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DBGI Digital Brands

Filed: 16 Aug 21, 4:11pm

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

☒   QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2021

☐   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from ____________ to ____________

Commission file number: 001-40400

DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware

    

46-1942864

(State or other jurisdiction of

(I.R.S. Employer

incorporation or organization)

Identification No.)

1400 Lavaca Street

Austin, TX 78701

(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)

Tel: (209) 651-0172

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and emerging growth company in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

 

 

Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if this registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes No 

As of August 16, 2021 the Company had 11,399,594 shares of common stock, $0.0001 par value, issued and outstanding

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1. CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(UNAUDITED)

    

June 30, 

    

December 31, 

2021

2020

ASSETS

Current assets:

 

  

 

  

Cash and cash equivalents

$

4,075,921

$

575,986

Accounts receivable, net

 

346,390

 

35,532

Due from factor, net

 

6,859

 

210,033

Inventory

 

1,165,152

 

1,163,279

Prepaid expenses

 

849,434

 

23,826

Total current assets

 

6,443,756

 

2,008,656

Deferred offering costs

 

 

214,647

Property, equipment and software, net

 

119,817

 

62,313

Goodwill

 

16,160,766

 

6,479,218

Intangible assets, net

 

11,175,794

 

7,494,667

Deposits

 

116,199

 

92,668

Total assets

$

34,016,332

$

16,352,169

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY (DEFICIT)

 

  

 

  

Current liabilities:

 

  

 

  

Accounts payable

$

6,307,071

$

5,668,703

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

 

1,615,622

 

1,245,646

Deferred revenue

 

172,470

 

1,667

Due to related parties

 

252,635

 

441,453

Contingent consideration liability

6,539,417

Convertible notes, current

 

100,000

 

700,000

Accrued interest payable

 

801,031

 

737,039

Note payable - related party

 

299,489

 

137,856

Venture debt, current

 

300,000

 

5,854,326

Loan payable, current

 

1,712,000

 

992,000

Promissory note payable

 

3,500,000

 

4,500,000

Total current liabilities

 

21,599,735

 

20,278,690

Convertible notes

 

 

1,215,815

Loan payable

 

1,762,639

 

709,044

Venture debt, net of discount

5,701,755

Warrant liability

 

78,710

 

6,265

Total liabilities

 

29,142,839

 

22,209,814

Commitments and contingencies (Note 12)

 

  

 

  

Stockholders' equity (deficit):

 

  

 

  

Series Seed convertible preferred stock, $0.0001 par, 0 shares and 20,714,518 shares, authorized, issued and outstanding at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively

 

 

2,071

Series A convertible preferred stock, $0.0001 par, 0 shares and 14,481,413 shares authorized, 0 shares and 5,654,072 shares issued and outstanding at June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively

 

 

565

Series A-2 convertible preferred stock, $0.0001 par, 0 shares and 20,000,000 shares authorized, no shares and 5,932,742 shares issued and outstanding at June 30, 2021, and December 31,2020,respectively

 

 

593

Series A-3 convertible preferred stock, $0.0001 par, 0 shares and 18,867,925 shares authorized, no shares and 9,032,330 shares issued and outstanding at June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively

 

 

904

Series CF convertible preferred stock, $0.0001 par, no shares and 2,000,000 shares authorized, no shares and 836,331 shares issued and outstanding at June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively

 

 

83

Series B convertible preferred stock, $0.0001 par, 0 shares and 20,714,517 shares authorized, no shares and 20,714,517 shares issued and outstanding at June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, respectively

 

 

2,075

Undesignated preferred stock, $0.0001 par, 10,000,000 shares and 936,144 shares authorized, 0 shares issued and outstanding as of both June 30,2021 and December 31, 2020

 

 

Common stock, $0.0001 par, 200,000,000 and 110,000,000 shares authorized, 11,044,594 and 664,167 shares issued and outstanding as of both June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively

1,104

66

Additional paid-in capital

 

51,939,819

 

27,481,995

Accumulated deficit

 

(47,067,430)

 

(33,345,997)

Total stockholders' equity (deficit)

 

4,873,493

 

(5,857,645)

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity (deficit)

$

34,016,332

$

16,352,169

See the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

3

DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(UNAUDITED)

Three Months Ended

Six Months Ended

June 30, 

June 30, 

    

2021

    

2020

    

2021

    

2020

Net revenues

$

1,003,529

$

664,017

$

1,411,934

$

3,240,702

Cost of net revenues

 

608,944

 

932,362

 

1,224,886

 

2,155,155

Gross profit (loss)

 

394,585

 

(268,345)

 

187,048

 

1,085,547

Operating expenses:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

General and administrative

 

7,192,460

 

1,426,388

 

9,099,978

 

3,901,431

Sales and marketing

 

923,283

 

124,370

 

1,094,103

 

442,246

Distribution

 

69,864

 

75,246

 

133,442

 

213,681

Change in fair value of contingent consideration

3,050,901

3,050,901

Total operating expenses

 

11,236,508

 

1,626,004

 

13,378,424

 

4,557,358

Loss from operations

 

(10,841,923)

 

(1,894,349)

 

(13,191,376)

 

(3,471,811)

Other income (expense):

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Interest expense

 

(897,920)

 

(373,957)

 

(1,572,964)

 

(688,932)

Other non-operating income (expenses)

 

(57,775)

 

 

(57,213)

 

Total other income (expense), net

 

(955,695)

 

(373,957)

 

(1,630,177)

 

(688,932)

Income tax benefit (provision)

 

1,100,120

 

709

 

1,100,120

 

(13,381)

Net loss

$

(10,697,498)

$

(2,267,597)

$

(13,721,433)

$

(4,174,124)

Weighted average common shares outstanding -

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

basic and diluted

 

5,435,023

 

664,167

 

3,062,774

 

664,167

Net loss per common share - basic and diluted

$

(1.97)

$

(3.41)

$

(4.48)

$

(6.28)

See the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

4

DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

(UNAUDITED)

Series Seed

Series A

Series A-2

Series A-3

Series CF

Series B

Additional

Total

Preferred Stock

Preferred Stock

Preferred Stock

Preferred Stock

Preferred Stock

Preferred Stock

Common Stock

Paid-in

Subscription

Accumulated

Stockholders'

    

Shares

    

Amount

    

Shares

    

Amount

    

Shares

    

Amount

    

Shares

    

Amount

    

Shares

    

Amount

    

Shares

    

Amount

    

Shares

    

Amount

    

Capital

    

Receivable

    

Deficit

    

Equity (Deficit)

 

Balances at December 31, 2019

 

20,714,518

$

2,071

 

5,654,072

$

565

 

5,932,742

$

593

 

8,223,036

$

823

 

126,641

$

12

 

$

 

664,167

$

66

$

15,486,050

$

(22,677)

$

(22,617,702)

$

(7,150,199)

Stock-based compensation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

49,932

 

 

 

49,932

Issuance of Series A-3 preferred stock for cash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

809,294

 

81

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

428,845

 

(117,614)

 

 

311,312

Issuance of Series B preferred stock for cash

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20,754,717

 

2,075

 

 

 

10,997,925

 

 

 

11,000,000

Offering costs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(31,690)

 

 

 

(31,690)

Fair value of warrant issuances - venture debt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

58,421

 

 

 

58,421

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1,906,527)

 

(1,906,527)

Balances at March 31, 2020

20,714,518

$

2,071

5,654,072

$

565

5,932,742

$

593

9,032,330

$

904

126,641

$

12

20,754,717

$

2,075

664,167

$

66

$

26,989,483

$

(140,291)

$

(24,524,229)

$

2,331,249

Stock-based compensation

49,932

-

-

49,932

Issuance of Series CF preferred stock for cash

709,690

71

286,447

-

-

286,518

Issuance of Series A-3 preferred stock for cash

126,837

-

126,837

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

-

(2,267,597)

(2,267,597)

Balances at June 30, 2020

 

20,714,518

$

2,071

 

5,654,072

$

565

 

5,932,742

$

593

 

9,032,330

$

904

 

836,331

$

83

 

20,754,717

$

2,075

 

664,167

$

66

$

27,325,862

$

(13,454)

$

(26,791,826)

$

526,939

Balances at December 31, 2020

 

20,714,518

$

2,071

 

5,654,072

$

565

 

5,932,742

$

593

 

9,032,330

$

904

 

836,331

$

83

 

20,754,717

$

2,075

 

664,167

$

66

$

27,481,995

$

$

(33,345,997)

$

(5,857,645)

Stock-based compensation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

36,976

 

 

 

36,976

Net loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(3,023,935)

 

(3,023,935)

Balances at March 31, 2021

 

20,714,518

$

2,071

 

5,654,072

$

565

 

5,932,742

$

593

 

9,032,330

$

904

 

836,331

$

83

 

20,754,717

$

2,075

 

664,167

$

66

$

27,518,971

$

$

(36,369,932)

$

(8,844,604)

Conversion of preferred stock into common stock

 

(20,714,518)

 

(2,071)

 

(5,654,072)

(565)

 

(5,932,742)

 

(593)

 

(9,032,330)

 

(904)

 

(836,331)

 

(83)

 

(20,754,717)

 

(2,075)

 

4,027,181

 

403

 

5,888

 

 

 

Issuance of common stock in public offering

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,409,639

 

241

 

9,999,761

 

 

 

10,000,002

Offering costs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(2,116,957)

(2,116,957)

Exercise of over-allotment option, net of offering costs

361,445

36

1,364,961

1,364,997

Conversion of debt into common stock

1,135,153

114

2,680,175

2,680,289

Conversion of related party notes and payables into common stock

152,357

15

257,500

257,515

Common stock and warrants issued in connection with note

20,000

2

73,956

73,958

Common stock issued in connection with business combination

2,192,771

219

8,025,323

8,025,542

Exercise of warrants

31,881

3

145,693

145,696

Common stock issued pursuant to consulting agreement

50,000

5

182,995

183,000

Stock-based compensation

3,801,553

3,801,553

Net loss

(10,697,498)

(10,697,498)

Balances at June 30, 2021

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

11,044,594

$

1,104

$

51,939,819

$

$

(47,067,430)

$

4,873,493

See the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

5

DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(UNAUDITED)

Six Months Ended

June 30, 

    

2021

    

2020

Cash flows from operating activities:

Net loss

$

(13,721,433)

$

(4,174,124)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

  

 

  

Depreciation and amortization

 

291,661

 

318,057

Amortization of loan discount and fees

 

580,684

 

69,710

Stock-based compensation

 

4,021,529

 

99,864

Fees incurred in connection with debt financings

132,609

Change in fair value of warrant liability

 

72,445

 

Change in fair value of contingent consideration

3,050,901

Deferred income tax benefit

(1,100,120)

Change in credit reserve

 

9,748

 

(58,132)

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

Accounts receivable, net

 

(261,386)

 

12,399

Due from factor, net

 

139,629

 

(67,361)

Inventory

 

75,287

 

639,006

Prepaid expenses

(688,893)

(40,165)

Accounts payable

 

575,513

 

1,410,476

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

 

262,019

 

(770,907)

Deferred revenue

 

(99,045)

 

(15,231)

Accrued compensation - related party

 

(88,550)

 

(28,807)

Accrued interest

 

151,465

 

446,854

Net cash used in operating activities

 

(6,595,937)

 

(2,158,361)

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

  

Cash acquired (consideration) pursuant to business combination

 

(475,665)

106,913

Issuance of related party receivable

(20,000)

Purchase of property, equipment and software

(10,276)

Deposits

 

(19,115)

43,510

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

 

(505,056)

 

130,423

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

  

 

  

Proceeds from related party advances

 

 

22,856

Advances from factor

 

53,795

 

180,552

Proceeds from venture debt

 

 

250,000

Issuance of loans payable

 

2,626,050

 

1,701,044

Repayments of promissory notes and loans payable

(2,001,305)

Issuance of convertible notes payable

 

528,650

 

Proceeds from initial public offering

 

10,000,002

 

Exercise of over-allotment option with public offering, net

 

1,364,997

 

Exercise of warrants

145,696

Proceeds from sale of Series A-3 preferred stock

428,845

Subscription receivable from Series A-3 preferred stock

9,223

Proceeds from sale of Series CF preferred stock

286,518

Offering costs

 

(2,116,957)

 

(30,772)

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

10,600,928

 

2,848,266

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

3,499,935

 

820,328

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

 

575,986

 

40,469

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

$

4,075,921

$

860,797

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:

 

  

 

  

Cash paid for income taxes

$

$

Cash paid for interest

$

460,179

$

Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing activities:

 

  

 

  

Conversion of preferred stock into common stock

$

6,293

$

Conversion of related party notes and payables into common stock

$

257,515

$

Conversion of debt into common stock

$

2,680,289

$

Venture debt issued in exchange of forgiveness of accrued interest

$

$

209,211

Warrants issued for offering costs

$

$

918

Warrants issued with venture debt

$

$

58,421

Issuance of promissory note payable in acquisition

$

$

4,500,000

Issuance of Series B preferred stock in acquisition

$

$

11,000,000

See the accompanying notes to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements

6

Table of Contents

DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

NOTE 1: NATURE OF OPERATIONS

Digital Brands Group, Inc. (formerly Denim.LA, Inc.) (the “Company” or “DBG”), was organized on September 17, 2012 under the laws of Delaware as a limited liability company under the name Denim.LA LLC. The Company converted to a Delaware corporation on January 30, 2013 and changed its name to Denim.LA, Inc. Effective December 31, 2020, the Company changed its name to Digital Brands Group, Inc. (DBG).

On February 12, 2020, Denim.LA, Inc. entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger with Bailey 44, LLC (“Bailey”), a Delaware limited liability company. On the acquisition date, Bailey 44 , LLC became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company. See Note 4.

On May 18, 2021, the Company closed its acquisition of Harper & Jones, LLC (“H&J”) pursuant to its Membership Interest Stock Purchase Agreement with D. Jones Tailored Collection, Ltd. to purchase 100% of the issued and outstanding equity of Harper & Jones, LLC. On the acquisition date, H&J became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company. See Note 4.

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of a novel coronavirus (“COVID-19”) a pandemic. As the global spread of COVID-19 continues, DBG remains first and foremost focused on a people-first approach that prioritizes the health and well-being of its employees, customers, trade partners and consumers. To help mitigate the spread of COVID-19, DBG has modified its business practices in accordance with legislation, executive orders and guidance from government entities and healthcare authorities (collectively, “COVID-19 Directives”). These directives include the temporary closing of offices and retail stores, instituting travel bans and restrictions and implementing health and safety measures including social distancing and quarantines.

The full extent of the future impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Company’s operational and financial performance is currently uncertain and will depend on many factors outside the Company’s control, including, without limitation, the timing, extent, trajectory and duration of the pandemic, the development and availability of effective treatments and vaccines, and the imposition of protective public safety measures.

Reverse Stock Split

On May 12, 2021, the Board of Directors approved a one-for-15.625 reverse stock split of its issued and outstanding shares of common stock and a proportional adjustment to the existing conversion ratios for each series of the Company’s preferred stock (see Note 8). Accordingly, all share and per share amounts for all periods presented in the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements and notes thereto have been adjusted retroactively, where applicable, to reflect this reverse stock split and adjustment of the preferred stock conversion ratios.

Initial Public Offering

On May 13, 2021, the Company’s registration statement on Form S-1 relating to its initial public offering of its common stock (the “IPO”) was declared effective by the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Further to the IPO, which closed on May 18, 2021, the Company issued and sold 2,409,639 shares of common stock at a public offering price of $4.15 per share. Additionally, the Company issued warrants to purchase 2,771,084 shares, which includes 361,445 warrants sold upon the partial exercise of the over-allotment option. The aggregate net proceeds to the Company from the IPO, were $8.6 million after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions of $0.8 million and direct offering expenses of $0.6 million. Concurrent with this offering, the Company acquired H&J (see Note 4). The Company incurred an additional $0.6 million in offering costs related to the IPO that were not paid directly out of the proceeds from the offering.

7

Table of Contents

DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

NOTE 2: GOING CONCERN

The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. The Company has not generated profits since inception, has sustained net losses of $13,721,433 and $4,174,124 for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively, and has incurred negative cash flows from operations for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020. The Company has historically lacked liquidity to satisfy obligations as they come due and as of June 30, 2021, and the Company had a working capital deficit of $15,155,979. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The Company expects to continue to generate operating losses for the foreseeable future.

Management Plans

As of August 16, 2021, the date of issuance of these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements, the Company expects that its cash and cash equivalents of $4.1 million as of June 30, 2021, together with the measures described below, will be sufficient to fund its operating expenses, debt obligations and capital expenditure requirements for at least one year from the date these consolidated financial statements are issued.

Throughout the next twelve months, the Company intends to fund its operations from the funds raised through the IPO, increased revenues as new designs and collections will be deployed in the second half of 2021, through settlement or renegotiation of aged payables and outstanding debt, and continuing its cost cutting measures.

The Company also plans to continue to fund its capital funding needs through a combination of public or private equity offerings, debt financings or other sources. There can be no assurance as to the availability or terms upon which such financing and capital might be available in the future. If the Company is unable to secure additional funding, it may be forced to curtail or suspend its business plans.

NOTE 3: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Basis of Presentation

The accounting and reporting policies of the Company conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”).

Unaudited Interim Financial Information

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheet as of June 30, 2021, the unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 and of cash flows for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 have been prepared by the Company, pursuant to the rules and regulations of the SEC for the interim financial statements. Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP have been condensed or omitted pursuant to rules and regulations. However, the Company believes that the disclosures are adequate to make the information presented not misleading. The unaudited interim consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a basis consistent with the audited consolidated financial statements and in the opinion of management, reflect all adjustments, consisting of only normal recurring adjustments, necessary for the fair presentation of the results for the interim periods presented and of the financial condition as of the date of the interim consolidated balance sheet.

The accompanying unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto for the year ended December 31, 2020 included in the Company’s prospectus that forms a part of the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-1 ( File No. 333-255193). The prospectus was filed with the SEC pursuant to Rule 424(b)(4) on May 17, 2021.

Principles of Consolidation

These condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries Bailey and H&J. All inter-company transactions and balances have been eliminated on consolidation.

8

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Cash and Equivalents and Concentration of Credit Risk

The Company considers all highly liquid securities with an original maturity of less than three months to be cash equivalents. As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Company did not hold any cash equivalents. The Company’s cash and cash equivalents in bank deposit accounts, at times, may exceed federally insured limits of $250,000.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

FASB guidance specifies a hierarchy of valuation techniques based on whether the inputs to those valuation techniques are observable or unobservable. Observable inputs reflect market data obtained from independent sources, while unobservable inputs reflect market assumptions. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1 measurement) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3 measurement). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy are as follows:

Level 1 — Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the reporting entity has the ability to access at the measurement date. Level 1 primarily consists of financial instruments whose value is based on quoted market prices such as exchange-traded instruments and listed equities.

Level 2 — Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly (e.g., quoted prices of similar assets or liabilities in active markets, or quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active).

Level 3 — Unobservable inputs for the asset or liability. Financial instruments are considered Level 3 when their fair values are determined using pricing models, discounted cash flows or similar techniques and at least one significant model assumption or input is unobservable.

The Company’s financial instruments consist of cash and cash equivalents, prepaid expenses, accounts payable, accrued expenses, due to related parties, related party note payable, and convertible debt. The carrying value of these assets and liabilities is representative of their fair market value, due to the short maturity of these instruments.

The following tables present information about the Company's financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis and indicates the level of the fair value hierarchy used to determine such fair values:

Fair Value Measurements

as of June 30, 2021 Using:

    

Level 1

    

Level 2

    

Level 3

    

Total

Liabilities:

Warrant liability

$

$

78,710

$

$

78,710

Contingent consideration

 

 

 

6,539,417

 

6,539,417

$

$

78,710

$

6,539,417

$

6,618,127

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

Fair Value Measurements

as of December 31, 2020 Using:

    

Level 1

    

Level 2

    

Level 3

    

Total

Liabilities:

Warrant liability

$

$

$

6,265

$

6,265

$

$

$

6,265

$

6,265

Warrant Liability

Certain of the Company’s common stock warrants are carried at fair value. As of December 31, 2020, the fair value of the Company’s common stock warrant liabilities was measured under the Level 3 hierarchy using the Black-Scholes pricing model as the Company’s underlying common stock had no observable market price (see Note 10). The warrant liability was valued using a market approach. Upon the IPO, the warrant liabilities were valued using quoted prices of identical assets in active markets, and was reclassified under the Level 2 hierarchy. Changes in common stock warrant liability during the six months ended June 30, 2021 are as follows:

    

Warrant

Liability

Outstanding as of December 31, 2020

$

6,265

Change in fair value

 

72,445

Outstanding as of June 30, 2021

$

78,710

Contingent Consideration

The Company records contingent consideration liabilities relating to stock price guarantees included in its acquisition and consulting agreements. The estimated fair value of the contingent consideration is recorded using significant unobservable measures and other fair value inputs and is therefore classified as a Level 3 financial instrument.

The fair value of the contingent consideration liability related to the Company's business combinations is valued using the Monte Carlo simulation model. The Monte Carlo simulation inputs include the stock price, volatility of common stock, timing of settlement and resale restrictions and limits. The fair value of the contingent consideration is then calculated based on guaranteed equity values at settlement as defined in the acquisition agreements. Changes in contingent consideration liability during the six months ended June 30, 2021 are as follows:

    

Contingent

Consideration

Liability

Balance as of December 31, 2020

$

Initial recognition in connection with acquisition of Harper & Jones

 

3,421,516

Stock price guarantee per consulting agreement

 

67,000

Change in fair value

 

3,050,901

Balance as of June 30, 2021

$

6,539,417

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

Inventory

Inventory is stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value and accounted for using the weighted average cost method and first-in, first-out method for Bailey. The inventory balances as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 consist substantially of finished good products purchased or produced for resale, as well as any materials the Company purchased to modify the products.

Property, Equipment, and Software

Property, equipment, and software are recorded at cost. Depreciation/amortization is recorded for property, equipment, and software using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of assets. The Company reviews the recoverability of all long-lived assets, including the related useful lives, whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of a long-lived asset might not be recoverable. The balances at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 consist of software with three (3) year lives, property and equipment with 3-10 year lives, and leasehold improvements which are depreciated over the shorter of the lease life or expected life.

Depreciation and amortization charges on property, equipment, and software are included in general and administrative expenses and amounted to $27,738 and $115,509 for the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, and $36,758 and $180,557 for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Capital assets as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 are as follows:

    

June 30, 

    

December 31, 

2021

2020

Computer equipment

$

6,339

$

57,810

Furniture and fixtures

 

184,701

 

207,140

Leasehold improvements and showrooms

 

444,951

 

69,274

 

635,991

 

334,224

Accumulated depreciation

 

(574,362)

 

(334,224)

Property and equipment, net

$

61,629

$

Software

$

233,737

$

278,405

Accumulated amortization

 

(175,549)

 

(216,092)

Software, net

$

58,188

$

62,313

Business Combinations

The Company accounts for acquisitions in which it obtains control of one or more businesses as a business combination. The purchase price of the acquired businesses is allocated to the tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their estimated fair values at the acquisition date. The excess of the purchase price over those fair values is recognized as goodwill. During the measurement period, which may be up to one year from the acquisition date, the Company may record adjustments, in the period in which they are determined, to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed with the corresponding offset to goodwill. If the assets acquired are not a business, the Company accounts for the transaction or other event as an asset acquisition. Under both methods, the Company recognizes the identifiable assets acquired, the liabilities assumed, and any noncontrolling interest in the acquired entity. In addition, for transactions that are business combinations, the Company evaluates the existence of goodwill or a gain from a bargain purchase.

Goodwill represents the excess of the purchase price of an acquired entity over the fair value of identifiable tangible and intangible assets acquired and liabilities assumed in a business combination.

Intangible assets are established with business combinations and consist of brand names and customer relationships. Intangible assets with finite lives are recorded at their estimated fair value at the date of acquisition and are amortized over their estimated useful lives using the straight-line method. The estimated useful lives of amortizable intangible assets are as follows:

Customer relationships

    

3 years

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

Contingent Consideration

The Company estimates and records the acquisition date fair value of contingent consideration as part of purchase price consideration for acquisitions. Additionally, each reporting period, the Company estimates changes in the fair value of contingent consideration and recognizes any change in fair in the consolidated statement of operations. The estimate of the fair value of contingent consideration requires very subjective assumptions to be made of future operating results, discount rates and probabilities assigned to various potential operating result scenarios. Future revisions to these assumptions could materially change the estimate of the fair value of contingent consideration and, therefore, materially affect the Company’s future financial results. The contingent consideration liability is to be settled with the issuance of shares of common stock once contingent provisions set forth in respective acquisition agreements have been achieved. Upon achievement of contingent provisions, respective liabilities are relieved and offset by increases to common stock and additional paid in capital in the stockholders’ equity section of the Company’s consolidated balance sheets.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

The Company reviews its long-lived assets (property and equipment and amortizable intangible assets) for impairment whenever events or circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. If the sum of the expected cash flows, undiscounted, is less than the carrying amount of the asset, an impairment loss is recognized as the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds its fair value.

Goodwill

Goodwill and identifiable intangible assets that have indefinite useful lives are not amortized, but instead are tested annually for impairment and upon the occurrence of certain events or substantive changes in circumstances. The annual goodwill impairment test allows for the option to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. An entity may choose to perform the qualitative assessment on none, some or all of its reporting units or an entity may bypass the qualitative assessment for any reporting unit and proceed directly to step one of the quantitative impairment test. If it is determined, on the basis of qualitative factors, that the fair value of a reporting unit is, more likely than not, less than its carrying value, the quantitative impairment test is required.

The quantitative impairment test calculates any goodwill impairment as the difference between the carrying amount of a reporting unit and its fair value, but not to exceed the carrying amount of goodwill. It is our practice, at a minimum, to perform a qualitative or quantitative goodwill impairment test in the first quarter every year.

In the first quarter of 2021, management performed its annual qualitative impairment test. The Company determined no factors existed to conclude that it is more likely than not that the fair value of the reporting unit was less than its carrying amount. As such, 0 goodwill impairment was recognized as of June 30, 2021.

Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets

Indefinite-lived intangible assets established in connection with business combinations consist of the brand name. The impairment test for identifiable indefinite-lived intangible assets consists of a comparison of the estimated fair value of the intangible asset with its carrying value. If the carrying value exceeds its fair value, an impairment loss is recognized in an amount equal to that excess.

Convertible Instruments

U.S. GAAP requires companies to bifurcate conversion options from their host instruments and account for them as free standing derivative financial instruments according to certain criteria. The criteria include circumstances in which (a) the economic characteristics and risks of the embedded derivative instrument are not clearly and closely related to the economic characteristics and risks of the host contract, the hybrid instrument that embodies both the embedded derivative instrument and the host contract is not re-measured at fair value under otherwise applicable generally accepted accounting principles with changes in fair value reported in earnings as they occur and (c) a separate instrument with the same terms as the embedded derivative instrument would be considered a derivative instrument. An exception to this rule is when the host instrument is deemed to be conventional as that term is described under applicable U.S. GAAP.

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

When the Company has determined that the embedded conversion options should not be bifurcated from their host instruments, the Company records, when necessary, discounts to convertible notes for the intrinsic value of conversion options embedded in debt instruments based upon the differences between the fair value of the underlying common stock at the commitment date of the note transaction and the effective conversion price embedded in the note. Debt discounts under these arrangements are amortized over the term of the related debt to their stated date of redemption. The Company also records, when necessary, deemed dividends for the intrinsic value of conversion options embedded in preferred shares based upon the differences between the fair value of the underlying common stock at the commitment date of the transaction and the effective conversion price embedded in the preferred shares.

Accounting for Preferred Stock

ASC 480, Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity, includes standards for how an issuer of equity (including equity shares issued by consolidated entities) classifies and measures on its balance sheet certain financial instruments with characteristics of both liabilities and equity.

Management is required to determine the presentation for the preferred stock as a result of the redemption and conversion provisions, among other provisions in the agreement. Specifically, management is required to determine whether the embedded conversion feature in the preferred stock is clearly and closely related to the host instrument, and whether the bifurcation of the conversion feature is required and whether the conversion feature should be accounted for as a derivative instrument.

If the host instrument and conversion feature are determined to be clearly and closely related (both more akin to equity), derivative liability accounting under ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging, is not required. Management determined that the host contract of the preferred stock is more akin to equity, and accordingly, liability accounting is not required by the Company. The Company has presented preferred stock within stockholders’ equity.

Costs incurred directly for the issuance of the preferred stock are recorded as a reduction of gross proceeds received by the Company, resulting in a discount to the preferred stock. The discount is not amortized.

Revenue Recognition

Revenues are recognized when performance obligations are satisfied through the transfer of promised goods to the Company’s customers. Control transfers upon shipment of product and when the title has been passed to the customers. This includes the transfer of legal title, physical possession, the risks and rewards of ownership, and customer acceptance. The Company provides the customer the right of return on the product and revenue is adjusted based on an estimate of the expected returns based on historical rates. The Company considers the sale of products as a single performance obligation. Sales tax collected from customers and remitted to taxing authorities is excluded from revenue and is included in accrued expenses. Revenue is deferred for orders received for which associated shipments have not occurred.

The reserve for returns totaled $22,214 and $5,229 as of June 30 , 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively, and is included in accrued expenses and other liabilities in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets.

Cost of Revenues

Cost of revenues consists primarily of inventory sold and related freight-in.

Shipping and Handling

The Company recognizes shipping and handling billed to customers as a component of net revenues, and the cost of shipping and handling as a component of sales and marketing. Total shipping and handling billed to customers as a component of net revenues was approximately $0 and $3,800 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Total shipping and handling costs included in distribution costs were approximately $59,000 and $104,000 for the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, and $119,000 and $161,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

13

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

Advertising and Promotion

Advertising and promotional costs are expensed as incurred. Advertising and promotional expense for the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 amounted to approximately $0 and $78,000, and $3,800 and $139,000 for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020,respectively. The amounts are included in sales and marketing expense.

Common Stock Purchase Warrants and Other Derivative Financial Instruments

The Company accounts for derivative instruments in accordance with ASC 815, which establishes accounting and reporting standards for derivative instruments and hedging activities, including certain derivative instruments embedded in other financial instruments or contracts and requires recognition of all derivatives on the balance sheet at fair value, regardless of hedging relationship designation. Accounting for changes in fair value of the derivative instruments depends on whether the derivatives qualify as hedging relationships and the types of relationships designated are based on the exposures hedged. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Company did not have any derivative instruments that were designated as hedges.

Stock Option and Warrant Valuation

Stock option and warrant valuation models require the input of highly subjective assumptions. The fair value of stock-based payment awards was estimated using the Black-Scholes option model with a volatility figure derived from an index of historical stock prices for comparable entities. For warrants and stock options issued to non- employees, the Company accounts for the expected life based on the contractual life of the warrants and stock options. For employees, the Company accounts for the expected life of options in accordance with the “simplified” method, which is used for “plain-vanilla” options, as defined in the accounting standards codification. The risk-free interest rate was determined from the implied yields of U.S. Treasury zero-coupon bonds with a remaining life consistent with the expected term of the options.

Stock-Based Compensation

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation costs under the provisions of ASC 718, Compensation — Stock Compensation, which requires the measurement and recognition of compensation expense related to the fair value of stock-based compensation awards that are ultimately expected to vest. Stock based compensation expense recognized includes the compensation cost for all stock-based payments granted to employees, officers, and directors based on the grant date fair value estimated in accordance with the provisions of ASC 718. ASC 718 is also applied to awards modified, repurchased, or cancelled during the periods reported. Stock-based compensation is recognized as expense over the employee’s requisite vesting period and over the nonemployee’s period of providing goods or services.

Deferred Offering Costs

The Company complies with the requirements of ASC 340, Other Assets and Deferred Costs, with regards to offering costs. Prior to the completion of an offering, offering costs are capitalized. The deferred offering costs are charged to additional paid-in capital or as a discount to debt, as applicable, upon the completion of an offering or to expense if the offering is not completed. As of December 31, 2020, the Company had capitalized $214,647 in deferred offering costs. Upon completion of the IPO in May 2021, all capitalized deferred offering costs were charged to additional paid-in capital.

14

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

Segment Information

In accordance with ASC 280, Segment Reporting (“ASC 280”), we identify our operating segments according to how our business activities are managed and evaluated. As of June 30, 2021 our operating segments included: DSTLD, Bailey and H&J. Each operating segment currently reports to the Chief Executive Officer. Each of our brands serve or are expected to serve customers through our wholesale, in store and online channels, allowing us to execute on our omni-channel strategy. We have determined that each of our operating segments share similar economic and other qualitative characteristics, and therefore the results of our operating segments are aggregated into one reportable segment. All of the operating segments have met the aggregation criteria and have been aggregated and are presented as one reportable segment, as permitted by ASC 280. We continually monitor and review our segment reporting structure in accordance with authoritative guidance to determine whether any changes have occurred that would impact our reportable segments.

Income Taxes

The Company uses the liability method of accounting for income taxes as set forth in ASC 740, Income Taxes. Under the liability method, deferred taxes are determined based on the temporary differences between the financial statement and tax basis of assets and liabilities using tax rates expected to be in effect during the years in which the basis differences reverse. A valuation allowance is recorded when it is unlikely that the deferred tax assets will not be realized. We assess our income tax positions and record tax benefits for all years subject to examination based upon our evaluation of the facts, circumstances and information available at the reporting date. In accordance with ASC 740-10, for those tax positions where there is a greater than 50% likelihood that a tax benefit will be sustained, our policy will be to record the largest amount of tax benefit that is more likely than not to be realized upon ultimate settlement with a taxing authority that has full knowledge of all relevant information. For those income tax positions where there is less than 50% likelihood that a tax benefit will be sustained, no tax benefit will be recognized in the financial statements.

Net Loss per Share

Net earnings or loss per share is computed by dividing net income or loss by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period, excluding shares subject to redemption or forfeiture. The Company presents basic and diluted net earnings or loss per share. Diluted net earnings or loss per share reflect the actual weighted average of common shares issued and outstanding during the period, adjusted for potentially dilutive securities outstanding. Potentially dilutive securities are excluded from the computation of the diluted net loss per share if their inclusion would be anti-dilutive. As all potentially dilutive securities are anti-dilutive as of June 30, 2021 and 2020, diluted net loss per share is the same as basic net loss per share for each year. Potentially dilutive items outstanding as of June 30, 2021 and 2020 are as follows:

    

June 30, 

2021

2020

Series Seed Preferred Stock (convertible to common stock)

 

 

20,714,518

Series A Preferred Stock (convertible to common stock)

 

 

5,654,072

Series A-2 Preferred Stock (convertible to common stock)

 

 

5,932,742

Series CF Preferred Stock (convertible to common stock)

 

 

836,331

Series A-3 Preferred Stock (convertible to common stock)

 

 

9,032,330

Series B Preferred Stock (convertible to common stock)

 

 

20,754,717

Common stock warrants

 

3,946,348

 

572,845

Preferred stock warrants

 

 

806,903

Stock options

 

3,875,103

 

1,084,215

Total potentially dilutive shares

 

7,821,451

 

65,388,673

All shares of preferred stock were convertible into shares of common stock at a ratio of 15.625:1 per share. Upon the closing of the IPO, all 62,924,710 shares of preferred stock converted into an aggregate of 4,027,181 shares of common stock according to their respective terms. Additionally, all preferred stock warrants converted into 51,642 common stock warrants at the same ratio as the underlying preferred stock conversion.

15

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

Concentrations

The Company utilized 4 vendors that made up 62% of all inventory purchases during the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 3 vendors that made up 23% of all inventory purchases during the six months ended June 30, 2020. The loss of one of these vendors, may have a negative short-term impact on the Company’s operations; however, we believe there are acceptable substitute vendors that can be utilized longer-term.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In August 2020, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2020-06, which simplifies the guidance on the issuer’s accounting for convertible debt instruments by removing the separation models for convertible debt with a cash conversion feature and convertible instruments with a beneficial conversion feature. As a result, entities will not separately present in equity an embedded conversion feature in such debt and will account for a convertible debt instrument wholly as debt, unless certain other conditions are met. The elimination of these models will reduce reported interest expense and increase reported net income for entities that have issued a convertible instrument that is within the scope of ASU 2020-06. ASU 2020-06 is applicable for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, with early adoption permitted no earlier than fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020. The Company has elected to early adopt this ASU and the adoption of this ASU did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

In February 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-02: Leases (Topic 842). The new guidance generally requires an entity to recognize on its balance sheet operating and financing lease liabilities and corresponding right-of-use assets. The standard will be effective for the first interim period within annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018 and early adoption is permitted. The new standard requires a modified retrospective transition for existing leases to each prior reporting period presented. The Company has elected to utilize the extended adoption period available to the Company as an emerging growth company and has not currently adopted this standard. This standard will be effective for the first interim period within annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2021. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the adoption of ASU 2016-02 on its financial position, results of operations and cash flows once adopted.

Management does not believe that any other recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting standards could have a material effect on the accompanying financial statements. As new accounting pronouncements are issued, the Company will adopt those that are applicable under the circumstances.

NOTE 4: BUSINESS COMBINATIONS

Bailey 44

On February 12, 2020, the Company acquired 100% of the membership interests of Bailey. The purchase price consideration included (i) an aggregate of 20,754,717 shares of Series B Preferred Stock of the Company (the “Parent Stock”) and (ii) a promissory note in the principal amount of $4,500,000.

Of the shares of Parent Stock issued in connection with the Merger, 16,603,773 shares were delivered on the effective date of the Merger (the “Initial Shares”) and four million one hundred fifty thousand nine hundred forty four (4,150,944) shares were held back solely, and only to the extent necessary, to satisfy any indemnification obligations of Bailey or the Holders pursuant to the terms of the Merger Agreement (the “Holdback Shares”).

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

DBG agreed that if at that date which is one year from the closing date of the IPO, the product of the number of shares of Parent Stock issued under the Merger multiplied by the sum of the closing price per share of the common stock of the Company on such date, plus Sold Parent Stock Gross Proceeds (as that term is defined in the Merger Agreement), does not exceed the sum of $11,000,000 less the value of any Holdback Shares cancelled further to the indemnification provisions of the Merger Agreement, then the Company shall issue to the Holders pro rata an additional aggregate number of shares of common stock of the Company equal to the valuation shortfall at a per share price equal to the then closing price per share of the common stock of the Company.

Series B preferred stock

    

$

11,000,000

Promissory note payable

 

4,500,000

Purchase price consideration

$

15,500,000

    

Purchase Price

Allocation

Cash and cash equivalents

$

106,913

Accounts receivable, net

 

37,479

Due (to) from factor, net

 

(312,063)

Inventory

 

3,303,660

Prepaid expenses

 

165,856

Deposits

 

187,493

Property, equipment and software, net

 

1,215,748

Goodwill

 

6,479,218

Intangible assets

 

8,600,000

Accounts payable

 

(3,397,547)

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

 

(886,757)

Purchase price consideration

$

15,500,000

As of June 30, 2021, the Company has a contingent consideration liability of $4,736,270 based on the valuation shortfall as noted above. See Note 3.

17

Table of Contents

DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

Harper & Jones

On May 18, 2021, the Company closed its acquisition of H&J pursuant to its previously disclosed Membership Interest Stock Purchase Agreement (as amended, the “Purchase Agreement”) with D. Jones Tailored Collection, Ltd. (the “Seller”), to purchase 100% of the issued and outstanding equity of Harper & Jones LLC. The purchase price consideration included (i) an aggregate of 2,192,771 shares of the Company’s common stock and (ii) $500,000 financed from the proceeds of the IPO.

Pursuant to the H&J Purchase Agreement, the Seller, as the holder of all of the outstanding membership interests of H&J, will exchange all of such membership interests for a number of common stock of the Company equal to the lesser of (i) $9.1 million at a per share price equal to the initial public offering price of the Company’s shares offered pursuant to its initial public offering or (ii) the number of Subject Acquisition Shares; “Subject Acquisition Shares” means the percentage of the aggregate number of shares of the Company’s common stock issued pursuant to the Agreement, which is the percentage that Subject Seller Dollar Value is in relation to Total Dollar Value. “Subject Seller Dollar Value” means $9.1 million. If, at the one year anniversary of the closing date of the Company’s IPO, the product of the number of shares of the Company’s common stock issued at the closing of the acquisition multiplied by the average closing price per share of the shares of the Company’s common stock as quoted on the NasdaqCM for the thirty (30) day trading period immediately preceding such date does not exceed the sum of $9.1 million less the value of any shares of the Company’s common stock cancelled further to any indemnification claims made against the Seller then the Company shall issue to Seller an additional aggregate number of shares of the Company’s common stock equal to the valuation shortfall at a per share price equal to the then closing price per share of the Company’s common stock as quoted on the NasdaqCM.

The Company evaluated the acquisition of H&J pursuant to ASC 805 and ASU 2017-01, Topic 805, Business Combinations. The acquisition method of accounting requires, among other things, that the assets acquired and liabilities assumed in a business combination be measured at their estimated respective fair values as of the closing date of the acquisition. Goodwill recognized in connection with this transaction represents primarily the potential economic benefits that the Company believes may arise from the acquisition.

Total fair value of the purchase price consideration was determined as follows:

Cash

    

$

500,000

Common stock

 

8,025,542

Contingent consideration

 

3,421,516

Purchase price consideration

$

11,947,058

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

The Company has made an allocation of the purchase price in regard to the acquisition related to the assets acquired and the liabilities assumed as of the purchase date. The following table summarizes the purchase price allocation:

Purchase Price

    

Allocation

Cash and cash equivalents

$

24,335

Accounts receivable, net

 

49,472

Inventory

 

77,159

Prepaid expenses

 

69,715

Deposits

 

4,415

Property, equipment and software, net

 

83,986

Goodwill

 

9,681,548

Intangible assets

 

3,936,030

Accounts payable

 

(51,927)

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

 

(107,957)

Deferred revenue

 

(269,848)

Due to related parties

 

(1,361)

Loan payable

 

(148,900)

Note payable - related party

 

(299,489)

Deferred tax liability

 

(1,100,120)

Purchase price consideration

$

11,947,058

The customer relationships and will be amortized on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives of three years. The brand name is indefinite-lived. The Company used the reilief of royalty approach to estimate the fair value of intangible assets acquired.

Goodwill is primarily attributable to the go-to-market synergies that are expected to arise as a result of the acquisition and other intangible assets that do not qualify for separate recognition. The goodwill is not deductible for tax purposes.

The Company recorded an initial contingent consideration liability at a fair value of $3,421,516 based on the valuation shortfall noted above. As of June 30, 2021, the H&J contingent consideration was valued at $1,736,147. See Note 3.

The results of H&J have been included in the consolidated financial statements since the date of acquisition. H&J’s net revenue and net income included in the consolidated financial statements since the acquisition date were approximately $379,000 and $158,000, respectively.

Unaudited Pro Forma Financial Information

The following unaudited pro forma financial information presents the Company’s financial results as if the Bailey and H&J acquisitions had occurred as of January 1, 2020. The unaudited pro forma financial information is not necessarily indicative of what the financial results actually would have been had the acquisitions been completed on this date. In addition, the unaudited pro forma financial information is not indicative of, nor does it purport to project, the Company’s future financial results. The following unaudited pro forma financial information includes incremental property and equipment depreciation and intangible asset amortization as a result of the acquisitions. The pro forma information does not give effect to any estimated and potential cost savings or other operating efficiencies that could result from the acquisition:

    

Six Months Ended

June 30, 

2021

2020

Net revenues

$

2,392,195

$

6,683,132

Net loss

$

(14,099,782)

$

(6,686,352)

Net loss per common share

$

(4.60)

$

(10.07)

19

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

NOTE 5: DUE FROM FACTOR

The Company, via its subsidiary, Bailey, assigns a portion of its trade accounts receivable to a third- party factoring company, who assumes the credit risk with respect to the collection of non-recourse accounts receivable. The Company may request advances on the net sales factored at any time before their maturity date, and up to 50% of eligible finished goods inventories. The factor charges a commission on the net sales factored for credit and collection services. Interest on advances is charged as of the last day of each month at a rate equal to the LIBOR rate plus 2.5%. Advances are collateralized by a security interest in substantially all of Bailley’s assets.

Due to/from factor consist of the following:

    

June 30, 

    

December 31, 

2021

2020

Outstanding receivables:

 

  

 

  

Without recourse

$

54,474

$

151,158

With recourse

 

 

42,945

Advances

 

2,449

 

56,246

Credits due customers

 

(50,064)

 

(40,316)

$

6,859

$

210,033

NOTE 6: GOODWILL AND INTANGIBLE ASSETS

The Company recorded $6,479,218 in goodwill from the Bailey business combination in February 2020, and $9,681,548 in goodwill from the H&J business combination in May 2021.

The following table summarizes information relating to the Company’s identifiable intangible assets as of June 30, 2021:

    

Gross

    

Accumulated

    

Carrying

Amount

Amortization

Value

Amortized:

 

  

 

  

 

  

Customer relationships

$

2,817,670

$

(575,736)

$

2,241,934

 

2,817,670

 

(575,736)

 

2,241,934

Indefinite-lived:

 

  

 

  

 

  

Brand name

$

8,933,860

 

 

8,933,860

$

11,751,530

$

(575,736)

$

11,175,794

The Company recorded amortization expense of $163,236 and $91,656 during the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, and $254,903 and $137,500 during the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively, which is included in general and administrative expenses in the consolidated statements of operations.

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

NOTE 7: LIABILITIES AND DEBT

Accrued Expenses and Other Liabilities

The Company accrued expenses and other liabilities line in the consolidated balance sheets is comprised of the following as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020:

    

June 30, 

    

December 31, 

2021

2020

Accrued expenses

$

285,387

$

92,074

Reserve for returns

 

22,214

 

5,229

Payroll related liabilities

 

973,099

 

843,704

Sales tax liability

 

206,092

 

196,410

Other liabilities

 

128,830

 

108,230

$

1,615,622

$

1,245,646

Certain liabilities including sales tax and payroll related liabilities maybe be subject to interest in penalties. As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, payroll related labilities included approximately $265,000 and $152,000 in estimated penalties associated with accrued payroll taxes.

Venture Debt

In March 2017, the Company entered into a senior credit agreement with an outside lender for up to $4,000,000, dependent upon the achievement of certain milestones. Through various amendments to the agreement, the credit agreement has been increased to approximately $6,000,000. The loan bears interest at 12.5% per annum, compounded monthly, plus fees currently at $5,000 per month. In March 2021, the Company and the lender agreed to extend the maturity date of the credit agreement to December 31, 2022, with certain payments due as follows. If the Company consummates a follow on public offering on or before July 31, 2021, the Company is required to make a $3,000,000 payment on the loan within five business days after such public offering. In addition, if the Company consummates an additional follow-on offering thereafter on or before September 30, 2021, the Company is required to make another $3,000,000 payment on the loan within five business days after such public offering. If the Company does not consummate the initial follow on offering or, if the Company does but does not consummate the aforementioned second follow-on offering by September 30, 2021, the Company is required to make a $300,000 payment on the loan by September 30, 2021. As of the filing date of these financial statements, all defaults were cured and there are no additional expected defaults in the next twelve months. Therefore, as of June 30, 2021, all venture debt is included as non-current with the exception of $300,000 included as current liabilities.

While the Company does not currently have a registration statement on file with the SEC to conduct a follow-on offering prior to July 31, 2021 and September 30, 2021, the Company may effect such an offering if market conditions are favorable for such an offering and should the representative agree to waive the standstill provision set forth herein. There is no assurance that even if market conditions are favorable that the representative will waive the standstill provision. In such a case the Company anticipates to make any required payments under its senior credit facility from cash generated from operations.

As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the gross loan balance was $6,001,755.

The lender was also granted warrants to purchase common stock representing 1% of the fully diluted capitalization of the Company for each $1,000,000 of principal loaned under the agreement, which was increased to 1.358% during 2019. The relative fair value of the warrants is initially recorded as a discount to the note, which is amortized over its term. See Note 10 for further detail.

For the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, $147,389 and $69,830 of these loan fees and discounts from warrants were amortized to interest expense, leaving unamortized balances of $0 and $147,389 as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.

Interest expense for the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 was $202,041 and $170,877, and $402,027 $334,923, respectively. Effective interest rate on the loan for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 was 13.4% and 14.0%, respectively.

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

Convertible Debt

2020 Regulation CF Offering

During the year ended December 31, 2020, the Company received gross proceeds of $450,308 from a Regulation CF convertible debt offering. In 2021, the Company received additional gross proceeds of $473,650. Interest was 6% per annum and the debt was due October 30, 2022.

Upon closing of the IPO, the outstanding principal and accrued and unpaid interest of $16,942 was converted into 319,661 shares of common stock based on the terms of the notes. Total issuances costs were $69,627, which was recognized as a debt discount and was amortized in 2021 through the date of IPO when such debt converted. During the six months ended June 30, 2021, $27,894 of the debt discount was amortized to interest expense.

2020 Regulation D Offering

Concurrently with the offering above, in 2021 and 2020 the Company received gross proceeds of $55,000 and $800,000, respectively, from a Regulation D convertible debt offering. The debt accrued interest at a rate of 14% per annum with a maturity date of nine months from the date of issuance. The debt was contingently convertible and contains both automatic and optional conversions. The debt converted automatically upon an initial public offering of at least $10,000,000 in gross proceeds at a price per share equal to 50% of the IPO price. Issuance costs on the aggregate funds totaled $100,000. In addition, the Company issued 512 warrants to purchase common stock in connection with the notes. The issuance costs and warrants are recognized as a debt discount and were amortized in 2021 through the date of IPO when such debt converted. The fair value of the warrants was determined to be negligible.

Upon closing of the IPO, $755,000 in outstanding principal and approximately $185,000 of the accrued and unpaid interest was converted into 453,437 shares of common stock. As of June 30, 2021, there was $100,000 remaining in outstanding principal that was not converted into equity.

During the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, $32,331 and $100,000 of debt discount was amortized to interest expense. The Company recorded an additional $132,609 in default interest expense upon conversion of these notes.

2019 Regulation D Offering

For the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company received gross proceeds of $799,280 from a Regulation D convertible debt offering. The debt accrued interest at a rate of 12% per annum with a maturity date of thirty-six months from the date of issuance. The debt was contingently convertible and contained both automatic and optional conversions. The debt converts automatically upon an initial public offering at $2.19 per share. If, prior to maturity there is a change in control event, the holders of a majority of the debt can vote to convert 2 times the value of the principle, with accrued interest being eliminated, at 1) the fair market value of the company’s common stock at the time of such conversion, 2) $2.19 per share, 3) dividing the valuation cap ($9,000,000) by the pre-money fully diluted capitalization.

Upon closing of the IPO, the outstanding principal was converted into 362,055 shares of common stock.

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

Loan Payable — PPP and SBA Loan

In April 2020, the Company and Bailey each entered into a loan with a lender in an aggregate principal amount of $203,994 and $1,347,050, respectively, pursuant to the Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. In February 2021, Bailey entered into an 2nd Round PPP Loan for a principal amount of $1,347,050. In May 2021, the Company entered into an 2nd Round PPP loan for a principal amount of $204,000.The PPP Loans are evidenced by a promissory note (“Note”). Subject to the terms of the Note, the PPP Loans bear interest at a fixed rate of 1 percent (1%) per annum, with the first six months of interest deferred, has an initial term of two years, and is unsecured and guaranteed by the Small Business Administration. The Company may apply to the Lender for forgiveness of the PPP Loan, with the amount which may be forgiven equal to the sum of payroll costs, covered rent, and covered utility payments incurred by the Company during the applicable forgiveness period, calculated in accordance with the terms of the CARES Act. The Note provides for customary events of default including, among other things, cross-defaults on any other loan with the lender. The PPP Loans may be accelerated upon the occurrence of an event of default. The loan proceeds were used for payroll and other covered payments and is expected to be forgiven in part based on current information available; however, formal forgiveness has not yet occurred as of the date of these financial statements.

The CARES Act additionally extended COVID relief funding for qualified small businesses under the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) assistance program. On June 25, 2020 the Company was notified that their EIDL application was approved by the Small Business Association (SBA). Per the terms of the EIDL agreement, the Company received total proceeds of $150,000. The Loan matures in thirty years from the effective date of the Loan and has a fixed interest rate of 3.75% per annum. As of June 30, 2021, Harper & Jones had an outstanding loan under the EIDL program of $148,900.

Loan Payable

In May 2021, H&J entered into a line of credit with a bank and received proceeds of $75,000. The line bears interest at 7.76% and matures in December 2025. As of June 30, 2021, the outstanding balance was $73,695.

Note Payable – Related Party

As of June 30, 2021, H&J had an outstanding note payable of $299,489 owned by the H&J Seller. The note matures on July 10, 2022 and bears interest at 12% per annum.

Promissory Note Payable

As noted in Note 4, the Company issued a promissory note in the principal amount of $4,500,000 to the Bailey Holders pursuant to the Bailey acquisition. In February 2021, the maturity note of the agreement was extended from December 31, 2020 to July 31, 2021. The note incurs interest at 12% per annum. Upon the IPO closing, the Company repaid $1,000,000 of the outstanding principal on this note in May 2021. As of June 30, 3021, $3,500,000 remained outstanding.

Interest expense was $120,000 and $135,000 for the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, and $284,000 and $202,500 for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively, all of which was accrued and unpaid as of June 30, 2021.

In April 2021, the Company entered into a promissory note in the principal amount of $1,000,000. The Company received $810,000 in proceeds, net of issuance costs and original issue discount. Additionally, the Company issued 120,482 warrants to the lender and 20,000 shares of common stock to the underwriter, both of which was recorded as a debt discount at the time of the loan. The fair value of the warrants and shares recorded as a debt discount was $73,958. Upon the closing of the IPO, the note was repaid in full. The entire debt discount of $263,958 was amortized to interest expense upon repayment of the note.

23

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

NOTE 8: STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (DEFICIT)

Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation

On May 18, 2021, the Company filed a Sixth Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation (the “Restated Certificate”) with the Secretary of State of the State of Delaware in connection with the Company’s IPO. The Company’s board of directors and stockholders previously approved the Restated Certificate to be effective immediately prior to the closing of the IPO.

The Restated Certificate amends and restates the Company’s amended and restated certificate of incorporation, as amended, in its entirety to, among other things: (i) increase the authorized number of shares of common stock to 200,000,000 shares; (ii) authorize 10,000,000 shares of preferred stock that may be issued from time to time by the Company’s board of directors in one or more series; (iii) provide that directors may be removed from office only for cause by the affirmative vote of the holders of at least 66 2/3% in voting power of the Company’s outstanding capital stock then entitled to vote in an election of directors; (iv) eliminate the ability of the Company’s stockholders to take action by written consent in lieu of a meeting; and (v) designate the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware to be the sole and exclusive forum for certain legal actions and proceedings against the Company.

The Restated Certificate also effected a 1-for-15.625 reverse stock split approved by the Company’s Board of Directors as described above.

Convertible Preferred Stock

During the six months ended June 30, 2020, the Company issued 809,294 shares of Series A-3 Preferred Stock at a price of $0.53 and 709,690 shares of Series CF Preferred Stock at price per share of $0.52.

During six months ended June 30, 2020, the Company issued 20,754,717 shares of Series B Preferred Stock to the Bailey Holders pursuant to the Bailey acquisition at a price per share of $0.53 for a total fair value of $11,000,000. See Note 4.

Upon the closing of the Company’s IPO on May 18, 2021, all then-outstanding shares of Preferred Stock converted into an aggregate of 4,027,181 shares of common stock according to their terms.

Common Stock

The Company had 200,000,000 shares of common stock authorized with a par value of $0.0001 as of June 30, 2021.

Common stockholders have voting rights of one vote per share. The voting, dividend, and liquidation rights of the holders of common stock are subject to and qualified by the rights, powers, and preferences of preferred stockholders.

2021 Transactions

On May 13, 2021, the Company’s registration statement on Form S-1 relating to the IPO was declared effective by the SEC. In the IPO, which closed on May 18, 2021, the Company issued and sold 2,409,639 shares of common stock at a public offering price of $4.15 per share. Additionally, the Company issued warrants to purchase 2,771,084 shares, which includes 361,445 warrants sold upon the partial exercise of the over-allotment option. The aggregate net proceeds to the Company from the were $8.6 million after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions of $0.8 million and direct offering expenses of $0.6 million.

Upon the closing of the Company’s IPO on May 18, 2021, all then-outstanding shares of Preferred Stock converted into an aggregate of 4,027,181 shares of common stock according to their terms.

Upon closing of the Company’s IPO, the Company converted outstanding principal totaling $2,680,289 and certain accrued and unpaid interest of the Company’s convertible debt into an aggregate of 1,135,153 shares of common stock. See Note 7.

24

Table of Contents

DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

Upon closing of the Company’s IPO, certain officers and directors converted balances due totaling $257,515 into 152,357 shares of common stock and recorded $233,184 in compensation expense for the shares issued in excess of accrued balances owed. See Note 9.

In connection with the H&J acquisition, the Company issued 2,192,771 shares of common stock to the seller. See Note 4.

The Company issued 20,000 shares to the underwriter in connection with its April 2021 note financing.

Pursuant to a consulting agreement, the Company issued 50,000 shares of common stock with a guaranteed equity value of $250,000. In connection with the agreement, the Company recorded a contingent consideration liability of $67,000. See Note 3.

In May 2021, an aggregate of 31,881 warrants were exercised for shares of common stock for proceeds of $145,696.

On June 28, 2021, the Company’s underwriters purchased 361,445 shares of common stock at a public offering price of $4.15 per share pursuant to the exercise of the remaining portion of their over-allotment option. The Company received net proceeds of approximately $1.4 million after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions of $0.1 million.

NOTE 9: RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

Employee Backpay, Loans Receivable and Loans Payable

As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, due to related parties includes advances from the former officer, Mark Lynn, who also serves as a director, totaling $124,568 and $194,568 respectively, and accrued salary and expense reimbursements of $126,706 and $246,885 respectively, to current officers. Upon closing of the IPO, 25,080 shares of common stock were issued to directors as conversion of balances owed.

The current CEO, Hil Davis, previously advanced funds to the Company for working capital. These prior advances were converted to a note payable totaling $115,000. Upon closing of the IPO, 127,278 shares of common stock were issued to the CEO as conversion of the outstanding note payable and related accrued interest, accrued compensation and other consideration. As of a result of the transaction, the Company recorded an additional $233,184 in stock compensation expense, which is included in general and administrative expenses in the condensed consolidated statements of operations.

As of June 30, 2021, H&J had an outstanding note payable of $299,489 owned by the H&J Seller. The note matures on July 10, 2022 and bears interest at 12% per annum.

NOTE 10: SHARE-BASED PAYMENTS

Common Stock Warrants

During the six months ended June 30, 2020, the Company granted 152,280 common stock warrants to the venture debt lender with an exercise price of $2.50 per share. The warrants were valued at $58,421 using the below range of inputs using the Black-Scholes model.

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DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

During the Company’s Series A-3 Preferred Stock raise, the Company granted 2,603 common stock warrants at an exercise price of $8.28 per share to a funding platform in the six months ended June 30, 2020.

    

Six Months Ended

 

June 30, 

 

2020

 

Risk Free Interest Rate

 

1.54 - 1.59

%

Expected Dividend Yield

 

0.00

%

Expected Volatility

 

58.0

%

Expected Life (years)

 

10.00

In connection with the IPO, the Company issued 2,409,639 warrants and an additional 361,445 warrants to purchase common stock per the over-allotment option. Each warrant will have an exercise price of $4.57 per share (equal to 110% of the offering price of the common stock), will be exercisable upon issuance and will expire five years from issuance.

On May 13, 2021, pursuant to the IPO Underwriting Agreement, the Company issued warrants to the underwriters to purchase up to an aggregate of 120,482 shares of common stock with an exercise price of $5.19 per share. The warrants may be exercised beginning on November 13, 2021 and will expire five years from issuance.

In connection with the Company’s April 2021 note financing, the Company issued warrants to the lender to purchase up to 120,482 shares of common stock. The warrants have an exercise price of $4.15 per share and are exercisable immediately after issuance.

In May 2021, an aggregate of 31,881 warrants were exercised for shares of common stock for proceeds of $145,696.

A summary of information related to common stock warrants for the six months ended June 30, 2021 is as follows:

    

Common

    

Weighted

Stock

Average

Warrants

Exercise Price

Outstanding - December 31, 2020

 

914,539

$

2.66

Granted

 

3,012,048

 

4.58

Converison of preferred stock warrants upon IPO

51,642

7.66

Exercised

 

(31,881)

 

4.57

Forfeited

 

 

Outstanding - June 30, 2021

 

3,946,348

$

4.17

Exercisable at June 30, 2021

 

3,825,866

$

4.14

Preferred Stock Warrants

A summary of information related to preferred stock warrants for the six months ended June 30, 2021 is as follows:

    

Preferred

    

Weighted

Stock

Average

Warrants

Exercise Price

Outstanding - December 31, 2020

 

806,903

$

0.49

Converted to common stock warrants upon IPO

(806,903)

0.49

Exercised

 

 

Forfeited

 

 

Outstanding - June 30, 2021

 

$

Exercisable at June 30, 2021

 

$

Upon the IPO, all outstanding preferred stock warrants converted into common stock warrants at a ratio of 15.625:1.

26

Table of Contents

DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

Stock Options

2020 Incentive Stock Plan

The Company has adopted a 2020 Omnibus Incentive Stock Plan (the “2020 Plan”). An aggregate of 3,300,000 shares of the Company’s common stock is reserved for issuance and available for awards under the 2020 Plan, including incentive stock options granted under the 2020 Plan. The 2020 Plan administrator may grant awards to any employee, director, consultant or other person providing services to us or our affiliates. Upon the IPO, 2,712,000 options were granted to executives and directors at an exercise price of $4.15 per share. As of June 30, 2021, 588,000 options were available for future issuance.

A summary of information related to stock options under our 2013 and 2020 Stock Plan for the six months ended June 30, 2021 is as follows:

    

    

Weighted

Average

Options

Exercise Price

Outstanding - December 31, 2020

 

1,163,103

$

2.34

Granted

 

2,712,000

 

4.15

Exercised

 

 

Forfeited

 

 

Outstanding - June 30, 2021

 

3,875,103

$

3.62

Exercisable at June 30, 2021

 

2,996,861

$

3.60

Weighted average duration (years) to expiration of outstanding options at June 30, 2021

 

8.53

 

  

Stock-based compensation expense of $3,568,370 and $49,932 was recognized for the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2021, and $3,605,346 and $99,864 was recognized for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively. During the six months ended June 30, 2021, $523,151 was recorded to sales and marketing expense, and all other stock compensation was included in general and administrative expense in the condensed consolidated statements of operations. Total unrecognized compensation cost related to non-vested stock option awards as of June 30, 2021 amounted to $1,298,335 and will be recognized over a weighted average period of 2.74 years.

NOTE 11: LEASE OBLIGATIONS

In April 2021, the Company entered into a lease agreement for operating space. The lease expires in June 2023 and has monthly base rent payments of $17,257. The lease required a $19,500 deposit.

Bailey leases facilities under operating leases with unrelated parties that expire at various dates through February 2029, however in July 2020 Bailey negotiated the early termination of the leases on two of its retail locations. The third lease was vacated and 0 additional liability is expected.

H&J leases office and showroom facilities in Dallas and Houston, Texas, and New Orleans, Louisiana. The leases expire at various dates through June 2022 with base rents ranging from $3,400 to $6,500.

Total rent expense for the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 was $173,052 and $181,152, and $305,841 and $463,349 for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

27

Table of Contents

DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

NOTE 12: CONTINGENCIES

On February 28, 2020, a Company vendor filed a lawsuit against the Company’s non-payment of trade payables totaling $123,000. Such amounts, including expected interest, are included in accounts payable in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and the Company does not believe it is probable that losses in excess of such trade payables will be incurred. The Company is actively working to resolve this matter.

On March 25, 2020, a Bailey’s product vendor filed a lawsuit against Bailey for non-payment of trade payables totaling $492,390. Approximately the same amount is held in accounts payable for this vendor in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and the Company does not believe it is probable that losses in excess of such trade payables will be incurred. The Company and product vendor have entered into a settlement, which will require the Company make 10 monthly payments of approximately $37,000, starting in May 2021. Upon completion of the payment schedule, any remaining amounts will be forgiven. If the Company fails to meet its obligations based on the prescribed time frame, the full amount will be due with interest, less payments made.

On December 21, 2020, a Company investor filed a lawsuit against DBG for reimbursement of their investment totaling $100,000. Claimed amounts are included in short-term convertible note payable in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and the Company does not believe it is probable that losses in excess of such short-term note payable will be incurred. The Company is actively working to resolve this matter.

In August 2020 and March 2021, 2 lawsuits were filed against Bailey’s by third-party’s related to prior services rendered. The claims (including fines, fees, and legal expenses) total an aggregate of $96,900. Both cases are in the preliminary stages and the Company believes the claims to be without merit. At this time, the Company is unable to determine potential outcomes but does not believe risk of loss is probable.

On September 24, 2020 a Bailey’s product vendor filed a lawsuit against Bailey’s non-payment of trade payables totaling approximately $481,000 and additional damages of approximately $296,000. Claimed amounts for trade payables are included in accounts payable in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets, net of payments made. The Company does not believe it will be liable for additional damages and therefore the Company does not believe additional accrual is needed over what is included in accounts payable at this time. The Company plans to contest any such damages vigorously.

Except as may be set forth above the Company is not a party to any legal proceedings, and the Company is not aware of any claims or actions pending or threatened against us. In the future, the Company might from time to time become involved in litigation relating to claims arising from its ordinary course of business, the resolution of which the Company does not anticipate would have a material adverse impact on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

NOTE 13: INCOME TAXES

The Company recorded a tax benefit of $1,100,200 for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 related to a full release of its valuation allowance pertaining to the acquisition of H&J (see Note 4). The acquisition of H&J created a deferred tax liability position, and those deferred tax liabilities can be used as a source of income for the Company’s existing deferred tax assets.

28

NOTE 14: SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

Management’s Evaluation

In July 2021, warrant holders exercised 355,000 warrants for proceeds of $1,622,350.

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our unaudited condensed financial statements and related notes appearing elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and our audited financial statements and related notes for the year ended December 31, 2020 included in our final prospectus for our initial public offering (the “IPO”) of our common stock filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, pursuant to Rule 424(b)(4) on May 17, 2021, which we refer to as the Prospectus.

Some of the statements contained in this discussion and analysis or set forth elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including information with respect to our plans and strategy for our business, constitute forward looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. We have based these forward-looking statements on our current expectations and projections about future events. The following information and any forward-looking statements should be considered in light of factors discussed elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, particularly including those risks identified in Part II-Item 1A “Risk Factors” and our other filings with the SEC.

Our actual results and timing of certain events may differ materially from the results discussed, projected, anticipated, or indicated in any forward-looking statements. We caution you that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and that our actual results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate may differ materially from the forward-looking statements contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Statements made herein are as of the date of the filing of this Form 10-Q with the SEC and should not be relied upon as of any subsequent date. Even if our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate are consistent with the forward-looking statements contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, they may not be predictive of results or developments in future periods. We disclaim any obligation, except as specifically required by law and the rules of the SEC, to publicly update or revise any such statements to reflect any change in our expectations or in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such statements may be based or that may affect the likelihood that actual results will differ from those set forth in the forward-looking statements.

Business Overview

We offer a wide variety of apparel through several brands on a both direct-to-consumer and wholesale basis. We have created a business model derived from our founding as a digitally native-first vertical brand. Digital native first brands are brands founded as e-commerce driven businesses, where online sales constitute a meaningful percentage of net sales, although they often subsequently also expand into wholesale or direct retail channels. Unlike typical e-commerce brands, as a digitally native vertical brand we control our own distribution, sourcing products directly from our third-party manufacturers and selling directly to the end consumer. We focus on owning the customer’s “closet share” by leveraging their data and purchase history to create personalized targeted content and looks for that specific customer cohort which includes products across our brands.

We define “closet share” as the percentage (“share”) of a customer’s clothing units that (“of closet”) she or he owns in her or his closet and the amount of those units that go to the brands that are selling these units. For example, if a customer buys 20 units of clothing a year and the brands that we own represent 10 of those units purchased, then our closet share is 50% of that customer’s closet, or 10 of our branded units divided by 20 units they purchased in entirety. Closet share is a similar concept to the widely used term wallet share, it is just specific to the customer’s closet. The higher our closet share, the higher our revenue as higher closet share suggests the customer is purchasing more of our brands than our competitors.

We have strategically expanded into an omnichannel brand offering these styles and content not only on-line but at selected wholesale and retail storefronts. We believe this approach allows us opportunities to successfully drive Lifetime Value (“LTV”) while increasing new customer growth. We define Lifetime Value or LTV as an estimate of the average revenue that a customer will generate throughout their lifespan as our customer. This value/revenue of a customer helps us determine many economic decisions, such as marketing budgets per marketing channel, retention versus acquisition decisions, unit level economics, profitability and revenue forecasting.

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We believe that a successful apparel brand needs to sell in every revenue channel. However, each channel offers different margin structures and requires different customer acquisition and retention strategies. We were founded as a digital-first retailer which has strategically expanded into select wholesale and direct retail channels. We strive to strategically create omnichannel strategies that blend physical and online channels to engage consumers in the channel of their choosing. Our products are sold direct-to-consumers principally through our websites, but also through our wholesale channel, primarily in specialty stores and select department stores, and our own showrooms.

We currently offer products under the DSTLD, Bailey 44 (“Bailey”) and Harper & Jones (“H&J”) brands. We plan to begin offering products under ACE Studios once we finalize the re-branding and repositioning into more casual wear. Bailey was historically a wholesale brand, which we have begun to transition to a digital, direct-to-consumer brand. DSTLD was historically a digital direct-to-consumer brand, to which we recently added select wholesale retailers to create more brand awareness. H&J is also primarily a direct-to-consumer brand using its own showrooms. We will leverage all three channels (our websites, wholesale and our own stores) for all our brands. Every brand will have a different revenue mix by channel based on optimizing revenue and margin in each channel for each brand, which includes factoring in customer acquisition costs and retention rates by channel and brand.

We believe that by leveraging a physical footprint to acquire customers and increase brand awareness, we can use digital marketing to focus on retention and a very tight, disciplined high value new customer acquisition strategy, especially targeting potential customers lower in the sales funnel. Building a direct relationship with the customer as the customer transacts directly with us allows us to better understand our customer’s preferences and shopping habits. Our substantial experience as a company originally founded as a digitally native-first retailer gives us the ability to strategically review and analyze the customer’s data, including contact information, browsing and shopping cart data, purchase history and style preferences. This in turn has the effect of lowering our inventory risk and cash needs since we can order and replenish product based on the data from our online sales history, replenish specific inventory by size, color and SKU based on real time sales data, and control our mark-down and promotional strategies versus being told what mark downs and promotions we have to offer by the department stores and boutique retailers.

We acquired Bailey in February 2020. Upon the closing of our IPO in May 2021, we closed on our acquisition of H&J.

We agreed on the consideration that we are paying in each acquisition in the course of arm’s length negotiations with the holders of the membership interests in each of Bailey and H&J. In determining and negotiating this consideration, we relied on the experience and judgment of our management and our evaluation of the potential synergies that could be achieved in combining the operations of Bailey and H&J. We did not obtain independent valuations, appraisals or fairness opinions to support the consideration that we agreed to pay.

Material Trends, Events and Uncertainties

COVID-19

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of a novel coronavirus (“COVID-19”) a pandemic. As the global spread of COVID-19 continues, DBG remains first and foremost focused on a people-first approach that prioritizes the health and well-being of its employees, customers, trade partners and consumers. To help mitigate the spread of COVID-19, DBG has modified its business practices, including in response to legislation, executive orders and guidance from government entities and healthcare authorities (collectively, “COVID-19 Directives”). These directives include the temporary closing of offices and retail stores, instituting travel bans and restrictions and implementing health and safety measures including social distancing and quarantines.

Our digital platform remains a high priority through which its brands stay connected with consumer communities while providing experiential content. In accordance with local government guidelines and in consultation with the guidance of global health professionals, we have implemented measures designed to ensure the health, safety and well-being of associates employed in its distribution and fulfillment center. Many of these facilities remain operational and support digital consumer engagement with its brands and to service retail partners as needed.

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Our business has been, and will continue to be, impacted by the effects of the COVID-19 global pandemic in countries where our suppliers, third-party service providers or consumers are located. These effects include recommendations or mandates from governmental authorities to close businesses, limit travel, avoid large gatherings or to self-quarantine, as well as temporary closures and decreased operations of the facilities of our suppliers, service providers and customers. The impacts on us have included, and in the future could include, but are not limited to:

●  significant uncertainty and turmoil in global economic and financial market conditions causing, among other things: decreased consumer confidence and decreased consumer spending, now and in the mid and long-term. Specifically, COVID has impacted our business in several ways, including store closings, supply chain disruptions and delivery delays, meaningfully lower net revenue, furloughs and layoffs of 52 employees and increased costs to operate our warehouse to ensure a healthy and safe work environment. Approximately 220 boutique stores where we sold our products closed temporarily and permanently in 2020 and into 2021, representing a reduction in approximately 40% of such stores prior to COVID. Additionally, approximately 40 department stores that carried our products have closed as well, representing a reduction of approximately 35% of such stores prior to COVID. We do not anticipate the department stores will open those stores back up, and we do not anticipate a majority of the closed boutique stores will reopen. We also waited to hire a new designer until the summer, once we knew that stores would open back up at some capacity. The delay in hiring a new designer caused a delay in the collections being shown, sold, and shipped. Sales of new collections commenced in the second quarter of 2021.

●  inability to access financing in the credit and capital markets at reasonable rates (or at all) in the event we, or our suppliers find it desirable to do so, increased exposure to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates relative to the U.S. Dollar, and volatility in the availability and prices for commodities and raw materials we use for our products and in our supply chain. Specifically, the pandemic shut down our supply chain for several months in 2020, and delayed deliveries throughout the year.

●  inability to meet our consumers’ needs for inventory production and fulfillment due to disruptions in our supply chain and increased costs associated with mitigating the effects of the pandemic caused by, among other things: reduction or loss of workforce due to illness, quarantine or other restrictions or facility closures, scarcity of and/or increased prices for raw materials, scrutiny or embargoing of goods produced in infected areas, and increased freight and logistics costs, expenses and times; failure of third parties on which we rely, including our suppliers, customers, distributors, service providers and commercial banks, to meet their obligations to us or to timely meet those obligations, or significant disruptions in their ability to do so, which may be caused by their own financial or operational difficulties, including business failure or insolvency and collectability of existing receivables; and

●  significant changes in the conditions in markets in which we do business, including quarantines, governmental or regulatory actions, closures or other restrictions that limit or close our operating and manufacturing facilities and restrict our employees’ ability to perform necessary business functions, including operations necessary for the design, development, production, distribution, sale, marketing and support of our products. Specifically, we had to furlough and layoff a significant amount of employees to adjust to our lower revenues.

The COVID-19 pandemic is ongoing and dynamic in nature, and continues to drive global uncertainty and disruption. As a result, COVID-19 had a significant negative impact on the Company’s business, including the consolidated financial condition, results of operations and cash flows throughout 2020 and the first six months of 2021. While we are not able to determine the ultimate length and severity of the COVID-19 pandemic, we expect store closures, an anticipated reduction in traffic once stores initially reopen and a highly promotional marketplace will continue to have a negative impact on our financial performance through the balance of 2021.

DBG has implemented cost controls to reduce discretionary spending to help mitigate the loss of sales and to conserve cash while continuing to support employees. DBG is also assessing its forward inventory purchase commitments to ensure proper matching of supply and demand, which will result in an overall reduction in future commitments. As DBG continues to actively monitor the situation, we may take further actions that affect our operations.

Although the Company has taken several measures to maximize liquidity and flexibility to maintain operations during the disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, uncertainty regarding the duration and severity of the COVID-19 pandemic, governmental actions in response to the pandemic, and the impact on us and our consumers, customers and suppliers, there is no certainty that the measures we take will be sufficient to mitigate the risks posed by COVID-19.

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Components of Our Results of Operations

Net Revenue

We sell our products to our customers directly through our website. In those cases, sales, net represents total sales less returns, promotions, and discounts.

Bailey sells its products directly to customers. Bailey also sells its products indirectly through wholesale channels that include third-party online channels and physical channels such as specialty retailers and department stores.

H&J sells its products directly to customers through their showrooms and sales reps.

Cost of Net Revenue

Cost of net revenue include direct cost of purchased merchandise; inventory shrinkage; inventory adjustments due to obsolescence, including excess and slow-moving inventory and lower of cost and net realizable reserves.

Bailey’s cost of net revenue includes the direct cost of purchased and manufactured merchandise; inventory shrinkage; inventory adjustments due to obsolescence including excess and slow-moving inventory and lower of cost and net realizable reserves; duties; and inbound freight.

H&J’s cost of net revenue sold is associated with procuring fabric and custom tailoring each garment.

Operating Expenses

Our operating expenses include all operating costs not included in cost of net revenues. These costs consist of general and administrative, sales and marketing, and fulfillment and shipping expense to the customer.

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of all payroll and payroll-related expenses, stock-based compensation, professional fees, insurance, software costs, and expenses related to our operations at our headquarters, including utilities, depreciation and amortization, and other costs related to the administration of our business.

Sales and marketing expense primarily includes digital advertising; photo shoots for wholesale and direct-to-consumer communications, including email, social media and digital advertisements; and commission expenses associated with sales representatives.

We expect to incur additional expenses as a result of operating as a public company, including costs to comply with the rules and regulations applicable to companies listed on a national securities exchange, costs related to compliance and reporting obligations pursuant to the rules and regulations of the SEC and higher expenses for insurance, investor relations and professional services. We expect these costs will increase our operating costs.

Distribution expenses include the cost to operate our warehouse — or prior to Bailey 44 acquisition, costs paid to our third-party logistics provider — including occupancy and labor costs to pick and pack customer orders and any return orders; packaging; and shipping costs to the customer from the warehouse and any returns from the customer to the warehouse.

At each reporting period, we estimate changes in the fair value of contingent consideration and recognize any change in fair in our consolidated statement of operations, which is included in operating expenses. Additionally, amortization of the identifiable intangibles acquired in the acquisitions is also included in operating expenses.

Interest Expense

Interest expense consists primarily of interest related to our debt outstanding to our senior lender, convertible debt, and other interest bearing liabilities.

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Results of Operations

Three Months Ended June 30, 2021 compared to Three Months Ended June 30, 2020

The following table presents our results of operations for the three months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020:

    

Three Months Ended

June 30,

    

2021

    

2020

Net revenues

$

1,003,529

$

664,017

Cost of net revenues

 

608,944

 

932,362

Gross profit (loss)

 

394,585

 

(268,345)

Operating expenses

 

11,236,508

 

1,626,004

Operating loss

 

(10,841,923)

 

(1,894,349)

Other expenses

 

(955,695)

 

(373,957)

Loss before provision for income taxes

 

(11,797,618)

 

(2,268,306)

Provision for income taxes

 

1,100,120

 

709

Net loss

$

(10,697,498)

$

(2,267,597)

Net Revenues

Revenues increased by $0.3 million to $1.0 million for the three months ended June 30, 2021, compared to $0.7 million in the corresponding fiscal period in 2020. The increase was primarily due to the acquisition of H&J in May 2021.

Gross Profit (Loss)

Our gross profit increased by $0.7 million for the three months ended June 30, 2021 to $0.4 million from a gross loss of ($0.3) million for the corresponding fiscal period in 2020. The increase in gross margin was primarily attributable to increased revenue in the three months ended June 30, 2021 and the gross profit achieved by H&J since the May 2021 acquisition.

Our gross margin was 39.3% for the three months ended June 30, 2021 compared to (40.4)% for the three months ended March 31, 2020. The increase in the gross margin was due to H&J’s margins in 2021, as well as mark downs to net realizable value of DBG and Bailey’s inventory in the second quarter of 2020. due to the effects of COVID.

Operating Expenses

Our operating expenses increased by $9.6 million for the three months ended June 30, 2021 to $11.2 million compared to $1.6 million for the corresponding fiscal period in 2020. The increase in operating expenses was primarily due to non-cash charges incurred in 2021 upon the IPO and acquisition of H&J, including stock-based compensation expense of $4.0 million and the change in fair value of contingent consideration of $3.1 million, as well as increased professional fees and investor relations costs. We expect operating expenses to increase in total dollars and as a percentage of revenues as our revenue base increases.

Other Expenses

Other expenses increased by $0.6 million to $1.0 million in the three months ended June 30, 2021 compared to $0.4 million in the corresponding fiscal period in 2020. The increase in the other expense was primarily due to interest expense from the April 2021 note which was fully amortized during the second quarter of 2021.

Net Loss

Our net loss increased by $8.4 million to a loss of $10.7 million for the three months ended June 30, 2021 compared to a loss of $2.3 million for the corresponding fiscal period in 2020 primarily due to our increased operating expenses, partially offset by higher gross profit and a tax benefit recorded in 2021.

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Six Months Ended June 30, 2021 compared to Six Months Ended June 30, 2020

The following table presents our results of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020:

Six Months Ended

 

June 30,

    

2021

 

2020

Net revenues

$

1,411,934

$

3,240,702

Cost of net revenues

 

1,224,886

 

2,155,155

Gross profit

 

187,048

 

1,085,547

Operating expenses

 

13,378,424

 

4,557,358

Operating loss

 

(13,191,376)

 

(3,471,811)

Other expenses

 

(1,630,177)

 

(688,932)

Loss before provision for income taxes

 

(14,821,553)

 

(4,160,743)

Provision for income taxes

 

1,100,120

 

(13,381)

Net loss

$

(13,721,433)

$

(4,174,124)

Net Revenues

Revenue decreased by $1.8 million to $1.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2021, compared to $3.2 million in the corresponding fiscal period in 2020. The decrease is primarily due to the full effects of COVID-19 on the operations of Bailey in the winter of 2021, partially offset by the increase in revenue due to the acquisition of H&J in May 2021.

Gross Profit

Our gross profit decreased by $0.9 million for the six months ended June 30, 2021 to $0.2 million from $1.1 million for the corresponding fiscal period in 2020. The decrease in gross margin was primarily attributable to lower revenues in the six months ended June 30, 2021, partially offset by the gross profit of H&J in 2021.

Our gross margin was 13.2% for the six months ended June 30, 2021 compared to 33.5% for the six months ended June 30, 2020. The decrease in gross margin was due to our discounting and liquidation measures by both DBG and Bailey to sell aged inventory in 2021.

Operating Expenses

Our operating expenses increased by $8.8 million for the six months ended June 30, 2021 to $13.4 million compared to $4.6 million for the corresponding fiscal period in 2020. The increase in operating expenses was primarily due to non-cash charges incurred in 2021 upon the IPO and acquisition of H&J, including stock-based compensation expense of $4.0 million and the change in fair value of contingent consideration of $3.1 million, as well as increased professional fees and investor relations costs. We expect operating expenses to increase in total dollars and as a percentage of revenues as our revenue base increases.

Other Expenses

Other expenses increased by $0.9 million to $1.6 million in the six months ended June 30, 2021 compared to $0.7 million in the corresponding fiscal period in 2020. The increase in the other expense was primarily due to interest expense from the April 2021 note which was fully amortized during the second quarter of 2021 as well as amortization of debt discounts recorded upon debt conversions during the IPO.

Net Loss

Our net loss increased by $9.5 million to a loss of $13.7 million for the six months ended June 30, 2021 compared to a loss of $4.2 million for the corresponding fiscal period in 2020 primarily due to lower gross profit and our increased operating expenses, partially offset by a tax benefit recorded in 2021.

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Liquidity and Capital Resources

We expect that our cash and cash equivalents of $4.1 million as of June 30, 2021 and measures described below will be sufficient to fund its operating expenses, debt obligations and capital expenditure requirements for at least one year from the date these consolidated financial statements are issued.

Throughout the next twelve months, we intend to fund our operations from the funds raised through the IPO. Additionally, we intend to fund operations from increased revenues as new designs and collections will be deployed in the second half of 2021, through settlement or renegotiation of aged payables and outstanding debt, and continuing its cost cutting measures.

The Company also plans to continue to fund its capital funding needs through a combination of public or private equity offerings, debt financings or other sources. There can be no assurance as to the availability or terms upon which such financing and capital might be available in the future. If the Company is unable to secure additional funding, it may be forced to curtail or suspend its business plans.

Cash Flow Activities

The following table presents selected captions from our condensed statement of cash flows for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020:

    

Six Months Ended

June 30,

    

2021

    

2020

Net cash used in operating activities:

 

  

 

  

Net loss

$

(13,721,433)

$

(4,174,124)

Non-cash adjustments

$

7,059,457

$

429,499

Change in operating assets and liabilities

$

66,039

$

1,586,264

Net cash used in operating activities

$

(6,595,937)

$

(2,158,361)

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

$

(505,056)

$

130,423

Net cash provided by financing activities

$

10,600,928

$

2,848,266

Net change in cash

$

3,499,935

$

820,328

Cash Flows Used In Operating Activities

Our cash used by operating activities increased by $4.4 million to cash used of $6.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2021 as compared to cash used of $2.2 million for the corresponding fiscal period in 2020. The increase in net cash used in operating activities was primarily driven by our higher net loss and less cash provided by changes in our operating assets and liabilities in 2021, partially offset by an increase in non-cash charges.

Cash Flows Provided By Investing Activities

Our cash used in investing activities was $0.5 million in the six months ended June 30, 2021 as compared to cash generated of $0.1 million for the corresponding fiscal period in 2020. Cash used in 2021 was primarily related to the cash consideration in the H&J acquisition. Cash generated during 2020 was primarily related to cash acquired due to the acquisition of Bailey and deposits.

Cash Flows Provided by Financing Activities

Cash provided by financing activities was $10.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2021 compared to cash provided of $2.8 million for the corresponding fiscal period in 2020. Cash inflows in the six months ended June 30, 2021 were primarily related to $8.6 million in net proceeds from the IPO after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and offering expenses, as well as $1.4 million in net proceeds from the underwriter’s exercise of their over-allotment option. Cash was also generated in 2021 from proceeds from loan payables of $2.6 million and proceeds from convertible notes payable of $0.5 million, partially offset by loan and note repayments of $2.0 million.

Cash inflows in the six months ended June 30, 2020 were primarily related to proceeds from PPP and SBA loans of $1.7 million, proceeds from our Series A-3 and CF preferred stock for $0.7 million, proceeds from venture debt of $0.3 million and advances from Bailey’s factor of $0.2 million.

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Contractual Obligations and Commitments

In March 2017, we entered into a senior credit agreement with an outside lender for up to $4,000,000, dependent upon the achievement of certain milestones. The initial close amount was a minimum of $1,345,000. The loan bears interest at 12.5% per annum, compounded monthly, including fees. A 5% closing fee is due upon each closing, legal and accounting fees of up to $40,000, and management fees of $4,167-$5,000 per month. As of June 30, 2021, we owed our senior secured lender approximately $6.0 million that is due on the scheduled maturity date of December 31, 2022.

If we consummate a follow-on public offering on or before July 31, 2021, we are required to make a $3,000,000 payment on the loan within five business days after such public offering. In addition, if we consummate an additional follow-on offering thereafter on or before September 30, 2021, we are required to make another $3,000,000 payment on the loan within five business��days after such public offering. If we do not consummate the initial follow-on offering or, if we do but do not consummate the aforementioned second follow-on offering by September 30, 2021, we are required to make a $300,000 payment on the loan by September 30, 2021.

While we have no current plans to conduct a follow-on offering prior to July 31, 2021 and September 30, 2021, we may effect such an offering if market conditions are favorable for such an offering and should the representative agree to waive the standstill provision set forth herein. There is no assurance that even if market conditions are favorable that the representative will waive the standstill provision. In such a case we anticipate to make any required payments under our senior credit facility from cash generated from operations.

Our credit agreement contains negative covenants that, subject to significant exceptions, limit our ability, among other things to make restricted payments, pledge assets as security, make investments, loans, advances, guarantees and acquisitions, or undergo other fundamental changes. A breach of any of these covenants could result in a default under the credit facility and permit the lender to cease making loans to us. If for whatever reason we have insufficient liquidity to make scheduled payments under our credit facility or to repay such indebtedness by the schedule maturity date, we would seek the consent of our senior lender to modify such terms.

Although our senior lender has previously agreed to seven prior modifications of our credit agreement, there is no assurance that it will agree to any such modification and could then declare an event of default. Upon the occurrence of an event of default under this agreement, the lender could elect to declare all amounts outstanding thereunder to be immediately due and payable. We have pledged all of our assets as collateral under our credit facility. If the lender accelerates the repayment of borrowings, we may not have sufficient assets to repay them and we could experience a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Repayment is accelerated upon a change in control, as defined in the agreement. The loan is senior to all of our other debts and obligations, is collateralized by all of our assets, and shares of our common stock pledged by former officers of the Company. As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the gross loan balance is $6,001,755. As of December 31, 2020, we were in technical default of this debt due to covenant violations. Subsequent to our IPO, all defaults have been cured. Management expects that the Company will remain in good standing with all requirements of this debt in the near term.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Our management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations is based on our financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. The preparation of our financial statements and related disclosures requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, costs and expenses and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities in our financial statements. We base our estimates on historical experience, known trends and events and various other factors that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. We evaluate our estimates and assumptions on an ongoing basis. Our actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

During the six months ended June 30, 2021, there were no material changes to our critical accounting policies except for the adoption of ASU 2020-06 (see Note 3 to the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements). Our critical accounting policies are described under the heading “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates” in our prospectus filed May 17, 2021 and the notes to the unaudited condensed financial statements included in Item 1, “Unaudited Financial Statements,” of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

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Emerging Growth Company Status

We are an emerging growth company as that term is used in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 and, as such, have elected to comply with certain reduced public company reporting requirements.

Section 107 of the JOBS Act provides that an emerging growth company can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. In other words, an emerging growth company can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. We have elected to take advantage of the benefits of this extended transition period. Our financial statements may, therefore, not be comparable to those of companies that comply with such new or revised accounting standards

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We did not have during the periods presented, and we do not currently have, any off-balance sheet arrangements, as defined in the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

We are a smaller reporting company as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) and are not required to provide the information required under this item.

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

We maintain “disclosure controls and procedures” as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the reports we file and submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. In designing and evaluating our disclosure controls and procedures, management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives, and management necessarily applies its judgment in evaluating the benefits of possible controls and procedures relative to their costs.

Our management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, who serve as our principal executive officer and principal financial and accounting officer, respectively, has evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of June 30, 2021. In making this evaluation, our management considered the material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting described below. Based on such evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of such date.

We have initiated various remediation efforts, including the hiring of additional financial personnel/consultants with the appropriate public company and technical accounting expertise and other actions that are more fully described below. As such remediation efforts are still ongoing, we have concluded that the material weaknesses have not been fully remediated. Our remediation efforts to date have included the following:

●  We have made an assessment of the basis of accounting, revenue recognition policies and accounting period cutoff procedures. In some cases, we made the necessary adjustments to convert the basis of accounting from cash basis to accrual basis. In all cases we have done the required analytical work to ensure the proper cutoff of the financial position and results of operations for the presented accounting periods.

●  We have made an assessment of the current accounting personnel, financial reporting and information system environments and capabilities. Based on our preliminary findings, we have found these resources and systems lacking and have concluded that these resources and systems will need to be supplemented and/or upgraded. We are in the process of identifying a single, unified accounting and reporting system that can be used by the Company and Bailey, with the goal of ensuring consistency and timeliness in reporting, real time access to data while also ensuring ongoing data integrity, backup and cyber security procedures and processes.

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●  We engaged external consultants with public company and technical accounting experience to facilitate accurate and timely accounting closes and to accurately prepare and review the financial statements and related footnote disclosures. We plan to retain these financial consultants until such time that the internal resources of the Company have been upgraded and the required financial controls have been fully implemented.

The actions that have been taken are subject to continued review, implementation and testing by management, as well as audit committee oversight. While we have implemented a variety of steps to remediate these weaknesses, we cannot assure you that we will be able to fully remediate them, which could impair our ability to accurately and timely meet our public company reporting requirements.

Notwithstanding the assessment that our internal controls over financial reporting are not effective and that material weaknesses exist, we believe that we have employed supplementary procedures to ensure that the financial statements contained in this filing fairly present our financial position, results of operations and cash flows for the reporting periods covered herein in all material respects.

Limitations on Effectiveness of Controls and Procedures

Our management, including our Chief Executive Officer (Principal Executive Officer) and Chief Financial Officer (Principal Financial Officer), does not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures will prevent all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include, but are not limited to, the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the control. The design of any system of controls also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

Management believes that the material weakness set forth above did not have an effect on our financial results.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

No change in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act) occurred during the six months ended June 30, 2021 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

We are currently involved in, and may in the future be involved in, legal proceedings, claims, and government investigations in the ordinary course of business. These include proceedings, claims, and investigations relating to, among other things, regulatory matters, commercial matters, intellectual property, competition, tax, employment, pricing, discrimination, consumer rights, personal injury, and property rights. See Note 12 in the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements for a complete listing of legal proceedings, which include:

On February 28, 2020, a Company vendor filed a lawsuit against the Company’s non-payment of trade payables totaling $123,000. Such amounts, including expected interest, are included in accounts payable in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and the Company does not believe it is probable that losses in excess of such trade payables will be incurred. The Company is actively working to resolve this matter.

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On March 25, 2020, a Bailey’s product vendor filed a lawsuit against Bailey for non-payment of trade payables totaling $492,390. Approximately the same amount is held in accounts payable for this vendor in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and the Company does not believe it is probable that losses in excess of such trade payables will be incurred. The Company and product vendor have entered into a settlement, which will require the Company make ten monthly payments of approximately $37,000, starting in May 2021. Upon completion of the payment schedule, any remaining amounts will be forgiven. If the Company fails to meet its obligations based on the prescribed time frame, the full amount will be due with interest, less payments made.
On December 21, 2020, a Company investor filed a lawsuit against DBG for reimbursement of their investment totaling $100,000. Claimed amounts are included in short-term convertible note payable in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and the Company does not believe it is probable that losses in excess of such short-term note payable will be incurred. The Company is actively working to resolve this matter.
In August 2020 and March 2021, two lawsuits were filed against Bailey’s by third-party’s related to prior services rendered. The claims (including fines, fees, and legal expenses) total an aggregate of $96,900. Both cases are in the preliminary stages and the Company believes the claims to be without merit. At this time, the Company is unable to determine potential outcomes but does not believe risk of loss is probable.
On September 24, 2020 a Bailey’s product vendor filed a lawsuit against Bailey’s non-payment of trade payables totaling approximately $481,000 and additional damages of approximately $296,000. Claimed amounts for trade payables are included in accounts payable in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets, net of payments made. The Company does not believe it will be liable for additional damages and therefore the Company does not believe additional accrual is needed over what is included in accounts payable at this time. The Company plans to contest any such damages vigorously.

Depending on the nature of the proceeding, claim, or investigation, we may be subject to monetary damage awards, fines, penalties, or injunctive orders. Furthermore, the outcome of these matters could materially adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial condition. The outcomes of legal proceedings, claims, and government investigations are inherently unpredictable and subject to significant judgment to determine the likelihood and amount of loss related to such matters. While it is not possible to determine the outcomes, we believe based on our current knowledge that the resolution of all such pending matters will not, either individually or in the aggregate, have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, cash flows, or financial condition.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

Investing in our common stock involves a high degree of risk. Before investing in our common stock, you should consider carefully the risks described in our prospectus filed on May 17, 2021, together with the other information contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including our financial statements and the related notes and in our other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. If any of the risks occur, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be materially and adversely affected. In these circumstances, the market price of our common stock could decline, and you may lose all or part of your investment.

ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

Upon the closing of the IPO on May 18, 2021, all then-outstanding shares of preferred stock converted into an aggregate of 4,027,181 shares of common stock according to their terms.

Upon closing of the IPO, we converted outstanding principal totaling $2,680,289 and certain accrued and unpaid interest of our convertible debt into an aggregate of 1,135,153 shares of common stock.

Upon closing of the IPO, certain officers and directors converted balances due totaling $257,515 into 152,357 shares of common stock and recorded $233,184 in compensation expense for the shares issued in excess of accrued balances owed.

In connection with the H&J acquisition, we issued 2,192,771 shares of common stock to the seller.

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We issued 20,000 shares to the underwriter in connection with its April 2021 note financing.

Pursuant to a consulting agreement, we issued 50,000 shares of common stock.

In May 2021, an aggregate of 31,881 warrants were exercised for shares of common stock for proceeds of $145,696.

In July 2021, an aggregate of 355,000 warrants were exercised for shares of common stock for proceeds of $1,622,350.

Unless otherwise stated, the sales of the below securities were deemed to be exempt from registration under the Securities Act in reliance upon Section 4 (a)(2) of the Securities Act (or Regulation D or Regulation S promulgated thereunder), or Rule 701 promulgated under Section 3(b) of the Securities Act as transactions by an issuer not involving any public offering or pursuant to benefit plans and contracts relating to compensation as provided under Rule 701. The recipients of the securities in each of these transactions represented their intentions to acquire the securities for investment only and not with a view to or for sale in connection with any distribution thereof, and appropriate legends were placed upon the stock certificates issued in these transactions.

Use of Proceeds from Initial Public Offering of Common Stock

On May 13, 2021, our registration statement on Form S-1 relating to our IPO was declared effective by the SEC. In the IPO, which closed on May 18, 2021, we issued and sold 2,409,639 shares of common stock at a public offering price of $4.15 per share. Additionally, we issued warrants to purchase 2,771,084 shares, which includes 361,445 warrants sold upon the partial exercise of the over-allotment option. Total gross proceeds were approximately $10 million, which includes the warrants. The aggregate net proceeds to us from the IPO, inclusive of the proceeds from the over-allotment exercise, were approximately $8.6 million after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions of $0.8 million and estimated offering expenses of approximately $0.6 million. The offer and sale of all of the shares in the offering were registered under the Securities Act pursuant to registration statement on Form S-1 (File No. 333-256174). Kingwood Capital Markets, a division of Benchmark Investments, Inc., acting as representative of the several underwriters named in the Underwriting Agreement.

On June 28, 2021, our underwriters purchased 361,445 shares of common stock at a public offering price of $4.15 per share pursuant to the exercise of the remaining portion of their over-allotment option. We received net proceeds of approximately $1.4 million after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions.

None of the underwriting discounts and commissions or offering expenses were paid directly or indirectly to any directors or officers of ours or their associates or to persons owning 10% or more of any class of equity securities or to any affiliates of ours.

We used the net proceeds to us from the IPO for general corporate purposes, including working capital, marketing initiatives and capital expenditures. Specifically, we used a portion of the net proceeds from the offering to pay the remaining approximately $1.0 million to pay off a note payable, $1.0 million owed for the acquisition of Bailey by DBG, $500,000 to fund the acquisition of H&J (which accrues interest at 12.0% per annum), and $179,501 to pay accrued interest owed further to the 2019 convertible debt.

ITEM 3. DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES

None.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE

Not applicable.

ITEM 5. OTHER INFORMATION

Not applicable.

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ITEM 6. EXHIBITS

Exhibit

Number

   

Description of Exhibit

2.1

Membership Interest Purchase Agreement dated October 14, 2020 among D. Jones Tailored Collection, LTD and Digital Brands Group (formerly known as Denim.LA, Inc.) (incorporated by reference to our Current Report on Form 1-U (File No. 24R-00032), filed with the Commission on November 18, 2020)

2.2

First Amendment to Membership Interest Purchase Agreement dated December 31, 2020 among D. Jones Tailored Collection, LTD and Digital Brands Group (formerly known as Denim.LA, Inc) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.2 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on April 13, 2021)

2.3

Agreement and Plan of Merger with Bailey 44, LLC dated February 11, 2020 among Bailey 44, LLC, Norwest Venture Partners XI, and Norwest Venture Partners XII, LP and Digital Brands Group (formerly known as Denim.LA, Inc) (incorporated by reference to exhibit 7.1 of our Current Report on Form 1-U, filed with the Commission on February 13, 2020)

2.4

Second Amendment to Membership Interest Purchase Agreement Dated May 10, 2021 among D. Jones Tailored Collection, LTD and Digital Brands Group (formerly known as Denim. LA, Inc.) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.4 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on May 11, 2021)

3.1

Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of the Registrant (incorporated by reference to exhibit 2.1 of our Regulation A Offering Statement on Form 1-A (Commission File No. 024-10535), filed with the Commission on March 23, 2016)

3.2

Amendment to Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of the Registrant (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on April 13, 2021)

3.3

Form of Sixth Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of the Registrant (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.3 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on May 12, 2021)

3.4

Bylaws of the Registrant (incorporated by reference to exhibit 2.2 of our Regulation A Offering Statement on Form 1-A (Commission File No. 024-10535), filed with the Commission on March 23, 2016)

3.5

Form of Amended and Restated Bylaws of Registrant (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.5 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on May 12, 2021)

4.1

Form of Common Stock Certificate (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on April 27, 2021)

4.2

Form of Warrant Agency Agreement, including Form of Warrant Certificate (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.2 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on April 27, 2021)

4.3

Form of Underwriter’s Warrants (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 1.1 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on May 11, 2021)

4.4

Form of Lender’s Warrants (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.4 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on April 27, 2021)

4.5

Form of Series Seed Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.5 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on April 13, 2021)

4.6

Form of Series A Preferred Stock Subscription Agreement (incorporated by reference to exhibit 4 of our Form 1-A/A (Commission File No. 024-10718), filed with the Commission on March 23, 2016)

4.7

Form of Series A-2 Preferred Stock Subscription Agreement (incorporated by reference to exhibit 4.1 of our Form 1-A/A (Commission File No. 024-10718), filed with the Commission on August 8, 2017)

4.8

Form of Series A-3 Preferred Stock Subscription Agreement (incorporated by reference to exhibit 4 of our Form 1-A/A (Commission File No. 024-10718), filed with the Commission on September 13, 2018)

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4.9

Form of Series CF Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.9 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on April 13, 2021)

4.10

Form of 2019 Regulation D Convertible Note (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.10 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on May 11, 2021)

4.11

Form of 2020 Regulation D Convertible Note (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.11 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on May 11, 2021)

10.1

Form of Indemnification Agreement between the Registrant and each of its directors and officers (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on April 13, 2021)

10.2

Form of Option Agreement with each of John “Hil” Davis, Laura Dowling and Reid Yeoman (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on May 11, 2021)

10.3

Amendment No. 7 to Senior Credit Agreement, dated as of April 1, 2021 between bocm3-DSTLD-Senior Debt, LLC, bocm3-DSTLD-Senior Debt 2, LLC, Stockholders and Digital Brands Group (formerly known as Denim.LA, Inc) (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.15 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on April 27, 2021)

10.4

Form of Board of Directors Agreement, entered into by each of the Director Nominees (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.27 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on April 13, 2021)

10.5

Original Issue Discount Promissory Note by Digital Brands Group, Inc. in favor of Target Capital 2, LLC in the aggregate amount of $1,000,000 dated as of April 8, 2021 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.29 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on May 11, 2021)

10.6

Consulting Agreement dated as of April 8, 2021 between Alchemy Advisory LLC and Digital Brands Group, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.30 to our Registration Statement on Form S-1/A (Commission File No. 333-255193), filed with the Commission on May 11, 2021)

Exhibit 31.1

 

Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

Exhibit 31.2

Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

Exhibit 32.1*

Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

Exhibit 32.2*

Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

101.INS

 

XBRL Instance Document

101.SCH

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document

101.CAL

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document

101.LAB

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Labels Linkbase Document

101.PRE

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

101.DEF

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document

Exhibit 104

The cover page from this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, formatted in Inline XBRL.

*

This certification is being furnished and shall not be deemed “filed” with the SEC for purposes of Section 18 of the Exchange Act, or otherwise subject to the liability of that section, and shall not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any filing under the Securities Act or the Exchange Act, except to the extent that the registrant specifically incorporates it by reference.

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SIGNATURES

In accordance with the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

DIGITAL BRANDS GROUP, INC.

August 16, 2021

By:

/s/ John Hilburn Davis

John Hilburn Davis, Chief Executive Officer

August 16, 2021

By:

/s/ Reid Yeoman

Reid Yeoman, Chief Financial Officer

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