Docoh
Loading...

NCSM NCS Multistage

Filed: 4 May 21, 4:21pm

 



UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

☑ Quarterly Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of

the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2021

OR

☐ Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of

the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the transition period from   ______  to  ______

Commission file number: 001-38071



NCS Multistage Holdings, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)



 

 

 

 



Delaware

 

46-1527455

 



(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(IRS Employer

Identification number)

 



 

 

 

 



19350 State Highway 249,  Suite 600

 

 

 



Houston,  Texas 

 

77070

 



(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 



Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (281)  453-2222

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:



 

 

Title of each class

Trading Symbol(s)

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $0.01 par value

NCSM

NASDAQ Capital Market

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.     Yes    No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).     Yes    No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.



 

 

 

 

 



Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

 



Non-accelerated filer

   

Smaller reporting company

 



 

 

Emerging growth company

 



If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.    

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes    No 

As of May 3, 2021, there were 2,379,265 shares of common stock outstanding.



 



 

 

2


 

 

 

Table of Contents    

 

 

PART I.  FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1.  Financial Statements

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands, except share data)

(Unaudited)











 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 



 

March 31,

 

December 31,



 

2021

 

2020

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

11,962 

 

$

15,545 

Accounts receivable—trade, net

 

 

22,106 

 

 

21,925 

Inventories, net

 

 

34,578 

 

 

34,871 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

2,878 

 

 

2,975 

Other current receivables

 

 

9,045 

 

 

8,358 

Total current assets

 

 

80,569 

 

 

83,674 

Noncurrent assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property and equipment, net

 

 

23,903 

 

 

24,435 

Goodwill

 

 

15,222 

 

 

15,222 

Identifiable intangibles, net

 

 

6,246 

 

 

6,413 

Operating lease assets

 

 

4,806 

 

 

5,170 

Deposits and other assets

 

 

3,501 

 

 

3,559 

Deferred income taxes, net

 

 

207 

 

 

205 

Total noncurrent assets

 

 

53,885 

 

 

55,004 

Total assets

 

$

134,454 

 

$

138,678 

Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable—trade

 

$

5,720 

 

$

4,943 

Accrued expenses

 

 

3,343 

 

 

3,347 

Income taxes payable

 

 

851 

 

 

653 

Operating lease liabilities

 

 

1,779 

 

 

1,826 

Current maturities of long-term debt

 

 

1,379 

 

 

1,347 

Other current liabilities

 

 

1,391 

 

 

2,768 

Total current liabilities

 

 

14,463 

 

 

14,884 

Noncurrent liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-term debt, less current maturities

 

 

4,302 

 

 

4,442 

Operating lease liabilities, long-term

 

 

3,651 

 

 

3,989 

Other long-term liabilities

 

 

1,920 

 

 

1,864 

Deferred income taxes, net

 

 

67 

 

 

13 

Total noncurrent liabilities

 

 

9,940 

 

 

10,308 

Total liabilities

 

 

24,403 

 

 

25,192 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 9)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $0.01 par value, 10,000,000 shares authorized, no shares issued and outstanding at

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

Common stock, $0.01 par value, 11,250,000 shares authorized, 2,396,042 shares issued

 

 

 

 

 

 

and 2,378,879 shares outstanding at March 31, 2021 and 2,371,992 shares issued

 

 

 

 

 

 

and 2,359,918 shares outstanding at December 31, 2020

 

 

24 

 

 

24 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

433,971 

 

 

432,801 

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

 

(81,487)

 

 

(81,780)

Retained deficit

 

 

(260,025)

 

 

(256,628)

Treasury stock, at cost; 17,163 shares at March 31, 2021 and 12,074 shares

 

 

 

 

 

 

at December 31, 2020

 

 

(1,000)

 

 

(809)

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

91,483 

 

 

93,608 

Non-controlling interest

 

 

18,568 

 

 

19,878 

Total equity

 

 

110,051 

 

 

113,486 

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity

 

$

134,454 

 

$

138,678 



















The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

3


 

 

 

Table of Contents    

 

 

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(In thousands, except per share data)

(Unaudited)









 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended



 

March 31,



 

2021

 

2020

Revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product sales

 

$

20,174 

 

$

39,430 

Services

 

 

8,340 

 

 

15,120 

Total revenues

 

 

28,514 

 

 

54,550 

Cost of sales

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of product sales, exclusive of depreciation
    and amortization expense shown below

 

 

13,921 

 

 

23,448 

Cost of services, exclusive of depreciation
    and amortization expense shown below

 

 

4,357 

 

 

7,166 

Total cost of sales, exclusive of depreciation
    and amortization expense shown below

 

 

18,278 

 

 

30,614 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

 

12,784 

 

 

20,835 

Depreciation

 

 

937 

 

 

1,452 

Amortization

 

 

167 

 

 

1,133 

Impairment

 

 

 —

 

 

50,194 

Loss from operations

 

 

(3,652)

 

 

(49,678)

Other income (expense)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense, net

 

 

(168)

 

 

(322)

Other income, net

 

 

341 

 

 

158 

Foreign currency exchange gain, net

 

 

150 

 

 

10 

Total other income (expense)

 

 

323 

 

 

(154)

Loss before income tax

 

 

(3,329)

 

 

(49,832)

Income tax expense (benefit)

 

 

128 

 

 

(925)

Net loss

 

 

(3,457)

 

 

(48,907)

Net (loss) income attributable to non-controlling interest

 

 

(60)

 

 

2,642 

Net loss attributable to
    NCS Multistage Holdings, Inc.

 

$

(3,397)

 

$

(51,549)

Loss per common share

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic loss per common share attributable to
    NCS Multistage Holdings, Inc. (1)

 

$

(1.43)

 

$

(21.92)

Diluted loss per common share attributable to
    NCS Multistage Holdings, Inc. (1)

 

$

(1.43)

 

$

(21.92)

Weighted average common shares outstanding

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic (1)

 

 

2,380 

 

 

2,352 

Diluted (1)

 

 

2,380 

 

 

2,352 

_______________

(1)

Amounts in 2020 have been retrospectively adjusted for the 1-for-20 reverse stock split that was effective on December 1, 2020.





The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

4


 

 

 

Table of Contents    

 

 

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE LOSS

(In thousands)

(Unaudited)









 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended



 

March 31,



 

2021

 

2020

Net loss

 

$

(3,457)

 

$

(48,907)

Foreign currency translation adjustments, net of tax of $0

 

 

293 

 

 

(5,249)

Comprehensive loss

 

 

(3,164)

 

 

(54,156)

Less: Comprehensive (loss) income attributable to non-controlling
interest

 

 

(60)

 

 

2,642 

Comprehensive loss attributable to NCS Multistage Holdings, Inc.

 

$

(3,104)

 

$

(56,798)

















 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

5


 

 

 

Table of Contents    

 

 

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(In thousands, except share data)

(Unaudited)





 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2021



 

Preferred Stock

 

Common Stock

 

Additional
Paid-In

 

Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive

 

Retained

 

Treasury Stock

 

Non-controlling

 

Total

Stockholders'



 

Shares

 

Amount

 

Shares

 

Amount

 

Capital

 

Loss

 

Deficit

 

Shares

 

Amount

 

Interest

 

Equity

Balances as of

  December 31, 2020

 

 —

 

$

 —

 

2,371,992 

 

$

24 

 

$

432,801 

 

$

(81,780)

 

$

(256,628)

 

(12,074)

 

$

(809)

 

$

19,878 

 

$

113,486 

Share-based

  compensation

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

1,170 

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

1,170 

Net loss

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(3,397)

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(60)

 

 

(3,457)

Distribution to

  noncontrolling

  interest

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(1,250)

 

 

(1,250)

Vesting of restricted

  stock

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

24,050 

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

Shares withheld

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

(5,089)

 

 

(191)

 

 

 —

 

 

(191)

Currency translation

  adjustment

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

293 

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

293 

Balances as of

  March 31, 2021

 

 —

 

$

 —

 

2,396,042 

 

$

24 

 

$

433,971 

 

$

(81,487)

 

$

(260,025)

 

(17,163)

 

$

(1,000)

 

$

18,568 

 

$

110,051 







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended March 31, 2020



 

Preferred Stock

 

Common Stock

 

Additional
Paid-In

 

Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive

 

Retained

 

Treasury Stock

 

Non-controlling

 

Total

Stockholders'



 

Shares

 

Amount

 

Shares (1)

 

Amount (1)

 

Capital (1)

 

Loss

 

Deficit

 

Shares (1)

 

Amount

 

Interest

 

Equity

Balances as of

 December 31, 2019

 

 —

 

$

 —

 

2,345,289 

 

$

23 

 

$

425,079 

 

$

(80,811)

 

$

(199,029)

 

(4,633)

 

$

(652)

 

$

18,935 

 

$

163,545 

Share-based

  compensation

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

2,950 

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

2,950 

Net (loss) income

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(51,549)

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

2,642 

 

 

(48,907)

Distribution to

  noncontrolling

  interest

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(3,050)

 

 

(3,050)

Vesting of restricted

  stock

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

24,099 

 

 

 

 

(1)

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

Shares withheld

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

(6,892)

 

 

(151)

 

 

 —

 

 

(151)

Currency translation

  adjustment

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(5,249)

 

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

(5,249)

Balances as of

  March 31, 2020

 

 —

 

$

 —

 

2,369,388 

 

$

24 

 

$

428,028 

 

$

(86,060)

 

$

(250,578)

 

(11,525)

 

$

(803)

 

$

18,527 

 

$

109,138 

_______________

(1) Amounts in 2020 have been retrospectively adjusted for the 1-for-20 reverse stock split that was effective on December 1, 2020.











 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

6

 


 

 

 

Table of Contents    

 

 

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(In thousands)

(Unaudited)















 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended



 

March 31,



 

2021

 

2020

Cash flows from operating activities

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(3,457)

 

$

(48,907)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash (used in) provided by operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

1,104 

 

 

2,585 

Impairment

 

 

 —

 

 

50,194 

Amortization of deferred loan costs

 

 

70 

 

 

75 

Share-based compensation

 

 

2,239 

 

 

2,883 

Provision for inventory obsolescence

 

 

404 

 

 

237 

Deferred income tax expense (benefit)

 

 

54 

 

 

(1,238)

(Gain) loss on sale of property and equipment

 

 

(79)

 

 

46 

Provision for doubtful accounts

 

 

(66)

 

 

383 

Proceeds from note receivable

 

 

48 

 

 

276 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable—trade

 

 

(42)

 

 

(2,716)

Inventories, net

 

 

(18)

 

 

(442)

Prepaid expenses and other assets

 

 

114 

 

 

(2,645)

Accounts payable—trade

 

 

746 

 

 

343 

Accrued expenses

 

 

(11)

 

 

494 

Other liabilities

 

 

(2,781)

 

 

1,758 

Income taxes receivable/payable

 

 

(140)

 

 

282 

Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities

 

 

(1,815)

 

 

3,608 

Cash flows from investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchases of property and equipment

 

 

(46)

 

 

(458)

Purchase and development of software and technology

 

 

(80)

 

 

 —

Proceeds from sales of property and equipment

 

 

62 

 

 

20 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(64)

 

 

(438)

Cash flows from financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payments on equipment note and finance leases

 

 

(324)

 

 

(432)

Line of credit borrowings

 

 

32 

 

 

5,000 

Treasury shares withheld

 

 

(191)

 

 

(151)

Distribution to noncontrolling interest

 

 

(1,250)

 

 

(3,050)

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

 

 

(1,733)

 

 

1,367 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

 

 

29 

 

 

(295)

Net change in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

(3,583)

 

 

4,242 

Cash and cash equivalents beginning of period

 

 

15,545 

 

 

11,243 

Cash and cash equivalents end of period

 

$

11,962 

 

$

15,485 

Noncash investing and financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leased assets obtained in exchange for new finance lease liabilities

 

$

246 

 

$

301 

Leased assets obtained in exchange for new operating lease liabilities

 

$

26 

 

$

2,572 

















 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

7


 

Table of Contents

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Note 1.  Basis of Presentation



Nature of Business



NCS Multistage Holdings, Inc., a Delaware corporation, through its wholly owned subsidiaries and subsidiaries for which it has a controlling voting interest (collectively referred to as the “Company,” “NCS,” “we,” our”  and “us”), is primarily engaged in providing engineered products and support services for oil and natural gas well completions and field development strategies. We offer our products and services primarily to exploration and production companies for use in onshore wells. We operate through service facilities principally located in Houston and Odessa, Texas; Tulsa, Oklahoma; Billings, Montana; Morgantown, West Virginia; Calgary, Red Deer, Grande Prairie and Estevan, Canada; Neuquén, Argentina and Stavanger, Norway.



Basis of Presentation



Our accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 8 of Regulation S-X of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, issued by the Securities Exchange Commission (“SEC”) and have not been audited by our independent registered public accounting firm. Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP have been condensed or omitted. These condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and related notes thereto included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020. As NCS has the controlling voting interest in Repeat Precision, LLC (“Repeat Precision”), the other party’s ownership is presented separately as a non-controlling interest. In the opinion of management, these condensed consolidated financial statements reflect all normal, recurring adjustments necessary for a fair statement of the interim periods presented. The results of operations for interim periods are not necessarily indicative of those for a full year. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated for purposes of preparing these condensed consolidated financial statements.



Significant Accounting Policies 



Our significant accounting policies are detailed in "Note 2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies" in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.



Recent Accounting Pronouncements



Pronouncements Adopted in 2021



In March 2020, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2020-04, Reference Rate Reform (Topic 848): Facilitation of the Effects of Reference Rate Reform on Financial Reporting. The ASU provides optional guidance for a limited period of time to ease the potential burden in accounting for contracts, hedging relationships, and other transactions affected by the discontinuation of the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) or other interest rates used globally that could be discontinued. The amendments are effective for all entities as of March 12, 2020 through December 31, 2022. We adopted ASU No. 2020-04 on January 1, 2021, with no material impact on our condensed consolidated financial statements.



In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU No. 2019-12, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes, which is intended to simplify various aspects related to accounting for income taxes. ASU No. 2019-12 removes certain exceptions to the general principles in Topic 740 and also clarifies and amends existing guidance to improve consistent application. For public entities, this guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020 and interim periods within those fiscal years. We adopted ASU No. 2019-12 on a prospective basis on January 1, 2021, with no material impact on our condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

Pronouncements Not Yet Effective



In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-13, Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments. This ASU introduces a new impairment model that is based on expected credit losses rather than incurred credit losses for financial instruments, including trade accounts receivable. It requires an entity to measure expected credit losses for financial assets held at the reporting date based on historical experience, current conditions and reasonable and supportable forecasts. The new standard was to become effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019 and interim periods within those fiscal years. In November 2019, the FASB issued ASU No. 2019-10, which deferred the effective dates for certain accounting guidance. The effective date for ASU No. 2016-13 remained the same for public business entities that are SEC filers, except for

 

8


 

Table of Contents

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

entities who are deemed smaller reporting companies (“SRC”). The effective date for all other entities, including SRCs, will begin for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022 and interim periods within those fiscal years. NCS qualifies as a SRC. We are currently evaluating the impact of the adoption of this guidance. 

 

Note 2.  Revenues



Disaggregation of Revenue



We sell our products and services primarily in North America and in selected international markets. Revenue by geography is attributed based on the current billing address of the customer. The following table depicts the disaggregation of revenue by geographic region (in thousands):







 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended



 

March 31,



 

2021

 

2020

United States

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product sales

 

$

6,296 

 

$

17,440 

Services

 

 

1,527 

 

 

3,528 

Total United States

 

 

7,823 

 

 

20,968 

Canada

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product sales

 

 

13,878 

 

 

20,807 

Services

 

 

6,357 

 

 

8,559 

Total Canada

 

 

20,235 

 

 

29,366 

Other Countries

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product sales

 

 

 —

 

 

1,183 

Services

 

 

456 

 

 

3,033 

Total Other Countries

 

 

456 

 

 

4,216 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product sales

 

 

20,174 

 

 

39,430 

Services

 

 

8,340 

 

 

15,120 

Total revenues

 

$

28,514 

 

$

54,550 



Contract Balances 



If the timing of the delivery of products and provision of services is different from the timing of the customer payments, we recognize either a contract asset (performance precedes contractual due date in connection with estimates of variable consideration) or a contract liability (customer payment precedes performance) on our condensed consolidated balance sheet.



The following table includes the current contract liabilities as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 (in thousands):







 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2020

 

$

51 

Additions

 

 

600 

Revenue recognized

 

 

(600)

Balance at March 31, 2021

 

$

51 



We currently do not have any contract assets or non-current contract liabilities. Our contract liability as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 is included in current liabilities on our condensed consolidated balance sheet. Our performance obligations for our product and service revenues are satisfied before the customer’s payment however prepayments may occasionally be required. Revenue recognized from the contract liability balance was $0.6 million and $5 thousand for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

Practical Expedient



We do not disclose the value of unsatisfied performance obligations when the related contract has a duration of one year or less. We recognize revenue equal to what we have the right to invoice when that amount corresponds directly with the value to the customer of our performance to date. 

 

 

9


 

Table of Contents

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Note 3.  Inventories, net



Inventories consist of the following as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 (in thousands):







 

 

 

 

 

 



 

March 31,

 

December 31,



 

2021

 

2020

Raw materials

 

$

1,757 

 

$

1,752 

Work in process

 

 

148 

 

 

287 

Finished goods

 

 

32,673 

 

 

32,832 

Total inventories, net

 

$

34,578 

 

$

34,871 

 

Note 4.  Other Current Receivables



Other current receivables consist of the following as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 (in thousands):







 

 

 

 

 

 



 

March 31,

 

December 31,



 

2021

 

2020

Current income tax receivables

 

$

6,637 

 

$

6,295 

Employee receivables

 

 

549 

 

 

544 

Other receivables

 

 

1,859 

 

 

1,519 

Total other receivables, net

 

$

9,045 

 

$

8,358 



Employee receivables relate primarily to amounts paid by us for foreign withholding tax paid on behalf of employees working on international assignments, which is expected to be reimbursed to us by the employees when refunded as foreign tax credits on home-country tax returns.







Note 5.  Property and Equipment



Property and equipment by major asset class consist of the following as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 (in thousands):







 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 



 

March 31,

 

December 31,



 

2021

 

2020

Land

 

$

1,715 

 

$

1,695 

Building and improvements

 

 

8,646 

 

 

8,511 

Machinery and equipment

 

 

18,209 

 

 

18,211 

Computers and software

 

 

2,385 

 

 

2,374 

Furniture and fixtures

 

 

1,157 

 

 

1,150 

Vehicles

 

 

391 

 

 

442 

Right of use assets - finance leases

 

 

7,983 

 

 

8,020 

Service equipment

 

 

244 

 

 

244 



 

 

40,730 

 

 

40,647 

Less: Accumulated depreciation and amortization

 

 

(16,960)

 

 

(16,312)



 

 

23,770 

 

 

24,335 

Construction in progress

 

 

133 

 

 

100 

Property and equipment, net

 

$

23,903 

 

$

24,435 



 

10


 

Table of Contents

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

The following table presents the depreciation expense associated with the following income statement line items for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 (in thousands):







 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended



 

March 31,



 

2021

 

2020

Cost of sales

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of product sales

 

$

350 

 

$

709 

Cost of services

 

 

197 

 

 

290 

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

 

390 

 

 

453 

Total depreciation

 

$

937 

 

$

1,452 

 

We evaluate our property and equipment for impairment whenever changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset group may not be recoverable. We determined there were no triggering events that indicated potential impairment of our property, plant and equipment for the three months ended March 31, 2021,  and accordingly no impairment loss was recorded.



During the first quarter of 2020, we performed an impairment analysis to assess the recoverability of the carrying values for our property and equipment because we determined that a triggering event had occurred. Evidence that led to a triggering event included the industry conditions, such as a reduction in global economic growth expectations, a significantly reduced demand for crude oil and refined products, the significant decline in commodity prices and the corresponding impact on future expectations of demand for our products and services primarily related to the Coronavirus disease 2019 (“COVID-19”) pandemic as well as the resulting decline in the quoted price of our common stock. As a result of the analysis, we recorded an impairment charge of $9.7 million in our property and equipment, primarily related to our land, building and improvements and machinery and equipment, to the extent the carrying value exceeded the estimated fair value as of March 31, 2020.



Note 6.  Goodwill and Identifiable Intangibles



Changes in the carrying amount of goodwill are as follows (in thousands): 







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Gross Value

 

Accumulated Impairment

 

Net

At December 31, 2020

 

$

177,162 

 

$

(161,940)

 

$

15,222 

Impairment

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

At March 31, 2021

 

$

177,162 

 

$

(161,940)

 

$

15,222 



We perform our annual impairment analysis of goodwill as of December 31, or whenever there is a triggering event that indicates an impairment loss may have been incurred. As of March 31, 2021, we did not identify any triggering events which would indicate potential impairment for Repeat Precision, our only reportable unit with goodwill totaling $15.2 million. Therefore, no impairment has been recorded for the three months ended March 31, 2021.



As of March 31, 2020, we performed a quantitative impairment analysis for goodwill utilizing a market participant perspective and determined that the fair value exceeded the carrying value of our reporting unit. Accordingly, there was no impairment charge recorded for goodwill for the three months ended March 31, 2020. 



 

11


 

Table of Contents

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Identifiable intangibles by major asset class consist of the following (in thousands):







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

March 31, 2021



 

Estimated

 

Gross

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Useful

 

Carrying

 

Accumulated

 

Net



 

Lives (Years)

 

Amount

 

Amortization

 

Balance

Technology

 

1 - 20

 

$

3,958 

 

$

(152)

 

$

3,806 

Customer relationships

 

10

 

 

4,100 

 

 

(1,708)

 

 

2,392 

Total amortizable intangible assets

 

 

 

$

8,058 

 

$

(1,860)

 

$

6,198 

Technology - not subject to amortization

 

Indefinite

 

 

48 

 

 

 —

 

 

48 

Total identifiable intangibles

 

 

 

$

8,106 

 

$

(1,860)

 

$

6,246 







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

December 31, 2020



 

Estimated

 

Gross

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Useful

 

Carrying

 

Accumulated

 

Net



 

Lives (Years)

 

Amount

 

Amortization

 

Balance

Technology

 

1 - 20

 

$

3,958 

 

$

(87)

 

$

3,871 

Customer relationships

 

10

 

 

4,100 

 

 

(1,606)

 

 

2,494 

Total amortizable intangible assets

 

 

 

$

8,058 

 

$

(1,693)

 

$

6,365 

Technology - not subject to amortization

 

Indefinite

 

 

48 

 

 

 —

 

 

48 

Total identifiable intangibles

 

 

 

$

8,106 

 

$

(1,693)

 

$

6,413 

 

Total amortization expense, which is associated with the selling, general and administrative expenses on the condensed consolidated statements of operations, was $0.2 million and $1.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. 



Identifiable intangibles are tested for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying amount may not be recoverable. There were no impairment charges recorded for our identifiable intangibles for the three months ended March 31, 2021.



On March 31, 2020, we evaluated our intangible assets for impairment due to current industry conditions including a reduction in global economic growth expectations, a significantly reduced demand for crude oil and refined products, the significant decline in commodity prices and the corresponding impact on future expectations of demand for our products and services primarily related to the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the resulting decline in the quoted price of our common stock. As a result of the analysis, we determined that the carrying values of certain intangible assets were no longer recoverable, which resulted in an impairment charge of $11.9 million in the asset group that includes fracturing systems and well construction related to technology and internally-developed software and an impairment charge of $28.6 million in our tracer diagnostics asset group related to customer relationships, technology, internally developed software and trademarks, each recorded on March 31, 2020. Following the impairment charges in the first quarter of 2020, we had no remaining identifiable intangible balances in the asset group that includes our fracturing systems and well construction or our tracer diagnostics asset group.



Note 7.  Accrued Expenses



Accrued expenses consist of the following as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 (in thousands):





 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 



 

March 31,

 

December 31,



 

2021

 

2020

Accrued payroll and bonus

 

$

1,897 

 

$

999 

Property and franchise taxes accrual

 

 

400 

 

 

505 

Severance and other termination benefits (Note 10)

 

 

50 

 

 

730 

Accrued other miscellaneous liabilities

 

 

996 

 

 

1,113 

Total accrued expenses

 

$

3,343 

 

$

3,347 

















 

12


 

Table of Contents

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Note 8.  Debt



Our long-term debt consists of the following as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 (in thousands):







 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 



 

March 31,

 

December 31,



 

2021

 

2020

Senior Secured Credit Facility

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

Promissory notes

 

 

32 

 

 

 —

Finance leases

 

 

5,649 

 

 

5,789 

Total debt

 

 

5,681 

 

 

5,789 

Less: current portion

 

 

(1,379)

 

 

(1,347)

Long-term debt

 

$

4,302 

 

$

4,442 



The estimated fair value of total debt as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 was $5.2 million and $5.6 million, respectively. The carrying value of the promissory note approximated the fair value of debt at March 31, 2021 since it had a variable interest rate and could be paid at any time. The fair value for the remaining debt was estimated using Level 2 inputs by calculating the sum of the discounted future interest and principal payments at our incremental borrowing rate through the date of maturity.



Below is a description of our credit agreement and other financing arrangements.



Senior Secured Credit Facility



On May 1, 2019, we entered into a Second Amended and Restated Credit Agreement (the “2019 Credit Agreement”) with Pioneer Investment, Inc., as U.S. borrower (the “U.S. Borrower”), NCS Multistage Inc., as Canadian borrower (the “Canadian Borrower”; together with the U.S. Borrower, the “Borrowers”), Pioneer Intermediate, Inc. (together with the Company, the “Parent Guarantors”), the lenders party thereto, Wells Fargo Bank, National Association as administrative agent (the “U.S. Agent”) in respect of the U.S. facility provided therein and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, Canadian Branch, as administrative agent (the “Canadian Agent”) in respect of the Canadian Facility provided therein. The 2019 Credit Agreement amended and restated our prior credit agreement in its entirety.



On August 6, 2020, we entered into Amendment No. 1 to Second Amended and Restated Credit Agreement (the “Amendment”; the 2019 Credit Agreement, as amended by the Amendment, the “Amended Credit Agreement”) with the Borrowers, Pioneer Intermediate, Inc., certain subsidiaries of the Borrowers, the lenders party thereto, the U.S. Agent and the Canadian Agent. The facility provided pursuant to the Amended Credit Agreement is referred to herein as the “Senior Secured Credit Facility”.



The Senior Secured Credit Facility consists of a senior secured revolving credit facility in an aggregate principal amount of $25.0 million made available to the U.S. Borrower,  of which up to $2.5 million may be made available for letters of credit and up to $2.5 million may be made available for swingline loans.  The Canadian Borrower may make borrowings under the Senior Secured Credit Facility, subject to a $15.0 million sublimit. Total borrowings available to the Borrowers under the Senior Secured Credit Facility is limited to a borrowing base calculated based on eligible receivables, provided that it does not include receivables at Repeat Precision. Our borrowing base under the Senior Secured Credit Facility as of March 31, 2021 was $14.4 million. The Senior Secured Credit Facility will mature on May 1, 2023.  As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, we had no outstanding indebtedness under the Senior Secured Credit Facility.



Borrowings under the Senior Secured Credit Facility may be made in U.S. dollars for Adjusted Base Rate Advances, and in U.S. dollars, Canadian dollars or Euros for Eurocurrency Rate Advances (each as defined in the Amended Credit Agreement). Such advances bear interest at the Adjusted Base Rate or at the Eurocurrency Rate (each as defined in the Amended Credit Agreement) plus an applicable interest margin between 2.75% and 3.75%, depending on our leverage ratio. The applicable interest rate at March 31, 2021 was 3.5%. We incurred interest expense related to the Senior Secured Credit Facility, including commitment fees, of $32 thousand and $0.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.



The obligations of the Borrowers under the Senior Secured Credit Facility are guaranteed by the Parent Guarantors, as well as each of the other existing and future direct and indirect restricted subsidiaries of NCS organized under the laws of the United States and Canada (subject to certain exceptions), and are secured by substantially all of the assets of the Parent Guarantors, the Borrowers and such other subsidiary guarantors, in each case, subject to certain exceptions and permitted liens.



The Amended Credit Agreement requires us to (i) maintain liquidity (defined as availability under the Senior Secured Credit Facility plus certain cash deposits) of at least $7.5 million as of the date of each borrowing base certificate due to be delivered either

 

13


 

Table of Contents

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

monthly (if availability is greater than or equal to than 12%) or weekly (if availability is less than 12%) thereunder, (ii) maintain, for quarters during which availability is less than 20% of the borrowing base, a fixed charge coverage ratio of at least 1.0 to 1.0 and (iii) on the last business day of each week, prepay advances to the extent that available cash exceeds $12.0 million. As of March 31, 2021, we were in compliance with these financial covenants. The Amended Credit Agreement also contains customary affirmative and negative covenants, including, among other things, restrictions on the creation of liens, the incurrence of indebtedness, investments, dividends and other restricted payments, dispositions and transactions with affiliates. 



The Amended Credit Agreement includes customary events of default for facilities of this type (with customary materiality thresholds and grace periods, as applicable). If an event of default occurs, the lenders party to the Amended Credit Agreement may elect (after the expiration of any applicable notice or grace periods) to declare all outstanding borrowings under such facility, together with accrued and unpaid interest and other amounts payable thereunder, to be immediately due and payable. The lenders party to the Amended Credit Agreement also have the right upon an event of default thereunder to terminate any commitments they have to provide further borrowings and to proceed against the collateral securing the Senior Secured Credit Facility.

 

We believe that our cash on hand, cash flows from operations and potential borrowings under our Senior Secured Credit Facility will be sufficient to fund our capital expenditure and liquidity requirements for the next twelve months. However, if the depressed market conditions, including reduced demand for oil, lower customer spending and the resulting low level of demand for our products and services continue, it will have a material negative impact on our financial performance. We can make no assurances that the current actions taken by us will provide us with enough liquidity in the future if the current economic environment worsens.



We capitalized direct costs of $1.2 million in connection with the Senior Secured Credit Facility and prior amendment, which were being amortized over the term of the Senior Secured Credit Facility using the straight-line method. The Amendment reduced the overall potential capacity under the Amended Credit Agreement from $75.0 million to $25.0 million. Therefore, we expensed $0.6 million of deferred loan costs during the third quarter of 2020, which was commensurate with the reduction in potential capacity. We recorded new deferred loan costs associated with the Amendment totaling $0.6 million, which have been capitalized and will be amortized over the remaining term of the facility. Amortization expense of the deferred financing charges of $0.1 million was included in interest expense, net for each of the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

Promissory Notes



On February 27, 2017, Repeat Precision entered into a promissory note with Security State Bank & Trust, Fredericksburg. The note bears interest at a variable interest rate based on prime plus 1.00%.  The promissory note is collateralized by certain equipment, inventory and receivables. The promissory note was renewed on February 16, 2018 for an aggregate borrowing capacity of $4.3 million and continues to be renewed on an annual basis. The note is currently scheduled to mature on February 12, 2022. Total borrowings are limited by a borrowing base calculated based on a portion of Repeat Precision’s eligible receivables, inventory and equipment. As of March 31, 2021, the outstanding balance on the promissory note was $32 thousand. As of December 31, 2020, we had no outstanding indebtedness under the promissory note.



On April 30, 2020, Repeat Precision entered into a promissory note with Security State Bank & Trust, Fredericksburg, for an aggregate borrowing capacity of $5.0 million. The note bears interest at a variable interest rate based on prime plus 1.00%.  The promissory note is collateralized by certain equipment and inventory. The note matured on April 30, 2021. Total borrowings are limited by a borrowing base calculated based on a portion of Repeat Precision’s eligible receivables, inventory and equipment. As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, we had no outstanding indebtedness under the promissory note.



Finance Leases



Finance leases include a building in Odessa, Texas. We also maintain a vehicle leasing arrangement with a fleet management company in order to lease light vehicles and trucks that meet the criteria to record as finance leases.





Note 9.  Commitments and Contingencies



Litigation



In the ordinary course of our business, from time to time, we have various claims, lawsuits and administrative proceedings that are pending or threatened with respect to commercial, intellectual property and employee matters.



On July 24, 2018, we filed a patent infringement lawsuit against Kobold Corporation, Kobold Completions Inc. and 2039974 Alberta Ltd. (“Kobold”) in the Federal Court of Canada, alleging that Kobold’s fracturing tools and methods infringe on several of our

 

14


 

Table of Contents

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Canadian patents. We previously filed a breach of contract lawsuit on March 16, 2018, against Kobold Corporation in the Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta, alleging breach of a prior settlement agreement. Both of these lawsuits seek unspecified monetary damages and injunctive relief. On July 12, 2019, Kobold filed a counterclaim seeking unspecified damages alleging that our fracturing tools and methods infringe on their patent and that we made false and misleading statements about Kobold. The patent infringement litigation against Kobold and their counterclaim is currently scheduled for trial beginning January 10, 2022.



On April 8, 2020, we filed a lawsuit alleging infringement of U.S. Patent No. 10,465,445 (the “‘445 Patent”) against Nine Energy Service, Inc. (“Nine”) in the Western District of Texas, Waco Division (“Waco District Court”). On July 9, 2020, we filed a lawsuit against TCO AS (“TCO”) also alleging infringement of the ‘445 Patent. The claim construction hearing for the Nine lawsuit was heard in the Waco District Court on January 14, 2021. On February 18, 2021 and March 24, 2021, respectively, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board decided to not institute a trial with regards to TCO’s request for a ‘445 Patent post-grant review and Nine’s request for a ‘445 Patent inter partes review. The litigation against Nine and TCO is currently scheduled for trial beginning October 18, 2021 and March 6, 2022, respectively. On February 12, 2021, Nine filed a lawsuit against us alleging infringement of their U.S. Patent No. 10,871,053 in the Waco District Court and Nine voluntarily dismissed this claim without prejudice on April 16, 2021. All of these lawsuits seek unspecified monetary damages and injunctive relief.



In accordance with GAAP, we accrue for contingencies where the occurrence of a material loss is probable and can be reasonably estimated, based on our estimate of the expected liability. If we have any outstanding legal accruals, we may increase or decrease these in the future, on a matter-by-matter basis, to account for developments. Our assessment of the likely outcome of litigation matters is based on our judgment of a number of factors, including experience with similar matters, past history, precedents, relevant financial information and other evidence and facts specific to the matter. While the outcome of any legal proceeding cannot be predicted with any certainty, based on a consideration of relevant facts and circumstances, our management currently does not expect that the results of these legal proceedings would have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.



Note 10.  Severance and Other Termination Benefits



During 2020, we implemented various workforce reductions resulting in the termination of approximately 190 employees, temporary furloughs for certain employees and lower compensation levels for executives and employees not participating in furloughs in response to the decrease in crude oil pricing, customer capital spending plans and activity as a result of the decline in market conditions primarily related to the COVID-19 pandemic and reduced demand for oil. In connection with these reductions in workforce and executive departures, we incurred a cumulative amount of $5.7 million in one-time severance costs, of which $1.3 million was recorded in the condensed consolidated statement of operations under general and administrative expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2020. We did not incur any significant severance or termination benefits during the three months ended March 31, 2021.



Below is a reconciliation of the beginning and ending liability balance (in thousands):





 

 

 

Beginning balance, December 31, 2020

 

$

730 

Severance payments

 

 

(680)

Ending balance, March 31, 2021

 

$

50 



We expect to finish paying off this severance and other terminations liability by May 2021.



Note 11.  Share-Based Compensation



During the three months ended March 31, 2021, we granted 67,839 equity-classified restricted stock units (“RSUs”) with a weighted average grant date fair value of $38.50.  We account for RSUs granted to employees at fair value on the date of grant, which we measure as the closing price of our stock on the date of grant, and recognize the compensation expense in the financial statements over the requisite service period. The RSUs granted to our employees generally vest over a period of three equal annual installments beginning on the anniversary of the date of grant. The RSUs granted to the members of our Board will vest on the one-year anniversary of the grant date and will either settle at vesting or, if the director has elected to defer the RSUs, within thirty days following the earlier of the termination of the director’s service for any reason or a change of control.



During the three months ended March 31, 2021, we granted 50,864 equivalent stock units, or cash-settled, liability-classified RSUs (“ESUs”), with a weighted average grant date fair value of $37.59.  When the ESUs are originally granted to employees, they are valued at fair value, which we measure as the closing price of our common stock on the date of grant. As the ESUs will be settled in cash, we record a liability, which is remeasured each reporting period at fair value based upon the closing price of our common stock until the awards are settled. The ESUs will vest and settle ratably in three equal annual installments beginning on the anniversary of the date of grant. The cash settled for any ESU will not exceed the maximum payout established by our Compensation, Nominating

 

15


 

Table of Contents

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

and Governance Committee. 



In addition, during the three months ended March 31, 2021, we granted 17,004 performance stock unit awards (“PSUs”), which have a performance period from January 1, 2021 to December 31, 2023. The PSUs grant date fair value of $66.14 was measured using a Monte Carlo simulation. The number of PSUs ultimately issued under the program is dependent upon our total shareholder return relative to a performance peer group (“relative TSR”) over the three-year performance period. Each PSU will settle for between zero and two shares of our common stock in the first quarter of 2024. The threshold performance level (25th percentile relative TSR) starts to earn PSUs, the mid-point performance level (50th percentile relative TSR) earns 100% of the target PSUs and the maximum performance level (90th percentile relative TSR) or greater earns 200% of the target PSUs.



Total share-based compensation expense for all awards was $2.2 million and $2.9 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. 



Note 12.  Income Taxes



The computation of the annual expected effective tax rate at each interim period requires certain estimates and assumptions including, but not limited to, the expected operating income (or loss) for the year, projections of the proportion of income (or loss) earned and taxed in foreign jurisdictions, permanent and temporary differences and the likelihood of recovering deferred tax assets generated in the current year. The accounting estimates used to compute the provision for income taxes may change as new events occur, more experience is acquired or additional information is obtained. The computation of the annual effective rate would include applicable modifications, which were projected for the year, such as certain book expenses not deductible for tax, tax credits and foreign deemed dividends.



We recorded a tax expense (benefit) of $0.1 million and $(0.9) million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Included in the tax expense for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was a tax expense of $0.7 million for an increase in a valuation allowance on deferred tax assets not expected to be realized and a tax expense of $0.3 for foreign taxes. Included in the tax benefit for the three months ended March 31, 2020 were several U.S. tax (benefit) expense adjustments related to the enactment of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”) including a tax benefit of $(1.4) million related to a net operating loss (“NOL”) carryback allowed under the CARES Act that was previously unavailable, and a  tax expense of $10.3 million for an increase in a valuation allowance on deferred tax assets not expected to be realized. Also included in tax benefit for the three months ended March 31, 2020 was a tax expense in the amount of $1.6 million for a valuation allowance against our Canadian deferred tax asset based on management’s position that NCS has not met the more likely than not condition of realizing part of the deferred tax asset. Additionally, the tax expense (benefit) for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 included a tax expense of $0.4 million and $1.1 million, respectively, for the tax effect of stock awards.



ASC 740 clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise’s financial statements. The impact of an uncertain income tax position on the income tax returns must be recognized at the largest amount that is more-likely-than-not to be required to be recognized upon audit by the relevant taxing authority. This standard also provides guidance on de-recognition, measurement, classification, interest and penalties, accounting for interim periods, disclosure and transition issues with respect to tax positions. We include interest and penalties as a component of other income, net in the condensed consolidated statements of operations.



 

16


 

Table of Contents

NCS MULTISTAGE HOLDINGS, INC.

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Note 13.  Loss Per Common Share



The following table presents the reconciliation of the numerator and denominator for calculating loss per common share from net loss (in thousands, except per share data):







 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended



 

March 31,



 

2021

 

2020

Numerator

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(3,457)

 

$

(48,907)

Less: (loss) income attributable to non-controlling interest

 

 

(60)

 

 

2,642 

Net loss attributable to NCS Multistage Holdings, Inc.

 

$

(3,397)

 

$

(51,549)



 

 

 

 

 

 

Denominator

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic weighted average number of shares (1)

 

 

2,380 

 

 

2,352 

Dilutive effect of stock options, RSUs and PSUs

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

Diluted weighted average number of shares (1)

 

 

2,380 

 

 

2,352 



 

 

 

 

 

 

Loss per common share

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic (1)

 

$

(1.43)

 

$

(21.92)

Diluted (1)

 

$

(1.43)

 

$

(21.92)



 

 

 

 

 

 

Potentially dilutive securities excluded as anti-dilutive (1)

 

 

235 

 

 

219 





_______________

(1) Amounts in 2020 have been retrospectively adjusted for the 1-for-20 reverse stock split that was effective on December 1, 2020.









Note 14.  Segment and Geographic Information



We have determined that we operate in one reportable segment that has been identified based on how our chief operating decision maker manages our business. See “Note 2. Revenues” for our disaggregated revenue by geographic area. 







 

 

17


 

Item 2.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations



The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read together with our financial statements and the related notes thereto included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (“Quarterly Report”) and with our audited financial statements and the related notes thereto included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K (“Annual Report”), filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). This discussion and analysis contains forward-looking statements regarding the industry outlook, estimates and assumptions concerning events and financial and industry trends that may affect our future results of operations or financial condition and other non-historical statements. These forward-looking statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to the risks and uncertainties described in “—Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and “Risk Factors.” Our actual results may differ materially from those contained in or implied by these forward-looking statements. As used in this Quarterly Report, except where the context otherwise requires or where otherwise indicated, the terms “Company,” “NCS,” “we,” “our” and “us” refer to NCS Multistage Holdings, Inc.



Overview



We are a leading provider of highly engineered products and support services that facilitate the optimization of oil and natural gas well completions and field development strategies. We provide our products and services primarily to exploration and production (“E&P”) companies for use in onshore wells, predominantly wells that have been drilled with horizontal laterals in unconventional oil and natural gas formations. Our products and services are utilized in oil and natural gas basins throughout North America and in selected international markets, including Argentina, China, the Middle East and the North Sea. We have provided our products and services to various customers, including leading large independent oil and natural gas companies and major oil companies.



Our primary offering is our fracturing systems products and services, which enable efficient pinpoint stimulation: the process of individually stimulating each entry point into a formation targeted by an oil or natural gas well. Our fracturing systems products and services are typically utilized in cemented wellbores and enable our customers to precisely place stimulation treatments in a more controlled and repeatable manner as compared with traditional completion techniques. Our fracturing systems products and services are utilized in conjunction with third-party providers of pressure pumping, coiled tubing and other services.



We own a 50% interest in Repeat Precision, LLC (“Repeat Precision”), which sells composite frac plugs and related products. We provide tracer diagnostics services for well completion and reservoir characterization that utilize downhole chemical and radioactive tracers. We sell products for well construction, including our AirLock casing buoyancy system, liner hanger systems and toe initiation sleeves. We operate in one reportable segment.



COVID-19 Impacts on the Oil & Gas Market and NCS Multistage



Coronavirus disease 2019 (“COVID-19”) is an infectious disease caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The World Health Organization (“WHO”) declared the COVID-19 outbreak a public health emergency of international concern on January 30, 2020 and a pandemic on March 11, 2020. According to Johns Hopkins University, as of April 30, 2021 there have been over 150 million confirmed cases, resulting in over 3.1 million deaths related to COVID-19 on a global basis.



Federal, state, provincial and local governments around the world have implemented measures designed to slow the spread of COVID-19. In many countries, the most restrictive measures were eased throughout the second quarter of 2020, though case counts began rising during the third and fourth quarters of 2020 in some areas, including several states in the U.S. and in Europe, following the relaxation of the restrictions.



These measures taken to slow the spread of COVID-19 have had material impacts on the global economy, resulting in a significant reduction in global gross domestic product (“GDP”) in 2020 and continued to negatively impact GDP in early 2021. In addition, businesses have been forced to shut down, either temporarily or permanently, resulting in a significant growth in unemployment rates, which have partially declined, but remain at elevated levels by historical standards. 



Several vaccines have been approved for use since the fourth quarter of 2020, with vaccination rates increasing through early 2021. Several new variants of COVID-19 have emerged and vaccines approved to date have lower efficacy in combating some of these new variants. Accordingly, the uncertainty of the continued development, availability, distribution and acceptance of effective vaccines precludes any prediction as to the continued impact of COVID-19 on our business.



The demand for crude oil has been materially reduced as a result of the measures taken by governments around the world to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, primarily due to significant reductions in air and motor vehicle travel, which has reduced the demand for jet fuel, diesel and gasoline, the key refined products derived from crude oil. In its January 2021 Oil Market Report, the International Energy Agency (“IEA”) stated that demand for crude oil for the full year in 2020 contracted by 8.8 MMBBL/D as compared to 2019, as a result of COVID-19 case counts and the timing of and nature of global economic activity. In its April 2021 Oil

 

18


 

Market Report, IEA predicts that demand for crude oil will rise by 5.7 MMBBL/D in 2021 but is dependent upon the economic recovery and vaccine deployment. Even if demand increases to the level predicted by the IEA, this increase in projected 2021 demand would not offset the significant demand reduction of 2020, leaving 2021 demand 3.1 MMBBL/D below 2019 levels.



The significant reduction in global demand that began in early 2020 led to a decline in the average WTI crude oil price which was $27.96/BBL in the second quarter of 2020 before measures to restrict the spread of COVID-19 were put in place for most of the world. The WTI crude oil price recovered to $48.35/BBL at the end of December 2020 and averaged $58.09/BBL over the first quarter of 2021 but remains volatile. Members of OPEC and certain other countries, including Russia (informally known as “OPEC+”), agreed to a collective reduction in oil production of 9.7 MMBBL/D in May through July of 2020, 7.7 MMBBL/D in August through December 2020 and approximately 7 MMBBL/D through April 2021. In April 2021, OPEC + approved the production level adjustments of 6.6 MMBBL/D, 6.2 MMBBL/D, and 5.8 MMBBL/D in May, June and July 2021, respectively. Saudi Arabia announced an additional voluntary supply reduction of 1.0 MMBBL/D in February through April of 2021 due to demand concerns stemming from restrictions put in place in late 2020 in response to a surge in infections. However, Saudi Arabia plans to phase out this voluntary reduction over May, June and July 2021. The intent of the voluntary supply reductions is to attempt to increase the realized price of crude oil, and more specifically to return global oil storage capacity to normal levels over time as the economy and oil demand recovers. Given the uncertainty related to the rate of new COVID-19 infections, vaccinations, economic recovery and oil demand recovery, OPEC+ plans to continue to meet monthly during 2021 to evaluate potential increases or decreases to the targeted level of reduction in production.



As a result of the rapid and material reduction in oil pricing, E&P companies responded by significantly reducing their capital expenditure budgets for 2020, which resulted in significant reductions in drilling and completion activity. In North America, capital expenditures in 2020 were typically reduced by 30% or more from the original E&P company capital budgets, with some only spending the capital required to safely operate their existing productive assets. Reductions in activity began in mid-to-late March of 2020 and decreases in completions activity occurred faster than reductions to drilling activity, as completions equipment is typically contracted on a short-term basis, while drilling rigs may be contracted for several months or years. Many E&P companies partially shut in production in areas where the marginal cash operating cost exceeds the market price. The amount of shut-in capacity in North America is believed to have peaked in May 2020, with the volume of shut-in production reducing over time. Initial 2021 budgets for E&P companies suggest a slight reduction from 2020 expenditures with an objective of generating free cash flow and maintaining production levels near those in late 2020. We believe that North American E&P companies may be hesitant to increase their 2021 capital expenditure budgets out of concern that OPEC+ may reverse any agreed-to collective reduction in oil production, which would be expected to lead to a reduction in realized prices.

 

Low commodity prices in 2020 also impacted E&P companies that carry significant debt on their balance sheets and companies that rely on liquidity from loans that are based on the value of their oil and gas reserves. There have been numerous Chapter 11 bankruptcy filings by E&P companies, and the credit quality of the upstream oil and gas sector, our customer base, has been negatively impacted by the decline in market conditions, primarily related to the COVID-19 pandemic. We recorded a provision for doubtful accounts of $0.8 million during 2020 and a recovery of $0.1 million during the three months ended March 31, 2021. In addition, perceptions of the industry in which we operate, by investors and financial institutions, have reduced the availability of financing for our customers and increased their cost of financing.



The factors mentioned above have led to an increase in consolidation amongst E&P companies, especially large, independent publicly-traded E&P companies. During late 2020, several large consolidation transactions were announced, including Chevron Corp’s acquisition of Noble Energy, ConocoPhillips’ acquisition of Concho Resources, Devon Energy’s merger with WPX Energy and Pioneer Natural Resources’ acquisition of Parsley Energy. These consolidation transactions allow the combined entities to reduce costs, in part due to economies of scale, and can lead to reduced capital spending on a pro forma basis than would have been spent had the transaction not occurred. NCS has provided products and services to several of the companies involved in consolidation transactions, and we have experienced a reduction in spending with certain customers and may continue to further experience a reduction in future business with consolidating customers if combined capital spending is reduced, if procurement strategies are altered, or if the counterparty in the consolidation has other preferred vendors for the products and services we have been providing.

 

The reduction in customer capital spending and responses as a result of a decline in market conditions primarily related to the COVID-19 pandemic began to impact NCS in March 2020. Customers in North America began to quickly reduce the number of active completions crews, travel restrictions began to impact international operations, and activity in certain regions, including Argentina and China, was shut down due to government actions to contain the spread of COVID-19. In addition, throughout 2020, customers further reduced their capital spending and the resulting drilling and completion activity, which reduced the level of demand for our products and services and the pricing we received for our products and services.

 

While we experienced modest disruptions to our supply chain as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, including delays in importation of certain chemical products from China and temporary work-from-home orders that reduced the capacity at the Repeat Precision machine shop operations in Mexico, such disruptions were temporary in nature, the impacted products are available through

 

19


 

alternative sources of supply and we maintained sufficient inventory on hand to meet customer demand. We also experienced delays in access to certain materials and products utilized in our research and development activities, which has led, and may continue to lead, to delays in new product introductions.

 

In response to the reduction in demand for our products and services, including as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, NCS has undertaken, and the Board of Directors monitored and evaluated, multiple initiatives to reduce our cost structure, limit capital expenditures and enhance our liquidity and access to capital, including:

·

Reductions in force which reduced our headcount in the U.S. and Canada by approximately 190 people and reductions to salaries and hourly rates for substantially all employees, including reductions in salaries for executives averaging 20%. These actions resulted in over $19 million in cost savings during 2020, with approximately 70% of that amount associated with selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses. In addition, our 2021 long-term incentive award grants were based on lower base salary levels;

·

Not paying 2019 or 2020 bonuses;

·

A temporary elimination of the employer matching contributions for NCS’s U.S. 401(k) plan and its Registered Retirement Savings Plan in Canada;

·

A moratorium on non-essential travel for all employees;

·

Negotiation of new rates, work rules and payment schedules with vendors;

·

Strategies to reduce third-party spend, including information technology, financial services and third-party research and development;

·

Deferral of U.S. employer payroll taxes, as permitted under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”);

·

Application for, and receipt of, benefits under the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy (“CEWS”) and Canada Emergency Rent Subsidy (“CERS”) programs;

·

Accelerating the filing of our 2019 U.S. federal tax return to utilize net operating loss (“NOL”) carryback provisions from the CARES Act;

·

Reducing planned capital expenditures for 2020 and 2021 and selling excess vehicles;

·

Closing our district operational facilities in Corpus Christi and Oklahoma City and relocating our U.S. assembly operations to better align with our supply chain partners, which reduces overhead and improves fixed cost absorption;

·

In April 2020, Repeat Precision entered into a new promissory note providing up to $5.0 million in additional borrowing capacity;  and

·

Amending our revolving credit facility to modify certain covenants and to establish a borrowing base related to our accounts receivable, which we believe provides us with enhanced financial flexibility (as described in more detail in “Note 8. Debt” in our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements).



NCS continues to evaluate market conditions and will continue to take necessary actions to further reduce our cost base and enhance liquidity should there be a further reduction in the demand for our products and services.



In connection with the reductions in force described above, NCS recorded severance expense of $5.7 million during the year ended December 31, 2020 and no significant severance or termination benefits during the three months ended March 31, 2021. For additional information, see “Note 10. Severance and Other Termination Benefits” of our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.



As a result of the decrease in crude oil pricing, customer capital spending plans and activity as a result of the decline in market conditions primarily related to the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the resulting decline in the quoted price of our common stock, we assessed the recoverability of the carrying value of our property and equipment and finite-lived intangible assets as of March 31, 2020 and determined that a triggering event had occurred. As a result of the analysis, we recorded impairment charges of $9.7 million in property and equipment and $40.5 million related to identifiable intangible assets, which we recorded during the first quarter of 2020. There were no impairment charges recorded on our property and equipment or identifiable intangible assets during the remainder of 2020 or for the three months ended March 31, 2021. For additional information, see “Note 5. Property and Equipment” and “Note 6. Goodwill and Identifiable Intangibles” of our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.



On August 6, 2020, we entered into an amendment to our Senior Secured Credit Facility which, among other changes, reduced the lender commitments in the U.S. under our Senior Secured Credit Facility to $25.0 million and further limited the amount we may borrow dependent on a borrowing base calculated based on eligible receivables, which does not include receivable balances at Repeat Precision. See —Liquidity and Capital Resources—Financing Arrangements for a description of the amendment. Our borrowing base

 

20


 

under the Senior Secured Credit Facility as of March 31, 2021 was $14.4 million. The amount available to be drawn under the Senior Secured Credit Facility may decline from current levels due to reductions in our borrowing base or a springing financial covenant, if our business continues to be adversely impacted by a decline in market conditions primarily related to the COVID-19 pandemic.



Outlook



Based on initial capital budgets for 2021 that have been set by E&P companies, we believe that industry drilling and completions activity in North America will be modestly lower in 2021 than in 2020. Many of our customers in North America committed to generating free cash flow while maintaining production at levels consistent with late 2020. Drilling activity in the U.S. declined sequentially throughout the first half of 2020 before bottoming in the third quarter and increasing in the fourth quarter of 2020 and in early 2021. Completions activity in the U.S. also increased in the first quarter of 2021 as compared to the fourth quarter of 2020, however customer drilling and completion activity in the U.S. in the first quarter of 2021 was negatively impacted by winter storm Uri, which resulted in widespread, but temporary, production shut-ins, unsafe road conditions and other logistical challenges particularly in the Permian Basin and other areas in Texas and Oklahoma. We believe that the rig count in Canada in the second quarter of 2020 was at the lowest levels of the last 50 years and did not experience a material seasonal increase in the third quarter of 2020. The Canadian rig count recovered, but it remained well below seasonal averages in the fourth quarter of 2020. Similarly, the Canadian rig count experienced the expected seasonal increase in the first quarter of 2021 but was 26% below the same period of 2020. We expect that customer drilling and completion activity in the U.S. and Canada in the second quarter of 2021 will be above the historically low levels experienced during the second quarter of 2020 and that customer drilling and completion activity in the U.S. and Canada in the second half of 2021 will also be above the levels experienced in 2020. The low level of industry activity has led, and is expected to continue to lead, to intense competitive pressure across all of our product and service offerings in North America, which impacts our market share as well as our margins. We currently expect international industry activity to be relatively flat in 2021 as compared to 2020, with activity levels increasing throughout the year.



Market Conditions



Oil and Natural Gas Drilling and Completion Activity



Our products and services are primarily sold to North American E&P companies and our ability to generate revenues from our products and services depends upon oil and natural gas drilling and completion activity in North America. Oil and natural gas drilling and completion activity is directly related to oil and natural gas prices.



Oil and natural gas prices remain volatile, with WTI crude oil pricing of approximately $48/BBL at the end of December 2020 before increasing to approximately $58/BBL over the first quarter of 2021, with crude oil pricing continuing to be supported by voluntary oil production reductions by members of OPEC and OPEC + as discussed above.



Natural gas pricing was at an average level of $2.03 per MMBtu during 2020 but has increased to an average level of $3.50 per MMBtu during the first quarter of 2021 as demand increased, due in part to colder weather in February 2021 and the industry experienced supply disruption due to widespread production freeze-offs. Realized natural gas prices for Canadian E&P customers are typically at a discount to U.S. Henry Hub pricing. Spot pricing for Canadian natural gas at the AECO hub has been volatile since mid-2017, with discounts to Henry Hub pricing narrowing over time as infrastructure bottlenecks have been partially alleviated.



Sustained declines in commodity prices, or sustained periods when the local pricing received in regional markets is below benchmark pricing, known in the industry as high differentials, would be expected to lead North American E&P companies to further reduce drilling and completion activity, which could negatively impact our business.



Listed and depicted below are recent crude oil and natural gas pricing trends, as provided by the Energy Information Administration (“EIA”) of the U.S. Department of Energy:







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Average Price

Quarter Ended

 

WTI Crude
(per Bbl)

 

Brent Crude
(per Bbl)

 

Henry Hub Natural Gas
(per MMBtu)

3/31/2020

 

$

45.54 

 

$

50.45 

 

$

1.90 

6/30/2020

 

 

27.96 

 

 

29.70 

 

 

1.70 

9/30/2020

 

 

40.89 

 

 

42.91 

 

 

2.00 

12/31/2020

 

 

42.52 

 

 

44.32 

 

 

2.52 

3/31/2021

 

 

58.09 

 

 

61.04 

 

 

3.50 



 

21


 

Picture 3



Picture 4



Listed and depicted below are the average number of operating onshore rigs in the U.S. and in Canada per quarter since the first quarter of 2020, as provided by Baker Hughes Company (“Baker Hughes”). The quarterly changes in the Canadian land rig count can be partially attributed to seasonality of activity in that market:  







 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Average Drilling Rig Count

Quarter Ended

 

U.S. Land

 

Canada Land

 

North America Land

3/31/2020

 

764 

 

194 

 

958 

6/30/2020

 

378 

 

23 

 

401 

9/30/2020

 

241 

 

46 

 

287 

12/31/2020

 

297 

 

88 

 

385 

3/31/2021

 

378 

 

144 

 

522 



Picture 1

 

22


 



Over the past several years, North American E&P companies have been able to reduce their cost structures and have also utilized technologies, including ours, to increase efficiency and improve well performance. The rig count in the U.S. began to decline in 2019 and the decline accelerated in 2020 before bottoming in the third quarter and increasing during the fourth quarter of 2020. During the first quarter of 2021, the average U.S. rig count continued to increase to 378, which is an increase of 27% from 297 in the fourth quarter of 2020 but was 51% below the first quarter of 2020. The average land rig count in Canada for the first quarter of 2021 was 26% lower than in the same period in 2020. The U.S. and Canadian rig counts are expected to be higher than historically low prior year levels for the remainder of 2021.



A substantial portion of our business is subject to quarterly variability. In Canada, we typically experience higher activity levels in the first quarter of each year, as our customers take advantage of the winter freeze to gain access to remote drilling and production areas. In the past, our revenue in Canada has declined during the second quarter due to warming weather conditions that result in thawing, softer ground, difficulty accessing drill sites and road bans that curtail drilling and completion activity. Access to well sites typically improves throughout the third and fourth quarters in Canada, leading to activity levels that are higher than in the second quarter, but lower than activity in the first quarter. Our business can also be impacted by a reduction in customer activity during the winter holidays in late December and early January. In recent years, many customers in the U.S. exhausted their capital budgets prior to the end of the year, leading to reductions in drilling and completion activity during the fourth quarter. 



The market in Canada also continues to be impacted by logistical constraints in moving oil and natural gas from areas of production activity to demand centers. These constraints have led to lower realized pricing for our Canadian customers.



The industry experienced a reduction in completions activity in the United States which extended through 2019 and into 2020, with the reduction further accelerating beginning in March 2020 before activity bottomed in the third quarter and began to increase during the fourth quarter of 2020, with increases continuing in early 2021.  Initial capital budgets from E&P companies indicate that full-year capital spending in 2021 is expected to be slightly below capital spending in 2020 though E&P capital spending for the last three quarters of 2021 is expected to be higher than during the same period in 2020.



Adoption of Pinpoint Stimulation



Traditional well completion techniques, including plug and perf and ball drop, currently account for the majority of unconventional well completions in North America and over 90% of unconventional well completions in the U.S. We believe that pinpoint stimulation provides benefits compared to these traditional well completion techniques. Our ability to grow our market share, as evidenced by the percentage of horizontal wells in North America completed using our products and services, will depend in large part on the industry’s further adoption of pinpoint stimulation to complete wells, our ability to continue to innovate our technology to compete against continuing technological advances in competing traditional well completions techniques, and our ability to successfully compete with other providers of pinpoint stimulation products and services, including adjusting our pricing in certain markets to respond to customer demands and to competitors that may provide discounted pricing to our customers.



Increasing Well Complexity and Focus on Completion Optimization



In recent years, E&P companies have drilled longer horizontal wells and completed more hydraulic fracturing stages per well to maximize the volume of hydrocarbon recoveries per well. This trend towards longer and more complex wells has resulted in us selling more sliding sleeves or composite frac plugs per well on average, which increases our revenue opportunity per well completion and has led to increased sales of our AirLock casing buoyancy systems. Additionally, E&P companies have become increasingly focused on well productivity through optimization of completion designs and we believe this trend may further the adoption of pinpoint stimulation, and in turn, increase the opportunity for sales of our products and services if our customers observe operational benefits and long-term production results from the application of pinpoint stimulation. This trend towards more complex well completions has also resulted in increased use of tracer diagnostics services, which can be utilized to assess the effectiveness of various well completion techniques and well spacing strategies in support of completion and field development optimization efforts.



How We Generate Revenues



We derive our revenues from the sale of our fracturing systems products and the provision of related services, the sale of composite frac plugs and related products through Repeat Precision and from sales of our tracer diagnostics services, AirLock casing buoyancy system, liner hanger systems and toe initiation sleeves products.



Product sales represented 71% and 72% of our revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Most of our sales are on a just-in-time basis, as specified in individual purchase orders, with a fixed price for our products. We occasionally supply our customers with large orders that may be filled on negotiated terms. Services represented 29% and 28% of our revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Services include our tool charges and associated services related to our

 

23


 

fracturing systems and tracer diagnostics services (which are classified together as “services” in our financial results). Services are provided at agreed upon rates to customers for the provision of our downhole frac isolation assembly, our personnel and for the provision of tracer diagnostics services.



During periods of low drilling and well completion activity or as may be needed to compete in certain markets we will, in certain instances, lower the prices of our products and services. Our revenues are also impacted by well complexity, with wells with more stages resulting in longer jobs and increased revenue attributable to selling more sliding sleeves or composite frac plugs and the provision of our services.



The percentages of our revenue derived from sales in Canada and denominated in Canadian dollars were approximately 71% and 54% for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Because our Canadian contracts are typically invoiced in Canadian dollars, the effects of foreign currency fluctuations impact our revenues and are regularly monitored.



Although most of our sales are to North American E&P companies, we also have sales to customers outside of North America and expect sales to international customers to increase over time. These international sales are made through local NCS entities or to our local operating partners on a free on board or free carrier basis with a point of sale in the United States. Some of the locations in which we have operating partners or sales representatives include China and the Middle East. Our operating partners and representatives do not have authority to contractually bind NCS but market our products in their respective territories as part of their product or service offering.



Costs of Conducting our Business



Our cost of sales is comprised of expenses relating to the manufacture of our products in addition to the costs of our support services. Manufacturing cost of sales includes payments made to our suppliers for raw materials and payments made to machine shops for the manufacturing of product components and finished assemblies and costs related to our employees that perform quality control analysis, assemble and test our products. Our strategic 50% purchase of Repeat Precision has allowed us to reduce our costs for certain product categories. We review forecasted activity levels in our business and either directly procure or ensure that our vendors procure the required raw materials with sufficient lead time to meet our business requirements. On September 24, 2018, the United States implemented a tariff of 10% on a significant number of commodities originating from China, including certain chemicals utilized in our tracer diagnostics business. The tariffs were subsequently increased to 25% in May 2019. The increased tariffs have resulted in an increase in our cost of sales. We are monitoring prices for certain raw materials, including steel, which have been increasing during 2021. While we strive to pass through some of the increases in raw material costs to our customers, there can be no assurance that we will be able to do so. Cost of sales for support services includes compensation and benefit-related expenses for employees who provide direct revenue generating services to customers in addition to the costs incurred by these employees for travel and subsistence while on site. Cost of sales includes other variable manufacturing costs, such as shrinkage, obsolescence, revaluation and scrap related to our existing inventory and costs related to the chemicals and laboratory analysis associated with our tracer diagnostics services.



Our SG&A expenses are comprised of compensation expense, which includes compensation and benefit-related expenses for our employees who are not directly involved in revenue generating activities, including those involved in our research and development activities, as well as our general operating costs. These general operating costs include, but are not limited to: rent and occupancy for our facilities, information technology infrastructure services, software licensing, advertising and marketing, third party research and development, risk insurance and professional service fees for audit, legal and other consulting services. Our SG&A expenses also include severance expenses, litigation expenses and provisions for doubtful accounts. As a result of being a public company, our legal, accounting and other expenses have increased and may further increase for costs associated with our compliance with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.



The percentage of our operating costs denominated in Canadian dollars (including cost of sales and SG&A expenses but excluding depreciation and amortization expense) approximated 27% and 30% for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. 



 

24


 

Results of Operations



Three Months Ended March 31, 2021 Compared to Three Months Ended March 31, 2020



The following table summarizes our revenues and expenses for the periods presented (dollars in thousands):







 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

March 31,

 

Variance



 

2021

 

2020

 

$

 

%  

Revenues

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product sales

 

$

20,174 

 

$

39,430 

 

$

(19,256)

 

(48.8)

%

Services

 

 

8,340 

 

 

15,120 

 

 

(6,780)

 

(44.8)

%

Total revenues

 

 

28,514 

 

 

54,550 

 

 

(26,036)

 

(47.7)

%

Cost of sales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of product sales, exclusive of depreciation and amortization expense shown below

 

 

13,921 

 

 

23,448 

 

 

(9,527)

 

(40.6)

%

Cost of services, exclusive of depreciation and amortization expense shown below

 

 

4,357 

 

 

7,166 

 

 

(2,809)

 

(39.2)

%

Total cost of sales, exclusive of depreciation and amortization expense shown below

 

 

18,278 

 

 

30,614 

 

 

(12,336)

 

(40.3)

%

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

 

12,784 

 

 

20,835 

 

 

(8,051)

 

(38.6)

%

Depreciation

 

 

937 

 

 

1,452 

 

 

(515)

 

(35.5)

%

Amortization

 

 

167 

 

 

1,133 

 

 

(966)

 

(85.3)

%

Impairment

 

 

 —

 

 

50,194 

 

 

(50,194)

 

(100.0)

%

Loss from operations

 

 

(3,652)

 

 

(49,678)

 

 

46,026 

 

92.6 

%

Other income (expense)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense, net

 

 

(168)

 

 

(322)

 

 

154 

 

47.8 

%

Other income, net

 

 

341 

 

 

158 

 

 

183 

 

115.8 

%

Foreign currency exchange gain, net

 

 

150 

 

 

10 

 

 

140 

 

NM

%

Total other income (expense)

 

 

323 

 

 

(154)

 

 

477 

 

309.7 

%

Loss before income tax

 

 

(3,329)

 

 

(49,832)

 

 

46,503 

 

93.3 

%

Income tax expense (benefit)

 

 

128 

 

 

(925)

 

 

1,053 

 

113.8 

%

Net loss

 

 

(3,457)

 

 

(48,907)

 

 

45,450 

 

92.9 

%

Net (loss) income attributable to noncontrolling interest

 

 

(60)

 

 

2,642 

 

 

(2,702)

 

(102.3)

%

Net loss attributable to
    NCS Multistage Holdings, Inc.

 

$

(3,397)

 

$

(51,549)

 

$

48,152 

 

93.4 

%

_______________

(1)

NM – Percentage not meaningful



Revenues



Revenues were $28.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 as compared to $54.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020.  This decrease reflected reductions in product sales and services volumes in all geographic areas as well as lower pricing for certain products and services, including composite plugs and tracer diagnostics. We believe the decrease in both activity and pricing resulted from the decline in market conditions primarily related to the COVID-19 pandemic, which had a negative impact on our revenues during the three months ended March 31, 2021 as drilling rig and completion activity was substantially lower in the first quarter of 2021 as compared to 2020, particularly in North America. Product sales for the three months ended March 31, 2021 were $20.2 million as compared to $39.4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020. Services revenue was $8.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 as compared to $15.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020.



Cost of sales



Cost of sales was $18.3 million, or 64.1% of revenues, for the three months ended March 31, 2021 as compared to $30.6 million, or 56.1% of revenues, for the three months ended March 31, 2020. Cost of sales as a percentage of total revenues increased due to the significant reduction in revenue, leading to under-utilization of manufacturing capacity and field service personnel, even after the reduction of our capacity and staff, as well as a reduction in pricing for certain products and services. Cost of sales in the first quarter of 2021 was also impacted by higher scrap expense and inventory reserves at Repeat Precision related to product design changes implemented during the quarter. We believe that our cost of sales as a percentage of revenue was negatively impacted by a decline in oil and gas market activity levels primarily related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Cost of product sales was $13.9 million, or 69.0% of product sales revenue, and cost of services was $4.4 million, or 52.2% of service revenue, for the three months ended March 31,

 

25


 

2021. For the three months ended March 31, 2020, cost of product sales was $23.4 million, or 59.5% of product sales revenue, and cost of services was $7.2 million, or 47.4% of service revenue.

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses



Selling, general and administrative expenses were $12.8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 as compared to $20.8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020. This overall decrease in expense reflects reductions in compensation and benefits associated with lower headcount and lower salary and wages,  professional fees, share-based compensation and bad debt expense of $2.9 million, $1.1 million, $0.6 million and $0.4 million, respectively. We believe that travel restrictions enacted in response to the COVID-19 pandemic had a slightly favorable impact on our SG&A expense, primarily due to a reduction in travel and entertainment expenses, which decreased by $0.4 million.  In addition, we incurred incremental severance charges of $1.4 million in 2020 due to the timing of workforce reductions.

 

Depreciation



Depreciation was $0.9 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 as compared to $1.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020. The decrease is primarily attributable to a non-cash impairment charge of $9.7 million during the first quarter of 2020, which reduced the carrying values of our land, building and improvements and machinery and equipment. Additionally, our capital expenditures in 2020 and 2021 have been lower than in prior years. See “Note 5. Property and Equipment” of our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements for additional detail.



Amortization



Amortization was $0.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 as compared to $1.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020. The decrease in amortization was related to non-cash impairment charges of $40.5 million during the first quarter of 2020, which reduced the carrying values of technology, internally-developed software,  customer relationships, and trademarks. See “Note 6. Goodwill and Identifiable Intangibles” of our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements for additional detail.



Impairment



On March 31, 2020, we evaluated our property and equipment and finite-lived intangible assets for impairment due to current industry conditions such as a reduction in global economic growth expectations, a significantly reduced demand for crude oil and refined products, the significant decline in commodity prices and the corresponding impact on future expectations of demand for our products and services primarily related to the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the resulting decline in the quoted price of our common stock. We determined that the carrying amount of certain of our long-lived assets exceeded the corresponding fair value. We recorded impairment charges of $9.7 million in property and equipment and $40.5 million in finite-lived intangible assets. See “Note 5. Property and Equipment” and “Note 6. Goodwill and Identifiable Intangibles” of our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements for additional detail.



Income tax expense (benefit)



Income tax expense (benefit) was $0.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 as compared to $(0.9) million for the three months ended March 31, 2020. Included in the tax expense for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was a tax expense of $0.7 million for an increase in a valuation allowance on deferred tax assets not expected to be realized and a tax expense of $0.3 for foreign taxes. Included in the tax benefit for the three months ended March 31, 2020 were several U.S. tax (benefit) expense adjustments related to the enactment of the CARES Act including a tax benefit of $(1.4) million related to a NOL carryback allowed under the CARES Act that was previously unavailable, and a tax expense of $10.3 million for an increase in a valuation allowance on deferred tax assets not expected to be realized. Also included in tax benefit for the three months ended March 31, 2020 was a tax expense in the amount of $1.6 million for a valuation allowance against our Canadian deferred tax asset based on management’s position that NCS has not met the more likely than not condition of realizing part of the deferred tax asset. Additionally, the tax expense (benefit) for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 included a tax expense of $0.4 million and $1.1 million, respectively, for the tax effect of stock awards.



As a result of the geographic mix of earnings and losses, including discrete items, our tax rate has been and will continue to be volatile.



 

26


 

Liquidity and Capital Resources



Our primary sources of liquidity are our existing cash and cash equivalents, cash provided by operating activities and borrowings under our Senior Secured Credit Facility. As of March 31, 2021, we had cash and cash equivalents of $12.0 million and total outstanding indebtedness of $5.7 million, of which no amount is currently outstanding under our Senior Secured Credit Facility. The Senior Secured Credit Facility consists of a senior secured revolving credit facility in an aggregate principal amount of $25.0 million. Total borrowings are limited to a borrowing base calculated based on eligible receivables, provided that it does not include receivables at Repeat Precision. We were in compliance with our debt covenants at March 31, 2021. We believe that our cash on hand, cash flows from operations and potential borrowings under our Senior Secured Credit Facility will be sufficient to fund our capital expenditure and liquidity requirements for the next twelve months.  Our borrowing base under the Senior Secured Credit Facility at March 31, 2021 was $14.4 million. The amount available to be drawn under the Senior Secured Credit Facility may decline from current levels due to reductions in our borrowing base or a springing financial covenant if our business continues to be adversely impacted by a decline in market conditions primarily related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Our principal liquidity needs have been, and are expected to continue to be, capital expenditures, working capital, debt service and potential mergers and acquisitions.



Our capital expenditures for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 were $0.1 million and $0.5 million, respectively. We plan to incur approximately $1.0 million to $2.0 million in capital expenditures during 2021, which includes (i) additional machining and other capital equipment at Repeat Precision, (ii) internally-developed software, (iii) additional equipment to support our tracer diagnostics services and (iv) vehicles used in international operations.



We anticipate that to the extent we require additional liquidity to fund our capital requirements or repay existing indebtedness, it will be funded through the incurrence of additional indebtedness, the proceeds of equity issuances, or a combination thereof. We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain this additional liquidity on reasonable terms, or at all. Our liquidity and our ability to meet our obligations and fund our capital requirements are also dependent on our future financial performance and ability to reduce costs, which is subject to general economic, financial and other factors that are beyond our control, including the COVID-19 pandemic. Accordingly, we cannot assure you that our business will generate sufficient cash flow from operations or that funds will be available from additional indebtedness, the capital markets or otherwise to meet our liquidity needs. If we decide to pursue one or more significant acquisitions, we may incur additional debt or sell additional equity to finance such acquisitions, which could result in additional expenses or dilution.



Cash Flows



The following table provides a summary of cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities for the periods presented (in thousands):







 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Three Months Ended



 

March 31,



 

2021

 

2020

Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities

 

$

(1,815)

 

$

3,608 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

(64)

 

 

(438)

Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities

 

 

(1,733)

 

 

1,367 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

 

 

29 

 

 

(295)

Net change in cash and cash equivalents

 

$

(3,583)

 

$

4,242 



Operating Activities



Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities was $(1.8) million and $3.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The decrease in cash flow was primarily driven by lower net income in 2021 compared to 2020, after adjusting for impairment charges, and unfavorable changes in other liabilities as well as lower non-cash share-based compensation and depreciation and amortization expenses. The decrease was partially offset by favorable changes in accounts receivable and prepaid expenses and other assets.



Investing Activities



Net cash used in investing activities was $0.1 million and $0.4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.  The decrease in cash used in investing activities during the three months ended March 31, 2021 as compared to the three months ended March 31, 2020 was primarily related to reduced capital expenditures for property, equipment, software and technology which totaled $0.1 million and $0.5 million, respectively.



 

27


 

Financing Activities



Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities was $(1.7) million and $1.4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.  Our primary use of funds for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was $1.3 million of distributions to our joint venture partner and principal payments under finance leases of $0.3 million. The primary source of cash from financing activities in 2020 was borrowing $5.0 million under our Senior Secured Credit Facility, partially offset by distributions to our joint venture partner of $3.1 million.



Financing Arrangements



On May 1, 2019, we entered into a Second Amended and Restated Credit Agreement (the “2019 Credit Agreement”) with Pioneer Investment, Inc., as U.S. borrower (the “U.S. Borrower”), NCS Multistage Inc., as Canadian borrower (the “Canadian Borrower”; together with the U.S. Borrower, the “Borrowers”), Pioneer Intermediate, Inc. (together with the Company, the “Parent Guarantors”), the lenders party thereto, Wells Fargo Bank, National Association as administrative agent (the “U.S. Agent”) in respect of the U.S. facility provided therein and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, Canadian Branch, as administrative agent (the “Canadian Agent”) in respect of the Canadian Facility provided therein. The 2019 Credit Agreement amended and restated our prior credit agreement in its entirety. See “Note 8. Debt” to our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements for additional details regarding our 2019 Credit Agreement.



On August 6, 2020, we entered into Amendment No. 1 to Second Amended and Restated Credit Agreement (the “Amendment”; the 2019 Credit Agreement, as amended by the Amendment, the “Amended Credit Agreement”) with the Borrowers, Pioneer Intermediate, Inc., certain subsidiaries of the Borrowers, the lenders party thereto, the U.S. Agent and the Canadian Agent. The facility provided pursuant to the Amended Credit Agreement is referred to herein as the “Senior Secured Credit Facility”.



The Senior Secured Credit Facility consists of a senior secured revolving credit facility in an aggregate principal amount of $25.0 million made available to the U.S. Borrower, of which up to $2.5 million may be made available for letters of credit and up to $2.5 million may be made available for swingline loans. The Canadian Borrower may make borrowings under the Senior Secured Credit Facility, subject to a $15.0 million sublimit. Total borrowings available to the Borrowers under the Senior Secured Credit Facility is limited to a borrowing base calculated based on eligible receivables, provided that it does not include receivables at Repeat Precision. The Senior Secured Credit Facility will mature on May 1, 2023.



Borrowings under the Senior Secured Credit Facility may be made in U.S. dollars for Adjusted Base Rate Advances, and in U.S. dollars, Canadian dollars or Euros for Eurocurrency Rate Advances (each as defined in the Amended Credit Agreement). Such advances bear interest at the Adjusted Base Rate or at the Eurocurrency Rate (each as defined in the Amended Credit Agreement) plus an applicable interest margin between 2.75% and 3.75%, depending on NCS’s leverage ratio.



The obligations of the Borrowers under the Senior Secured Credit Facility are guaranteed by the Parent Guarantors, as well as each of the other existing and future direct and indirect restricted subsidiaries of NCS organized under the laws of the United States and Canada (subject to certain exceptions), and are secured by substantially all of the assets of the Parent Guarantors, the Borrowers and such other subsidiary guarantors, in each case, subject to certain exceptions and permitted liens.



The Amended Credit Agreement requires us to (i) maintain liquidity (defined as availability under the Senior Secured Credit Facility plus certain cash deposits) of at least $7.5 million as of the date of each borrowing base certificate due to be delivered either monthly (if availability is greater than or equal to than 12%) or weekly (if availability is less than 12%) thereunder, (ii) maintain, for quarters during which availability is less than 20% of the borrowing base, a fixed charge coverage ratio of at least 1.0 to 1.0 and (iii) on the last business day of each week, prepay advances to the extent that available cash exceeds $12.0 million. As of March 31, 2021, we were in compliance with these financial covenants. The Amended Credit Agreement also contains customary affirmative and negative covenants, including, among other things, restrictions on the creation of liens, the incurrence of indebtedness, investments, dividends and other restricted payments, dispositions and transactions with affiliates.



The Amended Credit Agreement includes customary events of default for facilities of this type (with customary materiality thresholds and grace periods, as applicable). If an event of default occurs, the lenders party to the Amended Credit Agreement may elect (after the expiration of any applicable notice or grace periods) to declare all outstanding borrowings under such facility, together with accrued and unpaid interest and other amounts payable thereunder, to be immediately due and payable. The lenders party to the Amended Credit Agreement also have the right upon an event of default thereunder to terminate any commitments they have to provide further borrowings and to proceed against the collateral securing the Senior Secured Credit Facility.



Repeat Precision also has outstanding promissory notes with an aggregate borrowing capacity of up to $9.3 million as of March 31, 2021, subject to a borrowing base. See “Note 8. Debt” of our consolidated financial statements for further information regarding the promissory notes.

 

28


 



Contractual Obligations



There have been no material changes in our contractual obligations and commitments from those disclosed in the Annual Report for the year ended December 31, 2020.



Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements



We have no off-balance sheet financing arrangements.

 

Critical Accounting Policies



There are no other material changes to our critical accounting policies from those included in the Annual Report for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements



See “Note 1. Basis of Presentation” to our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements for a discussion of the accounting pronouncements we recently adopted and the accounting pronouncements recently issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board.

 

Emerging Growth Company and Smaller Reporting Company Status



We are an “emerging growth company” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”). We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of (1) the last day of our fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the completion of our initial public offering, (b) in which we have total annual gross revenue of at least $1.07 billion, or (c) in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of our common stock that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700.0 million as of the last business day of our most recently completed second fiscal quarter, and (2) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt securities during the prior three-year period. Additionally, we are also a “smaller reporting company” as defined by Section 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (“Exchange Act”), meaning that we are not an investment company, an asset-backed issuer, or a majority-owned subsidiary of a parent company that is not a smaller reporting company and have a public float of less than $250 million. As an emerging growth company and a smaller reporting company, we may take advantage of specified reduced reporting and other burdens that are otherwise applicable generally to public companies that do not qualify for those classifications.

 

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements



This Quarterly Report includes certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements can be identified by words such as “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “seeks,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects” and similar references to future periods, or by the inclusion of forecasts or projections. Examples of forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements we make regarding the outlook for our future business and financial performance, including the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic thereon, such as those contained in this Item 2. “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”



Forward-looking statements are based on our current expectations and assumptions regarding our business, the economy and other future conditions. Because forward-looking statements relate to the future, by their nature, they are subject to inherent uncertainties, risks and changes in circumstances that are difficult to predict. As a result, our actual results may differ materially from those contemplated by the forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements include regional, national or global political, economic, business, competitive, market and regulatory conditions and the following:

·

the risks and uncertainties relating to public health crises, including the COVID-19 pandemic and its continuing impact on market conditions and our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and stock price;

·

declines in the level of oil and natural gas exploration and production activity within Canada and the United States;

·

oil and natural gas price fluctuations;

·

the financial health of our customers including their ability to pay for products or services provided;

·

inability to successfully implement our strategy of increasing sales of products and services into the United States;

·

significant competition for our products and services that results in pricing pressures, reduced sales, or reduced market share;

 

29


 

·

loss of significant customers;

·

our inability to successfully develop and implement new technologies, products and services;

·

our inability to protect and maintain critical intellectual property assets;

·

losses and liabilities from uninsured or underinsured business activities;

·

our failure to identify and consummate potential acquisitions;

·

our inability to integrate or realize the expected benefits from acquisitions;

·

currency exchange rate fluctuations;

·

impact of severe weather conditions;

·

risks resulting from the operations of a joint venture arrangement;

·

restrictions on the availability of our customers to obtain water essential to the drilling and hydraulic fracturing processes;

·

changes in legislation or regulation governing the oil and natural gas industry, including restrictions on emissions of greenhouse gases;

·

our inability to meet regulatory requirements for use of certain chemicals by our tracer diagnostics business;

·

change in trade policy, including the impact of additional tariffs;

·

our inability to accurately predict customer demand, which may result in us holding excess or obsolete inventory;

·

failure to comply with or changes to federal, state and local and non-U.S. laws and other regulations, including anti-corruption and environmental regulations, the CARES Act and the U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017;

·

loss of our information and computer systems;

·

system interruptions or failures, including complications with our enterprise resource planning system, cyber security breaches, identity theft or other disruptions that could compromise our information;

·

impairment in the carrying value of long-lived assets and goodwill;

·

our failure to establish and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting;

·

our success in attracting and retaining qualified employees and key personnel;

·

risks and uncertainties relating to cost reduction efforts or savings we may realize from such cost reduction efforts;

·

the reduction in our Senior Secured Credit Facility borrowing base or our inability to comply with the covenants in our debt agreements; and

·

our inability to obtain sufficient liquidity on reasonable terms, or at all.



For the reasons described above, as well as factors identified in “Item 1A. Risk Factors” in this Quarterly Report and the section of the Annual Report entitled “Risk Factors,” we caution you against relying on any forward-looking statements. Any forward-looking statement made by us in this Quarterly Report speaks only as of the date on which we make it. Factors or events that could cause our actual results to differ may emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for us to predict all of them. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise, except as may be required by law.

 

Item 3.  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk



For our quantitative and qualitative disclosures about market risk, see Item 7A, “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk,” in our Annual Report for the year ended December 31, 2020. Our exposure to market risk has not changed materially since December 31, 2020.

 

Item 4.  Controls and Procedures



Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures



Our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act) as of March 31, 2021. Based on this evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that, as of March 31, 2021, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in

 

30


 

the SEC’s rules and forms and that such information is accumulated and communicated to management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.



Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting



There were no changes to our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the quarter ended March 31, 2021 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

31


 



PART II. OTHER INFORMATION



Item 1. Legal Proceedings



See “Note 9. Commitments and Contingencies” of our condensed consolidated financial statements for further information regarding our legal proceedings.



Item 1A.  Risk Factors



There have been no material changes from the risk factors disclosed in our Annual Report for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

32


 

Item 6.  Exhibits



























 

 

 

Exhibit

 

 

No.

 

Description

*

31.1

 

Certification of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

*

31.2

 

Certification of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

**

32.1

 

Certification of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

**

32.2

 

Certification of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

***

101.INS

 

XBRL Instance Document

***

101.SCH

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema

***

101.CAL

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase

***

101.DEF

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase

***

101.LAB

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase

***

101.PRE

 

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase



 

 

 

*

  Filed herewith.

**

  Furnished herewith.

***

  Submitted electronically with this Report.

 

 

33


 

SIGNATURES



Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.





 

 

 



 

 

 

Date: May 4, 2021

 

NCS Multistage Holdings, Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

By:  

/s/ Ryan Hummer

 

 

 

Ryan Hummer

 

 

 

Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

 

 

 

 



 

 

(Principal Financial Officer and Authorized



 

 

Signatory)



 

34