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Aptevo Therapeutics (APVO)

Filed: 12 Aug 21, 4:05pm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, DC 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2021

OR

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from               to               

 

Commission File Number: 001-37746

 

APTEVO THERAPEUTICS INC.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

 

Delaware

81-1567056

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

2401 4th Avenue, Suite 1050

Seattle, Washington

98121

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (206) 838-0500

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of Each Class

 

Trading Symbols(s)

 

Name of Exchange on Which Registered

Common Stock, $0.001 par value per share

 

APVO

 

The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
(The Nasdaq Capital Market)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.     Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

  

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

 

  

Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act).     

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes      No  

As of August 11, 2021, the number of shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding was 4,893,991.

 

 

 

 


 

 

Table of Contents

 

 

 

Page

PART I.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1.

Financial Statements (Unaudited)

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets

3

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations

4

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

5

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity

6

 

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

7

Item 2.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

17

Item 3.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

24

Item 4.

Controls and Procedures

24

 

 

 

PART II.

OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1.

Legal Proceedings

25

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

25

Item 2.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

52

Item 3.

Defaults Upon Senior Securities

52

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

52

Item 5.

Other Information

52

Item 6.

Exhibits

53

Signatures

54

 

In this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, “we,” “our,” “us,” “Aptevo,” and “the Company” refer to Aptevo Therapeutics Inc. and, where appropriate, its consolidated subsidiaries.

 

 

2


 

 

PART I—FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1. Financial Statements.

Aptevo Therapeutics Inc.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(in thousands, except share and per share amounts, unaudited)

 

 

 

June 30, 2021

 

 

December 31, 2020

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

60,394

 

 

$

39,979

 

Restricted cash - current

 

 

1,259

 

 

 

2,555

 

Royalty receivable

 

 

3,110

 

 

 

2,369

 

Prepaid expenses

 

 

936

 

 

 

2,228

 

Other current assets

 

 

66

 

 

 

133

 

Total current assets

 

 

65,765

 

 

 

47,264

 

Property and equipment, net

 

 

2,804

 

 

 

2,815

 

Operating lease right-of-use asset

 

 

2,159

 

 

 

2,722

 

Other assets

 

 

746

 

 

 

746

 

Total assets

 

$

71,474

 

 

$

53,547

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable and other accrued liabilities

 

$

5,196

 

 

$

5,583

 

Accrued compensation

 

 

1,203

 

 

 

2,757

 

Liability related to the sale of future royalties, net - short-term

 

 

12,810

 

 

 

 

Current portion of loan payable

 

 

10,667

 

 

 

5,000

 

Other current liabilities

 

 

988

 

 

 

1,199

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

30,864

 

 

 

14,539

 

Liability related to the sale of future royalties, net - long-term

 

 

20,537

 

 

 

 

Loan payable - long-term

 

 

4,323

 

 

 

20,054

 

Operating lease liability

 

 

1,869

 

 

 

2,360

 

Total liabilities

 

 

57,593

 

 

 

36,953

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders' equity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock: $0.001 par value; 15,000,000 shares authorized, 0 shares

   issued or outstanding

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock: $0.001 par value; 500,000,000 shares authorized; 4,884,515

   and 4,410,909 shares issued and outstanding at June 30, 2021 and

   December 31, 2020, respectively

 

 

47

 

 

 

46

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

214,628

 

 

 

202,154

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(200,794

)

 

 

(185,606

)

Total stockholders' equity

 

 

13,881

 

 

 

16,594

 

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity

 

$

71,474

 

 

$

53,547

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

3


 

 

Aptevo Therapeutics Inc.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(in thousands, except share and per share amounts, unaudited)

 

 

 

For the Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

For the Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Royalty revenue

 

 

3,110

 

 

 

473

 

 

 

5,531

 

 

 

473

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

(4,722

)

 

 

(4,440

)

 

 

(10,084

)

 

 

(8,446

)

General and administrative

 

 

(4,110

)

 

 

(2,840

)

 

 

(8,057

)

 

 

(6,456

)

Loss from operations

 

 

(5,722

)

 

 

(6,807

)

 

 

(12,610

)

 

 

(14,429

)

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income (expense) from continuing operations, net

 

 

(2,342

)

 

 

4

 

 

 

(3,124

)

 

 

(271

)

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(2,104

)

Net loss from continuing operations

 

$

(8,064

)

 

$

(6,803

)

 

$

(15,734

)

 

$

(16,804

)

Discontinued operations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income from discontinued operations

 

$

132

 

 

$

 

 

$

546

 

 

$

12,898

 

Net loss

 

$

(7,932

)

 

$

(6,803

)

 

$

(15,188

)

 

$

(3,906

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss from continuing operations

 

$

(1.78

)

 

$

(2.10

)

 

$

(3.51

)

 

$

(5.14

)

Net income from discontinued operations

 

$

0.03

 

 

$

 

 

$

0.12

 

 

$

3.95

 

Basic and diluted net loss per basic share

 

$

(1.75

)

 

$

(2.10

)

 

$

(3.39

)

 

$

(1.19

)

Weighted-average shares used to compute per share calculations

 

 

4,536,517

 

 

 

3,232,811

 

 

 

4,477,821

 

 

 

3,269,410

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

4


 

 

Aptevo Therapeutics Inc.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(in thousands, unaudited)

 

 

 

For the Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Operating Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(15,188

)

 

$

(3,906

)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

1,146

 

 

 

714

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

588

 

 

 

764

 

Loss on disposal of property and equipment

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

Gain on sale of Aptevo BioTherapeutics

 

 

 

 

 

(14,338

)

Loss on extinguishment of debt

 

 

 

 

 

2,104

 

Non-cash interest expense and other

 

 

2,354

 

 

 

137

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Royalty receivable

 

 

(741

)

 

 

(288

)

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

1,359

 

 

 

499

 

Operating lease right-of-use asset

 

 

563

 

 

 

496

 

Accounts payable, accrued compensation and other liabilities

 

 

(2,152

)

 

 

(3,239

)

Long-term operating lease liability

 

 

(491

)

 

 

(470

)

Changes in assets and liabilities held for sale

 

 

 

 

 

1,719

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(12,557

)

 

 

(15,808

)

Investing Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash received from sale of Aptevo BioTherapeutics

 

 

 

 

 

28,120

 

Purchases of property and equipment

 

 

(582

)

 

 

 

Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities

 

 

(582

)

 

 

28,120

 

Financing Activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payments of long-term debt, including exit and other fees

 

 

(10,550

)

 

 

(22,104

)

Repayments under liability related to sale of future royalties

 

 

(2,421

)

 

 

 

Proceeds from sale of future royalties

 

 

35,000

 

 

 

 

Transaction costs from sale of future royalties

 

 

(1,100

)

 

 

 

Proceeds from exercise of stock options

 

 

111

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from exercise of warrants

 

 

985

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from common stock issued pursuant to the Lincoln Park purchase agreement

 

 

10,233

 

 

 

 

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

 

 

32,258

 

 

 

(22,104

)

Increase (decrease) in cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash

 

 

19,119

 

 

 

(9,792

)

Cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash at beginning of period

 

 

42,534

 

 

 

19,946

 

Cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash at end of period

 

$

61,653

 

 

$

10,154

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

5


 

 

Aptevo Therapeutics Inc.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(in thousands, except share amounts, unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

Common Stock

 

 

Paid-In

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

Stockholders'

 

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Capital

 

 

Deficit

 

 

Equity

 

Balance at December 31, 2020

 

 

4,410,909

 

 

$

46

 

 

$

202,154

 

 

$

(185,606

)

 

$

16,594

 

Issuance of common stock from

   exercises of stock option

 

 

10,685

 

 

 

 

 

 

86

 

 

 

 

 

 

86

 

Issuance of common stock from

   exercise of warrants

 

 

27,828

 

 

 

 

 

 

506

 

 

 

 

 

 

506

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

574

 

 

 

 

 

 

574

 

Net loss for the period

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(7,256

)

 

 

(7,256

)

Balance at March 31, 2021

 

 

4,449,422

 

 

$

46

 

 

$

203,320

 

 

$

(192,862

)

 

$

10,504

 

Issuance of common stock from

   exercises of stock options

 

 

1,769

 

 

 

 

 

 

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

25

 

Issuance of common stock from

   exercise of warrants

 

 

26,277

 

 

 

 

 

 

478

 

 

 

 

 

 

478

 

Common stock sold pursuant to

   the Lincoln Park purchase

   agreement

 

 

407,047

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

10,233

 

 

 

 

 

 

10,234

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

572

 

 

 

 

 

 

572

 

Net loss for the period

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(7,932

)

 

 

(7,932

)

Balance at June 30, 2021

 

 

4,884,515

 

 

$

47

 

 

$

214,628

 

 

$

(200,794

)

 

$

13,881

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

Common Stock

 

 

Paid-In

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

Stockholders'

 

 

 

Shares

 

 

Amount

 

 

Capital

 

 

Deficit

 

 

Equity

 

Balance at December 31, 2019

 

 

3,234,231

 

 

$

45

 

 

$

179,653

 

 

$

(167,856

)

 

$

11,842

 

Cancellation of fractional

   shares arising from reverse

   stock split

 

 

(1,420

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

413

 

 

 

 

 

 

413

 

Net income for the period

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,897

 

 

 

2,897

 

Balance at March 31, 2020

 

 

3,232,811

 

 

$

45

 

 

$

180,066

 

 

$

(164,959

)

 

$

15,152

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

301

 

 

 

 

 

 

301

 

Net loss for the period

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6,803

)

 

 

(6,803

)

Balance at June 30, 2020

 

 

3,232,811

 

 

$

45

 

 

$

180,367

 

 

$

(171,762

)

 

$

8,650

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

6


 

Aptevo Therapeutics Inc.

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 

Note 1. Nature of Business and Significant Accounting Policies

Organization and Liquidity

Aptevo Therapeutics Inc. (Aptevo, we, us, or the Company) is a clinical-stage, research and development biotechnology company focused on developing novel immunotherapeutic candidates for the treatment of different forms of cancer. We have developed two versatile and enabling platform technologies for rational design of precision immune stimulatory drugs. Our lead clinical candidate, APVO436, and preclinical candidates, ALG.APV-527 and APVO603, were developed using our ADAPTIR™ modular protein technology platform. Our preclinical candidate APVO442 was developed using our ADAPTIR-FLEX™ modular protein technology platform.  

We are currently trading on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol “APVO.”

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared on a basis that assumes we will continue as a going concern and which contemplates the realization of assets and satisfaction of liabilities and commitments in the normal course of business. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, we had a net loss of $7.9 million and $15.2 million, respectively. We had an accumulated deficit of $200.8 million as of June 30, 2021. For the six months ended June 30, 2021, net cash used in our operating activities was $12.6 million. We have suffered recurring losses from operations and negative cash flows from operating activities. We believe that our existing cash resources, the cash to be generated from future deferred payments and milestones, the cash generated from warrant exercises, and release of restricted cash securing letters of credit, will be sufficient to meet our projected operating requirements and debt service for at least twelve months from the date of issuance of these financial statements. We may choose to raise additional funds to support our operating and capital needs.

We continue to face significant challenges and uncertainties and, as a result, our available capital resources may be consumed more rapidly than currently expected due to: (a) changes we may make to the business that affect ongoing operating expenses; (b) changes we may make in our business strategy; (c) changes we may make in our research and development spending plans; (d) potential decreases in our expected milestone and deferred payments from Medexus Pharmaceuticals Inc. (Medexus) with respect to IXINITY; (e) whether and to what extent future proceeds are received under our Royalty Purchase Agreement; and (f) other items affecting our forecasted level of expenditures and use of cash resources. We may attempt to obtain additional funding through our existing equity sales agreement with Lincoln Park or our Equity Distribution Agreement with Piper Sandler & Co (Piper Sandler), or other public or private financing, collaborative arrangements with strategic partners, or through credit lines or other debt financing sources to increase the funds available to fund operations. However, we may not be able to secure such funding in a timely manner or on favorable terms, if at all. Furthermore, if we issue equity or debt securities to raise additional funds, our existing stockholders may experience dilution, and the new equity or debt securities may have rights, preferences, and privileges senior to those of our existing stockholders. If we raise additional funds through collaboration, licensing, or other similar arrangements, it may be necessary to relinquish valuable rights to our potential products or proprietary technologies, or grant licenses on terms that are not favorable to us. Without additional funds, we may be forced to delay, scale back, or eliminate some of our research and development activities or other operations and potentially delay product development in an effort to provide sufficient funds to continue our operations. If any of these events occurs, our ability to achieve our development and commercialization goals may be adversely affected. Given the global economic climate and additional or unforeseen effects from the COVID-19 pandemic, we may experience delays or difficulties in the financing environment and raising capital due to economic uncertainty.  

Basis of Presentation

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). These condensed consolidated financial statements include all adjustments, which include normal recurring adjustments, necessary for the fair presentation of the Company’s financial position. These unaudited interim consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2020, and the notes thereto, which are included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from these estimates and changes in these estimates are recorded when known.

The condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and our wholly owned subsidiaries: Aptevo Research and Development LLC and Aptevo BioTherapeutics LLC (for the period prior to its sale on February 28, 2020). All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated.

In March 2020, we effected a 1-for-14 reverse stock split (the “Reverse Split”) of our common stock pursuant to which every 14 shares of our common stock issued and outstanding as of March 26, 2020 were automatically combined into one issued and outstanding share of common stock.  NaN fractional shares were issued as a result of the reverse stock split. Stockholders of record who would otherwise have been entitled to receive a fractional share received a cash payment in lieu thereof.  All share and per share information with respect to our common stock have been restated to reflect the effect of the Reverse Split for all periods presented.

7


 

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosures of contingent liabilities in the condensed consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. Estimates are used for, but not limited to, forecasted royalties, effective interest rates, clinical accruals, useful lives of equipment, commitments and contingencies, and stock-based compensation forfeiture rates. Given the global economic climate and additional or unforeseen effects from the COVID-19 pandemic, these estimates are becoming more challenging, and actual results could differ materially from those estimates.

Significant Accounting Policies

Liability Related to Sale of Future Royalties and Non-Cash Interest Expense

On March 30, 2021, the Company entered into and closed a royalty purchase agreement (the Royalty Purchase Agreement) with an entity managed by HealthCare Royalty Management, LLC (HCR) pursuant to which the Company sold to HCR the right to receive royalty payments made by Pfizer Inc. (Pfizer) in respect of net sales of RUXIENCE. Under the terms of the agreement, the Company received $35 million (the Investment Amount) at closing and the Company is eligible to receive additional payments in aggregate of up to an additional $32.5 million based on the achievement of sales milestones in 2021, 2022, and 2023 (collectively, the Milestone Amounts). The Royalty Purchase Agreement further provides that, once HCR reaches aggregate royalty payments totaling 190% of the Investment Amount plus the Milestone Amounts to the extent paid by HCR to the Company, Aptevo will be entitled to receive 50% of royalty interest payments thereafter.

We treat the Royalty Purchase Agreement with HCR (see Note 7) as a debt financing, amortized under the effective interest rate method over the estimated life of the related expected royalty stream. The liabilities related to sale of future royalties and the debt amortization are based on our current estimates of future royalties expected to be paid over the life of the arrangement. To the extent total future royalties collected are an amount less than the liability, the Company is not obligated to fund any such shortfall. We will periodically assess the expected royalty payments using projections from external sources. To the extent our estimates of future royalty payments are greater or less than previous estimates or the estimated timing of such payments is materially different than previous estimates, we will adjust the effective interest rate and recognize related non-cash interest expense on a prospective basis. We are not obligated to repay the proceeds received under the Royalty Purchase Agreement with HCR. Due to our continuing involvement under the collaboration and license agreement originally between Trubion and Wyeth, we continue to recognize royalty revenue on net sales of RUXIENCE and record the royalty payments to HCR as a reduction of the liability when paid. As such payments are made to HCR, the balance of the liability will be effectively repaid over the life of the Royalty Purchase Agreement.

Debt Modification

On March 30, 2021, we amended our Credit Agreement with MidCap Financial and used $10 million of the proceeds received from the Royalty Purchase Agreement to pay down the outstanding principal under the Credit Agreement from $25 million to $15 million. The amended Credit Agreement was accounted for under ASC 470-50, Debt Modifications and Extinguishments as a debt modification, rather than an extinguishment, based on a comparison of the present value of the cash flows under the terms of the debt immediately before and after the amendment, which resulted in a change of less than 10%. Unamortized issuance costs as of the date of modification will be amortized to interest expense using the effective interest method over the repayment term.

Other Significant Accounting Policies

Our other significant accounting policies were reported in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020 that was filed with the SEC on March 31, 2021. Our other significant accounting policies have not changed materially from the policies previously reported.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted

ASU 2020-04, “Reference Rate Reform (Topic 848)” provides optional expedients and exceptions for applying GAAP to loan and lease agreements, derivative contracts, and other transactions affected by the anticipated transition away from LIBOR toward new interest rate benchmarks. The United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority (the “FCA”), which regulates LIBOR, has announced that it intends to phase out LIBOR by the end of 2021. It is unclear if at that time LIBOR will cease to exist or if new methods of calculating LIBOR will be established such that it continues to exist after 2021. In addition, on March 25, 2020, the FCA stated that although the central assumption that firms cannot rely on LIBOR being published after the end of 2021 has not changed, the outbreak of COVID-19 has impacted the timing of many firms’ transition planning, and the FCA will continue to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on transition timelines and update the marketplace as soon as possible. At this time, it is not possible to predict the effect of any such changes, any establishment of alternative reference rates or any other reforms to LIBOR that may be enacted. An entity may elect to apply the amendments prospectively from March 12, 2020 through December 31, 2022. Our credit agreement with MidCap Financial currently references LIBOR and also provides that we may amend the credit agreement to reflect an alternative rate of interest upon the phase out of LIBOR. We are currently evaluating the impact that ASU 2020-04 may have on our consolidated financial statements.

8


 

Note 2. Discontinued Operations

The accompanying financial statements include results from discontinued operations from two separate transactions: the sale of our hyperimmune business in 2017, from which we received a payment in 2021 related to the collection of a certain accounts receivable, and our Aptevo BioTherapeutics LLC business, which was sold in 2020.

On February 28, 2020, we entered into an LLC Purchase Agreement with Medexus, pursuant to which we sold all of the issued and outstanding limited liability company interests of Aptevo BioTherapeutics LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Aptevo. As a result of the transaction, Medexus obtained all rights, title and interest to the IXINITY product and the related Hemophilia B business and intellectual property.

The net gain on sale of Aptevo BioTherapeutics, totaling $14.3 million, was calculated as the difference between the fair value of the consideration received for Aptevo BioTherapeutics, less the net carrying value of the assets transferred to Medexus, less the transaction costs incurred and a working capital adjustment. We recorded the gain on sale in the quarter ended March 31, 2020.

The following table represents the components attributable to income from discontinued operations in the unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations (in thousands):

 

 

For the Three Months Ended June,

 

 

For the Six Months Ended June,

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Loss from operations - Aptevo BioTherapeutics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1,580

)

Gain on sale of Aptevo BioTherapeutics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14,338

 

Payment from Saol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

227

 

 

 

 

Deferred payment from Medexus

 

 

132

 

 

 

 

 

 

319

 

 

 

140

 

Income from discontinued operations

 

$

132

 

 

$

 

 

$

546

 

 

$

12,898

 

The LLC Purchase Agreement with Medexus entitles us to future deferred payments and royalties. For the three months ended June 30, 2021, we collected a deferred payment of $0.1 million received from Medexus in May 2021 related to first quarter 2021 IXINITY sales. Medexus communicated their second quarter 2021 net IXINITY sales to Aptevo in July and expects to make a deferred payment, within 45 days after quarter-end per the LLC Purchase Agreement, to Aptevo of approximately $0.1 million. As such, we will record the deferred payment amount related to Medexus’ second quarter sales of IXINITY as a gain when collected.    

There was 0 amortization for Aptevo BioTherapeutics in the three or six months ended June 30, 2021 and amortization was $0.1 million in the three and six months ended June 30, 2020. There was 0 depreciation or capital expenditures for the three or six months ended June 30, 2021 or June 30, 2020. Significant operating non-cash items include the gain on sale of Aptevo BioTherapeutics of $14.3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020. There were 0 significant investing non-cash items for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020.

Note 3. Collaboration Agreements

Alligator

On July 20, 2017, our wholly owned subsidiary Aptevo Research and Development LLC (Aptevo R&D), entered into a collaboration and option agreement (the Collaboration Agreement) with Alligator Bioscience AB (Alligator), pursuant to which Aptevo and Alligator will collaboratively develop ALG.APV-527, a lead bispecific antibody candidate simultaneously targeting 4-1BB (CD137), a member of the TNFR superfamily of a costimulatory receptor found on activated T-cells, and 5T4, a tumor antigen widely overexpressed in a number of different types of cancer.

We assessed the arrangement in accordance with ASC 606 and concluded that the contract counterparty, Alligator, is not a customer. As such the arrangement is not in the scope of ASC 606 and is instead treated as a collaborative agreement under ASC 808 – Collaborative Arrangements (ASC 808). In accordance with ASC 808, we concluded that because the Collaboration Agreement is a cost sharing agreement, there is no revenue.

We recorded a $0.1 million increase and an immaterial increase in research and development expense related to the Collaboration Agreement, for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and June 30, 2020, respectively.

9


 

Note 4. Fair Value Measurements

The Company’s estimates of fair value for financial assets and financial liabilities are based on the framework established in the fair value accounting guidance. The framework is based on the inputs used in valuation, it gives the highest priority to quoted prices in active markets and requires that observable inputs be used in the valuations when available. The disclosure of fair value estimates in the fair value accounting guidance hierarchy is based on whether the significant inputs into the valuation are observable. In determining the level of the hierarchy in which the estimate is disclosed, the highest priority is given to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs that reflect the Company’s significant market assumptions. The level in the fair value hierarchy within which the fair value measurement is reported is based on the lowest level input that is significant to the measurement in its entirety. The three levels of the hierarchy are as follows:

Level 1— Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets and liabilities;

Level 2— Inputs other than quoted prices in active markets that are either directly or indirectly observable; and

Level 3— Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities.

At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, we had $55.9 million and $35.4 million in Level 1 money market funds, respectively. The carrying amounts of our money market funds approximate their fair value. At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, we did 0t have any Level 2 or Level 3 assets.

Note 5. Cash, Cash Equivalents, and Restricted Cash

 

The Company’s cash equivalents are highly liquid investments with a maturity of 90 days or less at the date of purchase and include time deposits and investments in money market funds. Restricted cash - current includes $1.3 million securing letters of credit.

The following table shows our cash, cash equivalents and current restricted cash as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020:

 

 

 

June 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

(in thousands)

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Cash

 

$

4,498

 

 

$

4,601

 

Cash equivalents

 

 

55,896

 

 

 

35,378

 

Restricted cash - current

 

 

1,259

 

 

 

2,555

 

Total cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash

 

$

61,653

 

 

$

42,534

 

 

Note 6. Debt

Credit Agreement

On August 5, 2020, we entered into a Credit and Security Agreement (the Credit Agreement), with MidCap Financial. The Credit Agreement provided us with up to $25.0 million of available borrowing capacity under a term loan facility. The full $25.0 million was drawn on the closing date of the Credit Agreement. The term loan facility has a 48 month term, is interest-only for the first 18 months, with straight-line amortization for the remaining 30 months and bears interest at a rate of one month LIBOR plus 6.25% per annum, subject to a 1.50% LIBOR floor and a 2.50% LIBOR cap. The term loan facility included additional repayment provisions should either or both of the royalties or milestones related to IXINITY or royalties related to RUXIENCE be sold during the term of the loan. The United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority (the “FCA”), which regulates LIBOR, has announced that it intends to phase out LIBOR by the end of 2021. It is unclear if at that time LIBOR will cease to exist or if new methods of calculating LIBOR will be established such that it continues to exist after 2021. Our credit agreement with MidCap Financial currently references LIBOR and also provides that we may amend the credit agreement to reflect an alternative rate of interest upon the phase out of LIBOR.

On November 6, 2020, Kevin Tang and his related entities filed a statement on Schedule 13D to report the purchase of

10


 

1,760,000 shares of the Company’s common stock, which at the time represented approximately 54% of the Company’s issued and outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock. This acquisition of voting stock triggered a change in control, resulting in an Event of Default under Section 10.1(a)(ii) of the Credit Agreement. On November 10, 2020, the Company obtained a waiver from MidCap Financial pursuant to which, among other things, MidCap Financial waived such Event of Default and MidCap Financial and the Company agreed that an immediate event of default under the Credit Agreement will be deemed to have occurred in the event that (a) a majority of the seats on the Company’s board of directors are occupied by persons who were neither (i) nominated by the Company’s board of directors nor (ii) appointed by the directors so nominated, and (b) Tang has appointed the majority of the Company’s board of directors. No other events of default have occurred with respect to the Credit Agreement.

On March 30, 2021, we amended our Credit Agreement with MidCap Financial and used $10.0 million of the proceeds received from the Royalty Purchase Agreement to pay down the outstanding principal under the Credit Agreement from $25.0 million to $15.0 million. $10.0 million of the remaining $15.0 million principal balance will be payable on March 31, 2022.  Beginning March 1, 2022, monthly repayment of the remaining $5.0 million of principal will commence and continue for the final 30 months of the loan term. If the Company sells the IXINITY deferred payment stream and milestones prior to full repayment of this $5.0 million principal amount, under the agreement with MidCap Financial, we will be required to use the proceeds from the sale to pay down the outstanding loan principal balance. MidCap Financial also released its security interest in the RUXIENCE royalty payments. A fee of $0.6 million was paid by the Company to MidCap Financial in connection with the amendment in lieu of the formula-based fee previously required.

The amended Credit Agreement was accounted for as a debt modification, rather than an extinguishment, based on a comparison of the present value of the cash flows under the terms of the debt immediately before and after the amendment, which resulted in a change of less than 10%. Unamortized issuance costs as of the date of modification will be amortized to interest expense using the effective interest method over the repayment term.

As of June 30, 2021, we classified $10.7 million of the remaining $15.0 million principal of the amended Credit Agreement to current portion of long-term debt on the condensed consolidated balance sheet. The amended Credit Agreement states $10.0 million of the remaining $15.0 million principal balance will be payable on March 31, 2022. Additionally, within the next twelve months, we will pay $0.7 million to MidCap Financial for monthly repayments of outstanding principal beginning on March 1, 2022.

This facility is subject to a subjective acceleration clause that could be invoked by MidCap Financial upon the occurrence of any event MidCap Financial deems to have a material adverse effect on our ability to repay the lender.

Note 7. Liability Related to Sale of Future Royalties

In March 2021, we entered into and closed the Royalty Purchase Agreement with HCR pursuant to which we sold to HCR the right to receive royalty payments made by Pfizer in respect of global net sales of RUXIENCE. Under the terms of the agreement, we received $35.0 million (the Investment Amount) at closing and we are eligible to receive additional payments in aggregate of up to an additional $32.5 million based on the achievement of sales milestones in 2021, 2022, and 2023 (collectively, the Milestone Amounts). The Royalty Purchase Agreement further provides that, once HCR reaches aggregate royalty payments totaling 190% of the amount paid at closing plus Milestone Amounts to the extent paid by HCR to the Company, Aptevo will be entitled to receive 50% of royalty interest payments thereafter.

The proceeds received from HCR of $35.0 million were recorded as a liability, net of transaction costs of $1.1 million, which will be amortized over the estimated life of the arrangement using the effective interest method. In order to determine the amortization of the liability, we are required to estimate the total amount of future royalty payments to be received by HCR over the life of the arrangement. The total amount of royalty payments received by HCR under the Royalty Purchase Agreement, less the net proceeds we received of $33.9 million, is recorded as non-cash interest expense over the life of the arrangement using the effective interest method. We maintain our rights under the collaboration and license agreement originally between Trubion and Wyeth, with the exception of the cash flows of the RUXIENCE royalty payments purchased by HCR. Due to our continuing involvement under the collaboration and license agreement originally between Trubion and Wyeth, we continue to recognize royalty revenue on net sales of RUXIENCE and record the royalty payments to HCR as a reduction of the liability when paid. As such payments are made to HCR, the balance of the liability will be effectively repaid over the life of the Royalty Purchase Agreement. To the extent total future royalties collected are an amount less than the liability, the Company is not obligated to fund any such shortfall.

We estimate the effective interest rate used to record non-cash interest expense under the Royalty Purchase Agreement based on the estimate of future royalty payments to be received by HCR. As of June 30, 2021, the estimated effective interest rate under the agreement was 21.9%. Over the life of the arrangement, the actual effective interest rate will be affected by the amount and timing of the royalty payments received by HCR and changes in our forecasted royalties. Periodically, we will reassess our estimate of total future royalty payments to be received by HCR, and prospectively adjust the effective interest rate and amortization of the liability as necessary.

The following table presents the changes in the liability related to the sale of future royalties under the Royalty Purchase Agreement with HCR (in thousands):

 

 

Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

2021

 

Liability related to sale of future royalties, beginning balance

 

$

33,920

 

Non-cash interest expense

 

 

1,848

 

RUXIENCE royalties paid to HCR

 

 

(2,421

)

Liability related to sale of future royalties, ending balance

 

 

33,347

 

Current portion of liability related to sale of future royalties

 

 

(12,810

)

Liability related to sale of future royalties, non-current

 

$

20,537

 

 

11


 

 

Note 8. Leases

 

Office Space Lease - Operating

 We have an operating lease related to our office and laboratory space in Seattle, Washington. This lease was amended and extended in March 2019. The term of the amended lease is through April 2030 and we have 2 options to extend the lease term, each by five years, as well as a one-time option to terminate the lease in April 2023. The lease was further amended, effective August 2019, to reduce the square footage of our rented area.  

 The amended lease has a renewal option of 2 five-year renewals at fair market value as determined at the time of renewal, and a termination option after month thirty-six with nine months written notice. The termination option also requires a penalty equal to the unamortized tenant improvement allowance at 8% interest, the unamortized real estate taxes at 8% interest, and the equivalent of four-months’ rent at the base rent price at the time of termination. The estimated termination penalty has been recorded in our lease payments. We determined we should not include any periods after the termination option when evaluating this amendment as we are not reasonably certain to not exercise the option, therefore we are recording our liability through April 30, 2023.

For the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, we recorded $0.2 million and $0.4 million, respectively, related to variable expenses. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, we recorded $0.2 million and $0.3 million, respectively, related to variable expenses.

Equipment Leases - Operating

As of June 30, 2021, we have operating leases for 1 piece of lab equipment and 4 copiers in our Seattle, Washington headquarters. The future expense for these leases will be straight-line and will include any variable expenses that arise.

Equipment Lease – Financing

As of June 30, 2021, we had 1 equipment lease classified as a financing lease as the lease transferred ownership of the underlying asset to us at the end of the lease term in 2020. The lease has no remaining expense obligation. There were 0 financing lease payments in the three months or six months ended June 30, 2021.  

 

Components of lease expense:

 

 

 

For the Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

For the Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

For the Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

For the Six Months Ended June 30,

 

(in thousands)

 

2021

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2020

 

Operating lease cost

 

$

395

 

 

$

790

 

 

$

395

 

 

$

790

 

Finance lease cost:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amortization of right-of-use assets

 

 

1

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

3

 

Interest on lease liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total lease cost

 

$

396

 

 

$

793

 

 

$

397

 

 

$

793

 

 

Right of use assets acquired under operating leases:

 

 

 

As of June 30,

 

 

As of December 31,

 

(in thousands)

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Operating leases, excluding Seattle office lease

 

$

56

 

 

$

122

 

Seattle office lease, including amendment

 

 

2,103

 

 

 

2,600

 

Total operating leases

 

$

2,159

 

 

$

2,722

 

 

Lease payments:

 

 

 

For the Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

For the Six Months Ended June 30,

 

(in thousands)

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

For operating leases

 

$

698

 

 

$

788

 

 

 

12


 

 

The long-term portion of the lease liabilities included in the amounts above is $1.9 million and the remainder of our lease liabilities are included in other current liabilities on our condensed consolidated balance sheets.

As of June 30, 2021, the weighted average remaining lease term and weighted average discount rate for operating leases was 1.8 years and 14.49%. As of June 30, 2020, the weighted average remaining lease term and weighted average discount rate for operating leases was 2.8 years and 14.54%.

Note 9. Net Income (Loss) per Share

Basic net income (loss) per share is calculated by dividing the net income (loss) by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted net income (loss) per share is computed by dividing the net income (loss) by the weighted average number of common share equivalents outstanding for the period using the as-if converted method. For the purpose of this calculation, warrants, stock options and restricted stock units (RSUs) are only included in the calculation of diluted net income (loss) per share when their effect is dilutive.

We utilize the control number concept in the computation of diluted earnings per share to determine whether potential common stock instruments are dilutive. The control number used is loss from continuing operations or income from discontinued operations. The control number concept requires that the same number of potentially dilutive securities applied in computing diluted earnings per share from continuing operations be applied to all other categories of income or loss, regardless of their anti-dilutive effect on such categories. Therefore, no dilutive effect has been recognized in the calculation of income from discontinued operations per share.

Common stock equivalents include warrants, stock options and unvested RSUs.

The following table presents the computation of basic and diluted net income (loss) per share (in thousands, except share and per share amounts):

 

 

 

For the Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

For the Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Net loss from continuing operations

 

$

(8,064

)

 

$

(6,803

)

 

$

(15,734

)

 

$

(16,804

)

Income from discontinued operations

 

 

132

 

 

 

 

 

 

546

 

 

 

12,898

 

Net loss

 

$

(7,932

)

 

$

(6,803

)

 

$

(15,188

)

 

$

(3,906

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted net income (loss) per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss from continuing operations

 

$

(1.78

)

 

$

(2.10

)

 

$

(3.51

)

 

$

(5.14

)

Net income from discontinued operations

 

$

0.03

 

 

$

 

 

$

0.12

 

 

$

3.95

 

Net loss per basic share

 

$

(1.75

)

 

$

(2.10

)

 

$

(3.39

)

 

$

(1.19

)

Weighted-average shares used to compute per share calculations

 

 

4,536,517

 

 

 

3,232,811

 

 

 

4,477,821

 

 

 

3,269,410

 

 

The following table represents all potentially dilutive shares, which were all anti-dilutive and therefore excluded from the calculation of diluted net loss per share:

 

 

 

As of June 30,

 

(in thousands)

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Warrants

 

 

351

 

 

 

1,571

 

Outstanding options to purchase common stock

 

 

368

 

 

 

340

 

Unvested RSUs

 

 

64

 

 

 

12

 

 

Note 10. Equity

Equity Distribution Agreement

 

On December 14, 2020, we entered into an Equity Distribution Agreement (the Equity Distribution Agreement) with Piper Sandler. The Equity Distribution Agreement provides that, upon the terms and subject to the conditions set forth therein, we may issue and sell through Piper Sandler, acting as sales agent, shares of our common stock, $0.001 par value per share having an aggregate offering price of up to $50.0 million. This offering supersedes and replaces the program we commenced in December 2017. We have no obligation to sell any such shares under the Equity Distribution Agreement. The sale of such shares of common stock by Piper Sandler will be effected pursuant to a Registration Statement on Form S-3 which we filed on December 14, 2020. We did 0t issue any shares under the Equity Distribution Agreement in the six months ended June 30, 2021.

13


 

Purchase Agreement

On December 20, 2018, we entered into the Purchase Agreement, and a registration rights agreement, with Lincoln Park. Pursuant to the Purchase Agreement, Lincoln Park has committed to purchase up to $35.0 million worth of our common stock over a 36-month period commencing on February 13, 2019, the date the registration statement covering the resale of the shares was declared effective by the SEC. Under the Purchase Agreement, on any business day selected by us, we may direct Lincoln Park to purchase shares of our common stock provided that Lincoln Park’s maximum commitment on any single day does not exceed $2.0 million. The purchase price per share will be based off of prevailing market prices of our common stock immediately preceding the time of sale; provided, however, that we cannot direct any such purchase if the prevailing market price is less than $1.00.

In the three months ended June 30, 2021, the Company issued approximately 0.4 million shares of common stock to Lincoln Park under the 2018 Purchase Agreement. We received $10.2 million in proceeds from issuance of these shares and now have a remaining $24.8 million worth of shares of our common stock that we may direct Lincoln Park to purchase pursuant to our Purchase Agreement with them.

Rights Plan

On November 8, 2020, our Board of Directors (Board) approved and adopted a Rights Agreement, dated as of November 8, 2020, by and between the Company and Broadridge Corporate Issuer Solutions, Inc., as rights agent, pursuant to which the Board declared a dividend of 1 preferred share purchase right (each, a Right) for each outstanding share of the Company’s common stock held by stockholders as of the close of business on November 23, 2020.  When exercisable, each right initially would represent the right to purchase from the Company one one-thousandth of a share of a newly-designated series of preferred stock, Series A Junior Participating Preferred Stock, par value $0.001 per share, of the Company, at an exercise price of $400.00 per one one-thousandth of a Series A Junior Participating Preferred Share, subject to adjustment. Subject to various exceptions, the Rights become exercisable in the event any person (excluding certain exempted or grandfathered persons) becomes the beneficial owner of ten percent (10%) or more of the Company’s common stock without the approval of the Board.

 

Converted Equity Awards Incentive Plan

In connection with the spin-off from Emergent BioSolutions, Inc. (Emergent) in August 2016, we adopted the Converted Equity Awards Incentive Plan (Converted Plan) and outstanding equity awards of Emergent held by Aptevo employees were converted into or replaced with equity awards of Aptevo (Conversion Awards). A total of 0.1 million shares of Aptevo common stock have been authorized for issuance under the Converted Plan.

2016 Stock Incentive Plan

On August 1, 2016, the Company adopted the 2016 Stock Incentive Plan (2016 SIP). A total of 0.2 million shares of Aptevo common stock have been authorized for issuance under the 2016 SIP in the form of equity stock options.

On May 31, 2017, at the 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (Annual Meeting), the Company’s stockholders approved the amendment and restatement of the Company’s 2016 SIP (Restated 2016 Plan) to, among other things, increase the number of authorized shares issuable by 0.1 million shares of Aptevo common stock. The Restated 2016 Plan was previously approved, subject to stockholder approval, by the Board of Directors of the Company.

2018 Stock Incentive Plan

 

On June 1, 2018, at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Stockholders, the Company’s stockholders approved a new 2018 Stock Incentive Plan (2018 SIP), which replaced the Restated 2016 Plan on a go-forward basis. All stock options, RSUs or other equity awards granted subsequent to June 1, 2018 have been and will be issued out of the 2018 SIP, which has 0.3 million shares of Aptevo common stock authorized for issuance. The 2018 Plan became effective immediately upon stockholder approval at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Stockholders. Any shares subject to outstanding stock awards granted under the 2016 SIP that (a) expire or terminate for any reason prior to exercise or settlement; (b) are forfeited because of the failure to meet a contingency or condition required to vest such shares or otherwise return to the Company; or (c) otherwise would have returned to the 2016 SIP for future grant pursuant to the terms of the 2016 Plan (such shares, the “Returning Shares”) will immediately be added to the share reserve under the 2018 SIP as and when such shares become Returning Shares, up to a maximum of 0.3 million shares. As of June 30, 2021, there are less than 0.1 million shares available to be granted under the 2018 SIP.

Stock options under the 2018 SIP generally vest pro rata over a three-year period and terminate ten years from the grant date, though the specific terms of each grant are determined individually. The Company’s executive officers and certain other employees may be awarded options with different vesting criteria, and options granted to non-employee directors also vest over a three-year period. Option exercise prices for new options granted by the Company equal the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the Nasdaq Capital Market on the date of grant.

 

14


 

 

Stock-Based Compensation Expense

Stock-based compensation expense includes amortization of stock options and RSUs granted to employees and non-employees and has been reported in our condensed consolidated statements of operations as follows:

 

 

 

For the Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

For the Six Months Ended June 30,

 

(in thousands)

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Research and development

 

$

172

 

 

$

114

 

 

$

411

 

 

$

284

 

General and administrative

 

 

400

 

 

 

187

 

 

 

735

 

 

 

430

 

Total stock-based compensation expense

 

$

572

 

 

$

301

 

 

$

1,146

 

 

$

714

 

 

The Company accounts for stock-based compensation by measuring the cost of employee services received in exchange for all equity awards granted based on the fair value of the award as of the grant date. The Company recognizes the compensation expense over the vesting period. All assumptions used to calculate the grant date fair value of nonemployee options are generally consistent with the assumptions used for options granted to employees. In the event the Company terminates any of its consulting agreements, the unvested options underlying the agreements would also be cancelled.

Stock Options

Aptevo utilizes the Black-Scholes valuation model for estimating the fair value of all stock options granted. Set forth below are the assumptions used in valuing the stock options granted:

 

 

 

For the Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

For the Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Expected dividend yield

 

0.00%

 

 

0.00%

 

 

0.00%

 

 

0.00%

 

Expected volatility

 

98.03%

 

 

0.00%

 

 

99.53%

 

 

83.64%

 

Risk-free interest rate

 

0.91%

 

 

0.00%

 

 

0.55%

 

 

1.42%

 

Expected average life of options

 

6 years

 

 

6 years

 

 

5 years

 

 

6 years

 

 

There were no equity grants made in the three months ended June 30, 2020. Management applied an estimated forfeiture rate of 19% and 23% for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, respectively, and 8% for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020.

The following is a summary of option activity for the six months ended June 30, 2021:

 

 

 

Number of

Shares

 

 

Weighted-

Average

Exercise Price

 

 

Weighted-

Average

Remaining Term

 

 

Aggregate

Intrinsic

Value

 

Balance at December 31, 2020

 

 

212,581

 

 

$

8.32

 

 

 

8.78

 

 

$

5,906,007

 

Granted

 

 

189,080

 

 

 

32.40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercised

 

 

(13,274

)

 

 

8.40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

283,572

 

Forfeited

 

 

(20,297

)

 

 

28.67

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding at June 30, 2021

 

 

368,090

 

 

$

19.80

 

 

 

9.17

 

 

$

2,732,280

 

Exercisable at June 30, 2021

 

 

79,097

 

 

$

8.39

 

 

 

8.50

 

 

$

1,118,038

 

 

As of June 30, 2021, we had $4.4 million of unrecognized compensation expense related to options expected to vest over a weighted average period of 2.5 years. The weighted average remaining contractual life of outstanding and exercisable options is 8.5 years.

The aggregate intrinsic value in the table above represents the total pretax intrinsic value (the difference between the closing stock price of Aptevo’s common stock on the last trading day of June 2021 and the exercise price, multiplied by the number of in the money options) that would have been received by the option holders had all the option holders exercised their options on the last trading day of the quarter.

15


 

Restricted Stock Units

The following is a summary of RSU activity for the six months ended June 30, 2021:

 

 

 

Number of

Units

 

 

Weighted

Average Fair

Value per Unit

 

Balance at December 31, 2020

 

 

9,000

 

 

$

41.00

 

Granted

 

 

62,643

 

 

 

32.37

 

Forfeited

 

 

(7,275

)

 

 

36.59

 

Outstanding at June 30, 2021

 

 

64,368

 

 

$

33.10

 

Expected to Vest

 

 

64,368

 

 

$

33.10

 

 

As of June 30, 2021, there was $1.9 million unrecognized stock-based compensation expense related to unvested RSUs.

The fair value of each RSU has been determined to be the closing trading price of the Company’s common stock on the date of grant as quoted on the Nasdaq Capital Market.

Warrants

In March 2019, as part of a public offering, we issued warrants to purchase up to 1,725,000 shares of our common stock, 1,571,429 of which have an exercise price of $18.20 per share and have a five-year life, and 153,571 of pre-funded warrants with an exercise price of $0.14 per share. The pre-funded warrants have a ten-year life and would have expired on March 11, 2029; however, all of the pre-funded warrants were exercised in March 2019. We determined the warrants do not meet liability classification pursuant to ASC 480 – Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity. These are therefore included within equity on our condensed consolidated balance sheet. As of June 30, 2021, there were warrants to purchase 350,589 shares of common stock outstanding.

16


 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q includes “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the Exchange Act). Statements in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q other than statements of historical facts, including statements regarding our strategy, future operations, future financial position, future revenues, projected costs, prospects, plans, intentions, expectations, and objectives could be forward-looking statements. The words “anticipates,” “believes,” “could,” “designed,” “estimates,” “expects,” “goal,” “intends,” “may,” “plans,” “projects,” “pursuing,” “will,” “would” and similar expressions (including the negatives thereof) are intended to identify forward-looking statements, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. Any forward-looking statements are based upon management’s assumptions, expectations, projections, intentions, objectives and/or beliefs about future events or occurrences and are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties. The timing of certain events and circumstances and known and unknown risks and uncertainties could cause actual results to differ materially from the plans, intentions, expectations and objectives underlying or disclosed in the forward-looking statements that we make. Therefore, you should not place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements. Some factors that we believe could cause actual results or events to differ materially from our forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, those discussed in “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Our forward-looking statements in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are based on current information and we do not assume any obligation to update any forward-looking statements expect as required by the federal securities laws.

 

You should read the following discussion and analysis together with the financial statements and the related notes to those statements included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

Overview

We are a clinical-stage, research and development biotechnology company focused on developing novel immunotherapeutic candidates for the treatment of different forms of cancer. We have developed two versatile and enabling platform technologies for rational design of precision immune modulatory drugs. Our lead clinical candidate, APVO436, and preclinical candidates, ALG.APV-527 and APVO603, were developed using our ADAPTIR™ modular protein technology platform. Our preclinical candidate APVO442, was developed using our ADAPTIR-FLEX™ modular protein technology platform.  

The versatile and robust ADAPTIR and ADAPTIR-FLEX platforms are designed to generate monospecific, bispecific, and multispecific antibody candidates that are capable of enhancing the human immune system against cancer cells. ADAPTIR and ADAPTIR-FLEX are both modular platforms, which gives us the flexibility to generate immunotherapeutic candidates with a variety of mechanisms of action. This flexibility in design allows us to potentially generate novel therapeutic candidates that may provide the foundation for the establishment of effective strategies against difficult to treat, as well as advanced forms of cancer. We have successfully designed and constructed numerous investigational-stage prototype product candidates based on our ADAPTIR and ADAPTIR-FLEX platforms. The ADAPTIR platform technology is designed to generate monospecific and bispecific immunotherapeutic proteins that specifically bind to one or more targets, for example, bispecific therapeutic molecules, which may have structural and functional advantages over monoclonal antibodies. The structural differences of ADAPTIR molecules over monoclonal antibodies allow for the development of ADAPTIR immunotherapeutics that are designed to engage immune effector cells and disease targets in a novel manner to produce unique signaling responses and ultimately kill tumors or modulate the immune system to kill tumors. The ADAPTIR-FLEX platform technology is designed to generate bispecific and multispecific immunotherapeutic proteins and uses heterodimer technology so that two or more targets can be engaged simultaneously.

We are skilled at candidate generation, validation, and subsequent preclinical and clinical development using the ADAPTIR platform and have added the ADAPTIR-FLEX platform to generate multispecific candidates or other candidates to our platform capabilities.  We have developed preclinical candidates based on the ADAPTIR-FLEX platform which are advancing in our pipeline. We are developing our ADAPTIR and ADAPTIR-FLEX molecules by way of our protein engineering, preclinical development, process development, and clinical development capabilities.

Recent Developments:

In May 2021, Aptevo announced that the company initiated the expansion phase of lead anti-leukemia drug candidate, APVO436, in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with a multi-center, multi-arm trial using the active recommended dose identified in the dose escalation phase (Part 1) of the study. During Part 1, APVO436 exhibited a manageable side effect profile, encouraging single agent activity and an acceptable benefit to risk profile in relapsed AML patients. The dose expansion phase (Part 2), has been rationally designed to further evaluate the tolerability and clinical impact potential of APVO436 for indications of unmet and urgent medical need. 

17


 

In June 2021, the Company issued 407,047 shares of common stock to Lincoln Park under the 2018 Purchase Agreement. We received $10.2 million in proceeds from issuance of these shares and now have a remaining $24.8 million worth of shares of our common stock that we may direct Lincoln Park to purchase pursuant to our Purchase Agreement with Lincoln Park. 

Previously, on February 9, 2021, Tang Capital Partners LP, Tang Capital Management, LLC and Kevin Tang (collectively, “Tang”) announced its intention to nominate two candidates for election to our board of directors at our 2021 annual meeting of stockholders and submitted an advisory stockholder proposal (The Advisory Proposal) for consideration at our 2021 Annual Meeting to commence a process to sell Aptevo to the highest bidder. On June 21, 2021, Tang filed an amendment to its Schedule 13D to report that Tang delivered a letter to Aptevo withdrawing the nomination of Thomas Wei and Kevin Tang as directors for election at the Annual Meeting and withdrawing the unsolicited offer. We have incurred and may incur in the future additional expenses by retaining the services of various professionals to advise us on responding to these and related stockholder activism matters.

The Advisory Proposal was voted on at the Annual Meeting and was approved by a majority of the votes cast at the Meeting.  However, a majority of the votes cast by the holders of all of the shares of common stock present or represented by proxy at the Annual Meeting and voting on the Advisory Proposal, other than those cast by Tang and Aptevo’s Board and management, voted against the Advisory Proposal. In accordance with its fiduciary duties and commitment to acting in the best interests of all of the Company’s stockholders, the Board considered the results of the vote on the Advisory Proposal and analyzed whether it should commence a process to sell Aptevo to the highest bidder.  The Board analyzed various matters relating to commencing a sales process as compared to remaining independent, taking into account the vote on the Advisory Proposal at the Annual Meeting and other factors, and has decided not to commence a sales process at this time.

Results of Operations

Except as otherwise stated below, the following discussions of our results of operations reflect the results of our continuing operations, excluding the results related to Aptevo BioTherapeutics LLC (Aptevo BioTherapeutics), which has been separated from continuing operations and reflected as a discontinued operation.  See Note 2 – Discontinued Operations to the accompanying financial statements for additional information.

Comparison of the six months ended June 30, 2021 and June 30, 2020

Royalty Revenue

We recorded royalty revenue of $5.5 million and $0.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and June 30, 2020, respectively. The payment from Pfizer relates to an agreement acquired by Aptevo as part of our spin-off from Emergent in 2016. The agreement was originally executed by Trubion Pharmaceuticals, which was subsequently acquired by Emergent, and Wyeth, a wholly-own subsidiary of Pfizer. The royalty term runs through January 2027, which is the seventh anniversary of the first commercial sale of the CD20 biosimilar. On March 30, 2021, we entered into the Royalty Purchase Agreement pursuant to which we sold to HCR the right to receive royalty payments made by Pfizer in respect of net sales of RUXIENCE. We maintain our rights under the collaboration and license agreement originally between Trubion and Wyeth, with the exception of the cash flows of the RUXIENCE royalty payments purchased by HCR. Due to our continuing involvement under the collaboration and license agreement originally between Trubion and Wyeth, we continue to recognize royalty revenue on net sales of RUXIENCE and record the royalty payments to HCR as a reduction of the liability when paid. As such payments are made to HCR, the balance of the liability will be effectively repaid over the life of the Royalty Purchase Agreement. To the extent total future royalties collected are an amount less than the liability, the Company is not obligated to fund any such shortfall.

Research and Development Expenses

We expense research and development costs as incurred. These expenses consist primarily of the costs associated with our research and discovery activities, including conducting pre-clinical studies and clinical trials, fees to professional service providers for analytical testing, independent monitoring or other administration of our clinical trials and obtaining and evaluating data from our clinical trials and non-clinical studies, as well as costs of contract manufacturing services for clinical trial material, and costs of materials used in clinical trials and research and development. Our research and development expenses primarily consist of:

 

employee salaries and related expenses, including stock-based compensation and benefits for our employees involved in our drug discovery and development activities;

 

external research and development expense incurred under agreements with third-party contract research organizations (CRO’s) and investigative sites;

 

manufacturing material expense for third-party manufacturing; and

 

overhead costs such as rent, utilities and depreciation.

18


 

 

We expect our research and development spending will be dependent upon such factors as the results from our clinical trials, the availability of reimbursement of research and development spending, the number of product candidates under development, the size, structure and duration of any clinical programs that we may initiate, and the costs associated with manufacturing our product candidates on a large-scale basis for later stage clinical trials. We may experience interruption of key clinical trial activities, such as patient enrollment and clinical trial site monitoring, and key non-clinical activities due to COVID-19. While programs are still in the pre-clinical trial phase, we do not provide a breakdown of the initial associated expenses as we are often evaluating multiple product candidates simultaneously. Costs are reported in pre-clinical research and discovery until the program enters the clinic.

Our research and development expenses by program for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 are shown in the following table:

 

 

 

For the Three Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

Change

 

Clinical programs:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APVO436

 

$

1,020

 

 

$

1,300

 

 

$

(280

)

Other

 

 

7

 

 

 

163

 

 

 

(156

)

Total clinical programs

 

 

1,027

 

 

 

1,463

 

 

 

(436

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preclinical program, general research and discovery

 

 

3,695

 

 

 

2,977

 

 

 

718

 

Total

 

$

4,722

 

 

$

4,440

 

 

$

282

 

 

 

 

For the Six Months Ended June 30,

 

 

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

Change

 

Clinical programs:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

APVO436

 

$

2,501

 

 

$

2,276

 

 

$

225

 

Other

 

 

40

 

 

 

223

 

 

 

(183

)

Total clinical programs

 

 

2,541

 

 

 

2,499

 

 

 

42

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preclinical program, general research and discovery

 

 

7,543

 

 

 

5,947

 

 

 

1,596

 

Total

 

$

10,084

 

 

$

8,446

 

 

$

1,638

 

 

Research and development expenses increased by $0.3 million and $1.6 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021 compared to the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, respectively. Research and development expenses increased as we continue to invest in the APVO436 clinical trial and our preclinical candidates, including ALG.APV-527, APVO603 and APVO442.

General and Administrative Expenses

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of personnel-related costs and professional fees in support of our executive, business development, finance, accounting, information technology, legal and human resource functions. Other costs include facility costs not otherwise included in research and development expenses.

For the three months ended June 30, 2021, general and administrative expenses increased by $1.3 million, to $4.1 million from $2.8 million for June 30, 2020. For the six months ended June 30, 2021, general and administrative expenses increased by $1.6 million, to $8.1 million from $6.5 million for June 30, 2020. This increase was primarily due to higher costs for professional services, including costs related to responding to stockholder activism matters.

Other Income (Expense), Net

Other income (expense), net consists primarily of gains or losses realized on foreign currency revaluation, costs related to debt extinguishment, accrued exit fees on debt, non-cash interest on financing agreements, and interest on debt. Other expense, net was $2.3 million for the three months ended June 30, 2021 compared to approximately zero for the three months ended June 30, 2020. Other expense, net was $3.1 million for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and $2.4 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020. The increase in other expense, net is primarily related to interest expense and accrued exit fees for the MidCap Credit Agreement, as well as non-cash interest expense for the Royalty Purchase Agreement.

Discontinued Operations

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements include results from discontinued operations from two separate transactions: the sale of our hyperimmune business to Saol International Limited in September 2017, from which we received a payment in 2021 related to the collection of a certain accounts receivable, and the sale of Aptevo BioTherapeutics in 2020.

19


 

The following table represents the components attributable to income from discontinued operations in the unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations (in thousands):

 

 

 

For the Three Months Ended June,

 

 

For the Six Months Ended June,

 

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Loss from operations - Aptevo BioTherapeutics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1,580

)

Gain on sale of Aptevo BioTherapeutics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14,338

 

Payment from Saol

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

227

 

 

 

 

Deferred payment from Medexus

 

 

132

 

 

 

 

 

 

319

 

 

 

140

 

Income from discontinued operations

 

$

132

 

 

$

 

 

$

546

 

 

$

12,898

 

For the six months ended June 30, 2021, we collected $0.2 million related to the sale of the hyperimmune business to Saol as a result of the collection of certain accounts receivable and a deferred payment of $0.3 million received from Medexus related to fourth quarter 2020 and first quarter 2021 IXINITY sales. For the six months ended June 30, 2020, we recognized net income from discontinued operations totaling $12.9 million. This included the gain on the sale of Aptevo BioTherapeutics of $14.3 million, net operating losses from Aptevo BioTherapeutics of $1.6 million related to the period prior to the sale on February 28, 2020, and a deferred payment from Medexus related to first quarter 2020 IXINITY sales.

Critical Accounting Policies and Significant Judgments and Estimates

The preparation of our condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, or GAAP, requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other factors. Although we believe that our judgments and estimates are appropriate, actual results may differ materially from our estimates and changes in these estimates are recorded when known. An accounting policy is considered critical if it is important to a company’s financial condition and results of operations and if it requires the exercise of significant judgment and the use of estimates on the part of management in its application.

Refer to Note 1 for discussion of our accounting policies, significant judgments, and estimates.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements as of June 30, 2021.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Cash Flows

The following table provides information regarding our cash flows for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and 2020:

 

 

 

For the Six Months Ended June 30,

 

(in thousands)

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

Net cash (used in) provided by:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating activities

 

$

(12,557

)

 

$

(15,808

)

Investing activities

 

 

(582

)

 

 

28,120

 

Financing activities

 

 

32,258

 

 

 

(22,104

)

Increase (decrease) in cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash

 

$

19,119

 

 

$

(9,792

)

 

Net cash used in operating activities of $12.6 million for the six months ended June 30, 2021 was primarily due to our net loss of $15.2 million and changes in working capital accounts. Net cash used in operating activities of $15.8 million for the six months ended June 30, 2020 was primarily due to our net loss of $3.9 million and gain on sale of Aptevo BioTherapeutics of $14.3 million, which was offset by the loss on extinguishment of debt of $2.1 million.

Net cash used in investing activities for the six months ended June 30, 2021, was due to purchases of property and equipment. For the six months ended June 30, 2020, net cash provided by investing activities was due to the cash received from the sale of Aptevo BioTherapeutics, net of transaction fees.

Net cash provided by financing activities for the six months ended June 30, 2021 is primarily due to the $35.0 million received from the Royalty Purchase Agreement, $10.2 million received from the common stock sold to Lincoln Park, offset by the $10.5 million repayment of the MidCap Financial term loan. Net cash used in financing activities for the six months ended June 30, 2020 is primarily due to the $22.1 million repayment of long-term debt.

20


 

Sources of Liquidity

Equity Distribution Agreement

On December 14, 2020, we entered into an Equity Distribution Agreement with Piper Sandler & Co (Piper Sandler). The Equity Distribution Agreement provides that, upon the terms and subject to the conditions set forth therein, we may issue and sell through Piper Sandler, acting as sales agent, shares of our common stock having an aggregate offering price of up to $50 million. We have no obligation to sell any such shares under the Equity Distribution Agreement. The sale of the shares of our common stock by Piper Sandler, if any, will be effected pursuant to a Registration Statement on Form S-3 which we filed on December 14, 2020. We did not issue any shares under the Equity Distribution Agreement in the six months ended June 30, 2021.

The Equity Distribution Agreement will terminate upon the issuance and sale of all shares under the Equity Distribution Agreement or upon the earlier termination thereof at any time by us or Piper Sandler upon notice to the other party.

Registration Statement

We previously filed a registration statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 13, 2017, amended on December 6, 2017 and declared effective on December 15, 2017 (the Prior Registration Statement). The Prior Registration Statement registered the offer and sale of an indeterminate number of shares of common stock and preferred stock, an indeterminate principal amount of debt securities and an indeterminate number of warrants to purchase common stock, preferred stock, and various series of debt securities and/or warrants to purchase any of such securities, having an aggregate initial offering price of $150 million, of which an aggregate of $127.8 million remained unsold as of the December 14, 2020. On December 14, 2020, we filed a new registration statement covering the offering, issuance, and sale up to $200 million in common stock, preferred stock, and various series of debt securities and/or warrants to purchase any of such securities, which included the unsold securities from the Prior Registration Statement.

Purchase Agreement

 

On December 20, 2018, we entered into a purchase agreement, and a registration rights agreement with Lincoln Park Financial LLC (Lincoln Park). Pursuant to the purchase agreement, Lincoln Park has committed to purchase up to $35.0 million worth of our common stock over a 36-month period commencing on February 13, 2019, the date the registration statement covering the resale of the shares was declared effective by the SEC.

Under the purchase agreement, on any business day selected by us, we may direct Lincoln Park to purchase shares of our common stock provided that Lincoln Park’s maximum commitment on any single day does not exceed $2.0 million. The purchase price per share will be based off of prevailing market prices of our common stock immediately preceding the time of sale; provided, however, that we cannot direct any such purchase if the prevailing market price is less than $1.00. In addition, we may also direct Lincoln Park to purchase other amounts as accelerated purchases or as additional accelerated purchases if the closing sale price of our common stock exceeds certain threshold prices as set forth in the purchase agreement. In the three months ended June 30, 2021, the Company issued 407,047 shares of common stock to Lincoln Park under the 2018 Purchase Agreement. We received $10.2 million in proceeds from issuance of these shares and now have a remaining $24.8 million worth of shares of our common stock that we may direct Lincoln Park to purchase pursuant to our Purchase Agreement with Lincoln Park, subject to us filing a registration statement with the SEC registering the remaining shares available for issuance under the Purchase Agreement and such registration statement being declared effective by the SEC. 

Actual sales of shares of our common stock to Lincoln Park under the purchase agreement will occur at our discretion from time to time and depend on a variety of factors, including, among others, market conditions, the trading price of our common stock and additional determinations as to the appropriate sources of funding for our operations. Lincoln Park has no right to require any sales, but is obligated to make purchases as we direct, in accordance with the Purchase Agreement.

Warrants

 

On March 11, 2019, we completed a public offering of common stock and warrants, as follows:

 

for a combined public offering price of $14.00 per share of common stock and related warrants, 1,417,857 shares of common stock and related warrants with a 5-year life to purchase up to 1,417,857 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $18.20 per share,

 

 

for a combined public offering price of $13.86 per pre-funded warrant and related warrant, pre-funded warrants with a 10-year life to purchase up to 153,571 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.14 per share and related warrants with a 5-year life to purchase up to 153,571 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $18.20 per share. These pre-funded warrants were exercised on March 21, 2019.

21


 

For the six months ended June 30, 2021, certain of the holders of our warrants exercised warrants with a strike price of $18.20 per share, resulting in the issuance of 54,105 shares of our common stock and aggregate proceeds to the Company of approximately $1.0 million. As of June 30, 2021, there were warrants to purchase 350,589 shares of our common stock outstanding.

Liquidity

We have financed our operations to date primarily through revenue generated from our commercial products, the Royalty Purchase Agreement with HCR, royalty payments from Pfizer, deferred payments from Medexus, the sale of our hyperimmune products business in September 2017, the sale of Aptevo BioTherapeutics on February 28, 2020, public offerings of our common stock, loan proceeds, milestone payments, research and development funding from strategic partners, and funds received at the date of our spin-off from Emergent. We had a net loss of $7.9 million and $15.2 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, respectively. We had cash and cash equivalents of $60.4 million, restricted cash of $1.3 million and an accumulated deficit of $200.8 million as of June 30, 2021.

For the six months ended June 30, 2021, net cash used in our operating activities was $12.6 million.

Our future success is dependent on our ability to develop our product candidates and ultimately upon our ability to attain profitable operations. We anticipate that we will continue to incur significant operating losses for the next several years as we incur expenses to continue to execute on our development strategy to advance our preclinical and clinical stage assets. We will not generate revenues from our development stage product candidates unless and/or until we or our collaborators successfully complete development and obtain regulatory approval for such product candidates, which we expect will take a number of years and is subject to significant uncertainty. If we obtain regulatory approval for one of our development stage product candidates, we expect to incur significant commercialization expenses related to sales, marketing, manufacturing and distribution, to the extent that such costs are not paid by collaborators. We do not have sufficient cash to complete the clinical development of any of our development stage product candidates and will require additional funding in order to complete the development activities required for regulatory approval of such product candidates. We will require substantial additional funds to continue our development programs and to fulfill our planned operating goals.

Due to COVID-19, we may experience delays in opportunities to partner our product candidates, due to financial and other impacts on potential partners. Additionally, we may experience potential impacts on our future deferred payments and milestones from Medexus due to effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, which may impact Medexus’ ability to continue to successfully commercialize the IXINITY businesses. Additionally, we may experience potential impacts on our future milestones, which are based on global net sales of RUXIENCE, from HCR due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, which may impact Pfizer’s ability to continue to successfully commercialize the RUXIENCE business. We believe that our existing cash resources, the Investment Amount from the Royalty Purchase Agreement with HCR, the cash to be generated from future IXINITY deferred payments, release of restricted cash securing letters of credit, and funds available to us from the remaining principal balance of the credit agreement with Midcap Financial, will be sufficient to meet our projected operating requirements and debt service for at least twelve months from the date of filing of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

There are numerous risks and uncertainties associated with research, development, and commercialization of pharmaceutical products. Accordingly, our future funding requirements may vary from our current expectations and will depend on many factors, including, but not limited to:

 

our ability to establish and maintain strategic partnerships, licensing or other arrangements and the financial terms of such agreements;

 

the number and characteristics of the product candidates we pursue;

 

the scope, progress, results, and costs of researching and developing our product candidates, and of conducting preclinical and clinical trials;

 

the timing of, and the costs involved in, completing our clinical trials, and obtaining regulatory approvals for our product candidates;

 

the costs involved in preparing, filing, prosecuting, maintaining, defending and enforcing patent claims, including litigation costs and the outcome of such litigation;

 

the cost of commercialization activities if any of our product candidates are approved for sale, including marketing, sales, and distribution costs;

 

the cost of manufacturing our product candidates and any products we successfully commercialize;

 

the cost of attracting and retaining skilled personnel;

 

whether and to what extent future proceeds are received under our royalty purchase agreement with HCR; and,

 

the timing, receipt and amount of any milestone payments and deferred payments from Medexus with respect to IXINITY.

22


 

If we are unable to raise substantial additional capital in the next year, whether on terms that are acceptable to us or at all, then we may be required to:

 

delay, limit, reduce or terminate our clinical trials or other development activities for one or more of our product candidates; and/or,

 

delay, limit, reduce or terminate our establishment of other activities that may be necessary to commercialize our product candidates, if approved.

The sale of additional equity or convertible debt securities may result in additional dilution to our stockholders. If we raise additional funds through the issuance of debt securities or preferred stock or through credit facilities, these securities and/or the loans under credit facilities could provide for rights senior to those of our common stock and could contain covenants that would restrict our operations. Additional funds may not be available when we need them, on terms that are acceptable to us, or at all. We also expect to seek additional funds through arrangements with collaborators, licensees or other third parties. These arrangements would generally require us to relinquish or encumber rights to some of our technologies or drug candidates, and we may not be able to enter into such arrangements on acceptable terms, if at all. Due to COVID-19, we may experience delays in clinical trials and pre-clinical work, and opportunities to partner our product candidates, due to financial and other impacts on potential partners.

Contractual Obligations

We have an operating lease related to our office and laboratory space in Seattle, Washington. This lease was amended and extended in March 2019. The term of the amended lease is through April 2030 and we have two options to extend the lease term, each by five years, as well as a one-time option to terminate the lease in April 2023.

In January 2020, we entered into a contract with The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) to be part of an ongoing national AML master clinical trial called the ‘Beat AML Master Clinical Trial.’ The Beat AML Master Clinical Trial provides access to leading academic cancer centers and allows us to study APVO436 in a front-line AML setting. Once we begin participation in the Beat AML Master Clinical Trial, our purchase obligation for the Beat AML Master Clinical Trial totals $8.1 million over four years. As of the second quarter of 2021, we have not begun participation in the Beat AML Master Clinical Trial. The Clinical Trial Participation Agreement contains a termination for convenience clause where we may terminate the agreement with 180 days prior written notice.

On August 5, 2020, we entered into a new Credit and Security Agreement (Credit Agreement), with MidCap Financial. The Credit Agreement provided us with up to $25 million of available borrowing capacity. The MidCap Financial loan has a 48 month term, is interest-only for the first 18 months, with straight-line amortization for the remaining 30 months and bears interest at a rate of one month LIBOR plus 6.25% per annum, subject to a 1.50% LIBOR floor and a 2.50% LIBOR cap. Additionally, on March 30, 2021, we amended our Credit Agreement with MidCap Financial and used $10 million of the proceeds received from the Royalty Purchase Agreement with HCR to pay down the outstanding principal under this agreement from $25 million to $15 million. The Company’s Credit Agreement currently references LIBOR. Contract language is expected to be incorporated into these agreements to address the transition to an alternative reference rate. The Company is currently evaluating the impact that ASU 2020-04 may have on its consolidated financial statements.

On March 30, 2021, we entered into the Royalty Purchase Agreement pursuant to which the Company sold to HCR the right to receive royalty payments made by Pfizer in respect of net sales of RUXIENCE.

Our principal commitments include obligations under vendor contracts to purchase research services and other purchase commitments with our vendors. In the normal course of business, we enter into services agreements with contract research organizations, contract manufacturing organizations and other third parties. Generally, these agreements provide for termination upon notice, with specified amounts due upon termination based on the timing of termination and the terms of the agreement. The actual amounts and timing of payments under these agreements are uncertain and contingent upon the initiation and completion of the services to be provided.

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Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

As of June 30, 2021, there was no material changes to the information provided under Item 7A, Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020 and filed on March 31, 2021.

Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

As of June 30, 2021, management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, performed an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Exchange Act. Based on this evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that, as of June 30, 2021, the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures were effective to provide reasonable assurance that information we are required to disclose in reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms and to provide reasonable assurance that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

There have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act) during the quarter ended June 30, 2021, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

Because of inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

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PART II—OTHER INFORMATION

 

 

We may from time to time be named as a party to legal claims, actions and complaints, including matters involving employment claims, our intellectual property or other third-party claims. Our management believes that there are currently no claims or actions pending against us, the ultimate disposition of which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition or cash flows.

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

We are subject to significant risks and uncertainties that could impact the Company’s businesses, results of operations and financial condition, including by causing our actual results to differ materially from those projected in any forward-looking statements. Additional risks and uncertainties that are not currently known to the Company or management or that are not currently believed by the Company or management to be material may also harm the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operation. You should carefully consider the following risks and other information in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q in evaluating us and our common stock.

RISK FACTOR SUMMARY

The following is a summary of the material risks to our business, operations, and ownership of our common stock:

 

We have a history of losses and may not be profitable in the future.

 

We will require additional capital and may be unable to raise capital when needed or on acceptable terms.

 

Our future income will depend, in part, on the ability of Medexus to successfully further develop, market and commercialize IXINITY, resulting in milestone payments and deferred payments to the Company by Medexus.

 

Our future income will depend, in part, on the ability of Pfizer to successfully sell RUXIENCE and our receipt of milestone and royalty payments from HCR in connection therewith. If Pfizer is unable, or does not devote sufficient resources, to maintain or continue increasing sales of RUXIENCE, or if HCR does not comply with the Royalty Purchase Agreement, our results of operations will be adversely affected.

 

COVID-19 could adversely impact our business, including our clinical trials.

 

The terms of our credit agreement may restrict the operation of our business and limit the cash available for investment in our business operations.

 

If we experience delays or difficulties in the enrollment of patients in clinical trials, the time to reach critical trial data and receipt of any necessary regulatory approvals could be delayed.

 

Our ability to grow revenues and execute on our long-term strategy depends heavily on our ability to discover, develop, and obtain marketing approval for our product candidates.

 

We may not be successful in our efforts to use and further develop our ADAPTIR or ADAPTIR-FLEX platforms.

 

Our long-term success depends, in part, upon our ability to develop, receive regulatory approval for and commercialize our product candidates.

 

If we are unable to protect our intellectual proprietary rights, our business could be harmed.

 

Our stock price may be volatile.

 

We may be subject to periodic litigation, which could result in losses or unexpected expenditure of time and resources.

 

Actions of activist stockholders against us have been and could be disruptive and costly and may cause uncertainty about the strategic direction of our business.

RISKS RELATED TO OUR BUSINESS

Financial Risks

We have a history of losses and may not be profitable in the future.

We have experienced significant operating losses and we may not achieve profitability in the future. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2021, we had net loss of $7.9 million and $15.2 million, respectively. As of June 30, 2021, we had an accumulated deficit of $200.8 million. We expect to continue to incur annual net operating losses, and will require substantial resources over the next several years as we expand our efforts to discover, develop and commercialize immunotherapeutic candidates, for the foreseeable future. While we believe our existing cash and cash equivalents and the funding provided by our IXINITY deferred payment streams, the Royalty Purchase Agreement with HCR, credit agreement, our Equity Distribution Agreement with Piper Sandler & Co (Piper Sandler) entered into in December 2020 (the Equity Distribution Agreement) and our Purchase Agreement with Lincoln Park Capital Fund, LLC (Lincoln Park), entered into in December 2018 (the Purchase Agreement), and exercises of warrants will provide us with sufficient liquidity to meet our cash requirements through 2021, our future success and ability to attain profitability will depend upon our ability to develop and take to market our product candidates.

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We will require additional capital and may be unable to raise capital when needed or on acceptable terms.

As of June 30, 2021, we had cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash in the amount of $61.7 million. We will require additional funding to grow our business including to develop additional products, support commercial marketing activities or otherwise provide additional financial flexibility. In October 2019, we implemented an expense reduction plan that reduced annual expenditures by approximately 30%, including streamlining research and development programs, through reducing investment in certain programs; cut-backs in legal, professional and consulting expenses; reduction of leased space, cut-backs in non-commercial headcount; and reductions in executive and board cash compensation, with such compensation restored to previous levels in August 2020. If we are not able to secure adequate additional funding, we may need to make further reductions in spending. This may include extending payment terms with suppliers, liquidating assets, and suspending or curtailing planned programs. We may also have to further delay, reduce the scope of, suspend or eliminate one or more research and development programs. A failure to raise the additional funding or to effectively implement cost reductions could harm our business, results of operations and future prospects. Our future capital requirements will depend on many factors, including:

 

the resolution of actions of activist investors;

 

the level, timing and receipt of any milestone or deferred payments under our agreement with Medexus with respect to the sales of IXINITY;

 

whether and to what extent future proceeds are received under our royalty purchase agreement with HCR;

 

the extent to which we invest in products or technologies;

 

the ability to satisfy the payment obligations and covenants under any future indebtedness;

 

the ability to secure partnerships and/or collaborations that generate additional cash;

 

capital improvements to our facilities;

 

the scope, progress, results, and costs of our development activities; and,

 

future clinical development costs and requirements to complete dosing of Phase 1/1b clinical trial for APVO436, as well as future clinical trials.

If our capital resources are insufficient to meet our future capital requirements, we will need to finance our cash needs through bank loans, public or private equity or debt offerings, collaboration and licensing arrangements, or other strategic transactions. Future issuances of common stock may include (i) any sale of up to the remaining $50.0 million worth of shares of our common stock pursuant to our Equity Distribution Agreement with Piper Sandler & Co entered into in December 2020, (ii) any sale of up to the remaining $24.8 million worth of shares of our common stock to issue from our Purchase Agreement with Lincoln Park Capital Fund, LLC, or Lincoln Park, entered into in December 2018, and (iii) the issuance of up to 350,589 remaining outstanding shares of common stock upon the exercise of warrants issued in connection with our March 2019 public offering of common stock and warrants. Public or bank debt financing, if available, may involve agreements that include covenants limiting or restricting our ability to take specific actions, such as incurring additional debt, making capital expenditures, pursuing acquisition opportunities, or declaring dividends. If we raise funds by issuing equity securities, our stockholders will experience dilution. If we raise funds through collaboration and licensing arrangements with third parties or enter into other strategic transactions, it may be necessary to relinquish valuable rights to our technologies or product candidates or grant licenses on terms that may not be favorable to us.

Current economic conditions, including the impact of COVID-19 on our operations or on the global economy and capital markets, may make it difficult to obtain additional financing on attractive terms, or at all. If financing is unavailable or lost, our business, results of operations, financial condition and financial prospects would be adversely affected and we could be forced to delay, reduce the scope of or eliminate many of our planned activities.

Actions of activist stockholders against us have been and could be disruptive and costly and may cause uncertainty about the strategic direction of our business.

On November 6, 2020, Tang filed a statement on Schedule 13D to report that Tang had purchased 1,760,000 shares of our common stock, representing at the time approximately 54% of our issued and outstanding shares of Common Stock (the Tang Ownership Change), although Tang has subsequently been diluted to a 36% beneficial ownership position.  

On November 18, 2020, our Board received a written unsolicited, non-binding indication of interest from Tang, proposing to acquire all of the outstanding shares of our common stock not already beneficially owned by Tang for $50.00 per share in cash, subject to confirmatory due diligence conducted under a customary non-disclosure agreement. We have had a series of communications with Tang during which we attempted to negotiate a non-disclosure agreement to permit discussions covering our nonpublic information and our operations.

The Aptevo Board was open to exploring the indication of interest from Tang and made earnest efforts to evaluate it. However, it was unable to do so because it was unable to reach agreement with Tang on the terms of a customary non-disclosure agreement, including limitations on the use of confidential information by Tang.  Had agreement on the terms of a non-disclosure agreement been reached, it would have permitted the exchange of confidential information and would have enabled both parties to conduct due diligence.  In this early stage of the Company’s development, the Aptevo Board believes it is difficult for the market to accurately value the potential of Aptevo’s proprietary platform technologies and therapeutic candidates, which have just begun to demonstrate their effectiveness and potentially life-saving capabilities to the Company’s patients, stockholders and other stakeholders. The Board will continue to carefully evaluate any indications of interest and proposals for strategic transactions that it receives from current stockholders or otherwise, in line with its fiduciary duties and commitment to acting in the best interests of all of the Company’s stockholders.

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On February 9, 2021, Tang announced its intention to nominate two candidates for election to our board of directors at our 2021 annual meeting of stockholders and submitted an advisory stockholder proposal for consideration at our 2021 annual meeting of stockholders to commence a process to sell Aptevo to the highest bidder. On June 21, 2021, Tang sent a letter to our board of directors that it was withdrawing its nomination of its two candidates for election to our board at the 2021 annual meeting of stockholders (the “Letter”). The Letter also indicated that Tang was withdrawing its previously submitted acquisition proposal to acquire the remaining common stock of Aptevo that Tang does not already own for a price of $50.00 per share in cash. We have incurred and may incur in the future additional expenses by retaining the services of various professionals to advise us on responding to these matters.

The Board and management team strive to maintain constructive communications with our stockholders, including Tang, and welcomes their views and opinions with the goal of enhancing value for all stockholders. However, an activist campaign that seeks to replace members of our Board or changes in our strategic direction could have an adverse effect on us because:

 

Responding to actions by Tang and other activist stockholders can disrupt our operations, are costly and time-consuming, and divert the attention of our Board and senior management team from the pursuit of business strategies, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition;

 

Perceived uncertainties as to our future direction as a result of changes to the composition of our Board or changes to our stockholder base may lead to the perception of a change in the direction of the business, instability or lack of continuity which may be exploited by our competitors, may result in the loss of potential business opportunities, cause concern for those enrolling in our clinical trial, and make it more difficult to attract and retain qualified personnel and business partners;

 

These and similar types of actions could cause significant fluctuations in our stock price based on temporary or speculative market perceptions or other factors that do not necessarily reflect the underlying fundamentals and prospects of our business;

 

If other activist stockholder activities ensue, our business could be adversely affected because responding to activist campaigns and proxy contests can be disruptive, costly, and time-consuming; and,

 

If individuals are elected to our Board with a specific agenda, it may adversely affect our ability to effectively implement our business strategy and to create additional value for our stockholders.

Proposals from third-parties to acquire the company and stockholder proposals, and our responses thereto, may cause volatility in the trading price of our common stock and interfere with our efforts to raise capital.

We have received in the past and may receive in the future proposals from third-parties to acquire the Company.  For example, on November 18, 2020, our Board received a written unsolicited, non-binding indication of interest from Tang, proposing to acquire all of the outstanding shares of our common stock not already beneficially owned by Tang for $50.00 per share in cash, subject to confirmatory due diligence conducted under a customary non-disclosure agreement.  We also have received in the past and may receive in the future stockholder proposals requesting us to take certain actions.  For example, on February 9, 2021, Tang submitted an advisory stockholder proposal for consideration at our 2021 annual meeting of stockholders to commence a process to sell Aptevo to the highest bidder. As a result of the uncertainty surrounding any such proposals, and our responses to such proposals, the future trading price of our common stock could be volatile and be subject to wide price fluctuations.

Our operating results are unpredictable and may fluctuate.  

Our operating results are difficult to predict and will likely fluctuate from quarter to quarter and year to year, as a result of a variety of factors, including:

 

the level and timing of any milestone or deferred payments with respect to sales of IXINITY by Medexus;

 

whether and to what extent future proceeds are received under our royalty purchase agreement with HCR;

 

the extent of any payments received from collaboration arrangements and development funding as well as the achievement of development and clinical milestones under collaboration and license agreements that we may enter into from time to time and that may vary significantly from quarter to quarter; and,

 

the timing, cost, and level of investment in our research and development activities as well as expenditures we will or may incur to acquire or develop additional technologies, products and product candidates.

Due to COVID-19, we may experience delays in opportunities to partner our product candidates, due to financial and other impacts on potential partners. Additionally, we may experience potential impacts on our future milestone or deferred payments from Medexus, which may impact Medexus’ ability to continue to successfully commercialize the IXINITY businesses. In 2020, we did see an impact of COVID-19 on our business as some of our clinical sites were at reduced capacity or closed, as well as our participation in the BEAT AML trial being delayed by the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. These and other factors may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

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Our future income will depend, in part, on the ability of Medexus to successfully further develop, market and commercialize IXINITY, resulting in milestone payments and deferred payments to the Company by Medexus.

On February 28, 2020, we entered into an LLC Purchase Agreement with Medexus, pursuant to which we sold all of the issued and outstanding limited liability company interests of Aptevo BioTherapeutics, a subsidiary of Aptevo that wholly owns the IXINITY and related Hemophilia B business. We are entitled to receive future potential payments to the extent of the achievement of certain regulatory and commercial milestones and through deferred payments based on net sales of IXINITY. Royalties are earned at the rate of 2% of net revenue through the earlier of June 2022 or completion of the IXINITY pediatric trial being run by Medexus.  After that, the royalty rate will increase to 5%. We no longer control the development, marketing, and commercialization of IXINITY and are dependent on Medexus to successfully do so.  Although Medexus has agreed to use commercially reasonable efforts to commercialize IXINITY in the ordinary course of business in good faith, Medexus may not commit adequate resources to the further development, marketing, and commercialization of IXINITY, may experience financial difficulties, may face competition, or may prioritize other products or initiatives.  Due to the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the current and future environment for clinical development and regulatory approval, Medexus’ ability to continue to successfully commercialize the IXINITY business may be effected, and we may experience potential impacts on our future deferred payments from Medexus. The failure of Medexus to successfully market and commercialize IXINITY, including because of factors outside of Medexus’ control, could result in lower than expected milestone or deferred payments to us and negatively impact our future financial and operating results.

Our future income will depend, in part, on the ability of Pfizer to successfully sell RUXIENCE and our receipt of milestone and royalty payments from HCR in connection therewith. If Pfizer is unable, or does not devote sufficient resources, to maintain or continue increasing sales of RUXIENCE, or if HCR does not comply with the Royalty Purchase Agreement, our results of operations will be adversely affected.

On June 25, 2020, we announced that we will receive royalty payments from Pfizer related to sales of a rituximab biosimilar product, RUXIENCE (Rituximab-pvvr), which was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in July 2019 and launched by Pfizer in the United States and Japan in early 2020, and the European Union in the third quarter of 2020. The payments from Pfizer relate to a collaboration and license agreement acquired by us as part of our spin-off from Emergent in 2016, which applies a fixed royalty rate of 2.5% on global net sales. The agreement was originally executed by Trubion Pharmaceuticals (which was subsequently acquired by Emergent) and Wyeth (a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pfizer). The royalty term runs until the seventh anniversary of the first commercial sale of the biosimilar. Royalty payments to us are due within 60 days after the end of each quarter. Although the agreement was terminated in 2012, the royalty obligation thereunder survived.

On March 30, 2021, we entered into and closed a Royalty Purchase Agreement with HCR (Royalty Purchase Agreement) pursuant to which we sold to HCR the right to receive royalty payments made by Pfizer in respect of net sales of RUXIENCE. Under the terms of the Royalty Purchase Agreement, we received $35 million (the Investment Amount) at closing and we are eligible to receive additional payments in aggregate of up to an  $32.5 million based on the achievement of sales milestones in 2021, 2022, and 2023 (collectively, the Milestone Amounts). The Royalty Purchase Agreement further provides that, once HCR reaches aggregate royalty payments totaling 190% of the Investment Amount plus the Milestone Amounts to the extent paid to us by HCR, we will be entitled to receive 50% of any additional royalty payments by Pfizer thereafter.

We have no control over the sales of RUXIENCE and are therefore dependent on the efforts and ability of Pfizer to generate net sales of RUXIENCE sufficient for us to receive Milestone Payments and additional royalty payments under the Royalty Purchase Agreement.  The failure of Pfizer to successfully generate such net sales could negatively impact our future financial and operating results and our results of operations could therefore be adversely affected. Additionally, even if Pfizer is able to generate net sales of RUXIENCE sufficient for us to receive such payments, if HCR breaches the Royalty Purchase Agreement (for example, by not making required payments when due, or at all), disputes or litigation may arise. Such disputes or litigation could be time-consuming and expensive and could adversely affect our business.

We face product liability exposure, which could cause us to incur substantial liabilities and negatively affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The nature of our business exposes us to potential liability inherent in pharmaceutical products, including with respect to the testing of our product candidates in clinical trials and any product candidates that we successfully develop. Product liability claims might be made by patients in clinical trials, consumers, health care providers or pharmaceutical companies or others that sell any products that we successfully develop. These claims may be made even with respect to those products that are manufactured in licensed and regulated facilities or otherwise possess regulatory approval for study or commercial sale. We cannot predict the frequency, outcome or cost to defend any such claims.

If we cannot successfully defend ourselves against future claims that our product candidates caused injuries, we may incur substantial liabilities. Regardless of merit or eventual outcome, product liability claims may result in:

 

adverse publicity and/or injury to our reputation;

 

withdrawal of clinical trial participants;

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costs to defend the related litigation;

 

substantial monetary awards to trial participants or patients;

 

decreased demand or withdrawal of an approved product;

 

loss of revenue; and

 

an inability to commercialize products that we may develop.

The amount of insurance that we currently hold may not be adequate to cover all liabilities that may occur. Further product liability insurance may be difficult and expensive to obtain. We may not be able to maintain insurance coverage at a reasonable cost and we may not be able to obtain insurance coverage that will be adequate to satisfy all potential liabilities. Claims or losses in excess of our product liability insurance coverage could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. The cost of defending any product liability litigation or other proceeding, even if resolved in our favor, could be substantial. Uncertainties resulting from the initiation and continuation of product liability litigation or other proceedings could have a material adverse effect on our ability to compete in the marketplace. Product liability claims, regardless of merit or eventual outcome, may absorb significant management time and result in reputational harm, potential loss of revenue from decreased demand for any product candidates we successfully develop, withdrawal of clinical trial participants and potential termination of clinical trial sites or entire clinical programs, and could cause our stock price to fall.

Our success is dependent on our continued ability to attract, motivate and retain key personnel, and any failure to attract or retain key personnel may negatively affect our business.

Because of the specialized scientific nature of our business, our ability to develop products and to compete with our current and future competitors largely depends upon our ability to attract, retain and motivate highly qualified managerial and key scientific and technical personnel. If we are unable to retain the services of one or more of the principal members of senior management, including our Chief Executive Officer, Marvin L. White, our Chief Financial Officer, Jeffrey G. Lamothe, our Chief Scientific Officer, Jane Gross Ph.D., or other key employees, our ability to implement our business strategy could be materially harmed. We face intense competition for qualified employees from biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, research organizations and academic institutions. Attracting, retaining or replacing these personnel on acceptable terms may be difficult and time-consuming given the high demand in our industry for similar personnel. We believe part of being able to attract, motivate and retain personnel is our ability to offer a competitive compensation package, including equity incentive awards. If we cannot offer a competitive compensation package or otherwise attract and retain the qualified personnel necessary for the continued development of our business, we may not be able to maintain our operations or grow our business. A novel strain of coronavirus, COVID-19 has spread through the world, including the United States.  We have experienced and may experience an impact on the health of key personnel due to COVID-19.

COVID-19 could adversely impact our business, including our clinical trials.

Since March of 2020, a novel strain of coronavirus, COVID-19, has spread through the world, including the United States. The COVID-19 outbreak has caused severe global economic and societal disruptions and uncertainties, and we have experienced disruptions that have impacted our business and clinical trials, including, limitation of company operations, implementing work from home policies and office closures; delays or difficulties in receiving deliveries of critical experimental materials; delays or difficulties in enrolling patients in our clinical trials; delays or difficulties in clinical site initiation, including difficulties in recruiting clinical site investigators and clinical site staff; diversion of healthcare resources away from the conduct of clinical trials, including the diversion of hospitals serving as our clinical trial sites and hospital staff supporting the conduct of our clinical trials; delay in participation of APVO436 in the Beat AML trial; interruption of key clinical trial activities, such as patient enrollment and clinical trial site monitoring; and, limitations in employee resources that would otherwise be focused on our business, including the conduct of our research and development activities and process development activities, due to the illness of employees or their families, or the preference of employees to avoid contact with large groups of people.

We may continue to experience disruptions in the future, or additional disruptions that could severely impact our business, such as delays or difficulties to the financing environment and raising capital due to economic uncertainty; delays in opportunities to partner our product candidates, due to financial and other impacts on potential partners; diversion of healthcare resources away from the conduct of clinical trials, including the diversion of hospitals serving as our clinical trial sites and hospital staff supporting the conduct of our clinical trials; potential impacts on our future deferred payments and milestones from Medexus due to the environment which may impact Medexus’ ability to continue to successfully commercialize the IXINITY business; and negative impacts on suppliers and licensees. The global outbreak of COVID-19 continues to rapidly evolve. The COVID-19 pandemic may also result in the need to suspend enrollment into studies, patient withdrawals, postponement of preclinical studies, study modification, suspension, or termination, the introduction of remote study procedures and modified informed consent procedures, study site changes, direct delivery of investigational products to patient homes requiring state licensing, study deviations or noncompliance, and changes or delays in site monitoring.  The foregoing may require that we consult with relevant review and ethics committees and the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities.  The foregoing may also impact the integrity of our study data. The pandemic could further impact our ability to interact with the FDA or other regulatory authorities, and may result in delays in the conduct of inspections or review of pending submissions.

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The COVID-19 pandemic may further impact our suppliers and manufacturers.  If any of our suppliers or manufacturers are adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic or the restrictions resulting from the outbreak, if they cannot obtain the necessary supplies, or if such third parties need to prioritize other products or customers over us, including under the Defense Production Act, we may experience delays or disruptions in our supply chain, which could have a material and adverse impact on our business and development plans. Third party manufacturers may also need to implement measures and changes, or deviate from typical requirements, because of the COVID-19 pandemic that may otherwise adversely impact our supply chains or the quality of the resulting products or supplies.  Depending on the change, we may need to obtain FDA pre-approval or otherwise provide FDA with a notification of the change.

The COVID-19 pandemic may result in changes in laws, policies, and regulations.  By example, due to the potential impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on clinical trials, drug development, and manufacturing, FDA issued a number of guidances concerning how sponsors and investigators may address these challenges.  FDA’s guidance is continually evolving.  By further example, in March 2020, the U.S. Congress passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act, which includes various provisions regarding FDA drug shortage reporting requirements, as well as provisions regarding supply chain security, such as risk management plan requirements, and the promotion of supply chain redundancy and domestic manufacturing.  This and any future changes in law may require that we change our internal processes and procedures to ensure continued compliance.

The extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic may impact our business and clinical trials will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, such as the ultimate geographic spread of the disease, the duration of the outbreak, travel restrictions and social distancing in the United States and other countries, business closures or business disruptions, the effectiveness of actions taken in the United States and other countries to contain and treat the disease, including the effectiveness of vaccination programs, and whether businesses and the economy in general will continue to reopen and stay open.

The terms of our credit agreement may restrict the operation of our business and limit the cash available for investment in our business operations.

In August 2020, we entered into a Credit and Security Agreement (the Credit Agreement), by and among us and certain of our subsidiaries as borrowers, MidCap Financial, as agent, and the lenders from time to time party thereto. The terms of the Credit Agreement and borrowings we may make under the Credit Agreement in the future, could have significant adverse consequences for our business, including:

 

requiring us to dedicate a substantial portion of any cash flow from operations to payment on our debt, which would reduce the amounts available to fund other corporate initiatives;

 

increasing the amount of interest that we have to pay on borrowings under the Credit Agreement if market rates of interest increase;

 

requiring compliance with restrictive covenants restricting, among other things, certain indebtedness, liens, dividends and other distributions, repayment of subordinated indebtedness, mergers, dispositions, investments, acquisitions, transactions with affiliates and modification of organizational documents or certain other agreements, subject to certain exceptions;

 

requiring compliance with affirmative covenants including payment and reporting covenants; and

 

placing us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our competitors that have less debt, better debt servicing options or stronger debt servicing capacity.

We may not have sufficient funds or be able to obtain additional financing to pay the amounts due under the Credit Agreement. In addition, failure to comply with the covenants under the Credit Agreement, including those outside of our control, could result in an event of default. An event of default could result in the acceleration of amounts due under the Credit Agreement, and we may not be able to obtain additional financing to make any accelerated payments. Under these circumstances, our lenders could seek to enforce security interests in our assets securing our indebtedness, including our intellectual property.

We believe it is likely that we experienced by virtue of the Tang Ownership Change, an “ownership change” as defined in Section 382 of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the Code), and, if we are correct, the tax benefits of our pre-“ownership change” net operating loss carryforwards and certain other tax attributes will be subject to annual limitation under Sections 382 and 383 of the Code.  

In general, a corporation undergoes an “ownership change” under Section 382 of the Code if, among other things, the stockholders who own, directly or indirectly, 5% or more of the corporation’s stock (by value), or are otherwise treated as “5% stockholders” under Section 382 of the Code and the Treasury regulations promulgated thereunder, increase their aggregate percentage ownership (by value) of the corporation’s stock by more than 50 percentage points over the lowest percentage of value owned by the 5% stockholders at any time during the applicable testing period, which is generally the rolling three-year period preceding the potential ownership change.  Such potential ownership change testing events include changes involving a stockholder becoming a 5% stockholder or arising from a new issuance of capital stock or share repurchases by the corporation, subject to certain exceptions.

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In the event of an “ownership change,” Sections 382 and 383 of the Code impose an annual limitation on the amount of taxable income a corporation may offset with pre-change net operating loss carryforwards and certain other tax attributes. The annual limitation is generally equal to the value of the outstanding stock of the corporation immediately before the ownership change (excluding certain capital contributions), multiplied by the long-term tax-exempt rate as published by the IRS for the month in which the ownership change occurs (the long-term tax-exempt rate for November 2020 is 0.89%).  Any unused annual limitation may generally be carried over to subsequent years until the pre-ownership change net operating loss carryforwards and certain other tax attributes expire or are fully utilized by the corporation.  Similar provisions of state tax law may also apply to limit the use of state net operating loss carryforwards and certain other tax attributes.

Additionally, Section 382 of the Code includes special rules that apply to a corporation with a significant amount of net unrealized built-in gains or net unrealized built-in losses in its assets immediately prior to an ownership change under Section 382 of the Code. In general, certain built-in gains recognized during the five-year period beginning on the date of the ownership change increases the corporation’s annual limitation under Section 382 and 383 of the Code in the taxable year that such built-in gains are recognized or deemed recognized (but only up to the amount of the net unrealized built-in gain), while certain built-in losses recognized during such five-year period is subject to the annual limitation under Section 382 of the Code (but only up to the amount of the net unrealized built-in loss). 

As of December 31, 2020, we had approximately $162.5 million and $68.1 million of federal and state net operating loss carryforwards, respectively, available to reduce future taxable income that will begin to expire in 2037 for federal purposes. These net operating loss carryforwards could expire unused and be unavailable to offset future income tax liabilities. Federal net operating loss carryforwards incurred in 2018 and in future years may be carried forward indefinitely, but the usage of such federal net operating losses is limited. We completed an IRC Section 382 study on our federal tax attributes in connection with the acquisition by Tang of 1,760,000 shares of our common stock and determined that the annual utilization of the federal net operating loss carryforwards is limited. It is not expected that the annual limitations will result in the expiration of tax attribute carryforwards prior to utilization assuming sufficient income.  

We cannot predict or control the occurrence or timing of another ownership change under Section 382 of the Code in the future. In addition, it is possible that any offering of securities by us could result in an ownership change.  If another ownership change were to occur, future limitations could apply to our net operating losses and certain other tax attributes, which could result in a material amount of our net operating loss carryforwards and certain other tax attributes becoming unavailable to offset future income tax liabilities.

The realization of all or a portion of our deferred income tax assets (including net operating loss carryforwards) is dependent upon the generation of future income during the statutory carryforward periods. Our inability to utilize our limited pre-ownership change net operating loss carryforwards and certain other tax attributes, or the occurrence of a future ownership change and resulting additional limitations to these tax attributes, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Product Development Risks

 

The results of our current and planned clinical trials may not satisfy the requirements of the FDA or non-U.S. regulatory authorities.  Interim or top line data may be subject to change or qualification based on the complete analysis of data.

Clinical failure can occur at any stage of clinical development. Clinical trials may produce negative or inconclusive results.  The FDA or a non-US regulatory authority may require us, to conduct additional clinical or preclinical testing. Success in early clinical trials does not mean that future larger registration clinical trials will be successful because product candidates in later-stage clinical trials may fail to demonstrate sufficient safety and efficacy to the satisfaction of the FDA and non-U.S. regulatory authorities despite having progressed through initial clinical trials. A number of companies in the pharmaceutical industry, including those with greater resources and experience than us, have suffered significant setbacks in advanced clinical trials, even after obtaining promising results in earlier clinical trials.

We may publicly disclose top line or interim data from time to time, which is based on a preliminary analysis of then-available data, and the results and related findings and conclusions are subject to change following a more comprehensive review of the data related to the particular study or trial. The top line or interim results that we report may differ from future results of the same studies, or different conclusions or considerations may qualify such results once additional data have been received and fully evaluated. Even in situations where a clinical stage candidate appears to be benefiting a patient, that benefit may not be of a permanent nature.  For example, we have previously reported on a patient in cohort 4 of our APVO 436 Phase 1/1b clinical trial who showed a complete marrow response.  That patient dropped out of the trial during the eleventh cycle of treatment because his/her disease progressed. Additionally, we previously reported on two patients in cohort 6 of our APVO 436 Phase 1/1b clinical trial who had a complete remission status. Both patients are no longer in a complete remission status and discontinued therapy due to progression in their disease. Top line and interim data also remain subject to audit and verification procedures, that may result in the final data being materially different from the preliminary data we previously published. In addition, the achievement of one primary endpoint for a trial does not guarantee that additional co-primary endpoints or secondary endpoints will be achieved.

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Our future clinical trials may not be successful. Moreover, should there be a flaw in a clinical trial, it may not become apparent until the clinical trial is well advanced. We may also experience numerous unforeseen events during, or as a result of, clinical trials that could delay or prevent our ability to receive marketing approval or commercialize our product candidates, including:

 

regulators or Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) may not authorize us or our investigators to commence or continue a clinical trial, conduct a clinical trial at a prospective trial site, or amend trial protocols, or regulators or IRBs may require that we modify or amend our clinical trial protocols;

 

we may experience delays in reaching, or fail to reach, agreement on acceptable clinical trial contracts or clinical trial protocols with prospective trial sites and our contract research organizations (CROs);

 

regulators may require us to perform additional or unanticipated clinical trials to obtain approval or we may be subject to additional post-marketing testing, surveillance, or REMS requirements to maintain regulatory approval;

 

clinical trials of our product candidates may produce negative or inconclusive results, or our studies may fail to reach the necessary level of statistical significance;

 

changes in marketing approval policies, laws, regulations, or the regulatory review process during the development period rendering our data insufficient to obtain marketing approval;

 

the cost of clinical trials of our product candidates may be greater than we anticipate or we may have insufficient funds for a clinical trial or to pay the substantial user fees required by the FDA upon the filing of a marketing application;

 

the supply or quality of our product candidates or other materials necessary to conduct clinical trials of our product candidates may be insufficient or inadequate;

 

we may fail to reach an agreement with regulators or IRBs regarding the scope, design, or implementation of our clinical trials;

 

we may have delays in adding new investigators or clinical trial sites, or we may experience a withdrawal of clinical trial sites;

 

there may be regulatory questions or disagreements regarding interpretations of data and results, or new information may emerge regarding our product candidates;

 

the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities may disagree with our study design, including endpoints, or our interpretation of data from preclinical studies and clinical trials or find that a product candidate’s benefits do not outweigh its safety risks;

 

the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities may not accept data from studies with clinical trial sites in foreign countries;

 

the FDA or comparable regulatory authorities may disagree with our intended indications;

 

the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities may fail to approve or subsequently find fault with the manufacturing processes or our contract manufacturer’s manufacturing facility for clinical and future commercial supplies; and

 

we may not be able to demonstrate that a product candidate provides an advantage over current standards of care or current or future competitive therapies in development.

Further, our product candidates may not be approved even if they achieve their primary endpoints in Phase 3 clinical trials or registration trials. Regardless of any advisory committee recommendation, the FDA may decline to approve the BLA for a number of reasons including, if the clinical benefit, safety profile or effectiveness of the drug is not deemed by the FDA to warrant approval. The FDA or other non-U.S. regulatory authorities may disagree with our trial design, and our interpretation of data from preclinical studies and clinical trials. In particular, the FDA may not view our data as being clinically meaningful or statistically persuasive. In addition, any of these regulatory authorities may change requirements for the approval of a product candidate even after reviewing and providing comments or advice on a protocol for a pivotal Phase 3 clinical trial. Any of these regulatory authorities may also approve a product candidate for fewer or more limited indications than we request or may grant approval contingent on the performance of costly post-marketing clinical trials. The FDA or other non-U.S. regulatory authorities may not approve the labeling claims that we believe would be necessary or desirable for the successful commercialization of our product candidates.

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If we experience delays or difficulties in the enrollment of patients in clinical trials, the time to reach critical trial data and receipt of any necessary regulatory approvals could be delayed.

We may not be able to initiate or continue clinical trials for our product candidates if we are unable to locate and enroll a sufficient number of eligible patients to participate in these trials as required by the FDA or similar regulatory authorities outside the United States. In addition, some of our competitors have ongoing clinical trials for product candidates that treat the same indications as our product candidates, and patients who would otherwise be eligible for our clinical trials may instead enroll in clinical trials of our competitors’ product candidates.  In addition, the global outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic makes it more difficult to initiate studies and enroll patients.

Patient enrollment is affected by other factors including:

 

the severity of the disease under investigation;

 

the patient eligibility criteria for the study in question;

 

the perceived risks and benefits of the product candidate under study;

 

our payments for conducting clinical trials;

 

the patient referral practices of physicians;

 

the ability to monitor patients adequately during and after treatment; and,

 

the proximity and availability of clinical trial sites for prospective patients.

Our inability to enroll a sufficient number of patients for clinical trials could result in significant delays and could require us to abandon one or more clinical trials altogether. Enrollment delays in our clinical trials may result in increased development costs for our product candidates and in delays to commercially launching our product candidates, if approved, which may cause the value of our company to decline and limit our ability to obtain additional financing.

Serious adverse events, undesirable side effects or other unexpected properties of our product candidates may be identified that could delay, prevent, or cause the withdrawal of regulatory approval, limit the commercial potential, or result in significant negative consequences following marketing approval.

Serious adverse events or undesirable side effects caused by, or other unexpected properties of any of our product candidates could cause us or regulatory authorities to interrupt, delay or halt our manufacturing and distribution operations and could result in a more restrictive label, the imposition of distribution or use restrictions or the delay or denial of regulatory approval by the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities. If any of our product candidates are associated with serious adverse events or undesirable side effects or have properties that are unexpected, we may need to abandon their development or limit development to certain uses or subpopulations in which the undesirable side effects or other characteristics are less prevalent, less severe or more acceptable from a risk-benefit perspective. Many compounds that initially showed promise in clinical or earlier stage testing have later been found to cause undesirable or unexpected side effects that prevented further development of the compound.

As we continue developing our product candidates and initiate clinical trials of our additional product candidates, serious adverse events, or SAEs, undesirable side effects, relapse of disease or unexpected characteristics may emerge causing us to abandon these product candidates or limit their development to more narrow uses or subpopulations in which the SAEs or undesirable side effects or other characteristics are less prevalent, less severe or more acceptable from a risk-benefit perspective or in which efficacy is more pronounced or durable. Undesirable side effects, or other unexpected adverse events or properties of any of our product candidates, could arise or become known either during clinical development or, if approved, after the approved product has been marketed. If such an event occurs during development, our trials could be suspended or terminated, and the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities could order us to cease further development of or deny approval of our other product candidates. If such an event occurs, a number of potentially significant negative consequences may result, including:

 

regulatory authorities may require additional warnings on the label or impose distribution or use restrictions;

 

regulatory authorities may require one or more post-market studies;

 

we may be required to create a medication guide outlining the risks of such side effects for distribution to patients;

 

regulatory authorities may require implementation of a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy, or REMS, Field Safety Corrective Actions or equivalent, which may include safety surveillance, restricted distribution and use, patient education, enhanced labeling, special packaging or labeling, expedited reporting of certain adverse events, preapproval of promotional materials and restrictions on direct-to-consumer advertising;

 

we could be sued and held liable for harm caused to patients; and,

 

our reputation may suffer.

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Any of these events could prevent us from achieving or maintaining market acceptance of the affected product candidate, or could substantially increase commercialization costs and expenses, which could delay or prevent us from generating revenue from the sale of our products and materially harm our business and results of operations.

We depend on third parties to conduct our clinical and non-clinical trials.

We do not have the ability to independently conduct the clinical and non-clinical trials required to obtain regulatory approval for our product candidates. We depend on third parties, such as independent clinical investigators, contract research organizations, or CROs, and other third-party service providers to conduct the clinical and non-clinical trials of our product candidates, and we expect to continue to do so. For example, Dr. Fatih Uckun, our current Chief Clinical Advisor, is now providing clinical trial and medical affairs oversight duties as a consultant.

While we have agreements governing the activities of third parties, we have limited influence and control over their actual performance and activities. For instance, our third-party service providers are not our employees, and except for remedies available to us under our agreements with such third parties we cannot control whether or not they devote sufficient time and resources to our ongoing clinical, non-clinical, and preclinical programs. Our third-party service providers may also have relationships with other entities, some of which may be our competitors, for whom they may also be conducting trials or other therapeutic development activities that could harm our competitive position.  If these third parties do not successfully carry out their contractual duties, meet expected deadlines or conduct our preclinical studies or clinical trials in accordance with regulatory requirements or our stated protocols, if they need to be replaced or if the quality or accuracy of the data they obtain is compromised due to the failure to adhere to our protocols, regulatory requirements or for other reasons, our trials may be repeated, extended, delayed, or terminated, we may not be able to obtain, or may be delayed in obtaining, marketing approvals for our product candidates, we may not be able to, or may be delayed in our efforts to, successfully commercialize our product candidates, or we or they may be subject to regulatory enforcement actions.

Our reliance on third-party service providers does not relieve us of our regulatory responsibilities, including ensuring that our trials are conducted in accordance with the FDA-approved good clinical practices, or GCPs, and the plans and protocols contained in the relevant regulatory application. In addition, these organizations and individuals may not complete these activities on our anticipated or desired timeframe. We also may experience unexpected cost increases that are beyond our control. Problems with the timeliness or quality of the work of a contract research organization may lead us to seek to terminate the relationship and use an alternative service provider, which may prove difficult and/or costly and result in a delay of our trials. In addition, business disruptions arising from the COVID-19 pandemic could negatively affect the ability of some of the independent clinical investigators, contract research organizations and other third-party service providers that conduct our clinical and non-clinical trials of our product candidates. Any delay in or inability to complete our trials could delay or prevent the development, approval, and commercialization of our product candidates.

If CROs or other third parties assisting us or our study sites fail to comply with applicable GCPs, the clinical data generated in our clinical trials may be deemed unreliable and the FDA or its non-U.S. counterparts may require us to perform additional clinical trials before approving our marketing applications. We or they may also face regulatory enforcement action.  We cannot assure you that, upon inspection, the FDA or non-U.S. regulatory agencies will determine that any of our clinical trials comply with GCPs. In addition, our clinical trials must be conducted with product produced under GMPs and similar regulations outside of the United States. Our failure, or the failure of our product manufacturers, to comply with these regulations may require us to repeat or redesign clinical trials, or conduct additional trials, which would increase our development costs and delay or impact the likelihood of regulatory approval.

If third parties do not carry out their duties under their agreements with us, if the quality or accuracy of the data they obtain is compromised due to the failure to adhere to our clinical protocols, including dosing requirements, or regulatory requirements, or if they otherwise fail to comply with clinical trial protocols or meet expected deadlines, our clinical trials may not meet regulatory requirements. If our clinical trials do not meet regulatory requirements or if these third parties need to be replaced, our clinical trials may be extended, delayed, suspended or terminated.

Agreements with third parties conducting or otherwise assisting with our clinical or preclinical studies might terminate for a variety of reasons, including a failure to perform by the third parties. If any of our relationships with these third parties terminate, we may not be able to enter into arrangements with alternative providers or to do so on commercially reasonable terms. Switching or adding additional third parties involves additional cost and requires management time and focus. In addition, there is a natural transition period when a new third party commences work. As a result, if we need to enter into alternative arrangements, it could delay our product development activities and adversely affect our business. Though we carefully manage our relationships with our third parties, there can be no assurance that we will not encounter challenges or delays in the future or that these delays or challenges will not have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and prospects, and results of operations.

If any of these events occur, we may not be able to obtain regulatory approval of our product candidates or succeed in our efforts to create approved line extensions for certain of our existing products or generate additional useful clinical data in support of these products. Moreover, if we are unable to obtain any necessary third-party services on acceptable terms or if these service providers do not successfully carry out their contractual duties or meet expected deadlines, our efforts to obtain regulatory approvals for our product candidates may be delayed or prevented.

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Certain of our product candidates have received orphan drug designation from the FDA. However, there is no guarantee that we will be able to maintain this designation, receive this designation for any of our other product candidates, or receive or maintain any corresponding benefits, including periods of exclusivity.

Certain of our product candidates have received orphan drug designation. We may also seek orphan drug designation for our other product candidates, as appropriate. While orphan drug designation does provide us with certain advantages, it neither shortens the development time or regulatory review time of a product candidate nor gives the product candidate any advantage in the regulatory review or approval process.

Generally, if a product candidate with orphan drug designation subsequently receives marketing approval before another product considered by the FDA to be the same for the same orphan indication, the product is entitled to a period of marketing exclusivity, which precludes the FDA from approving another marketing application for the same drug or biologic for the same indication for a period of seven years in the United States.

We may not be able to obtain any future orphan drug designations that we apply for. Orphan drug designations do not guarantee that we will be able to successfully develop our product candidates, and there is no guarantee that we will be able to maintain any orphan drug designations that we receive. For instance, orphan drug designations may be revoked if the FDA finds that the request for designation contained an untrue statement of material fact or omitted material information, or if the FDA finds that the product candidate was not eligible for designation at the time of the submission of the request.

Moreover, even if we are able to receive and maintain orphan drug designations, we may ultimately not receive any period of regulatory exclusivity if our product candidates are approved. For instance, we may not receive orphan product regulatory exclusivity if the indication for which we receive FDA approval is broader than the orphan drug designation. Orphan exclusivity may also be lost for the same reasons that orphan drug designation may be lost. Orphan exclusivity may further be lost if we are unable to assure a sufficient quantity of the product to meet the needs of patients with the rare disease or condition.

Even if we obtain orphan exclusivity for any of our current or future product candidates, that exclusivity may not effectively protect the product from competition as different products can be approved for the same condition or products that are the same as ours can be approved for different conditions. Even after an orphan product is approved, the FDA can also subsequently approve a product containing the same principal molecular features for the same condition if the FDA concludes that the later product is clinically superior. The FDA may further grant orphan drug designation to multiple sponsors for the same compound or active molecule and for the same indication. If another sponsor receives FDA approval for such product before we do, we would be prevented from launching our product in the United States for the orphan indication for a period of at least seven years, unless we can demonstrate clinical superiority. Moreover, third-party payors may reimburse for products off-label even if not indicated for the orphan condition.

Commercialization Risks

Our ability to grow revenues and execute on our long-term strategy depends heavily on our ability to discover, develop, and obtain marketing approval for our product candidates.

We currently have no products approved for commercial distribution. We have invested a significant portion of our efforts and financial resources in the development of our product candidates.  Our business depends on the successful development and commercialization of our product candidates, which will require additional clinical and non-clinical development, regulatory approval, commercial manufacturing arrangements, establishment of a commercial organization, significant marketing efforts, and further investment, which may never occur. Our ability to generate revenues is substantially dependent on our ability to develop, obtain regulatory approval for, and then successfully commercialize our product candidates. Except for the revenues from previously sold products, we currently generate no revenues from sales of any products, and we may never be able to develop or commercialize a marketable product.

In order for us to achieve our long-term business objectives, we will need to successfully discover and/or develop and commercialize our product candidates. Although we have made, and expect to continue to make, significant investments in research and development, we have had only a limited number of our internally-discovered product candidates reach the clinical development stage. We currently have one clinical-stage candidate, APVO436, which is built on the ADAPTIR platform. Drug discovery and development is a complex, time-consuming and expensive process that is fraught with risk and a high rate of failure. Our product candidates are susceptible to the risks of failure inherent at any stage of product development, including the appearance of unexpected or unacceptable adverse events or failure to demonstrate efficacy in clinical trials.  For example, in 2018, we announced the discontinuation of development of APVO414 and otlertuzumab as a result of clinical trial results. In addition, in October 2019, we announced our decision to discontinue development of APVO210, a novel investigational bispecific antibody candidate under development for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. The decision followed the review of data from Phase 1 multiple ascending dose (MAD) clinical study of APVO210 in healthy volunteers that suggests that APVO210 would not meet the desired target product profile for future commercialization. Specifically, the clinical data showed evidence of increasing titers of ADA with repeated doses of APVO210, which had varying impact on APVO210 drug levels in subjects’ blood. Failure to successfully discover and/or develop,

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obtain marketing approval for and commercialize additional products and product candidates would likely have a material adverse effect on our ability to grow revenues and improve our financial condition. If we are required to conduct additional clinical trials or other testing of our product candidates that we develop beyond those that we currently expect, if we are unable to successfully complete clinical trials of our product candidates or other testing, if the results of these trials or tests are not positive or are only modestly positive, or if there are safety concerns, we may be delayed in obtaining marketing approval for our product candidates, not obtain marketing approval at all, obtain approval for limited indications or patient populations, with a label without claims necessary for us to successfully market or products, or with significant labeled warnings. We may also be subject to additional post-marketing testing requirements, surveillance requirements, or REMS. To the extent any of the foregoing should occur, our business may be materially harmed.

We may not be successful in our efforts to use and further develop our ADAPTIR or ADAPTIR-FLEX platforms.

A key element of our strategy is to expand our product pipeline of immunotherapeutics based on our ADAPTIR and ADAPTIR-FLEX platform technologies. We plan to select and create product candidates for early development, potentially with other collaborative partners. We expect to continue to develop the platform to address unmet medical needs through directed cytokine delivery via monospecifics and bispecifics in areas including oncology, and multispecific molecules in oncology and other therapeutic areas. Our goal is to leverage this technology to make targeted investment in monospecific, bispecific, and multispecific ADAPTIR and ADAPTIR-FLEX therapeutics. Even if we are successful in continuing to build our pipeline, the potential product candidates that we identify may not be suitable for clinical development, including as a result of being shown to have harmful side effects or other characteristics that indicate that they are unlikely to be products that will receive marketing approval and achieve market acceptance. If we do not successfully develop and commercialize product candidates based on our ADAPTIR and ADAPTIR-FLEX platform technologies, our ability to obtain product revenues in future periods may be adversely affected, which likely would result in harm to our financial position and our financial prospects, and adversely affect our stock price.

We face substantial competition.

The development and commercialization of new biotechnology products is highly competitive and subject to rapid technological advances. We may face future competition with respect to our current product candidates and any product candidates we may seek to develop or commercialize in the future obtained from other companies and governments, universities, and other non-profit research organizations. Our competitors may develop products that are safer, more effective, more convenient, or less costly than any products that we may develop or market, or may obtain marketing approval for their products from the FDA, or equivalent foreign regulatory bodies more rapidly than we may obtain approval for our product candidates. Our competitors may have greater resources and may devote greater resources to research and develop their products, research and development capabilities, adapt more quickly to new technologies, scientific advances or patient preferences and needs, initiate or withstand substantial price competition more successfully, or more effectively negotiate third-party licensing and collaborative arrangements.

We believe that our most significant competitors in the oncology market include: AbbVie Inc., Affimed, Amgen Inc., AnaptysBio, Inc., Astellas Pharma Inc., Bayer AG, Biogen Idec Inc., Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH, Chinook Therapeutics, F-Star Biotechnology Ltd., Genentech Inc. (a subsidiary of F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd.), Genmab A/S, GlaxoSmithKline plc, Grifols USA LLC, Bristol Myers Squibb, ImmunoGen, Inc., Immunomedics, Inc., Janssen BioTech Inc., Johnson & Johnson, Macrogenics, Inc., Novartis International AG, Pieris Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Sanofi-Aventis US LLC, Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc., Teneobio, Inc., Xencor, Inc. and Zymeworks Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. We expect to compete on the basis of product efficacy, safety, ease of administration, price and economic value compared to drugs used in current practice or currently being developed. If we are not successful in demonstrating these attributes, physicians and other key healthcare decision makers may choose other products over any products we successfully develop, switch from our products, to new products or choose to use our products only in limited circumstances, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Any of our product candidates, if approved, may become subject to unfavorable pricing regulations or third-party coverage and reimbursement policies, which would harm our business.

The success of our product candidates, if approved, will depend upon, among other things, their acceptance by physicians, patients, third-party payors, and other members of the medical community as a therapeutic and cost-effective alternative to competing products and treatments. If any of our product candidates do not achieve and maintain an adequate level of acceptance, we may not generate material revenues from sales of these products. The degree of market acceptance of our products will depend on a number of factors, including: our ability to provide acceptable evidence of safety and efficacy; the prevalence and severity of any side effects; availability, relative cost and relative efficacy of alternative and competing treatments; the ability to offer our products for sale at competitive prices; our ability to continuously supply the market without interruption; the relative convenience and ease of administration; the willingness of the target patient population to try new products and of physicians to prescribe these products; the strength of marketing and distribution support; publicity concerning our products or competing products and treatments; and the sufficiency of coverage or reimbursement by third parties.

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Legislative or healthcare reform measures may have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

In the United States, there have been and continue to be a number of legislative initiatives to contain healthcare costs. For example, in March 2010, the ACA was enacted, which substantially changed the way health care is financed by both governmental and private insurers, and significantly impacted the U.S. pharmaceutical industry. However, some provisions of the ACA have yet to be fully implemented and certain provisions have been subject to legal and political challenges, as well as efforts to repeal, replace delay, circumvent, or loosen certain aspects of the ACA or mandates required thereby. Additionally, Congress has considered legislation that would repeal or repeal and replace all or part of the ACA. While Congress has not passed comprehensive repeal legislation, it has enacted laws that modify certain provisions of the ACA, such as removing penalties as of January 1, 2019 for not complying with the ACA’s individual mandate to carry health insurance, delaying the implementation of certain ACA-mandated fees, and increasing the point-of-sale discount that is owed by pharmaceutical manufacturers who participate in Medicare Part D. Additionally, on December 14, 2018, a Texas U.S. District Court Judge ruled that the ACA is unconstitutional in its entirety because the individual mandate was repealed by Congress as part of the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act and the case is currently pending before the United States Supreme Court. It is unclear how this decision, subsequent appeals, and other efforts to repeal and replace the ACA will impact the ACA and our business. We continue to evaluate how the ACA and recent efforts to repeal and replace or limit the implementation of the ACA will impact our business.

In addition, other legislative changes have been proposed and adopted in the United States since the ACA was enacted. On August 2, 2011, the Budget Control Act of 2011 among other things, created measures for spending reductions by Congress. A Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, tasked with recommending a targeted deficit reduction of at least $1.2 trillion for the years 2013 through 2021, was unable to reach required goals, thereby triggering the legislation’s automatic reduction to several government programs. This includes aggregate reductions of Medicare payments to providers of 2 percent per fiscal year. These reductions went into effect on April 1, 2013 and, due to subsequent legislative amendments to the statute, will remain in effect through 2030 unless additional Congressional action is taken.

Additionally, there has been heightened governmental scrutiny recently over the manner in which manufacturers set prices for their marketed products. For example, there have been several recent Congressional inquiries and proposed and enacted federal and state legislation designed to, among other things, bring more transparency to drug pricing, review the relationship between pricing and manufacturer patient programs, and reform government program reimbursement methodologies for drug products, including by tying reimbursement to the price of products in other developed countries. For example, proposals have been made to increase drug manufacturer competition, increase the negotiating power of certain federal healthcare programs, incentivize manufacturers to lower the list price of their products, and reduce the out of pocket costs of drug products paid by consumers. Individual states in the United States have also become increasingly active in passing legislation and implementing regulations designed to control pharmaceutical product pricing, including price or patient reimbursement constraints, discounts, restrictions on certain product access and marketing cost disclosure and transparency measures, and, in some cases, designed to encourage importation from other countries and bulk purchasing. On January 20, 2021, Joe Biden was sworn in as the U.S. president, and the Democratic Party obtained an equal number of seats in the U.S. Senate as the Republican Party, as well as maintained control of the U.S. House of Representatives. Many expect that the Biden administration will pursue stronger healthcare consumer protections, and it may act to overturn some of the prior Trump administration initiatives; however, the legislative and regulatory agendas, as they relate to the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries and the economy as a whole, of the Biden administration and the U.S. Congress currently remain uncertain. Any new laws and initiatives may result in additional reductions in Medicare and other healthcare funding or impose additional regulatory requirements on drug development or approval, which could have a material adverse effect on our future customers and accordingly, our financial operations.

We expect that additional state and federal healthcare reform measures will be adopted in the future, any of which could limit the amounts that federal and state governments will pay for healthcare products and services, which could result in reduced demand for any product candidates we successfully develop or additional pricing pressures.

Manufacture of our product candidates, especially in large quantities, is complex and time consuming. The loss of any of our third-party manufacturers, or delays or problems in the manufacture our product candidates, could result in product shortages and/or delays in clinical development.

We do not have manufacturing capabilities and do not plan to develop such capacity in the foreseeable future. We depend on a limited number of sole source third-party suppliers for our product candidates. Accordingly, our ability to develop and deliver products in a timely and competitive manner and to enable us to conduct our development programs depends on our third-party manufacturers being able to continue to meet our ongoing clinical trial needs and perform their contractual obligations. In order to successfully develop and commercialize our product candidates in a timely manner, we and our third-party manufacturers must be able to develop and execute on manufacturing processes and reach agreement on contract terms.

Our current and anticipated future dependence upon others for the manufacture of our product candidates or any product that we develop may adversely affect our future profit margins and our ability to commercialize any products that receive marketing approval on a timely and competitive basis. In addition, any performance failure on the part of our existing or future manufacturers could delay clinical development or marketing approval.

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If these third-party manufacturers do not successfully carry out their contractual duties, meet expected deadlines or manufacture our product candidates in accordance with regulatory requirements, if there are disagreements between us and such parties, or if such parties are unable to expand capacities to support commercialization of any of our product candidates for which we obtain marketing approval, we may not be able to produce, or may be delayed in producing sufficient product candidates to meet our supply requirements. Any delays in obtaining adequate supplies with respect to our product candidates and components may delay the development or commercialization of our product candidates.

We may not succeed in our efforts to establish manufacturing relationships or other alternative arrangements for any of our product candidates, components, and programs. Our product candidates may compete with other products and product candidates for access to manufacturing facilities. There are a limited number of manufacturers that operate under GMP regulations and that are both capable of manufacturing for us and willing to do so.

If our existing third-party manufacturers, or the third parties that we engage in the future to manufacture a product or component for commercial sale or for our clinical trials should cease to continue to do so for any reason, we likely would experience delays in obtaining sufficient quantities of our product candidates for us to meet commercial demand or to advance our clinical trials while we identify and qualify replacement suppliers. These third-party facilities may also be affected by natural disasters, such as floods or fire, or such facilities could face manufacturing issues, such as contamination or regulatory findings following a regulatory inspection of such facility. In such instances, we may need to locate an appropriate replacement third-party relationship, which may not be readily available or on acceptable terms, which would cause additional delay and increased expense. The addition of a new or alternative manufacturer may also require FDA approvals and may have a material adverse effect on our business.

If for any reason we are unable to obtain adequate supplies of our product candidates or the components used to manufacture them, it will be more difficult for us to develop our product candidates and compete effectively. Further, even if we do establish such collaborations or arrangements, our third-party manufacturers may breach, terminate, or not renew these agreements.

We or our third-party manufacturers may also encounter shortages in the raw materials or therapeutic substances necessary to produce our product candidates in the quantities needed for our clinical trials or, if our product candidates are approved, in sufficient quantities for commercialization or to meet an increase in demand. Such shortages may occur for a variety of reasons, including capacity constraints, delays or disruptions in the market, and shortages caused by the purchase of such materials by our competitors or others. We may also not be able to obtain such materials on favorable terms as a result of global trade policies.  Our or our third-party manufacturers’ failure to obtain the raw materials, therapeutic substances, or active pharmaceutical ingredients necessary to manufacture sufficient quantities of our product candidates may have a material adverse effect on our business.

All of our current product candidates are biologics. Our product candidates must be made consistently and in compliance with a clearly defined manufacturing process. Problems may arise during manufacturing for a variety of reasons, including problems with raw materials, equipment malfunction or replacement and failure to follow specific protocols and procedures. Slight deviations anywhere in the manufacturing process, including obtaining materials, maintaining master seed or cell banks and preventing genetic drift, seed or cell growth, fermentation and contamination including from, among other things, particulates, filtration, filling, labeling, packaging, storage and shipping, and quality control testing, may result in lot failures or manufacturing shut-down, delays in the release of lots, product recalls, spoilage or regulatory action. Due to COVID-19, our third-party manufacturers may experience difficulties that impact our product candidates.

Additionally, our development and commercialization strategy involves entering into arrangements with corporate and academic collaborators, contract research organizations, distributors, third-party manufacturers, licensors, licensees and others to conduct development work, manage or conduct our clinical trials, manufacture our product candidates and market and sell our products outside of the United States and maintaining our existing arrangements with respect to the commercialization or manufacture of our products. We may not have the expertise or the resources to conduct all of these activities for all products and product candidates on our own and, as a result, are particularly dependent on third parties in many areas. Any current or future arrangements for development and commercialization may not be successful, as the amount and timing of resources that third parties devote to developing, manufacturing, and commercializing our products candidates are not within our control. If we are not able to establish or maintain agreements relating to our product candidates in development, our results of operations and prospects would be materially and adversely affected.

Any loss of a third-party manufacturer, any delays, or problems in the manufacture of our products, or termination of any arrangements for development and commercialization of our products could have a material adverse effect on our business, operations, results of operations and financial condition. We may be required to replace our manufacturer and if this were to occur, we may incur added costs and delays in identifying and qualifying any such replacements. We may also not be able to enter into such arrangements on favorable commercial terms.

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Failure of our third-party manufacturers to successfully manufacture material that conforms to our specifications and the FDA’s or foreign regulatory authorities’ strict regulatory requirements, may prevent regulatory approval of those manufacturing facilities.

We rely on third parties to manufacture all clinical trial materials for our product candidates, and we will rely on third parties to manufacture commercial supplies, if any such product candidates are ultimately approved for commercial sale. Manufacturers of our product candidates and therapeutic substances must comply with GMP requirements enforced by the FDA that are applicable to both finished products and their active components used both for clinical and commercial supply. The FDA enforces these requirements through its facilities inspection program. Our product candidates, including APVO436 and ALG.APV-527 will not be approved for marketing by the FDA or other foreign regulatory authorities unless the FDA or their foreign equivalents also approve the facilities used by our third-party manufacturers to produce them for commercialization. If our third-party manufacturers cannot successfully manufacture material that conforms to our specifications and the FDA’s or foreign regulatory authorities’ strict regulatory requirements, the FDA or their foreign counterparts will not approve their manufacturing facilities, which would result in significant delays in obtaining FDA or foreign marketing approvals for our product candidates.   If this were to occur, we may also never receive marketing approval, we may need to repeat clinical trials, we may need to undertake costly corrective actions, including product recalls, we may risk harm to subjects or patients, and we may face enforcement actions.  

While we are ultimately responsible for the manufacture of our product candidates, other than through our contractual arrangements, we have little control over our manufacturers’ compliance with these regulations and standards. If the FDA or a comparable foreign regulatory authority does not approve these facilities for the manufacture of our product candidates or if it withdraws any such approval in the future, we may need to find alternative manufacturing facilities, which would significantly impact our ability to develop, obtain and maintain regulatory approval for or market our product candidates, if approved. Any new manufacturers would need to either obtain or develop the necessary manufacturing know-how, and obtain the necessary equipment and materials, which may take substantial time and investment. We must also receive FDA approval for the use of any new manufacturers for commercial supply.

We and our third-party manufacturers may not be able to meet these manufacturing process requirements for any of our current product candidates, all of which have complex manufacturing processes, which make meeting these requirements even more challenging. Due to COVID-19, our third-party manufacturers may experience difficulties that impact our product candidates. If we are unable to develop manufacturing processes for our clinical product candidates that satisfy these requirements, we will not be able to supply sufficient quantities of test material to conduct our clinical trials in a timely or cost effective manner, and as a result, our development programs will be delayed, our financial performance will be adversely impacted and we will be unable to meet our long-term goals.

Changes in product candidate manufacturing or formulation may result in additional costs or delay.

As product candidates are developed through preclinical studies to late-stage clinical trials toward approval and commercialization, it is common that various aspects of the development program, such as manufacturing methods, manufacturing sites, and formulation, are altered along the way in an effort to optimize processes and results. Any of these changes could cause our product candidates to perform differently and affect the results of planned clinical trials or other future clinical trials conducted with the altered materials. Such changes may also require additional testing, clinical trials, FDA notification, or FDA approval. Any of the foregoing could limit our future revenues and growth.

Regulatory and Compliance Risks

Our long-term success depends, in part, upon our ability to develop, receive regulatory approval for and commercialize our product candidates.

Our product candidates and the activities associated with their development, including testing, manufacture, recordkeeping, storage, and approval, are subject to comprehensive regulation by the FDA and other regulatory agencies in the United States and by comparable authorities in other countries. Failure to obtain regulatory approval for a product candidate will prevent us from commercializing the product candidate. We have limited resources for use in preparing, filing, and supporting the applications necessary to gain regulatory approvals and expect to rely on third-party contract research organizations and consultants to assist us in this process.

The FDA and other comparable regulatory agencies in foreign countries impose substantial and rigorous requirements for the development, production, marketing authorization and commercial introduction of drug products. These requirements include pre-clinical, laboratory and clinical testing procedures, sampling activities, clinical trials, and other costly and time-consuming procedures. In addition, regulation is not static, and regulatory authorities, including the FDA evolve in their staff interpretations and practices and may impose more stringent or different requirements than currently in effect, which may adversely affect our planned and ongoing drug development and/or our sales and marketing efforts.

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In the United States, to obtain approval from the FDA to market any of our future biologic products, we will be required to submit a BLA to the FDA. Ordinarily, the FDA requires a sponsor to support a BLA with substantial evidence of the product’s safety, purity, and potency in treating the targeted indication based on data derived from adequate and well-controlled clinical trials, including Phase 3 safety and efficacy trials conducted in patients with the disease or condition being targeted.

Developing and obtaining regulatory approval for product candidates is a lengthy process, often taking a number of years, is uncertain and is expensive. All of the product candidates that we are developing, or may develop in the future, require research and development, pre-clinical studies, nonclinical testing, and clinical trials prior to seeking regulatory approval, and commencing commercial sales. In addition, we may need to address a number of technological challenges in order to complete development of our product candidates. As a result, the development of product candidates may take longer than anticipated or not be successful at all.

Our product candidate development costs will also increase if we experience delays in testing or approvals, and we may not have sufficient funding to complete the testing and approval process for any of our product candidates. We may be required to obtain additional funds to complete clinical trials and prepare for possible commercialization of our product candidates. We do not know whether any preclinical tests or clinical trials above what we currently have planned will be required, will begin as planned, will need to be restructured, or will be completed on schedule, or at all. Significant delays relating to any preclinical or clinical trials also could shorten any periods during which we may have the exclusive right to commercialize our product candidates or allow our competitors to bring products to market before we do. This may prevent us from receiving marketing approvals and impair our ability to successfully commercialize our product candidates and may harm our business and results of operations. In addition, many of the factors that cause, or lead to, delays in clinical trials may ultimately lead to the denial of marketing approval of any of our product candidates. If any of this occurs, our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects will be materially harmed.

Generally, no product can receive FDA approval, marketing authorization from the European Commission or the competent authorities of the EU Member States, or approval from comparable regulatory agencies in foreign countries unless data generated in human clinical trials demonstrates both safety and efficacy for each target indication in accordance with such authority’s standards.

The large majority of product candidates that begin human clinical trials fail to demonstrate the required safety and efficacy characteristics necessary for marketing approval. Failure to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of any of our product candidates for each target indication in clinical trials would prevent us from obtaining required approvals from regulatory authorities, which would prevent us from commercializing those product candidates. Negative or inconclusive results from the clinical trials or adverse medical events during the trials could lead to requirements that trials be repeated or extended, or that additional trials be conducted, any of which may not be clinically feasible or financially practicable, that the conduct of trials be suspended, or that a program be terminated.

Any regulatory approval we ultimately obtain may limit the indicated uses for the product or subject the product to restrictions or post-approval commitments that render the product commercially non-viable. Securing regulatory approval requires the submission of extensive non-clinical and clinical data, information about product manufacturing processes and inspection of facilities and supporting information to the regulatory authorities for each therapeutic indication to establish the product’s safety and efficacy. If we are unable to submit the necessary data and information, for example, because the results of clinical trials are not favorable, or if the applicable regulatory authority delays reviewing or does not approve our applications, we will be unable to obtain regulatory approval.

Delays in obtaining or failure to obtain regulatory approvals may: delay or prevent the successful commercialization of any of the products or product candidates in the jurisdiction for which approval is sought; diminish our competitive advantage; and defer or decrease our receipt of revenue.

Some of our product candidates previously in development experienced regulatory and/or clinical setbacks. Clinical development has been discontinued for product candidates otlertuzumab, APVO414, and APVO210. Both APVO414 and APVO210 were discontinued after patients developed ADA. Most recently, in 2019, we elected to discontinue the APVO210 development program following the review of data from the Phase 1 multiple ascending dose (MAD) clinical study of APVO210 in healthy volunteers that suggests that APVO210 would not meet the desired target product profile for future commercialization. Specifically, the clinical data showed evidence of increasing titers of ADA with repeated doses of APVO210, which had varying impact on APVO210 drug levels in subjects’ blood.  The cause of the ADA is uncertain; however, we believe that appearance of ADA is related to the mechanism of action of APVO210, and not due to the structure, or sequences characteristic of the ADAPTIR platform.  Although we have re-designed certain components of the ADAPTIR platform based on what we have learned in prior clinical trials, there is no guarantee that the occurrence of ADA or other clinical setbacks will not occur in the development of our existing and future ADAPTIR product candidates.

The procedures to obtain marketing approvals vary among countries and can involve additional clinical trials or other pre-filing requirements. The time required to obtain foreign regulatory approval may differ from that required to obtain FDA approval. The foreign regulatory approval process may include all the risks associated with obtaining FDA approval, or different or additional risks. Regulatory agencies may have varying interpretations of the same data, and approval by one regulatory authority does not ensure approval by regulatory authorities in other jurisdictions. Accordingly, approval by the FDA does not ensure approval by the regulatory authorities in other countries, and approval by one foreign regulatory authority does not ensure approval by the FDA or regulatory authorities in other foreign countries. Failure to obtain regulatory approval in one jurisdiction, however, may impact the decision of other jurisdictions.  We may not be able to file for regulatory approvals and may not receive necessary approvals to commercialize our products and products in development in any market on a timely basis, if at all.

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Our product candidates are and will continue to be subject to ongoing obligations and continued regulatory review, which may result in significant additional expense.  We may be subject to penalties if we fail to comply with regulatory requirements or experience unanticipated problems with our products.

We and our product candidates are subject to extensive and ongoing requirements of and review by the FDA and other regulatory authorities, including requirements related to the conduct of clinical and pre-clinical studies, manufacturing processes, post-approval clinical data, labeling, packaging, distribution, adverse event reporting, storage, recordkeeping, export, import, advertising, marketing, and promotional activities for such products. These requirements further include submissions of safety and other post-marketing information, including manufacturing deviations and reports, registration and listing requirements, the payment of annual fees, continued compliance with GMP-requirements relating to manufacturing, quality control, quality assurance, and corresponding maintenance of records and documents, and requirements regarding the distribution of samples to physicians.

FDA and comparable foreign regulatory authorities will continue to closely monitor the safety profile of any product even after approval. If the FDA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities become aware of new safety information after approval of any of our product candidates, they may, among other actions, withdraw approval, require labeling changes or establishment of a REMS or similar strategy, impose significant restrictions on a product’s indicated uses or marketing, or impose ongoing requirements for potentially costly post-approval studies or post-market surveillance. Any such restrictions could limit sales of the product.

We and any of our collaborators could be subject to periodic unannounced inspections by the FDA to monitor and ensure compliance with GMPs and other FDA regulatory requirements. Application holders must further notify the FDA, and depending on the nature of the change, obtain FDA pre-approval for product and manufacturing changes.  In addition, later discovery of previously unknown adverse events or that the product is less effective than previously thought or other problems with our products, manufacturers or manufacturing processes, or failure to comply with regulatory requirements both before and after approval, may yield various results, including:

 

restrictions on manufacturing or distribution, or marketing of such products;

 

modifications to promotional pieces and product labels;

 

issuance of corrective information;

 

requirements to conduct post-marketing studies or other clinical trials;

 

clinical holds or termination of clinical trials;

 

requirements to establish or modify a REMS or a similar strategy;

 

changes to the way the product is administered;

 

liability for harm caused to patients or subjects;

 

reputational harm;

 

the product becoming less competitive;

 

warning, untitled, or cyber letters;

 

suspension of marketing or withdrawal of the products from the market;

 

regulatory authority issuance of safety alerts, Dear Healthcare Provider letters, press releases, or other communications containing warnings or other safety information about the product;

 

refusal to approve pending applications or supplements to approved applications that we submit;

 

recalls of products;

 

fines, restitution or disgorgement of profits or revenues;

 

suspension or withdrawal of marketing approvals;

 

refusal to permit the import or export of our products;

 

product seizure or detention;

 

FDA debarment, suspension and debarment from government contracts, and refusal of orders under existing government contracts, exclusion from federal healthcare programs, consent decrees, or corporate integrity agreements; or

 

injunctions or the imposition of civil or criminal penalties, including imprisonment.

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Any of these events could prevent us from achieving or maintaining product approval and market acceptance of the particular product candidate, if approved, or could substantially increase the costs and expenses of developing and commercializing such product, which in turn could delay or prevent us from generating significant revenues from its sale. Any of these events could further have other material and adverse effects on our operations and business and could adversely impact our stock price and could significantly harm our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects.

The FDA’s policies may change and additional government laws and regulations may be enacted that could prevent, limit, or delay regulatory approval of our product candidates, that could limit the marketability of our product candidates, or that could impose additional regulatory obligations on us. By example, the change in the U.S. administration that occurred on January 20, 2021, may result in new or revised laws, regulatory requirements, and associated compliance obligations, as well as postponed or frozen regulatory requirements.  Changes in medical practice and standard of care may also impact the marketability of our product candidates. If we are slow or unable to adapt to changes in existing requirements, standards of care, or the adoption of new requirements or policies, or if we are not able to maintain regulatory compliance, we may lose any marketing approval that we may have obtained and be subject to regulatory enforcement action.

Should any of the above actions take place, they could adversely affect our ability to achieve or sustain profitability. Further, the cost of compliance with post-approval regulations may have a negative effect on our operating results and financial condition.

If we fail to comply with foreign, federal, state, and local healthcare laws, including fraud and abuse and health information privacy and security laws, we could face substantial penalties and our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects could be adversely affected.

As a biotechnology company, even though we do not provide healthcare services or receive payments directly from or bill directly to Medicare, Medicaid, or other third-party payors for our products, certain federal, state, local and foreign healthcare laws and regulations pertaining to fraud and abuse and patients’ rights are applicable to our business. We are subject to healthcare fraud and abuse and patient privacy regulation by both the federal government and the states in which we conduct our business. The laws that may affect our ability to operate include:

 

the federal Anti-Kickback Statute makes it illegal for any person or entity, including a prescription drug manufacturer (or a party acting on its behalf) to knowingly and willfully solicit, receive, offer or pay remuneration, directly or indirectly, overtly or covertly, to induce, or in return for, either the referral of an individual, or the purchase, lease, prescribing or recommendation of an item, good, facility or service reimbursable by a federally funded healthcare program, such as the Medicare or Medicaid program. The term “remuneration” has been interpreted broadly and may constrain our marketing practices, educational programs, pricing policies and relationships with healthcare providers or other entities, among other activities;

 

federal civil and criminal false claims, including the federal False Claims Act, and false statement laws and civil monetary penalty laws, which impose criminal and civil penalties, including through civil whistleblower or qui tam actions, on individuals or entities for, among other things, knowingly presenting, or causing to be presented, claims for payment or approval from Medicare, Medicaid or other federal health care programs that are false or fraudulent or knowingly making any materially false statement in connection with the delivery or payment for healthcare benefits, items or services;

 

the U.S. federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, as amended, or HIPAA, which imposes criminal and civil liability for, among other things, knowingly and willfully executing, or attempting to execute, a scheme to defraud any healthcare benefit program or obtain, by means of false or fraudulent pretenses, representations, or promises, any of the money or property owned by, or under the custody or control of, any healthcare benefit program, regardless of the payor (e.g., public or private) and knowingly and willfully falsifying, concealing or covering up by any trick or device a material fact or making any materially false statement, in connection with the delivery of, or payment for, healthcare benefits, items or services. Similar to the U.S. federal Anti-Kickback Statute, a person or entity does not need to have actual knowledge of the statute or specific intent to violate it in order to have committed a violation;

 

HIPAA, as amended by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health, or HITECH, and their respective implementing regulations mandates, among other things, the adoption of uniform standards for the electronic exchange of information in common healthcare transactions, as well as standards relating to the privacy, security and transmission of individually identifiable health information, which require the adoption of administrative, physical and technical safeguards to protect such information. Among other things, HITECH makes HIPAA's security standards directly applicable to "business associates", or independent contractors or agents of covered entities that create, receive or obtain protected health information in connection with providing a service for or on behalf of a covered entity;

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the Physician Payments Sunshine Act and its implementing regulations, which requires certain manufacturers of drugs, biologics, medical devices and medical supplies for which payment is available under Medicare, Medicaid or the CMS, certain payments and transfers of value made to physicians and teaching hospitals, and ownership or investment interests held by physicians and their immediate family members. Beginning in 2022, applicable manufacturers will also be required to report information regarding payments and transfers of value provided to physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, certified nurse anesthetists, and certified nurse-midwives; and,

 

state law equivalents of each of the above federal laws, such as anti-kickback and false claims laws, which may apply to items or services reimbursed by any third-party payor, including commercial insurers; state and foreign laws governing the privacy and security of health information in certain circumstances, many of which differ from each other in significant ways and may not have the same effect, thus complicating compliance efforts; state, local and foreign laws that require pharmaceutical companies to comply with the pharmaceutical industry’s voluntary compliance guidelines and the relevant compliance guidance promulgated by the federal government, obtain pharmaceutical agent licensure, and/or otherwise restrict payments that may be made to healthcare providers and entities; and state, local and foreign laws and industry codes that require drug manufacturers to report information related to payments and other transfers of value to healthcare providers or entities, or marketing expenditures.

Because of the breadth of these laws and the narrowness of the statutory exceptions and safe harbors available under the U.S. federal Anti-Kickback Statute, it is possible that some of our business activities could be subject to challenge under one or more of such laws. Moreover, recent health care reform legislation has strengthened these laws. For example, the ACA, among other things, amends the intent requirement of the federal Anti-Kickback Statute and criminal health care fraud statutes, so that a person or entity no longer needs to have actual knowledge of the statute or specific intent to violate it. In addition, the ACA provides that the government may assert that a claim including items or services resulting from a violation of the federal Anti-Kickback Statute constitutes a false or fraudulent claim for purposes of the False Claims Act.

Recently, several pharmaceutical and other healthcare companies have been prosecuted under the federal false claims laws for allegedly inflating drug prices they report to pricing services, which in turn are used by the government to set Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement rates, and for allegedly providing free product to customers with the expectation that the customers would bill federal programs for the product. In addition, certain marketing practices, including off-label promotion, interactions with specialty pharmacies, and patient assistance programs may also violate fraud and abuse laws. To the extent that any product we make is sold in a foreign country, we may be subject to similar foreign laws and regulations.

In addition, certain state and local laws mandate that we comply with a state code of conduct, adopt a company code of conduct under state criteria, disclose marketing payments made to health care professionals and entities, disclose drug pricing information and/or report compliance information to the state authorities. The shifting compliance environment and the need to build and maintain robust and expandable systems to comply in multiple jurisdictions with different compliance and reporting requirements increase the possibility that a pharmaceutical company may violate one or more of the requirements. Any failure to comply with these reporting requirements could result in significant fines and penalties.

The risks of complying with these laws cannot be entirely eliminated. The risk of violation of such laws is also increased because many of them have not been fully interpreted by the regulatory authorities or the courts, and their provisions are open to a variety of interpretations. Any action against us for violation of these laws, even if we successfully defend against it, could cause us to incur significant legal expenses and divert our management’s attention from the operation of our business. Moreover, achieving and sustaining compliance with applicable federal, state, local and foreign privacy, security, fraud and transparency laws may prove costly. If our past or present operations, or those of our distributors are found to be in violation of any of the laws described above or any other governmental regulations that apply to us, we may be subject to sanctions, including civil and administrative penalties, criminal fines, damages, disgorgement, exclusion from participation in U.S. federal or state health care programs, individual imprisonment, integrity obligations, and the curtailment or restructuring of our operations, any of which could materially adversely affect our ability to operate our business and our financial results. Similarly, if healthcare providers, distributors or other entities with whom we do business are found to be out of compliance with applicable laws and regulations, they may be subject to sanctions, which could also have a negative impact on us.

Our employees, independent contractors, consultants, commercial partners, principal investigators, or CROs may engage in misconduct or other improper activities, including noncompliance with regulatory standards and requirements, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

We are exposed to the risk of employee fraud or other misconduct. Misconduct by employees, independent contractors, consultants, commercial partners, manufacturers, investigators, or CROs could include intentional, reckless, negligent, or unintentional failures to comply with FDA regulations or applicable fraud and abuse laws, provide accurate information to the FDA, properly calculate pricing information required by federal programs, comply with federal procurement rules or contract terms, report financial information or data accurately or disclose unauthorized activities to us. This misconduct could also involve the improper use or misrepresentation of information obtained in the course of clinical trials, which could result in regulatory sanctions and serious

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harm to our reputation. It is not always possible to identify and deter this type of misconduct, and the precautions we take to detect and prevent this activity may not be effective in controlling unknown or unmanaged risks or losses or in protecting us from governmental investigations or other actions or lawsuits stemming from a failure to be in compliance with such laws or regulations. Moreover, it is possible for a whistleblower to pursue a False Claims Act case against us even if the government considers the claim unmeritorious and declines to intervene, which could require us to incur costs defending against such a claim. Further, due to the risk that a judgment in a False Claims Act case could result in exclusion from federal health programs or debarment from government contracts, whistleblower cases often result in large settlements. If any such actions are instituted against us, and we are not successful in defending ourselves or asserting our rights, those actions could have a significant impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations, including the imposition of significant fines or other sanctions.

Our operations, including our use of hazardous materials, chemicals, bacteria, and viruses, require us to comply with regulatory requirements and expose us to significant potential liabilities.

Our operations involve the use of hazardous materials, including chemicals, and may produce dangerous waste products. Accordingly, we, along with the third parties that conduct clinical trials and manufacture our products and product candidates on our behalf, are subject to federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations that govern the use, manufacture, distribution, storage, handling, exposure, disposal and recordkeeping with respect to these materials. We are also subject to a variety of environmental and occupational health and safety laws. Compliance with current or future laws and regulations can require significant costs and we could be subject to substantial fines and penalties in the event of noncompliance. In addition, the risk of contamination or injury from these materials cannot be completely eliminated. In such event, we could be held liable for substantial civil damages or costs associated with the cleanup of hazardous materials.

Intellectual Property Risks

If we are unable to protect our intellectual proprietary rights, our business could be harmed.

Our commercial success will depend, in large part, on our ability to obtain and maintain protection in the United States and other countries for the intellectual property covering or incorporated into our technology, products and product candidates. Obtaining and maintaining this protection is very costly. The patentability of technology in the biotechnology field generally is highly uncertain and involves complex legal and scientific questions. We cannot be certain that our patents and patent applications, including our own and those that we have rights through licenses from third parties, will adequately protect our intellectual property. Our success protecting our intellectual property depends significantly on our ability to:

 

obtain and maintain U.S. and foreign patents, that are meaningful to our products, including defending those patents against adverse claims;

 

secure patent term extension for the patents covering our approved products;

 

protect trade secrets;

 

operate without infringing the proprietary rights of others; and,

 

prevent others from infringing our proprietary rights.

We may not be able to obtain issued patents relating to our technology or product candidates. Even if issued, patents may inadvertently lapse or be challenged, narrowed, invalidated, or circumvented, which could limit our ability to stop competitors from marketing similar products or limit the duration of patent protection we may have for our product candidates. Further, patents may lapse prior to the regulatory approval of the underlying product in one or more territories. In the past, we have abandoned the prosecution and/or maintenance of patent applications related to patent families in the ordinary course of business. In the future, we may choose to abandon such prosecution and/or maintenance in a similar fashion. If these patent rights are later determined to be valuable or necessary to our business, our competitive position may be adversely affected. Changes in patent laws or administrative patent office rules or changes in interpretations of patent laws in the United States and in other countries may diminish the value of our intellectual property or narrow the scope of our patent protection, or result in costly defensive measures.

Patent and other intellectual property laws outside the United States are even more uncertain than in the United States and are continually undergoing review and revisions in many countries. Further, the laws of some foreign countries may not protect our intellectual property rights to the same extent as the laws of the United States. For example, certain countries do not grant patent claims that are directed to business methods and processes. In addition, we may have to participate in additional opposition proceedings, like the proceedings described above, to determine the validity of our foreign patents or our competitors’ foreign patents, which could result in substantial costs and diversion of our efforts.

Our collaborative partners and licensors may not adequately protect our intellectual property rights. These third parties may have the first right to maintain or defend intellectual property rights in which we have an interest and, although we may have the right to assume the maintenance and defense of such intellectual property rights if these third parties do not do so, our ability to maintain and defend such intellectual property rights may be compromised by the acts or omissions of these third parties.

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The cost of litigation to uphold the validity of patents, once obtained, to prevent infringement or to otherwise protect or enforce our proprietary rights could be substantial and, from time to time, our patents are subject to patent office proceedings. Some of our competitors may be better able to sustain the costs of complex patent litigation because they may have substantially greater financial resources. Intellectual property lawsuits are expensive and unpredictable and would consume management’s time and attention and other resources, even if the outcome were successful. In addition, there is a risk that a court would decide that our patents are not valid and that we do not have the right to stop the other party from using the inventions covered by or incorporating them. There is also a risk that, even if the validity of a patent were upheld, a court would refuse to stop the other party from using the invention(s), including on the grounds that its activities do not infringe the patent. If any of these events were to occur, our business, financial condition and operating results could be materially and adversely affected.

In addition to patent litigation, we may be a party to adversarial proceedings before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) of the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), or the Opposition Division of the European Patent Office (EPO). Potential proceedings before the PTAB include inter partes review proceedings, post-grant review proceedings and interference proceedings. Depending on our level of success at the PTAB and Opposition Division of the EPO, these proceedings could adversely impact our intellectual property rights with respect to our products and technology.

In addition, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled on several patent cases in recent years, either narrowing the scope of patent protection available in certain circumstances or weakening the rights of patent owners in certain situations. This combination of events has created uncertainty with respect to the value of patents, once obtained, and with regard to our ability to obtain patents in the future. Depending on decisions by the U.S. Congress, the federal courts, and the USPTO, the laws and regulations governing patents could change in unpredictable ways that would weaken our ability to obtain new patents or to enforce our existing patents and patents that we might obtain in the future. Patent and intellectual property laws outside of the United States may also change and be uncertain.

Our patents, once obtained, also may not afford us protection against competitors with similar technology. Because patent applications in the United States and many foreign jurisdictions are typically not published until eighteen months after filing, or in some cases not at all, and because publications of discoveries in the scientific literature often lag behind actual discoveries, neither we nor our licensors can be certain that others have not filed or maintained patent applications for technology used by us or covered by our pending patent applications without our being aware of these applications.

We also will rely on current and future trademarks to establish and maintain recognized brands, including APTEVO THERAPEUTICS, APTEVO BIOTHERAPEUTICS, APTEVO RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, the Aptevo logo, ADAPTIR, and ADAPTIR-FLEX in relevant jurisdictions. If we fail to acquire and protect such trademarks, our ability to market and sell our products, if approved for marketing, will be harmed. In addition, our current and future trademarks may be challenged, infringed, circumvented, declared generic, lapsed or determined to be infringing on or dilutive of other marks and we may not be able to protect our rights in these trademarks, which we need in order to build name recognition. Any of the foregoing could have a material and adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operating results.  

Third parties may choose to file patent infringement claims against us.

Our development and commercialization activities, as well as any product candidates or products resulting from these activities, may infringe or be claimed to infringe patents and other intellectual property rights of third parties under which we do not hold sufficient licenses or other rights. Third parties may be successful in obtaining patent protection for technologies that cover development and commercialization activities in which we are already engaged. These third parties may have substantially greater financial resources than us and could bring claims against us that could cause us to incur substantial expenses to defend against these claims and, if successful against us, could cause us to pay substantial damages. If a patent infringement or other similar suit were brought against us, we could be forced to stop or delay development, manufacturing or sales of the product or product candidate that is the subject of the suit. Intellectual property litigation in the biotechnology industry is common, and we expect this trend to continue.

As a result of patent infringement or other similar claims, or to avoid potential claims, we may choose or be required to seek a license from the third party and be required to pay license fees or royalties or both. These licenses may not be available on acceptable terms, or at all. Even if we were able to obtain a license, the rights may be non-exclusive, which could result in our competitors gaining access to the same intellectual property. Ultimately, we could be prevented from commercializing a product, or be forced to cease some aspect of our business operations, if, as a result of actual or threatened patent infringement claims, we are unable to enter into licenses on acceptable terms, if at all, or if an injunction is granted against us, which could harm our business significantly.

There has been substantial litigation and other proceedings regarding patent and other intellectual property rights in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. In addition to infringement claims against us, we may become a party to other patent litigation and other adversarial proceedings such as proceedings before the Patent Trial Appeals Board and opposition proceedings in the European Patent Office, regarding intellectual property rights that could impact our products and technology.

Patent litigation and other proceedings may also absorb significant management time. The cost to us of any patent litigation or other proceeding, even if resolved in our favor, could be substantial. Some of our competitors may be able to sustain the costs of such litigation or proceedings more effectively than we can because of their substantially greater financial resources. Uncertainties resulting from the initiation and continuation of patent litigation or other proceedings could have a material adverse effect on our ability to compete in the marketplace. Patent litigation and other proceedings may also absorb significant management time.

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Our Aptevo trademarks may be opposed which could have a material and adverse effect on our business.

We have applications pending that cover the APTEVO THERAPEUTICS, APTEVO BIOTHERAPEUTICS, and APTEVO RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT trademarks. We refer to these trademarks as our house marks. If a third party opposes any of these house marks and we are unable to reach settlement prior to the commencement of an opposition proceeding, we may incur significant expense in the course of participating in the opposition process, which can be expensive and lengthy. Any settlement with a third party may result in our agreeing to be subject to restrictions on our use of the relevant house mark. In addition, if we are unsuccessful in an opposition against a house mark, we would lose the ability to obtain trademark registration for one or more uses of the relevant mark both in the United States and in other territories which could have a material and adverse effect on our business.

We may be subject to claims that our employees have wrongfully used or disclosed alleged trade secrets of their former employers.

As is common in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry, we employ individuals who were previously employed at other biotechnology or pharmaceutical companies, including our competitors or potential competitors. We may be subject to claims that these employees or we have inadvertently or otherwise used or disclosed trade secrets or other proprietary information of their former employers. Litigation may be necessary to defend against these claims. Even if we are successful in defending against these claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management.

Failure to comply with our obligations in our intellectual property licenses with third parties, could result in loss of license rights or other damages.

We are a party to a number of license agreements and expect to enter into additional license agreements in the future. Our existing licenses impose, and we expect future licenses will impose, various diligence, milestone payment, royalty, insurance, and other obligations on us. If we fail to comply with these obligations, the licensor may have the right to terminate the license in whole or in part, terminate the exclusive nature of the license and/or sue us for breach, which could cause us to not be able to market any product that is covered by the licensed patents and may be subject to damages.

If we are unable to protect the confidentiality of our proprietary information and know-how, the value of our technology and product candidates could be adversely affected.

In addition to patented technology, we rely upon unpatented proprietary technology, information processes and know-how. These types of trade secrets can be difficult to protect. We seek to protect this confidential information, in part, through agreements with our employees, consultants and third parties as well as confidentiality policies and audits, although these may not be successful in protecting our trade secrets and confidential information. These agreements may be breached, and we may not have adequate remedies for any such breach. In addition, our trade secrets may otherwise become known, including through a potential cyber security breach, or may be independently developed by competitors. If we are unable to protect the confidentiality of our proprietary information and know-how, competitors may be able to use this information to develop products that compete with our products, which could adversely impact our business.

Risk Related to Collaborations and Other Agreements

We may not be successful in establishing and maintaining collaborations that leverage our capabilities in pursuit of developing and commercializing our product candidates.

For each of our product candidates we plan to evaluate the merits of entering into collaboration arrangements with third parties, including leading biotechnology companies or non-governmental organizations. In July 2017, we entered into a collaboration agreement with Alligator pursuant to which Aptevo R&D and Alligator will collaboratively develop ALG.APV-527, a lead bispecific antibody candidate simultaneously targeting 4-1BB (CD137), a member of the TNFR superfamily of a costimulatory receptor found on activated T-cells, and 5T4, a tumor antigen widely overexpressed in a number of different types of cancer. We intend to pursue collaboration arrangements with third parties that have particular technology, expertise or resources for the development or commercialization of our product candidates or for accessing particular markets. We face, and will continue to face, significant competition in seeking appropriate partners for our product candidates. If we are unable to identify partners whose capabilities complement and integrate well with ours and reach collaboration arrangements with such partners on a timely basis, on acceptable terms or at all, or if the arrangements we establish are unproductive for us, we may fail to meet our business objectives for the particular product candidate. Our ability to enter into such arrangements with respect to products in development that are subject to licenses may be limited by the terms of those licenses.

Our collaboration agreement with Alligator, or any collaboration agreement we may consider entering into, may not be successful and the success of our collaboration arrangements will depend heavily on the efforts and activities of our collaborative partners. It is likely that our collaborative partners will have significant discretion in determining the efforts and resources that they will apply to these collaborations.

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The risks that we are subject to in any of our collaborations include, among others:

 

our collaborative partners may not commit adequate resources to the development, marketing and distribution of any collaboration products, limiting our potential revenues from these products;

 

our collaborative partners may experience financial difficulties and may therefore be unable to meet their commitments to us;

 

our collaborative partners may pursue a competing product candidate developed either independently or in collaboration with others, including our competitors; and,

 

our collaborative partners may terminate our relationship.

The failure of any of our current or future collaboration partners to perform as expected could place us at a competitive disadvantage and adversely affect us financially, including delay and increased costs of development, loss of market opportunities, lower than expected revenues and impairment of the value of the related product candidate. A loss of our collaboration agreement with Alligator would result in a burden of locating a replacement partner under potentially less favorable terms at an additional cost. Collaborations are a critical part of our business strategy, and any inability on our part to establish and successfully maintain such arrangements on terms favorable to us or to work successfully with our collaborative partners could have an adverse effect on our operations and financial performance. Due to COVID-19, we may experience delays in opportunities to develop our product candidates, due to financial and other impacts on potential partners.

In connection with our separation from Emergent, we and Emergent agreed to indemnify the other party for certain liabilities. The Emergent indemnity may not be sufficient to hold us harmless from the full amount of liabilities for which Emergent will be allocated responsibility, and Emergent may not be able to satisfy its indemnification obligations in the future.

Pursuant to the separation agreement and certain other agreements with Emergent, Emergent has agreed to indemnify us for certain liabilities, and we agreed to indemnify Emergent for certain liabilities. Indemnities that we may be required to provide Emergent are not subject to any cap, may be significant and could negatively impact our business, particularly indemnities relating to our actions that could impact the tax-free nature of the distribution. Third parties could also seek to hold us responsible for any of the liabilities that Emergent has agreed to retain. Any amounts we are required to pay pursuant to these indemnification obligations and other liabilities could require us to divert cash that would otherwise have been used in furtherance of our operating business. Further, the indemnity from Emergent may not be sufficient to protect us against the full amount of such liabilities, and Emergent may not be able to fully satisfy its indemnification obligations. Moreover, even if we ultimately succeed in recovering from Emergent any amounts for which we are held liable, we may be temporarily required to bear these losses ourselves. Each of these risks could negatively affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Risks Related to Our Common Stock and General Risks

Our stock price may be volatile.

Our stock price has fluctuated in the past and is likely to be volatile in the future. Since August 1, 2016, the reported closing price of our common stock has fluctuated between $3.29 and $112 per share (as adjusted to reflect our 1-for-14 reverse stock split of our outstanding common stock that was effective on March 26, 2020). The stock market in general, and the market for biotechnology companies in particular, have experienced extreme volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. The market price of our common stock may fluctuate significantly due to a number of factors, some of which may be beyond our control or unrelated to our operations, including, among others:

 

changes in earnings estimated by securities analysts or management, or our ability to meet those estimates;

 

investor perceptions or negative announcements by our competitors, suppliers, or partners regarding their own performance;

 

the success of competitive products or technologies;

 

the timing, expenses, and results of clinical and non-clinical trials of our product candidates;

 

announcements regarding clinical trial results and product introductions by us or our competitors;

 

announcements of acquisitions, collaborations, financings or other transactions by us or our competitors;

 

public concern as to the safety of our product candidates;

 

termination or delay of a development program;

 

the recruitment or departure of key personnel;

 

estimated or actual sales of IXINITY by Medexus;

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whether and to what extent future proceeds are received under our royalty purchase agreement with HCR;

 

actual or anticipated variations in our cash flows or results of operations;

 

the operating and stock price performance of comparable companies;

 

the impact of COVID-19 or similar global health challenges;

 

general industry conditions and domestic and global financial, economic, and geo-political instability; and,

 

the other factors described in this “Risk Factors” section.

Biotechnology company stock prices have declined significantly in certain instances where companies have failed to obtain FDA or foreign regulatory authority approval of a product candidate or if the timing of FDA or foreign regulatory authority approval is delayed. If the FDA’s or any foreign regulatory authority’s response to any application for approval is delayed or not favorable for any of our product candidates, our stock price could decline significantly.

In addition, when the market price of a company’s common stock drops significantly, stockholders often institute securities class action lawsuits against the company. A lawsuit against us could cause us to incur substantial costs and could divert the time and attention of our management and other resources.

In the event that coverage under our directors’ and officers’ liability insurance is reduced or terminated as a result of the Tang Ownership Change or otherwise, our indemnification obligations and limitations of our directors’ and officers’ liability insurance may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Under Delaware law, our certificate of incorporation, and our bylaws and certain indemnification agreements to which we are a party, we have an obligation to indemnify, or we have otherwise agreed to indemnify, certain of our current and former directors and officers with respect to past, current, and future investigations and litigation. In order to reduce the risk of expense of these obligations, we maintain directors’ and officers’ liability insurance. However, as a result of the Tang Ownership Change, the cost to us of our directors’ and officers’ liability insurance coverage has increased, and it may continue to increase in the future, or the coverage thereunder may be reduced or terminated in full. In the event that the coverage under our directors’ and officers’ liability insurance is reduced or terminated, we will be required to pay the expenses of indemnifying our current and former directors and officers in their defense of current and future investigations and litigation, which expenses may be significant. The increased costs to us of our directors’ and officers’ liability insurance coverage, or our indemnification obligations if our directors’ and officers’ liability insurance coverage is reduced or terminated, could result in the diversion of our financial resources, and may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

If we do not maintain effective internal controls, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results and our business could be harmed.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires, among other things, that we assess the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting annually and the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures quarterly. In particular, Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, or Section 404, requires us to perform system and process evaluation and testing of our internal control over financial reporting to allow management to report on, and our independent registered public accounting firm potentially to attest to, the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. As an emerging growth company, we have availed ourselves of the exemption from the requirement that our independent registered public accounting firm attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting under Section 404. However, we may no longer avail ourselves of this exemption when we cease to be an emerging growth company. When our independent registered public accounting firm is required to undertake an assessment of our internal control over financial reporting, the cost of our compliance with Section 404 will correspondingly increase. Our compliance with applicable provisions of Section 404 will require that we incur substantial accounting expense and expend significant management time on compliance-related issues as we implement additional corporate governance practices and comply with reporting requirements. Moreover, if we are not able to comply with the requirements of Section 404 applicable to us in a timely manner, or if we or our independent registered public accounting firm identifies deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting that are deemed to be material weaknesses, the market price of our stock could decline and we could be subject to sanctions or investigations by the SEC or other regulatory authorities, which would require additional financial and management resources.

Investor perceptions of our company may suffer if material weaknesses are found, and this could cause a decline in the market price of our common stock. Irrespective of compliance with Section 404, any failure of our internal control over financial reporting could harm our operating results and reputation. If we are unable to implement these requirements effectively or efficiently, it could harm our operations, financial reporting, or financial results and could result in an adverse opinion on our internal controls from our independent registered public accounting firm.

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The public announcement of data from clinical trials or news of any developments related to our product pipeline may cause significant volatility in our stock price.

The announcement of data from clinical trials by us or our collaborative partners or news of any developments related to our key pipeline product candidates may cause significant volatility in our stock price. Furthermore, the announcement of any negative or unexpected data or the discontinuation of development of any of our key pipeline product candidates, or any delay in our anticipated timelines for filing for regulatory approval, could cause our stock price to decline significantly. There can be no assurance that data from clinical trials will support a filing for regulatory approval or even if approved, that any of our key pipeline products will become commercially successful.

Our common stock may be at risk for delisting from the Nasdaq Capital Market in the future. Delisting could adversely affect the liquidity of our common stock and the market price of our common stock could decrease.

Our common stock is currently listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market. The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC has minimum requirements that a company must meet in order to remain listed on Nasdaq, including corporate governance standards and a requirement that we maintain a minimum closing bid price of $1.00 per share.  If we fail to maintain such minimum requirements and a final determination is made by Nasdaq that our common stock must be delisted, the liquidity of our common stock would be adversely affected and the market price of our common stock could decrease. In addition, if delisted, we would no longer be subject to Nasdaq rules, including rules requiring us to have a certain number of independent directors and to meet other corporate governance standards. Our failure to be listed on Nasdaq or another established securities market would have a material adverse effect on the value of your investment in us.

If our common stock is not listed on Nasdaq or another national exchange, the trading price of our common stock is below $5.00 per share and we have net tangible assets of $6,000,000 or less, the open-market trading of our common stock will be subject to the “penny stock” rules promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. If our shares become subject to the “penny stock” rules, broker-dealers may find it difficult to effectuate customer transactions and trading activity in our securities may be adversely affected. Under these rules, broker-dealers who recommend such securities to persons other than institutional accredited investors must:

 

make a special written suitability determination for the purchaser;

 

receive the purchaser’s written agreement to the transaction prior to sale;

 

provide the purchaser with risk disclosure documents which identify certain risks associated with investing in “penny stocks” and which describe the market for these “penny stocks” as well as a purchaser’s legal remedies; and

 

obtain a signed and dated acknowledgment from the purchaser demonstrating that the purchaser has actually received the required risk disclosure document before a transaction in a “penny stock” can be completed.

As a result of these requirements, the market price of our securities may be adversely impacted, and current stockholders may find it more difficult to sell our securities.

Your percentage of ownership in Aptevo may be diluted in the future.

In the future, your percentage ownership in Aptevo may be diluted because of equity issuances for acquisitions, capital market transactions or otherwise, including, but not limited to, equity issuances under our existing equity sales agreement with Lincoln Park Financial LLC, under our Equity Distribution Agreement with Piper Sandler, under our Rights Plan with Broadridge Corporate Issuer Solutions, Inc., upon the exercise of warrants issued in connection with our March 2019 public offering, and equity awards to our directors, officers and employees. Our employees have options to purchase shares of our common stock and from time to time, we expect to issue additional options, restricted stock units, or other stock-based awards to our employees under our employee benefits plans.

In addition, our restated certificate of incorporation authorizes us to issue, without the approval of our stockholders, one or more classes or series of preferred stock having such designation, powers, preferences and relative, participating, optional and other special rights, including preferences over our common stock respecting dividends and distributions, as our board of directors generally may determine. The terms of one or more classes or series of preferred stock could dilute the voting power or reduce the value of our common stock. For example, we could grant the holders of preferred stock the right to elect some number of our directors in all events or on the happening of specified events or the right to veto specified transactions. Similarly, the repurchase or redemption rights or liquidation preferences we could assign to holders of preferred stock could affect the residual value of the common stock.

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Provisions under Delaware law and in our restated certificate of incorporation, amended and restated by-laws and rights agreement may discourage acquisition proposals, delay a change in control or prevent transactions that stockholders may consider favorable.

Certain provisions in our restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated by-laws, and under Delaware law, may discourage, delay, or prevent a merger, acquisition or other changes in control that stockholders may consider favorable, including transactions in which stockholders might otherwise receive a premium for their shares. These provisions may also prevent or frustrate attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our incumbent directors and management.

These provisions include:

 

the classification of our directors;

 

limitations on the removal of directors;

 

limitations on filling vacancies on the board;

 

advance notice requirements for stockholder nominations of candidates for election to the Board of Directors and other proposals;

 

the inability of stockholders to act by written consent;

 

the inability of stockholders to call special meetings; and,

 

the ability of our Board of Directors to designate the terms of and issue a new series of preferred stock without stockholder approval.

The affirmative vote of holders of our capital stock representing at least 75% of the voting power of all outstanding stock entitled to vote is required to amend or repeal the above provisions of our certificate of incorporation. The affirmative vote of either a majority of the directors present at a meeting of our Board of Directors or holders of our capital stock representing at least 75% of the voting power of all outstanding stock entitled to vote is required to amend or repeal our by-laws.

In addition, Section 203 of the General Corporation Law of Delaware prohibits a corporation from engaging in a business combination with an interested stockholder, generally a person which, together with its affiliates, owns or within the last three years has owned 15% or more of the corporation’s voting stock, for a period of three years after the date of the transaction in which the person became an interested stockholder, unless the business combination is approved in a prescribed manner. Accordingly, Section 203 may discourage, delay or prevent a change in control of us. Tang is an interested stockholder for purposes of Section 203.

Moreover, we currently have a short-term stockholder rights agreement in effect. This rights agreement could render more difficult, or discourage a merger, tender offer, or assumption of control of the Company that is not approved by our Board that some stockholders may consider favorable. The rights agreement, however, should not interfere with any merger, tender or exchange offer or other business combination approved by our Board. Nor does the rights agreement prevent our Board from considering any offer that it considers to be in the best interest of our stockholders.

Our bylaws include a forum selection clause, which may impact your ability to bring actions against us.

Subject to certain limitations, our bylaws provide that, unless we consent in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the Court of Chancery in the State of Delaware will be the sole and exclusive forum for any stockholder (including a beneficial owner) to bring: (a) any derivative action or proceeding brought on our behalf; (b) any action asserting a claim of breach of fiduciary duty owed by any of our directors, officers or other employees or our stockholders; (c) any action asserting a claim arising pursuant to any provision of the DGCL or our certificate of incorporation or bylaws; or (d) any action asserting a claim governed by the internal affairs doctrine. In addition, our bylaws provide that unless we consent in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the federal district courts of the United States will be the exclusive forum for resolving any complaint asserting a cause of action arising under the federal securities laws of the United States against us, our officers, directors, employees or underwriters. These limitations on the forum in which stockholders may initiate action against us could create costs, inconvenience or otherwise adversely affect your ability to seek legal redress.

Section 22 of the Securities Act creates concurrent jurisdiction for federal and state courts over all suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Securities Act or the rules and regulations thereunder. As a result, a court may decline to enforce these exclusive forum provisions with respect to suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Securities Act or any other claim for which the federal and state courts have concurrent jurisdiction, and our stockholders may not be deemed to have waived our compliance with the federal securities laws and the rules and regulations thereunder. If a court were to find the exclusive forum provisions to be inapplicable or unenforceable in an action, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving such action in other jurisdictions.

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We may be subject to periodic litigation, which could result in losses or unexpected expenditure of time and resources.

From time to time, we may be called upon to defend ourselves against lawsuits relating to our business. Any litigation, regardless of its merits, could result in substantial costs and a diversion of management’s attention and resources that are needed to successfully run our business. Due to the inherent uncertainties of litigation, we cannot accurately predict the ultimate outcome of any such proceedings. An unfavorable outcome in any such proceedings could have an adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations. If our stock price is volatile, we may become involved in securities class action lawsuits in the future.

Our failure to comply with data protection laws and regulations could lead to government enforcement actions and significant penalties against us, and adversely impact our operating results.

EU Member States, Switzerland and other countries have adopted data protection laws and regulations, which impose significant compliance obligations. For example, European Union, or EU, member states and other foreign jurisdictions, including Switzerland, have adopted data protection laws and regulations which impose significant compliance obligations. Moreover, the collection and use of personal health data in the EU is now governed under the EU General Data Protection Regulation, or the GDPR, effective in May 2018. The GDPR, which is wide-ranging in scope, imposed several requirements relating to the consent of the individuals to whom the personal data relates, the information provided to the individuals, the security and confidentiality of the personal data, data breach notification and the use of third-party processors in connection with the processing of personal data. The GDPR also imposes strict rules on the transfer of personal data out of the EU to the U.S., provides an enforcement authority and imposes large penalties for noncompliance, including the potential for fines of up to €20 million or 4% of the annual global revenues of the noncompliant company, whichever is greater. The GDPR requirements apply not only to third-party transactions, but also to transfers of information between us and our subsidiaries, including employee information. The GDPR increases our responsibility and liability in relation to personal data that we process, including in clinical trials, and we may be required to put in place additional mechanisms to ensure compliance with the GDPR, which could divert management’s attention and increase our cost of doing business. In addition, new regulation or legislative actions regarding data privacy and security (together with applicable industry standards) may increase our costs of doing business. However, despite our ongoing efforts, we may not be successful either due to various factors within our control, such as limited financial or human resources, or other factors outside our control. It is also possible that local data protection authorities may have different interpretations of the GDPR, leading to potential inconsistencies amongst various EU member states. Any failure or alleged failure (including as a result of deficiencies in our policies, procedures, or measures relating to privacy, data security, marketing, or communications) by us to comply with laws, regulations, policies, legal or contractual obligations, industry standards, or regulatory guidance relating to privacy or data security, may result in governmental investigations and enforcement actions, litigation, fines and penalties or adverse publicity. In addition, we expect that there will continue to be new proposed laws, regulations and industry standards relating to privacy and data protection in the United States, the EU and other jurisdictions, such as the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, which has been characterized as the first “GDPR-like” privacy statute to be enacted in the United States, and we cannot determine the impact such future laws, regulations and standards may have on our business.

If we experience a significant disruption in our information technology systems or breaches of data security, including due to a cyber-security incident, our business could be adversely affected.

We rely on information technology systems to keep financial records, capture laboratory data, maintain clinical trial data and corporate records, communicate with staff and external parties and operate other critical functions. Our information technology systems are potentially vulnerable to disruption due to breakdown, malicious intrusion and computer viruses or other disruptive events including but not limited to natural disaster. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic also poses an increased security risk, due to the remote working environment.

We also face the challenge of promptly detecting and remediating any cyber-security breaches.  Our information technology systems security measures are focused on the prevention, detection and remediation of damage from computer viruses, unauthorized access, cyber-attack and other similar disruptions. However, our information technology systems protection measures may not be successful in preventing unauthorized access, intrusion and damage. Threats to our systems can derive from human error, fraud or malice on the part of employees or third parties, including computer hackers, encryption by ransomware, or may result from technological failure.  

If we were to experience a prolonged system disruption in our information technology systems or those of certain of our vendors, it could delay or negatively impact our development and commercialization of our product candidates, which could adversely impact our business. If operations at our facilities were disrupted, it may cause a material disruption in our business if we are not capable of restoring function on an acceptable timeframe.

In addition, as discussed above, our information technology systems are potentially vulnerable to data security breaches—whether by employees or others, intentionally or unintentionally—which may expose sensitive or personal data to unauthorized persons. Such data security breaches could lead to the loss of trade secrets or other intellectual property, or could lead to the public exposure of personal information (including sensitive personal information) of our employees, patients in our clinical trials, customers and others, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Moreover, a security breach or privacy violation that leads to destruction, loss, alteration, unauthorized use or access, disclosure or modification of, personally identifiable information or personal data, could harm our reputation, compel us to comply with federal, state and/or international breach notification laws, subject us to mandatory corrective or regulatory action, require us to verify the correctness of database contents and otherwise subject us to liability under laws and regulations that protect personal data, including the GDPR and the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, which could disrupt our business, result in increased costs or loss, and/or result in significant legal and financial exposure. In addition, a data security breach could result in loss of clinical trial data or damage to the integrity of that data.

If we are unable to implement and maintain adequate organizational and technical measures to prevent such security breaches or privacy violations, or to respond adequately in the event of a breach, our operations could be disrupted, and we may suffer loss of reputation, problems with regulatory authorities, financial loss and other negative consequences. In addition, these breaches and other inappropriate access can be difficult to detect, and any delay in identifying them may lead to increased harm of the type described above.

If a breach of our information technology systems occurs, we may incur additional costs related to rebuilding our internal systems, defending legal claims or proceedings, responding to regulatory actions, incurring penalties, and paying damages. Moreover, it may be determined that as a result of such a breach there was a material weakness or significant deficiency in our internal controls or other failure of our control environment.  If such a breach occurs, it may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, and financial condition, and it may also negatively impact our reputation.

A significant portion of our shares may be sold into the market at any time which could depress our stock price

If our stockholders sell a substantial number of shares of our common stock in the public market, our market price could decline. In connection with the transaction with Lincoln Park, we have agreed to register under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, the resale of shares of common stock that have been and may be issued under the Purchase Agreement with Lincoln Park. Any such sales by Lincoln Park, or the perception that such sales may occur, could decrease the market price of our common stock. In addition, holders of an aggregate of approximately three million shares of our common stock have the right to require us to register these shares of common stock under specified circumstances.

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.

Not applicable.

Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities.

Not applicable.

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

Not applicable.

Item 5. Other Information.

Not applicable.

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Item 6. Exhibits

Exhibit Index

 

Exhibit

Number

 

Description

 

 

 

  31.1*

 

Certification of Principal Executive Officer Pursuant to Rules 13a-14(a) and 15d-14(a) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

  31.2*

 

Certification of Principal Financial Officer Pursuant to Rules 13a-14(a) and 15d-14(a) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

  32.1*

 

Certification of Principal Executive Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

  32.2*

 

Certification of Principal Financial Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

101.INS*

 

Inline XBRL Instance Document

101.SCH*

 

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document

101.CAL*

 

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document

101.DEF*

 

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document

101.LAB*

 

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document

101.PRE*

 

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

104*

 

Cover Page Interactive Data File (embedded within the Inline XBRL document)

 

*

Filed herewith.

 

 

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SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

 

 

APTEVO THERAPEUTICS INC.

 

 

 

 

 

Date: August 12, 2021

 

By:

 

/s/ Marvin White

 

 

 

 

Marvin White

 

 

 

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

 

 

 

 

 

Date: August 12, 2021

 

By:

 

/s/ Jeffrey G. Lamothe

 

 

 

 

Jeffrey G. Lamothe

 

 

 

 

Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer,

and Treasurer

 

 

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