett has expanded his territory at American Rebel and he is often travelling to visit accounts or attend trade shows. Brett has been instrumental in the launch of the industry’s first inventory control safe, the AR-INV.

 

Jordan Bath, Director of Operations, American Rebel Safes

 

Jordan joins American Rebel with knowledge and experience in the outdoor industry. He gained this through his work with Liberty Safe and hopes to make American Rebel a household name for safes, concealed carry products and more. In his spare time he can be found anywhere from BBQ competitions to volunteering for the Kansas Department of Wildlife.


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Rocco LaVista, VP of Business Development for American Rebel Holdings, Inc.

 

Mr. LaVista was appointed as Vice President of Business Development on April 9, 2021. Rocco has worked in the financial services industry for the past 25 years and formed Gurkha Consulting LLC, a full-service business consultancy specializing in start-ups to small companies, in early 2017. Upon graduating Cum Laude from Fairleigh Dickinson University in 1994 with a B.S in Accounting, he began his career in the accounting departments at The Dreyfus Corporation and Mitchell Hutchins Asset Management before joining PaineWebber and embarking on an 18 year journey as a registered representative. He has held various FINRA licenses, including the Series 7, 24, 63 and 65. He is currently a licensed Life & Health Insurance producer in the State of NJ. During his tenure as a stockbroker, Rocco was very active in placing Investment Banking deals including Private Placements, Secondary Offerings, PIPEs, NASDAQ Uplistings, SPACs, Convertibles, Bridge Financings, and IPOs. Mr. LaVista is also an officer and director of Beverage USA Holdings, Inc., a private beverage company.

 

Term of Office

 

Each director is elected by the Board and serves until his or her successor is elected and qualified, unless he or she resigns or is removed earlier. Each of our officers is elected to a term of one (1) year and serves until his or her successor is duly elected and qualified, or until he or she is earlier removed from office or resigns.

 

Family Relationships

 

There are no family relationships between or among any of our directors, executive officers and incoming directors or executive officers.

 

Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings

 

Other than disclosed in their biography above, no director, executive officer, significant employee or control person of the Company has been involved in any legal proceeding listed in Item 401(f) of Regulation S-K in the past 10 years.

 

Committees of the Board

 

Our Board held no formal meetings in the prior fiscal year. All proceedings of the Board were conducted by resolutions consented to in writing by the directors and filed with the minutes of the proceedings of the directors. Such resolutions consented to in writing by the directors entitled to vote on that resolution at a meeting of the directors are, according to the Nevada Revised Statutes and the bylaws of our Company, as valid and effective as if they had been passed at a meeting of the directors duly called and held. We do not presently have a policy regarding director attendance at meetings.

 

We do not currently have a standing nominating or compensation committee of the Board, or any committee performing similar functions. Our Board performs the functions of nominating and compensation committees.

 

Audit Committee

 

Our Board has not established an audit committee within the meaning of Section 3(a)(58)(A) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Instead, the entire Board acts as the audit committee within the meaning of Section 3(a)(58)(B) of the Exchange Act and will continue to do so until such time as a separate audit committee has been established.

 

Audit Committee Financial Expert

 

We currently have not designated anyone as an “audit committee financial expert,” as defined in Item 407(d)(5) of Regulation S-K as we have not yet created an audit committee of the Board.

 

Code of Ethics

 

We adopted a Code of Ethics (the “Code”) that applies to directors, officers and employees, including our chief executive officer and chief financial officer. A written copy of the Code is available upon written request to the Company.

 

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

 

Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act requires our executive officers and directors, and persons who own more than 10% of our common stock, to file reports regarding ownership of, and transactions in, our securities with the Securities and Exchange Commission and to provide us with copies of those filings.


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Based solely on our review of the copies of such forms received by us, or written representations from certain reporting persons, we believe that none of our officers, directors and greater than 10% percent beneficial owners complied with all applicable filing requirements.

 

Nominations to the Board of Directors

 

Our directors take a critical role in guiding our strategic direction and oversee the management of the Company. Board candidates are considered based upon various criteria, such as their broad-based business and professional skills and experiences, a global business and social perspective, concern for the long-term interests of the stockholders, diversity, and personal integrity and judgment.

 

In addition, directors must have time available to devote to Board activities and to enhance their knowledge in the growing business. Accordingly, we seek to attract and retain highly qualified directors who have sufficient time to attend to their substantial duties and responsibilities to the Company.

 

Director Nominations

 

As of December 31, 2020, we did not make any material changes to the procedures by which our stockholders may recommend nominees to our Board. In April of 2021, the board approved increasing the size of our board of directors to four persons and appointed a new member, Ronald A. Smith.

 

Board Leadership Structure and Role on Risk Oversight

 

Mr. Ross currently serves as our principal executive officer and director of the Company. We have determined this leadership structure was duly appropriate for us because of our small size, limited operations and resources. The Board will continue to evaluate our leadership structure and modify as deemed appropriate based on size, resources and operations of the Company. It is anticipated that our Board will establish procedures and guidelines to determine an appropriate role for members of the Board in risk oversight function of the Company.

 

Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation

 

No interlocking relationship exists between our Board and the board or compensation committee of any other company, nor has any interlocking relationship existed in the past.


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ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

General Philosophy

 

Our Board is solely responsible for establishing and administering our executive and director compensation plans, if any.

 

Executive Compensation

 

The following table sets forth the salaries and director fees we paid to our current executive officer(s) during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively:

 

SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

 

 

Salary

Bonus

Stock

Awards

Option

Awards

Non-Equity

Incentive Plan

Compensation

Nonqualified

Deferred

Compensation

Earnings

All Other

Compensation

Total

Name and principal position

Year

($)

($)

($)

($)

($)

($)

($)

($)

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

(g)

(h)

(i)

(j)

Charles A. Ross, Jr. (1)

2020

-

-

-

-

-

-

180,250(2)

180,250

CEO, CFO and Director

2019

-

-

817,500(3)

-

-

-

200,000(2)

1,017,500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Doug E. Grau(4)

2020

-

-

-

-

-

-

120,000(2)

120,000

President and Director

2019

-

-

900,000(5)

-

-

-

120,000(2)

1,020,000

 

(1)During the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, the Company had no formal employment arrangement with Mr. Ross for services. Mr. Ross’ compensation was not based on any percentage calculations. The board made all decisions determining the amount and timing of payment for his compensation. 

 

(2)Represents cash compensation paid to the named executive officer. 

 

(3)In September 2019, Mr. Ross received a grant of 2,725,000 shares of common stock, with a deemed value of $0.30 per share 

 

(4)Mr. Grau was appointed as an officer on February 12, 2020. Prior to such appointment, Mr. Grau worked for the Company as a non-executive officer. 

 

(5)In September 2019, Mr. Grau received a grant of 3,000,000 shares of common stock, with a deemed value of $0.30 per share. 

 

Employment Agreements

 

Effective January 1, 2021, the Registrant entered into employment agreements with Charles A. Ross, Jr., its CEO, and Doug E. Grau, its President. These agreements were amended in April of 2021. Further, on April 9, 2021, the Registrant entered into employment agreements with Ronald A. Smith, its COO, and Rocco LaVista, its VP of Business Development.

 

Charles A. Ross, Jr. Employment Agreement and Amendment -

 

In general, Mr. Ross’ employment agreement contains provisions concerning terms of employment, voluntary and involuntary termination, indemnification, severance payments, and other termination benefits, in addition to a non-compete clause and certain other perquisites.

 

The original term of Mr. Ross’ employment agreement runs from January 1, 2021 until December 31, 2025.

 

Mr. Ross’ employment agreement provides for an initial annual base salary of $180,000, which may be adjusted by the board of directors of the Registrant. Pursuant to the amendment to his employment agreement, dated April 9, 2021, Mr. Ross agreed to reduce his salary to $6,667 per month for a six-month period.

 

In addition, Mr. Ross is eligible to receive annual short term incentive bonuses as determined by a review at the discretion of the Registrant’s board of directors.

 

Further, the Registrant granted and issued Mr. Ross 50,000 shares of Series A - Super Voting Convertible Preferred Stock. Pursuant to the amendment to his employment agreement, the Registrant authorized for issuance 4,000,000 shares of common stock to Mr. Ross, with such shares only being issued upon amendment to the Registrant’s articles of incorporation to increase the authorized shares of common stock.


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In the event of a termination of employment with the Registrant by the Registrant without “cause” or by Mr. Ross for “Good Reason” (as defined in the employment agreement), Mr. Ross would receive: (i) a lump sum payment equal to all earned but unpaid base salary through the date of termination of employment; (ii) a lump sum payment equal to 12-months base salary; and (iii) immediate vesting of all equity awards (including but not limited to stock options and restricted shares).

 

In the event of a termination of employment with the Registrant by the Registrant for “cause” (as defined in the employment agreement), by reason of incapacity, disability or death, Mr. Ross, or his estate, would receive a lump sum payment equal to all earned but unpaid base salary through the date of termination of employment, disability or death.

 

In the event of a termination of Mr. Ross’ employment with the Registrant by reason of change in control (as defined in the employment agreement), Mr. Ross, would receive: (i) a lump sum payment equal to all earned but unpaid base salary through the date of termination of employment; (ii) a lump sum payment equal to twelve (12) months Salary plus 100% of his prior year’s Bonus; and (iii) and immediate vesting of all equity awards (including but not limited to stock options and restricted shares).

 

The above description of Mr. Ross’ employment agreement is qualified in its entirety by reference to the full text of that agreement, a copy of which was attached as Exhibit 10.2 to the Form 8-K filed on March 2, 2021. A copy of the amendment to Mr. Ross’ employment agreement is attached hereto as Exhibit 10.36.

 

Doug E. Grau Employment Agreement and Amendment-

 

In general, Mr. Grau’s employment agreement contains provisions concerning terms of employment, voluntary and involuntary termination, indemnification, severance payments, and other termination benefits, in addition to a non-compete clause and certain other perquisites.

 

The original term of Mr. Grau’s employment agreement runs from January 1, 2021 until December 31, 2025.

 

Mr. Grau’s employment agreement provides for an initial annual base salary of $120,000, which may be adjusted by the board of directors of the Registrant. Pursuant to the amendment to his employment agreement, dated April 9, 2021, Mr. Grau agreed to reduce his salary to $6,667 per month for a six-month period.

 

In addition, Mr. Grau is eligible to receive annual short term incentive bonuses as determined by a review at the discretion of the Registrant’s board of directors.

 

Further, the Registrant granted and issued Mr. Grau 50,000 shares of Series A - Super Voting Convertible Preferred Stock. Pursuant to the amendment to his employment agreement, the Registrant authorized for issuance 4,000,000 shares of common stock to Mr. Grau, with such shares only being issued upon amendment to the Registrant’s articles of incorporation to increase the authorized shares of common stock.

 

In the event of a termination of employment with the Registrant by the Registrant without “cause” or by Mr. Grau for “Good Reason” (as defined in the employment agreement), Mr. Grau would receive: (i) a lump sum payment equal to all earned but unpaid base salary through the date of termination of employment; (ii) a lump sum payment equal to 12-months base salary; and (iii) immediate vesting of all equity awards (including but not limited to stock options and restricted shares).

 

In the event of a termination of employment with the Registrant by the Registrant for “cause” (as defined in the employment agreement), by reason of incapacity, disability or death, Mr. Grau, or his estate, would receive a lump sum payment equal to all earned but unpaid base salary through the date of termination of employment, disability or death.

 

In the event of a termination of Mr. Grau’s employment with the Registrant by reason of change in control (as defined in the employment agreement), Mr. Grau, would receive: (i) a lump sum payment equal to all earned but unpaid base salary through the date of termination of employment; (ii) a lump sum payment equal to twelve (12) months Salary plus 100% of his prior year’s Bonus; and (iii) and immediate vesting of all equity awards (including but not limited to stock options and restricted shares).

 

The above description of Mr. Grau’s employment agreement is qualified in its entirety by reference to the full text of that agreement, a copy of which was attached as Exhibit 10.2 to the Form 8-K filed on March 2, 2021. A copy of the amendment to Mr. Grau’s employment agreement is attached hereto as Exhibit 10.37.


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Ronald A. Smith Employment Agreement -

 

In general, Mr. Smith’s employment agreement contains provisions concerning terms of employment, voluntary and involuntary termination, indemnification, severance payments, and other termination benefits, in addition to a non-compete clause and certain other perquisites.

 

The original term of Mr. Smith’s employment agreement runs from April 9, 2021 until March 31, 2023.

 

Mr. Smith will not be paid a salary for his services.

 

In addition, Mr. Smith is eligible to receive annual short term incentive bonuses as determined by a review at the discretion of the Registrant’s board of directors.

 

Further, the Registrant authorized for issuance 4,750,000 shares of common stock to Mr. Smith, with such shares only being issued upon amendment to the Registrant’s articles of incorporation to increase the authorized shares of common stock.

 

In the event of a termination of employment with the Registrant by the Registrant without “cause” or by Mr. Smith for “Good Reason” (as defined in the employment agreement), Mr. Smith would receive immediate vesting of all equity awards (including but not limited to stock options and restricted shares).

 

In the event of a termination of Mr. Smith’s employment with the Registrant by reason of change in control (as defined in the employment agreement), Mr. Smith, would receive: (i) a lump sum payment equal to 100% of his prior year’s Bonus; and (ii) and immediate vesting of all equity awards (including but not limited to stock options and restricted shares).

 

The above description of Mr. Smith’s employment agreement is qualified in its entirety by reference to the full text of that agreement, a copy of which is attached as Exhibit 10.34 hereto.

 

Rocco LaVista Employment Agreement -

 

In general, Mr. LaVista’s employment agreement contains provisions concerning terms of employment, voluntary and involuntary termination, indemnification, severance payments, and other termination benefits, in addition to a non-compete clause and certain other perquisites.

 

The original term of Mr. LaVista’s employment agreement runs from April 9, 2021 until March 31, 2023.

 

Mr. LaVista will not be paid a salary for his services.

 

In addition, Mr. LaVista is eligible to receive annual short term incentive bonuses as determined by a review at the discretion of the Registrant’s board of directors.

 

Further, the Registrant authorized for issuance 4,000,000 shares of common stock to Mr. LaVista, with such shares only being issued upon amendment to the Registrant’s articles of incorporation to increase the authorized shares of common stock

 

In the event of a termination of employment with the Registrant by the Registrant without “cause” or by Mr. LaVista for “Good Reason” (as defined in the employment agreement), Mr. LaVista would receive immediate vesting of all equity awards (including but not limited to stock options and restricted shares).

 

In the event of a termination of Mr. LaVista’s employment with the Registrant by reason of change in control (as defined in the employment agreement), Mr. LaVista, would receive: (i) a lump sum payment equal to 100% of his prior year’s Bonus; and (ii) and immediate vesting of all equity awards (including but not limited to stock options and restricted shares).

 

The above description of Mr. LaVista’s employment agreement is qualified in its entirety by reference to the full text of that agreement, a copy of which is attached as Exhibit 10.35 hereto.

 

Grants of Plan-Based Awards Table

 

None of the named executive officers received any grants of stock, option awards or other plan-based awards during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019. In April of 2021, our board authorized the grant and issuance of 2,145,000 shares of common stock to Mr. Ross and 2,145,000 shares of common stock to Mr. Grau. These shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Corporation’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock.


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Options Exercised and Stock Vested Table

 

None of the named executive officers exercised any stock options, nor were there any restricted stock units held by our named executive officers vested, during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-end Table

 

None of the named executive officers held any unexercised options and unvested stock awards previously awarded as of December 31, 2020.

 

Potential Payments upon Termination or Change-in-Control

 

SEC regulations state that we must disclose information regarding agreements, plans or arrangements that provide for payments or benefits to our executive officers in connection with any termination of employment or change in control of the company. During the year ended December 31, 2020, we did not have any employment agreements with any of our executive officers, nor any compensatory plans or arrangements resulting from the resignation, retirement or any other termination of any of our executive officers, from a change-in-control, or from a change in any executive officer’s responsibilities following a change-in-control. However, on January 1, 2021 we entered into employment agreements with Charles A. Ross, Jr. and Doug E. Grau and on April 9, 2021, we entered into employment agreements with Ronald A. Smith and Rocco LaVista. All of these agreements provide for certain payments to be made in the event of a termination of their employment agreements by reason of change in control (as defined in the employment agreements). Each of them would receive: (i) a lump sum payment equal to all earned but unpaid base salary through the date of termination of employment (not applicable to Smith and LaVista as they receive no salary); (ii) a lump sum payment equal to twelve (12) months Salary (not applicable to Smith and LaVista as they receive no salary) plus 100% of his prior year’s bonus; and (iii) and immediate vesting of all equity awards (including but not limited to stock options and restricted shares).

 

Compensation of Directors

 

We do not have any standard arrangement for compensation of our directors for any services provided as director, including services for committee participation or for special assignments. We did not compensate any of our directors for their services.

 

Retirement Plans

 

We do not offer any annuity, pension, or retirement benefits to be paid to any of our officers, directors, or employees in the event of retirement.

 

Compensation Committee

 

We do not have a separate compensation committee. Instead, our Board reviews and approves executive compensation policies and practices, reviews salaries and bonuses for other officers, administers our stock option plans and other benefit plans, if any, and considers other matters that may be brought forth to it.

 

Risk Management Considerations

 

We believe that our compensation policies and practices for our employees, including our executive officers, do not create risks that are reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on our Company.

 

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

Long-Term Incentive Plans and Awards

 

As of December 31, 2020, we did not have any long-term incentive plans that provide compensation intended to serve as incentive for performance. No individual grants or agreements regarding future payouts under non-stock price-based plans were made to any executive officer or any director or any employee or consultant since our inception; accordingly, no future payouts under non-stock price-based plans or agreements were granted or entered into or exercised by our officer or director or employees or consultants during fiscal 2020. On January 1, 2021, we adopted a long-term incentive plan (described in Item 5 above) and in March of 2021 made two grants totaling 4,290,000 shares of common stock under such plan.

 


45


 

 

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT

 

The following table sets forth certain information concerning the number of shares of our Common Stock owned beneficially as of May 5, 2021 or exercisable within the next 60 days thereafter, by: (i) our directors; (ii) our named executive officers; and (iii) each person or group known by us to beneficially own more than 5% of our outstanding shares of common stock. Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC and generally includes voting or investment power with respect to securities. Except as indicated by footnote, the persons named in the table below have sole voting power and investment power with respect to all shares of common stock shown as beneficially owned by them.

 

Name and Address of Beneficial Owner(1)

 

Amount and

Nature of

Beneficial

Ownership

 

Percentage of

Common

Stock

Outstanding(2)

Charles A. Ross, Jr., CEO, principal executive officer, treasurer, principal financial officer and principal accounting officer (3)(4)

 

13,400,000

 

16.86%

 

 

 

 

 

Doug Grau, President and a Director (3)(5)

 

11,145,000

 

14.02%

 

 

 

 

 

Corey Lambrecht, Director (8)

 

1,000,000

 

1.26%

 

 

 

 

 

Ronald A. Smith, newly appointed COO and Chairman(6)

 

17,450,000

 

21.96%

 

 

 

 

 

Rocco LaVista, newly appointed VP of Business Development(7)

 

8,600,000

 

10.82%

 

 

 

 

 

Directors and executive officers as a group (5 Persons)

 

51,595,000

 

64.93%

 

(1)Unless otherwise noted above, the address of the persons and entities listed in the table is c/o American Rebel Holdings, Inc., 718 Thompson Lane, Suite 108-199, Nashville, Tennessee 37204. 

 

(2)Percentage is based upon 79,466,563 shares of common stock issued and outstanding and figures are rounded to the nearest hundredth of a percent. 

 

(3)Does not include 50,000 shares of Series A Preferred stock, whereby each share is entitled to cast one thousand (1,000) votes for each share held of the Series A Preferred stock on all matters presented to the stockholders of the Company for stockholder vote. 

 

(4)Includes 1,545,000 shares of common stock authorized on March 24, 2021 but unissued and 4,000,000 shares of common stock authorized on April 9, 2021 but unissued. Such shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock. 

 

(5)Includes 2,145,000 shares of common stock authorized on March 24, 2021 but unissued and 4,000,000 shares of common stock authorized on April 9, 2021 but unissued. Such shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock. 

 

(6)Includes 2,000,000 five-year warrants to purchase shares of common stock at $0.10 per share. Includes 4,750,000 shares of common stock authorized on April 9, 2021 but unissued. Such shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock. Does not include 2,000,000 shares of common stock pledged as security for a bridge loan agreement dated April 9, 2021. 

 

(7)Includes 2,500,000 shares of common stock authorized on March 24, 2021 but unissued and 4,000,000 shares of common stock authorized on April 9, 2021 but unissued. Such shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock. 

 

(8)Includes 500,000 shares of common stock authorized on March 24, 2021 but unissued. Such shares will be issued only upon the amendment to the Company’s articles of incorporation to increase its authorized shares of common stock. 


46


 

 

Non-Cumulative Voting

 

The holders of our shares of common stock do not have cumulative voting rights, which means that the holders of more than 50% of such outstanding shares, voting for the election of Directors, can elect all of the Directors to be elected, if they so choose. In such event, the holders of the remaining shares will not be able to elect any of our Directors.

 

Transfer Agent

 

The Transfer Agent for our common stock is Action Stock Transfer Corporation, 2469 E. Fort Union Blvd, Suite 214, Salt Lake City, Utah 84121. Its telephone number is (801) 274-1088.

 

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE.

 

The following information summarizes transactions we have either engaged in for the past two fiscal years or propose to engage in, involving our executive officers, directors, more than 5% stockholders, or immediate family members of these persons. These transactions were negotiated between related parties without “arm’s length” bargaining and, as a result, the terms of these transactions may be different than transactions negotiated between unrelated persons.

 

Other than as set forth below, we were not a party to any transactions or series of similar transactions that have occurred during fiscal 2020 in which:

 

·The amounts involved exceeds the lesser of $120,000 or one percent of the average of our total assets at year-end for the last two completed fiscal years ($14,980); and 

 

·A director, executive officer, holder of more than 5% of our common stock or any member of their immediate family had or will have a direct or indirect material interest. 

 

Transactions with Related Parties

 

The Company has agreements with related parties for services, notes payable and stock grants. See Notes to Financial Statements numbers 5, 7, 8, 11 and 12.

 

Other than the foregoing, none of the directors or executive officers of the Company, nor any person who owned of record or was known to own beneficially more than 5% of the Company’s outstanding shares of its Common Stock, nor any associate or affiliate of such persons or companies, has any material interest, direct or indirect, in any transaction that has occurred during the past fiscal year, or in any proposed transaction, which has materially affected or will affect the Company.

 

Review, Approval or Ratification of Transactions with Related Persons

 

Although we adopted a Code of Ethics, we still rely on our Board to review related party transactions on an ongoing basis to prevent conflicts of interest. Our Board reviews a transaction in light of the affiliations of the director, officer or employee and the affiliations of such person’s immediate family. Transactions are presented to our Board for approval before they are entered into or, if this is not possible, for ratification after the transaction has occurred. If our Board finds that a conflict of interest exists, then it will determine the appropriate remedial action, if any. Our Board approves or ratifies a transaction if it determines that the transaction is consistent with the best interests of the Company.

 

Director Independence

 

One of the Company’s directors (Mr. Lambrecht) is an independent director as defined by NASDAQ Stock Market Rule 5605(a)(2). This rule defines persons as “independent” who are neither officers nor employees of the company and have no relationships that, in the opinion of the board, would interfere with the exercise of independent judgment in carrying out their responsibilities as directors.


47


 

 

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

 

The following table presents the fees for professional audit services rendered by PLS CPA, a professional corporation (“PLS CPA’s”) for the audit of the Company’s annual financial statements for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019 and fees billed for other services rendered by PLS CPA’s during those periods. All services reflected in the following fee table for 2020 and 2019 were pre-approved, respectively, in accordance with the policy of the Board.

 

 

 

December 31,

 

December 31,

 

 

2020

 

2019

Audit fees (1)

$

37,000

$

37,000

Audit-related fees

 

-

 

-

Tax fees

 

-

 

-

All other fees

 

-

 

-

Total Fees

$

37,000

$

37,000

 

Notes:

 

(1)Audit fees consist of audit and review services, consent and review of documents filed with the SEC. For fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019.  

 

In its capacity, the Board pre-approves all audit (including audit-related) and permitted non-audit services to be performed by the independent auditors. The Board will annually approve the scope and fee estimates for the year-end audit to be performed by the Company’s independent auditors for the fiscal year. With respect to other permitted services, the Board pre-approves specific engagements, projects and categories of services on a fiscal year basis, subject to individual project and annual maximums. To date, the Company has not engaged its auditors to perform any non-audit related services.


48


 

 

PART IV

 

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

The following documents are filed as part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K

 

(a)Financial Statements 

 

 

 

Page

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

F-1

Financial Statements for the years ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019

 

 

Balance Sheets

 

F-2

Statements of Operations

 

F-3

Statement of Stockholders’ Equity (Deficit)

 

F-4

Statements of Cash Flows

 

F-5

Notes to the Financial Statements

 

F-6

 

(b)Financial Statement Schedules 

 

None.

 

(c)Exhibits Index  

 

3.1

 

Articles of Incorporation (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to Form S-1, filed August 4, 2015)

 

 

 

3.2

 

Bylaws of CubeScape, Inc. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to Form S-1, filed August 4, 2015)

 

 

 

3.3

 

Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.3 to Form 8-K, filed January 10, 2017)

 

 

 

4.1

 

$100,000 Note dated June 10, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 to Form 10-Q, filed August 14, 2020)

 

 

 

4.2

 

$101,000 Note dated June 18, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.3 to Form 10-Q, filed August 14, 2020)

 

 

 

4.3

 

$75,000 Note dated June 29, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.4 to Form 10-Q, filed August 14, 2020)

 

 

 

4.4

 

$50,000 Note dated June 29, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.5 to Form 10-Q, filed August 14, 2020)

 

 

 

4.5

 

$102,000 Note dated July 3, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.6 to Form 10-Q, filed August 14, 2020)

 

 

 

4.6

 

$150,000 Note dated July 31, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.7 to Form 10-Q, filed August 14, 2020)

 

 

 

4.7

 

$150,000 Note dated August 3, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.8 to Form 10-Q, filed August 14, 2020)

 

 

 

4.8

 

$350,000 Labrys Promissory Note dated September 29, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.9 to Form 10-Q, filed November 16, 2020)

 

 

 

4.9

 

Digital Ally $250,000 Note dated October 1, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.10 to Form 10-Q, filed November 16, 2020)

 

 

 

4.10

 

$100,000 Note dated October 6, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.11 to Form 10-Q, filed November 16, 2020)

 

 

 

4.11

 

$200,000 Note dated October 13, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.12 to Form 10-Q, filed November 16, 2020)


49


 

 

 

 

4.12

 

Digital Ally $250,000 Note dated October 21, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.13 to Form 10-Q, filed November 16, 2020)

 

 

 

4.13#

 

$1,000,000 Bridge Loan Agreement dated April 9, 2021

 

 

 

10.1

 

$250,000 Working Capital Loan Agreement, Note, and Security Agreement dated June 29, 2018 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.6 to Form 10-Q, filed June 18, 2019)

 

 

 

10.2

 

Notice of Amendment to June 29, 2018 Note (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.7 to Form 10-Q, filed June 18, 2019)

 

 

 

10.3

 

$50,000 Convertible Term Note dated October 2, 2018 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.8 to Form 10-Q, filed June 18, 2019)

 

 

 

10.4

 

$100,000 Convertible Term Note dated October 5, 2018 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.9 to Form 10-Q, filed June 18, 2019)

 

 

 

10.5

 

$400,000 Working Capital Loan Agreement and Note dated November 1, 2018 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.10 to Form 10-Q, filed June 18, 2019)

 

 

 

10.6

 

$130,000 Loan and Security Agreement to invest in safe inventory dated January 2, 2019 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.11 to Form 10-Q, filed June 18, 2019)

 

 

 

10.7

 

$55,000 Loan Agreement dated January 14, 2019 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.12 to Form 10-Q, filed June 18, 2019)

 

 

 

10.8

 

$25,000 Loan Agreement dated January 15, 2019 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.13 to Form 10-Q, filed June 18, 2019)

 

 

 

10.9

 

$300,000 Loan Agreement dated January 22, 2019 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.14 to Form 10-Q, filed June 18, 2019)

 

 

 

10.10

 

$150,000 Convertible Term Note dated March 1, 2019 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.15 to Form 10-Q, filed June 18, 2019)

 

 

 

10.11

 

$125,000 Convertible Promissory Note dated February 15, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.16 to Form 10-Q, filed June 26, 2020)

 

 

 

10.12

 

$90,000 Note dated February 18, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.17 to Form 10-Q, filed June 26, 2020)

 

 

 

10.13

 

$180,000 Note dated February 20, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.18 to Form 10-Q, filed June 26, 2020)

 

 

 

10.14

 

$200,000 Note dated March 6, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.19 to Form 10-Q, filed June 26, 2020)

 

 

 

10.15

 

$722,422 Amortized Note dated March 10, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.20 to Form 10-Q, filed June 26, 2020)

 

 

 

10.16

 

$90,000 Note dated March 11, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.21 to Form 10-Q, filed June 26, 2020)

 

 

 

10.17

 

$300,000 Note dated March 26, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.22 to Form 10-Q, filed June 26, 2020)

 

 

 

10.18

 

$100,000 Note dated May 20, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.23 to Form 10-Q, filed June 26, 2020)


50


 

 

 

 

10.19

 

$75,000 Note dated June 29, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.24 to Form 10-Q, filed August 14, 2020)

 

 

 

10.20

 

Labrys Fund $150,000 Securities Purchase Agreement (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.25 to Form 10-Q, filed August 14, 2020)

 

 

 

10.21

 

EMA Financial $150,000 Securities Purchase Agreement (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.26 to Form 10-Q, filed August 14, 2020)

 

 

 

10.22

 

Labrys Fund $350,000 Securities Purchase Agreement (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.27 to Form 10-Q, filed November 16, 2020)

 

 

 

10.23

 

Digital Ally $250,000 Note dated October 1, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.28 to Form 10-Q, filed November 16, 2020)

 

 

 

10.24

 

$100,000 Note dated October 6, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.29 to Form 10-Q, filed November 16, 2020)

 

 

 

10.25

 

$200,000 Note dated October 13, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.30 to Form 10-Q, filed November 16, 2020)

 

 

 

10.26

 

Digital Ally $250,000 Note dated October 21, 2020 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.31 to Form 10-Q, filed November 16, 2020)

 

 

 

10.27

 

Ross Employment Agreement dated January 1, 2021 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to Form 8-K, filed March 5, 2021)

 

 

 

10.28

 

Grau Employment Agreement dated January 1, 2021 (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10. 2 to Form 8-K, filed March 5, 2021)

 

 

 

10.29

 

2021 Long-Term Incentive Plan (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to Form 8-K, filed March 5, 2021)

 

 

 

10.30#

 

$100,000 Note dated September 10, 2020

 

 

 

10.31#

 

$450,000 Note dated November 1, 2020

 

 

 

10.32#

 

$150,000 Note dated November 1, 2020

 

 

 

10.33#

 

$118,049 Note dated November 19, 2020

 

 

 

10.34#

 

$109,200 Note dated November 20, 2020

 

 

 

10.35#

 

$60,000 Note dated December 16, 2020

 

 

 

10.36#

 

$40,000 Note dated January 6, 2021

 

 

 

10.37#

 

$50,000 Note dated March 4, 2021

 

 

 

10.38#

 

Forbearance Agreement dated March 31, 2021

 

 

 

10.39#

 

$1,000,000 Bridge Loan Note dated April 9, 2021

 

 

 

10.40#†

 

Smith Employment Agreement dated April 9, 2021


51


 

 

 

 

10.41#†

 

LaVista Employment Agreement dated April 9, 2021

 

 

 

10.42#†

 

Ross Amendment to Employment Agreement dated April 9, 2021

 

 

 

10.43#†

 

Grau Amendment to Employment Agreement dated April 9, 2021

 

 

 

10.44#

 

$591,000 Secured Replacement Note dated April 18, 2021

 

 

 

10.45#

 

Digital Ally Debt Settlement Agreement and Mutual Release dated April 21, 2021

 

 

 

10.46#

 

Settlement Agreement dated April 22, 2021

 

 

 

10.47#

 

Officer loan dated April 30, 2021

 

 

 

21.1#

 

List of Subsidiaries

 

 

 

31.1#

 

Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

 

 

 

31.2#

 

Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

 

 

 

32.1#

 

Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

 

 

 

 

 

XBRL Instance Document**

 

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema**

 

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase**

 

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase**

 

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Labels Linkbase**

 

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase**

 

# Filed herewith.

 

† Indicates management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement.

 

** The XBRL related information in Exhibit 101 shall not be deemed “filed” for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or otherwise subject to liability of that section and shall not be incorporated by reference into any filing or other document pursuant to the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, except as shall be expressly set forth by specific reference in such filing or document.

 

ITEM 16. FORM 10-K SUMMARY

 

Optional disclosure not included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.


52


 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

 

AMERICAN REBEL HOLDINGS, INC.

 

(Registrant)

 

 

 

Date: May 17, 2021

By:

/s/ Charles A. Ross

 

 

Charles A. Ross

 

 

Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary, Treasurer and Director (Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and Principal Accounting Officer)

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this Annual Report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

Signatures

 

Title(s)

 

Date

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ Charles A. Ross

 

Director

 

May 17, 2021

Charles A. Ross

 

(Principal Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer

 

 

 

 

and Principal Accounting Officer)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ Doug E. Grau

 

Director and President

 

May 17, 2021

Doug E. Grau

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

/s/ Ronald A. Smith

 

Chairman/Director and COO

 

May 17, 2021

Ronald A. Smith

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


53