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DXC Technology (DXC)

Filed: 3 Aug 22, 9:06pm

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2022
OR
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from _____________ to ____________

Commission File No.: 001-38033
dxc-20220630_g1.jpg
DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Nevada61-1800317
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
20408 Bashan Drive, Suite 231
Ashburn, Virginia 20147
(Address of principal executive offices and zip code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (703) 972-7000
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each classTrading Symbol(s)Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, $0.01 par value per shareDXCThe New York Stock Exchange
1.750% Senior Notes Due 2026DXC 26The New York Stock Exchange
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d)
of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  x Yes  o No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). x Yes  o No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large Accelerated FilerxAccelerated Filero
Non-accelerated FileroSmaller reporting company
Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
       ☐ Yes  x   No

229,876,830 shares of common stock, par value $0.01 per share, were outstanding on July 25, 2022.



TABLE OF CONTENTS






PART I

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Index to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements



1


DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS (unaudited)

Three Months Ended
(in millions, except per-share amounts)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Revenues$3,707 $4,141 
Costs of services (excludes depreciation and amortization and restructuring costs)2,930 3,255 
Selling, general and administrative (excludes depreciation and amortization and restructuring costs)349 383 
Depreciation and amortization389 422 
Restructuring costs33 67 
Interest expense37 62 
Interest income(20)(20)
Debt extinguishment costs— 28 
Gain on disposition of businesses(29)(377)
Other income, net(104)(103)
Total costs and expenses3,585 3,717 
Income before income taxes122 424 
Income tax expense19 142 
Net income103 282 
Less: net income attributable to non-controlling interest, net of tax
Net income attributable to DXC common stockholders$102 $278 
Income per common share:
Basic$0.44 $1.09 
Diluted$0.43 $1.07 


The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.




2



DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE (LOSS) INCOME (unaudited)

Three Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Net income$103 $282 
Other comprehensive loss, net of taxes:
Foreign currency translation adjustments, net of tax expense (benefit) of $5 and $(2)(176)(112)
Cash flow hedges adjustments, net of tax benefit of $1 and $0— (1)
Pension and other post-retirement benefit plans, net of tax:
Amortization of prior service cost, net of tax benefit of $4 and $0(2)(2)
Pension and other post-retirement benefit plans, net of tax(2)(2)
Other comprehensive loss, net of taxes(178)(115)
Comprehensive (loss) income(75)167 
Less: comprehensive income attributable to non-controlling interest13 
Comprehensive (loss) income attributable to DXC common stockholders$(76)$154 



The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.


3


DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (unaudited)

As of
(in millions, except per-share and share amounts)June 30, 2022March 31, 2022
ASSETS
Current assets:
Cash and cash equivalents$2,209 $2,672 
Receivables and contract assets, net of allowance of $46 and $553,693 3,854 
Prepaid expenses666 617 
Other current assets270 268 
Assets held for sale10 35 
Total current assets6,848 7,446 
Intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization of $5,186 and $5,1243,117 3,378 
Operating right-of-use assets, net1,025 1,133 
Goodwill582 617 
Deferred income taxes, net210 221 
Property and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation of $3,917 and $3,9982,212 2,412 
Other assets4,602 4,850 
Assets held for sale - non-current51 82 
Total Assets$18,647 $20,139 
LIABILITIES and EQUITY
Current liabilities:
Short-term debt and current maturities of long-term debt904 900 
Accounts payable795 840 
Accrued payroll and related costs610 570 
Current operating lease liabilities346 388 
Accrued expenses and other current liabilities2,479 2,882 
Deferred revenue and advance contract payments938 1,053 
Income taxes payable181 197 
Liabilities related to assets held for sale23 
Total current liabilities6,257 6,853 
Long-term debt, net of current maturities3,874 4,065 
Non-current deferred revenue806 862 
Non-current operating lease liabilities742 815 
Non-current income tax liabilities and deferred tax liabilities919 994 
Other long-term liabilities1,000 1,136 
Liabilities related to assets held for sale - non-current— 39 
Total Liabilities13,598 14,764 
Commitments and contingencies00
DXC stockholders’ equity:
Preferred stock, par value $0.01 per share; authorized 1,000,000 shares; none issued as of June 30, 2022 and March 31, 2022— — 
Common stock, par value $0.01 per share; authorized 750,000,000 shares; issued 232,994,878 as of June 30, 2022 and 240,508,348 as of March 31, 2022
Additional paid-in capital9,708 10,057 
Accumulated deficit(4,239)(4,450)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss(563)(385)
Treasury stock, at cost, 3,160,188 and 2,878,079 shares as of June 30, 2022 and March 31, 2022(183)(173)
Total DXC stockholders’ equity4,725 5,052 
Non-controlling interest in subsidiaries324 323 
Total Equity5,049 5,375 
Total Liabilities and Equity$18,647 $20,139 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
4


DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (unaudited)
Three Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Cash flows from operating activities:
Net income$103 $282 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by (used in) operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization398 427 
Operating right-of-use expense106 130 
Share-based compensation28 25 
Deferred taxes(38)(25)
Gain on dispositions(62)(414)
Provision for losses on accounts receivable(3)
Unrealized foreign currency exchange loss (gain)46 (8)
Debt extinguishment costs— 28 
Other non-cash charges, net
Changes in assets and liabilities, net of effects of acquisitions and dispositions:
(Increase) decrease in assets(69)26 
Decrease in operating lease liability(106)(130)
Decrease in other liabilities(248)(370)
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities163 (29)
Cash flows from investing activities:
Purchases of property and equipment(68)(98)
Payments for transition and transformation contract costs(57)(55)
Software purchased and developed(50)(122)
Business dispositions, net of cash sold(36)513 
Proceeds from sale of assets14 67 
Other investing activities, net
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities(192)311 
Cash flows from financing activities:
Borrowings of commercial paper292 216 
Repayments of commercial paper(239)(194)
Borrowings on long-term debt— 19 
Principal payments on long-term debt— (352)
Payments on finance leases and borrowings for asset financing(159)(494)
Proceeds from stock options and other common stock transactions
Taxes paid related to net share settlements of share-based compensation awards(12)(11)
Payments for debt extinguishment costs— (28)
Repurchase of common stock and advance payment for accelerated share repurchase(272)(48)
Other financing activities, net(5)17 
Net cash used in financing activities(394)(866)
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents(50)13 
Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents including cash classified within current assets held for sale(473)(571)
Cash classified within current assets held for sale10 63 
Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents(463)(508)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year2,672 2,968 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period$2,209 $2,460 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
5


DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY (unaudited)

Three Months Ended June 30, 2022
(in millions, except
shares in thousands)
Common Stock
Additional
Paid-in Capital
 Accumulated Deficit
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive Loss
Treasury Stock(1)
Total
DXC Equity
Non-
Controlling Interest
Total Equity
SharesAmount
Balance at March 31, 2022240,508 $$10,057 $(4,450)$(385)$(173)$5,052 $323 $5,375 
Net income102 102 103 
Other comprehensive loss(178)(178)0(178)
Share-based compensation expense24 24 24 
Acquisition of treasury stock(10)(10)(10)
Share repurchase program(8,851)(1)(374)109 (266)(266)
Stock option exercises and other common stock transactions1,338 
Balance at June 30, 2022232,995$$9,708 $(4,239)$(563)$(183)$4,725 $324 $5,049 
Three Months Ended June 30, 2021
(in millions, except
shares in thousands)
Common Stock
Additional
Paid-in Capital
Accumulated DeficitAccumulated
Other
Comprehensive Loss
Treasury Stock
Total
DXC Equity
Non-
Controlling Interest
Total Equity
SharesAmount
Balance at March 31, 2021257,053 $$10,761 $(5,331)$(302)$(158)$4,973 $335 $5,308 
Net income278 278 282 
Other comprehensive loss(124)(124)(115)
Share-based compensation expense18 18 18 
Acquisition of treasury stock(10)(10)(10)
Share repurchase program(1,750)(74)7(67)(67)
Stock option exercises and other common stock transactions1,378 
Non-controlling interest distributions and other(39)(38)
Balance at June 30, 2021256,681 $$10,713 $(5,045)$(426)$(168)$5,077 $309 $5,386 
        

    (1) 3,160,188 treasury shares as of June 30, 2022.



The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.
6



DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)
Note 1 – Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Business

DXC Technology Company (“DXC,” the “Company,” “we,” “us,” or “our”) helps global companies run their mission critical systems and operations while modernizing IT, optimizing data architectures, and ensuring security and scalability across public, private and hybrid clouds. With decades of driving innovation, the world’s largest companies and public sector organizations trust DXC to deploy services to drive new levels of performance, competitiveness, and customer experience across their IT estates.

Basis of Presentation

In order to make this report easier to read, DXC refers throughout to (i) the interim unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements as the “financial statements,” (ii) the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations as the “statements of operations,” (iii) the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive (Loss) Income as the “statements of comprehensive income,” (iv) the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as the “balance sheets,” and (v) the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows as the “statements of cash flows.” In addition, references are made throughout to the numbered Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (“Notes”) in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

The accompanying financial statements include the accounts of DXC, its consolidated subsidiaries, and those business entities in which DXC maintains a controlling interest. Investments in business entities in which the Company does not have control, but has the ability to exercise significant influence over operating and financial policies, are accounted for by the equity method. Other investments are accounted for by the cost method. Non-controlling interests are presented as a separate component within equity in the balance sheets. Net earnings attributable to the non-controlling interests are presented separately in the statements of operations and comprehensive income attributable to non-controlling interests are presented separately in the statements of comprehensive income. All intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated. Certain amounts reported in the previous year have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation.

The financial statements of the Company have been prepared in accordance with the rules and regulations of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) for quarterly reports and accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”). Certain disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP have been condensed or omitted pursuant to such rules. These financial statements should therefore be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022 (“fiscal 2022”).
7

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)


Use of Estimates

The preparation of the financial statements, in accordance with GAAP, requires the Company’s management to make estimates and assumptions that affect reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expense during the reporting period. The Company bases its estimates on assumptions regarding historical experience, currently available information, and anticipated developments that it believes are reasonable and appropriate. However, because the use of estimates involves an inherent degree of uncertainty, actual results could differ from those estimates. The severity, magnitude and duration, as well as the economic consequences of the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (“COVID-19”) crisis, are uncertain, rapidly changing and difficult to predict. Therefore, accounting estimates and assumptions may change over time in response to the COVID-19 crisis and may change materially in future periods. Estimates are used for, but are not limited to, contracts accounted for using the percentage-of-completion method, cash flows used in the evaluation of impairment of goodwill and other long-lived assets, reserves for uncertain tax positions, valuation allowances on deferred tax assets, loss accruals for litigation, and obligations related to our pension plans. In the opinion of the Company’s management, the accompanying financial statements contain all adjustments necessary, including those of a normal recurring nature, to fairly present the financial statements. The results of operations for the interim periods are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full fiscal year.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

Recently issued ASUs effective after June 30, 2022 are not expected to have a material effect on DXC’s condensed consolidated financial statements.

Note 2 – Divestitures

Fiscal 2023 Divestitures

During the first quarter of fiscal 2023, the Company sold insignificant businesses that resulted in a gain of $38 million. During the first quarter of fiscal 2023, the Company also classified certain insignificant businesses as held for sale and recognized a loss of $9 million.

Planned FDB Sale

During the third quarter of fiscal 2022, a subsidiary of DXC entered into a purchase agreement to sell (the "FDB Sale") its German financial services subsidiary ("FDB" or the "FDB Business") to the FNZ Group ("FNZ") for €300 million (approximately $314 million as of June 30, 2022), subject to certain adjustments. The closing of the transaction is subject to certain conditions, including receipt of certain regulatory consents. Until these regulatory constraints are satisfied, FDB continues to be reported within ongoing operations. At June 30, 2022, FDB held approximately $566 million in cash which primarily related to customer deposit liabilities.
8

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

Fiscal 2022 Divestitures

HPS Sale

On April 1, 2021, DXC completed the sale of its HPS Business to Dedalus for €468 million (approximately $551 million), which included €10 million (approximately $12 million) related to future services to be provided by the Company. The HPS Sale resulted in a pre-tax gain on sale of $341 million, net of closing costs, for the three months ended June 30, 2021. The pre-tax gain on sale was further adjusted during subsequent quarters of fiscal 2022 resulting in a final pre-tax gain on sale of $331 million for fiscal 2022.

Other Divestitures

During the first quarter of fiscal 2022, the Company also sold some insignificant businesses that resulted in a gain of $49 million. This was partially offset by $13 million in sales price adjustments related to prior year dispositions, which resulted from changes in estimated net working capital.


Note 3 – Earnings per Share

Basic earnings per share (“EPS”) is computed using the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted EPS reflects the incremental shares issuable upon the assumed exercise of stock options and equity awards. The following table reflects the calculation of basic and diluted EPS:

Three Months Ended
(in millions, except per-share amounts)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Net income attributable to DXC common shareholders:$102 $278 
Common share information:
Weighted average common shares outstanding for basic EPS232.48 254.67 
Dilutive effect of stock options and equity awards4.90 5.65 
Weighted average common shares outstanding for diluted EPS237.38 260.32 
Earnings per share:
Basic$0.44 $1.09 
Diluted$0.43 $1.07 

Certain share-based equity awards were excluded from the computation of dilutive EPS because inclusion of these awards would have had an anti-dilutive effect. The number of awards excluded were as follows:

Three Months Ended
June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Stock Options480,727 529,216 
Restricted Stock Units1,542,055 759,922 
Performance Stock Units234,731 393,802 

9

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

Note 4 – Receivables

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

The following table presents the change in balance for the allowance for doubtful accounts:

As of
(in millions)June 30, 2022March 31, 2022
Beginning balance$55 $91 
Provisions for losses on accounts receivable
Other adjustments to allowance and write offs(11)(41)
Ending balance$46 $55 

Receivables Facility

The Company has an accounts receivable sales facility (as amended, restated, supplemented or otherwise modified as of June 30, 2022, the “Receivables Facility”) with certain unaffiliated financial institutions for the sale of commercial accounts receivable in the United States.

As of June 30, 2022, the total availability under the Receivables Facility was $371 million, and the amount sold to the Purchasers was $400 million, which was derecognized from the Company’s balance sheet. As of June 30, 2022, the Company recorded a $29 million liability within accounts payable because the amount of cash proceeds received by the Company under the Receivables Facility was more than the total availability. The Receivables Facility was amended on July 29, 2022 extending the termination date to July 28, 2023.

The fair value of the sold receivables approximated book value due to the short-term nature, and as a result, no gain or loss on sale of receivables was recorded.


Note 5 – Leases

The Company has operating and finance leases for data centers, corporate offices, and certain equipment. Its leases have remaining lease terms of one to 10 years, some of which include options to extend the leases for up to 10 years, and some of which include options to terminate the leases within one to three years.

Operating Leases

The components of operating lease expense were as follows:

(in millions)Three Months Ended June 30, 2022Three Months Ended June 30, 2021
Operating lease cost$106 $130 
Short-term lease cost11 
Variable lease cost22 18 
Sublease income(4)(9)
Total operating costs$132 $150 

10

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

Cash payments made for variable lease costs and short-term leases are not included in the measurement of operating lease liabilities, and as such, are excluded from the supplemental cash flow information stated below.

(in millions)Three Months Ended June 30, 2022Three Months Ended June 30, 2021
Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of operating lease liabilities – operating cash flows$106 $130 
ROU assets obtained in exchange for operating lease liabilities(1)
$55 $52 
    

(1) Net of $338 million and $242 million in lease modifications and terminations for the three months ended June 30, 2022 and June 30, 2021, respectively. See Note 17 – “Cash Flows” for further information on non-cash activities affecting cash flows.

The following table presents operating lease balances:

As of
(in millions)Balance Sheet Line ItemJune 30, 2022March 31, 2022
ROU operating lease assetsOperating right-of-use assets, net$1,025 $1,133 
Operating lease liabilitiesCurrent operating lease liabilities$346 $388 
Operating lease liabilitiesNon-current operating lease liabilities742 815 
Total operating lease liabilities$1,088 $1,203 

The weighted-average operating lease term was 4.2 years and 4.4 years as of June 30, 2022 and March 31, 2022, respectively. The weighted-average operating lease discount rate was 3.4% and 3.3% as of June 30, 2022 and March 31, 2022, respectively.

The following maturity analysis presents expected undiscounted cash payments for operating leases as of June 30, 2022:

Fiscal Year
(in millions)Remainder of 20232024202520262027ThereafterTotal
Operating lease payments$286 $304 $232 $141 $68 $150 $1,181 
Less: imputed interest(93)
Total operating lease liabilities$1,088 

11

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

Finance Leases

The components of finance lease expense were as follows:

(in millions)Three Months Ended June 30, 2022Three Months Ended June 30, 2021
Amortization of right-of-use assets$61 $87 
Interest on lease liabilities
Total finance lease cost$66 $96 

The following table provides supplemental cash flow information related to the Company’s finance leases:

(in millions)Three Months Ended June 30, 2022Three Months Ended June 30, 2021
Interest paid for finance lease liabilities – Operating cash flows$$
Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of finance lease obligations – financing cash flows96 170 
Total cash paid in the measurement of finance lease obligations$101 $179 
Capital expenditures through finance lease obligations(1)
$26 $71 
    

(1) See Note 17 – ”Cash Flows” for further information on non-cash activities affecting cash flows.

The following table presents finance lease balances:

As of
(in millions)Balance Sheet Line ItemJune 30, 2022March 31, 2022
ROU finance lease assetsProperty and Equipment, net$534 $602 
Finance leaseShort-term debt and current maturities of long-term debt$267 $289 
Finance leaseLong-term debt, net of current maturities321 354 
Total finance lease liabilities(1)
$588 $643 
    

(1) See Note 10 – “Debt” for further information on finance lease liabilities.

The weighted-average finance lease term was 2.8 years as of June 30, 2022 and March 31, 2022, respectively. The weighted-average finance lease discount rate was 2.9% as of June 30, 2022 and March 31, 2022, respectively.

The following maturity analysis presents expected undiscounted cash payments for finance leases as of June 30, 2022:

Fiscal Year
(in millions)Remainder of 20232024202520262027ThereafterTotal
Finance lease payments$217 $196 $116 $58 $26 $$614 
Less: imputed interest(26)
Total finance lease liabilities$588 
12

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)


Note 6 – Fair Value

Fair Value Measurements on a Recurring Basis

The following table presents the Company’s assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis, excluding pension assets and derivative assets and liabilities. See Note 7 – “Derivative Instruments” for information about derivative assets and liabilities. Note 10 – “Debt” includes information about the estimated fair value of the Company’s long-term debt. There were no transfers between any of the levels during the periods presented.

Fair Value Hierarchy
(in millions)June 30, 2022
Assets:Fair ValueLevel 1Level 2Level 3
Money market funds and money market deposit accounts$10 $10 $— $— 
Time deposits(1)
46 46 — — 
Other securities(2)
46 — 44 
Total assets$102 $56 $44 $
Liabilities:
Contingent consideration$$— $— $
Total liabilities$$— $— $


March 31, 2022
Assets:Fair ValueLevel 1Level 2Level 3
Money market funds and money market deposit accounts$$$— $— 
Time deposits(1)
51 51 — — 
Other securities(2)
51 — 49 
Total assets$107 $56 $49 $
Liabilities:
Contingent consideration$$— $— $
Total liabilities$$— $— $
        

(1) Cost basis approximated fair value due to the short period of time to maturity.
(2) Other securities include available-for-sale equity security investments with Level 2 inputs that have a cost basis of $50 million and $53 million, and accumulated (losses) of $(6) million and $(4) million, as of June 30, 2022 and March 31, 2022, respectively. (Loss) gain included in other income, net in the Company’s statements of operations was $(2) million and $1 million for the three months ended June 30, 2022 and June 30, 2021, respectively.

Note 7 – Derivative Instruments

In the normal course of business, the Company is exposed to interest rate and foreign exchange rate fluctuations. As part of its risk management strategy, the Company uses derivative instruments, primarily foreign currency forward contracts and interest rate swaps, to hedge certain foreign currency and interest rate exposures. The Company’s objective is to reduce earnings volatility by offsetting gains and losses resulting from these exposures with losses and gains on the derivative contracts used to hedge them. The Company does not use derivative instruments for trading or any speculative purposes.

13

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

Derivatives Designated for Hedge Accounting

Cash flow hedges

The Company has designated certain foreign currency forward contracts as cash flow hedges to reduce foreign currency risk related to certain Indian Rupee-denominated intercompany obligations and forecasted transactions. The notional amounts of foreign currency forward contracts designated as cash flow hedges as of June 30, 2022 and March 31, 2022 were $787 million and $727 million, respectively. As of June 30, 2022, the related forecasted transactions extend through June 2024.

For the three months ended June 30, 2022 and June 30, 2021, respectively, the Company performed an assessment at the inception of the cash flow hedge transactions and determined that all critical terms of the hedging instruments and hedged items matched. The Company performs an assessment of critical terms on an on-going basis throughout the hedging period. During the three months ended June 30, 2022 and June 30, 2021, respectively, the Company had no cash flow hedges for which it was probable that the hedged transaction would not occur. As of June 30, 2022, $14 million of the existing amount of gain related to the cash flow hedge reported in accumulated other comprehensive loss is expected to be reclassified into earnings within the next 12 months.

Amounts recognized in other comprehensive loss and income before income taxes

During the three months ended June 30, 2022, the pre-tax gain on derivatives designated for hedge accounting recognized in other comprehensive loss was $2 million and income before income taxes was $4 million. During the three months ended June 30, 2021, the pre-tax gain (loss) on derivatives designated for hedge accounting was not material.

Derivatives Not Designated for Hedge Accounting

The derivative instruments not designated as hedges for purposes of hedge accounting include certain short-term foreign currency forward contracts. Derivatives that are not designated as hedging instruments are adjusted to fair value through earnings in the financial statement line item to which the derivative relates.

Foreign currency forward contracts

The Company manages the exposure to fluctuations in foreign currencies by using short-term foreign currency forward contracts to hedge certain foreign currency denominated assets and liabilities, including intercompany accounts and forecasted transactions. The net notional amounts of the foreign currency forward contracts outstanding as of June 30, 2022 and March 31, 2022 were $1.7 billion and $2.1 billion, respectively.

The following table presents the pretax amounts impacting income related to designated and non-designated foreign currency forward contracts:
For the Three Months Ended
(in millions)Statement of Operations Line ItemJune 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Foreign currency forward contractsOther income (expense), net$38 $(35)
14

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)


Fair Value of Derivative Instruments

All derivative instruments are recorded at fair value. The Company’s accounting treatment for these derivative instruments is based on its hedge designation. The following tables present the fair values of derivative instruments included in the balance sheets:

Derivative Assets
As of
(in millions)Balance Sheet Line ItemJune 30, 2022March 31, 2022
Derivatives designated for hedge accounting:
Foreign currency forward contractsOther current assets$20 $18 
Derivatives not designated for hedge accounting:
Foreign currency forward contractsOther current assets$25 $

Derivative Liabilities
As of
(in millions)Balance Sheet Line ItemJune 30, 2022March 31, 2022
Derivatives designated for hedge accounting:
Foreign currency forward contractsAccrued expenses and other current liabilities$$— 
Derivatives not designated for hedge accounting:
Foreign currency forward contractsAccrued expenses and other current liabilities$16 $15 

The fair value of foreign currency forward contracts represents the estimated amount required to settle the contracts using current market exchange rates and is based on the period-end foreign currency exchange rates and forward points which are classified as Level 2 inputs.

Other Risks for Derivative Instruments

The Company is exposed to the risk of losses in the event of non-performance by the counterparties to its derivative contracts. The amount subject to credit risk related to derivative instruments is generally limited to the amount, if any, by which a counterparty’s obligations exceed the obligations of the Company with that counterparty. To mitigate counterparty credit risk, the Company regularly reviews its credit exposure and the creditworthiness of the counterparties. With respect to its foreign currency derivatives, as of June 30, 2022, there were 11 counterparties with concentration of credit risk, and based on gross fair value, the maximum amount of loss that the Company could incur is $27 million.

The Company also enters into enforceable master netting arrangements with some of its counterparties. However, for financial reporting purposes, it is the Company’s policy not to offset derivative assets and liabilities despite the existence of enforceable master netting arrangements. The potential effect of such netting arrangements on the Company’s balance sheets is not material for the periods presented.

15

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)


Non-Derivative Financial Instruments Designated for Hedge Accounting

The Company applies hedge accounting for foreign currency-denominated debt used to manage foreign currency exposures on its net investments in certain non-U.S. operations. To qualify for hedge accounting, the hedging instrument must be highly effective at reducing the risk from the exposure being hedged.

Net Investment Hedges

DXC seeks to reduce the impact of fluctuations in foreign exchange rates on its net investments in certain non-U.S. operations with foreign currency-denominated debt. For foreign currency-denominated debt designated as a hedge, the effectiveness of the hedge is assessed based on changes in spot rates. For qualifying net investment hedges, all gains or losses on the hedging instruments are included in currency translation. Gains or losses on individual net investments in non-U.S. operations are reclassified to earnings from accumulated other comprehensive loss when such net investments are sold or substantially liquidated.

As of June 30, 2022, DXC had $0.3 billion of foreign currency-denominated debt designated as hedges of net investments in non-U.S. subsidiaries. For the three months ended June 30, 2022, the pre-tax impact of gain on foreign currency-denominated debt designated for hedge accounting recognized in other comprehensive loss was $17 million. As of March 31, 2022, DXC had $0.3 billion of foreign currency-denominated debt designated as hedges of net investments in non-U.S. subsidiaries.


Note 8 – Intangible Assets

Intangible assets consisted of the following:

As of June 30, 2022
(in millions)Gross Carrying ValueAccumulated AmortizationNet Carrying Value
Software$4,025 $3,071 $954 
Customer related intangible assets3,985 2,016 1,969 
Other intangible assets293 99 194 
Total intangible assets$8,303 $5,186 $3,117 

As of March 31, 2022
(in millions)Gross Carrying ValueAccumulated AmortizationNet Carrying Value
Software$4,063 $3,039 $1,024 
Customer related intangible assets4,148 1,995 2,153 
Other intangible assets291 90 201 
Total intangible assets$8,502 $5,124 $3,378 

16

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

The components of amortization expense were as follows:

Three Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Intangible assets amortization$199 $215 
Transition and transformation contract cost amortization(1)
52 49 
Total amortization expense$251 $264 
        

(1)Transaction and transformation contract costs are included within other assets on the balance sheet.

Estimated future amortization related to intangible assets as of June 30, 2022 is as follows:

Fiscal Year(in millions)
Remainder of 2023$600 
2024$666 
2025$564 
2026$520 
2027$383 
Thereafter$384 


Note 9 – Goodwill

The following table summarizes the changes in the carrying amount of goodwill, by segment, as of June 30, 2022.

(in millions)GBSGISTotal
Balance as of March 31, 2022, net$617 $— $617 
Divestitures(9)— (9)
Assets held for sale(3)— (3)
Foreign currency translation(23)— (23)
Balance as of June 30, 2022, net$582 $— $582 
Goodwill, gross5,072 5,066 10,138 
Accumulated impairment losses(4,490)(5,066)(9,556)
Balance as of June 30, 2022, net$582 $— $582 

The adjustments for divestitures and assets held for sale are described in Note 2 - "Divestitures." The foreign currency translation amount reflects the impact of currency movements on non-U.S. dollar-denominated goodwill balances.




17

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

Note 10 – Debt

The following is a summary of the Company’s debt:

(in millions)Interest RatesFiscal Year Maturities
June 30, 2022(1)
March 31, 2022(1)
Short-term debt and
current maturities of long-term debt
Commercial paper(2)
(0.40)% - (0.08)%2023$392 $362 
Current maturities of long-term debtVarious2023 - 2024245 249 
Current maturities of finance lease liabilities0.23% - 13.84%2023 - 2024267 289 
Short-term debt and current maturities of long-term debt$904 $900 
Long-term debt, net of current maturities
€650 million Senior notes1.75%2026677 720 
$700 million Senior notes1.80%2027695 694 
€750 million Senior notes0.45%2028779 828 
$650 million Senior notes2.375%2029645 644 
€600 million Senior notes0.95%2032621 661 
Finance lease liabilities0.23% - 13.84%2023 - 2027588 643 
Borrowings for assets acquired under long-term financing0.00% - 6.78%2023 - 2027313 344 
Mandatorily redeemable preferred stock outstanding6.00%202363 63 
Other borrowingsVarious2023 - 2024
Long-term debt4,386 4,603 
Less: current maturities512 538 
Long-term debt, net of current maturities$3,874 $4,065 
        

(1)The carrying amounts of the senior notes as of June 30, 2022 and March 31, 2022, include the remaining principal outstanding of $3,442 million and $3,575 million, respectively, net of total unamortized debt (discounts) and premiums, and deferred debt issuance costs of $(25) million and $(28) million respectively.
(2)At DXC’s option, DXC can borrow up to a maximum of €1 billion or its equivalent in €, £, and $.


The estimated fair value of the Company’s long-term debt, excluding finance lease liabilities, was $3.3 billion and $3.7 billion as of June 30, 2022 and March 31, 2022, respectively, compared with carrying value of $3.8 billion and $4.0 billion as of June 30, 2022 and March 31, 2022, respectively.
18

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)


Note 11 – Revenue

Revenue Recognition

The following table presents DXC’s revenues disaggregated by geography, based on the location of incorporation of the DXC entity providing the related goods or services:
Three Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
United States$1,131 $1,209 
United Kingdom473 602 
Other Europe1,138 1,305 
Australia391 401 
Other International574 624 
Total Revenues$3,707 $4,141 

The revenue by geography pertains to both of the Company’s reportable segments. Refer to Note 18 – “Segment Information” for the Company’s segment disclosures.

Remaining Performance Obligations

As of June 30, 2022, approximately $20 billion of revenue is expected to be recognized from remaining performance obligations. We expect to recognize revenue on approximately 32% of these remaining performance obligations in fiscal 2023, with the remainder of the balance recognized thereafter.

Contract Balances

The following table provides information about the balances of the Company’s trade receivables and contract assets and contract liabilities:
As of
(in millions)Balance Sheet Line ItemJune 30, 2022March 31, 2022
Trade receivables, netReceivables and contract assets, net of allowance for doubtful accounts$2,484 $2,694 
Contract assetsReceivables and contract assets, net of allowance for doubtful accounts$368 $371 
Contract liabilitiesDeferred revenue and advance contract payments and Non-current deferred revenue$1,744 $1,915 

Change in contract liabilities were as follows:
Three Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Balance, beginning of period$1,915 $1,701 
Deferred revenue612 609 
Recognition of deferred revenue(684)(668)
Currency translation adjustment(87)
Other(12)(18)
Balance, end of period$1,744 $1,630 
19

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)


Note 12 – Restructuring Costs

The composition of restructuring liabilities by financial statement line item is as follows:
As of
(in millions)June 30, 2022March 31, 2022
Accrued expenses and other current liabilities$84 $113 
Other long-term liabilities29 39 
Total$113 $152 

Summary of Restructuring Plans

Fiscal 2023 Plan

During fiscal 2023, management approved global cost savings initiatives designed to better align the Company’s workforce and facility structures (the “Fiscal 2023 Plan).

Restructuring Liability Reconciliations by Plan
Restructuring Liability as of March 31, 2022Costs Expensed, Net of Reversals
Costs Not Affecting Restructuring Liability(1)
Cash Paid
Other(2)
Restructuring Liability as of June 30, 2022
Fiscal 2023 Plan
Workforce Reductions$— $15 $(1)$(4)$(1)$
Facilities Costs— (9)— — — 
— 24 (10)(4)(1)
Fiscal 2022 Plan
Workforce Reductions$84 $$(2)$(28)$(4)$51 
Facilities Costs(5)(3)— 
85 (7)(31)(4)52 
Fiscal 2021 Plan
Workforce Reductions$33 $(1)$— $(6)$(2)$24 
Facilities Costs— — (1)— — 
34 (1)— (7)(2)24 
Other Prior Year Plans
Workforce Reductions$10 $$— $(5)$(1)$
Facilities Costs— — — — 
12 — (5)(1)
Acquired Liabilities
Workforce Reductions$21 $— $— $(1)$$21 
Facilities Costs— — — — — — 
21 — — (1)21 
Total$152 $33 $(17)$(48)$(7)$113 
        

(1) Pension benefit augmentations recorded as a pension liability, asset impairments and restructuring costs associated with right-of-use assets.
(2)Foreign currency translation adjustments.

Included in restructuring costs for the three months ended June 30, 2022 is $5 million related to amortization of the right-of-use asset and interest expense for leased facilities that we have vacated but are being actively marketed for sublease or we are in negotiations with the landlord to potentially terminate or modify those leases.
20

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)


Note 13 – Pension and Other Benefit Plans

Defined Benefit Plans

The components of net periodic pension income were:
Three Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Service cost$19 $23 
Interest cost67 52 
Expected return on assets(132)(147)
Amortization of prior service costs(2)(2)
Net periodic pension income$(48)$(74)

The service cost component of net periodic pension income is presented in costs of services and selling, general and administrative and the other components of net periodic pension income are presented in other income, net.

Note 14 – Income Taxes

The Company’s effective tax rate (“ETR”) was 15.6% and 33.5% for the three months ended June 30, 2022 and June 30, 2021, respectively. For the three months ended June 30, 2022, the primary drivers of the ETR were the global mix of income, U.S. tax on foreign income and base erosion payments, and a decrease in uncertain tax positions due to statute of limitation expirations. For the three months ended June 30, 2021, the primary drivers of the ETR were the global mix of income, gain on sale of the HPS business, and tax rate changes in non-U.S. jurisdictions.

The majority of our global unremitted foreign earnings have been taxed or would be exempt from U.S. tax upon repatriation. Such earnings and all current foreign earnings are not indefinitely reinvested. The following earnings are considered indefinitely reinvested: approximately $467 million that could be subject to U.S. federal tax when repatriated to the U.S. under section 1.245A-5(b) of the final Treasury regulations; and our accumulated earnings in India as of March 31, 2021. A portion of these indefinitely reinvested earnings may be subject to foreign and U.S. state tax consequences when remitted. The Company will continue to evaluate its position based on its future strategy and cash needs.

In connection with the HPES Merger, the Company entered into a tax matters agreement with HPE. HPE generally will be responsible for tax liabilities arising prior to the HPES Merger, and DXC is liable to HPE for income tax receivables it receives related to pre-HPES Merger periods. Pursuant to the tax matters agreement, the Company recorded a $27 million tax indemnification receivable related to uncertain tax positions, a $68 million tax indemnification receivable related to other tax payables, and a $112 million tax indemnification payable related to other tax receivables.

In connection with the spin-off of the Company’s former U.S. public sector business (the “USPS Separation”), the Company entered into a tax matters agreement with Perspecta Inc. (including its successors and permitted assigns, “Perspecta”). The Company generally will be responsible for tax liabilities arising prior to the USPS Separation, and Perspecta is liable to the Company for income tax receivables related to pre-spin-off periods. Income tax liabilities transferred to Perspecta primarily relate to pre-HPES Merger periods, for which the Company is indemnified by HPE pursuant to the tax matters agreement between the Company and HPE. The Company remains liable to HPE for tax receivables transferred to Perspecta related to pre-HPES Merger periods. Pursuant to the tax matters agreement, the Company recorded a $59 million tax indemnification receivable from Perspecta related to other tax payables and a $15 million tax indemnification payable to Perspecta related to income tax and other tax receivables.

In connection with the sale of the HPS business, the Company entered into a tax matters agreement with Dedalus. Pursuant to the tax matters agreement, the Company generally will be responsible for tax liabilities arising prior to the sale of the HPS business.

21

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

The Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) has examined, or is examining, the Company’s federal income tax returns for fiscal 2008 through the tax year ended October 31, 2018. With respect to CSC’s fiscal 2008 through 2017 federal tax returns, the Company participated in settlement negotiations with the IRS Office of Appeals. The IRS examined several issues for these tax years that resulted in various audit adjustments. The Company and the IRS Office of Appeals have settled various audit adjustments, and we disagree with the IRS’ disallowance of certain losses and deductions resulting from restructuring costs and tax planning strategies in previous years. As we believe we will ultimately prevail on the technical merits of the disagreed items and are challenging them in the IRS Office of Appeals or the U.S. Tax Court, these matters are not fully reserved and would result in a federal and state tax expense of approximately $462 million (including estimated interest and penalties) for the unreserved portion of these items and related cash cost if we do not prevail. We have received notices of deficiency with respect to fiscal 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2013 and have timely filed petitions with the U.S. Tax Court. We do not expect the U.S. Tax Court matters to be resolved in the next 12 months.

The Company’s fiscal years 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2013 are in the U.S. Tax Court, and consequently these years will remain open until such proceedings have concluded. The statute of limitations on assessments related to a refund claim for fiscal year 2012 is open through February 28, 2025. The Company has agreed to extend the statute of limitations generally for fiscal years 2014 through fiscal 2017 to February 28, 2023, and for the tax years ended October 31, 2017 and October 31, 2018 to September 30, 2023. The statute of limitations is also open on assessments related to certain refund claims for fiscal years 2014 to 2017 through August 15, 2023.

The Company expects to reach resolution with regard to disagreed items for fiscal years 2009 through 2013 no earlier than fiscal 2025, and to reach resolution for fiscal years 2014 through 2017 no earlier than fiscal 2024.

The Company may settle certain other tax examinations for different amounts than the Company has accrued as uncertain tax positions. Consequently, the Company may need to accrue and ultimately pay additional amounts or pay lower amounts than previously estimated and accrued when positions are settled in the future. For the three months ended June 30, 2022, the Company’s liability for uncertain tax positions decreased by $44 million (excluding interest and penalties and related tax attributes) primarily due to income tax audit settlements and statute of limitation expirations. The Company believes the outcomes that are reasonably possible within the next 12 months to result in a reduction in its liability for uncertain tax positions, excluding interest, penalties, and tax carryforwards, would be approximately $5 million.

Note 15 Stockholders’ Equity

Share Repurchases

The details of shares repurchased during the three months ended June 30, 2022 and June 30, 2021 are shown below:

Fiscal 2023Fiscal 2022
Fiscal PeriodNumber of Shares RepurchasedAverage Price Per ShareAmount
(in millions)
Number of Shares RepurchasedAverage Price Per ShareAmount
(in millions)
1st Quarter
Open market purchases8,850,912 $30.09 $266 1,750,000 $38.52 $67 
Total8,850,912 $30.09 $266 1,750,000 $38.52 $67 
22

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss

The following table shows the changes in accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of taxes:

(in millions)Foreign Currency Translation AdjustmentsCash Flow HedgesPension and Other Post-retirement Benefit PlansAccumulated Other Comprehensive Loss
Balance at March 31, 2022$(651)$10 $256 $(385)
Other comprehensive loss before reclassifications(176)— (172)
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss— (4)(2)(6)
Balance at June 30, 2022$(827)$10 $254 $(563)


(in millions)Foreign Currency Translation AdjustmentsCash Flow HedgesPension and Other Post-retirement Benefit PlansAccumulated Other Comprehensive Loss
Balance at March 31, 2021$(554)$(1)$253 $(302)
Other comprehensive loss before reclassifications(35)(1)— (36)
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss(1)
(86)— (2)(88)
Balance at June 30, 2021$(675)$(2)$251 $(426)
    

(1)Includes net cumulative foreign currency translation losses of $86 million upon sale of foreign entities primarily related to the HPS business divestiture. See Note 2 – “Divestitures” for additional information.


Note 16 – Stock Incentive Plans

Restricted Stock Units and Performance-Based Restricted Stock Units

Restricted stock units ("RSUs") represent the right to receive one share of DXC common stock upon a future settlement date, subject to vesting and other terms and conditions of the award, plus any dividend equivalents accrued during the award period. The Company also grants performance-based restricted stock units (“PSUs”), which generally vest over a three year period. The number of PSUs that ultimately vest is dependent upon the Company’s achievement of certain specified market- and performance-based criteria over the three-year vesting period. The fair value of RSUs and performance-based PSUs is based on the Company’s common stock closing price on the grant date. For PSUs with a market-based condition, DXC uses a Monte Carlo simulation model to value the grants.

Employee Equity PlanDirector Equity Plan
Number of
Shares
Weighted Average Grant Date
Fair Value
Number of
Shares
Weighted Average Grant Date
Fair Value
Outstanding as of March 31, 20227,477,126 $35.89 156,722 $36.18 
Granted3,206,094 $38.87 1,800 $29.63 
Settled(1,704,601)$34.76 — $— 
Canceled/Forfeited(482,991)$40.48 — $— 
Outstanding as of June 30, 20228,495,628 $36.90 158,522 $36.11 

23

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)


Share-Based Compensation

Three Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Total share-based compensation cost$28 $25 
Related income tax benefit$$

Note 17 – Cash Flows

Cash payments for interest on indebtedness and income taxes and other select non-cash activities are as follows:

Three Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Cash paid for:
Interest$22 $65 
Taxes on income, net of refunds (1)
$53 $52 
Non-cash activities:
Operating:
ROU assets obtained in exchange for lease, net (2)
$55 $52 
   Prepaid assets acquired under long-term financing$34 $111 
Investing:
Capital expenditures in accounts payable and accrued expenses$$
Capital expenditures through finance lease obligations$26 $71 
Assets acquired under long-term financing$$35 
Financing:
Shares repurchased but not settled in cash$— $19 
        
    
(1) Income tax refunds were $13 million and $14 million for the three months ended June 30, 2022 and June 30, 2021, respectively.
(2) Net of $338 million and $242 million in lease modifications and terminations for the three months ended.June 30, 2022 and June 30, 2021, respectively.


24

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

Note 18 – Segment Information

DXC has a matrix form of organization and is managed in several different and overlapping groupings including services, industries and geographic regions. As a result, and in accordance with accounting standards, operating segments are organized by the type of services provided. DXC's chief operating decision maker ("CODM"), the chief executive officer, obtains, reviews, and manages the Company’s financial performance based on these segments. The CODM uses these results, in part, to evaluate the performance of, and allocate resources to, each of the segments.

Global Business Services (“GBS”)

GBS provides innovative technology solutions that help our customers address key business challenges and accelerate transformations tailored to each customer’s industry and specific objectives. GBS offerings include:

Analytics and Engineering. Our portfolio of analytics services and extensive partner ecosystem help customers gain rapid insights, automate operations, and accelerate their transformation journeys. We provide software engineering, consulting, and data analytics solutions that enable businesses to run and manage their mission-critical functions, transform their operations, and develop new ways of doing business.
Applications. We help simplify, modernize, and accelerate mission-critical applications that support business agility and growth through our Applications services. We are the engineers that enable our customers to take advantage of the latest digital platforms with both customized and pre-packaged applications, ensure resiliency, launch new products and enter new markets with minimal disruption. We help customers define, execute and manage their enterprise applications strategy.
Insurance Software and Business Process Services. We partner with insurance clients, to modernize and run IT systems, provide proprietary modular insurance software and platforms, and operate the full spectrum of insurance business process services. We also help operate and continuously improve bank cards, payment and lending processes and operations, and customer experience operations. We administer 13 million insurance policies and contracts, and manage 250 million customer interactions each year across industries.

Global Infrastructure Services (“GIS”)

GIS provides a portfolio of technology offerings that deliver predictable outcomes and measurable results while reducing business risk and operational costs for customers. GIS offerings include:

Security. Our Security services help customers assess risk and proactively address all facets of the security environment, from threat intelligence to compliance. We leverage proven methodologies, intelligent automation and industry-leading partners to tailor security solutions to customers’ unique business needs. Our experts weave cyber resilience into IT security, operations and culture. Whether migrating to the cloud, protecting data with a Zero Trust strategy or managing a security operations center, our Security services enable our customers to focus on their business.
Cloud Infrastructure and IT Outsourcing (“ITO”). We enable customers to do Cloud Right™, making the right investments at the right time and on the right platforms. We orchestrate hybrid cloud and multicloud environments, ensuring private and public clouds, servers and mainframes operate effectively together. We provide companies with tailored plans for cloud migration and optimization to enable successful transformation. We leverage our deep expertise in legacy IT and drive innovation with reliable, secure, mission-critical IT Outsourcing services – from compute and data center, to storage and backup, to network, to mainframe and to business continuity – providing a clear path to modernization.
Modern Workplace. Our Modern Workplace services put the employee experience first, helping them achieve new levels of productivity, engagement and collaboration while working seamlessly and securely on any device. Organizations are empowered to deliver a consumer-like experience, centralize IT management and support services, and improve the total cost of ownership.

25

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

Segment Measures

The following table summarizes operating results regularly provided to the CODM by reportable segment and a reconciliation to the financial statements:
(in millions)GBSGISTotal Reportable SegmentsAll OtherTotals
Three Months Ended June 30, 2022
Revenues$1,758 $1,949 $3,707 $— $3,707 
Segment profit$210 $127 $337 $(78)$259 
Depreciation and amortization(1)
$41 $218 $259 $26 $285 
Three Months Ended June 30, 2021
Revenues$1,887 $2,254 $4,141 $— $4,141 
Segment profit$272 $131 $403 $(71)$332 
Depreciation and amortization(1)
$40 $246 $286 $27 $313 
        

(1) Depreciation and amortization as presented excludes amortization of acquired intangible assets of $104 million and $109 million for the
three months ended June 30, 2022 and June 30, 2021, respectively.

Reconciliation of Reportable Segment Profit to Consolidated Total

The Company's management uses segment profit as the measure for assessing performance of its segments. Segment profit is defined as segment revenues less cost of services, segment selling, general and administrative, depreciation and amortization, and other income (excluding the movement in foreign currency exchange rates on DXC's foreign currency denominated assets and liabilities and the related economic hedges). The Company does not allocate to its segments certain operating expenses managed at the corporate level. These unallocated costs include certain corporate function costs, stock-based compensation expense, pension and OPEB actuarial and settlement gains and losses, restructuring costs, transaction, separation, and integration-related costs and amortization of acquired intangible assets.

Three Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Profit
Total profit for reportable segments$337 $403 
All other loss(78)(71)
Subtotal$259 $332 
Interest income20 20 
Interest expense(37)(62)
Restructuring costs(33)(67)
Transaction, separation and integration-related costs(2)(9)
Amortization of acquired intangible assets(104)(109)
Merger related indemnification(10)— 
Gains on dispositions29 347 
Debt extinguishment costs— (28)
Income before income taxes$122 $424 
Management does not use total assets by segment to evaluate segment performance or allocate resources. As a result, assets are not tracked by segment and therefore, total assets by segment are not disclosed.


26

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

Note 19 – Commitments and Contingencies

Commitments

Minimum purchase commitments as of June 30, 2022 were as follows:
Fiscal yearMinimum Purchase Commitment
(in millions)
Remainder of 2023$614 
2024399 
2025256 
2026246 
202723 
     Total$1,538 

Contingencies

Forsyth, et al. v. HP Inc. and Hewlett Packard Enterprise: On August 18, 2016, this purported class and collective action was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, against HP and HPE alleging violations of the federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act (“ADEA”) and California state law, in connection with workforce reductions that occurred in or after August 2012 in California, and in or after as early as December 2014 in other U.S. locations. Former business units of HPE now owned by the Company, and former business units of the Company now owned by Peraton (formerly Perspecta), may be proportionately liable for any recovery by plaintiffs in this matter.

In December 2020, Plaintiffs filed a motion for preliminary certification of the collective action, which Defendants opposed. In April 2021, the court granted Plaintiffs’ motion for preliminary certification and lifted the previously imposed stay of the action. In November 2021, notice was sent to putative members of the ADEA collectives regarding participation in the case. In February 2022, the notice period closed. The litigation is currently in discovery.

Oracle America, Inc., et al. v. Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company: On March 22, 2016, Oracle filed a complaint against HPE in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, alleging copyright infringement, interference with contract, intentional interference with prospective economic relations, and unfair competition. The litigation relates in part to former business units of HPE that are now owned by the Company. The Company may be required to indemnify HPE for a portion of any recovery by Oracle in the litigation related to these business units.

Oracle’s claims arise primarily out of HPE’s prior relationship with a third-party maintenance provider named Terix Computer Company, Inc. (“Terix”). Oracle claims that Terix infringed its copyrights while acting as HPE’s subcontractor for certain customers of HPE’s multivendor support business. Oracle claims that HPE is liable for vicarious and contributory infringement arising from the alleged actions of Terix and for direct infringement arising from HPE’s own alleged conduct.

On January 29, 2019, the court granted HPE’s motion for summary judgment and denied Oracle’s motion for summary judgment, resolving the matter in HPE’s favor. Oracle appealed the judgment to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. In August 2020, the court granted Oracle’s appeal in part. The case was then remanded to the District Court for further proceedings.

In January 2021, the District Court entered a scheduling order that provided for summary judgment briefing to be completed by May 2021 and a trial date in November 2021. In June 2021, the Court issued a decision denying HPE’s motion for summary judgment and granting Oracle’s motion for summary judgment on various HPE defenses. In November 2021, the court issued an order continuing the trial to May 2022.

A jury trial was held in May - June 2022, after which a jury awarded Oracle $30 million in damages. A final judgment has yet to be entered, pending the resolution of certain post-trial motions the parties will be filing in July - November 2022.

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DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)

In re DXC Technology Company Securities Litigation: Previously disclosed securities litigation matters have been dismissed, with one case remaining, in the Superior Court of the State of California.

On August 20, 2019, a purported class action lawsuit was filed in the Superior Court of the State of California, County of Santa Clara, against the Company, directors of the Company, and a former officer of the Company, among other defendants. The action asserts claims under Sections 11, 12 and 15 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and is premised on allegedly false and/or misleading statements, and alleged non-disclosure of material facts, regarding the Company’s prospects and expected performance. The putative class of plaintiffs includes all persons who acquired shares of the Company’s common stock pursuant to the offering documents filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission in connection with the April 2017 transaction that formed DXC.

The State of California action had been stayed pending the outcome of the substantially similar federal action filed in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California. The federal action was dismissed with prejudice in December 2021. Thereafter, the state court lifted the stay and entered an order permitting additional briefing by the parties. In March 2022, Plaintiffs filed an amended complaint. In April 2022, the Company moved to dismiss the amended complaint. A hearing on the Company’s motion to dismiss is scheduled for August 2022.

The Company believes that the final remaining lawsuit described above is also without merit, and intends to vigorously defend it.

Tax Examinations: The Company is under IRS examination in the U.S. on its federal income tax returns for certain fiscal years and is in disagreement with the IRS on certain of our tax positions. For more detail, see Note 14 – “Income Taxes” for further information.

SEC Matter: In December 2019, the Company received a request for voluntary production of information in connection with an informal investigation by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The current focus of the investigation is the Company’s historical reporting related to its non-GAAP adjustment for “transaction, separation, and integration-related costs,” including whether the disclosure the Company previously used to describe the non-GAAP adjustment was sufficiently broad to cover certain expenses the Company included as transaction, separation, and integration-related costs. The non-GAAP costs at issue primarily consist of expenses associated with the business combination that formed DXC in 2017. The Company has cooperated fully with the SEC’s informal investigation, and the new management team appointed beginning in September of 2019 has proactively clarified and expanded the disclosure of the Company’s non-GAAP transaction, separation, and integration-related costs. In addition, the new management team significantly reduced the transaction, separation, and integration-related costs. The Company intends to continue its voluntary cooperation with the SEC while seeking to resolve the matter.

In addition to the matters noted above, the Company is currently subject in the normal course of business to various claims and contingencies arising from, among other things, disputes with customers, vendors, employees, contract counterparties and other parties, as well as securities matters, environmental matters, matters concerning the licensing and use of intellectual property, and inquiries and investigations by regulatory authorities and government agencies. Some of these disputes involve or may involve litigation. The financial statements reflect the treatment of claims and contingencies based on management’s view of the expected outcome. DXC consults with outside legal counsel on issues related to litigation and regulatory compliance and seeks input from other experts and advisors with respect to matters in the ordinary course of business. Although the outcome of these and other matters cannot be predicted with certainty, and the impact of the final resolution of these and other matters on the Company’s results of operations in a particular subsequent reporting period could be material and adverse, management does not believe based on information currently available to the Company, that the resolution of any of the matters currently pending against the Company will have a material adverse effect on the financial position of the Company or the ability of the Company to meet its financial obligations as they become due. Unless otherwise noted, the Company is unable to determine at this time a reasonable estimate of a possible loss or range of losses associated with the foregoing disclosed contingent matters.
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CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

All statements and assumptions contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and in the documents incorporated by reference that do not directly and exclusively relate to historical facts constitute “forward-looking statements.” Forward-looking statements often include words such as “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects,” “forecast,” “goal,” “intends,” “objective,” “plans,” “projects,” “strategy,” “target,” and “will” and words and terms of similar substance in discussions of future operating or financial performance. These statements represent current expectations and beliefs, and no assurance can be given that the results described in such statements will be achieved.

Forward-looking statements include, among other things, statements with respect to our future financial condition, results of operations, cash flows, business strategies, operating efficiencies or synergies, divestitures, competitive position, growth opportunities, share repurchases, dividend payments, plans and objectives of management and other matters. Such statements are subject to numerous assumptions, risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in such statements, many of which are outside of our control. Furthermore, many of these risks and uncertainties are currently amplified by and may continue to be amplified by or may, in the future, be amplified by the coronavirus disease 2019 (“COVID-19”) crisis and the impact of varying private and governmental responses that affect our customers, employees, vendors and the economies and communities where they operate.

Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to:

the uncertainty of the magnitude, duration, geographic reach of the COVID-19 crisis, its impact on the global economy and the impact of current and potential travel restrictions, stay-at-home orders, vaccine mandates and economic restrictions implemented to address the crisis;
our inability to succeed in our strategic objectives;
the risk of liability or damage to our reputation resulting from security incidents, including breaches, and cyber-attacks to our systems and networks and those of our business partners, insider threats, disclosure of sensitive data or failure to comply with data protection laws and regulations in a rapidly evolving regulatory environment; in each case, whether deliberate or accidental;
our inability to develop and expand our service offerings to address emerging business demands and technological trends, including our inability to sell differentiated services amongst our offerings;
our inability to compete in certain markets and expand our capacity in certain offshore locations and risks associated with such offshore locations such as Russia’s recent invasion of Ukraine;
failure to maintain our credit rating and ability to manage working capital, refinance and raise additional capital for future needs;
our indebtedness;
the competitive pressures faced by our business;
our inability to accurately estimate the cost of services, and the completion timeline of contracts;
execution risks by us and our suppliers, customers, and partners;
the risks associated with natural disasters;
our inability to retain and hire key personnel and maintain relationships with key partners;
the risks associated with prolonged periods of inflation;
the risks associated with our international operations, such as risks related to currency exchange rates and the withdrawal of U.K. from the European Union on January 31, 2020;
our inability to comply with governmental regulations or the adoption of new laws or regulations, including social and environmental responsibility regulations, policies and provisions;
our inability to achieve the expected benefits of our restructuring plans;
inadvertent infringement of third-party intellectual property rights or our inability to protect our own intellectual property assets;
our inability to procure third-party licenses required for the operation of our products and service offerings;
risks associated with disruption of our supply chain;
our inability to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting;
potential losses due to asset impairment charges;
our inability to pay dividends or repurchase shares of our common stock;
pending investigations, claims and disputes and any adverse impact on our profitability and liquidity;
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disruptions in the credit markets, including disruptions that reduce our customers’ access to credit and increase the costs to our customers of obtaining credit;
our failure to bid on projects effectively;
financial difficulties of our customers and our inability to collect receivables;
our inability to maintain and grow our customer relationships over time and to comply with customer contracts or government contracting regulations or requirements;
our inability to succeed in our strategic transactions;
changes in tax laws and any adverse impact on our effective tax rate;
risks following the merger of Computer Sciences Corporation (“CSC”) and Enterprise Services business of Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company’s (“HPES”) businesses, including anticipated tax treatment, unforeseen liabilities, and future capital expenditures;
risks following the spin-off of our former U.S. Public Sector business (the “USPS”) and its related mergers with Vencore Holding Corp. and KeyPoint Government Solutions in June 2018 to form Perspecta Inc, (including its successors and permitted assigns, “Perspecta”), which was acquired by Peraton in May 2021; and
the other factors described in Part I, Item 1A “Risk Factors” of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022 and subsequent SEC filings, including Part II, Item 1A “Risk Factors” of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

No assurance can be given that any goal or plan set forth in any forward-looking statement can or will be achieved, and readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such statements, which speak only as of the date they are made. Any forward-looking statement made by us in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q speaks only as of the date on which this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q was first filed. We do not undertake any obligation to update or release any revisions to any forward-looking statement or to report any events or circumstances after the date of this report or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events, except as required by law.

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ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Introduction

The purpose of the Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”) is to present information that management believes is relevant to an assessment and understanding of our results of operations and cash flows for the first quarter of fiscal 2023 and our financial condition as of June 30, 2022. The MD&A is provided as a supplement to, and should be read in conjunction with, our financial statements and accompanying notes.

The MD&A is organized in the following sections:
Background
Results of Operations
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Critical Accounting Estimates

The following discussion includes a comparison of our results of operations and liquidity and capital resources for the first quarters of fiscal 2023 and fiscal 2022. References are made throughout to the numbered Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (“Notes”) in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

Background

DXC helps global companies run their mission critical systems and operations while modernizing IT, optimizing data architectures, and ensuring security and scalability across public, private and hybrid clouds. The world’s largest companies and public sector organizations trust DXC to deploy services to drive new levels of performance, competitiveness, and customer experience across their IT estates.

We generate revenue by offering a wide range of information technology services and solutions primarily in North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. We operate through two segments: Global Business Services ("GBS") and Global Infrastructure Services ("GIS"). We market and sell our services directly to customers through our direct sales offices around the world. Our customers include commercial businesses of many sizes and in many industries and public sector clients.
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Results of Operations

The following table sets forth certain financial data for the first quarters of fiscal 2023 and fiscal 2022:
Three Months Ended
(In millions, except per-share amounts)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Revenues$3,707 $4,141 
Income before income taxes122 424 
Income tax expense19 142 
Net income$103 $282 
Diluted earnings per share$0.43 $1.07 


Fiscal 2023 First Quarter Highlights

Financial highlights for the first quarter of fiscal 2023 include the following:

Revenues for the first quarter of fiscal 2023 were $3.7 billion, a decrease of 10.5% as compared to the first quarter of fiscal 2022. See "Revenues” below for additional information.
Net income and diluted earnings per share for the first quarter of fiscal 2023 were $103 million and $0.43, respectively. Net income decreased by $179 million during the first quarter of fiscal 2023 as compared to the first quarter of fiscal 2022. Net income for the first quarter of fiscal 2022 included $377 million of gain on disposition of business.
Our cash and cash equivalents were $2.2 billion as of June 30, 2022.
We generated $163 million of net cash provided by operating activities during the first quarter of fiscal 2023, a change of $192 million as compared to $29 million of net cash used in operating activities during the first quarter of fiscal 2022.

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Revenues

During the first quarters of fiscal 2023 and fiscal 2022, the distribution of our revenues across operating segments and geographies were as follows:


Three Months EndedThree Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021Percentage Change
Constant Currency
 June 30, 2022(1)
Percentage Change in Constant Currency(1)
Geographic Market
United States$1,131 $1,209 (6.5)%$1,131 (6.5)%
U.K.473 602 (21.4)%527 (12.5)%
Other Europe1,138 1,305 (12.8)%1,262 (3.3)%
Australia391 401 (2.5)%422 5.2 %
Other International574 624 (8.0)%606 (2.9)%
Total Revenues$3,707 $4,141 (10.5)%$3,948 (4.7)%
Reportable Segments
GBS$1,758 $1,887 (6.8)%$1,869 (1.0)%
GIS1,949 2,254 (13.5)%2,079 (7.8)%
Total Revenues$3,707 $4,141 (10.5)%$3,948 (4.7)%
        
(1) Constant currency revenues are a non-GAAP measure calculated by translating current period activity into U.S. dollars using the comparable prior period’s currency conversion rates. This information is consistent with how management views our revenues and evaluates our operating performance and trends. For more information, see "Non-GAAP Financial Measures."

The decrease in revenues for the first quarter of fiscal 2023, compared with the first quarter of fiscal 2022 included an unfavorable foreign currency exchange rate impact of 5.8%, primarily driven by the strengthening of the U.S. dollar against the Euro, British Pound and Australian Dollar.

For the discussion of risks associated with our foreign operations, see Part 1, Item 1A “Risk Factors” of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022.

Global Business Services

Our GBS revenues were $1.8 billion in the first quarter of fiscal 2023, a decrease of 6.8% compared to the same period in fiscal 2022. GBS revenue in constant currency decreased 1.0% compared to the same period in fiscal 2022. The decrease in GBS revenues was primarily due to project completions and the disposition of businesses during fiscal 2022 and the first quarter of fiscal 2023. The decrease in GBS revenues was partially offset by additional services provided to new and existing customers and an increase in run-rate project volumes.

For the first quarter of fiscal 2023, GBS contract awards were $1.7 billion, as compared to $2.4 billion during the first quarter of fiscal 2022.

Global Infrastructure Services

Our GIS revenues were $1.9 billion in the first quarter of fiscal 2023, a decrease of 13.5% compared to the same period of fiscal 2022. GIS revenue in constant currency decreased 7.8% compared to the same period of fiscal 2022. The decrease in GIS revenues primarily reflects project completions, project terminations, and a decrease in pass-through revenue associated with the resale of hardware and software. The decrease in GIS revenues was partially offset by additional services provided to new and existing customers and an increase in run-rate project volumes.
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For the first quarter of fiscal 2023, GIS contract awards were $1.5 billion, as compared to $2.2 billion during the first quarter of fiscal 2022.

Costs and Expenses

Our total costs and expenses is shown in the tables below:
Three Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021ChangePercentage Change
Costs of services (excludes depreciation and amortization and restructuring costs)$2,930 $3,255 $(325)(10.0)%
Selling, general and administrative (excludes depreciation and amortization and restructuring costs)349 383 (34)(8.9)%
Depreciation and amortization389 422 (33)(7.8)%
Restructuring costs33 67 (34)(50.7)%
Interest expense37 62 (25)(40.3)%
Interest income(20)(20)— — %
Debt extinguishment costs— 28 (28)(100.0)%
Gain on disposition of businesses(29)(377)348 (92.3)%
Other income, net(104)(103)(1)1.0 %
Total Costs and Expenses$3,585 $3,717 $(132)(3.6)%

Total costs and expenses as a percentage of revenue increased 690 basis points for the first quarter of fiscal 2023 as compared to the first quarter of fiscal 2022, reflecting a reduction of $348 million in gain on disposition of businesses. Total costs and expenses for the first quarter of fiscal 2023 included a favorable foreign currency exchange rate impact of $216 million.

Costs of Services

Costs of services, excluding depreciation and amortization and restructuring costs (“COS”), were $2,930 million for the first quarter of fiscal 2023. COS decreased $325 million during the first quarter of fiscal 2023 as compared to the same period of the prior fiscal year. The decrease was primarily due to a favorable foreign currency exchange rate impact of $195 million. The decrease in COS was also driven by cost optimization savings realized during the first quarter of fiscal 2023, partially offset by increased labor investments. COS as a percentage of revenue increased 40 basis points primarily driven by a decline in revenue exceeding the associated decline in costs compared to the same period in the prior fiscal year.

Selling, General and Administrative

Selling, general and administrative expense, excluding depreciation and amortization and restructuring costs (“SG&A”), was $349 million for the first quarter of fiscal 2023, a decrease of $34 million compared to the same period of the prior fiscal year. The decrease in SG&A during the first quarter of fiscal 2023 was primarily driven by reductions in payroll and related expenses and real estate costs, and included a favorable foreign currency exchange rate impact of $13 million. The decrease in SG&A was partially offset by a $10 million charge for merger related indemnification costs.

Transaction, separation and integration-related costs of $2 million were included in SG&A for the first quarter of fiscal 2023, as compared to $9 million for the comparable period of the prior fiscal year.
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Depreciation and Amortization

Depreciation expense was $138 million for the first quarter of fiscal 2023, as compared to $158 million in the same period of the prior fiscal year, a decrease of $20 million primarily due to lower average net property and equipment balances. The decrease in depreciation expense included a favorable foreign currency exchange rate impact of $7 million.

Amortization expense was $251 million for the first quarter of fiscal 2023, as compared to $264 million in the same period of the prior fiscal year, a decrease of $13 million primarily due to a favorable change in foreign currency exchange rate impact of $10 million.

Restructuring Costs

Restructuring costs represent severance related to workforce optimization programs and expense associated with facilities and data center rationalization.

During fiscal 2023, management approved global cost savings initiatives designed to better align our workforce and facility structures. Total restructuring costs recorded, net of reversals, was $33 million for the first quarter of fiscal 2023, as compared to $67 million in the same period of the prior fiscal year, a decrease of $34 million.

See Note 12 – “Restructuring Costs” for additional information about our restructuring actions.

Interest Expense and Interest Income

Interest expense for the first quarter of fiscal 2023 was $37 million, as compared to $62 million for the first quarter of fiscal 2022, a decrease of 40.3%. The decrease in interest expense was primarily due to a reduction in bonds and term loans and the Company's refinancing of its high coupon debt subsequent to the first quarter in fiscal 2022 and decreases in interest expense from finance leases and borrowings for asset financing.

Interest income for the first quarter of fiscal 2023 was $20 million, consistent with the same period in the prior fiscal year.

Debt Extinguishment Costs

During the first quarter of fiscal 2022, we recorded $28 million of debt extinguishment costs within the consolidated statement of operations, which consists primarily of costs related to the full redemption of two series of 4.45% senior notes due in fiscal 2023, partial redemption of 4.125% senior notes due in fiscal 2026, and extinguishment of debt associated with borrowings for asset financing. There were no debt extinguishment costs during the first quarter of fiscal 2023.

Gain on Disposition of Businesses

During the first quarter of fiscal 2023, DXC sold insignificant businesses that resulted in a gain of $38 million. This gain was partially offset by a loss of $9 million related to certain insignificant businesses classified as held for sale as of June 30, 2022.

During the first quarter of fiscal 2022, DXC sold its HPS business for $551 million which resulted in an estimated pre-tax gain on sale of $341 million, net of closing costs. The pre-tax gain on sale was further adjusted during subsequent quarters of fiscal 2022 resulting in a final pre-tax gain on sale of $331 million for fiscal 2022. Insignificant businesses were also sold during the first quarter of fiscal 2022 that resulted in a gain of $49 million. This was partially offset by $13 million in sales price adjustments related to prior year dispositions, which resulted from changes in projected closing net working capital.

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Other Income, Net

Other income, net comprises non-service cost components of net periodic pension income, movement in foreign currency exchange rates on our foreign currency denominated assets and liabilities and the related economic hedges, equity earnings of unconsolidated affiliates and other miscellaneous gains and losses.

Three Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Non-service cost components of net periodic pension income$(67)$(97)
Foreign currency loss(2)
Other gain(35)(7)
Total$(104)$(103)

The $1 million increase in other income, net, for the first quarter of fiscal 2023, as compared to the same period of the prior fiscal year, was due to a year-over-year increase of $28 million in other gains from sales of non-operating assets and a year-over-year favorable foreign currency impact of $3 million offset by a year-over-year decrease of $30 million in non-service cost components of net periodic pension income attributable to changes in expected returns on assets and other actuarial assumptions.

Taxes

Our effective tax rate (“ETR”) was 15.6% and 33.5% for the first quarter of fiscal 2023 and the first quarter of fiscal 2022, respectively. For the first quarter of fiscal 2023, the primary drivers of the ETR were the global mix of income, U.S. tax on foreign income and base erosion payments, and a decrease in uncertain tax positions due to statute of limitation expirations. For the first quarter of fiscal 2022, the primary drivers of the ETR were the global mix of income, gain on sale of the HPS business, and tax rate changes in non-U.S. jurisdictions.

Earnings Per Share

Diluted EPS for the first quarter of fiscal 2023 was $0.43, as compared to $1.07 in the first quarter of fiscal 2022, a decrease of $0.64 due to a decrease of $176 million in net income attributable to DXC common stockholders.

Diluted EPS for the first quarter of fiscal 2023 includes $0.11 per share of restructuring costs, $0.01 per share of transaction, separation and integration-related costs, $0.34 per share of amortization of acquired intangible assets, $0.03 per share of merger related indemnification costs, and $(0.16) per share of net gains on dispositions.

Diluted EPS for the first quarter of fiscal 2022 includes $0.22 per share of restructuring costs, $0.02 per share of transaction, separation and integration-related costs, $0.33 per share of amortization of acquired intangible assets, $(0.98) per share of net gains on dispositions, $0.08 per share of debt extinguishment costs, and $0.11 per share of tax adjustments relating to the net revaluation of deferred taxes resulting from changes in non-US jurisdiction tax rates.
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Non-GAAP Financial Measures

We present non-GAAP financial measures of performance which are derived from the statements of operations of DXC. These non-GAAP financial measures include earnings before interest and taxes (“EBIT”), adjusted EBIT, non-GAAP income before income taxes, non-GAAP net income, non-GAAP net income attributable to DXC common stockholders, and non-GAAP EPS, and constant currency revenues.

We believe EBIT, adjusted EBIT, non-GAAP income before income taxes, non-GAAP net income, non-GAAP net income attributable to DXC common stockholders, and non-GAAP EPS provide investors with useful supplemental information about our operating performance after excluding certain categories of expenses.

We believe constant currency revenues provides investors with useful supplemental information about our revenues after excluding the effect of currency exchange rate fluctuations for currencies other than U.S. dollars in the periods presented. See below for a description of the methodology we use to present constant currency revenues.

One category of expenses excluded from adjusted EBIT, non-GAAP income before income tax, non-GAAP net income, non-GAAP net income attributable to DXC common stockholders, and non-GAAP EPS, incremental amortization of intangible assets acquired through business combinations, if included, may result in a significant difference in period over period amortization expense on a GAAP basis. We exclude amortization of certain acquired intangible assets as these non-cash amounts are inconsistent in amount and frequency and are significantly impacted by the timing and/or size of acquisitions. Although DXC management excludes amortization of acquired intangible assets, primarily customer-related intangible assets, from its non-GAAP expenses, we believe that it is important for investors to understand that such intangible assets were recorded as part of purchase accounting and support revenue generation. Any future transactions may result in a change to the acquired intangible asset balances and associated amortization expense.

Another category of expenses excluded from adjusted EBIT, non-GAAP income before income tax, non-GAAP net income, non-GAAP net income attributable to DXC common stockholders, and non-GAAP EPS is impairment losses, which, if included, may result in a significant difference in period over period expense on a GAAP basis. We exclude impairment losses as these non-cash amounts reflect generally an acceleration of what would be multiple periods of expense and are not expected to occur frequently. Further, assets such as goodwill may be significantly impacted by market conditions outside of management’s control.

There are limitations to the use of the non-GAAP financial measures presented in this report. One of the limitations is that they do not reflect complete financial results. We compensate for this limitation by providing a reconciliation between our non-GAAP financial measures and the respective most directly comparable financial measure calculated and presented in accordance with GAAP. Additionally, other companies, including companies in our industry, may calculate non-GAAP financial measures differently than we do, limiting the usefulness of those measures for comparative purposes between companies. Selected references are made on a “constant currency basis” so that certain financial results can be viewed without the impact of fluctuations in foreign currency rates, thereby providing comparisons of operating performance from period to period. Financial results on a “constant currency basis” are non-GAAP measures calculated by translating current period activity into U.S. dollars using the comparable prior period’s currency conversion rates. This approach is used for all results where the functional currency is not the U.S. dollar. Please see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Results of Operations—Fiscal 2023 First Quarter Highlights.”



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Certain non-GAAP financial measures and the respective most directly comparable financial measures calculated and presented in accordance with GAAP include:
Three Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021ChangePercentage Change
Income before income taxes$122 $424 $(302)(71.2)%
Non-GAAP income before income taxes$242 $290 $(48)(16.6)%
Net income$103 $282 $(179)(63.5)%
Adjusted EBIT$259 $332 $(73)(22.0)%


Reconciliation of Non-GAAP Financial Measures

Our non-GAAP adjustments include:
Restructuring costs – includes costs, net of reversals, related to workforce and real estate optimization and other similar charges.
Transaction, separation and integration-related (“TSI”) costs – includes costs related to integration, planning, financing and advisory fees and other similar charges associated with mergers, acquisitions, strategic investments, joint ventures, and dispositions and other similar transactions.(1)
Amortization of acquired intangible assets – includes amortization of intangible assets acquired through business combinations.
Merger related indemnification - represents the Company’s current estimate of potential liability to HPE for indemnification following the outcome of the Oracle v. HPE litigation in June 2022; obligation pursuant to ES-CSC merger.(2)
Gains and losses on dispositions – gains and losses related to dispositions of businesses, strategic assets and interests in less than wholly-owned entities.(3)
Debt extinguishment costs – costs associated with early retirement, redemption, repayment or repurchase of debt and debt-like items including any breakage, make-whole premium, prepayment penalty or similar costs as well as solicitation and other legal and advisory expenses.(4)
Tax adjustments – discrete tax adjustments to impair or recognize certain deferred tax assets, adjustments for changes in tax legislation and the impact of merger and divestitures. Income tax expense of all other (non-discrete) non-GAAP adjustments is based on the difference in the GAAP annual effective tax rate (AETR) and overall non-GAAP provision (consistent with the GAAP methodology).(5)

(1) TSI-Related costs for both periods presented include fees and other internal and external expenses associated with legal, accounting, consulting, due diligence, investment banking advisory, and other services, as well as financing fees, retention incentives, and resolution of transaction related claims in connection with, or resulting from, exploring or executing potential acquisitions, dispositions and strategic investments, whether or not announced or consummated.

The TSI-Related costs for the first quarter of fiscal 2023 include $2 million of costs incurred in connection with activities related to acquisitions and divestitures.

The TSI-Related costs for the first quarter of fiscal 2022 include $11 million of costs to execute the strategic alternatives; $4 million legal costs and $(12) million credit towards Perspecta Arbitration settlement, $4 million in expenses related to integration projects resulting from the CSC - HP ES merger (including costs associated with continuing efforts to separate certain IT systems) and $2 million of costs incurred in connection with activities related to other acquisitions and divestitures.

(2) See Note 19 – “Commitments and Contingencies,” Oracle America, Inc., et al. v. Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company.

(3) Gains and losses on dispositions for the first quarter of fiscal 2023 include a net gain of $38 million on dispositions and a loss of $9 million related to certain insignificant businesses classified as held for sale as of June 30, 2022.

Gains and losses on dispositions for the first quarter of fiscal 2022 include a $341 million gain on sale of the HPS business, gains of $19 million on other dispositions and $(13) million of adjustments relating to the sale of the HHS business.

(4) Debt extinguishment costs adjustments for the first quarter of fiscal 2022 include $18 million to fully redeem two series of our 4.45% senior notes due fiscal 2023, $3 million to partially redeem our 4.125% senior notes due fiscal 2026, and $7 million of debt associated with borrowings for asset financing.

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(5) Tax adjustment for the first quarter of fiscal 2022 reflects net revaluation of deferred taxes resulting from changes in non-US jurisdiction tax rates.





A reconciliation of reported results to non-GAAP results is as follows:
Three Months Ended June 30, 2022
(in millions, except per-share amounts)As
Reported
Restructuring
Costs
Transaction,
Separation and
Integration-Related Costs
Amortization
of Acquired
Intangible
Assets
Merger Related
Indemnification
Gains and
Losses on
Dispositions
Non-GAAP
Results
Income before income taxes$122 $33 $$104 $10 $(29)$242 
Income tax expense19 — 24 62 
Net income103 25 80 (38)180 
Less: net income attributable to non-controlling interest, net of tax— — — — — 
Net income attributable to DXC common stockholders$102 $25 $$80 $$(38)$179 
Effective Tax Rate15.6 %25.6 %
Basic EPS$0.44 $0.11 $0.01 $0.34 $0.03 $(0.16)$0.77 
Diluted EPS$0.43 $0.11 $0.01 $0.34 $0.03 $(0.16)$0.75 
Weighted average common shares outstanding for:
Basic EPS232.48 232.48 232.48 232.48 232.48 232.48 232.48 
Diluted EPS237.38 237.38 237.38 237.38 237.38 237.38 237.38 




Three Months Ended June 30, 2021
(in millions, except per-share amounts)As
Reported
Restructuring
Costs
Transaction,
Separation and
Integration-Related Costs
Amortization
of Acquired
Intangible
Assets
Gains and
Losses on
Dispositions
Debt
Extinguishment
Costs
Tax
Adjustment
Non-GAAP
Results
Income before income taxes$424 $67 $$109 $(347)$28 — $290 
Income tax expense142 10 24 (91)(28)68 
Net income282 57 85 (256)21 28 222 
Less: net income attributable to non-controlling interest, net of tax— — — — — — 
Net income attributable to DXC common stockholders$278 $57 $$85 $(256)$21 $28 $218 
Effective Tax Rate33.5 %23.4 %
Basic EPS$1.09 $0.22 $0.02 $0.33 $(1.01)$0.08 $0.11 $0.86 
Diluted EPS$1.07 $0.22 $0.02 $0.33 $(0.98)$0.08 $0.11 $0.84 
Weighted average common shares outstanding for:
Basic EPS254.67 254.67 254.67 254.67 254.67 254.67 254.67 254.67 
Diluted EPS260.32 260.32 260.32 260.32 260.32 260.32 260.32 260.32 


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Reconciliations of net income to adjusted EBIT are as follows:
Three Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Net income$103 $282 
Income tax expense19 142 
Interest income(20)(20)
Interest expense37 62 
EBIT139 466 
Restructuring costs33 67 
Transaction, separation and integration-related costs
Amortization of acquired intangible assets104 109 
Merger related indemnification10 — 
Gains on dispositions(29)(347)
Debt extinguishment costs— 28 
Adjusted EBIT$259 $332 

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Liquidity and Capital Resources

Cash and Cash Equivalents and Cash Flows

As of June 30, 2022, our cash and cash equivalents (“cash”) were $2.2 billion, of which $1.0 billion was held outside of the U.S. As of March 31, 2022, our cash was $2.7 billion, of which $1.3 billion was held outside of the U.S. We maintain various multi-currency, multi-entity, cross-border, physical and notional cash and pool arrangements with various counterparties to manage liquidity efficiently that enable participating subsidiaries to draw on the Company’s pooled resources to meet liquidity needs.

A significant portion of the cash held by our foreign subsidiaries is not expected to be impacted by U.S. federal income tax upon repatriation. However, a portion of this cash may still be subject to foreign and U.S. state income tax consequences upon future remittance. Therefore, if additional funds held outside the U.S. are needed for our operations in the U.S., we plan to repatriate these funds not designated as indefinitely reinvested.

We have $0.2 billion in cash held by foreign subsidiaries used for local operations that is subject to country-specific limitations which may restrict or result in increased costs in the repatriation of these funds. In addition, other practical considerations may limit our use of consolidated cash. This includes cash of $0.6 billion held in a German financial services subsidiary subject to regulatory requirements, and $0.1 billion held by majority owned consolidated subsidiaries where third-parties or public shareholders hold minority interests.

The following table summarizes our cash flow activity:
Three Months Ended
(in millions)June 30, 2022June 30, 2021Change
Net cash provided by (used in):
    Operating activities$163 $(29)$192 
    Investing activities(192)311 (503)
    Financing activities(394)(866)472 
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents(50)13 (63)
Cash classified within current assets held for sale10 63 (53)
Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents$(463)$(508)$45 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year2,672 2,968 
Cash and cash equivalents at the end of period$2,209 $2,460 

Operating cash flow

Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities during the first quarter of fiscal 2023 was $163 million as compared to $(29) million during the comparable period of the prior fiscal year. The change of $192 million was primarily due to a increase in net income, net of adjustments of $141 million, and a $51 million favorable change in working capital due to lower working capital outflows during the first quarter of fiscal 2023.

The following table contains certain key working capital metrics:
As of
June 30, 2022June 30, 2021
Days of sales outstanding in accounts receivable70 70 
Days of purchases outstanding in accounts payable(48)(44)
Cash conversion cycle22 26 

41


Investing cash flow

Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities during the first quarter of fiscal 2023 was $(192) million as compared to $311 million during the comparable period of the prior fiscal year. The change of $503 million was primarily due to decreases in cash from business dispositions of $549 million and in proceeds from sale of assets of $53 million. These decreases were partially offset by a decrease in capital expenditures of $100 million.

Financing cash flow

Net cash used in financing activities during the first quarter of fiscal 2023 was $394 million as compared to $866 million during the comparable period of the prior fiscal year. The $472 million decrease was primarily due to a decrease in payments on capital leases and borrowings for asset financing of $335 million, an increase in commercial paper borrowings, net of repayments of $31 million, payments for debt extinguishment costs of $28 million and net repayments on long term debt of $333 million in the first quarter of fiscal 2022. This was partially offset by an increase in share repurchases of $224 million.

Capital Resources

See Note 19 – “Commitments and Contingencies” for disclosure of certain commitments. The anticipated sources of funds to fulfill such commitments are listed below and under the “Liquidity” subheading.

The following table summarizes our total debt:
As of
(in millions)June 30, 2022March 31, 2022
Short-term debt and current maturities of long-term debt$904 $900 
Long-term debt, net of current maturities3,874 4,065 
Total debt$4,778 $4,965 

The $187 million decrease in total debt during the first quarter of fiscal 2023 was primarily attributable to the favorable foreign currency exchange rate of U.S. dollar against the Euro. The decrease in total debt also included decreases in finance leases and borrowings for asset financing attributable to payments exceeding additions, partially offset by an increase in commercial paper borrowings.

We were in compliance with all financial covenants associated with our borrowings as of June 30, 2022 and June 30, 2021.

Our credit ratings are as follows:

Rating AgencyLong Term RatingsShort Term RatingsOutlook
FitchBBBF-2Stable
Moody’sBaa2P-2Stable
S&PBBB--Stable

For information on the risks of ratings downgrades, see Part I, Item 1A “Risk Factors” of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022.

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Liquidity

We expect our existing cash and cash equivalents, together with cash generated from operations, will be sufficient to meet our normal operating requirements for the next 12 months. We expect to continue using cash generated by operations as a primary source of liquidity; however, should we require funds greater than that generated from our operations to fund discretionary investment activities, such as business acquisitions, we have the ability to raise capital through borrowing under our revolving credit facility, issuance of capital market debt instruments such as commercial paper, term loans, and bonds. In addition, we currently utilize, and will further utilize our cross currency cash pool for liquidity needs. However, there is no guarantee that we will be able to obtain debt financing, if required, on terms and conditions acceptable to us, if at all, in the future.

Our exposure to operational liquidity risk is primarily from long-term contracts which require significant investment of cash during the initial phases of the contracts. The recovery of these investments is over the life of the contracts and is dependent upon our performance as well as customer acceptance.

Our total liquidity of $5.2 billion as of June 30, 2022, includes $2.2 billion of cash and cash equivalents and $3.0 billion of available borrowings under our revolving credit facility.

Share Repurchases

See Note 15 – “Stockholders’ Equity”.

Dividends

To maintain our financial flexibility we continue to suspend payment of quarterly dividends for fiscal 2023.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

In the normal course of business, we are party to arrangements that include guarantees, the receivables securitization facility and certain other financial instruments with off-balance sheet risk, such as letters of credit and surety bonds. We also use performance letters of credit to support various risk management insurance policies. No liabilities related to these arrangements are reflected in our condensed consolidated balance sheets. There have been no material changes to our off-balance-sheet arrangements reported under Part II, Item 7 of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022, other than as disclosed in Note 4 – “Receivables” and Note 19 – “Commitments and Contingencies”.

Contractual Obligations

There have been no material changes, outside the ordinary course of business, to our contractual obligations since March 31, 2022. For further information see “Contractual Obligations” in Part II, Item 7 of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022

For our minimum purchase commitments as of June 30, 2022, in connection with our long-term purchase agreements with certain software, hardware, telecommunication, and other service providers, see Note 19 – “Commitments and Contingencies.”

43


Critical Accounting Estimates

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, as well as the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. These estimates may change in the future if underlying assumptions or factors change. Accordingly, actual results could differ materially from our estimates under different assumptions, judgments or conditions. We consider the following policies to be critical because of their complexity and the high degree of judgment involved in implementing them: revenue recognition, income taxes, business combinations, defined benefit plans and valuation of assets. We have discussed the selection of our critical accounting policies and the effect of estimates with the audit committee of our board of directors. During the three months ended June 30, 2022, there were no changes to our critical accounting policies and estimates from those described in our fiscal 2022 Annual Report on Form 10-K except as mentioned in Note 1 – “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies.”

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

For quantitative and qualitative disclosures about market risk affecting DXC, see “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk” in Part II, Item 7A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022. Our exposure to market risk has not changed materially since March 31, 2022.


ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

Our management, under the supervision and with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, evaluated, as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”)). Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of June 30, 2022.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the three months ended June 30, 2022 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

PART II


ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

See Note 19 – “Commitments and Contingencies” to the financial statements in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q under the caption “Contingencies” for information regarding legal proceedings in which we are involved.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

Our operations and financial results are subject to various risks and uncertainties, which may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations, and the actual outcome of matters as to which forward-looking statements are made in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. In such case, the trading price for DXC common stock could decline, and you could lose all or part of your investment. Past performance may not be a reliable indicator of future financial performance and historical trends should not be used to anticipate results or trends in future periods. Future performance and historical trends may be adversely affected by the aforementioned risks, and other variables and risks and uncertainties not currently known or that are currently expected to be immaterial may also materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations or the price of our common stock in the future. There have been no material changes in the three months ended June 30, 2022 to the risk factors described in Part I, Item 1A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2022.
44





ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities
    
None during the period covered by this report.

Use of Proceeds

Not applicable.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

The following table provides information on a monthly basis for the quarter ended June 30, 2022, with respect to the Company’s purchase of equity securities:

PeriodTotal Number
of Shares
Purchased
Average Price
Paid Per Share
Total Number
of Shares
Purchased as
Part of Publicly
Announced Plans or Programs
Approximate
Dollar Value
of Shares that
May Yet be Purchased
Under the Plans or Programs
April 1, 2022 to April 30, 20223,430,580 $30.323,430,580$1,050,058,447
May 1, 2022 to May 31, 20224,814,532 $29.404,814,532$908,531,890
June 1, 2022 to June 30, 2022605,800 $34.40605,800$887,691,440
    
On April 3, 2017, we announced the establishment of a share repurchase plan approved by the Board of Directors with an initial authorization of $2.0 billion for future repurchases of outstanding shares of our common stock. On November 8, 2018, our Board of Directors approved an incremental $2.0 billion share repurchase authorization. On February 2, 2022, we announced our intention to repurchase incrementally up to $1.0 billion of our outstanding shares of common stock in the open market. An expiration date has not been established for this repurchase plan.

Share repurchases may be made from time to time through various means, including in open market purchases, 10b5-1 plans, privately-negotiated transactions, accelerated stock repurchases, block trades and other transactions, in compliance with Rule 10b-18 under the Exchange Act as well as, to the extent applicable, other federal and state securities laws and other legal requirements. The timing, volume, and nature of share repurchases pursuant to the share repurchase plan are at the discretion of management and may be suspended or discontinued at any time. See Note 15 - "Stockholders’ Equity" to the financial statements in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for more information.


ITEM 3. DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES

None.


ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.


ITEM 5. OTHER INFORMATION

None.

45


ITEM 6. EXHIBITS

Exhibit
Number
Description of Exhibit
10.1*
10.2*
31.1*
31.2*
32.1**
32.2**
101.INSInteractive Data Files
101.SCHXBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema
101.CALXBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation
101.LABXBRL Taxonomy Extension Labels
101.PREXBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation
104Cover Page Interactive Data File (formatted as Inline XBRL and contained in Exhibit 101)

    * Filed herewith
    ** Furnished herewith
    
46



SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

DXC TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
Dated:August 3, 2022By:/s/ Christopher A. Voci
Name:Christopher A. Voci
Title:Senior Vice President, Corporate Controller and
Principal Accounting Officer

47