Docoh
Loading...

ZLAB Zai Lab Limited

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 20-F

 

(Mark One)

REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OR (g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

OR

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

 

OR

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from      to      

 

OR

SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

Date of event requiring this shell company report      

 

Commission file number 001-38205

 

ZAI LAB LIMITED

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

N/A

(Translation of Registrant’s name into English)

 

Cayman Islands

(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

4560 Jinke Road

Bldg. 1, Fourth Floor
Pudong

Shanghai, China 201210

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

Samantha Du

Chief Executive Officer
Zai Lab Limited

4560 Jinke Road

Bldg. 1, Fourth Floor
Pudong

Shanghai, China 201210

Telephone: +86 21 6163 2588

(Name, telephone, email and/or facsimile number and address of Company contact person)

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Trading Symbol(s)

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

American depositary shares, each representing one
ordinary share, par value $0.00006 per share

 

ZLAB

 

Nasdaq Global Market

 

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

None

(Title of Class)

 

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act:

 

None

(Title of Class)

 

 

Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the Annual Report:

 

68,375,511 ordinary shares were issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2019

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes No

 

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Yes No

 

Note—checking the box above will not relieve any registrant required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 from their obligations under those sections.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or an emerging growth company. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large Accelerated Filer 

 

Accelerated Filer

Non-Accelerated Filer

 

Emerging Growth Company

 

If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards† pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  

 

† The term “new or revised financial accounting standard” refers to any update issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to its Accounting Standards Codification after April 5, 2012.

 

Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:

 

U.S. GAAP

International Financial Reporting Standards
as issued by the International Accounting
Standards Board

Other

 

If “Other” has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow. Item 17 Item 18

If this is an Annual Report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes No

 


 

Zai Lab Limited

Table of Contents

 

 

 

 

Page

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

 

3

Part I.

 

 

5

Item 1.

Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers

 

5

Item 2.

Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable

 

5

Item 3.

Key Information

 

5

Item 4.

Information on the Company

 

53

Item 4A.

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

137

Item 5.

Operating and Financial Review and Prospects

 

137

Item 6.

Directors, Senior Management and Employees

 

152

Item 7.

Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions

 

170

Item 8.

Financial Information

 

171

Item 9.

The Offer and Listing

 

171

Item 10.

Additional Information

 

171

Item 11.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

183

Item 12.

Description of Securities Other Than Equity Securities

 

184

Part II.

 

 

186

Item 13.

Defaults, Dividend Arrearages and Delinquencies

 

186

Item 14.

Material Modifications to the Rights of Security Holders and Use of Proceeds

 

186

Item 15.

Controls and Procedures

 

186

Item 16

Reserved

 

 

Item 16A.

Audit Committee Financial Experts

 

188

Item 16B.

Code of Ethics

 

188

Item 16C.

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

189

Item 16D.

Exemptions From The Listing Standards For Audit Committees

 

189

Item 16E.

Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers

 

189

Item 16F.

Change In Registrant’s Certifying Accountant

 

189

Item 16G.

Corporate Governance

 

190

Item 16H

Mine Safety Disclosure

 

190

Part III.

 

 

191

Item 17.

Financial Statements

 

191

Item 18.

Financial Statements

 

191

Item 19.

Exhibits

 

192

SIGNATURES

 

195

 

 

 


 

Industry and Market Data

Although we are responsible for all disclosure contained in this Annual Report on Form 20-F, in some cases we have relied on certain market and industry data obtained from third-party sources that we believe to be reliable. Market estimates are calculated by using independent industry publications, government publications and third-party forecasts in conjunction with our assumptions about our markets. While we are not aware of any misstatements regarding any market, industry or similar data presented herein, such data involves risks and uncertainties and is subject to change based on various factors, including those discussed under the headings “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and “Item 3.D. Risk Factors” in this Annual Report on Form 20-F.

Trademarks and Service Marks

We own or have rights to trademarks and service marks for use in connection with the operation of our business, including, but not limited to, ZAI LAB and 再鼎医药. All other trademarks or service marks appearing in this Annual Report on Form 20-F that are not identified as marks owned by us are the property of their respective owners.

Solely for convenience, the trademarks, service marks and trade names referred to in this Annual Report on Form 20-F are listed without the ®, (TM) and (sm) symbols, but we will assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our applicable rights in these trademarks, service marks and trade names.

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD‑LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Annual Report on Form 20-F contains forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are neither historical facts nor assurances of future performance. Instead, they are based on our current beliefs, expectations and assumptions regarding the future of our business, future plans and strategies, our operational results and other future conditions. Forward-looking statements can be identified by words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “predict,” “project,” “seek,” “target,” “potential,” “will,” “would,” “could,” “should,” “continue,” “contemplate” and other similar expressions, although not all forward-looking statements contain these identifying words. These forward-looking statements include all matters that are not historical facts. They appear in a number of places throughout this Annual Report on Form 20-F and include statements regarding our intentions, beliefs or current expectations concerning, among other things, our results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, prospects, growth, strategies and the industry in which we operate.

By their nature, forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties because they relate to events and depend on circumstances that may or may not occur in the future. We believe that these risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, those described in the “Item 3.D. Risk Factors” section of this Annual Report on Form 20-F, which include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

our ability to successfully commercialize ZEJULA, Optune and any other products and drug candidates that we may obtain regulatory approval for;

 

the initiation, timing, progress and results of our pre-clinical studies and clinical trials, and our research and development programs;

 

the timing or likelihood of regulatory filings and approvals;

 

our ability to continue to develop our commercial team and our sales and marketing capabilities;

 

our ability to contract on commercially reasonable terms with contract research organizations, or CROs, third-party suppliers and manufacturers;

 

the pricing and reimbursement of our drug candidates, if approved;

 

our ability to contract on commercially reasonable terms with CROs;

 

the disruption of our business relationships with our licensors;

3


 

 

our ability to operate our business without breaching our licenses or other intellectual property-related agreements;

 

cost associated with defending against intellectual property infringement, product liability and other claims;

 

regulatory developments in China, the United States and other jurisdictions;

 

the ability to obtain additional funding for our operations;

 

the rate and degree of market acceptance of our products and drug candidates;

 

developments relating to our competitors and our industry;

 

our ability to effectively manage our growth; and

 

our ability to retain key executives and to attract, retain and motivate personnel.

These factors should not be construed as exhaustive and should be read with the other cautionary statements in this Annual Report on Form 20-F.

Although we base these forward-looking statements on assumptions that we believe are reasonable when made, we caution you that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and that our actual results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate may differ materially from those made in or suggested by the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 20-F. In addition, even if our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate, are consistent with the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 20-F, those results or developments may not be indicative of results or developments in subsequent periods.

Given these risks and uncertainties, you are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Any forward-looking statement that we make in this Annual Report on Form 20-F speaks only as of the date of such statement, and we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements or to publicly announce the results of any revisions to any of those statements to reflect future events or developments. Comparisons of results for current and any prior periods are not intended to express any future trends or indications of future performance, unless specifically expressed as such, and should only be viewed as historical data.

 

4


 

PART I

ITEM 1.  IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS

Not applicable.

ITEM 2.  OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE

Not applicable.

ITEM 3.  KEY INFORMATION

A.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

Our Selected Consolidated Financial Data

The following selected consolidated statement of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017 and the selected balance sheet data as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 20-F. Our historical results for any period are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected for any future period. The selected consolidated financial data should be read in conjunction with, and are qualified in their entirety by reference to, our audited consolidated financial statements and related notes and “Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects” below. Our consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, or U.S. GAAP.

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

 

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

Revenue

 

$

12,985

 

 

$

129

 

 

$

 

Expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of sales

 

 

(3,749

)

 

 

(43

)

 

 

 

Research and development expenses

 

 

(142,221

)

 

 

(120,278

)

 

 

(39,342

)

Selling, general and administrative expenses

 

 

(70,211

)

 

 

(21,576

)

 

 

(12,049

)

Loss from operations

 

$

(203,196

)

 

$

(141,768

)

 

$

(51,391

)

Interest income

 

 

8,232

 

 

 

3,261

 

 

 

527

 

Interest expenses

 

 

(293

)

 

 

(40

)

 

 

 

Changes in fair value of warrants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

200

 

Other income, net

 

 

938

 

 

 

59

 

 

 

530

 

Loss before income taxes and share of loss from

   equity method investment

 

$

(194,319

)

 

$

(138,488

)

 

$

(50,134

)

Income tax expense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share of loss from equity method investment

 

 

(752

)

 

 

(587

)

 

 

(250

)

Net loss

 

$

(195,071

)

 

$

(139,075

)

 

$

(50,384

)

Weighted-average shares used in calculating net loss

   per ordinary share, basic and diluted (1)

 

 

64,369,490

 

 

 

52,609,810

 

 

 

21,752,757

 

Net loss per share, basic and diluted (1)

 

 

(3.03

)

 

 

(2.64

)

 

 

(2.32

)

 

(1)

See Note 2 to our audited consolidated financial statements appearing elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 20-F for a description of the method used to calculate basic and diluted net loss per share.

5


 

 

 

 

As of December 31,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Consolidated balance sheet data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash

 

$

76,442

 

 

$

62,952

 

Short-term investments (1)

 

$

200,000

 

 

$

200,350

 

Total assets

 

$

355,153

 

 

$

301,987

 

Total shareholders’ equity

 

$

294,660

 

 

$

251,082

 

Total current liabilities

 

$

46,635

 

 

$

48,842

 

Total non-current liabilities

 

$

13,858

 

 

$

2,064

 

 

(1)

The short-term investments primarily comprise of the time deposits with original maturities between three months and one year.

 

B.

CAPITALIZATION AND INDEBTEDNESS

Not applicable.

 

 

C.

REASONS FOR THE OFFER AND USE OF PROCEEDS

Not applicable.

D.

RISK FACTORS

Risks Related to Our Financial Position and Need for Additional Capital

We have incurred significant losses since our inception and anticipate that we will continue to incur losses in the future and may never achieve or maintain profitability.

The Hong Kong Department of Health approved ZEJULA in October 2018 and we launched ZEJULA in Hong Kong in December 2018. In June 2019, we received marketing authorization to commercialize ZEJULA in Macau for women with relapsed ovarian cancer. The China National Medical Products Administration, or NMPA, approved ZEJULA in December 2019 as a maintenance therapy for adult patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer, who are in a complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy and we launched ZEJULA in the People’s Republic of China, or PRC or China, in January 2020. In December 2018, we announced the launch of Optune (Tumor Treating Fields) for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme, or GBM, in Hong Kong. Although we launched ZEJULA in China in January 2020 for recurrent ovarian cancer, in Macau in June 2019 for recurrent ovarian cancer, and in Hong Kong in December 2018 for adult patients with platinum-sensitive relapsed high grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer who are in a complete response or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy and we launched Optune (Tumor Treating Fields) in Hong Kong in December 2018, it will take some time to attain profitability and we may never do so. We have also obtained the rights to commercialize many clinical-stage drug candidates. Investment in biopharmaceutical product development is highly speculative because it entails substantial upfront capital expenditures and significant risk that a drug candidate will fail to gain regulatory approval or become commercially viable. To date, we have financed our activities primarily through private placements, our initial public offering in September 2017 and multiple follow-on offerings. For the year ended December 31, 2019, we generated revenue of $13.0 million from product sales, and we continue to incur significant development and other expenses related to our ongoing operations. As a result, we are not profitable and have incurred losses in each period since our inception in 2013. For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, we reported a net loss of $195.1 million and $139.1 million, respectively.

We expect to continue to incur losses in the foreseeable future, and we expect these losses to increase as we:

 

continue to commercialize ZEJULA, Optune and any other products for which we may obtain regulatory approval;

 

maintain and expand sales, marketing and commercialization infrastructure for ZEJULA, Optune and any other products for which we may obtain regulatory approval;

6


 

 

maintain and expand regulatory approvals for our products and drug candidates that successfully complete clinical trials;

 

continue our development and commence clinical trials of our drug candidates;

 

maintain our manufacturing facilities;

 

hire additional clinical, operational, financial, quality control and scientific personnel;

 

seek to identify additional drug candidates;

 

obtain, maintain, expand and protect our intellectual property portfolio;

 

enforce and defend intellectual property-related claims; and

 

acquire or in-license other intellectual property, drug candidates and technologies.

To become and remain profitable, we must continue commercialization efforts of ZEJULA and Optune and develop and eventually commercialize other drug candidates with significant market potential. This will require us to be successful in a range of challenging activities, including manufacturing, marketing and selling approved products such as ZEJULA, Optune and other products for which we may obtain marketing approval as well as completing pre-clinical testing and clinical trials of and obtaining marketing approval for our clinical and pre-clinical stage drug candidates. We will also need to be successful in satisfying any post-marketing requirements with respect to all of our products and drug candidates. We may not succeed in any or all of these activities and, even if we do, we may never generate product revenues that are significant or large enough to achieve profitability. We may encounter unforeseen expenses, difficulties, complications, delays and other unknown factors that may adversely affect our business. The size of our future net losses will depend, in part, on the rate of future growth of our expenses and our ability to generate revenue. Even if we achieve profitability in the future, we may not be able to sustain profitability in subsequent periods. Our failure to become and remain profitable would decrease the value of our company and could impair our ability to raise capital, maintain our research and development efforts and commercialization efforts, expand our business or continue our operations. A decline in the value of our company also could cause you to lose all or part of your investment.

We will continue to require substantial additional funding for our drug development programs and for our commercialization efforts for ZEJULA, Optune and other products for which we may obtain regulatory approval, which may not be available on acceptable terms, or at all. If we are unable to raise capital on acceptable terms when needed, we could incur losses or be forced to delay, reduce or terminate such efforts.

To date, we have financed our activities primarily through private placements, our initial public offering in September 2017 and three rounds of follow-on offerings. In January 2020, we raised $280.6 million in net proceeds from our subsequent follow-on offering of 6,300,000 of our American depositary shares, or ADSs. As of April 2020, through these offerings, we have raised $958.6 million. Our operations have consumed substantial amounts of cash since inception. The net cash used in our operating activities was $191.0 million and $97.5 million for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. We expect our expenses to increase significantly in connection with our ongoing activities, particularly as we continue to commercialize ZEJULA and Optune, research and develop our pre-clinical-stage drug candidates and initiate additional clinical trials of, and seek and/or expand regulatory approval for, ZEJULA, Optune and our other drug assets. In addition, if we obtain regulatory approval for any additional drug candidates, we expect to incur significant commercialization expenses related to product manufacturing, marketing, sales and distribution. In particular, if more of our drug candidates are approved, additional costs may be substantial as we may have to modify or increase the production capacity at our current manufacturing facilities or contract with third-party manufacturers. We have, and may continue to, incur expenses as we create additional infrastructure to support our operations. Accordingly, we will likely need to obtain substantial additional funding in connection with our continuing operations through public or private equity offerings, debt financing, collaborations or licensing arrangements or other sources. If we are unable to raise capital when needed or on acceptable terms, we could incur losses and be forced to delay, reduce or terminate our research and development programs or any future commercialization efforts.

7


 

We believe our cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments as of December 31, 2019 will enable us to fund our operating expenses and capital expenditure requirements for at least the next 12 months. We have based this estimate on assumptions that may prove to be wrong, and we could use our capital resources sooner than we currently expect. Our future capital requirements will depend on many factors, including:

 

the cost and timing of future commercialization activities, including product manufacturing, marketing, sales and distribution for ZEJULA, Optune and any other products for which we receive regulatory approval;

 

the cash received, if any, from future commercial sales of ZEJULA, Optune and any other products for which we receive regulatory approval;

 

the number and development requirements of the drug candidates we pursue;

 

the scope, progress, timing, results and costs of researching and developing our drug candidates, and conducting pre-clinical and clinical trials;

 

the number and characteristics of other product candidates that we may pursue;

 

the cost, timing and outcome of seeking, obtaining, maintaining and expanding regulatory approval of our products and drug candidates;

 

our ability to establish and maintain strategic partnerships, collaboration, licensing or other arrangement and the financial terms of such arrangements;

 

the cost, timing and outcome of preparing, filing and prosecuting patent applications, maintaining and enforcing our intellectual property rights and defending any intellectual property related claims;

 

the extent to which we acquire or in-license other drug candidates and technologies;

 

resources required to develop and implement policies and processes to promote ongoing compliance with applicable healthcare laws and regulations;

 

costs required to ensure that our and our partners’ business arrangements with third parties comply with applicable healthcare laws and regulations;

 

our headcount growth and associated costs; and

 

the costs of operating as a public company in the United States.

Raising additional capital or entering into certain other arrangements may cause dilution to our shareholders, restrict our operations or require us to relinquish rights to our technologies or drug candidates.

Identifying and acquiring rights to develop potential drug candidates, conducting pre-clinical testing and clinical trials and commercializing products for which we receive regulatory approval is a time-consuming, expensive and uncertain process that may take years to complete. Our near-term commercial revenue, if any, will be derived from sales of ZEJULA and Optune. Any additional commercial revenue, if any, will be derived from sales of drug candidates that we do not expect to be commercially available until we receive regulatory approval, if at all. We may never generate the necessary data or results required to obtain regulatory approval and achieve product sales of some of our drug candidates, and even if we obtain regulatory approval, our products may not achieve commercial success. Accordingly, we will need to continue to rely on additional financing to achieve our business objectives. Adequate additional financing may not be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all.

We may seek additional funding through a combination of equity offerings, debt financings, collaborations, licensing arrangements, strategic alliances and marketing or distribution arrangements. To the extent that we raise additional capital through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities, our shareholders’ ownership interest will be diluted, and the terms may include liquidation or other preferences that adversely affect rights of our security holders. The incurrence of additional indebtedness or the issuance of certain equity securities could result in increased fixed payment obligations and could also result in certain additional restrictive covenants, such as limitations on our ability to

8


 

incur additional debt or issue additional equity, limitations on our ability to acquire or license intellectual property rights and other operating restrictions that could adversely impact our ability to conduct our business. In addition, issuance of additional equity securities, or the possibility of such issuance, may cause the market price of our ADSs to decline. In the event that we enter into collaborations or licensing arrangements to raise capital, we may be required to accept unfavorable terms, including relinquishing or licensing to a third party on unfavorable terms our rights to technologies or drug candidates that we otherwise would seek to develop or commercialize ourselves or potentially reserve for future potential arrangements when we might be able to achieve more favorable terms.

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

Even though we have launched ZEJULA in China, Hong Kong and Macau and Optune (Tumor Treating Fields) in Hong Kong, we may never obtain approval of or commercialize Optune outside of Hong Kong and we may never obtain approval of ZEJULA for other indications outside of the regulatory approvals we have already obtained, which would limit our ability to realize its full market potential.

In order to market products in any given jurisdiction, we must comply with numerous and varying regulatory requirements of such jurisdiction regarding safety, efficacy and quality. The Hong Kong Department of Health approved ZEJULA in October 2018 and we launched ZEJULA in Hong Kong in December 2018. In June 2019, we received marketing authorization to commercialize ZEJULA in Macau for women with relapsed ovarian cancer. The NMPA approved ZEJULA in December 2019 as a maintenance therapy for adult patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer, who are in a complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy and we launched ZEJULA in China in January 2020. In December 2018, we announced the launch of Optune (Tumor Treating Fields) for the treatment of GBM in Hong Kong. The approval of Optune for commercialization in Hong Kong does not mean that the NMPA will approve Optune. The approval of ZEJULA for certain indications does not mean that the NMPA will approve ZEJULA for other indications. Approval procedures vary among jurisdictions and clinical trials conducted in one jurisdiction may not be accepted by regulatory authorities in other jurisdictions, and regulatory approval in one country does not mean that regulatory approval will be obtained in any other jurisdiction.

We are invested in the commercial success of ZEJULA and Optune and our ability to generate product revenues in the near future is highly dependent on the commercial success of ZEJULA in China and Hong Kong and Optune in Hong Kong.

A substantial portion of our time, resources and effort are focused on the commercialization of our approved product ZEJULA in China, Hong Kong, and Macau, and our approved product Optune in Hong Kong. Our ability to generate product revenues will depend heavily on the successful commercialization of ZEJULA in China, Hong Kong and Macau and Optune in Hong Kong. Our ability to successfully commercialize ZEJULA and Optune will depend on, among other things, our ability to:

 

maintain commercial manufacturing or supply arrangements with third-party manufacturers for ZEJULA and Optune;

 

produce, through a validated process or procure, from third-party manufacturers sufficient quantities and inventory of ZEJULA and Optune to meet demand;

 

build and maintain internal sales, distribution and marketing capabilities sufficient to generate commercial sales of ZEJULA and Optune;

 

secure widespread acceptance of our product from physicians, healthcare payors, patients and the medical community;

 

properly price and obtain coverage and adequate reimbursement of ZEJULA and of Optune by governmental authorities, private health insurers, managed care organizations and other third-party payors;

 

maintain compliance with ongoing regulatory labeling, packaging, storage, advertising, promotion, recordkeeping, safety and other post-market requirements;

9


 

 

manage our growth and spending as costs and expenses increase due to commercialization; and

 

manage business interruptions resulting from the occurrence of any pandemic, epidemic, including from the outbreak of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, or any other public health crises, natural catastrophe or other disasters.

There are no guarantees that we will be successful in completing these tasks. In addition, we have invested, and will continue to invest, substantial financial and management resources to build out our commercial infrastructure and to recruit and train sufficient additional qualified marketing, sales and other personnel in support of our sales of ZEJULA and Optune.

Sales of ZEJULA and Optune may be slow or limited for a variety of reasons including competing therapies or safety issues. If ZEJULA or Optune is not successful in gaining broad commercial acceptance, our business would be harmed.

Any sales of ZEJULA and Optune will be dependent on several factors, including our and our partners’ ability to educate and increase physician awareness of the benefits, safety and cost-effectiveness of ZEJULA and Optune relative to competing therapies. The degree of market acceptance of ZEJULA and Optune among physicians, patients, healthcare payors and the medical community will depend on a number of factors, including:

 

acceptable evidence of safety and efficacy;

 

relative convenience and ease of administration;

 

prevalence and severity of any adverse side effects;

 

availability of alternative treatments;

 

pricing, cost effectiveness and value propositions;

 

effectiveness of our sales and marketing capabilities and strategies;

 

ability to obtain sufficient third-party coverage and reimbursement;

 

the clinical indications for which ZEJULA and Optune are approved, as well as changes in the standard of care for their targeted indications;

 

the continuing effectiveness of manufacturing and supply chain;

 

warnings and limitations contained in the approved labeling for ZEJULA and for Optune;

 

safety concerns with similar products marketed by others;

 

the prevalence and severity of any side effects as a result of treatment with ZEJULA or Optune;

 

our ability to comply with regulatory post-marketing requirements associated with the approval of ZEJULA or Optune;

 

the actual market-size for ZEJULA and Optune, which may be larger or smaller than expected; and

 

our ability to manage complications or barriers that inhibit our commercial team from reaching the appropriate audience to promote our product(s) because of the outbreak of COVID-19 or any other public health crises, natural catastrophe or other disasters.

For example, due to business interruptions to hospitals and treatment centers in China arising in connection with the outbreak of COVID-19, some patients have experienced difficulties in accessing hospital care and, as a result, our commercial team has had fewer opportunities to reach patients who could benefit from ZEJULA or Optune (Tumor Treating Fields). Although the outbreak of COVID-19 has largely been contained in China and we have experienced

10


 

only minimal disruption to our commercialization of ZEJULA and Optune (Tumor Treating Fields), outbreaks may occur again and may result in similar business interruptions in the future.

We have a very limited operating history, which may make it difficult for you to evaluate the success of our business to date and to assess our future viability.

We commenced our operations in 2014. Our operations to date have been limited to organizing and staffing our company, identifying potential partnerships and drug candidates, acquiring product and technology rights, conducting research and development activities for our drug candidates and, more recently, commercializing products for which we have obtained regulatory approval. We have not yet demonstrated the ability to successfully complete large-scale, pivotal clinical trials. Additionally, we have limited experience in the sale, marketing or distribution of pharmaceutical and medical device products. Consequently, any predictions about our future success, performance or viability may not be as accurate as they could be if we had a longer operating history.

Our limited operating history, particularly in light of the rapidly evolving drug research and development industry in which we operate, may make it difficult to evaluate our current business and prospects for future performance. Our short history makes any assessment of our future performance or viability subject to significant uncertainty. We will encounter risks and difficulties frequently experienced by companies in rapidly evolving fields as we continue to expand our commercial activities. In addition, as a new business, we may be more likely to encounter unforeseen expenses, difficulties, complications and delays due to limited experience. If we do not address these risks and difficulties successfully, our business will suffer.

Many of our drug candidates are still in clinical development. If we are unable to obtain regulatory approval and ultimately commercialize these drug candidates or experience significant delays in doing so, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may be materially adversely harmed.

Many of our drug candidates are in clinical development and various others are in pre-clinical development. Our ability to generate revenue from our drug candidates is dependent on receipt of regulatory approval and successful commercialization of such products, which may never occur. Each of our drug candidates will require additional pre-clinical and/or clinical development, regulatory approval in multiple jurisdictions, development of manufacturing supply and capacity, substantial investment and significant marketing efforts before we generate any revenue from product sales. The success of our drug candidates will depend on several factors, including the following:

 

successful completion of pre-clinical and/or clinical studies;

 

successful enrollment in, and completion of, clinical trials;

 

receipt of regulatory approvals from applicable regulatory authorities for planned clinical trials, future clinical trials or drug registrations, manufacturing and commercialization;

 

successful completion of all safety studies required to obtain regulatory approval in China, the United States and other jurisdictions for our drug candidates;

 

adapting our commercial manufacturing capabilities to the specifications for our drug candidates for clinical supply and commercial manufacturing;

 

making and maintain arrangements with third-party manufacturers;

 

obtaining and maintaining patent, trade secret and other intellectual property protection and/or regulatory exclusivity for our drug candidates;

 

launching commercial sales of our drug candidates, if and when approved, whether alone or in collaboration with others;

 

acceptance of the drug candidates, if and when approved, by patients, the medical community and third-party payors;

 

effectively competing with other therapies and alternative drugs;

11


 

 

obtaining and maintaining healthcare coverage and adequate reimbursement;

 

successfully enforcing and defending intellectual property rights and claims; and

 

maintaining a continued acceptable safety profile of the drug candidates following regulatory approval.

The success of our business is substantially dependent on our ability to successfully commercialize ZEJULA and Optune as well as complete the development of, maintain, expand or obtain regulatory approval for, and successfully commercialize our drug candidates in a timely manner.

We cannot commercialize drug candidates in China without first obtaining regulatory approval from the NMPA. Similarly, we cannot commercialize drug candidates in the United States or another jurisdiction outside of China without obtaining regulatory approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, or comparable foreign regulatory authorities. The process to develop, obtain regulatory approval for and commercialize drug candidates is long, complex and costly both inside and outside of China and approval may not be granted. Clinical trials conducted in one country may not be accepted by regulatory authorities in other countries, and obtaining regulatory approval in one country does not mean that regulatory approval will be obtained in any other country. Approval processes vary among countries and can involve additional product testing and validation and additional administrative review periods. Even after obtaining regulatory approval from the FDA and comparable foreign regulatory authorities, we would still need to seek approval in China and any other jurisdictions where we plan to market the product. For example, we will need to conduct clinical trials of each of our drug candidates in patients in China prior to seeking regulatory approval in China. Even if our drug candidates have successfully completed clinical trials outside of China, there is no assurance that clinical trials conducted with Chinese patients will be successful. Any safety issues, product recalls or other incidents related to products approved and marketed in other jurisdictions may impact approval of those products by the NMPA. If we are unable to obtain regulatory approval for our drug candidates in one or more jurisdictions, or any approval contains significant limitations, or are imposed on certain drug candidates, we may not be able to obtain sufficient funding or generate sufficient revenue to continue the commercialization of our products and the development of our drug candidates or any other drug candidate that we may in-license, acquire or develop in the future.

We may allocate our limited resources to pursue a particular product, drug candidate or indication and fail to capitalize on products, drug candidates or indications that may later prove to be more profitable or for which there is a greater likelihood of success.

Because we have limited financial and managerial resources, we must limit our licensing, research, development and commercialization programs to specific products and drug candidates that we identify for specific indications. As a result, we may forego or delay pursuit of opportunities with other products or drug candidates or for other indications that later prove to have greater commercial potential. Our resource allocation decisions may cause us to fail to capitalize on viable commercial drugs or profitable market opportunities. In addition, if we do not accurately evaluate the commercial potential or target market for a particular drug candidate, we may relinquish valuable rights to that drug candidate through collaboration, licensing or other royalty arrangements when it would have been more advantageous for us to retain sole development and commercialization rights to such drug candidate.

Our products and drug candidates are subject to extensive regulation, and we cannot give any assurance that any of our drug candidates will receive any, or that any of our products will receive any additional, regulatory approval or be successfully commercialized.

Our products and drug candidates and the activities associated with their development and commercialization, including their design, testing, manufacture, safety, efficacy, quality control, recordkeeping, labeling, packaging, storage, approval, advertising, promotion, sale, distribution, import and export are subject to comprehensive regulation by the NMPA, FDA and European Medicines Agency, or EMA, and other regulatory agencies in China and the United States and by comparable authorities in other countries. We are not permitted to market any of our products or drug candidates in China, the United States and other jurisdictions unless and until we receive regulatory approval from the NMPA, FDA and EMA and other comparable authorities, respectively. Securing regulatory approval requires the submission of extensive pre-clinical and clinical data and supporting information to the various regulatory authorities for each therapeutic indication to establish the product’s or drug candidate’s safety and efficacy. Securing regulatory approval may also require the submission of information about the product or drug manufacturing process to, and inspection of manufacturing facilities by, the relevant regulatory authority. Our products and drug candidates may not be effective, may be only moderately effective or may prove to have undesirable or unintended side effects, toxicities or other characteristics that may preclude our obtaining regulatory approval or prevent or limit commercial use. Although Optune was approved for commercialization in Hong Kong, the United States and the European Union, we cannot provide any

12


 

assurance that we will ever obtain regulatory approval for Optune in China or for any of our other drug candidates in any jurisdiction or that any of our drug candidates will be successfully commercialized even if we receive regulatory approval.

The process of obtaining regulatory approvals in China, the United States and other countries is expensive, may take many years of additional clinical trials and can vary substantially based upon a variety of factors, including the type, complexity and novelty of the product or drug candidates involved. Changes in regulatory approval policies during the development period, changes in or the enactment of additional statutes or regulations, or changes in regulatory review for each submitted New Drug Application, or NDA, pre-market approval or equivalent application type, may cause delays in the approval or rejection of an application. The NMPA, FDA and EMA and comparable authorities in other countries have substantial discretion in the approval process and may refuse to accept any application or may decide that our data are insufficient for approval and require additional pre-clinical, clinical or other studies. Our products and drug candidates could be delayed in receiving, or fail to receive, regulatory approval for many reasons, including the following:

 

disagreement with the NMPA, FDA and EMA or comparable regulatory authorities regarding the number, design, size, conduct or implementation of our clinical trials;

 

failure to demonstrate to the satisfaction of the NMPA, FDA and EMA or comparable regulatory authorities that a drug candidate is safe and effective for its proposed indication;

 

failure of CROs, clinical study sites or investigators to comply with the ICH-good clinical practice, or GCP, requirements imposed by the NMPA, FDA and EMA or comparable regulatory authorities;

 

failure of the clinical trial results to meet the level of statistical significance required by the NMPA, FDA and EMA or comparable regulatory authorities for approval;

 

failure to demonstrate that a product’s or drug candidate’s clinical and other benefits outweigh its safety risks;

 

the NMPA, FDA and EMA or comparable regulatory authorities disagreeing with our interpretation of data from pre-clinical studies or clinical trials;

 

insufficient data collected from clinical trials to support the submission of an NDA or other submission or to obtain regulatory approval in China, the United States or elsewhere;

 

the NMPA, FDA and EMA or comparable regulatory authorities not approving the manufacturing processes for our clinical and commercial supplies;

 

changes in the approval policies or regulations of the NMPA, FDA or comparable regulatory authorities rendering our clinical data insufficient for approval;

 

the NMPA, FDA or comparable regulatory authorities restricting the use of our products to a narrow population; and

 

our CROs or licensors taking actions that materially and adversely impact the clinical trials. 

In addition, even if we were to obtain approval, regulatory authorities may revoke approval, may approve any of our products or drug candidates for fewer or more limited indications than we request, may monitor the price we intend to charge for our products or drugs, may grant approval contingent on the performance of costly post-marketing clinical trials, or may approve a product or drug candidate with a label that does not include the labeling claims necessary or desirable for the successful commercialization of that product or drug candidate. Any of the foregoing scenarios could materially harm the commercial prospects for our products or drug candidates.

13


 

The pharmaceutical industry in China is highly regulated and such regulations are subject to change, which may affect the approval and commercialization of our drugs and drug candidates.

The pharmaceutical industry in China is subject to comprehensive government regulation and supervision, encompassing the approval, manufacturing, distribution, and marketing of new drugs. In recent years, the pharmaceutical regulatory framework in China has undergone significant changes, and we expect that the transformation will continue. For instance, in June 2019, the State Council promulgated the Regulation on the Administration of PRC Human Genetic Resources, which became effective in July 2019. The Regulation on the Administration of PRC Human Genetic Resources replaced the advance approval requirement for clinical studies involving the collection of patient human genetic resources with a record-filing process, except for those involving the export of patient human genetic resources out of China. In August 2019, the PRC Drug Administration Law was amended by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, and became effective in December 2019. The new Drug Administration Law codifies the marketing authorization holder system and enhances the compliance standards throughout the product life cycle. In January 2020, the SAMR released the amended Administrative Measures for Supervision and Administration for Drug Registration, or the Drug Registration Measures Regulation, and the amended Measures for Supervision and Administration for Drug Manufacturing, or Drug Manufacturing Regulation, both of which will come into effect in July 2020. In April 2020, the NMPA and the NHC released the amended Good Clinical Practice for Pharmaceutical Product, or the Amended GCP, which will come into effect in July 2020. The amended Drug Registration Regulations omits the provisions that provide an administrative exclusivity of the new drug monitoring period up to five years. Detailed implementation rules on the Drug Registration Regulation and Drug Manufacturing Regulation are still pending, thus uncertainties exist as to whether other intellectual property protection systems, such as patent linkage and patent term extension, would be available.

Any changes or amendments with respect to government regulation and supervision of the pharmaceutical industry in China may result in uncertainties with respect to the interpretation and implementation of the relevant laws and regulations or adversely impact the development or commercialization of our drugs and drug candidates in China.

For further information regarding government regulation in China and other jurisdictions, see “Regulation—Government Regulation of Pharmaceutical Product Development and Approval,” “Regulation—Coverage and Reimbursement” and “Regulation—Other Healthcare Laws.”

If safety, efficacy, manufacturing or supply issues arise with any therapeutic that we use in combination with our products and drug candidates, we may be unable to market such products or drug candidate or may experience significant regulatory delays or supply shortages, and our business could be materially harmed.

We plan to develop certain of our products and drug candidates for use as a combination therapy. For example, GlaxoSmithKline, or GSK, is currently developing, and we also plan to develop, ZEJULA as both a monotherapy and in combination with any potential anti-VEGF or PD-1/PD-L1 treatments. However, we did not develop or obtain regulatory approval for, and we do not manufacture or sell, any anti-VEGF or PD-1/PD-L1 treatments or any other therapeutic we use in combination with our drug candidates. We may also seek to develop our drug candidates in combination with other therapeutics in the future.

If the NMPA, FDA or another regulatory agency revokes its approval of any anti-VEGF or PD-1/PD-L1 treatments or another therapeutic we use in combination with our drug candidates, we will not be able to market our drug candidates in combination with such revoked therapeutic. If safety or efficacy issues arise with these or other therapeutics that we seek to combine with our drug candidates in the future, we may experience significant regulatory delays, and we may be required to redesign or terminate the applicable clinical trials. In addition, if manufacturing or other issues result in a supply shortage of any anti-VEGF or PD-1/PD-L1 treatments or any other combination therapeutics, we may not be able to successfully commercialize ZEJULA on our current timeline or at all.

Even after obtaining regulatory approval for use in combination with any anti-VEGF or PD-1/PD-L1 treatments, as applicable, or another therapeutic, we would continue to be subject to the risk that the NMPA, FDA or another regulatory agency could revoke its approval of the combination therapeutic, or that safety, efficacy, manufacturing or supply issues could arise with one of these combination therapeutics. This could result in ZEJULA or one of our other products being removed from the market or being less successful commercially.

14


 

Additionally, although we have not experienced material supply disruptions due to the outbreak of COVID-19, we cannot guarantee that we will not experience supply disruptions in the future due to COVID-19 or any other pandemic, epidemic or other public health crises, natural catastrophe or other disasters.

We face substantial competition, which may result in our competitors discovering, developing or commercializing drugs before or more successfully than we do, or developing products or therapies that are more advanced or effective than ours, which may adversely affect our financial condition and our ability to successfully market or commercialize our products and drug candidates.

The development and commercialization of new medical device products and drugs is highly competitive. We face competition with respect to our current products and drug candidates, and will face competition with respect to any drug candidates that we may seek to develop or commercialize in the future, from major pharmaceutical companies, specialty pharmaceutical companies, biotechnology companies and medical device companies worldwide. For example, there are a number of large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies that currently market drugs or are pursuing the development of therapies in the field of poly ADP ribose polymerase, or PARP, inhibition to treat cancer. Some of these competitive drugs and therapies are based on scientific approaches that are the same as or similar to that of our drug candidates. Potential competitors also include academic institutions, government agencies and other public and private research organizations that conduct research, seek patent protection and establish collaborative arrangements for research, development, manufacturing and commercialization. Specifically, there are a large number of companies developing or marketing treatments for oncology, autoimmune and infectious diseases including many major pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies.

Many of the companies against which we are competing or against which we may compete in the future have significantly greater financial resources and expertise in research and development, manufacturing, pre-clinical testing, conducting clinical trials, obtaining regulatory approvals and marketing approved drugs than we do. Mergers and acquisitions in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic industries may result in even more resources being concentrated among a smaller number of our competitors. Smaller or early stage companies may also prove to be significant competitors, particularly through collaborative arrangements with large and established companies. These competitors also compete with us in recruiting and retaining qualified scientific and management personnel and establishing clinical trial sites and patient registration for clinical trials, as well as in acquiring technologies complementary to, or necessary for, our programs.

Our commercial opportunities could be reduced or eliminated if our competitors develop and commercialize products or drugs that are safer, more effective, have fewer or less severe side effects, are more convenient or are less expensive than products or drugs that we may develop. Our competitors also may obtain NMPA, FDA or other regulatory approval for their products or drugs more rapidly than we may obtain approval for ours, which could result in our competitors establishing a strong market position before we are able to enter the market. Additionally, technologies developed by our competitors may render our products or potential drug candidates uneconomical or obsolete, and we may not be successful in marketing our products or drug candidates against competitors.

In addition, as a result of the expiration or successful challenge of our patent rights, we could face more litigation with respect to the validity and/or scope of patents relating to our competitors’ products. The availability of our competitors’ products could limit the demand, and the price we are able to charge, for any products that we may develop and commercialize.

Clinical development involves a lengthy and expensive process with an uncertain outcome.

There is a risk of failure for each of our drug candidates. It is difficult to predict when or if any of our drug candidates will prove effective and safe in humans or will receive regulatory approval. Before obtaining regulatory approval from regulatory authorities for the sale of any drug candidate, our drug candidates must complete pre-clinical studies and then conduct extensive clinical trials to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of our drug candidates in humans. Clinical testing is expensive, difficult to design and implement, and can take many years to complete.

The outcomes of pre-clinical development testing and early clinical trials may not be predictive of the success of later clinical trials, and interim results of a clinical trial do not necessarily predict final results. Moreover, pre-clinical and clinical data are often susceptible to varying interpretations and analyses, and many companies that have believed their drug candidates performed satisfactorily in pre-clinical studies and clinical trials have nonetheless failed to obtain regulatory approval of their drug candidates. Future clinical trials of our drug candidates may not be successful. For

15


 

example, brivanib (ZL-2301) failed to meet its primary endpoint of overall survival, or OS, noninferiority for brivanib (ZL-2301) versus sorafenib in Phase III trials in patients with HCC conducted by Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, or BMS, before we licensed the development rights from them. In addition, brivanib (ZL-2301) showed no difference when compared to placebo in the primary efficacy endpoint. Although we believe that brivanib (ZL-2301) has the potential to be an effective treatment for Chinese patients and merits further clinical trials patients, we cannot guarantee that our future clinical trials of brivanib (ZL-2301) in Chinese patients will be successful.

Commencement of clinical trials is subject to finalizing the trial design based on ongoing discussions with the NMPA, FDA and/or other regulatory authorities. The NMPA, FDA and other regulatory authorities could change their position on the acceptability of trial designs or clinical endpoints, which could require us to complete additional clinical trials or impose approval conditions that we do not currently expect. Successful completion of our clinical trials is a prerequisite to submitting an NDA (or analogous filing) to the NMPA, FDA and/or other regulatory authorities for each drug candidate and, consequently, the ultimate approval and commercial marketing of our drug candidates. We do not know whether the clinical trials for our drug candidates will begin or be completed on schedule, if at all.

We may incur additional costs or experience delays in completing pre-clinical or clinical trials, or ultimately be unable to complete the development and commercialization of our products and drug candidates.

We may experience delays in completing our pre-clinical or clinical trials, and numerous unforeseen events could arise during, or as a result of, future clinical trials, which could delay or prevent us from receiving regulatory approval, including:

 

regulators or institutional review boards, or IRBs, or ethics committees may not authorize us or our investigators to commence or conduct a clinical trial at a prospective trial site;

 

we may experience delays in reaching, or may fail to reach, agreement on acceptable terms with prospective trial sites and prospective CROs who conduct clinical trials on our behalf, the terms of which can be subject to extensive negotiation and may vary significantly among different CROs and trial sites;

 

clinical trials may produce negative or inconclusive results, and we may decide, or regulators may require us or them, to conduct additional clinical trials or we may decide to abandon drug development programs;

 

the number of patients required for clinical trials of our products and drug candidates may be larger than we anticipate, enrollment in these clinical trials may be slower than we anticipate or participants may drop out of these clinical trials or fail to return for post-treatment follow-up at a higher rate than we anticipate;

 

third-party contractors used in our clinical trials may fail to comply with regulatory requirements or meet their contractual obligations in a timely manner, or at all, or may deviate from the clinical trial protocol or drop out of the trial, which may require that we add new clinical trial sites or investigators;

 

the ability to conduct a companion diagnostic test to identify patients who are likely to benefit from our products and drug candidates;

 

we may elect to, or regulators, IRBs or ethics committees may require that we or our investigators, suspend or terminate clinical research for various reasons, including non-compliance with regulatory requirements or a finding that participants are being exposed to unacceptable health risks;

 

the cost of clinical trials of our products and drug candidates may be greater than we anticipate;

 

the supply or quality of our products and drug candidates or other materials necessary to conduct clinical trials of our drug candidates may be insufficient or inadequate; and

 

our products and drug candidates may have undesirable side effects or unexpected characteristics, causing us or our investigators, regulators, IRBs or ethics committees to suspend or terminate the trials, or reports may arise from pre-clinical or clinical testing of other cancer therapies that raise safety or efficacy concerns about our products and drug candidates.

We could encounter regulatory delays if a clinical trial is suspended or terminated by us or, as applicable, the IRBs or the ethics committee of the institutions in which such trials are being conducted, by the data safety monitoring

16


 

board, which is an independent group of experts that is formed to monitor clinical trials while ongoing, or by the NMPA, FDA or other regulatory authorities. Such authorities may impose a suspension or termination due to a number of factors, including: a failure to conduct the clinical trial in accordance with regulatory requirements or the applicable clinical protocols, a failure to obtain the regulatory approval and/or complete record filings with respect to the collection, preservation, use and export of China's human genetic resources, inspection of the clinical trial operations or trial site by the NMPA, FDA or other regulatory authorities that results in the imposition of a clinical hold, unforeseen safety issues or adverse side effects, failure to demonstrate a benefit from using a drug, changes in governmental regulations or administrative actions or lack of adequate funding to continue the clinical trial. Many of the factors that cause a delay in the commencement or completion of clinical trials may also ultimately lead to the denial of regulatory approval of our drug candidates. Further, the NMPA, FDA or other regulatory authorities may disagree with our clinical trial design or our interpretation of data from clinical trials, or may change the requirements for approval even after it has reviewed and commented on the design for our clinical trials.

If we are required to conduct additional clinical trials or other testing of our products or drug candidates beyond those that are currently contemplated, if we are unable to successfully complete clinical trials of our products or drug candidates or other testing, if the results of these trials or tests are not positive or are only modestly positive or if there are safety concerns, we may:

 

be delayed in obtaining regulatory approval for our products and drug candidates;

 

not obtain regulatory approval at all;

 

obtain approval for indications or patient populations that are not as broad as intended or desired;

 

be subject to post-marketing testing requirements;

 

encounter difficulties obtaining or be unable to obtain reimbursement for use of our products and drug candidates;

 

be subject to restrictions on the distribution and/or commercialization of our products and drug candidates; or

 

have our products and drug candidates removed from the market after obtaining regulatory approval.

Our product and drug development costs will also increase if we experience delays in testing or regulatory approvals. We do not know whether any of our clinical trials will begin as planned, will need to be restructured or will be completed on schedule, or at all. Significant pre-clinical study or clinical trial delays also could allow our competitors to bring products to market before we do and impair our ability to successfully commercialize our products and drug candidates and may harm our business and results of operations. Any delays in our clinical development programs may harm our business, financial condition and prospects significantly.

If we experience delays or difficulties in the enrollment of patients in clinical trials, the progress of such clinical trials and our receipt of necessary regulatory approvals could be delayed or prevented.

We may not be able to initiate or continue clinical trials for our products and drug candidates if we are unable to locate and enroll a sufficient number of eligible patients to participate in these trials as required by the NMPA, FDA or similar regulatory authorities. In particular, we have designed many of our clinical trials, and expect to design future trials, to include some patients with the applicable genomic mutation with a view to assessing possible early evidence of potential therapeutic effect. Genomically defined diseases, however, may have relatively low prevalence, and it may be difficult to identify patients with the applicable genomic mutation. The inability to enroll a sufficient number of patients with the applicable genomic alteration or that meet other applicable criteria for our clinical trials would result in significant delays and could require us to abandon one or more clinical trials altogether.

In addition, some of our competitors have ongoing clinical trials for products or drug candidates that treat the same indications as our products or drug candidates, and patients who would otherwise be eligible for our clinical trials may instead enroll in clinical trials of our competitors’ products or drug candidates.

17


 

Patient enrollment may be affected by other factors including:

 

the severity of the disease under investigation;

 

the total size and nature of the relevant patient population;

 

the design and eligibility criteria for the clinical trial in question;

 

the availability of an appropriate genomic screening test;

 

the perceived risks and benefits of the product or drug candidate under study;

 

the efforts to facilitate timely enrollment in clinical trials;

 

the patient referral practices of physicians;

 

the availability of competing therapies also undergoing clinical trials;

 

the ability to monitor patients adequately during and after treatment;

 

the proximity and availability of clinical trial sites for prospective patients; and

 

the occurrence of any pandemic, epidemic, including from the outbreak of COVID-19, or any other public health crises, natural catastrophe or other disasters may cause a delay in enrollment of patients in clinical trials; and

For example, we have experienced delays in the enrollment of patients in our clinical trials due to the outbreak of COVID-19. Although the outbreak of COVID-19 has largely been contained in China and we have experienced only minimal disruption to our planned clinical trials, outbreaks may occur again and may result in delays and interruptions to our clinical trials in the future. Additionally, our commercial partners and licensors have similarly experienced and may continue to experience delays in enrollment of patients to their clinical trials due to the outbreak of COVID-19 in their respective territories. Such delays may result in increased development costs for our products and drug candidates, which could cause the value of our company to decline and limit our ability to obtain additional financing.

Our products and drug candidates may cause undesirable side effects that could delay or prevent their regulatory approval, limit the commercial profile of an approved label, or result in significant negative consequences following regulatory approval, if any.

Undesirable side effects caused by our products or drug candidates could cause us to interrupt, delay or halt clinical trials or could cause regulatory authorities to interrupt, delay or halt our clinical trials and could result in a more restrictive label or the delay or denial of regulatory approval by the NMPA, FDA or other regulatory authorities. In particular, as is the case with all oncology products and drugs, it is likely that there may be side effects, such as fatigue, nausea and low blood cell levels, associated with the use of certain of our oncology products or drug candidates. For example, the known adverse events for ZEJULA include thrombocytopenia, anemia and neutropenia and for brivanib (ZL-2301), the known adverse events include hyponatremia, AST elevation, fatigue, hand-foot skin reaction and hypertension. The results of our products’ or drug candidates’ trials could reveal a high and unacceptable severity and prevalence of these or other side effects. In such an event, trials of our products or drug candidates could be suspended or terminated and the NMPA, FDA or comparable regulatory authorities could order us to cease further development of or deny approval of our products or drug candidates for any or all targeted indications. The drug-related side effects could affect patient recruitment or the ability of enrolled patients to complete the trial or result in potential product liability claims. Any of these occurrences may harm our business, financial condition and prospects significantly.

Additionally, our products and drug candidates could cause undesirable side effects related to off-target toxicity. For example, many of the currently approved PARP inhibitors have been associated with off-target toxicities. Many compounds that initially showed promise in early stage testing for treating cancer have later been found to cause side effects that prevented further development of the compound.

18


 

Clinical trials assess a sample of the potential patient population. With a limited number of patients and duration of exposure, rare and severe side effects of our products or drug candidates may only be uncovered with a significantly larger number of patients exposed to the drug candidate. Even after a product or drug candidate receives regulatory approval, if we, our partners or others identify undesirable side effects caused by such drug candidates (or any other similar drugs) after such approval, a number of potentially significant negative consequences could result, including:

 

the NMPA, FDA or other comparable regulatory authorities may withdraw or limit their approval of such products or drug candidates;

 

the NMPA, FDA or other comparable regulatory authorities may require the addition of labeling statements, such as a “boxed” warning or a contra-indication;

 

we may be required to create a medication guide outlining the risks of such side effects for distribution to patients;

 

we may be required to change the way such products or drug candidates are distributed or administered, conduct additional clinical trials or change the labeling of our products or drug candidates;

 

the NMPA, FDA or other comparable regulatory authorities may require a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy, or REMS (or analogous requirement), plan to mitigate risks, which could include medication guides, physician communication plans, or elements to assure safe use, such as restricted distribution methods, patient registries and other risk minimization tools;

 

we may be subject to regulatory investigations and government enforcement actions;

 

we may decide to remove such products or drug candidates from the marketplace;

 

we could be sued and held liable for injury caused to individuals exposed to or taking our products or drug candidates; and

 

our reputation may suffer.

Any of these events could prevent us from achieving or maintaining market acceptance of the affected products or drug candidates and could substantially increase the costs of commercializing our products and drug candidates, if approved, and significantly impact our ability to successfully commercialize our products and drug candidates and generate revenue.

If we are unable to obtain NMPA approval for our products and drug candidates to be eligible for an expedited registration pathway as Category 1 drug candidates, the time and cost we incur to obtain regulatory approvals may increase. Even if we receive such Category 1 designation, it may not lead to a faster development, review or approval process.

The NMPA categorizes domestically-manufactured innovative drug applications as Category 1, provided such drug has a new and clearly defined structure, pharmacological property and apparent clinical value and has not been marketed anywhere in the world. Domestically developed and manufactured innovative drugs will be attributed to Category 1 for their clinical trial application, or CTA, and NDA applications. While some multinational pharmaceutical companies may file CTAs with the NMPA prior to approval of a drug in another country in order to take advantage of Category 1 classification, such drug will most likely be assigned to Category 5, a class designated for drugs that were approved outside China before the NMPA approval for NDA approval purposes. This is because, based on historical observations, multinational pharmaceutical companies would typically not prioritize China as the first market for product launch, hence subjecting the drug to the Category 5 status. Because margetuximab and durlobactam (ETX2514) are imported drug products, they will be subject to Category 5 status if they are approved by the NMPA. Our CTAs for ZEJULA and omadacycline (ZL-2401) were approved as Category 1 drugs by the NMPA. A Category 1 designation by the NMPA may not be granted for any of our other drug candidates that will not be first approved in China or, if granted, such designation may not lead to faster development or regulatory review or approval process. Moreover, a Category 1 designation does not increase the likelihood that our product or drug candidates will receive regulatory approval. Optune is a medical device and does not follow the NMPA drug categorization.

19


 

Furthermore, despite positive regulatory changes introduced since 2015 which significantly accelerated time to market for innovative drugs, the regulatory process in China is still relatively ambiguous and unpredictable. The NMPA might require us to change our planned clinical study design or otherwise spend additional resources and effort to obtain approval of our drug candidates. In addition, policy changes may contain significant limitations related to use restrictions for certain age groups, warnings, precautions or contraindications, or may be subject to burdensome post-approval study or risk management requirements. If we are unable to obtain regulatory approval for our drug candidates in one or more jurisdictions, or any approval contains significant limitations, we may not be able to obtain sufficient funding or generate sufficient revenue to continue the development of our drug candidates or any other drug candidate that we may in-license, acquire or develop in the future.

Even if we receive regulatory approval for our products or any drug candidates, we will be subject to ongoing obligations and continued regulatory review, which may result in significant additional expense, and if we fail to comply with ongoing regulatory requirements or experience any unanticipated problems with any of our products or drug candidates, we may be subject to penalties.

Even after obtaining regulatory approval, our products and drug candidates will be subject to, among other things, ongoing regulatory requirements governing the labeling, packaging, promotion, recordkeeping, data management and submission of safety, efficacy and other post-market information. These requirements include submissions of safety and other post-marketing information and reports, registration, and continued compliance with cGMPs and GCPs. For example, ZEJULA and Optune will continue to be subject to post-approval development and regulatory requirements, which may limit how they are manufactured and marketed, and could materially impair our ability to generate revenue. As such, we and our partners and any of our and their respective contract manufacturers will be subject to ongoing review and periodic inspections to assess compliance with applicable post-approval regulations. Additionally, to the extent we want to make certain changes to the approved products, product labeling, or manufacturing processes, we will need to submit new applications or supplements to the Hong Kong Department of Health and the NMPA and obtain the agencies’ approval.

Additionally, any additional regulatory approvals that we receive for our products or drug candidates may also be subject to limitations on the approved indicated uses for which the products or drug may be marketed or to the conditions of approval, or contain requirements for potentially costly post-marketing testing, including Phase IV studies for the surveillance and monitoring the safety and efficacy of the products or drug.

In addition, once a product or drug is approved by the NMPA, FDA or a comparable regulatory authority for marketing, it is possible that there could be a subsequent discovery of previously unknown problems with the product or drug, including problems with third-party manufacturers or manufacturing processes, or failure to comply with regulatory requirements. If any of the foregoing occurs with respect to our products or drug products, it may result in, among other things:

 

restrictions on the marketing or manufacturing of the product or drug, withdrawal of the product or drug from the market, or voluntary or mandatory product or drug recalls;

 

fines, warning letters or holds on clinical trials;

 

refusal by the NMPA, FDA or comparable regulatory authority to approve pending applications or supplements to approved applications filed by us, or suspension or revocation of product or drug license approvals;

 

drug seizure or detention, or refusal to permit the import or export of the product or drug; and

 

injunctions or the imposition of civil, administrative or criminal penalties.

Any government investigation of alleged violations of law could require us to expend significant time and resources and could generate negative publicity. Moreover, regulatory policies may change or additional government regulations may be enacted that could prevent, limit or delay regulatory approval of our products or drug candidates. If we are not able to maintain regulatory compliance, regulatory approval that has been obtained may be lost and we may not achieve or sustain profitability, which may harm our business, financial condition and prospects significantly.

20


 

The incidence and prevalence for target patient populations of our products and drug candidates are based on estimates and third-party sources. If the market opportunities for our products and drug candidates are smaller than we estimate or if any approval that we obtain is based on a narrower definition of the patient population, our revenue and ability to achieve profitability might be materially and adversely affected.

Periodically, we make estimates regarding the incidence and prevalence of target patient populations for particular diseases based on various third-party sources and internally generated analysis and use such estimates in making decisions regarding our product and drug development strategy, including acquiring or in-licensing products or drug candidates and determining indications on which to focus in pre-clinical or clinical trials.

These estimates may be inaccurate or based on imprecise data. For example, the total addressable market opportunity will depend on, among other things, their acceptance by the medical community and patient access, product and drug pricing and reimbursement. The number of patients in the addressable markets may turn out to be lower than expected, patients may not be otherwise amenable to treatment with our products or drugs, or new patients may become increasingly difficult to identify or gain access to, all of which may significantly harm our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

The recent restructure of the drug regulatory authorities may delay approval of our products or drug candidates.

On March 17, 2018, China’s highest legislative body, the National People’s Congress, approved a sweeping government restructuring plan. This is generally considered to be the most comprehensive government restructuring that China has undertaken since its “Open Door” policy in the late 1970s. As part of the new plan, China has established a State Market Regulatory Administration, or SMRA, which merges and undertakes the responsibilities previously held by the China State Food and Drug Administration, or SFDA, the State Administration for Industry and Commerce, or SAIC, General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine, or AQSIQ, price supervision and antitrust enforcement responsibilities previously held by the National Development and Reform Commission, or NDRC, the antitrust enforcement responsibilities previously held by the Ministry of Commerce, or MOFCOM, and the Antimonopoly and Anti-Unfair Competition Bureau of State Council, as well as the responsibilities previously held by the Certification and Accreditation Administration, or CAC, and the Standardization Administration of China, or SAC.

The new NMPA reports to the SMRA, is responsible for the review and approval of drugs, medical devices and cosmetics, and maintains its own branches at the provincial level and leave the post-approval enforcement authorities at the local level to the consolidated SMRA branches.

Although the NMPA is fully functional as of 2019 and the restructuring at the state, municipal and county level authorities has been mostly completed as of July 2019, there could still be delays in the NMPA’s implementation of the new reform initiatives and disruption in the NMPA’s routine operations due to personnel reshuffling post-restructuring.

Our future success depends on our ability to retain key executives and to attract, retain and motivate qualified personnel.

We are highly dependent on the expertise of the members of our research and development team, as well as the other principal members of our management, including Samantha Du, our founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. Although we have entered into employment letter agreements with our executive officers, each of them may terminate their employment with us at any time with one months’ prior written notice. We do not maintain “key person” insurance for any of our executives or other employees.

Recruiting and retaining qualified management, scientific, clinical, manufacturing and sales and marketing personnel will also be critical to our success. The loss of the services of certain of our executive officers or other key employees could impede the achievement of our research, development and commercialization objectives and seriously harm our ability to successfully implement our business strategy. Furthermore, replacing certain of our executive officers and key employees may be difficult and may take an extended period of time because of the limited number of individuals in our industry with the breadth of skills and experience required to successfully develop, gain regulatory approval of and commercialize drugs. Competition to hire from this limited pool is intense, and we may be unable to hire, train, retain or motivate these key personnel on acceptable terms given the competition among numerous pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies for similar personnel. We also experience competition for the hiring of scientific and clinical personnel from universities and research institutions. In addition, our management will be required to devote significant time to new compliance initiatives from our status as a U.S. public company, which may require us to recruit more management personnel. Failure to succeed in clinical trials may make it more challenging to recruit and retain qualified scientific personnel.

21


 

We will need to increase the size and capabilities of our organization, and we may experience difficulties in managing our growth.

We expect to experience significant growth in the number of our employees and consultants and the scope of our operations, particularly in the areas of drug development, drug commercialization, regulatory affairs and business development. To manage our anticipated future growth, we must continue to implement and improve our managerial, operational and financial systems, expand our facilities and continue to recruit and train additional qualified personnel. Due to our limited financial resources and the limited experience of our management team in managing a company with such anticipated growth, we may not be able to effectively manage the expansion of our operations or recruit and train additional qualified personnel. The expansion of our operations may lead to significant costs and may divert our management and business development resources. Any inability to manage growth could delay the execution of our business plans or disrupt our operations, and have a materially adverse effect on our business.

In addition to in-licensing or acquiring drug candidates, we may engage in future business acquisitions that could disrupt our business, cause dilution to our ADS holders and harm our financial condition and operating results.

We have, from time to time, evaluated partnership opportunities or investments and may, in the future, make acquisitions of, or investments in, companies that we believe have products or capabilities that are a strategic or commercial fit with our current drug candidates and business or otherwise offer opportunities for our company. In connection with these acquisitions or investments, we may:

 

issue stock that would dilute our ADS holders’ percentage of ownership;

 

incur debt and assume liabilities; and

 

incur amortization expenses related to intangible assets or incur large and immediate write-offs.

We also may be unable to find suitable acquisition candidates and we may not be able to complete partnership opportunities or investments on favorable terms, if at all. If we do enter into partnership opportunities or investments, we cannot assure you that it will ultimately strengthen our competitive position or that it will not be viewed negatively by customers, financial markets or investors. Further, future partnership opportunities or investments could also pose numerous additional risks to our operations, including:

 

problems integrating the purchased business, products or technologies;

 

increases to our expenses;

 

the failure to have discovered undisclosed liabilities of the acquired asset or company;

 

diversion of management’s attention from their day-to-day responsibilities;

 

harm to our operating results or financial condition;

 

entrance into markets in which we have limited or no prior experience; and

 

potential loss of key employees, particularly those of the acquired entity.

We may not be able to complete one or more partnership opportunities or investments or effectively integrate the operations, products or personnel gained through any such partnership opportunities or investments without a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may need to significantly concede on prices for ZEJULA, Optune or our other drug candidates and devices for which we may receive regulatory approval in China and face uncertainty of reimbursement, which could diminish our sales or affect our profitability.

The regulations that govern pricing and reimbursement for pharmaceutical drugs and devices vary widely from country to country. In China, the newly created National Healthcare Security Administration, or NHSA, an agency responsible for administering China’s social security system, organized a price negotiation with drug companies for 119 new drugs that had not been included in the National Reimbursable Drug List, or the NRDL, at the time of the

22


 

negotiation in November 2019, which resulted in an average price reduction by over 60% for 70 of the 119 drugs that passed the negotiation. NHSA, together with other government authorities, review the inclusion or removal of drugs from China’s National Drug Catalog for Basic Medical Insurance, Work-related Injury Insurance and Maternity Insurance, or the NRDL, or provincial or local medical insurance catalogues for the national medical insurance program regularly, and the tier under which a drug or device will be classified, both of which affect the amounts reimbursable to program participants for their purchases of those drugs. These determinations are made based on a number of factors, including price and efficacy. In November 2019, the NRDL was expanded to include 70 new drugs.

We may also be invited to attend the price negotiation with NHSA upon receiving regulatory approval in China, but we will likely need to significantly reduce our prices, and to negotiate with each of the provincial healthcare security administrations on reimbursement ratios. If we were to successfully launch commercial sales of our oncology-based product and drug candidates, including ZEJULA and Optune, our revenue from such sales is largely expected to be self-paid by patients, which may make our drug candidates and devices less desirable. On the other hand, if the NHSA or any of its local counterpart includes our drugs and devices in the NRDL or provincial RDL, which may increase the demand for our drug candidates and devices, our potential revenue from the sales of our drug candidates and devices may still decrease as a result of lower prices.

Moreover, eligibility for reimbursement in China does not imply that any drug or device will be paid for in all cases or at a rate that covers our costs, including licensing fees, research, development, manufacture, sale and distribution.

Companies in China that manufacture or sell drugs and medical devices are required to comply with extensive regulations and hold a number of permits and licenses to carry on their business. Our ability to obtain and maintain these regulatory approvals is uncertain, and future government regulation may place additional burdens on our efforts to commercialize our drug candidates.

The life sciences industry in China is subject to extensive government regulation and supervision. The regulatory framework addresses all aspects of operating in the pharmaceutical industry, including approval, registration, production, distribution, packaging, labelling, storage and shipment, advertising, licensing and certification requirements and procedures, periodic renewal and reassessment processes, registration of new products and environmental protection. Violation of applicable laws and regulations may materially and adversely affect our business. In order to manufacture and distribute drug and medical device products in China, we are required to:

 

obtain a manufacturing permit for each production facility from the NMPA and its relevant branches for the manufacture of drug and device products;

 

obtain a marketing authorization, which includes an approval number, from the NMPA for each drug or device manufactured by us;

 

obtain a distribution permit (or record filing) from the NMPA and its relevant branches; and

 

renew the manufacturing permits, the distribution permits (or record-filing) and marketing authorizations every five years, among other requirements.

If we are unable to obtain or renew such permits or any other permits or licenses required for our operations, will not be able to engage in the commercialization, manufacture and distribution of our products and drug candidates and our business may be adversely affected.

The regulatory framework governing the pharmaceutical industry in China is subject to change and amendment from time to time. Any such change or amendment could materially and adversely impact our business, financial condition and prospects. China government has introduced various reforms to the Chinese healthcare system in recent years and may continue to do so, with an overall objective to expand basic medical insurance coverage and improve the quality and reliability of healthcare services without incurring significant fiscal burden. The specific regulatory changes under the reform still remain uncertain. The implementing measures to be issued may not be sufficiently effective to achieve the stated goals, and as a result, we may not be able to benefit from such reform to the level we expect, if at all. Moreover, the reform could give rise to regulatory developments, such as more burdensome administrative procedures, which may have an adverse effect on our business and prospects.

23


 

For further information regarding government regulation in China and other jurisdictions, see “Regulation—Government Regulation of Pharmaceutical Product Development and Approval,” “Regulation—Coverage and Reimbursement” and “Regulation—Other Healthcare Laws.”

If we breach our license or other intellectual property-related agreements for our products or drug candidates or otherwise experience disruptions to our business relationships with our licensors and collaboration partners, we could lose the ability to continue the development and commercialization of our products and drug candidates.

Our business relies, in large part, on our ability to develop and commercialize products and drug candidates from third parties including ZEJULA from GSK; Optune from Novocure Limited, or Novocure; omadacycline (ZL-2401) from Paratek Pharmaceuticals, or Paratek; bemarituzumab (FPA144) from Five Prime Therapeutics, Inc., or Five Prime; durlobactam from Entasis Therapeutics Holdings, Inc., or Entasis; margetuximab, MGD-013 and a pre-clinical multi-specific TRIDENT molecule from MacroGenics Inc., or MacroGenics; ripretinib from Deciphera Pharmaceuticals, LLC, or Deciphera; INCMGA0012 (PD-1) from Incyte Corporation, or Incyte; and REGN1979 from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., or Regeneron. If we have not obtained a license to all intellectual property rights that are relevant to our products and drug candidates and that are owned or controlled by our licensors and collaboration partners or owned or controlled by affiliates of such licensors and collaboration partners, we may need to obtain additional licenses to such intellectual property rights which may not be available on an exclusive basis, on commercially reasonable terms or at all. In addition, if our licensors and collaboration partners breach such agreements, we may not be able to enforce such agreements against our licensors’ parent entity or affiliates. Under each of our license and intellectual property-related agreements, in exchange for licensing or sublicensing us the right to develop and commercialize the applicable drug candidates, our licensors will be eligible to receive from us milestone payments, tiered royalties from commercial sales of such drug candidates, assuming relevant approvals from government authorities are obtained, or other payments. Our license and other intellectual property-related agreements also require us to comply with other obligations including development and diligence obligations, providing certain information regarding our activities with respect to such drug candidates and/or maintaining the confidentiality of information we receive from our licensors. For example, we are also obligated to use commercially reasonable efforts to develop and commercialize Optune, margetuximab, MGD-013, a pre-clinical multi-specific TRIDENT molecule, omadacycline (ZL-2401), bemarituzumab (FPA144), durlobactam, ripretinib, INCMGA0012 (PD-1) and REGN1979 in certain of their respective territories, in each case, under their respective agreements.

If we fail to meet any of our obligations under our license and other intellectual property-related agreements, our licensors have the right to terminate our licenses and sublicenses and, upon the effective date of such termination, have the right to re-obtain the licensed and sub-licensed technology and intellectual property. If any of our licensors terminate any of our licenses or sublicenses, we will lose the right to develop and commercialize our applicable products and drug candidates and other third parties may be able to market products or drug candidates similar or identical to ours. In such case, we may be required to provide a grant back license or expand an existing license to the licensors under our own intellectual property with respect to the terminated products. In addition, if our agreements with GSK for ZEJULA terminate for any reason, we are required to grant GSK an exclusive license to certain of our intellectual property rights that relate to ZEJULA, as applicable. Furthermore, if our agreement with MacroGenics for margetuximab, MGD-013 and a pre-clinical multi-specific TRIDENT molecule is terminated by MacroGenics for certain reasons, we are required to grant MacroGenics an option to convert the non-exclusive license granted to MacroGenics to use certain of our intellectual property rights that relate to margetuximab, MGD-013 and a pre-clinical multi-specific TRIDENT molecule in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan to an exclusive license. If our agreement with Entasis for durlobactam is terminated for certain reasons, we are required to grant Entasis an exclusive, fully paid, royalty free, perpetual irrevocable and sublicenseable (through multiple tiers) license to use certain of our intellectual property rights that relate to EXT2514 in the licensed territory. If our agreement with Incyte for INCMGA0012 (PD-1) is terminated for certain reasons, we are required to assign to Incyte certain trademarks and certain other business premises, data and regulatory materials that relate to INCMGA0012 (PD-1). If our agreement with Deciphera for ripretinib is terminated for certain reasons, we are required to grant Deciphera a worldwide, perpetual and irrevocable license to use certain of our intellectual property rights that relate to ripretinib in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. While we would expect to exercise all rights and remedies available to us, including seeking to cure any breach by us, and otherwise seek to preserve our rights under the intellectual property rights licensed and sublicensed to us, we may not be able to do so in a timely manner, at an acceptable cost or at all. In particular, some of the milestone payments are payable upon our drug candidates reaching development milestones before we have commercialized, or received any revenue from, sales of such drug candidate, and we cannot guarantee that we will have sufficient resources to make such milestone payments. Any uncured, material breach under the agreements could result in our loss of exclusive rights and may lead to a complete termination of our rights to the applicable drug candidate. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial conditions, results of operations, and prospects.

24


 

In addition, disputes may further arise regarding intellectual property subject to a license and/or collaboration agreement, including, but not limited to:

 

the scope of rights granted under the license agreement and other interpretation-related issues;

 

the extent to which our technology and processes infringe, misappropriate or otherwise violate on intellectual property of the licensor that is not subject to the licensing agreement;

 

the sublicensing of patent and other rights under our collaborative development relationships;

 

our diligence obligations under the license agreement and what activities satisfy those diligence obligations;

 

the inventorship and ownership of inventions and know-how resulting from the joint creation or use of intellectual property by our licensors and us and our partners; and

 

the priority of invention of patented technology.

Moreover, certain of our licensors do not own some or all of the intellectual property included in the license, but instead have licensed such intellectual property from a third party, and have granted us a sub-license. As a result, the actions of our licensors or of the ultimate owners of the intellectual property may affect our rights to use our sublicensed intellectual property, even if we are in compliance with all of the obligations under our license agreements. For example, our licenses from GSK, Paratek, MacroGenics and Incyte comprise sublicenses to us of certain intellectual property rights owned by third parties that are not our direct licensors. If our licensors were to fail to comply with their obligations under the agreements pursuant to which they obtain the rights that are sublicensed to us, or should such agreements be terminated or amended, our rights to the applicable licensed intellectual property may be terminated or narrowed, our exclusive licenses may be converted to non-exclusive licenses, and our ability to produce and sell our products and drug candidates may be materially harmed. In addition, our license from Paratek is limited to intellectual property rights under the control of Paratek Bermuda, Ltd. To the extent Paratek Bermuda, Ltd. loses control over any of the licensed intellectual property rights for any reason, we will no longer be licensed to such intellectual property rights to use, develop and otherwise commercialize omadacycline (ZL-2401). Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial conditions, results of operations, and prospects.

In addition, the agreements under which we currently license or have rights to use intellectual property or technology from third parties are complex, and certain provisions in such agreements may be susceptible to multiple interpretations. The resolution of any contract interpretation disagreement that may arise could narrow what we believe to be the scope of our rights to the relevant intellectual property or technology, or increase what we believe to be our financial or other obligations under the relevant agreement, either of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects. Moreover, if disputes over intellectual property that we have licensed, sublicensed or obtained rights to use prevent or impair our ability to maintain our current licensing arrangements on commercially acceptable terms, we may be unable to successfully develop and commercialize the affected products or drug candidates, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial conditions, results of operations and prospects.

Product liability claims or lawsuits could cause us to incur substantial liabilities.

We face an inherent risk of product liability exposure related to the use of our products and drug candidates in clinical trials or any products or drug candidates we may decide to commercialize and manufacture. If we cannot successfully defend against claims that the use of such products or drug candidates in our clinical trials or any products that we procure from third-party manufacturers, or that we may choose to manufacture at our production facilities in the future, including any of our products or drug candidates which receive regulatory approval, caused injuries, we could incur substantial liabilities. Regardless of merit or eventual outcome, liability claims may result in:

 

significant negative media attention and reputational damage;

 

withdrawal of clinical trial participants and inability to continue clinical trials;

 

significant costs to defend the related litigation;

 

substantial monetary awards to trial participants or patients;

25


 

 

the inability to commercialize any products or drug candidates that we may develop;

 

initiation of investigations by regulators;

 

a diversion of management’s time and our resources; and

 

a decline in the ADS price.

Any litigation might result in substantial costs and diversion of resources. While we maintain liability insurance for certain clinical trials (which covers the patient human clinical trial liabilities including, among others, bodily injury), product liability insurance to cover our product liability claims and general liability insurance to cover other commercial liability claims, these insurances may not fully cover our potential liabilities. Additionally, inability to obtain sufficient insurance coverage at an acceptable cost could prevent or inhibit the successful commercialization of products or drugs we develop, alone or with our collaborators.

The research and development projects under our internal discovery programs are at an early stage of development. As a result, we are unable to predict if or when we will successfully develop or commercialize any drug candidates under such programs.

Our internal discovery programs are at an early stage of development and will require significant investment and regulatory approvals prior to commercialization. Each of our drug candidates will require additional clinical and pre-clinical development, management of clinical, pre-clinical and manufacturing activities, obtaining regulatory approval, obtaining manufacturing supply, building of a commercial organization, substantial investment and significant marketing efforts before they generate any revenue from product sales. We are not permitted to market or promote any of our drug candidates before we receive regulatory approval from the NMPA, the FDA or comparable regulatory authorities, and we may never receive such regulatory approval for any such drug candidates.

We cannot be certain that clinical development of any drug candidates from our internal discovery programs will be successful or that we will obtain regulatory approval or be able to successfully commercialize any of our drug candidates and generate revenue. Success in pre-clinical testing does not ensure that clinical trials will be successful, and the clinical trial process may fail to demonstrate that our drug candidates are safe and effective for their proposed uses. Any such failure could cause us to abandon further development of any one or more of our drug candidates and may delay development of other drug candidates. Any delay in, or termination of, our clinical trials will delay and possibly preclude the filing of any NDAs with the NMPA, the FDA or comparable regulatory authorities and, ultimately, our ability to commercialize our drug candidates and generate product revenue.

If our manufacturing facilities are not approved by regulators, are damaged or destroyed or production at such facilities is otherwise interrupted, our business and prospects would be negatively affected.

In 2017, we built a small molecule facility capable of supporting clinical and commercial production, and in 2018, we built a large molecule facility in Suzhou, China using GE Healthcare FlexFactory platform technology capable of supporting clinical production of our drug candidates. We intend to rely on these facilities for the manufacture of clinical and commercial supply of some of our products or drug candidates. Prior to being permitted to sell any products or drugs produced at these facilities, the facilities will need to be inspected and approved by regulatory authorities. If either facility is not approved by regulators or is damaged or destroyed, or otherwise subject to disruption, it would require substantial lead-time to replace our manufacturing capabilities. In such event, we would be forced to identify and rely partially or entirely on third-party contract manufacturers for an indefinite period of time. Any new facility needed to replace an existing production facility would need to comply with the necessary regulatory requirements and be tailored to our production requirements and processes. We also would need regulatory approvals before using any products or drugs manufactured at a new facility in clinical trials or selling any products or drugs that are ultimately approved. Any disruptions or delays at our facility or its failure to meet regulatory compliance would impair our ability to develop and commercialize our products or drug candidates, which would adversely affect our business and results of operations.

26


 

We may become involved in lawsuits to protect or enforce our intellectual property.

Competitors may infringe our patent rights or misappropriate or otherwise violate our intellectual property rights. To counter infringement or unauthorized use, litigation may be necessary in the future to enforce or defend our intellectual property rights, to protect our trade secrets or to determine the validity and scope of our own intellectual property rights or the proprietary rights of others. This can be expensive and time consuming. Any claims that we assert against perceived infringers could also provoke these parties to assert counterclaims against us alleging that we infringe their intellectual property rights. We may not be able to prevent third parties from infringing upon or misappropriating our intellectual property, particularly in countries where the laws may not protect intellectual property rights as fully as in the United States. An adverse result in any litigation proceeding could put our patent, as well as any patents that may issue in the future from our pending patent applications, at risk of being invalidated, held unenforceable or interpreted narrowly. Furthermore, because of the substantial amount of discovery required in connection with intellectual property litigation, there is a risk that some of our confidential information could be compromised by disclosure during this type of litigation.

If we are unable to protect the confidentiality of our trade secrets, our business and competitive position would be harmed. We may be subject to claims that our employees have wrongfully used or disclosed alleged trade secrets of their former employers.

In addition to our issued patent and pending patent applications, we rely on trade secrets, including unpatented know-how, technology and other proprietary information, to maintain our competitive position and to protect our drug candidates. We seek to protect these trade secrets, in part, by entering into nondisclosure and confidentiality agreements with parties that have access to them, such as our employees, corporate collaborators, outside scientific collaborators, sponsored researchers, contract manufacturers, consultants, advisors and other third parties. We also enter into confidentiality and invention or patent assignment agreements with our employees and consultants. However, any of these parties may breach such agreements and disclose our proprietary information, and we may not be able to obtain adequate remedies for such breaches. Enforcing a claim that a party illegally disclosed or misappropriated a trade secret can be difficult, expensive and time-consuming, and the outcome is unpredictable. If any of our trade secrets were to be lawfully obtained or independently developed by a competitor, we would have no right to prevent them from using that technology or information to compete with us and our competitive position would be harmed.

Furthermore, many of our employees, including our senior management, were previously employed at other biotechnology or pharmaceutical companies, including our competitors or potential competitors. Some of these employees, including each member of our senior management, executed proprietary rights, nondisclosure and non-competition agreements in connection with such previous employment. Although we try to ensure that our employees do not use the proprietary information or know-how of others in their work for us, we may be subject to claims that we or these employees have used or disclosed intellectual property, including trade secrets or other proprietary information, of any such employee’s former employer. We are not aware of any threatened or pending claims related to these matters or concerning the agreements with our senior management, but in the future litigation may be necessary to defend against such claims. If we fail in defending any such claims, in addition to paying monetary damages, we may lose valuable intellectual property rights or personnel. Even if we are successful in defending against such claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management.

Our internal computer systems, or those used by our CROs or other contractors or consultants, may fail or suffer security breaches.

Despite the implementation of security measures, our internal computer systems and those of our CROs and other contractors and consultants are vulnerable to damage from computer viruses and unauthorized access. Although to our knowledge we have not experienced any material system failure or security breach to date, if such an event were to occur and cause interruptions in our operations, it could result in a material disruption of our development programs and our business operations.

The data privacy regime in China and in the United States are evolving and there may be more stringent compliance requirements for the collection, processing, use, and transfer of personal information and important data. In the ordinary course of our business, we collect and store sensitive data, including, among other things, legally protected patient health information, personally identifiable information about our employees, intellectual property, and proprietary business information. We manage and maintain our applications and data utilizing on-site systems and outsourced vendors. These applications and data encompass a wide variety of business critical information including

27


 

research and development information, commercial information and business and financial information. Because information systems, networks and other technologies are critical to many of our operating activities, shutdowns or service disruptions at our company or vendors that provide information systems, networks, or other services to us pose increasing risks. Such disruptions may be caused by events such as computer hacking, phishing attacks, ransomware, dissemination of computer viruses, worms and other destructive or disruptive software, denial of service attacks and other malicious activity, as well as power outages, natural disasters (including extreme weather), terrorist attacks or other similar events. Such events could have an adverse impact on us and our business, including loss of data and damage to equipment and data. In addition, system redundancy may be ineffective or inadequate, and our disaster recovery planning may not be sufficient to cover all eventualities. Significant events could result in a disruption of our operations, damage to our reputation or a loss of revenues, and invite regulator’s scrutiny. In addition, we may not have adequate insurance coverage to compensate for any losses associated with such events.

We could be subject to risks caused by misappropriation, misuse, leakage, falsification or intentional or accidental release or loss of information maintained in the information systems and networks of our company and our vendors, including personal information of our employees and patients, and company and vendor confidential data. In addition, outside parties may attempt to penetrate our systems or those of our vendors or fraudulently induce our personnel or the personnel of our vendors to disclose sensitive information in order to gain access to our data and/or systems. Like other companies, we may experience threats to our data and systems, including malicious codes and viruses, phishing, and other cyber-attacks. The number and complexity of these threats continue to increase over time. If a material breach of our information technology systems or those of our vendors occurs, the market perception of the effectiveness of our security measures could be harmed and our reputation and credibility could be damaged. We could be required to expend significant amounts of money and other resources to repair or replace information systems or networks. Although we develop and maintain systems and controls designed to prevent these events from occurring, and we have a process to identify and mitigate threats, the development and maintenance of these systems, controls and processes is costly and requires ongoing monitoring and updating as technologies change and efforts to overcome security measures become increasingly sophisticated. Moreover, despite our efforts, the possibility of these events occurring cannot be eliminated entirely. As we outsource more of our information systems to vendors, engage in more electronic transactions with payors and patients, and rely more on cloud-based information systems, the related security risks will increase and we will need to expend additional resources to protect our technology and information systems.

We are subject to laws and government regulations relating to privacy and data protection that have required us to modify certain of our policies and procedures with respect to the collection and processing of personal data, and future laws and regulations may cause us to incur additional expenses or otherwise limit our ability to collect and process personal data.

We may be subject to privacy and security laws in the various jurisdictions in which we operate, obtain or store personally identifiable information. The legislative and regulatory landscape for privacy and data protection continues to evolve, and there has been an increasing focus on privacy and data protection issues with the potential to affect our business.

Within the United States, our operations may be affected by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 as amended by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act and its implementing regulations, collectively, HIPAA, which impose obligations on certain “covered entities” (healthcare providers, health plans and healthcare clearinghouses) and certain of their “business associate” contractors with respect to safeguarding the privacy, security and transmission of individually identifiable health information. Although we believe that we currently are neither a “covered entity” nor a “business associate” under the legislation, a business associate relationship may be imputed from facts and circumstances even in the absence of an actual business associate agreement. In addition, HIPAA may affect our interactions with customers who are covered entities or their business associates because HIPAA affects the ability of these entities to disclose patient health information to us. The federal government, various states and localities also have laws that regulate the privacy and security of personal information and so may affect our business operations. For example, we are subject to the California Consumer Privacy Act, or CCPA, that became effective on January 1, 2020. The CCPA gives California consumers (defined to include all California residents) certain rights, including the right to ask companies to disclose details about the personal information they collect, as well as other rights such as the right to ask companies to delete a consumer’s personal information and opt out of the sale of personal information.

28


 

We could be subject to regulatory actions and/or claims made by individuals and groups in private litigation involving privacy issues related to data collection and use practices and other data privacy laws and regulations, including claims under the laws described, as well as for alleged unfair or deceptive practices. If our operations are found to be in violation of any of the privacy laws, rules or regulations that apply to us, we could be subject to penalties, including civil penalties, damages, injunctive relief, and other penalties, which could adversely affect our ability to operate our business and our financial results. We will continue to review these and all future privacy and other laws and regulations to assess whether additional procedural safeguards are warranted, which may cause us to incur additional expenses or otherwise limit our ability to collect and process personal data.

Risks Related to Our Dependence on Third Parties

We rely on third parties to conduct our pre-clinical and clinical trials. If these third parties do not successfully carry out their contractual duties or meet expected deadlines, we may not be able to obtain regulatory approval for or commercialize our products or drug candidates and our business could be substantially harmed.

We have relied upon and plan to continue to rely upon third-party CROs to monitor and manage data for some of our ongoing pre-clinical and clinical programs. We rely on these parties for execution of our pre-clinical and clinical trials, and control only certain aspects of their activities. Nevertheless, we are responsible for ensuring that each of our studies is conducted in accordance with the applicable protocol and legal, regulatory and scientific standards, and our reliance on the CROs does not relieve us of our regulatory responsibilities. We also rely on third parties to assist in conducting our pre-clinical studies in accordance with Good Laboratory Practices, or GLP, and the Administrative Regulations on Experimental Animals or the Animal Welfare Act requirements. We and our CROs are required to comply with GCP regulations and guidelines enforced by the NMPA, and comparable foreign regulatory authorities for all of our products or drug candidates in clinical development. Regulatory authorities enforce these GCP requirements through periodic inspections of trial sponsors, investigators and trial sites. If we or any of our CROs fail to comply with applicable GCP requirements, the clinical data generated in our clinical trials may be deemed unreliable and the NMPA or comparable foreign regulatory authorities may require us to perform additional clinical trials before approving our marketing applications. We cannot assure that upon inspection by a given regulatory authority, such regulatory authority will determine that any of our clinical trials comply with GCP requirements. In addition, our clinical trials must be conducted with products or drugs produced under cGMP requirements. Failure to comply with these regulations may require us to repeat pre-clinical and clinical trials, which would delay the regulatory approval process.

Our CROs are not our employees, and except for remedies available to us under our agreements with such CROs, we cannot control whether or not they devote sufficient time and resources to our on-going clinical, nonclinical and pre-clinical programs. If CROs do not successfully carry out their contractual duties or obligations or meet expected deadlines or if the quality or accuracy of the clinical data they obtain is compromised due to their failure to adhere to our clinical protocols, regulatory requirements or for other reasons, our clinical trials may be extended, delayed or terminated and we may not be able to obtain regulatory approval for or successfully commercialize our products or drug candidates. As a result, our results of operations and the commercial prospects for our products and drug candidates would be harmed, our costs could increase and our ability to generate revenues could be delayed or compromised.

Because we rely on third parties, our internal capacity to perform these functions is limited. Outsourcing these functions involves risk that third parties may not perform to our standards, may not produce results in a timely manner or may fail to perform at all. In addition, the use of third-party service providers requires us to disclose our proprietary information to these parties, which could increase the risk that this information will be misappropriated. We currently have a small number of employees, which limits the internal resources we have available to identify and monitor our third-party providers. To the extent we are unable to identify and successfully manage the performance of third-party service providers in the future, our business may be adversely affected. Though we carefully manage our relationships with our CROs, there can be no assurance that we will not encounter similar challenges or delays in the future or that these delays or challenges will not have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and prospects.

If we lose our relationships with CROs, our product or drug development efforts could be delayed.

We rely on third-party vendors and CROs for some of our pre-clinical studies and clinical trials related to our product or drug development efforts. Switching or adding additional CROs involves additional cost and requires management time and focus. Our CROs have the right to terminate their agreements with us in the event of an uncured material breach. In addition, some of our CROs have an ability to terminate their respective agreements with us if it can be reasonably demonstrated that the safety of the subjects participating in our clinical trials warrants such termination, if we make a general assignment for the benefit of our creditors or if we are liquidated. Identifying, qualifying and

29


 

managing performance of third-party service providers can be difficult, time-consuming and cause delays in our development programs. In addition, there is a natural transition period when a new CRO commences work and the new CRO may not provide the same type or level of services as the original provider. If any of our relationships with our third-party CROs are terminated, we may not be able to enter into arrangements with alternative CROs or to do so on commercially reasonable terms, and we may not be able to meet our desired clinical development timelines.

We have limited experience manufacturing our products and drug candidates on a large clinical or commercial scale. We are or will be dependent on third party manufacturers for the manufacture of certain of our products and drug candidates as well as on third parties for our supply chain, and if we experience problems with any of these third parties, the manufacture of our products or drug candidates or products could be delayed, which could harm our results of operations.

If our two manufacturing facilities are unable to meet our intended production capacity in a timely fashion, we may have to engage a contract manufacturing organization, or CMO, for the production of clinical supplies of our products or drug candidates.

Additionally, in order to successfully commercialize our products and drug candidates, we will need to identify qualified CMOs for the scaled production of a commercial supply of certain of our products and drug candidates. The CMOs should be drug manufacturers holding manufacturing permits with a scope that can cover our drug registration candidates, and such CMO arrangement should be approved by the NMPA’s provincial level branches. We have not yet identified suppliers to support scaled production. If we are unable to arrange for alternative third-party manufacturing sources, or to do so on commercially reasonable terms or in a timely manner, or to obtain the NMPA approval for our CMO arrangement in a timely manner, we may not be able to complete development of our products or drug candidates, or market or distribute them.

We rely on third-party manufacturers to manufacture at least some of our products and drug candidates. For example, we rely on MacroGenics to manufacture and supply margetuximab, MGD-013, and a pre-clinical multi-specific TRIDENT molecule, Entasis to manufacture and supply durlobactam, Novocure to manufacture and supply Optune, Deciphera to manufacture and supply ripretinib, Incyte to manufacture and supply INCMGA0012 (PD-1) and, as of April 2020, Regeneron to manufacture and supply REGN1979.

Such reliance entails risks to which we would not be subject to if we manufactured drug candidates or products ourselves, including reliance on the third party for regulatory compliance and quality assurance, the possibility of breach of the manufacturing or supply agreement by the third party because of factors beyond our control (including a failure to synthesize and manufacture our drug candidates or any products we may eventually commercialize in accordance with our specifications) and the possibility of termination or nonrenewal of the agreement by the third party, based on its own business priorities, at a time that is costly or damaging to us. In addition, the NMPA and other regulatory authorities require that our drug candidates and any products that we may eventually commercialize be manufactured according to cGMP standards. Any failure by our third-party manufacturers to comply with cGMP standards or failure to scale up manufacturing processes, including any failure to deliver sufficient quantities of drug candidates in a timely manner, could lead to a delay in, or failure to obtain, regulatory approval of any of our drug candidates. In addition, such failure could be the basis for the NMPA to issue a warning or untitled letter, withdraw approvals for drug candidates previously granted to us, or take other regulatory or legal action, including recall or seizure, total or partial suspension of production, suspension of ongoing clinical trials, refusal to approve pending applications or supplemental applications, detention or product, refusal to permit the import or export of products, injunction, or imposing civil and criminal penalties.

Any significant disruption in our potential supplier relationships could harm our business. We currently source key materials from third parties, either directly through agreements with suppliers or indirectly through our manufacturers who have agreements with suppliers, as well as through our licensors. We anticipate that, in the near term, all key materials will be sourced through third parties. There are a small number of suppliers for certain capital equipment and key materials that are used to manufacture some of our drugs. Such suppliers may not sell these key materials to us or our manufacturers at the times we need them or on commercially reasonable terms. We currently do not have any agreements for the commercial production of these key materials. Any significant delay in the supply of a product or drug candidate or its key materials for an ongoing clinical study could considerably delay completion of our clinical studies, product or drug testing and potential regulatory approval of our products or drug candidates. If we or our manufacturers are unable to purchase these key materials after regulatory approval has been obtained for our drug candidates, the commercialization of our products or the commercial launch of our drug candidates could be delayed or there could be a shortage in supply, which would impair our ability to generate revenues from the sale of our products and drug candidates.

30


 

Furthermore, because of the complex nature of our compounds, we or our manufacturers may not be able to manufacture our compounds at a cost or in quantities or in a timely manner necessary to make commercially successful products and drugs. In addition, as our drug development pipeline increases and matures, we will have a greater need for clinical study and commercial manufacturing capacity. We have limited experience manufacturing pharmaceutical products or drugs on a commercial scale and some of our current suppliers will need to increase their scale of production to meet our projected needs for commercial manufacturing, the satisfaction of which on a timely basis may not be met.

We depend on our licensors or patent owners of our in-licensed patent rights to prosecute and maintain patents and patent applications that are material to our business. Any failure by our licensors or such patent owners to effectively protect these patent rights could adversely impact our business and operations.

We have licensed and sublicensed patent rights from third parties for some of our development programs, including ZEJULA from GSK, Optune from Novocure, omadacycline (ZL-2401) from Paratek, bemarituzumab (FPA144) from Five Prime, durlobactam from Entasis, and margetuximab, MGD-013 and a pre-clinical multi-specific TRIDENT molecule from MacroGenics, ripretinib from Deciphera and INCMGA0012 (PD-1) from Incyte. As a licensee and sublicensee of third parties, we rely on these third parties to file and prosecute patent applications and maintain patents and otherwise protect the licensed intellectual property under certain of our license agreements. In addition, we have not had and do not have primary control over these activities for certain of our patents or patent applications and other intellectual property rights that we jointly own with certain of our licensors and sub-licensors. We cannot be certain that the patents and patent applications for our products and drug candidates have been or will be prepared, filed, prosecuted or maintained by such third parties in compliance with applicable laws and regulations, in a manner consistent with the best interests of our business, or in a manner that will result in valid and enforceable patents or other intellectual property rights that cover our drug candidates. If our licensors or such third parties fail to prepare, prosecute, or maintain such patent applications and patents, or lose rights to those patent applications or patents, the rights we have licensed may be reduced or eliminated, and our right to develop and commercialize any of our drug candidates that are subject of such licensed rights could be adversely affected.

Pursuant to the terms of the license agreements with some of our licensors, the licensors may have the right to control enforcement of our licensed patents or defense of any claims asserting the invalidity or unenforceability of these patents. For example, under our agreement with Novocure for Optune, Novocure owns and has the right to control all patent application and patent prosecution activities related to Optune in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. Similarly, under our agreement with Five Prime for bemarituzumab (FPA144), Five Prime has the first right to enforce the licensed patents in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan, subject to certain exceptions. In addition, with respect to the patent portfolio for omadacycline (ZL-2401), which we sub-license from Paratek, Paratek has the first right to enforce such patent portfolio in territories outside of China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. Under our agreements with each of Entasis and Incyte, each of Entasis and Incyte has the first right to enforce the respective licensed patents in the licensed territory, including China, subject to certain exceptions. Under our agreement with Deciphera for ripretinib, Deciphera has the first right to enforce the licensed patents in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan, subject to certain exceptions. With respect to the patent portfolio for ZEJULA, which we sub-license from GSK, we have the first right to enforce such patent portfolio within China, Hong Kong and Macau. However, GSK maintains the right to enforce such patent portfolio in all other territories or, if we fail to bring an action within 90 days within China, Hong Kong or Macau, GSK can control such enforcement actions in those areas as well. In the case where GSK controls such enforcement actions, although we have rights to consult with GSK on such actions within China, Hong Kong and Macau, rights granted by GSK under ZEJULA to another licensee, such as Janssen Biotech, Inc. to whom GSK has granted an exclusive right to develop ZEJULA for the treatment of prostate cancer, could potentially influence GSK’s interests in the exercise of its prosecution, maintenance and enforcement rights in a manner that may favor the interests of such other licensee as compared with us, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial conditions, results of operations and prospects.

Even if we are permitted to pursue the enforcement or defense of our licensed and sub-licensed patents, we will require the cooperation of our licensors and any applicable patent owners and such cooperation may not be provided to us. We cannot be certain that our licensors will allocate sufficient resources or prioritize their or our enforcement of such patents or defense of such claims to protect our interests in the licensed patents. Even if we are not a party to these legal actions, an adverse outcome could harm our business because it might prevent us from continuing to license intellectual property that we may need to operate our business. If we lose any of our licensed intellectual property, our right to develop and commercialize any of our drug candidates that are subject of such licensed rights could be adversely affected.

31


 

Other Risks and Risks Related to Doing Business in China

If we fail to comply with environmental, health and safety laws and regulations of China, we could become subject to fines or penalties or incur costs that could have a material adverse effect on the success of our business.

We are subject to numerous environmental, health and safety laws and regulations, including those governing laboratory procedures and the handling, use, storage, treatment and disposal of hazardous materials and wastes. Our operations primarily occur in China and involve the use of hazardous materials, including chemical materials. Our operations also produce hazardous waste products. We are therefore subject to PRC laws and regulations concerning the discharge of waste water, gaseous waste and solid waste during our processes of research and development of drugs. We engage competent third party contractors for the transfer and disposal of these materials and wastes. We may not at all times comply fully with environmental regulations. Any violation of these regulations may result in substantial fines, criminal sanctions, revocations of operating permits, shutdown of our facilities and obligation to take corrective measures. We cannot completely eliminate the risk of contamination or injury from these materials and wastes. In the event of contamination or injury resulting from the use or discharge of hazardous materials, we could be held liable for any resulting damages, and any liability could exceed our resources. We also could incur significant costs associated with civil, administrative or criminal fines and penalties.

Although we maintain workers’ compensation insurance to cover costs and expenses incurred due to on-the-job injuries to our employees and third party liability insurance for injuries caused by unexpected seepage, pollution or contamination, such insurance may not provide adequate coverage against potential liabilities. Furthermore, China government may take steps towards the adoption of more stringent environmental regulations. Due to the possibility of unanticipated regulatory or other developments, the amount and timing of future environmental expenditures may vary substantially from those currently anticipated. If there is any unanticipated change in the environmental regulations, we may need to incur substantial capital expenditures to install, replace, upgrade or supplement our manufacturing facility and equipment or make operational changes to limit any adverse impact or potential adverse impact on the environment in order to comply with new environmental protection laws and regulations. If such costs become prohibitively expensive, we may be forced to cease certain aspects of our business operations.

China’s economic, political and social conditions, as well as governmental policies, could affect the business environment and financial markets in China, our ability to operate our business, our liquidity and our access to capital.

Substantially all of our operations are conducted in China. Accordingly, our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects may be influenced to a significant degree by economic, political, legal and social conditions in China as well as China’s economic, political, legal and social conditions in relation to the rest of the world. China’s economy differs from the economies of developed countries in many respects, including with respect to the amount of government involvement, level of development, growth rate, control of foreign exchange and allocation of resources. While China’s economy has experienced significant growth over the past 40 years, growth has been uneven across different regions and among various economic sectors of China. China’s government has implemented various measures to encourage economic development and guide the allocation of resources. Some of these measures may benefit the overall economy in China, but may have a negative effect on us. For example, our financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected by government control over capital investments or changes in tax regulations that are currently applicable to us. In addition, in the past, China’s government implemented certain measures, including interest rate increases, to control the pace of economic growth. These measures may cause decreased economic activity in China, which may adversely affect our business and results of operation. More generally, if the business environment in China deteriorates from the perspective of domestic or international investment, our business in China may also be adversely affected.

Uncertainties with respect to Chinese legal system and changes in laws, regulations and policies in China could materially and adversely affect us.

We conduct our business primarily through our subsidiaries in China. PRC laws and regulations govern our operations in China. Our subsidiaries are generally subject to laws and regulations applicable to foreign investments in China, which may not sufficiently cover all of the aspects of our economic activities in China. In addition, the implementation of laws and regulations may be in part based on government policies and internal rules that are subject to the interpretation and discretion of different government agencies (some of which are not published on a timely basis or at all) that may have a retroactive effect. As a result, we may not always be aware of any potential violation of these

32


 

policies and rules. Such unpredictability regarding our contractual, property and procedural rights could adversely affect our business and impede our ability to continue our operations. Furthermore, since PRC administrative and court authorities have significant discretion in interpreting and implementing statutory and contractual terms, it may be more difficult to evaluate the outcome of administrative and court proceedings and the level of legal protection we enjoy than in more developed legal systems. These uncertainties could materially and adversely affect our business and results of operations.

In January 2015, the Ministry of Commerce of China, or the MOFCOM, published a discussion draft of the proposed Foreign Investment Law. The Foreign Investment Law passed the legislative review in March 2019, and came into effect on January 1, 2020. Foreign-invested entities will enjoy national treatment in industry sectors that are not prohibited or restricted from foreign investment. The Foreign Investment Law imposes information reporting requirements on foreign investors and the applicable foreign invested entities. Non-compliance with the reporting requirements will result in corrective orders and fines between RMB 100,000 to 500,000. The Foreign Investment Law reinforces the duties of government authorities to protect intellectual property rights and trade secrets of foreign-investment entities. Government authorities cannot compel technology transfer by administrative means, reveal or provide trade secrets of foreign-invested entities to third parties. Last but not least, the Foreign Investment Law calls for the establishment of a foreign investment security review mechanism, details of which will be further developed by the Chinese government.

In addition, any administrative and court proceedings in China may be protracted, resulting in substantial costs and diversion of resources and management attention.

We may be exposed to liabilities under the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or FCPA, and Chinese anti-corruption laws, and any determination that we have violated these laws could have a material adverse effect on our business or our reputation.

We are subject to the FCPA. The FCPA generally prohibits us from making improper payments to non-U.S. officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. We are also subject to the anti-bribery laws of other jurisdictions, particularly China. As our business continues to expand, the applicability of the FCPA and other anti-bribery laws to our operations will continue to increase. Our procedures and controls to monitor anti-bribery compliance may fail to protect us from reckless or criminal acts committed by our employees or agents. If we, due to either our own deliberate or inadvertent acts or those of others, fail to comply with applicable anti-bribery laws, our reputation could be harmed and we could incur criminal or civil penalties, other sanctions and/or significant expenses, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, including our financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and prospects.

Restrictions on currency exchange may limit our ability to receive and use financing in foreign currencies effectively.

Our PRC subsidiaries’ ability to obtain foreign exchange is subject to significant foreign exchange controls and, in the case of transactions under the capital account, requires the approval of and/or registration with PRC government authorities, including the state administration of foreign exchange, or SAFE. In particular, if we finance our PRC subsidiaries by means of foreign debt from us or other foreign lenders, the amount is not allowed to, among other things, exceed the statutory limits and such loans must be registered with the local counterpart of the SAFE. If we finance our PRC subsidiaries by means of additional capital contributions, the amount of these capital contributions must first be approved or filed by the relevant government approval authority.

In the light of the various requirements imposed by PRC regulations on loans to, and direct investment in, PRC entities by offshore holding companies, we cannot assure you that we will be able to complete the necessary government registrations or obtain the necessary government approvals on timely basis, if at all, with respect to future loans or capital contributions by us to our PRC subsidiaries. If we fail to complete such registrations or obtain such approval, our ability to capitalize or otherwise fund our PRC operations may be negatively affected, which could materially and adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business.

33


 

PRC regulations relating to the establishment of offshore special purpose companies by PRC residents may subject our PRC resident beneficial owners or our wholly foreign-owned subsidiaries in China to liability or penalties, limit our ability to inject capital into these subsidiaries, limit these subsidiaries’ ability to increase their registered capital or distribute profits to us, or may otherwise adversely affect us.

In 2014, SAFE promulgated the Circular on Relevant Issues Concerning Foreign Exchange Control on Domestic Residents’ Offshore Investment and Financing and Roundtrip Investment through Special Purpose Vehicles, or SAFE Circular 37. SAFE Circular 37 requires PRC residents to register with local branches of SAFE or competent banks designated by SAFE in connection with their direct establishment or indirect control of an offshore entity, for the purpose of overseas investment and financing, with such PRC residents’ legally owned assets or equity interests in domestic enterprises or offshore assets or interests, referred to in SAFE Circular 37 as a “special purpose vehicle.” The term “control” under SAFE Circular 37 is broadly defined as the operation rights, beneficiary rights or decision-making rights acquired by the PRC residents in the offshore special purpose vehicles or PRC companies by such means as acquisition, trust, proxy, voting rights, repurchase, convertible bonds or other arrangements. SAFE Circular 37 further requires amendment to the registration in the event of any changes with respect to the basic information of or any significant changes with respect to the special purpose vehicle. If the shareholders of the offshore holding company who are PRC residents do not complete their registration with the local SAFE branches, the PRC subsidiaries may be prohibited from distributing their profits and proceeds from any reduction in capital, share transfer or liquidation to the offshore company, and the offshore company may be restricted in its ability to contribute additional capital to its PRC subsidiaries. Moreover, failure to comply with SAFE registration and amendment requirements described above could result in liability under PRC law for evasion of applicable foreign exchange restrictions.

We will request PRC residents who we know hold direct or indirect interests in our company, if any, to make the necessary applications, filings and amendments as required under SAFE Circular 37 and other related rules. However, we may not be informed of the identities of all the PRC residents holding direct or indirect interest in our company, and we cannot provide any assurance that these PRC residents will comply with our request to make or obtain any applicable registrations or comply with other requirements under SAFE Circular 37 or other related rules. The failure or inability of our PRC resident shareholders to comply with the registration procedures set forth in these regulations may subject us to fines and legal sanctions, restrict our cross-border investment activities, limit the ability of our wholly foreign-owned subsidiaries in China to distribute dividends and the proceeds from any reduction in capital, share transfer or liquidation to us, and we may also be prohibited from injecting additional capital into these subsidiaries. Moreover, failure to comply with the various foreign exchange registration requirements described above could result in liability under PRC law for circumventing applicable foreign exchange restrictions. As a result, our business operations and our ability to distribute profits to you could be materially and adversely affected.

PRC regulations establish complex procedures for some acquisitions of Chinese companies by foreign investors, which could make it more difficult for us to pursue growth through acquisitions in China.

PRC regulations and rules concerning mergers and acquisitions including the Regulations on Mergers and Acquisitions of Domestic Companies by Foreign Investors, or the M&A Rules, and other recently adopted regulations and rules with respect to mergers and acquisitions established additional procedures and requirements that could make merger and acquisition activities by foreign investors more time consuming and complex. For example, the M&A Rules require that the MOFCOM be notified in advance of any change-of-control transaction in which a foreign investor takes control of a PRC domestic enterprise, if (i) any important industry is concerned, (ii) such transaction involves factors that have or may have impact on the national economic security, or (iii) such transaction will lead to a change in control of a domestic enterprise which holds a famous trademark or PRC time-honored brand. Moreover, according to the Anti-Monopoly Law of PRC promulgated on August 30, 2007 and the Provisions on Thresholds for Prior Notification of Concentrations of Undertakings, or the Prior Notification Rules issued by the State Council in August 2008 and amended in September 2018, the concentration of business undertakings by way of mergers, acquisitions or contractual arrangements that allow one market player to take control of or to exert decisive impact on another market player must also be notified in advance to the anti-monopoly enforcement agency of the State Council when the threshold is crossed and such concentration shall not be implemented without the clearance of prior notification. In addition, the Regulations on Implementation of Security Review System for the Merger and Acquisition of Domestic Enterprise by Foreign Investors, or the Security Review Rules issued by the MOFCOM that became effective in September 2011 specify that mergers and acquisitions by foreign investors that raise “national defense and security” concerns and mergers and acquisitions through which foreign investors may acquire the de facto control over domestic enterprises that raise “national security” concerns are subject to strict review by the MOFCOM, and the rules prohibit any activities attempting to bypass a security review by structuring the transaction through, among other things, trusts, entrustment or contractual control arrangements. In the future, we may grow our business by acquiring complementary businesses. Complying with the requirements of the above-mentioned regulations and other relevant rules to complete such

34


 

transactions could be time consuming, and any required approval processes, including obtaining approval from the MOFCOM or its local counterparts may delay or inhibit our ability to complete such transactions. It is unclear whether our business would be deemed to be in an industry that raises “national defense and security” or “national security” concerns. However, the MOFCOM or other government agencies may publish explanations in the future determining that our business is in an industry subject to the security review, in which case our future acquisitions in the PRC, including those by way of entering into contractual control arrangements with target entities, may be closely scrutinized or prohibited. Our ability to expand our business or maintain or expand our market share through future acquisitions would as such be materially and adversely affected.

If we are classified as a PRC resident enterprise for PRC income tax purposes, such classification could result in unfavorable tax consequences to us and our non-PRC shareholders or ADS holders.

China Enterprise Income Tax Law, or the EIT Law, which was promulgated in March 2007, became effective in January 2008 and was amended in February 2017 and December 2018, and the Regulation on the Implementation of the EIT Law, effective as of January 1, 2008 and amended in April 2019, define the term “de facto management bodies” as “bodies that substantially carry out comprehensive management and control on the business operation, employees, accounts and assets of enterprises.” Under the EIT Law, an enterprise incorporated outside of PRC whose “de facto management bodies” are located in PRC is considered a “resident enterprise” and will be subject to a uniform 25% enterprise income tax, or EIT, rate on its global income. On April 22, 2009, PRC’s State Administration of Taxation, or the SAT, in the Notice Regarding the Determination of Chinese-Controlled Offshore-Incorporated Enterprises as PRC Tax Resident Enterprises on the Basis of De Facto Management Bodies, or SAT Circular 82, further specified certain criteria for the determination of what constitutes “de facto management bodies.” If all of these criteria are met, the relevant foreign enterprise may be regarded to have its “de facto management bodies” located in China and therefore be considered a PRC resident enterprise. These criteria include: (i) the enterprise’s day-to-day operational management is primarily exercised in China; (ii) decisions relating to the enterprise’s financial and human resource matters are made or subject to approval by organizations or personnel in China; (iii) the enterprise’s primary assets, accounting books and records, company seals, and board and shareholders’ meeting minutes are located or maintained in China; and (iv) 50% or more of voting board members or senior executives of the enterprise habitually reside in China. Although SAT Circular 82 only applies to foreign enterprises that are majority-owned and controlled by PRC enterprises, not those owned and controlled by foreign enterprises or individuals, the determining criteria set forth in SAT Circular 82 may be adopted by the PRC tax authorities as the test for determining whether the enterprises are PRC tax residents, regardless of whether they are majority-owned and controlled by PRC enterprises.

We believe that neither Zai Lab Limited nor any of our subsidiaries outside of China is a PRC resident enterprise for PRC tax purposes. However, the tax resident status of an enterprise is subject to determination by the PRC tax authorities, and uncertainties remain with respect to the interpretation of the term “de facto management body.” If the PRC tax authorities determine that Zai Lab Limited or any of its subsidiaries outside of China is a PRC resident enterprise for EIT purposes that entity would be subject to a 25% EIT on its global income. If such entity derives income other than dividends from its wholly-owned subsidiaries in China, a 25% EIT on its global income may increase our tax burden. Dividends paid to a PRC resident enterprise from its wholly-owned subsidiaries in China may be regarded as tax-exempt income if such dividends are deemed to be “dividends between qualified PRC resident enterprises” under the EIT Law and its implementation rules. However, we cannot assure you that such dividends will not be subject to PRC withholding tax, as the PRC tax authorities, which enforce the withholding tax, have not yet issued relevant guidance.

In addition, if Zai Lab Limited is classified as a PRC resident enterprise for PRC tax purposes, we may be required to withhold tax at a rate of 10% from dividends we pay to our shareholders, including the holders of our ADSs, that are non-resident enterprises. In addition, non-resident enterprise shareholders (including our ADS holders) may be subject to a 10% PRC withholding tax on gains realized on the sale or other disposition of ADSs or ordinary shares, if such income is treated as sourced from within China. Furthermore, gains derived by our non-PRC individual shareholders from the sale of our shares and ADSs may be subject to a 20% PRC withholding tax. It is unclear whether our non-PRC individual shareholders (including our ADS holders) would be subject to any PRC tax (including withholding tax) on dividends received by such non-PRC individual shareholders in the event we are determined to be a PRC resident enterprise. If any PRC tax were to apply to such dividends, it would generally apply at a rate of 20%. The PRC tax liability may be reduced under applicable tax treaties. However, it is unclear whether our non-PRC shareholders would be able to claim the benefits of any tax treaties between their country of tax residence and the PRC in the event that Zai Lab Limited is treated as a PRC resident enterprise.

35


 

We may rely on dividends and other distributions on equity paid by our PRC subsidiaries to fund any cash and financing requirements we may have, and any limitation on the ability of our PRC subsidiaries to make payments to us could have a material and adverse effect on our ability to conduct our business.

We are a holding company, and we may rely on dividends and other distributions on equity paid by our PRC subsidiaries for our cash and financing requirements, including the funds necessary to pay dividends and other cash distributions to our shareholders or to service any debt we may incur. If any of our PRC subsidiaries incur debt on its own behalf in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict its ability to pay dividends or make other distributions to us. Under PRC laws and regulations, our PRC subsidiaries, each of which is a wholly foreign-owned enterprise may pay dividends only out of its respective accumulated profits as determined in accordance with PRC accounting standards and regulations. In addition, a wholly foreign-owned enterprise is required to set aside at least 10% of its accumulated after-tax profits each year, if any, to fund a certain statutory reserve fund, until the aggregate amount of such fund reaches 50% of its registered capital. Such reserve funds cannot be distributed to us as dividends. At its discretion, a wholly foreign-owned enterprise may allocate a portion of its after-tax profits based on PRC accounting standards to an enterprise expansion fund, or a staff welfare and bonus fund.

Our PRC subsidiaries generate primarily all of their revenue in renminbi, which is not freely convertible into other currencies. As result, any restriction on currency exchange may limit the ability of our PRC subsidiaries to use their renminbi revenues to pay dividends to us.

In response to the persistent capital outflow in China and renminbi’s depreciation against U.S. dollar in the fourth quarter of 2016, the People’s Bank of China, or PBOC, and the SAFE have promulgated a series of capital control measure in early 2017, including stricter vetting procedures for domestic companies to remit foreign currency for overseas investments, dividends payments and shareholder loan repayments.

The PRC government may continue to strengthen its capital controls, and more restrictions and substantial vetting process may be put forward by SAFE for cross-border transactions falling under both the current account and the capital account. Any limitation on the ability of our PRC subsidiaries to pay dividends or make other kinds of payments to us could materially and adversely limit our ability to grow, make investments or acquisitions that could be beneficial to our business, pay dividends, or otherwise fund and conduct our business.

We and our shareholders face uncertainties in the PRC with respect to indirect transfers of equity interests in PRC resident enterprises.

The indirect transfer of equity interest in PRC resident enterprises by a non-PRC resident enterprise, or Indirect Transfer, is potentially subject to income tax in China at a rate of 10% on the gain if such transfer is considered as not having a commercial purpose and is carried out for tax avoidance. The SAT has issued several rules and notices to tighten the scrutiny over acquisition transactions in recent years. SAT Circular 7 sets out the scope of Indirect Transfers, which includes any changes in the shareholder’s ownership of a foreign enterprise holding PRC assets directly or indirectly in the course of a group’s overseas restructuring, and the factors to consider in determining whether an Indirect Transfer has a commercial purpose. An Indirect Transfer satisfying all the following criteria will be deemed to lack a bona fide commercial purpose and be taxable under PRC laws: (i) 75% or more of the equity value of the intermediary enterprise being transferred is derived directly or indirectly from the PRC taxable assets; (ii) at any time during the one-year period before the indirect transfer, 90% or more of the asset value of the intermediary enterprise (excluding cash) is comprised directly or indirectly of investments in China, or 90% or more of its income is derived directly or indirectly from China; (iii) the functions performed and risks assumed by the intermediary enterprise and any of its subsidiaries that directly or indirectly hold the PRC taxable assets are limited and are insufficient to prove their economic substance; and (iv) the non-PRC tax payable on the gain derived from the indirect transfer of the PRC taxable assets is lower than the potential PRC income tax on the direct transfer of such assets. Nevertheless, a non-resident enterprise’s buying and selling shares or ADSs of the same listed foreign enterprise on the public market will fall under the safe harbor available under SAT Circular 7 and will not be subject to PRC tax pursuant to SAT Circular 7. Under SAT Circular 7, the entities or individuals obligated to pay the transfer price to the transferor shall be the withholding agent and shall withhold the PRC tax from the transfer price. If the withholding agent fails to do so, the transferor shall report to and pay the PRC tax to the PRC tax authorities. In case neither the withholding agent nor the transferor complies with the obligations under SAT Circular 7, other than imposing penalties such as late payment interest on the transferors, the tax authority may also hold the withholding agent liable and impose a penalty of 50% to 300% of the unpaid tax on the withholding agent. The penalty imposed on the withholding agent may be reduced or waived if the withholding agent has submitted the relevant materials in connection with the indirect transfer to the PRC tax authorities in accordance with SAT Circular 7.

36


 

However, as these rules and notices are relatively new and there is a lack of clear statutory interpretation, we face uncertainties regarding the reporting required for and impact on future private equity financing transactions, share exchange or other transactions involving the transfer of shares in our company by investors that are non-PRC resident enterprises, or the sale or purchase of shares in other non-PRC resident companies or other taxable assets by us. Our company and other non-resident enterprises in our group may be subject to filing obligations or being taxed if our company and other non-resident enterprises in our group are transferors in such transactions, and may be subject to withholding obligations if our company and other non-resident enterprises in our group are transferees in such transactions. For the transfer of shares in our company by investors that are non-PRC resident enterprises, our PRC subsidiaries may be requested to assist in the filing under the rules and notices. As a result, we may be required to expend valuable resources to comply with these rules and notices or to request the relevant transferors from whom we purchase taxable assets to comply, or to establish that our company and other non-resident enterprises in our group should not be taxed under these rules and notices, which may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. There is no assurance that the tax authorities will not apply the rules and notices to our offshore restructuring transactions where non-PRC residents were involved if any of such transactions were determined by the tax authorities to lack reasonable commercial purpose. As a result, we and our non-PRC resident investors may be at risk of being taxed under these rules and notices and may be required to comply with or to establish that we should not be taxed under such rules and notices, which may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations or such non-PRC resident investors’ investments in us. We may conduct acquisition transactions in the future. We cannot assure you that the PRC tax authorities will not, at their discretion, adjust any capital gains and impose tax return filing obligations on us or require us to provide assistance for the investigation of PRC tax authorities with respect thereto. Heightened scrutiny over acquisition transactions by the PRC tax authorities may have a negative impact on potential acquisitions we may pursue in the future.

Any failure to comply with PRC regulations regarding the registration requirements for our employee equity incentive plans may subject us to fines and other legal or administrative sanctions, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

In February 2012, the SAFE promulgated the Notices on Issues Concerning the Foreign Exchange Administration for Domestic Individuals Participating in Stock Incentive Plans of Overseas Publicly Listed Companies, or the Stock Option Rules. In accordance with the Stock Option Rules and relevant rules and regulations, PRC citizens or non-PRC citizens residing in China for a continuous period of not less than one year, who participate in any stock incentive plan of an overseas publicly listed company, subject to a few exceptions, are required to register with SAFE through a domestic qualified agent, which could be a PRC subsidiary of such overseas listed company, and complete certain procedures. We and our employees who are PRC citizens or who reside in China for a continuous period of not less than one year and who participate in our stock incentive plan will be subject to such regulation. We plan to assist our employees to register their share options or shares. However, any failure of our PRC individual beneficial owners and holders of share options or shares to comply with the SAFE registration requirements may subject them to fines and legal sanctions and may limit the ability of our PRC subsidiaries to distribute dividends to us. We also face regulatory uncertainties that could restrict our ability to adopt additional incentive plans for our directors and employees under PRC law.

Proceedings brought by the SEC against the Big Four PRC-based accounting firms, including our independent registered public accounting firm, could result in our inability to file future financial statements in compliance with the requirements of the Exchange Act.

In December 2012, the SEC instituted administrative proceedings under Rule 102(e)(1)(iii) of the SEC’s Rules of Practice against the Big Four PRC-based accounting firms, including our independent registered public accounting firm, alleging that these firms had violated U.S. securities laws and the SEC’s rules and regulations thereunder by failing to provide to the SEC the firms’ audit work papers with respect to certain PRC-based companies under the SEC’s investigation. On January 22, 2014, the administrative law judge, or the ALJ, presiding over the matter rendered an initial decision that each of the firms had violated the SEC’s rules of practice by failing to produce audit workpapers to the SEC. The initial decision censured each of the firms and barred them from practicing before the SEC for a period of six months. On February 12, 2014, the Big Four PRC-based accounting firms appealed the ALJ’s initial decision to the SEC. On February 6, 2015, the four China-based accounting firms each agreed to a censure and to pay a fine to the SEC to settle the dispute and avoid suspension of their ability to practice before the SEC and audit U.S.-listed companies. The settlement required the firms to follow detailed procedures and to seek to provide the SEC with access to Chinese firms’ audit documents via the CSRC, in response to future document requests by the SEC made through the CSRC. If the Big Four PRC-based accounting firms fail to comply with the documentation production procedures that are in the settlement agreement or if there is a failure of the process between the SEC and the CSRC, the SEC could restart the proceedings against the firms.

37


 

In the event that the SEC restarts the administrative proceedings, depending upon the final outcome, listed companies in the United States with major PRC operations may find it difficult or impossible to retain auditors in respect of their operations in the PRC, which could result in financial statements being determined to not be in compliance with the requirements of the Exchange Act, including possible delisting. Moreover, any negative news about the proceedings against these audit firms may cause investor uncertainty regarding PRC-based, United States-listed companies and the market price of our ADSs may be adversely affected.

If the accounting firms are subject to additional remedial measures, our ability to file our financial statements in compliance with SEC requirements could be impacted. A determination that we have not timely filed financial statements in compliance with SEC requirements would substantially reduce or effectively terminate the trading of our ADSs in the United States.

Certain of our investments may be subject to review from the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, or CFIUS, which may delay or block a transaction from closing.

The U.S. Congress has passed legislation that will expand the jurisdiction and powers of the CFIUS, the U.S. interagency committee that conducts national security reviews of foreign investment. President Trump signed the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act (FIRRMA) in August 2018. Pursuant to FIRRMA, investments in companies that deal in “critical technology” are subject to filing requirements and, in some instances, review and approval by CFIUS. The term “critical technology” includes, among others, technology subject to U.S. export controls and certain “emerging and foundational technology,” a term that is still being defined but that is expected to include a range of U.S. biotechnology. If an investment by a foreign entity in a U.S. business dealing in “critical technology” meets certain thresholds, a filing with CFIUS is mandatory.

Accordingly, to the extent the U.S. portion of our business decides to take investments from foreign persons, such investments could be subject to CFIUS jurisdiction. To date, none of our investments have been subject to CFIUS review but, depending on the particulars of ongoing or future investments, we may be obligated to secure CFIUS approval before closing, which could delay the time period between signing and closing. If we determine that a CFIUS filing is not mandatory (or otherwise advisable), there is a risk that CFIUS could initiate its own review, if it determines that the transaction is subject to its jurisdiction. If an investment raises significant national security concerns, CFIUS has the authority to impose mitigation conditions or recommend that the President block a transaction.

Risks Related to Intellectual Property

If we are unable to obtain and maintain patent protection for our products and drug candidates through intellectual property rights, or if the scope of such intellectual property rights obtained is not sufficiently broad, third parties may compete directly against us.

Our success depends, in part, on our ability to protect our products and drug candidates from competition by obtaining, maintaining and enforcing our intellectual property rights, including patent rights. We seek to protect the products and drug candidates and technology that we consider commercially important by filing PRC and international patent applications, relying on trade secrets or pharmaceutical regulatory protection or employing a combination of these methods. We also seek to protect our proprietary position by in-licensing intellectual property relating to our technology and drug candidates. We do not own or exclusively license any issued patents with respect to certain of our products and drug candidates in all territories in which we plan to commercialize our products and drug candidates. For example, we do not own or exclusively license any issued patents covering ZEJULA in Hong Kong or Macau. We do not own or exclusively license any issued patents covering margetuximab, MGD-013 and a pre-clinical multi-specific TRIDENT molecule in Macau or Taiwan, but we do non-exclusively in-license issued patents in China and Hong Kong and pending patent applications in China, Hong Kong or Taiwan covering them. We do not own or exclusively license any issued patents or pending patent applications covering Optune in Hong Kong, Macau, or Taiwan, but we do exclusively license issued patents and pending patent applications covering Optune in China. We do not own or exclusively license any issued patents covering INCMGA0012 (PD-1), but we do in-license two pending patent applications relating to INCMGA0012 (PD-1) in China, 2 in Taiwan and 1 in Hong Kong. We in-license 1 issued patent in China and 1 in Taiwan, but we also in-license 1 pending patent application relating to EXT2514 in China, 1 in Hong Kong, 1 in Taiwan. We cannot predict whether such patent applications or any of our other owned or in-licensed pending patent applications will result in the issuance of any patents that effectively protect our products and drug candidates. If we or our licensors are unable to obtain or maintain patent protection with respect to our products or drug candidates and technology we develop, our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects could be materially harmed.

38


 

The patent prosecution process is expensive, time-consuming and complex, and we may not be able to file, prosecute, maintain, enforce or license all necessary or desirable patent applications at a reasonable cost or in a timely manner. In addition, our license and intellectual property-related agreements may not provide us with exclusive rights to use our in-licensed intellectual property rights relating to the applicable products and drug candidates in all relevant fields of use and in all territories in which we may wish to develop or commercialize our technology and products in the future. For example, under our agreements with GSK for ZEJULA, our licenses are limited to China, Hong Kong, and Macau. In the case of our agreements with Novocure for Optune, Paratek for omadacycline (ZL-2401), Five Prime for bemarituzumab (FPA144), and MacroGenics for margetuximab, MGD-013 and a pre-clinical multi-specific TRIDENT molecule, our licenses are limited to China, Hong Kong, Macau, and Taiwan. Also, in the case of our agreement with Entasis for durlobactam, our license is limited to China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Singapore, Australia, New Zealand and Japan. As a result, we may not be able to prevent competitors from developing and commercializing competitive products in all such fields and territories. In the case of our agreement with Deciphera for ripretinib, our license is limited to China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. In the case of our agreement with Incyte for INCMGA0012 (PD-1), our licenses are limited to China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan.

Patents may be invalidated and patent applications, including our in-licensed patent application relating to FP144, Optune, margetuximab, MGD-013, EXT2514, a pre-clinical multi-specific TRIDENT molecule or INCMGA0012 (PD-1) as well as Regeneron’s patents relating to REGN1979, may not be granted for a number of reasons, including known or unknown prior art, deficiencies in the patent application or the lack of novelty of the underlying invention or technology. It is also possible that we will fail to identify patentable aspects of our research and development output in time to obtain patent protection. Although we enter into non-disclosure and confidentiality agreements with parties who have access to confidential or patentable aspects of our research and development output, such as our employees, corporate collaborators, outside scientific collaborators, contract manufacturers, consultants, advisors and any other third parties, any of these parties may breach such agreements and disclose such output before a patent application is filed, thereby jeopardizing our ability to seek patent protection. In addition, publications of discoveries in the scientific literature often lag behind the actual discoveries, and patent applications in the United States and other jurisdictions are typically not published until 18 months after filing, or in some cases, not at all. Therefore, we cannot be certain that we or our licensors were the first to make the inventions claimed in our owned or in-licensed patents or pending patent applications or that we or our licensors were the first to file for patent protection of such inventions. Furthermore, the PRC and, recently, the United States have adopted the “first-to-file” system under which whoever first files a patent application will be awarded the patent if all other patentability requirements are met. Under the first-to-file system, third parties may be granted a patent relating to a technology, which we invented.

In addition, under PRC Patent Law, any organization or individual that applies for a patent in a foreign country for an invention or utility model accomplished in China is required to report to the State Intellectual Property Office, or SIPO, for confidentiality examination. Otherwise, if an application is later filed in China, the patent right will not be granted. Moreover, even if patents do grant from any of the applications, the grant of a patent is not conclusive as to its scope, validity or enforceability.

The coverage claimed in a patent application can be significantly reduced before the patent is issued, and its scope can be reinterpreted after issuance. Even if patent applications we license or own currently or in the future issue as patents, they may not issue in a form that will provide us with any meaningful protection, prevent competitors or other third parties from competing with us, or otherwise provide us with any competitive advantage. In addition, the patent position of biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies generally is highly uncertain, involves complex legal and factual questions, and has been the subject of much litigation in recent years. As a result, the issuance, scope, validity, enforceability and commercial value of our patent rights are highly uncertain.

39


 

The issuance of a patent is not conclusive as to its inventorship, scope, validity or enforceability, and our patents may be challenged in the courts or patent offices in the PRC, United States and abroad. We and our licensors and collaboration partners may be subject to a third-party preissuance submission of prior art to the United States Patent and Trademark Office, or USPTO, or become involved in opposition, derivation, revocation, re-examination, post-grant and inter partes review, or interference proceedings or similar proceedings in foreign jurisdictions challenging our patent rights or the patent rights of others. An adverse determination in any such submission, proceeding or litigation could reduce the scope of, or invalidate, our owned or in-licensed patent rights, allow third parties to commercialize our technology, products or drug candidates and compete directly with us without payment to us, or result in our inability to manufacture or commercialize products or drug candidates without infringing, misappropriating or otherwise violating third-party patent rights. Moreover, we, or one of our licensors or collaboration partners, may have to participate in interference proceedings declared by the USPTO to determine priority of invention or in post-grant challenge proceedings, such as oppositions in a foreign patent office, that challenge the priority of our or our licensor’s or collaboration partner’s invention or other features of patentability of our owned or in-licensed patents and patent applications. Such challenges may result in loss of patent rights, loss of exclusivity, or in patent claims being narrowed, invalidated, or held unenforceable, which could limit our ability to stop others from using or commercializing similar or identical technology and products, limit the duration of the patent protection of our technology, or limit the price at which we can sell our products and drug candidates. Such proceedings also may result in substantial costs and require significant time from our scientists and management, even if the eventual outcome is favorable to us. Consequently, we do not know whether any of our technology, products or drug candidates will be protectable or remain protected by valid and enforceable patents. Our competitors or other third parties may be able to circumvent our owned or in-licensed patents by developing similar or alternative technologies or products in a non-infringing manner.

Furthermore, the terms of patents are finite. The patents we own or in-license and the patents that may issue from our currently pending owned and in-licensed patent applications generally have a 20-year protection period starting from such patents and patent applications’ earliest filing date. Given the amount of time required for the development, testing and regulatory review of products and new drug candidates, patents protecting such products and drug candidates might expire before or shortly after such products or drug candidates are commercialized. As a result, our owned or in-licensed patents and patent applications may not provide us with sufficient rights to exclude others from commercializing products similar or identical to ours. Moreover, some of our patents and patent applications are, and may in the future be, co-owned with third parties. If we are unable to obtain an exclusive license to any such third party co-owners’ interest in such patents or patent applications, such co-owners may be able to license their rights to other third parties, including our competitors, and our competitors could market competing products and technology. In addition, we may need the cooperation of any such co-owners of our patents in order to enforce such patents against third parties, and such cooperation may not be provided to us. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our competitive position, business, financial conditions, results of operations and prospects.

Our owned or in-licensed patents could be found invalid or unenforceable if challenged in court or before the USPTO or comparable foreign authority.

We or our licensors or collaboration partners may become involved in patent litigation against third parties to enforce owned or in-licensed patent rights, to invalidate patents held by such third parties, or to defend against such claims. A court may refuse to stop the other party from using the technology at issue on the grounds that patents owned or in-licensed by us, our licensors or our collaboration partners do not cover the third-party technology in question. Further, such third parties could counterclaim that we infringe, misappropriate or otherwise violate their intellectual property or that a patent we or our licensors or collaboration partners have asserted against them is invalid or unenforceable. In patent litigation, defendant counterclaims challenging the validity, enforceability or scope of asserted patents are commonplace and there are numerous grounds upon which a third party can assert invalidity or unenforceability of a patent. In addition, third parties may initiate legal proceedings before administrative bodies in the United States or abroad, even outside the context of litigation, against us or our licensors with respect to our owned or in-licensed intellectual property to assert such challenges to such intellectual property rights. Such mechanisms include re-examination, inter partes review, post-grant review, interference proceedings, derivation proceedings and equivalent proceedings in foreign jurisdictions (e.g., opposition proceedings). Such proceedings could result in revocation, cancellation or amendment to our patents in such a way that they no longer cover and protect our products and drug candidates.

40


 

The outcome of any such proceeding is generally unpredictable. Grounds for a validity challenge could be, among other things, an alleged failure to meet any of several statutory requirements, including lack of novelty, obviousness, lack of written description or non-enablement. Grounds for an unenforceability assertion could be, among other things, an allegation that someone connected with prosecution of the patent withheld relevant information or made a misleading statement during prosecution. It is possible that prior art of which we and the patent examiner were unaware during prosecution exists, which could render our patents invalid. Moreover, it is also possible that prior art may exist that we are aware of but do not believe is relevant to our current or future patents, but that could nevertheless be determined to render our patents invalid. Even if we are successful in defending against such challenges, the cost to us of any patent litigation or similar proceeding could be substantial, and it may consume significant management and other personnel time. We do not maintain insurance to cover intellectual property infringement, misappropriation or violation.

An adverse result in any litigation or other intellectual property proceeding could put one or more of our patents at risk of being invalidated, rendered unenforceable or interpreted narrowly. If a defendant were to prevail on a legal assertion of invalidity and/or unenforceability of our patents covering one or more of our products or drug candidates, we would lose at least part, and perhaps all, of the patent protection covering such products or drug candidates. Competing products or drugs may also be sold in other countries in which our patent coverage might not exist or be as strong. If we lose a foreign patent lawsuit, alleging our infringement of a competitor’s patents, we could be prevented from marketing our products or drugs in one or more foreign countries. Any of these outcomes would have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

We may not be able to protect our intellectual property in the PRC.

The validity, enforceability and scope of protection available under the relevant intellectual property laws in the PRC are uncertain and still evolving. Implementation and enforcement of PRC intellectual property-related laws have historically been deficient and ineffective. Accordingly, intellectual property and confidentiality legal regimes in China may not afford protection to the same extent as in the United States or other countries. Policing unauthorized use of proprietary technology is difficult and expensive, and we may need to resort to litigation to enforce or defend patents issued to us or our licensors to determine the enforceability, scope and validity of our proprietary rights or those of others. As noted above, we may need to rely on our licensors to enforce and defend our technologies. The experience and capabilities of PRC courts in handling intellectual property litigation varies, and outcomes are unpredictable. Further, such litigation may require a significant expenditure of cash and may divert management’s attention from our operations, which could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. An adverse determination in any such litigation could materially impair our intellectual property rights and may harm our business, prospects and reputation.

We may not be able to protect our intellectual property and proprietary rights throughout the world.

Filing, prosecuting, maintaining and defending patents on products and drug candidates in all countries throughout the world would be prohibitively expensive, and the laws of foreign countries may not protect our rights to the same extent as the laws of the United States. Consequently, we may not be able to prevent third parties from practicing our inventions in all countries outside the United States or PRC or from selling or importing products made using our inventions in and into the United States, the PRC or other jurisdictions. Competitors may use our technologies in jurisdictions where we have not obtained patent protection to develop their own competing products and, further, may export otherwise infringing products to territories where we have patent protection or licenses but enforcement is not as strong as that in the United States. These products may compete with our products, and our patents or other intellectual property rights may not be effective or sufficient to prevent them from competing.

Many companies have encountered significant problems in protecting and defending intellectual property rights in foreign jurisdictions, including China. The legal systems of certain countries, particularly certain developing countries, do not favor the enforcement of patents, trade secrets, and other intellectual property protection, particularly those relating to biotechnology products, which could make it difficult for us to stop the infringement of our patents or marketing of competing products in violation of our intellectual property and proprietary rights generally. Proceedings to enforce our intellectual property and proprietary rights in foreign jurisdictions could result in substantial costs and divert our efforts and attention from other aspects of our business, could put our patents at risk of being invalidated or interpreted narrowly, could put our patent applications at risk of not issuing, and could provoke third parties to assert claims against us. We may not prevail in any lawsuits that we initiate, and the damages or other remedies awarded, if any, may not be commercially meaningful. Accordingly, our efforts to enforce our intellectual property and proprietary rights around the world may be inadequate to obtain a significant commercial advantage from the intellectual property that we develop or license.

41


 

Furthermore, many countries have compulsory licensing laws under which a patent owner may be compelled to grant licenses to third parties. In addition, many countries limit the enforceability of patents against government agencies or government contractors. In these countries, the patent owner may have limited remedies, which could materially diminish the value of such patent. If we or any of our licensors are forced to grant a license to third parties with respect to any patents relevant to our business, our competitive position may be impaired, and our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may be adversely affected.

Developments in patent law could have a negative impact on our business.

Changes in either the patent laws or interpretation of the patent laws in the United States, PRC and other jurisdictions could increase the uncertainties and costs surrounding the prosecution of patent applications and the enforcement or defense of issued patents, including changing the standards of patentability, and any such changes could have a negative impact on our business. For example, in the United States, the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act, or the America Invents Act, which was signed into law in September 2011, includes a number of significant changes to U.S. patent law. These changes include a transition from a “first-to-invent” system to a “first-to-file” system as of March 2013, changes to the way issued patents are challenged, and changes to the way patent applications are disputed during the examination process. These include allowing third party submission of prior art to the USPTO during patent prosecution and additional procedures to attack the validity of a patent by USPTO administered post grant proceedings, including post grant review, inter partes review, and derivation proceedings. As a result of these changes, patent law in the United States may favor larger and more established companies that have greater resources to devote to patent application filing and prosecution. The USPTO has developed new and untested regulations and procedures to govern the full implementation of the America Invents Act, and many of the substantive changes to patent law associated with the America Invents Act, and, in particular, the first-to-file provisions became effective in March 2013. Substantive changes to patent law associated with the America Invents Act may affect our ability to obtain patents, and if obtained, to enforce or defend them. Accordingly, it is not clear what, if any, impact the America Invents Act will have on the cost of prosecuting our patent applications and our ability to obtain patents based on our discoveries and to enforce or defend any patents that may issue from our patent applications, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

In addition, the patent positions of companies in the development and commercialization of biologics and pharmaceuticals are particularly uncertain. Recent U.S. Supreme Court rulings have narrowed the scope of patent protection available in certain circumstances and weakened the rights of patent owners in certain situations. This combination of events has created uncertainty with respect to the validity and enforceability of patents, once obtained. Depending on future actions by the U.S. Congress, the federal courts and the USPTO, the laws and regulations governing patents could change in unpredictable ways that could have a material adverse effect on our existing patent portfolio and our ability to protect and enforce our intellectual property in the future.

If we are unable to maintain the confidentiality of our trade secrets, our business and competitive position may be harmed.

In addition to the protection afforded by registered patents and pending patent applications, we rely upon unpatented trade secret protection, unpatented know-how and continuing technological innovation to develop and maintain our competitive position. However, trade secrets and know-how can be difficult to protect. We also seek to protect our proprietary technology and processes, in part, by entering into confidentiality agreements with parties that have access to them, such as our partners, collaborators, scientific advisors, employees, consultants and other third parties, and invention assignment agreements with our consultants and employees. We cannot guarantee that we have entered into such agreements with each party that may have or have had access to our trade secrets or proprietary technology and processes. We may not be able to prevent the unauthorized disclosure or use of our technical know-how or other trade secrets by the parties to these agreements, however, despite the existence generally of confidentiality agreements and other contractual restrictions. If any of the partners, collaborators, scientific advisors, employees and consultants who are parties to these agreements breaches or violates the terms of any of these agreements or otherwise discloses our proprietary information, we may not have adequate remedies for any such breach or violation, and we could lose our trade secrets as a result. Enforcing a claim that a third party illegally disclosed or misappropriated our trade secrets, including through intellectual property litigations or other proceedings, is difficult, expensive and time consuming, and the outcome is unpredictable. In addition, courts in China and other jurisdictions inside and outside the United States are less prepared, less willing or unwilling to protect trade secrets.

42


 

Our trade secrets could otherwise become known or be independently discovered by our competitors or other third parties. For example, competitors could purchase our products and drug candidates and attempt to replicate some or all of the competitive advantages we derive from our development efforts, willfully infringe, misappropriate or otherwise violate our intellectual property rights, design around our intellectual property protecting such technology or develop their own competitive technologies that fall outside of our intellectual property rights. If any of our trade secrets were to be disclosed or independently developed by a competitor, we would have no right to prevent them, or others to whom they communicate it, from using that technology or information to compete against us, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

If our products or drug candidates infringe, misappropriate or otherwise violate the intellectual property rights of third parties, we may incur substantial liabilities, and we may be unable to sell or commercialize these products and drug candidates.

Our commercial success depends significantly on our ability to develop, manufacture, market and sell our products and drug candidates and use our proprietary technologies without infringing, misappropriating or otherwise violating the patents and other proprietary rights of third parties. The biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries are characterized by extensive litigation regarding patents and other intellectual property rights. In the PRC and the United States, invention patent applications are generally maintained in confidence until their publication 18 months from the filing date. The publication of discoveries in the scientific or patent literature frequently occurs substantially later than the date on which the underlying discoveries were made and invention patent applications are filed. Even after reasonable investigation, we may not know with certainty whether any third-party may have filed a patent application without our knowledge while we are still developing or producing that product. We may become party to, or threatened with, adversarial proceedings or litigation regarding intellectual property rights with respect to our technology and any products or drug candidates we may develop, including interference proceedings, post-grant review, inter partes review and derivation proceedings before the USPTO and similar proceedings in foreign jurisdictions.

Third parties may assert infringement claims against us based on existing patents or patents that may be granted in the future, regardless of their merit. Even if we believe third-party intellectual property claims are without merit, there is no assurance that a court would find in our favor on questions of infringement, validity, enforceability or priority. A court of competent jurisdiction could hold that these third-party patents are valid, enforceable and infringed, which could materially and adversely affect our ability to commercialize any products or drug candidates we may develop and any other products, drug candidates or technologies covered by the asserted third-party patents. In order to successfully challenge the validity of any such U.S. patent in federal court, we would need to overcome a presumption of validity. There is no assurance that a court of competent jurisdiction would invalidate the claims of any such U.S. patent.

 

If we are found to infringe a third party’s patent rights, and we are unsuccessful in demonstrating that such patents are invalid or unenforceable, we could be required to:

 

obtain royalty-bearing licenses from such third party to such patents, which may not be available on commercially reasonable terms, if at all and even if we were able to obtain such licenses, they could be non-exclusive, thereby giving our competitors and other third parties access to the same technologies licensed to us, and could require us to make substantial licensing and royalty payments;

 

defend litigation or administrative proceedings;

 

reformulate product(s) so that it does not infringe the intellectual property rights of others, which may not be possible or could be very expensive and time consuming;

 

cease developing, manufacturing and commercializing the infringing technology, products or drug candidates; and

 

pay such third party significant monetary damages, including treble damages and attorneys’ fees, if we are found to have willfully infringed a patent or other intellectual property right.

43


 

Claims that we have misappropriated the confidential information or trade secrets of third parties could have a similar material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects. Even if we are successful in such litigations or administrative proceedings, such litigations and proceedings may be costly and could result in a substantial diversion of management resources. Any of the foregoing may have a material adverse effect on our business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations.

Intellectual property litigation and proceedings could cause us to spend substantial resources and distract our personnel from their normal responsibilities.

Even if resolved in our favor, litigation or other legal proceedings relating to our, our licensor’s or other third parties’ intellectual property claims may cause us to incur significant expenses and could distract our personnel from their normal responsibilities. In addition, there could be public announcements of the results of hearings, motions, or other interim proceedings or developments, and if securities analysts or investors perceive these results to be negative, it could have a substantial adverse effect on the price of our common stock. Such litigation or proceedings could substantially increase our operating losses and reduce the resources available for development activities or any future sales, marketing, or distribution activities. We may not have sufficient financial or other resources to conduct such litigation or proceedings adequately. Some of our competitors may be able to sustain the costs of such litigation or proceedings more effectively than we can because of their greater financial resources and more mature and developed intellectual property portfolios. Uncertainties resulting from the initiation and continuation of patent litigation or other proceedings could have a material adverse effect on our ability to compete in the marketplace.

We may be subject to claims that we or our employees, consultants or advisors have wrongfully used or disclosed alleged trade secrets of competitors or their current or former employers or are in breach of non-competition or non-solicitation agreements with competitors or other third parties.

We could in the future be subject to claims that we or our employees, consultants or advisors have inadvertently or otherwise used or disclosed alleged trade secrets or other proprietary information of current or former employers, competitors or other third parties. Many of our employees, consultants and advisors are currently or were previously employed at universities or other biotechnology or pharmaceutical companies, including our competitors or potential competitors. Although we try to ensure that our employees and consultants do not improperly use the intellectual property, proprietary information, know-how or trade secrets of others in their work for us, we may be subject to claims that we or these individuals have breach the terms of his or her non-competition or non-solicitation agreement, or that we or these individuals have, inadvertently or otherwise, used or disclosed the alleged trade secrets or other proprietary information of a current or former employer, competitor or other third parties.

Litigation may be necessary to defend against these claims. Even if we are successful in defending against these claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and could be a distraction to management and research personnel. If our defenses to these claims fail, in addition to requiring us to pay monetary damages, a court could prohibit us from using technologies or features that are essential to our products and drug candidates, if such technologies or features are found to incorporate or be derived from the trade secrets or other proprietary information of the former employers. An inability to incorporate such technologies or features would have a material adverse effect on our business and may prevent us from successfully commercializing our products and drug candidates. In addition, we may lose valuable intellectual property rights or personnel as a result of such claims. Moreover, any such litigation or the threat thereof may adversely affect our ability to hire employees or contract with independent sales representatives. A loss of key personnel or their work product could hamper or prevent our ability to commercialize our products and drug candidates, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

In addition, while it is our policy to require our employees and contractors who may be involved in the conception or development of intellectual property to execute agreements assigning such intellectual property to us, we may be unsuccessful in executing such an agreement with each party who, in fact, conceives or develops intellectual property that we regard as our own. The assignment of intellectual property rights may not be self-executing, or the assignment agreements may be breached, and we may be forced to bring claims against third parties, or defend claims that they may bring against us, to determine the ownership of what we regard as our intellectual property. Such claims could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

44


 

We may not be successful in obtaining necessary intellectual property rights to drug candidates for our development pipeline through acquisitions and in-licenses. 

Although we also intend to develop drug candidates through our own internal research, our near-term business model is predicated, in large part, on our ability to successfully identify and acquire or in-license drug candidates to grow our drug candidate pipeline. However, we may be unable to acquire or in-license intellectual property rights relating to, or necessary for, any such drug candidates from third parties on commercially reasonable terms or at all, including because we are focusing on specific areas of care such as oncology and inflammatory and infectious diseases. In that event, we may be unable to develop or commercialize such drug candidates. We may also be unable to identify drug candidates that we believe are an appropriate strategic fit for our company and intellectual property relating to, or necessary for, such drug candidates. Any of the foregoing could have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

The in-licensing and acquisition of third-party intellectual property rights for drug candidates is a competitive area, and a number of more established companies are also pursuing strategies to in-license or acquire third-party intellectual property rights for drug candidates that we may consider attractive or necessary. These established companies may have a competitive advantage over us due to their size, cash resources and greater clinical development and commercialization capabilities. Furthermore, companies that perceive us to be a competitor may be unwilling to assign or license rights to us. If we are unable to successfully obtain rights to suitable drug candidates, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects for growth could suffer.

In addition, we expect that competition for the in-licensing or acquisition of third-party intellectual property rights for drug candidates that are attractive to us may increase in the future, which may mean fewer suitable opportunities for us as well as higher acquisition or licensing costs. We may be unable to in-license or acquire the third-party intellectual property rights for drug candidates on terms that would allow us to make an appropriate return on our investment.

If we do not obtain patent term extension and data exclusivity for our products or any drug candidates we may develop, our business may be materially harmed.

Depending upon the timing, duration and specifics of any FDA marketing approval of our products or any drug candidates we may develop, one or more of our owned or in-licensed U.S. patents may be eligible for limited patent term extension under the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Action of 1984, or Hatch Waxman Amendments. The Hatch Waxman Amendments permit a patent extension term of up to five years as compensation for patent term lost during the FDA regulatory review process. A patent term extension cannot extend the remaining term of a patent beyond a total of 14 years from the date of product approval, only one patent may be extended and only those claims covering the approved drug, a method for using it, or a method for manufacturing it may be extended. However, we may not be granted an extension because of, for example, failing to exercise due diligence during the testing phase or regulatory review process, failing to apply within applicable deadlines, failing to apply prior to expiration of relevant patents, or otherwise failing to satisfy applicable requirements. Moreover, the applicable time period or the scope of patent protection afforded could be less than we request. The PRC has not established a patent term extension system, but the government proposed to grant patent term extension to new drugs that will be marketed in and outside China for up to 5 years.

In China, there is currently no effective law or regulation providing for patent term extension, patent linkage, or data exclusivity. Therefore, a lower-cost generic or biosimilar drug can emerge onto the market more quickly. Chinese regulators have set forth a framework for integrating patent linkage and data exclusivity into the Chinese regulatory regime and for establishing a pilot program for patent term extension. To be implemented, this framework will require promulgation of laws, regulations and detailed implementation measures. To date, no laws, regulations or implementation measures have been promulgated and become effective. Consequently, the absence of currently effective laws and regulations on patent linkage, patent term extension and data exclusivity or the cancellation of the currently effective five-year administrative exclusivity for domestically manufactured new drugs could result in much weaker protection for us against generic competition in China. For instance, the patents we have in China are not yet eligible to be extended for patent term lost during clinical trials and the regulatory review process. If we are unable to obtain patent term extension or term of any such extension is less than we request, our competitors may obtain approval of competing products following our patent expiration, and our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects could be materially harmed.

45


 

Obtaining and maintaining our patent protection depends on compliance with various procedural, document submission, fee payment, and other requirements imposed by government patent agencies, and our patent protection could be reduced or eliminated for non-compliance with these requirements.

Periodic maintenance fees, renewal fees, annuity fees, and various other government fees on patents and applications will be due to be paid to the USPTO and various government patent agencies outside of the United States over the lifetime of our owned or licensed patents and applications. In certain circumstances, we rely on our licensing partners to pay these fees due to U.S. and non-U.S. patent agencies. The USPTO and various non-U.S. government agencies require compliance with several procedural, documentary, fee payment, and other similar provisions during the patent application process. We are also dependent on our licensors to take the necessary action to comply with these requirements with respect to our licensed intellectual property. In some cases, an inadvertent lapse can be cured by payment of a late fee or by other means in accordance with the applicable rules. There are situations, however, in which non-compliance can result in abandonment or lapse of the patent or patent application, resulting in a partial or complete loss of patent rights in the relevant jurisdiction. In such an event, potential competitors might be able to enter the market with similar or identical products or technology, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, and prospects.

Intellectual property rights do not necessarily address all potential threats.

The degree of future protection afforded by our intellectual property rights is uncertain because intellectual property rights have limitations and may not adequately protect our business or permit us to maintain our competitive advantage. For example:

 

others may be able to make gene therapy products that are similar to any product or drug candidates we may develop or utilize similar gene therapy technology but that are not covered by the claims of the patents that we license or may own in the future;

 

we, our licensors, patent owners of patent rights that we have in-licensed, or current or future collaborators might not have been the first to make the inventions covered by the issued patent or pending patent application that we license or may own in the future;

 

we, our licensors, patent owners of patent rights that we have in-licensed, or current or future collaborators might not have been the first to file patent applications covering certain of our or their inventions;

 

others may independently develop similar or alternative technologies or duplicate any of our technologies without infringing, misappropriating or otherwise violating our owned or licensed intellectual property rights;

 

it is possible that our pending licensed patent applications or those that we may own in the future will not lead to issued patents;

 

issued patents that we hold rights to may be held invalid or unenforceable, including as a result of legal challenges by our competitors;

 

our competitors might conduct research and development activities in countries where we do not have patent rights and then use the information learned from such activities to develop competitive products for sale in our major commercial markets;

 

we may not develop additional proprietary technologies that are patentable;

 

the patents of others may harm our business; and

 

we may choose not to file a patent in order to maintain certain trade secrets or know how, and a third party may discover certain technologies containing such trade secrets or know how through independent research and development and/or subsequently file a patent covering such intellectual property.

Should any of these events occur, they could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

46


 

Risks Related to Our ADSs

We may be at an increased risk of securities class action litigation.

Historically, securities class action litigation has often been brought against a company following a decline in the market price of its securities. This risk is especially relevant for us because biotechnology and biopharmaceutical companies have experienced significant share price volatility in recent years. If we were to be sued, it could result in substantial costs and a diversion of management’s attention and resources, which could harm our business.

If we fail to establish and maintain proper internal financial reporting controls, our ability to produce accurate financial statements or comply with applicable regulations could be impaired.

Pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, we are required to file a report by our management on our internal control over financial reporting, including an attestation report on internal control over financial reporting issued by our independent registered public accounting firm. The presence of material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting could result in financial statement errors which, in turn, could lead to errors in our financial reports and/or delays in our financial reporting, which could require us to restate our operating results. We might not identify one or more material weaknesses in our internal controls in connection with evaluating our compliance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. In order to maintain and improve the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures and internal controls over financial reporting, we will need to expend significant resources and provide significant management oversight. Implementing any appropriate changes to our internal controls may require specific compliance training of our directors and employees, entail substantial costs in order to modify our existing accounting systems, take a significant period of time to complete and divert management’s attention from other business concerns. These changes may not, however, be effective in maintaining the adequacy of our internal control.

If we fail to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in the future, our management and our independent registered public accounting firm may not be able to conclude that we have effective internal controls over financial reporting, investors may lose confidence in our operating results, the price of the ADSs could decline and we may be subject to litigation or regulatory enforcement actions. In addition, if we are unable to meet the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the ADSs may not be able to remain listed on the Nasdaq Global Market.

As a foreign private issuer, we are not subject to certain U.S. securities law disclosure requirements that apply to a domestic U.S. issuer, which may limit the information publicly available to our shareholders.

As a foreign private issuer we are not required to comply with all of the periodic disclosure and current reporting requirements of the Exchange Act and therefore there may be less publicly available information about us than if we were a U.S. domestic issuer. For example, we are not subject to the proxy rules in the United States and disclosure with respect to our annual general meetings will be governed by the Cayman Islands requirements. In addition, our officers, directors and principal shareholders are exempt from the reporting and “short-swing” profit recovery provisions of Section 16 of the Exchange Act and the rules thereunder. Therefore, our shareholders may not know on a timely basis when our officers, directors and principal shareholders purchase or sell our ordinary shares or ADSs.

As a foreign private issuer, we are permitted to adopt certain home country practices in relation to corporate governance matters that differ significantly from the Nasdaq Stock Market corporate governance listing standards. These practices may afford less protection to shareholders than they would enjoy if we complied fully with corporate governance listing standards.

As a foreign private issuer, we are permitted to take advantage of certain provisions in the Nasdaq Stock Market listing rules that allow us to follow Cayman Islands law for certain governance matters. Certain corporate governance practices in the Cayman Islands may differ significantly from corporate governance listing standards as, except for general fiduciary duties and duties of care, Cayman Islands law has no corporate governance regime which prescribes specific corporate governance standards. We follow Cayman Islands corporate governance practices in lieu of the corporate governance requirements of the Nasdaq Stock Market in respect of the following: (i) the majority independent director requirement under Section 5605(b)(1) of the Nasdaq Stock Market listing rules, (ii) the requirement under Section 5605(d) of the Nasdaq Stock Market listing rules that a compensation committee comprised solely of independent directors governed by a compensation committee charter oversee executive compensation, (iii) the requirement under Section 5605(e) of the Nasdaq Stock Market listing rules that director nominees be selected or recommended for selection by either a majority of the independent directors or a nominations committee comprised solely of independent directors and (iv) the requirement under Section 5605(b)(2) of the Nasdaq Stock Market listing

47


 

rules that our independent directors hold regularly scheduled executive sessions. Cayman Islands law does not impose a requirement that our board of directors consist of a majority of independent directors. Nor does Cayman Islands law impose specific requirements on the establishment of a compensation committee or nominating committee or nominating process. Therefore, our shareholders may be afforded less protection than they otherwise would have under corporate governance listing standards applicable to U.S. domestic issuers.

We expect to lose our foreign private issuer status and be subject to U.S. domestic issuer disclosure requirements beginning in fiscal year 2021, which could result in significant additional costs and expenses.

As discussed above, we are currently a foreign private issuer, and therefore, we are not required to comply with all of the periodic disclosure and current reporting requirements of the Exchange Act. The determination of foreign private issuer status is made annually on the last business day of an issuer’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter and, accordingly, the next determination will be made with respect to us on June 30, 2020. Currently, more than 50% of our ordinary shares are directly or indirectly held by residents of the U.S. and, therefore, we expect that we will lose our foreign private issuer status as of June 30, 2020. If we lose our foreign private issuer status on this date, we will be required to file with the SEC periodic reports and registration statements on U.S. domestic issuer forms beginning on January 1, 2021, which are more detailed and extensive than the forms available to a foreign private issuer. We will also have to mandatorily comply with U.S. federal proxy requirements, and our officers, directors and principal shareholders will become subject to the short-swing profit disclosure and recovery provisions of Section 16 of the Exchange Act. In addition, we will lose our ability to rely upon exemptions from certain corporate governance requirements under the Nasdaq Stock Market listing rules. As a U.S. listed public company that is not a foreign private issuer, we will incur significant additional legal, accounting and other expenses that we will not incur as a foreign private issuer, and accounting, reporting and other expenses in order to maintain a listing on a U.S. securities exchange.

The audit report included in this Annual Report on Form 20-F was prepared by an auditor who is not inspected by the U.S. Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or the PCAOB, and as such, you are deprived of the benefits of such inspection.

Auditors of companies that are registered with the SEC and traded publicly in the United States, including the independent registered public accounting firm of our company, must be registered with the PCAOB, and are required by the laws of the United States to undergo regular inspections by the PCAOB to assess their compliance with the laws of the United States and professional standards. Because substantially all of our operations are within China, a jurisdiction where the PCAOB is currently unable to conduct inspections without the approval of the Chinese authorities, our auditor is not currently inspected by the PCAOB.

In May 2013, the PCAOB entered into a Memorandum of Understanding on Enforcement Cooperation with the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or CSRC, and the Ministry of Finance, to establish a cooperative framework between the parties for the production and exchange of audit documents relevant to investigations undertaken by the PCAOB in the United States or the CSRC or the Ministry of Finance in the PRC. The PCAOB has announced that, since May 2013, cooperation has not been sufficient to enable the PCAOB to obtain timely access to relevant documents and testimony necessary to carry out its mission. The PCAOB continues to address these issues with Chinese regulators, and whether the PCOAB will obtain equivalent access remains an open issue.

This lack of PCAOB inspections in China prevents the PCAOB from evaluating audits and quality control procedures of any auditors operating in China, including our auditor. As a result, investors may be deprived of the benefits of PCAOB inspections. The inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections of auditors in China makes it more difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of our auditor’s audit procedures or quality control procedures as compared to auditors outside of China that are subject to PCAOB inspections. Additionally, the SEC, the U.S. Department of Justice and other authorities often have substantial difficulties in bringing and enforcing actions against non-U.S. persons and companies, including those based in China. Investors should understand the attendant risks. Further, as a result, investors may lose confidence in our reported financial information and procedures and the quality of our financial statements as a result thereof.

48


 

We do not currently intend to pay dividends on our securities, and, consequently, your ability to achieve a return on your investment will depend on appreciation in the price of the ADSs.

We have never declared or paid any dividends on our ordinary shares. We currently intend to invest our future earnings, if any, to fund our growth. Therefore, investors are not likely to receive any dividends on their ADSs at least in the near term, and the success of an investment in ADSs will depend upon any future appreciation in its value. Consequently, investors may need to sell all or part of their holdings of ADSs after price appreciation, which may never occur, to realize any future gains on their investment. There is no guarantee that the ADSs will appreciate in value or even maintain the price at which our investors purchased their ADSs.

The market price for our ADSs may be volatile which could result in substantial loss to you.

The market price for our ADSs has been volatile. From September 19, 2017 to April 24, 2020, the closing price of our ADSs ranged from a high of $65.80 to a low of $14.95 per ADS.

The market price of our ADSs is likely to be highly volatile and subject to wide fluctuations in response to factors, including the following:

 

announcements of competitive developments;

 

regulatory developments affecting us, our customers or our competitors;

 

announcements regarding litigation or administrative proceedings involving us;

 

actual or anticipated fluctuations in our period-to-period operating results;

 

changes in financial estimates by securities research analysts;

 

additions or departures of our executive officers;

 

fluctuations of exchange rates between the RMB and the U.S. dollar;

 

release or expiration of lock-up or other transfer restrictions on our outstanding ordinary shares of ADSs; and

 

sales or perceived sales of additional ordinary shares or ADSs.

In addition, the securities markets have from time to time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are not related to the operating performance of particular companies. For example, since August 2008, multiple exchanges in the United States and other countries and regions, including China, experienced sharp declines in response to the growing credit market crisis and the recession in the United States. As recently as March 2020, the exchanges in both the United States and China experienced a sharp decline. Prolonged global capital markets volatility may affect overall investor sentiment towards our ADSs, which would also negatively affect the trading prices for our ADSs.

Fluctuations in the value of the renminbi may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and the value of your investment.

The value of the renminbi against the U.S. dollar and other currencies may fluctuate and is affected by, among other things, changes in political and economic conditions. On July 21, 2005, China government changed its decade-old policy of pegging the value of the renminbi to the U.S. dollar, and the renminbi appreciated more than 20% against the U.S. dollar over the following three years. Between July 2008 and June 2010, this appreciation halted, and the exchange rate between the renminbi and U.S. dollar remained within a narrow band. In June 2010, the PBOC announced that China government would increase the flexibility of the exchange rate, and thereafter allowed the renminbi to appreciate slowly against the U.S. dollar within the narrow band fixed by the PBOC. However, more recently, on August 11, 12 and 13, 2015, the PBOC significantly devalued the renminbi by fixing its price against the U.S. dollar 1.9%, 1.6%, and 1.1% lower than the previous day’s value, respectively. On October 1, 2016, the renminbi joined the International Monetary Fund’s basket of currencies that make up the Special Drawing Right, or SDR, along with the U.S. dollar, the Euro, the Japanese yen and the British pound. In the fourth quarter of 2016, the renminbi depreciated significantly while the U.S. dollar surged and China experienced persistent capital outflows. With the development of the foreign exchange

49


 

market and progress towards interest rate liberalization and renminbi internationalization, the Chinese government may in the future announce further changes to the exchange rate system. There is no guarantee that the renminbi will not appreciate or depreciate significantly in value against the U.S. dollar in the future. It is difficult to predict how market forces or PRC or U.S. government policy may impact the exchange rate between the renminbi and the U.S. dollar in the future.

Significant revaluation of the renminbi may have a material adverse effect on your investment. For example, to the extent that we need to convert U.S. dollars into renminbi for our operations, appreciation of the renminbi against the U.S. dollar would have an adverse effect on the renminbi amount we would receive from the conversion. Conversely, if we decide to convert our renminbi into U.S. dollars for the purpose of making payments for dividends on our ordinary shares or ADSs or for other business purposes, appreciation of the U.S. dollar against the renminbi would have a negative effect on the U.S. dollar amount available to us. In addition, appreciation or depreciation in the value of the renminbi relative to U.S. dollars would affect our financial results reported in U.S. dollar terms regardless of any underlying change in our business or results of operations.

Very limited hedging options are available in China to reduce our exposure to exchange rate fluctuations. To date, we have not entered into any hedging transactions in an effort to reduce our exposure to foreign currency exchange risk. While we may decide to enter into hedging transactions in the future, the availability and effectiveness of these hedges may be limited and we may not be able to adequately hedge our exposure or at all. In addition, our currency exchange losses may be magnified by PRC exchange control regulations that restrict our ability to convert renminbi into foreign currency.

Holders of ADSs have fewer rights than shareholders and must act through the depositary to exercise their rights.

Holders of our ADSs do not have the same rights as our shareholders and may only exercise the voting rights with respect to the underlying ordinary shares in accordance with the provisions of the deposit agreement. Under our fourth amended and restated memorandum and articles of association, an annual general meeting and any extraordinary general meeting may be called with not less than seven days’ notice. When a general meeting is convened, you may not receive sufficient notice of a shareholders’ meeting to permit you to withdraw the ordinary shares underlying your ADSs to allow you to vote with respect to any specific matter. If we ask for your instructions, we will give the depositary notice of any such meeting and details concerning the matters to be voted upon at least 30 days in advance of the meeting date and the depositary will send a notice to you about the upcoming vote and will arrange to deliver our voting materials to you. The depositary and its agents, however, may not be able to send voting instructions to you or carry out your voting instructions in a timely manner. We will make all commercially reasonable efforts to cause the depositary to extend voting rights to you in a timely manner, but we cannot assure you that you will receive the voting materials in time to ensure that you can instruct the depositary to vote the ordinary shares underlying your ADSs. Furthermore, the depositary will not be liable for any failure to carry out any instructions to vote, for the manner in which any vote is cast or for the effect of any such vote. As a holder or beneficial owner of ADSs, you may have limited recourse if we or the depositary fail to meet our respective obligations under the deposit agreement or if you wish us or the depositary to participate in legal proceedings. As a result, you may not be able to exercise your right to vote and you may lack recourse if your ADSs are not voted as you request. In addition, in your capacity as an ADS holder, you will not be able to call a shareholders’ meeting.

You may not receive distributions on our ADSs or any value for them if such distribution is illegal or impractical or if any required government approval cannot be obtained in order to make such distribution available to you.

Although we do not have any present plan to pay any dividends, the depositary of our ADSs has agreed to pay to you the cash dividends or other distributions it or the custodian receives on ordinary shares or other deposited securities underlying our ADSs, after deducting its fees and expenses and any applicable taxes and governmental charges. You will receive these distributions in proportion to the number of ordinary shares your ADSs represent. However, the depositary is not responsible if it decides that it is unlawful or impractical to make a distribution available to any holders of ADSs. For example, it would be unlawful to make a distribution to a holder of ADSs if it consists of securities whose offering would require registration under the Securities Act but are not so properly registered or distributed under an applicable exemption from registration. The depositary may also determine that it is not reasonably practicable to distribute certain property. In these cases, the depositary may determine not to distribute such property. We have no obligation to register under the U.S. securities laws any offering of ADSs, ordinary shares, rights or other securities received through such distributions. We also have no obligation to take any other action to permit the distribution of ADSs, ordinary shares, rights or anything else to holders of ADSs. This means that you may not receive distributions we make on our ordinary shares or any value for them if it is illegal or impractical for us to make them available to you. These restrictions may cause a material decline in the value of our ADSs.

50


 

Your right to participate in any future rights offerings may be limited, which may cause dilution to your holdings.

We may from time to time distribute rights to our shareholders, including rights to acquire our securities. However, we cannot make rights available to you in the United States unless we register the rights and the securities to which the rights relate under the Securities Act or an exemption from the registration requirements is available. Also, under the deposit agreement, the depositary bank will not make rights available to you unless either both the rights and any related securities are registered under the Securities Act, or the distribution of them to ADS holders is exempted from registration under the Securities Act. We are under no obligation to file a registration statement with respect to any such rights or securities or to endeavor to cause such a registration statement to be declared effective. Moreover, we may not be able to establish an exemption from registration under the Securities Act. If the depositary does not distribute the rights, it may, under the deposit agreement, either sell them, if possible, or allow them to lapse. Accordingly, you may be unable to participate in our rights offerings and may experience dilution in your holdings.

Taxing authorities could reallocate our taxable income among our subsidiaries, which could increase our overall tax liability.

We are incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands and currently have subsidiaries in China, Hong Kong, the Cayman Islands, the United States, Australia and the British Virgin Islands. If we succeed in growing our business we expect to conduct increased operations through our subsidiaries in various tax jurisdictions pursuant to transfer pricing arrangements between us, our parent company and our subsidiaries. If two or more affiliated companies are located in different countries, the tax laws or regulations of each country generally will require that transfer prices be the same as those between unrelated companies dealing at arms’ length and that appropriate documentation is maintained to support the transfer prices. While we believe that we operate in compliance with applicable transfer pricing laws and intend to continue to do so, our transfer pricing procedures are not binding on applicable tax authorities.

If tax authorities in any of these countries were to successfully challenge our transfer prices as not reflecting arms’ length transactions they could require us to adjust our transfer prices and thereby reallocate our income to reflect these revised transfer prices, which could result in a higher tax liability to us. In addition, if the country from which the income is reallocated does not agree with the reallocation, both countries could tax the same income, resulting in double taxation. If tax authorities were to allocate income to a higher tax jurisdiction, subject our income to double taxation or assess interest and penalties, it would increase our consolidated tax liability, which could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

A tax authority could asset that we are subject to tax in a jurisdiction where we believe we have not established a taxable connection, often referred to as a “permanent establishment” under international tax treaties, and such an assertion, if successful, could increase our expected tax liability in one or more jurisdictions. A tax authority may take the position that material income tax liabilities, interest and penalties are payable by us, in which case, we expect that we might contest such assessment. Contesting such an assessment may be lengthy and costly and if we were unsuccessful in disputing the assessment, the implications could increase our anticipated effective tax rate, where applicable.

If we are classified as a passive foreign investment company, U.S. investors could be subject to adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences.

Generally, if, for any taxable year, at least 75% of our gross income is passive income, or at least 50% of the value of our assets is attributable to assets that produce passive income or are held for the production of passive income, including cash, we would be characterized as a “passive foreign investment company,” or PFIC, for U.S. federal income tax purposes. For purposes of these tests, passive income generally includes dividends, interest, and gains from the sale or exchange of investment property and rents and royalties other than rents and royalties which are received from unrelated parties in connection with the active conduct of a trade or business. If we are a PFIC, U.S. holders of our ADSs may suffer adverse tax consequences, including having gains realized on the sale of the ADSs treated as ordinary income rather than capital gain, the loss of the preferential rate applicable to dividends received on the ADSs by individuals who are U.S. holders, and having interest charges apply to distributions by us and the proceeds of sales of the ADSs.

As discussed in “Material United States Federal Income Tax Considerations—Passive Foreign Investment Company Considerations,” we believe that our Hong Kong subsidiary, Zai Lab (Hong Kong) Limited, was a PFIC for its taxable year ended July 12, 2017 and that the Company and its other subsidiaries were not PFICs for the taxable years ended December 31, 2018 and 2019, and we do not expect that the Company and its subsidiaries will be treated as PFICs for the current taxable year, although no assurance can be provided in that regard. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the

51


 

determination of whether we are a PFIC for any taxable year is a factual determination that can be made only after the end of each taxable year and which depends on the composition of our income and the composition and value of our assets for the relevant taxable year. Because we hold a substantial amount of passive assets, including cash, and because the value of our assets for purposes of the PFIC rules (including goodwill) may be determined by reference to the market value of our ADSs, which may be especially volatile due to the early stage of our products and drug candidates, and by how, and how quickly, we spend any cash that is raised in any financing transaction, we cannot give any assurance that we will not be a PFIC for the current or any future taxable year.

Whether or not U.S. holders make a timely “qualified electing fund,” or QEF election or mark-to-market election may affect the U.S. federal income tax consequences to U.S. holders with respect to the acquisition, ownership and disposition of our ADSs. Prospective investors should consult their own tax advisors regarding all aspects of the application of the PFIC rules to the ADSs. See “Material United States Federal Income Tax Considerations—Passive Foreign Investment Company Considerations.”

If a United States person is treated as owning at least 10% of our common shares, such holder may be subject to adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences.

If a U.S. Holder (as defined below under “Material United States Federal Income Tax Considerations”) is treated as owning (directly, indirectly or constructively) at least 10% of the value or voting power of our ADSs, such U.S. Holder may be treated as a “United States shareholder” with respect to each “controlled foreign corporation” in our group (if any). Because our group includes at least one U.S. subsidiary (Zai Lab (US), LLC), certain of our non-U.S. subsidiaries will be treated as controlled foreign corporations (regardless of whether Zai Lab Limited is treated as a controlled foreign corporation). A United States shareholder of a controlled foreign corporation may be required to annually report and include in its U.S. taxable income its pro rata share of “Subpart F income,” “global intangible low-taxed income” and investments in U.S. property by controlled foreign corporations, regardless of whether we make any distributions. An individual that is a United States shareholder with respect to a controlled foreign corporation generally would not be allowed certain tax deductions or foreign tax credits that would be allowed to a United States shareholder that is a U.S. corporation. We cannot provide any assurances that we will assist investors in determining whether any of our non-U.S. subsidiaries, if any, are treated as a controlled foreign corporation or whether such investor is treated as a United States shareholder with respect to any of such controlled foreign corporations. Further, we cannot provide any assurances that we will furnish to any United States shareholders information that may be necessary to comply with the reporting and tax paying obligations discussed above. Failure to comply with these reporting obligations may subject you to significant monetary penalties and may prevent the statute of limitations with respect to your U.S. federal income tax return for the year for which reporting was due from starting. U.S. holders should consult their tax advisors regarding the potential application of these rules to their investment in our ADSs.

Changes in tax law may adversely affect our business and financial results.

Under current law, we expect to be treated as a non-U.S. corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes. The tax laws applicable to our business activities, however, are subject to change and uncertain interpretation. Our tax position could be adversely impacted by changes in tax rates, tax laws, tax practice, tax treaties or tax regulations or changes in the interpretation thereof by the tax authorities in jurisdictions in which we do business. Our actual tax rate may vary from our expectation and that variance may be material. A number of factors may increase our future effective tax rates, including: (1) the jurisdictions in which profits are determined to be earned and taxed; (2) the resolution of issues arising from any future tax audits with various tax authorities; (3) changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities; (4) our ability to use net operating loss carryforwards to offset future taxable income and any adjustments to the amount of the net operating loss carryforwards we can utilize, and (5) changes in tax laws or the interpretation of such tax laws, and changes in U.S. GAAP.

On December 22, 2017, President Trump signed into law new legislation that significantly revises the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. The newly enacted U.S. federal income tax law, among other things, contains significant changes to corporate taxation, including reduction of the corporate tax rate from a top marginal rate of 35% to a flat rate of 21%, limitation of the tax deduction for interest expense to 30% of adjusted earnings (except for certain small businesses), limitation of the deduction for net operating losses to 80% of current year taxable income and elimination of net operating loss carrybacks, one time taxation of offshore earnings at reduced rates regardless of whether they are repatriated, elimination of U.S. tax on foreign earnings (subject to certain important exceptions), immediate deductions for certain new investments instead of deductions for depreciation expense over time, and modifying or repealing many business deductions and credits. The overall impact of the new federal tax law is uncertain and our business and financial condition could be adversely affected. The impact of this tax reform on holders of our

52


 

ADSs is also uncertain and could be adverse. We urge holders of our ADS to consult with their legal and tax advisors with respect to this legislation and the potential tax consequences of investing in or holding our ADSs.

You may have difficulty enforcing judgments obtained against us.

We are a company incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands, and substantially all of our assets are located outside the United States. Substantially all of our current operations are conducted in the PRC. In addition, some of our directors and officers are nationals and residents of countries other than the United States. A substantial portion of the assets of these persons are located outside the United States. As a result, it may be difficult for investors to effect service of process within the United States upon these persons. It may also be difficult for investors to enforce in U.S. courts judgments obtained in U.S. courts based on the civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal securities laws against us and our officers and directors, some of whom currently reside in the United States and whose assets are located outside the United States. In addition, there is uncertainty as to whether the courts of the Cayman Islands or China would recognize or enforce judgments of U.S. courts against us or such persons predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the securities laws of the United States or any state.

The recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments are provided for under China Civil Procedures Law. PRC courts may recognize and enforce foreign judgments in accordance with the requirements of China Civil Procedures Law based either on treaties between China and the country where the judgment is made or on principles of reciprocity between jurisdictions. China does not have any treaties or other forms of reciprocity with the United States that provide for the reciprocal recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments. In addition, according to China Civil Procedures Law, China courts will not enforce a foreign judgment against us or our directors and officers if they decide that the judgment violates the basic principles of PRC laws or national sovereignty, security or public interest. As a result, it is uncertain whether and on what basis a PRC court would enforce a judgment rendered by a court in the United States.

Investors may be subject to limitations on transfers of your ADSs.

ADSs are transferable on the books of the depositary. However, the depositary may close its transfer books at any time or from time to time when it deems expedient in connection with the performance of its duties. In addition, the depositary may refuse to deliver, transfer or register transfers of ADSs generally when our books or the books of the depositary are closed, or at any time if we or the depositary deems it advisable to do so because of any requirement of law or of any government or governmental body, or under any provision of the deposit agreement, or for any other reason.

 

ITEM 4.  INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY

A. History and Development of the Company

Our company was founded in the Cayman Islands on March 28, 2013 as an exempted company with limited liability under the Companies Law, Cap 22 (Law 3 of 1961, as consolidated and revised) of the Cayman Islands. Our principal executive offices are located at 4560 Jinke Road, Bldg. 1, 4F, Pudong, Shanghai, China 201210. Our telephone number at that address is +86 21 6163 2588. The address of our registered office in the Cayman Islands is Harbour Place 2nd Floor, 103 South Church Street, P.O. Box 472, George Town, Grand Cayman KY1-1106, Cayman Islands. Our agent for service of process in the United States is Cogency Global Inc., located at 10 E. 40th Street, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10016.

53


 

The chart below shows our principal subsidiaries as of March 31, 2020.

 

 

 

Since our founding, we have raised approximately $164.6 million in private equity financing. In September 2017, we completed our initial public offering in the United States, listing on the Nasdaq Global Market, raising approximately $157.7 million in net proceeds after deducting underwriting commissions and the offering expenses payable by us. In September 2018, we completed a registered offering of ADSs, raising approximately $140.3 million in net proceeds after deducting underwriting commissions and the offering expenses payable by us. In May 2019, we completed a registered offering of ADSs, raising approximately $215.4 million in net proceeds after deducting underwriting commissions and the offering expenses payable by us. In January 2020, we completed a registered offering of ADSs, raising approximately $280.6 million in net proceeds after deducting underwriting commissions and the offering expenses payable by us. In addition, we have received government grants totaling approximately $8.7 million since our inception.

As of December 31, 2019, we had ten active in-licensed clinical drug candidates for development in China, Hong Kong, Macau and, in certain instances, Taiwan, Australia, New Zealand and other countries throughout the Asia Pacific region, through partnerships with GSK, BMS, Paratek, Five Prime, Entasis, Novocure, MacroGenics, Deciphera and Incyte. In April 2020, our portfolio was expanded to eleven clinical-stage drug assets with the addition of REGN1979, through our partnership with Regeneron. To date, we have made upfront, milestone and clinical cost reimbursement payments totaling approximately $167.9 million since our inception in connection with these licensing arrangements. In early 2017, we built a small molecule drug product facility in Suzhou, China capable of supporting clinical and commercial production. In 2018, we built a large molecule facility in Suzhou, China using GE Healthcare FlexFactory platform technology capable of supporting clinical production of our drug candidates. The cost to complete the small molecule facility was approximately $6.7 million and was paid with cash on hand. The construction of the large molecule facility was completed in 2018, which cost approximately $12.9 million to complete.

Business

Overview of Our Business

We are an innovative, research-based, commercial-stage biopharmaceutical company focusing on discovering or licensing, developing and commercializing proprietary therapeutics that address areas of large unmet medical need in the China and global markets, including in the fields of oncology, infectious and autoimmune diseases. As part of that effort, we have assembled a leadership team with global experience and an extensive track record in navigating the regulatory process to develop and commercialize innovative drugs. Our mission is to leverage our expertise and insight to address the expanding needs of patients in China and to utilize our China-based competencies to improve the lives of patients worldwide.

Furthermore, Zai Lab was built on the vision that, despite having a significant addressable market and sizable growth potential, China has historically lacked access to many innovative therapies available in other parts of the world and its drug development infrastructure has been underutilized. There remains the need to bring new and transformative therapies to China. In recent years, the Chinese government has focused on promoting local innovation through

54


 

streamlining regulatory processes, improving drug quality standards and fostering a favorable environment, which we believe creates an attractive opportunity for the growth of innovation-focused companies such as Zai Lab.

As of April 2020, our portfolio consists of eleven assets, including two approved, commercial drug products and seven late-stage clinical assets targeting large, fast growing segments of China’s pharmaceutical market. ZEJULA, our lead drug candidate is an oral, once-daily small molecule PARP 1/2 inhibitor being developed and commercialized outside of China, Hong Kong and Macau by our partner, GSK. ZEJULA has the potential to be a differentiated drug for treatment across multiple solid tumor types in China, including ovarian and certain other types of cancer. In March 2017, ZEJULA received FDA marketing approval and in November 2017, it received EMA marketing approval as a maintenance treatment for recurrent platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer. In April 2017, Tesaro, Inc., or Tesaro, which was later acquired by GSK, commercially launched the product in the United States under the commercial name ZEJULA. In October 2018, the Hong Kong Department of Health approved our application for ZEJULA in Hong Kong for adult patients with platinum-sensitive relapsed high grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer who are in a complete response or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy and we began commercializing ZEJULA in Hong Kong in the fourth quarter of 2018. In June 2019, we received marketing authorization to commercialize ZEJULA in Macau for women with relapsed ovarian cancer. In December 2019, ZEJULA was approved by the NMPA in China as a Category 1 maintenance therapy for adult patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer, who are in a complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy. ZEJULA was also designated as a “National Sciences and Technology Major Project” by the Chinese government as part of a key initiative to strengthen local innovation. In addition, the NMPA accepted and granted priority review to our supplemental New Drug Application, or sNDA, for ZEJULA as a maintenance treatment of adult patients with advanced epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who are in a complete or partial response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy in March 2020 and April 2020, respectively. We are also exploring the combination potential of ZEJULA with immuno-oncology therapy, targeted therapy and chemotherapy in the clinically relevant indications.

Across our broader portfolio, we currently have over 25 ongoing or planned clinical trials. We believe that our leadership team’s extensive global drug development expertise, combined with our demonstrated understanding of the pharmaceutical industry, clinical resources and regulatory system in China, has provided us, and will continue to provide us, with opportunities to bring innovative products to market in China efficiently.

Our current eleven clinical-stage drug candidates were in-licensed for development in China, Hong Kong, Macau and, in certain instances, Taiwan, Australia, New Zealand and other countries throughout the Asia Pacific region.

We have built a premier, fully integrated drug discovery and development platform that aims to bring both in-licensed and internally-discovered medicines to patients in China and globally. Our in-house research and development team had previously been directly involved in the discovery and development of several innovative drug candidates at Hutchison Medi-Pharma, including fruquintinib and savolitinib. Our in-house research and development team focuses on the development of innovative therapeutics for the treatment of oncology and auto-immune diseases. We believe our discovery efforts will enable us to achieve our long-term goal of generating a sustainable, internally discovered product pipeline of new products and drug candidates for patients around the world. This effort has resulted in the identification of a number of proprietary candidates against targets in our focus areas that include immuno-oncology, DNA damage response/repair and oncogenic signaling that we are moving into pre-clinical development. Our company has a leadership team with extensive pharmaceutical research, development and commercialization track records in both global and Chinese biopharmaceutical companies. We believe this team and our in-house discovery and development capabilities will enable us to achieve our long-term goal of commercializing our internally discovered innovative medicine for patients worldwide.

We have built our own commercial team consisting of more than 298 employees as of December 31, 2019 to launch our portfolio of drug products. Part of our strategy to become a fully integrated biopharmaceutical company is the ability to produce both large and small molecule therapeutics under global standards, such as current good manufacturing practices, or cGMP. To this end, in the first half of 2017, we built a small molecule drug product facility capable of supporting clinical and commercial production, and in 2018, we built a large molecule facility capable of supporting clinical production of our drug candidates.

55


 

Our Innovative Pipeline

We have a broad pipeline of proprietary products and drug candidates that range from discovery stage to late-stage clinical to commercial-stage programs. The following table summarizes our commercial products, clinical-stage drug candidates and programs.

 

 

Our Products and Late-Stage Clinical Pipeline

As of December 31, 2019, our pipeline included two commercial products in China, Hong Kong and Macau and eight clinical-stage assets in oncology and infectious diseases, two therapeutic areas where there is a large unmet need and lack of innovative treatment options in China. In April 2020, our portfolio was further expanded with the addition of REGN1979. Within our broad and validated portfolio, the approved products and late-stage clinical drug candidates are:

Our Products

 

Niraparib (ZEJULA) is a highly potent and selective oral, small molecule PARP 1/2 inhibitor with the potential to be a differentiated drug for treatment across multiple solid tumor types in China, including ovarian and certain types of lung cancers. We have licensed ZEJULA, or niraparib, from Tesaro (now GSK), which in March 2017 received FDA marketing approval and in November 2017, received EMA marketing approval for ZEJULA for maintenance treatment for women with recurrent platinum-sensitive epithelial ovarian cancer. We believe ZEJULA is uniquely suited for the China marketplace, where there is a large ovarian cancer population. Niraparib was commercially launched by Tesaro (now GSK) in the United States in April 2017. We commercialized ZEJULA in Hong Kong in the fourth quarter of 2018. In June 2019, we received marketing authorization to commercialize ZEJULA in Macau for women with relapsed ovarian cancer. In China, ZEJULA has been approved as a Category 1 drug by the NMPA in December 2019 as maintenance therapy for adult patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer, who are in a complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy. In

56


 

 

addition, the NMPA accepted and granted priority review to our sNDA for ZEJULA as a maintenance treatment of adult patients with advanced epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who are in a complete or partial response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy in March 2020 and April 2020, respectively. We are also exploring the combination potential of ZEJULA with immuno-oncology therapy, targeted therapy and chemotherapy in the clinically relevant indications.

 

Optune (Tumor Treating Fields) is a new treatment modality known as Tumor Treating Fields which has demonstrated overall survival benefit in patients with newly diagnosed GBM in a large randomized controlled clinical trial. Tumor Treating Fields is an innovative cancer therapy that uses electric fields tuned to specific frequencies to disrupt cell division, inhibiting tumor growth and causing affected cancer cells to die. Optune is currently marketed in the United States, the European Union and Japan for the first line and reoccurring treatment of GBM. Tumor Treating Fields delivery system was approved by the FDA in May 2019 under the brand name “Optune Lua™” to treat mesothelioma and has demonstrated clinical proof of concept in multiple other tumor types such as lung cancer and pancreatic cancer. Novocure currently has global Phase III studies in brain metastases, non-small cell lung cancer, or NSCLC, pancreatic cancer and ovarian cancer, which are large commercial opportunities in China. In September 2018, we announced a global strategic development collaboration with Novocure. We obtained an exclusive license to develop and commercialize Tumor Treating Fields in China, Hong Kong and Macau and will also support enrollment of Chinese patients to accelerate clinical trial enrollment for additional indications. In December 2018, within three months of signing the partnership deal with Novocure, we launched Optune in Hong Kong and treated its first patient with newly diagnosed GBM. In September 2019, the NMPA accepted the Marketing Authorization Application (MAA) of Optune, a Tumor Treating Fields delivery system for the treatment of GBM.

Late-Stage Clinical Pipeline

 

Ripretinib is an investigational KIT and PDGFRα kinase switch control inhibitor in clinical development for the treatment of KIT and/or PDGFRα-driven cancers, including GIST, systemic mastocytosis, or SM, and other cancers. Ripretinib was specifically designed to improve the treatment of GIST patients by inhibiting a broad spectrum of mutations in KIT and PDGFRα. Ripretinib is a KIT and PDGFRα inhibitor that blocks initiating and secondary KIT mutations in exons 9, 11, 13, 14, 17, and 18, involved in GIST as well as the primary D816V exon 17 mutation involved in SM. Ripretinib also inhibits primary PDGFRα mutations in exons 12, 14 and 18, including the exon 18 D842V mutation, involved in a subset of GIST. On June 11, 2019, Deciphera and we announced an exclusive license agreement to advance the development and commercialization of ripretinib in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan.

 

REGN1979, developed by Regeneron, is a fully human bispecific antibody that binds to CD3, a T cell antigen associated with the T cell receptor (TCR) complex, and CD20. REGN1979 was granted orphan drug designation by the FDA for the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL). REGN1979 has demonstrated clinical activity in heavily pre-treated patients with Relapsed/Refractory (R/R) B-non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHL) in a Phase I trial and is currently being investigated in a potentially registrational Phase II program. We are exploring regulatory approval pathways for REGN1979 in R/R B-NHL in China by joining the global registrational Phase II program. On April 6, 2020, we entered into a collaboration agreement with Regeneron to develop and exclusively commercialize REGN1979 in oncology in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macau.

 

Margetuximab is an immune-optimized anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody developed by MacroGenics. In February 2019, MacroGenics announced positive top-line results from its SOPHIA Phase III clinical trial. Margetuximab demonstrated improved progression-free survival compared to HERCEPTIN (trastuzumab) when used in combination with chemotherapy in patients with HER2+ metastatic breast cancer. We plan to discuss with the NMPA a potential accelerated approval pathway for HER2+ breast cancer in China. In addition, jointly with MacroGenics, we plan to conduct the China portion of the global pivotal study in HER2+ gastric cancer, which is expected to start in the first half of 2020.We have exclusive rights to margetuximab in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan from MacroGenics.

57


 

 

INCMGA0012 (PD-1) is an investigational monoclonal antibody that inhibits PD-1. INCMGA0012 (PD-1) is currently being evaluated as monotherapy in registration-directed trials for patients with MSI-high endometrial cancer, Merkel cell carcinoma and anal cancer. In 2017, Incyte entered into an exclusive global collaboration and license agreement with MacroGenics for global rights to INCMGA0012 (PD-1). Incyte is currently developing INCMGA0012 (PD-1) in phase II/III clinical trials for the gastric cancer and oesophageal cancer; phase II clinical trials for anal cancer; endometrial cancer; merkel cell carcinoma; solid tumours; phase I/II clinical trials for colorectal cancer; and phase I clinical trials for acute myeloid leukaemia, among other indications. On July 2, 2019, Incyte and we announced that the companies have entered into a collaboration and license agreement for the development and commercialization of INCMGA0012 (PD-1), an investigational anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody, in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. We receive the rights to develop and exclusively commercialize INCMGA0012 (PD-1) in haematology and oncology in mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. Incyte retains an option to assist in the promotion of INCMGA0012 (PD-1) in our licensed territories.

 

Bemarituzumab (FPA144) is a humanized monoclonal antibody (IgG1 isotype) specific to the human fibroblast growth factor receptor 2b, or FGFR2b, in clinical development as a targeted therapy for tumors that overexpress FGFR2b, including gastric and gastroesophageal cancer. China has one of the highest incidence rates of gastric cancer in the world, with approximately 680,000 new cases annually. We have licensed bemarituzumab from Five Prime as part of a global strategic collaboration. The randomized, controlled Phase III portion of the trial evaluating bemarituzumab in combination with a chemotherapy regimen, or the FIGHT trial, started in the fourth quarter of 2018. We enrolled the first patient from China in this international Phase III trial that will serve as a global registrational study for the treatment of front-line gastric and gastroesophageal cancers. In May 2018, we received CTA approval from the NMPA to enroll Chinese patients in the bemarituzumab global registrational study. We will manage the China portion of this global Phase III study and contribute patients from China to this Phase III study. In 2019, our partner Five Prime suspended trial enrollment in order to conduct a futility analysis prior to continuing patient enrollment.  Patients enrolled into the trial are currently undergoing treatment and follow-up. Five Prime has paused enrollment in the FIGHT trial pending the occurrence of a sufficient number of events to trigger a futility analysis that is expected to occur in mid-2020. Approximately 150 patients with newly diagnosed advanced stage gastric cancer were enrolled into the FIGHT trial before Five Prime paused enrollment in the fourth quarter of 2019. Five Prime expects that it will only resume enrollment in the FIGHT trial if the trial passes the futility analysis.

 

 

Omadacycline (ZL-2401) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic in a new class of tetracycline derivatives, known as aminomethylcyclines. We have licensed omadacycline from Paratek, which in October 2018 received FDA marketing approval. Omadacycline is primarily being developed for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Omadacycline is designed to overcome the two major mechanisms of tetracycline resistance, known as pump efflux and ribosome protection. Drugs competing with omadacycline in the same class are only available in IV formulation, in contrast, omadacycline is available in both IV and oral once-daily formulations that makes treatment convenient for care givers and patients. We have completed the technology transfer and completed in 2019 the NMPA required microbiology, PK and clinical bridging programs. We engaged in discussions with the NMPA and key opinion leaders on our planned China development strategy for our NDA filing in China. In July 2018, we received CTA approval from the NMPA. In February 2020, the NMPA accepted our NDA with Category 1 new drug designation for NUZYRA for the treatment of CABP and ABSSSI.

 

Durlobactam (ZL-2402) is a novel beta-lactamase inhibitor. We have licensed durlobactam from Entasis as part of a global strategic collaboration. Durlobactam restores activity of beta-lactams against Class A, C, and D beta-lactamases. Entasis is developing durlobactam as sulbactum-durlobactum (SUL-DUR), a fixed combination of durlobactam and sulbactam, for the treatment of Acinetobacter baumannii bacterial infections, including penem-resistant A. baumannii. Acinetobacter infections occur predominantly in the hospital setting; the pathogen is often multi-drug resistant (MDR), and has become extremely difficult to treat. The efficacy of the combined durlobactam and sulbactam was demonstrated in large microbiologic studies of well-characterized MDR Acinetobacter isolates from diverse regions, including Asia. The FDA has granted SUL-DUR Qualified Infectious Disease Product (QIDP) status as well as Fast Track and Priority Review status. Entasis has completed a Phase II cUTI trial in 2018, reviewed clinical Phase III

58


 

 

plans with FDA and initiated a pivotal Phase III study in MDR Acinetobacter pneumonia and bloodstream infections in 2019, which will serve as a global registrational study. Zai Lab will manage the China portion of this global Phase III study and plans to contribute a significant number of patients from China. We plan to initiate patient dosing in the Asia-Pacific portion of the Phase III global registration trial of durlobactam for MDR Acinetobacter pneumonia and bloodstream infections in the first half of 2020.

For our late-stage oncology drug candidates with China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan rights, our near-term development plan focuses on specific patient segments. These segments have an estimated annual incidence of over 1.6 million patients in China. We expect that the commercial success of our products will be driven by their differentiated clinical profiles, efficacy in Chinese patients and ability to provide clinical benefits over existing standards of care in a market where targeted therapies are either unavailable or less utilized relative to more developed markets.

Within our anti-infective portfolio, we believe that our two novel antibiotics, omadacycline and durlobactam, will address significant unmet patient and market needs.

With omadacycline, we have the chance to introduce into China a new broad-spectrum antibiotic with excellent activity not only against common Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, but also against several MDR pathogens. The profile of omadacycline includes MRSA, penicillin- and macrolide-resistant streptococci, enterococci and ESBL-E. coli isolates. In addition, the availability of an IV and oral formulation allows step-down treatment of infections in the hospital and continued oral therapy in the ambulatory care setting. This favorable antimicrobial spectrum has been confirmed now for Chinese isolates as well.

With durlobactam, in collaboration with our partner, we are focusing on the combination with sulbactam, which we believe provides unique and specific bactericidal activity against Acinetobacter baumannii spp., an extremely difficult-to-treat pathogen associated with high mortality that is more prevalent in China than most other countries. In a study conducted by Zai Lab of Acinetobacter pathogens from Chinese patients, durlobactam demonstrated excellent activity against all isolates including MDR and carbapenem-resistant strains. The prevalent overuse of antibiotics, the evolution of resistant bacteria and state of current treatment practices are expected to lead to an increase in drug-resistant infection rates. In 2013, total antibiotic usage in China accounted for about half of the global antibiotic usage, with a per-capita use of antibiotics being more than five times that in Europe and the United States.

In 2015, the estimated incidence for ABSSSI and CABP was 2.8 million patients and 16.5 million patients, respectively, in China alone. In 2016, based on a national survey of over 1,300 hospitals in China, there were approximately 210,000 Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Due to the high rates of MDR, the Chinese government has identified the goal of developing one to two innovative anti-infective drugs by 2020.

In addition to mainland China, we intend to seek registration and commercialization of the above drug candidates in all areas where we have applicable rights. Notably in Hong Kong and Macau, products with existing approvals by the FDA, EMA or a comparable regulatory agency are eligible for an expedited registration process that does not require conducting local clinical trials.

While the overall patient population in Hong Kong and Macau is smaller compared to that of China, they are higher income markets with developed medical infrastructure, widely available private insurance and proven capacity to pay for advanced therapeutics. In addition to local patients, there is a significant opportunity to provide treatment for medical tourists from China, who visit these regions in order to access high-end cancer treatment, including prescription drugs that may not be available in mainland China.

Our Discovery Pipeline

Our in-house discovery team is dedicated to the research and discovery of novel therapeutics in the areas of oncology and autoimmune diseases, with a focus on large market opportunities with unmet clinical needs. Our aim is to produce up to two global INDs starting in 2020. We believe our discovery efforts will enable us to achieve our long-term goal of generating a sustainable, internally discovered product pipeline of new products and drug candidates for patients around the world. This effort has resulted in the identification of a number of proprietary candidates against targets in our focus areas that include immuno-oncology, DNA damage response/repair and oncogenic signaling that we are moving into pre-clinical development. Our discovery operations in Shanghai, China was established in 2016. Our discovery operations in San Francisco, California, was established in 2018. Our U.S. discovery team focuses on generating small and large molecule therapeutics and is currently creating a proprietary, best-in-class human Ig transgenic mouse platform.

59


 

Our Clinical Pipeline

ZEJULA

ZEJULA is a highly potent and selective oral, once-daily small molecule poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1/2, or PARP 1/2, inhibitor with the potential to be a first-in-class Category 1 drug for treatment across multiple solid tumor types in China. ZEJULA was approved in March 2017 by the FDA and in November 2017 by EMA, as a maintenance treatment for women with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Maintenance therapy is for those women who have had prior treatment but are expected to see their cancer return, with the purpose of avoiding or slowing a recurrence if the cancer is in remission after the prior treatment. A platinum-sensitive cancer is one that responded to initial platinum-based chemotherapy and remained in remission post-chemotherapy for more than six months.

ZEJULA is the first PARP inhibitor to be approved by the FDA for ovarian cancer that does not require BRCA mutation or other biomarker testing. This makes ZEJULA suitable for a wide patient population and significantly more accessible to patients in China where BRCA biomarker diagnostic tests are not widely available.

We obtained an exclusive license for the development and commercialization of ZEJULA in China, Hong Kong and Macau in 2016. We commercialized ZEJULA in Hong Kong in the fourth quarter of 2018. In October 2018, the Hong Kong Department of Health approved our application for ZEJULA in Hong Kong for adult patients with platinum-sensitive relapsed high grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer who are in a complete response or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy and we began commercializing ZEJULA in Hong Kong in the fourth quarter of 2018. In June 2019, we received marketing authorization to commercialize ZEJULA in Macau for women with relapsed ovarian cancer. In December 2019, ZEJULA was approved by the NMPA in China as a Category 1 maintenance therapy for adult patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer, who are in a complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy. ZEJULA was also designated as a “National Sciences and Technology Major Project” by the Chinese government as part of a key initiative to strengthen local innovation. In addition, the NMPA accepted and granted priority review to our sNDA for ZEJULA as a maintenance treatment of adult patients with advanced epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who are in a complete or partial response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy in March 2020 and April 2020, respectively.

We initiated the Phase III study of ZEJULA in patients with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer as a second-line maintenance therapy in September 2017. In May 2018, we completed enrollment ahead of schedule for our pharmacokinetics, or PK, study for Chinese patients with platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer, and in June 2018, we initiated the second Phase III study in patients with platinum-responsive ovarian cancer as a first-line maintenance therapy and dosed our first patient. These studies are similar in design to Tesaro’s clinical studies of niraparib in ovarian cancer. In August 2018, we completed our PK study for Chinese patients with platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer, which demonstrated a comparable efficacy profile to studies in non-Chinese patients. We continue to explore ZEJULA in patients with breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer in China. In February 2020, Zai Lab dosed the first patient in the Phase Ib study of niraparib with MGD-013, a first-in-class PD1/LAG-3 bispecific antibody, in advanced or metastatic gastric cancer. We are also exploring the combination potential of ZEJULA with immuno-oncology therapy, targeted therapy and chemotherapy in the clinically relevant indications.

Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian cancer had an estimated annual incidence of 52,000 patients in China in 2015, which is more than double that of the 21,300 patients in the United States and has seen increasing mortality rates. Since early symptoms of ovarian cancer are non-specific and difficult to detect, a majority of women with ovarian cancer are diagnosed when the disease is at an advanced stage, when prognosis is poor. Finding effective therapeutic approaches for advanced ovarian cancer patients represents a large unmet medical need. Given the broad applicability of ZEJULA across all patient populations, regardless of gBRCA mutation status, we are currently targeting the entire platinum sensitive ovarian cancer patient population. This represents a significant advantage for patient convenience and access, given that there is no need for patients to utilize diagnostic tests to determine their gBRCA mutation status, particularly in China where such tests are not widely available.

60


 

The current standard of care in China consists of radical surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Although platinum-based chemotherapy is effective at inducing an initial response, ovarian cancer will recur in approximately 85% of women. Many women continue to respond to second-line platinum based chemotherapy, and following a response, the guideline-recommended approach for many patients is surveillance, monitoring patients for disease progression and managing their symptoms. However, during the surveillance period, ovarian cancer survivors report anxiety about cancer antigen testing and fear of recurrence, many experiencing symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. After relapse, patients respond moderately or poorly to subsequent chemotherapy, with later lines of therapy leading to progressively shorter treatment-free intervals. Therefore, we believe effective maintenance therapies that address a broad patient population are needed to prolong the duration of response following platinum-based treatment.

Lung Cancer

Lung cancer has the highest total incidence as well as the highest mortality rate of any cancer in China. Annual incidence was estimated at 733,300 patients in China in 2015, which is more than triple the 221,200 patients in the United States for the same period. We intend to explore ZEJULA’s efficacy in patients with lung cancer based on the large unmet need for effective treatment for such patients in China. According to the American Cancer Society, approximately 80% to 85% of lung cancers are non-small cell lung cancer and squamous cell carcinoma is about 25% to 30% of lung cancers.

Our Clinical Trial Designs and Strategy for ZEJULA in the China Market

Ovarian Cancer

In September 2018, we completed our open-label study evaluating the pharmacokinetic, or PK, profile of ZEJULA made in China in Chinese ovarian cancer patients. Results from the study show comparable PK profile of the Chinese patients administered ZEJULA to that of patients evaluated in Tesaro’s global PK study. The study demonstrated that the drug exposure increased proportionally from 100mg to 300mg, with a Tmax of approximately three hours. Systemic exposure of ZEJULA, as measured by Cmax and AUC, increased approximately proportionally with increased dose. There were no unexpected safety issues noted during the trial. All key PK and safety parameters were comparable to those in global studies. The study results and population PK data did not identify ethnicity differences between Chinese and non-Chinese patients.

In January 2019, we completed patient enrollment of our Phase III trial evaluating ZEJULA as a second-line maintenance therapy in patients with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Recurrent ovarian cancer patients who have responded to a platinum-containing regimen were enrolled in the study and randomized 2:1 to receive either ZEJULA or placebo once daily. Patients were stratified by gBRCA status. Patients will be randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive ZEJULA or placebo once daily. Patients will be stratified by gBRCA status. The primary endpoint is progression-free survival. The primary analysis will be conducted in the entire study population, regardless of gBRCA mutation status. If the primary analysis meets the statistical significance, the study will be ended. If it does not, the study will continue for gBRCA mutation positive patients with the second-step primary analysis conducted in this population.

In November 2019, we completed patient enrollment of our Phase III trial evaluating ZEJULA as a first-line maintenance therapy in patients who are in a complete or partial response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. Advanced ovarian cancer patients were randomized 2:1 to receive niraparib or placebo as maintenance therapy. Randomization was stratified by use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (yes or no), best response to platinum therapy (CR or PR), and homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) status (positive or negative/not determined). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) in patients who had tumors with HRD+ve and in those in the overall population, as determined on hierarchical testing.

In China, ZEJULA has been approved as a Category 1 drug by the NMPA in December 2019 as maintenance therapy for adult patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer, who are in a complete or partial response to platinum-based chemotherapy. The NMPA accepted and granted priority review to our sNDA for ZEJULA as a maintenance treatment of adult patients with advanced epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer who are in a complete or partial response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy in March 2020 and April 2020, respectively.

61


 

Lung Cancer

We initiated a Phase III study in patients with platinum responsive small cell lung cancer as maintenance therapy in August 2018. Given the rapidly changing landscape in the management of small cell lung cancer, particularly with the introduction of PD1/PD-L1 antibodies in the first-line treatment of small cell lung cancer, we terminated this study to prioritize our resources to other opportunities including exploring potential combination regimen for ZEJULA and immuno-oncology agents in the maintenance setting for non-small cell lung cancer.

We continue to explore the combination potential of ZEJULA with immuno-oncology therapy, targeted therapy and chemotherapy in the other clinically relevant indications.

Background on PARP Inhibitors

One well-studied area of PARP activity relates to DNA repair. DNA contains genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of most known living organisms. DNA can be damaged by many types of mutagens, including oxidizing agents, alkylating agents, ultraviolet light and X-rays. An important property of DNA is that it can replicate, or make copies of itself. This is critical when cells divide because each new cell needs to have an exact copy of the DNA present in the old cell. It is also critical to the integrity and survival of cells that DNA damage can be repaired. Cells have evolved multiple mechanisms to enable such DNA repair, and these mechanisms are complementary to each other, each driving repair of specific types of DNA damage. If a cell’s DNA damage repair system is overpowered, then the cell is programmed to die.

Radiation and certain chemotherapies such as alkylating agents and topoisomerase inhibitors induce significant damage to tumor cells, which results in programmed cell death. DNA repair mechanisms may reduce the activity of these anti-cancer therapies and, conversely, inhibition of DNA repair processes may enhance the effects of DNA-damaging anti-cancer therapy. For example, cancer cells can maintain viability despite disruption of the key DNA repair pathway known as the homologous recombination pathway, but they become particularly vulnerable to chemotherapy if an alternative DNA repair pathway is disrupted. This is known as “synthetic lethality”—a situation where the individual loss of either repair pathway is compatible with cell viability, but the simultaneous loss of both pathways results in cancer cell deaths. Since PARP inhibitors block DNA repair, PARP inhibition is thought to be an important part of cancer therapy.

Clinical studies have shown that PARP inhibitors are effective as a monotherapy in patients with certain types of cancer, including those with gene mutations as discussed below. PARP inhibitors have also been explored in numerous clinical trials to enhance chemotherapy treatments, including in combination with temozolomide (TMZ), cisplatin, carboplatin, gemcitabine and topotecan.

ZEJULA Mechanism of Action

Many DNA repair processes involve PARP-1 and PARP-2, which are zinc-finger DNA-binding enzymes that sense DNA damage and convert it into intracellular signals to promote DNA repair. PARP inhibitors block DNA repair by the base excision repair pathway. PARP inhibitors appear most effective when used to treat tumors with underlying defects in DNA repair or when combined with another DNA-damaging agent. This is because, in normal cells, the homologous recombination pathway compensates for PARP-mediated inhibition of the base excision repair pathway and maintains the fidelity of DNA repair. In cells with a deficiency in the homologous recombination pathway, such as those with BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 mutations, PARP inhibition leads to irreparable double-strand breaks, collapsed replication forks, and an increased use of the less effective nonhomologous end joining pathway. These disruptions ultimately result in synthetic lethality, and, in this manner, treatment with PARP inhibitors represents an opportunity to selectively kill cancer cells with deficiencies in homologous recombination and other DNA repair mechanisms. PARP inhibitors also have an additional mechanism of action known as “PARP trapping.” The effect of PARP trapping is to poison DNA by stabilizing PARP-1 and PARP-2 at sites of DNA damage, generating complexes that may be even more toxic than the unrepaired single-strand breaks which result from PARP inhibition.

ZEJULA is designed to be a highly potent, selective inhibitor of PARP-1 and PARP-2. In an ovarian cancer patient-derived xenograft model, where tumor models are established from transplantation of a human tumor specimen from a cancer patient directly into a mouse, ZEJULA has been shown to have greater tumor concentration, allowing it to deliver sustained anti-tumor activity as compared to olaparib, an FDA-approved PARP inhibitor marketed by AstraZenaca for gBRCA+ ovarian cancer patients who have received at least three prior lines of chemotherapy.

62


 

ZEJULA Clinical Results

NOVA, a Phase III maintenance study of ZEJULA versus placebo in patients with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer.

In March 2017, the FDA approved ZEJULA as a maintenance treatment for women with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer, regardless of BRCA mutation or biomarker status, three months ahead of the FDA’s scheduled decision date (PDUFA date). ZEJULA’s FDA approval followed the release of successful results from Tesaro’s NOVA trial in which ZEJULA demonstrated a clinically meaningful increase in progression-free survival in women with recurrent ovarian cancer, regardless of gBRCA mutation or biomarker status. Treatment with ZEJULA reduced the risk of disease progression or death by 73% in gBRCA mutation positive patients (hazard ratio = 0.27) and by 55% in patients without gBRCA mutations (hazard ratio = 0.45). Hazard ratio is the probability of an event (such as disease progression or death) occurring in the treatment arm divided by the probability of the event occurring in the control arm of a study, with a ratio of less than one indicating a lower probability of an event occurring for patients in the treatment arm. P-value is a measure of the probability of obtaining the observed sample results, with a lower value indicating a higher degree of statistical confidence in these studies. The magnitude of benefit was similar for patients entering the trial with a partial response or a complete response to platinum treatment.

The NOVA trial was a Phase III randomized double-blind trial that assessed the effectiveness of ZEJULA compared with placebo to delay tumor progression following a platinum containing chemotherapy regimen. Patients enrolled into one of two independent cohorts based on gBRCA mutation status. A total of 553 patients were enrolled in the NOVA study at 107 centers worldwide. The study population has 203 patients assigned to the gBRCA mutation positive cohort and 350 patients assigned to the gBRCA mutation negative cohort. Among the patients in the gBRCA mutation negative cohort, 162 had tumors that were tumors deficient in homologous recombination, or HRDpos, and 134 had tumors did not have a homologous recombination deficiency, or HRDneg. The homologous recombination deficiency status was not determined for 54 patients. The gBRCA mutation negative cohort analyses included all patients randomized, regardless of homologous recombination deficiency status.

Within each cohort, patients were randomized 2:1 to receive ZEJULA or placebo, and were continuously treated with placebo or ZEJULA until progression. The primary endpoint of this study was progression free survival. Secondary endpoints included patient-reported outcomes, chemotherapy free interval length, and OS. This trial successfully achieved its primary endpoint in both cohorts, showing that ZEJULA treatment significantly prolonged progression free survival, compared to control in patients who were gBRCA mutation positive and in patients who were gBRCA mutation negative. In addition, within the gBRCA mutation negative cohort, ZEJULA treatment significantly prolonged progression free survival compared to placebo for the prospectively defined patient population with HRDpos tumors. A high proportion of patients in both treatment groups in both cohorts had received three or four prior lines of chemotherapy. The most common treatment-emergent grade 3/4 adverse events in the ZEJULA arm of the NOVA study, based on the National Cancer Institute’s Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event, or CTC, which is a set of criteria for the standardized classification of adverse effects of drugs used in cancer therapy (with one and two being relatively mild and higher numbers up to five being more severe), were thrombocytopenia, anemia, and neutropenia.

63


 

The figures below present the results for the primary endpoint of progression free survival for the three primary efficacy populations.

Figure 1: Progression free survival was significantly longer for patients who received ZEJULA compared to those who received placebo for all primary efficacy populations.

 

 

 

Median PFS

(95%CI)

 

Hazard Ratio

(95%CI)

 

Disease Progression Free (%)

 

Treatment

 

(Months)

 

p Value

 

6 Months

 

 

12 Months

 

 

18 Months

 

gBRCAmut Cohort

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Niraparib (N = 138)

 

21.0 (12.9, NE)

 

0.27 (0.173, 0.410)

 

80%

 

 

62%

 

 

50%

 

Placebo (N = 65)

 

5.5 (3.8,7.2)

 

p <0.0001

 

43%

 

 

16%

 

 

16%

 

HRDpos Subgroup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Niraparib (N = 106)

 

12.9 (8.1, 15.9)

 

0.38 (0.243, 0.586)

 

69%

 

 

51%

 

 

37%

 

Placebo (N = 56)

 

3.8 (3.5, 5.7)

 

p <0.0001

 

35%

 

 

13%

 

 

9%

 

Non-gBRCAmut Cohort

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Niraparib (N = 234)

 

9.3 (7.2, 11.2)

 

0.45 (0.338, 0.607)

 

61%

 

 

41%

 

 

30%

 

Placebo (N = 116)

 

3.9 (3.7, 5.5)

 

p <0.0001

 

36%

 

 

14%

 

 

12%

 

 

Source: Tesaro.

Notes: gBRCAmut = gBRCA mutation positive; non-gBRCA mut = gBRCA mutation negative

Figure 2: Progression free survival in the gBRCA mutation positive cohort of patients treated with ZEJULA versus placebo

 

 

 

Source: Tesaro.

64


 

Figure 3: Progression free survival in the HRDpos group of the gBRCA mutation negative cohort of patients treated with ZEJULA versus placebo

 

 

 

Source: Tesaro.

Figure 4: Progression free survival in the overall gBRCA mutation negative cohort of patients treated with ZEJULA versus placebo

 

 

 

Source: Tesaro.

Within the gBRCA mutation positive cohort, the median progression free survival was 21.0 months on ZEJULA versus 5.5 months on placebo (hazard ratio=0.27; p<0.0001). As shown in the chart above, ZEJULA’s treatment effect started very early during treatment as seen by the two curves being separated at first efficacy assessment. Progression free survival was also significantly longer with ZEJULA in the HRDpos group of the gBRCA mutation negative cohort (median, 12.9 months versus 3.8 months; hazard ratio=0.38; p<0.0001) and in the overall gBRCA mutation negative cohort (median, 9.3 months versus 3.9 months; hazard ratio = 0.45; p<0.0001). Additionally, in an exploratory pooled analysis that evaluated all patients in both cohorts combined, progression free survival was longer with ZEJULA (median 11.3 months versus 4.7 months, hazard ratio = 0.38, 95% confidence interval: 0.303, 0.488; p<0.0001).

65


 

As it is maintenance therapy, quality of life is important to patients receiving treatment. Patient-reported outcome data from validated survey tools indicated that ZEJULA-treated patients reported no significant difference from placebo in measures associated with symptom specific and general quality of life.

Furthermore, ZEJULA treatment did not reduce the effectiveness of subsequent therapies, and continued to show carry-over of the beneficial treatment effect in the secondary efficacy measure of second objective disease progression, which is time from randomization to objective tumor progression on next-line treatment or death from any cause. OS data, while immature, showed no negative impact of ZEJULA treatment.

The incidences of CTC grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse events (74% vs 23%), serious adverse events (30% vs 15%), treatment-emergent adverse events leading to treatment interruption (69% vs 5%), treatment-emergent adverse events leading to dose reduction (67% vs 15%), and treatment-emergent adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation (15% vs 2%) were higher for ZEJULA versus placebo. There were no on-treatment deaths reported.

The most commonly observed hematologic treatment-emergent adverse events (all CTC grades) related to ZEJULA were thrombocytopenia (61%), anemia (50%) and neutropenia (30%). Although CTC grade 3/4 hematologic laboratory events were common at the initiation of treatment, no severe clinical sequelae were observed and relatively few patients discontinued due to these adverse events. Dose adjustment based on individual tolerability during the first cycles substantially reduced the incidence of these events beyond the third 28-day treatment cycle, indicating the overall effectiveness of the approach to dose modification. Overall the treatment-emergent adverse events were manageable, with no negative impact on quality of life.

PRIMA, a Phase III maintenance study of ZEJULA versus placebo in patients with advanced ovarian cancer following response on front-line platinum-based chemotherapy.

PRIMA is a randomized, double-blind, phase III trial evaluating niraparib versus placebo as maintenance therapy in patients with advanced ovarian cancer following response on front-line platinum-based chemotherapy. The study was designed to enrol subjects with Stage III or IV ovarian cancer (including fallopian and peritoneal cancers) who had previously completed front-line platinum-based therapy with a physician-assessed response of CR or PR. Randomization was stratified by use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (yes or no), best response to platinum therapy (CR or PR), and homologous recombination deficiency (HRD) status (positive or negative/not determined). The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) in patients who had tumors with HRD+ve and in those in the overall population, as determined on hierarchical testing.

From July 2016 through June 2018 and across 220 sites worldwide, a total of 733 patients were randomized at 2:1 to receive niraparib or placebo as maintenance therapy, of whom 373 (50.9%) had tumors with HRD. Among the patients in this category, the median PFS was significantly longer in the niraparib group than in the placebo group (21.9 months vs. 10.4 months; hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.31 to 0.59; P<0.001). In the overall population, the corresponding progression-free survival was 13.8 months and 8.2 months (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.50 to 0.76; P<0.001) (Table 1, Figure 5 and 6). At the 24-month interim analysis, the rate of overall survival was 84% in the niraparib group and 77% in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.44 to 1.11).

The safety profile observed in the PRIMA study was consistent with the known safety profile of niraparib seen in previous clinical studies and other PARP inhibitors, including gastrointestinal and hematological events. In the safety population, for the niraparib versus placebo treatment arms, the incidences of CTCAE Grade ≥3 TEAEs (70.5% versus 18.9%), SAEs (32.2% versus 13.1%), TEAEs leading to treatment interruption (79.5% versus 18.0%), TEAEs leading to dose reduction (70.9% versus 8.2%), and of TEAEs leading to treatment discontinuation (12.0% versus 2.5%) were higher for those receiving niraparib vs placebo. There were no on-treatment deaths reported during the study. The incidence of the most commonly reported events (overall and Grade ≥3) was higher for subjects who received a fixed starting dose of niraparib (300mg) compared with those who received an individualized starting dose based on baseline body weight and platelet count (300mg or 200mg).

66


 

Table 1: Primary efficacy endpoint of PFS based on blinded independent central review (BICR) (ITT Population)

 

Parameters

HRDpos

Overall

 

Niraparib

(N = 247)

placebo

(N = 126)

Niraparib

(N = 487)

Placebo

(N = 246)

PFS(months)

 

 

 

 

median(95% CI)

21.9 (19.3, NE)

10.4 (8.1,12.1)

13.8 (11.5,14.9)

8.2 (7.3,8.5)

Survival distribution function

(95% CI)

 

 

 

 

6-month

0.86 (0.81,0.90)

0.68 (0.59,0.76)

0.73 (0.69,0.77)

0.60 (0.53,0.66)

12-month

0.72 (0.65,0.77)

0.42 (0.33,0.51)

0.53 (0.48,0.58)

0.35 (0.29,0.42)

18-month

0.59 (0.50,0.66)

0.35 (0.25,0.45)

0.42 (0.36,0.47)

0.28 (0.21,0.35)

24-month

0.47 (0.36,0.58)

0.26 (0.14,0.39)

0.32 (0.25,0.39)

0.23 (0.14,0.32)

30-month

0.47 (0.36,0.58)

0.26 (0.14,0.39)

0.32 (0.25,0.39)

0.23 (0.14,0.32)

P value

<0.0001

<0.0001

HR(95% CI)

0.43 (0.310,0.588)

0.62 (0.502,0.755)

 

Source: GSK.

Figure 5: Kaplan-Meier plot of PFS by BICR assessment in subjects with HRD tumors (ITT Population)

 

Source: GSK.

67


 

Figure 6: Kaplan-Meier plot of PFS by BICR assessment in overall population (ITT Population)

 

Source: GSK.

Based on PRIMA results, sNDA application for niraparib for first-line maintenance treatment for women with platinum-responsive advanced ovarian cancer has been submitted to FDA.

ZEJULA Pre-clinical Development

As discussed below, Merck, Sharp & Dohme Corp. (a subsidiary of Merck & Co. Inc.), or Merck Corp., and our partner Tesaro (now GSK) have completed various pre-clinical trials to evaluate the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and toxicology profile of ZEJULA.

Pharmacodynamics. In pre-clinical trials studying ZEJULA’s pharmacodynamics, ZEJULA was found to be a potent and selective PARP-1 and PARP-2 inhibitor that displayed at least a 100-fold selectivity over other PARP-family members PARP-3, v-PARP, and Tankyrase-1. A commonly used quantitative measure of potency is IC 90, which represents the concentration of a drug that is required to suppress 90% of the target enzyme. The IC 90 of ZEJULA for PARylation in BRCA-deficient tumor cells correlates with functional suppression of single strand breakage repair and anti-tumor effects on BRCA mutation positive tumor cells.

Normal primary cells were resistant to ZEJULA with the most sensitive cells (megakaryocytes) exhibiting a 13-fold selectivity margin as compared to BRCA mutation positive tumor cells in vitro. Maximal in-vivo efficacy was achieved in BRCA 1 mutation positive ovarian tumor models with once-daily oral administration of ZEJULA at a dose sufficient to suppress 90% of the PARP enzymatic activity in the tumor at eight hours after the dose, which translated to greater than 50% inhibition of PARP activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at eight hours post dose.

The therapeutic potential of ZEJULA was evaluated in a study designed to examine the benefit of ZEJULA in maintenance setting, i.e., daily ZEJULA treatment following a regression induced with a platinum-based regimen. In this study, tumors in mice receiving maintenance ZEJULA therapy became undetectable whereas regrowth was observed in those receiving only the chemotherapy regimen. These data support the concept that maintenance ZEJULA therapy after tumor response to chemotherapeutic agents may prolong recurrence-free survival.

68


 

ZEJULA showed no significant observable effects in nonclinical safety pharmacology studies at clinically relevant doses across the species evaluated.

Pharmacokinetics. ZEJULA elicited desirable and consistent pharmacokinetic profiles in nonclinical species in vivo. The oral absorption in rats and dogs was rapid, with moderate to high bioavailability. The compound is readily distributed to the brains of rats and monkeys to a modest extent, suggesting additional therapeutic potential.

Elimination of ZEJULA and its metabolites was fecal and renal in rats, while mainly renal in dogs. The potential risk for drug—drug interactions was determined to be minimal for ZEJULA, due to the lack of the interactions between ZEJULA and the hepatic drug-metabolizing CYP enzymes, the major hepatic and renal uptake transporters (OATP1B1, OATP1B3, OAT1, OAT3, and OCT2), and BSEP, an efflux transporter known to be associated with hepatotoxicity. The in vitro metabolic results, combined with the in vivo pharmacokinetic findings, demonstrated that ZEJULA had a desirable disposition profile with a minimal potential for drug—drug interactions, consistent with the development of ZEJULA as an anticancer agent.

Toxicology. A comprehensive pre-clinical toxicology program was conducted to support the administration of ZEJULA in patients with cancer. This program included oral repeat-dose toxicity studies (up to three-months duration) in dogs and rats, genotoxicity and phototoxicity studies. The results obtained from the general toxicity studies in rats and dogs indicated that ZEJULA causes bone marrow suppression which leads to decreases in circulating white and red blood cells. Infections and septicemia were a consequence of bone marrow suppression and lymphoid depletion. These findings are linked to pharmacology of ZEJULA and showed reversibility.

ZEJULA—Pharmacokinetics

The pharmacokinetic profile of ZEJULA has been evaluated in multiple clinical studies, with an overall ZEJULA-dosed population of 526 patients.

Absorption. ZEJULA exhibited linear pharmacokinetic, dose proportional exposure, and dose-independent absorption and clearance. Following repeat administrations of the daily recommended dose of 300 mg, ZEJULA accumulation on day 21 was consistent for both the area under the plasma concentration-time curve and maximum concentration (approximately two- to three-fold). ZEJULA was shown to be highly orally bioavailable (F ~73%). Bioavailability is a measure of the absorption of drug and is expressed as a percentage of the administrated case of the drug which reaches the patient’s system. ZEJULA can be administered with or without food.

Distribution. ZEJULA was moderately protein bound to human plasma (83.0%). The apparent volume of distribution was 1220 L, indicating an extensive tissue distribution of ZEJULA.

Metabolism. The carboxylesterases-catalyzed amide hydrolysis was delineated to be the major primary pathway, followed by the uridine-5’-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT)-mediated glucuronidation and the other minor secondary pathway (i.e., methylation). The major circulating metabolites in humans are the carboxylic acid and the glucuronides of carboxylic acid. The metabolic profile seen in humans is consistent with what was detected in the experimental species (rats and dogs).

Elimination. In an absorption, metabolism and elimination study in cancer patients using 14C-radioactive ZEJULA, a mean measured total of 86.2% of the radioactive dose was recovered in urine and fecal samples collected daily from 0 to 504 hours (21 days) post dose after single oral administration of 14C-ZEJULA. It suggests minimal long-term retention of ZEJULA or its metabolites in body. Moreover, hepatobiliary clearance and renal excretion are the major routes of elimination in humans.

Intrinsic Effects. Population pharmacokinetic analysis identified no intrinsic factors such as age, race, hepatic impairment, renal impairment would have significant impact on the pharmacokinetic of ZEJULA.

Optune and Tumor Treating Fields

Overview of Tumor Treating Fields

Tumor Treating Fields were invented in 2000 by Professor Emeritus Yoram Palti of the Technion Institute of Technology in Israel, who founded Novocure (Israel) in 2000, conducted pre-clinical studies of Tumor Treating Fields, developed a medical device capable of delivering Tumor Treating Fields to patients, and finally brought Tumor Treating

69


 

Fields into clinical use through clinical testing in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Today, after more than 15 years of pre-clinical research, it is known that Tumor Treating Fields are an electric field based loco-regional, antimitotic treatment modality, which inhibits the growth of cancerous tumors in vitro and in vivo. As intermediate frequency (200 kHz) and low intensity (1-3 V/cm) alternating electric fields, Tumor Treating Fields act predominantly during two phases of mitosis: 1) during metaphase, by disrupting the formation of the mitotic spindle, and 2) during cytokinesis, by dielectrophoretic dislocation of intracellular constituents resulting in apoptosis. Tumor Treating Fields cannot stimulate nerves or muscles, nor do they lead to heating of the tumor or surrounding tissues. Since Tumor Treating Fields are generated using electrically insulated electrodes (transducer arrays), there is no direct current flow into the tissue so that electrolysis and tissue damage do not occur over time. Since most normal adult brain cells proliferate very slowly, if at all, they are not affected by the Tumor Treating Fields.

The efficacy of Tumor Treating Fields is frequency dependent on specific cell types. The anti-mitotic effect of Tumor Treating Fields has been shown in multiple cell lines when the appropriate frequency was utilized. This includes but not limited to the following tumor models: glioblastoma at 200 kHz, NSCLC at 150kHz; breast carcinoma at 120kHz; melanoma at 100kHz.

Four Phase III trials of Tumor Treating Fields in a variety of solid tumors are ongoing. PANOVA-3 is Tumor Treating Fields combined with chemotherapy for newly-diagnosed pancreatic cancer. LUNAR is targeting advanced NSCLC with disease progression on or after prior platinum-based treatment, to evaluate Tumor Treating Fields combined with chemotherapy versus chemotherapy alone, METIS trial is intended for patients who have recently been diagnosed with brain metastases from NSCLC, and ENGOT-ov50/INNOVATE-3 trial is intended for patients who have recently been diagnosed with ovarian cancer that progressed and became resistant to chemotherapy containing platinum (platinum resistant ovarian cancer).

A Phase II, single arm, multi-center, open-label trial (EF-31, ZL-8301-001) to evaluate the safety and efficacy of treatment with Tumor Treating Fields and chemotherapy as first-line treatment for subjects with unresectable gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma or gastric (GC) adenocarcinoma is ongoing. This study is conducted in Hong Kong and mainland China and the first patient was dosed in January 2020. The First-Patient-In (FPI) occurred in January 2020 in Hong Kong. The initiation of enrollment in China is expected in the second half of 2020.

Optune Device Description

Optune is a portable battery or power supply operated device which act by delivering low intensity (1-3 V/cm), intermediate frequency (100-300 kHz), alternating Tumor Treating Fields to the patient’s shaved head by means of electrically insulated surface transducer arrays. It has been FDA approved for the treatment of recurrent GBM and has received CE mark for the treatment of both recurrent and newly diagnosed GBM. The device has been available commercially in the European Union and in the United States since October 2011. Optune was approved in Japan for the treatment of recurrent GBM in March 2015. The indication of Optune in the United States was expanded to include treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed GBM in combination with TMZ in October 2015. Additionally, we commercially launched Optune in Hong Kong for the treatment of GBM in December 2018.

Indications for Optune Use

GBM, a malignant form of astrocytoma, is the most common primary intracranial neoplasm. The incidence of GBM increases steadily above 45 years of age with a prevalence of approximately 7,500 cases in the United States Despite numerous attempts to improve the outcome of patients with GBM, the 3-year survival of these patients is only 6% with median survival of 14.6 months.

 

Optune is indicated for the treatment of adult patients (22 years of age or older) with histologically-confirmed recurrence in the supra-tentorial region of GBM. The device is intended to be used as a monotherapy, and is intended as an alternative to standard medical therapy for GBM after surgical and radiation options have been exhausted.

 

Optune with TMZ is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed, supratentorial GBM following maximal debulking surgery and completion of radiation therapy together with concomitant standard of care chemotherapy.

70


 

Pivotal Study of Tumor Treating Fields for Recurrent GBM Subjects

In a prospective, randomized, open label, active parallel control trial (EF-11) was conducted to compare the effectiveness and safety. A total of 237 patients (120 Optune; 117 best supportive care, BSC) with progressive or recurrent GBM were enrolled in the study. Baseline characteristics were similar between treatment groups. In the ITT population which included all randomized subjects, overall survival in subjects treated with Optune was comparable to that observed in subjects treated with BSC (median OS=6.3 vs. 6.4 months; p=0.98). The pivotal study data establish that Optune therapy is comparable to BSC therapy in extending OS.

The one-year survival is similar in the Optune and BSC groups in the ITT population (21.9% vs. 22.1%). Progression free survival at 6 months (PFS6) is the same in the ITT population (21.4% vs. 15.2%). Radiological response rates from the subset of patients evaluated were reported as 14% for the Optune group compared to 9.6% for the BSC group in the ITT population. Median time to progression, or TTP, was 9.3 weeks for Optune vs. 9.6 weeks for BSC.

Optune subjects experienced fewer adverse events in general, significantly fewer treatment related adverse events, and significantly lower gastrointestinal, hematological and infectious adverse events compared to BSC controls. The only device-related adverse event seen was a mild to moderate skin irritation beneath the device transducer arrays, which was easily treated with topical ointments. Finally, certain quality of life measures were better in Optune subjects as a group when compared to subjects receiving effective BSC chemotherapy.

Pivotal Study of Optune for Newly Diagnosed GBM

An international Phase III trial (EF-14) in newly diagnosed GBM, evaluating the role of Optune in combination with TMZ maintenance after surgery and chemoradiation versus TMZ alone was conducted between July 2009 and September 2014 to evaluate efficacy and safety.

A total of 695 patients were randomized, the median number of maintenance TMZ cycles was 6 and 5 cycles, for Optune /TMZ and TMZ alone, respectively. The median progression-free survival was 6.7 months for the patients treated with Optune /TMZ versus 4.0 months for TMZ alone (HR 0.63;95% CI 0.52-0.76; p<0.001). Median overall survival from randomization was 20.9 months versus 16 months for the Optune /TMZ and TMZ alone, respectively, with a hazard ratio of 0.63 (95% CI 0.53–0.76), p<0.001. The most common adverse events in the Optune /TMZ arm, defined as occurring in ≥10% of patients, were thrombocytopenia, nausea, constipation, vomiting, fatigue, medical device site reaction, headache, convulsions, and depression. Grade 3 to 4 adverse events were well balanced between the 2 treatment arms. None of the systemic grade 3 to 4 adverse events were considered related to Optune by any of the investigators. Mild to moderate skin toxicity underneath the transducer arrays occurred in 52% of patients who received Optune-TMZ vs no patients who received TMZ alone.

Based on the data, FDA expanded approval of Optune in combination with TMZ for the treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed GBM.

Our Strategy for Tumor Treating Fields in the China Market

Given the strong clinical data from randomized control trials of Optune and its approval status in the European Union and United States in recurrent and newly diagnosed GBM, Zai Lab plans to leverage the global study data to seek potential regulatory approval in China. Zai Lab intends to participate in the ongoing global studies of Tumor Treating Fields, and will also conduct trials of Tumor Treating Fields in Chinese patients with gastric cancer.

Ripretinib

Ripretinib is an investigational KIT and PDGFRα kinase switch control inhibitor in clinical development for the treatment of KIT and/or PDGFRα-driven cancers, including GIST, systemic mastocytosis, or SM, and other cancers. Ripretinib was specifically designed to improve the treatment of GIST patients by inhibiting a broad spectrum of mutations in KIT and PDGFRα. Ripretinib is a KIT and PDGFRα inhibitor that blocks initiating and secondary KIT mutations in exons 9, 11, 13, 14, 17, and 18, involved in GIST as well as the primary D816V exon 17 mutation involved in SM. Ripretinib also inhibits primary PDGFRα mutations in exons 12, 14 and 18, including the exon 18 D842V mutation, involved in a subset of GIST.

71


 

We obtained an exclusive license to develop and commercialize ripretinib in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan in 2019.

In December 2019, an NDA was submitted to the FDA for ripretinib in the treatment of patients with advanced GIST who have received prior treatment with imatinib, sunitinib, and regorafenib.  The NDA submission is based on positive results from our first Phase III study, INVICTUS, in fourth-line and fourth-line plus GIST patients, for whom there are currently no approved therapies other than avapritinib in the U.S. which is approved for GIST patients with PDGFRα exon 18 mutations only (estimated approximately 6% of all patients with newly-diagnosed GIST).  In August 2019, the top-line results from INVICTUS was published, including that the study achieved its primary endpoint of improved PFS compared to placebo as determined by blinded independent central radiologic review using modified RECIST.  In February 2020, the FDA accepted the NDA for ripretinib for the treatment of patients with fourth-line and fourth-line plus GIST, granted priority review and set an action date of August 13, 2020 under the PDUFA.

Our Clinical Trial Designs and Strategy for ripretinib in the China Market

Zai Lab will seek regulatory approval for ripretinib in China using data from global studies and China bridging studies.  In February 2020, Zai Lab received the NMPA approval to conduct the bridging study in >4L GIST. In additional, Zai Lab also plans to conduct a 2L bridging study in the GIST patients in China.

Ripretinib Mechanism of Action

KIT and PDGFRα are dual switch kinases, each containing i) an auxiliary inhibitory switch encoded by KIT exon 11 or PDGFRα exon 12 and ii) a main activation loop switch within the kinase domain encoded by KIT exons 17 and 18 or PDGFRα exons 18 and 19. This dual switch mechanism carefully regulates cellular kinase activity by controlling kinase conformation in either an "on" or "off" position. Oncogenic kinase mutations predominantly function by disrupting one or more regulatory switch mechanisms, leading to dysregulated switch function and loss of normal, physiologic conformational control. Ripretinib is a novel switch-control tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) specifically designed to broadly inhibit KIT and PDGFRα kinase signaling through a dual mechanism of action that locks the kinase into an inactive conformation, resulting in inhibition of downstream signaling and cell proliferation.

Ripretinib precisely and durably binds to both the switch pocket region and the activation loop to lock the kinase in the inactive "off" state. Portions of ripretinib mimic the inhibitory loop and occupy the switch pocket, thereby preventing the activation loop's entry. Other residues on ripretinib bind to the activation loop, stabilizing it out of the switch pocket and covering the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding site, so kinase activation cannot occur.

This dual mechanism of action secures KIT and PDGFRα kinases in their inactive conformations providing broad in vitro inhibition of KIT and PDGFRα kinase activity, including wild type and multiple primary and secondary mutations. Ripretinib also inhibits other kinases in vitro, such as PDGFRβ, TIE2, VEGFR2, and BRAF.

Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST)

GISTs are the most common sarcoma of the gastrointestinal tract and present most often in the stomach or small intestine. The typical patient is over 50 years old. According to the American Cancer Society, in 2019 approximately 4,000 to 6,000 patients were newly diagnosed with GIST in the U.S. Estimates for 5-year survival range from 48% to 90% depending upon the stage of the disease at diagnosis.

72


 

GIST is a disease driven initially by primary mutations in KIT kinase in approximately 75% to 80% of cases or in PDGFRα kinase in approximately 5% to 10% of cases. In approximately 13% of all GIST patients, the disease is not driven by KIT or PDGFRα but by other genetic mutations or alterations. Primary mutations in the KIT gene are found in exon 11 in approximately 67% of GIST patients, in exon 9 in approximately 10% of GIST patients, and less frequently in exon 13 or 17. Primary mutations in the PDGFRα gene are found in exon 18 (a mutation referred to as D842V being the most frequent) in approximately 6% of GIST patients and more rarely in exon 12. Activation of these kinases caused by primary mutations leads to uncontrolled cancer cell growth and spread. The diagram below illustrates the mutations that drive GIST:

 

 

Metastatic KIT-driven GIST is a disease characterized by many mutations in KIT, with over 90% of individual KIT-driven GIST patients harboring multiple mutations that drive progression of their disease. Multiple secondary mutations can arise within an individual patient and/or tumor in different areas or sites of tumor growth. Drug resistant secondary mutations in patients with KIT-driven GIST span exon regions 13 to 18, and in a recent study, 35% of GIST patients had at least two secondary mutations, each as illustrated below.

 

 

The complex heterogeneity of KIT mutations within individual tumors and individual patients is a major cause of resistance to existing therapies, which individually only address a subset of the mutations driving disease progression. A kinase inhibitor that could inhibit a broad spectrum of clinically relevant KIT mutations could be of high therapeutic value in the treatment of KIT-driven GIST in patients who are unresponsive to treatment or have grown resistant to treatment. In PDGFRα-driven GIST, there are no approved therapies other than avapritinib. The primary PDGFRα mutations are mostly insensitive to imatinib and other drugs approved for GIST. The design of ripretinib as a PDGFRα switch control inhibitor may make the appearance of secondary mutations less likely after treatment than with a traditional kinase inhibitor.

73


 

The following table shows reported PFS or TTP (as applicable), ORR, overall survival, all as per RECIST, for imatinib, sunitinib, and regorafenib in first-line, second-line, and third-line GIST, respectively, based upon the published results of registrational trials that were presented to the FDA for approval of these drugs.

 

 

While imatinib, sunitinib, and regorafenib inhibit certain clinically relevant initiating and drug resistance-causing mutations in KIT, these approved drugs, in addition to avapritinib, each inhibit only a limited subset of KIT and PDGFRα mutations known to occur in GIST patients. Although GIST patients may experience periods of disease control with these treatments, due to the heterogeneous nature of the mutations that drive the disease, many patients continue to progress and ultimately fail all lines of treatment.

Clinical development of Ripretinib in GIST

INVICTUS: Completed Phase III Study in Fourth-Line and Fourth-Line Plus GIST

The INVICTUS Phase III study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, global, multicenter trial to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of ripretinib compared to placebo in patients with advanced GIST whose previous therapies have included at least imatinib, sunitinib, and regorafenib. The trial enrolled 129 patients who had a confirmed diagnosis of GIST and had previously received at least three different kinase inhibitors including imatinib, sunitinib, and regorafenib. Patients were treated with ripretinib or placebo, in accordance with their randomization, until they developed disease progression, experienced unacceptable toxicity, or withdrew consent. Placebo patients had the opportunity to cross over to ripretinib treatment upon disease progression with placebo. Patients on ripretinib had the opportunity to remain on their current dose or escalate to 150 mg twice daily (BID) upon disease progression.

Patients were randomized 2:1 to either 150 mg of ripretinib or placebo once daily (QD) in repeated 28-day cycles with best supportive care. Patients were evaluated for PFS based upon independent radiologic review of CT scans, as assessed by modified RECIST. Tumor response assessments per modified RECIST were conducted every cycle for the first three cycles and then every two cycles thereafter beginning with the fourth cycle. The primary efficacy endpoint was PFS as determined by independent radiologic review using modified RECIST. Secondary endpoints as determined by independent radiologic review using modified RECIST included ORR, overall survival (OS), and TTP.

In 2019, the top-line results from INVICTUS is published, including that the study achieved its primary endpoint of improved PFS compared to placebo.

In the INVICTUS study, ripretinib demonstrated a median PFS of 6.3 months (27.6 weeks) compared to 1.0 month (4.1 weeks) in the placebo arm and significantly reduced the risk of disease progression or death by 85% (Hazard Ratio (HR) of 0.15, 95% Confidence Interval (0.09,0.25), p-value <0.0001) compared to placebo. This PFS benefit was consistent across all assessed patient subgroups. The following graph shows the estimated PFS probability at each time point for the ripretinib and placebo arms in INVICTUS:

74


 

INVICTUS: Estimated PFS Probability for Ripretinib and Placebo Arms

 

 

*Double-blind period

For the key secondary endpoint of ORR as determined by blinded independent radiologic review using modified RECIST, ripretinib demonstrated an ORR of 9.4% compared with 0% for placebo (p-value=0.0504), which was not statistically significant. As of the cutoff date of May 31, 2019, the median duration of response had not been reached with seven of the eight patients still responding to treatment. All responders had partial responses.

Ripretinib also showed a clinically meaningful improvement over placebo in terms of the secondary endpoint of OS (median OS 15.1 months with ripretinib compared to 6.6 months with placebo, HR = 0.36, 95% Confidence Interval (0.20,0.62), nominal p-value=0.0004). The OS data for the placebo arm includes patients taking placebo who, following progression, were crossed-over to ripretinib treatment. The following graph shows the estimated OS probability at each time point for the ripretinib and placebo arms in INVICTUS:

INVICTUS: Estimated OS Probability for Ripretinib and Placebo Arms

 

 

*Due to hierarchal testing procedures of the endpoints, the OS endpoint could not be formally tested because the ORR was not statistically significant.

Data includes all time periods, including dose escalations. Placebo arm includes patients taking placebo who, following progression, were crossed-over to ripretinib treatment.

Ripretinib was generally well tolerated and the adverse events reported in the INVICTUS study were consistent with data from previously presented Phase I study results. Grade 3 or 4 treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) occurred in 42 patients (49%) on the ripretinib arm compared to 19 patients (44%) on the placebo arm. Grade 3 or 4 TEAEs in greater than 5% of patients in the ripretinib arm were anemia (9%; n=8), abdominal pain (7%; n=6), and hypertension (7%; n=6). Grade 3 or 4 TEAEs in greater than 5% of patients in the placebo arm were anemia (14%; n=6).

75


 

The below table lists all TEAEs (and corresponding grade 3 and 4 TEAEs) in greater than 10% of patients in the ripretinib arm compared to the placebo arm in INVICTUS.

INVICTUS: TEAEs in >10% of Patients

(and Corresponding Grade 3 and 4 TEAEs)

 

Treatment Emergent Adverse Event

Ripretinib

any grade

(n=85)

Ripretinib

grade 3 and 4

(n=85))1

 

Placebo

any grade

(n=43))2

 

Placebo

grade 3 and 4

(n=43))1,2

 

Any TEAE or grade 3/4 TEAE3

84 (98.8%)

42 (49.4%)

 

42 (97.7%)

 

19 (44.2%)

 

Alopecia

44 (51.8%)

 

0

 

2 (4.7%)

 

 

0

 

Fatigue

36 (42.4%)

3 (3.5%)

 

10 (23.3%)

 

1 (2.3%)

 

Nausea

33 (38.8%)

3 (3.5%)

 

5 (11.6%)

 

 

0

 

Abdominal pain

31 (36.5%)

6 (7.1%)

 

13 (30.2%)

 

2 (4.7%)

 

Constipation

29 (34.1%)

1 (1.2%)

 

8 (18.6%)

 

 

0

 

Myalgia

27 (31.8%)

1 (1.2%)

 

5 (11.6%)

 

 

0

 

Diarrhea

24 (28.2%)

1 (1.2%)

 

6 (14%)

 

1 (2.3%)

 

Decreased appetite

23 (27.1%)

1 (1.2%)

 

9 (20.9%)

 

1 (2.3%)

 

Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia syndrome

18 (21.2%)

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

Vomiting

18 (21.2%)

3 (3.5%)

 

3 (7%)

 

 

0

 

Headache

16 (18.8%)

 

0

 

2 (4.7%)

 

 

0

 

Weight decreased

16 (18.8%)

 

0

 

5 (11.6%)

 

 

0

 

Arthralgia

15 (17.6%)

 

0

 

2 (4.7%)

 

 

0

 

Blood bilirubin increased

14 (16.5%)

1 (1.2%)

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

Edema peripheral

14 (16.5%)

1 (1.2%)

 

3 (7%)

 

 

0

 

Muscle spasms

13 (15.3%)

 

0

 

2 (4.7%)

 

 

0

 

Anemia

12 (14.1%)

8 (9.4%)

 

8 (18.6%)

 

6 (14%)

 

Hypertension

12 (14.1%)

6 (7.1%)

 

2 (4.7%)

 

 

0

 

Asthenia

11 (12.9%)

1 (1.2%)

 

6 (14%)

 

2 (4.7%)

 

Dry skin

11 (12.9%)

 

0

 

3 (7%)

 

 

0

 

Dyspnea

11 (12.9%)

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

Hypophosphatemia

9 (10.6%)

4 (4.7%)

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

Lipase increased

9 (10.6%)

4 (4.7%)

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

Pruritus

9 (10.6%)

 

0

 

2 (4.7%)

 

 

0

 

Stomatitis

9 (10.6%)

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

0

 

 

1 Corresponding grade 3 and 4 TEAEs to TEAEs in >10% of patients receiving ripretinib

2 44 patients were randomized to placebo, but 1 did not receive treatment

3 Regardless of causality

TEAEs leading to dose reduction occurred in 7% of patients on the ripretinib arm compared to 2% on the placebo arm. TEAEs leading to dose interruption occurred in 24% of patients on the ripretinib arm compared to 21% on the placebo arm. TEAEs leading to study treatment discontinuation occurred in 8% of patients on the ripretinib arm compared to 12% of patients on the placebo arm. TEAEs leading to death occurred in 6% of patients on the ripretinib arm compared to 23% on the placebo arm.

INTRIGUE: Ongoing Phase III Study in Second-Line GIST

The INTRIGUE Phase III study is an interventional, randomized, global, multicenter, open-label study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of ripretinib compared to sunitinib in approximately 358 patients with GIST previously treated with imatinib. Patients are randomized 1:1 to either 150 mg of ripretinib once daily or 50 mg of sunitinib once daily for four weeks followed by two weeks without sunitinib. The primary efficacy endpoint is PFS as determined by independent radiologic review using modified RECIST. Secondary endpoints as determined by independent radiologic review using modified RECIST include ORR and OS.

76


 

REGN1979

Overview

Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) is the most common hematologic malignancy in the world. It comprises a heterogeneous group of malignancies with lymphoid characteristics that arise from hematopoietic progenitor cells. NHL ranks the seventh most common malignancy and accounts for approximately 4.5% of all cancers occurring in the US. There were approximately 74,200 new cases and 19,970 deaths due to NHL in 2019 in the US. In China, an estimated 88,090 new cases and 48,129 deaths were due to NHL in 2018.

Among the heterogeneous group of NHLs, 85-90% are of B-cell origin (B-NHL) and include follicular lymphoma (FL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), marginal zone lymphoma (MZL), and several other B-NHLs. DLBCL and FL are the two most common subtypes of B-NHL, accounting for approximately 45.8% and 8.1%-23.5% of NHL in China. Anti-CD20 antibodies in combination with chemotherapy are the standard of care for the treatment of B-NHLs; however, despite initial responses, many patients relapse, often with progressively shorter response durations in subsequent lines of therapy and have a poor outcome.

REGN1979 is a fully human bispecific antibody that binds to CD3, a T cell antigen associated with the T-cell receptor (TCR) complex, and CD20. REGN1979 is designed to bridge CD20‑expressing cells with cytotoxic T cells by binding to the CD3 subunit of the TCR, resulting in CD20-directed polyclonal T cell killing. REGN1979 was granted orphan drug designation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of FL and DLBCL and was invented by Regeneron using the company's proprietary VelocImmune® technology and proprietary Veloci-Bi® bispecific platform. Veloci-Bi® allows for the generation of full-length bispecific antibodies similar to native antibodies that are amenable to production by standard antibody manufacturing techniques, and likely to have favorable antibody-like pharmaco-kinetic properties.

REGN1979 has demonstrated clinical activity in heavily pre-treated patients with Relapsed/Refractory (R/R) B-NHL in a Phase I trial and is currently being investigated in a potentially registrational Phase II program.

Our Clinical Trial Designs and Strategy for REGN1979 in the China Market

Zai Lab is exploring regulatory approval pathways for REGN1979 in R/R B-NHL in China by joining the global Phase II program with multiple, potentially registrational cohorts of different subtypes of R/R B-NHL.

Mechanism of Action

Bispecific antibodies are an emerging class of therapeutic molecules which have been engineered to engage more than one target. When targeted to CD3, a component of the T cell receptor (TCR), and a tumor target antigen, these molecules can direct cytotoxic effector T cells to kill tumor cells in an antigen-specific manner that is independent of the specificity of the TCR. In the case of REGN1979, that binds to CD3 and CD20 (a B cell surface antigen present on normal B cells and several B cell lineage malignancies), this binding directs T-cells to specifically kill CD20 expressing target cells.

Pre-clinical and Clinical Background

Pre-clinical Pharmacology

In vitro assays were performed to examine the ability of REGN1979 to bind to target cells and to activate T-cells to specifically kill CD20-expressing target cells. REGN1979 was shown to bind to both Raji cells, a CD20+ B-cell lymphoma line, and Jurkat cells, an immortalized CD3+ T-cell line, as well as to primary human B and T-cells. In cellular cytotoxicity assays, REGN1979 was able to engage T cells to kill CD20-expressing cells in a target dependent manner. In these cytotoxicity assays, REGN1979 also induced the expression of T-cell activation markers, T-cell proliferation, and cytokine release.

In vivo experiments utilizing murine tumor models were performed to evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of REGN1979. In a model where Raji (B) lymphoma cells were grown in mice and human PBMC were added as effector cells, REGN1979 treatment resulted in significant tumor growth suppression.

77


 

Nonclinical pharmacokinetics

The PK profile of REGN1979 was evaluated in cynomolgus monkeys during a single-dose PK study. In general, the PK of total REGN1979 in the monkey is described by non-linear, target-mediated elimination. Following a single IV infusion, mean total REGN1979 serum maximum concentration (Cmax) values in monkeys increased in an approximately dose-proportional manner. The concentration-time profile of total REGN1979 was characterized by a short distribution phase, followed by a saturating beta elimination phase at higher doses and an accelerated target mediated elimination phase at low doses (and corresponding low serum concentrations). Target mediated elimination (presumably due to binding of REGN1979 to the CD20 target on B cells) was observed in the distribution phase and correlated with the nearly complete depletion of B cells observed 24 hours post infusion. The duration of peripheral B cell depletion increased with the REGN1979 dose and in general, the rate of B cell repletion was positively correlated with the rate of clearance of total REGN1979.

Nonclinical Toxicology

The toxicity profile of REGN1979 was evaluated in an exploratory, non-GLP, single-dose intravenous (IV) infusion toxicology study (dose level 1mg/kg) and a 4-week repeat dose GLP-toxicology study (dose levels 0.01, 0.1, and 1 mg/kg). The no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) for each of the toxicology studies conducted is considered to be 1.0 mg/kg, the highest dosage administered. REGN1979 resulted in B cell depletion at all doses tested, with earlier recovery at the lower doses. This depletion extended into deep tissues including lymph nodes and spleen. A transient release of cytokines was observed whose magnitude correlated with the strength of the dose, and at the highest dose several animals also displayed some vomiting with the first dose. Neither cytokine release nor symptoms occurred upon second or subsequent dosing. An ex vivo tissue cross-reactivity study also was conducted to assess the binding specificity of REGN1979 in a panel of human and cynomolgus monkey tissues. All staining in this study was consistent with expected reactivity with the target antigens, and no unanticipated cross-reactivity of REGN1979 was observed.

Clinical Background

In an ongoing Phase I study (NCT02290951) of REGN1979 in patients with B-cell malignancies, a total of 110 patients (61 with DLBCL; 31 with grade 1 to 3a FL; 9 with MCL; 6 with MZL; and 3 with other B-cell malignancies) were treated with REGN1979 ranging from 0.03-320 mg as of 3rd September 2019. Patients had a median of 3 prior lines of therapy (range 1-11).

Among the 22 patients with R/R FL who were treated with ≥5 mg of REGN1979, the overall response rate (ORR) was 95.5% and the complete response (CR) rate was 77.3%. Patients with R/R FL who were treated with ≥80 mg of REGN1979 had an ORR of 100%. The median progression-free survival for R/R FL patients treated with ≥5mg of REGN1979 was 11.4 months (95% CI, 6.7-not evaluable). In the DLBCL cohort, the objective response rate (ORR) was 57.9% (11/19), and the CR rate was 42.1% (8/19) with treatment at ≥80 mg of REGN1979. At this dosage, the ORR was 71.4% in those patients not treated with prior chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy (n = 7), which included all CRs. In those who received prior CAR T-cell therapy, the ORR and CR rate were 50% and 25%, respectively. The response rate was higher in patients who had not previously received CAR T-cell therapy (Figure 14). Survival rates and ongoing response rates are shown in Figure 15 by diagnosis, dose of REGN1979, and prior CAR T therapy.

Figure 14. Efficacy results by diagnosis and dose of REGN1979

 

Diagnosis

 

FL, n (%)

 

 

DLBCL, n (%)

 

 

DLBCL with prior

CAR T therapy, n

(%)

 

 

DLBCL without prior CAR T

therapy, n (%)

 

Dose of REGN1979

 

≥5mg

 

 

≥80mg

 

 

≥80mg

 

 

≥80mg

 

N

 

 

22

 

 

 

19

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

7

 

ORR

 

21 (95.5)

 

 

11 (57.9)

 

 

6 (50.0)

 

 

5 (71.4)

 

CR

 

17 (77.3)

 

 

8 (42.1)

 

 

3 (25.0)

 

 

5 (71.4)

 

PR

 

4 (18.2)

 

 

3 (15.8)

 

 

3 (25.0)

 

 

 

0

 

SD

 

1 (4.5)

 

 

2 (10.5)

 

 

1 (8.3)

 

 

1 (14.3)

 

PD

 

 

0

 

 

3 (15.8)

 

 

2 (16.7)

 

 

1 (14.3)

 

Not available

 

 

0

 

 

3 (15.8)

 

 

3 (25.0)

 

 

 

0

 

 

78


 

CAR, chimeric antigen receptor; CR, complete response; DLBCL, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma; FL, follicular lymphoma; ORR, overall response rate; PD, progressive disease; PR, partial response; SD, stable disease

Figure 15. Median survival and responses by diagnosis, prior CAR T therapy and REGN1979 dosing

 

 

 

Patients with FL

 

 

DLBCL with prior

CAR T therapy

 

 

DLBCL without prior CAR T

therapy

 

Dose of REGN1979

 

≥5mg

 

 

≥80mg

 

 

≥80mg

 

N

 

 

22

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

7

 

Median PFS, months (95% CI)

 

11.4

(6.7–not evaluable)

 

 

NR

 

 

NR

 

Median duration of follow-up,

months (range)

 

6.8 (1.0–22.1)

 

 

2.6 (0.4–9.9)

 

 

5.3 (1.2–11.8)

 

Number of patients with ongoing

response at last assessment

 

14/21

 

 

4/6

 

 

5/5

 

Number of patients with ongoing

CRs at last tumor assessment

 

12/17

 

 

3/3

 

 

5/5

 

 

CAR, chimeric antigen receptor; CR, complete response; DLBCL, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma; FL, follicular lymphoma; NR, not reported; PFS, progression-free survival

No dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) were observed during dose escalation. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) of any grade were pyrexia (80%) and cytokine release syndrome (CRS, 59.1%). Grade 3–4 TEAEs that occurred in 10% or more of patients are anemia (21.8%), hypophosphatemia (19.1%), neutropenia (19.1%), lymphopenia (19.1%), thrombocytopenia (13.6%), and leukopenia (10.0%). CRS grade ≥3 occurred in 6.4% of patients and no seizures or grade 4–5 neurologic events were observed.

Preliminary data from the Phase I study showed broad antitumor activity with REGN1979 in heavily pretreated R/R B-NHL patients, including some with progression after prior chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR T)-cell therapy. REGN1979 has been tolerated at doses up to 320 mg weekly, with no observed dose limiting toxicities. 

REGN1979 is currently evaluated in a potentially pivotal Phase II program. This open-label, multi-center, Phase II program (NCT03888105) is evaluating the efficacy and safety of REGN1979 in different disease-specific cohorts, including patients with R/R FL, DLBCL, MCL, MZL and other B-NHL subtypes. Recruitment of this study is ongoing.

Margetuximab

Overview

Approximately 25% of breast tumors overexpress the HER2 protein which is a member of the ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase family and plays an important role in the growth and proliferation of HER2-expressing cancer cells. HER2 expression has been associated with aggressive metastatic cancers with a poor prognosis. The overall incidence of breast cancer is similar between the U.S. (~268,600 new cases in 2019) and China (~278,800), so is the proportion of patients with HER2+ breast cancer. Many HER2-targeting agents have been developed and marketed with trastuzumab (Herceptin) as one of the most important treatments for HER2+ breast cancer.

Margetuximab is a human/mouse chimeric IgG1 anti-HER2 antibody with an optimized Fc domain designed to outperform trastuzumab whose mechanism of action involves not only the inhibition of the signal transduction pathway from HER2, but also the antibody-dependent cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by the binding of the Fc domain of the antibody with CD16A (Fcg receptor IIIA or FcgRIIIA) expressed on the surface of the natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages. Both 158V and 131H variants bind the Fc of IgG1 with higher affinity than their respective allelic counterparts. With optimized Fc domain, margetuximab binds different CD16 variants with similar affinity, leading to stronger ADCC than trastuzumab. A Phase III trial known as SOPHIA compared margetuximab in combination with chemotherapy with trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapy in HER2+ breast cancer after 2 or more lines of treatment with other HER2-targeting agents including trastuzumab and pertuzumab. The study reported positive outcome indicating that margetuximab is superior to trastuzumab in a heavily pretreated HER2+ metastatic breast cancer. Additional clinical trials are being planned to evaluate margetuximab in HER2+ breast and gastric cancer.

79


 

Our Clinical Trial Designs and Strategy for Margetuximab in the China Market

Zai Lab is exploring regulatory approval pathways for margetuximab in HER2+ breast cancer in China using a bridging approach which may require a PK study and a bridging trial. In February 2020, the first patient was dosed in the registrational bridging study of margetuximab in combination with chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. Data from the positive SOPHIA study and the bridging study data will be used to support potential regulatory filing and approval in China. In additional, Zai Lab plans to participate in the upcoming global studies of margetuximab (MAHOGANY) in combination with a PD-1 antibody or a PD-1 x LAG-3 bispecific DART molecule in gastric cancer sponsored by MacroGenics in HER2+ first line treatment of gastric cancer.Margetuximab Mechanism of Action

HER2 oncoprotein drive the aggressive behavior of HER2+ breast and other cancer and it proves to be a good target for cancer therapeutics exemplified by the clinical success of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Margetuximab is believed to mediate its therapeutic activity against HER2+ tumours by a combination of mechanisms that are initiated by binding of margetuximab to HER2 expressed on the cell surface, including the following:

 

Direct impact on HER2 receptor leading to reduced HER receptor dimerization and subsequent activation, induction of endocytosis of the HER2 receptor, and prevention of shedding of the extracellular domain of the HER2 receptor (thereby preventing formation of a constitutively active truncated intracellular receptor)

 

Induction of apoptosis

 

Antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity, or ADCC, and presentation of the antigenic determinants of opsonized cells to antigen-presenting cells.

Fcγ-receptor (FcγR)-mediated mechanisms, such as ADCC, play a critical part in the action of many antibodies including trastuzumab. Optimization of the Fc component of margetuximab enhances binding to the V/F heterozygous subtype and the F/F homozygous subtype of FcγR compared to trastuzumab, potentially leading to enhanced ADCC activity in a broader patient population. Margetuximab significantly increased the level of ADCC activity mediated by Fc domain optimization, and the enhanced ADCC was observed in a range of breast, gastric, bladder and colorectal cancer cell lines. Margetuximab maintains the same direct anti-proliferative activity as trastuzumab, but, in contrast to trastuzumab, margetuximab interacts efficiently with both 158F and 158V allotypes of CD16A due to specific mutations introduced into its Fc region. Consistent with its enhanced binding to CD16A, margetuximab exhibits enhanced in vitro antitumor activity against HER2-expressing tumor cell lines, including against lines expressing low HER2 levels, and in xenograft models in human CD16A+ transgenic mice. The data from the nonclinical pharmacology studies support the hypothesis that margetuximab can be active against HER2-expressing tumors.

Margetuximab Pre-clinical and Clinical Background

Nonclinical Pharmacology

In ligand binding studies, compared to the wild-type Fc domain, margetuximab imparts enhanced binding to both the CD16A-158F and CD16A-158V alleles. Binding to human CD32A is unchanged (131H allele) or decreased (131R allele), and there is a substantial decrease in binding to the human inhibitory receptor, CD32B. In the monkey, the optimized Fc domain of margetuximab imparts increased binding to all three cynomolgus FcγRs (CD16A, CD32A and CD32B) compared to the wild type Fc domain.

Consistent with its enhanced binding to CD16A, margetuximab exhibits enhanced antitumour activity against HER2-expressing tumour cell lines in vitro and in xenograft models in human CD16A-transgenic mice. Margetuximab, as a single agent, is active against HER2-expressing breast, ovarian or pancreatic tumours in a manner consistent with that of trastuzumab. In general, HER2 3+ tumours (breast BT474 and ovarian SKOV3 cell lines) were highly sensitive to treatment with either margetuximab or a trastuzumab analogue, RES120, with maximal effects observed at the lowest dose tested. Margetuximab showed enhanced activity against JIMT-1 xenografts compared to RES120 in mCD16-/- hCD16A+ transgenic mouse lines. JIMT-1 is a HER2+ (2+ by HercepTest) line derived from a metastatic breast cancer patient that progressed on trastuzumab therapy and is insensitive to trastuzumab anti-proliferative activity. Margetuximab was also active as a single agent against HER2-expressing gastric cancer xenografts and when combined with a chemotherapy agent (taxane or irinotecan). The anti-tumour effects of the combinations were enhanced compared to that of the individual agents.

80


 

Based on in vitro secondary pharmacology studies conducted with human PBMC and anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies in the absence or presence of immobilized HER2 antigen, the optimized Fc domain of margetuximab does not contribute to enhanced cytokine release in vitro. These data suggest that margetuximab is not likely to induce cytokine release in human patients to levels any higher than those induced by trastuzumab.

Margetuximab exhibited anti-tumour activity equal to or better than that of RES120, its WT Fc domain counterpart, in all models tested and increased potency compared with RES120 in a selected system where the contribution of the optimized Fc domain can be ascertained. These data support the hypothesis that margetuximab is more potent than trastuzumab. In addition, margetuximab exhibited enhanced tumour activity when combined with chemotherapy agents. For patients with HER2-expressing tumours, margetuximab has the potential to expand the benefit to the whole patient population, irrespective of the CD16A genotype. Thus, these data support the use of margetuximab, in combination with chemotherapy, to treat HER2+ breast cancer.

Nonclinical pharmacokinetics

In the single dose toxicology study, intravenous infusion of margetuximab at 50 mg/kg led to a mean Cmax of 1.62 mg/mL for males and 1.70 mg/mL for females. The terminal phase half-life was estimated to be 223.9 hours in males and 233.9 hours in females, while serum clearance was 0.434 mL/hr and 0.400 mL/hr in males and females, respectively. The volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) was estimated to be 132.4 mL in males and 127.2 mL in females, which is similar to the plasma volume. No gender related differences were apparent in the pharmacokinetic profile. The pharmacokinetic properties for RES120, an antibody identical to margetuximab except for the presence of a wild type human IgG1 Fc domain, were similar to those for margetuximab. In the multi-dose toxicology study, margetuximab was administered weekly for 6 weeks at doses of 15, 50 or 150 mg/kg. Toxicokinetic measurements showed an increase in exposure to margetuximab with increasing dose. Cmax appeared to increase linearly with dose following the first dose on Day 1; however, increases in Cmax were not dose proportional following the sixth dose on Day 36. Similar trends were observed with respect to AUC0-∞. Terminal serum half-life ranged from 133 to 189 hours on Day 1 and 176 to 222 hours on Day 36. Serum clearance ranged from 0.55 to 1.09 mL/hr on Day 1 and 0.20 to 0.36 mL/hr on Day 36. The volume of distribution approximated to the blood volume. No substantial gender differences were observed. The more rapid clearance following the first dose on Day 1 as compared to Day 36 was probably due to binding to the target receptor and saturation of this binding following multiple doses. Taken together, these data indicate that the pharmacokinetic profile of margetuximab in monkeys is comparable to that of other anti-HER2 IgG1 monoclonal antibodies

Nonclinical Toxicology

Margetuximab has been investigated in single and repeat dose toxicity studies in the cynomolgus monkey and in a battery of in vitro tissue cross-reactivity studies in human and cynomolgus monkey tissues. Cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) express both the target antigen and FcγRs that are relevant for modeling margetuximab. A direct comparison of margetuximab and trastuzumab revealed similar staining patterns in human and cynomolgus monkey tissues. A second (rodent) species was not used in repeat dose toxicity studies because margetuximab, which retains the HER2-binding properties of 4D5, the original precursor to the trastuzumab antibody, does not cross react with rodent HER2/neu.

In a pilot toxicology study in cynomolgus monkeys margetuximab or RES120 was well tolerated when administered by IV infusion at a single dose of 50 mg/kg. There were no test article-related mortalities and no test article-related changes with regard to clinical signs, food consumption, body weights, haematology, coagulation, or urinalysis parameters. There were also no macroscopic, organ weight or microscopic findings related to the administration of RES120 or margetuximab. Mild increases in alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and lactate dehydrogenase (LD), with both margetuximab and RES120, were consistent with a nonhepatic source and can be observed following 1-hour infusions and frequent blood sampling for toxicokinetic analysis. In the repeat dose study, margetuximab, administered weekly via 1-hour intravenous infusion for six weeks at 15, 50 and 150 mg/kg, was well tolerated in male and female cynomolgus monkeys. There were no margetuximab-related mortalities or clinical signs and no test article-related changes in food consumption, body weights, ECG, troponin I or ophthalmic examinations, physical examinations, blood pressure or heart rate, haematology, coagulation, or urinalysis parameters. No margetuximab-related changes were observed in natural killer (NK) cell cytolytic activity during the dosing or recovery intervals. There were no gross findings observed at necropsy, no organ weight or organ weight ratio alterations, and no microscopic findings attributed to the administration of margetuximab (including no findings in heart tissue).

81


 

Clinical Background

HER2-expressing tumors represent ~25% of breast cancer and ~ 20% of gastric cancer. The HER2 positive rate may be lower for gastric cancer in China. HER2-targeting agents have had significant impact on the behavior of HER2+ breast and gastric cancers. In the metastatic setting, trastuzumab in combination with pertuzumab and chemotherapy has become the standard of care (SOC) in the first line treatment of HER2-postive breast cancer, while trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapy is the SOC in the first line treatment of HER2+ gastric cancer. Trastuzumab has been demonstrated to improve PFS of patients with gastric and GEJ tumors that overexpress HER-2 from 5.5 months to 6.7 months and OS from 11.1 months to 13.8 months when added to chemotherapy compared to chemotherapy alone. The addition of a targeted mAb to chemotherapy has also demonstrated improved PFS and OS in the second line setting. Ramucirumab (a mAb targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway) improved median OS to 9.6 months when added to paclitaxel chemotherapy compared to 7.4 months with paclitaxel chemotherapy alone.

HER2 is a protein found on the surface of some cancer cells that promotes growth and is associated with aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Approximately 15-20% of breast cancer cases are HER2-positive, representing approximately 45,000 new cases annually in the U.S. according to the American Cancer Society Breast Cancer Facts & Figures 2019-2020. Monoclonal antibody-based therapies targeting HER2 have greatly improved outcomes of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer and are now standard of care in both early- and late-stage disease. Ongoing HER2 blockade is recommended for patients who have relapsed or refractory HER2-positive disease; after progression occurs during treatment with other HER2-directed therapies, the need for additional agents in later lines remains.

In December 2019, MacroGenics submitted a Biologics License Application (BLA) to the FDA for margetuximab for the treatment of patients with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer in combination with chemotherapy. The BLA submission was based primarily on data from SOPHIA, the Phase III clinical trial comparing margetuximab plus chemotherapy versus trastuzumab plus chemotherapy in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer who have previously been treated with anti-HER2-targeted therapies. In February 2020, the BLA was accepted for review by the FDA.

The SOPHIA study enrolled 536 patients at approximately 200 trial sites across North America, Europe and Asia. Patients were treated with either margetuximab or trastuzumab in combination with one of four chemotherapy agents (capecitabine, eribulin, gemcitabine or vinorelbine). All study patients had previously received trastuzumab and pertuzumab, and approximately 90% had previously received ado-trastuzumab emtansine. Primary endpoints are sequentially-assessed progression-free survival (PFS), determined by centrally-blinded radiological review, and overall survival (OS). A pre-specified exploratory objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of CD16A (Fcγ receptor) allelic variation on margetuximab activity; approximately 85% of the overall human population, as well as patients enrolled in the SOPHIA study, carry the CD16A 158F allele, which has been previously associated with diminished clinical response to trastuzumab and other antibodies.

In June 2019, at a medical conference, the data from SOPHIA as of the aforementioned October 2018 data cut-off that showed a statistically significant improvement in PFS in patients treated with margetuximab plus chemotherapy compared to trastuzumab plus chemotherapy in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population after 265 PFS events (median PFS=5.8 months versus 4.9 months; hazard ratio [HR]=0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.59-0.98; P=0.033). In the pre-specified, exploratory subpopulation of patients carrying the CD16A 158F allele, PFS was prolonged by 1.8 months in the margetuximab arm compared to the trastuzumab arm (median PFS=6.9 months versus 5.1 months; HR=0.68; 95% CI: 0.52-0.90; P=0.005). The data from the planned first interim analysis of OS based on 158 OS events. This interim analysis was not expected to and did not reach statistical significance. In the ITT population, median OS was 18.9 months in the margetuximab arm versus 17.2 months in the trastuzumab arm (HR=0.95; 95% CI: 0.69-1.31). In the pre-specified, exploratory subpopulation of patients carrying the CD16A 158F allele, median OS was 23.6 months in the margetuximab arm versus 16.9 months in the trastuzumab arm (HR=0.82; 95% CI: 0.58-1.17). As a secondary outcome measure in the SOPHIA study, the objective response rate (ORR) in the ITT population was 22% in the margetuximab arm (95% CI: 17.3-27.7%) compared to 16% in the trastuzumab arm (95% CI: 11.8-21.0%).

At a medical conference in December 2019, the data from the planned second interim analysis of OS as of a September 2019 cut-off after 270 OS events showed that, OS favored margetuximab plus chemotherapy compared with trastuzumab plus chemotherapy in the ITT population; however, these data were not expected to and did not reach statistical significance (median OS=21.6 months versus 19.8 months; HR=0.89; 95% CI: 0.69-1.13; nominal P=0.326). The final pre-specified OS analysis is planned after 385 OS events have accrued, which is projected to occur in the second half of 2020, at which point the results may or may not reach statistical significance. Among the genetically

82


 

defined exploratory subpopulation of patients carrying a CD16A 158F allele, the median OS at the second interim analysis was prolonged by 4.3 months in the margetuximab arm compared to the trastuzumab arm (23.7 months versus 19.4 months; HR=0.79; 95% CI: 0.61-1.04; nominal P=0.087). Among the approximately 15% of patients who were homozygous for the CD16A 158V allele, the trastuzumab arm performed better than the margetuximab arm.

As of the April 2019 data cut-off for safety, Grade 3 or greater adverse events occurred in 142 (54%) patients on the margetuximab arm compared to 140 (53%) patients on the trastuzumab arm. Serious adverse events occurred in 43 (16%) patients on the margetuximab arm compared to 49 (18%) patients on the trastuzumab arm. Infusion-related reactions (IRR) were more common with margetuximab treatment than with trastuzumab (13% versus 3%) and were mostly Grade 1 or 2 and associated with the first dose. A substudy evaluating shorter, 30-minute infusions of margetuximab in Cycle 2 and beyond showed no effect on safety outcomes, including risk or severity of IRR.

Gastric Cancer

Cancer of the stomach, also called gastric cancer (GC), and cancer of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ), which is where the esophagus joins the stomach, are collectively referred to as gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma, which is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide according to the World Health Organization in 2018. Both GC and GEJ cancer are often diagnosed at an advanced stage and therefore have very poor prognosis, with a 5-year survival of 5-20%. Chemotherapy is the standard of care for first-line therapy and may be combined with trastuzumab for the approximately 20% of patients whose tumors are HER2-positive.

In September 2019, two ongoing Phase II, open-label, dose escalation and expansion study of margetuximab plus pembrolizumab, an anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody, in patients with advanced HER2-positive GC or GEJ cancer who have previously been treated with chemotherapy and trastuzumab in the metastatic setting were presented. In this study, 92 patients, including 61 patients with GC and 31 patients with GEJ, who had HER2-positive disease, were treated at the recommended Phase II dose of 15 mg/kg margetuximab and 200 mg pembrolizumab, both administered every three weeks, and were included in the analysis. HER2 positivity was characterized by a score of 3+ by immunohistochemistry (IHC), or IHC3-positve, or a score of 2+ by IHC and detection by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), or IHC2-positive/FISH-positive. Patients in the study were enrolled irrespective of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression status. We reported data as of July 10, 2019. As of this data cut-off date, the study was ongoing with eight patients remaining on therapy. Acceptable tolerability was observed in this study in patients treated with margetuximab and pembrolizumab. Grade 3 or higher treatment-related adverse events (TRAE) occurred in 19.6% of patients. Response rates, median PFS and OS observed in the ongoing study are summarized in the following table:

 

 

Gastroesophageal Adenocarcinoma

(GEA = GC + GEJ)

 

Gastric Cancer

(GC)

 

 

ORR

DCR

Median

PFS

(months)

 

Median

OS

(months)

 

ORR

DCR

Median

PFS

(months)

 

Median

OS

(months)

 

All Patients

20*/92

(21.7%)

50/92

(54.4%)

 

2.7

 

 

12.5

 

18*/61

(29.5%)

40/61

(65.6%)

 

4.1

 

 

13.9

 

HER2 IHC3+

20*/71

(28.2%)

45/71

(63.4%)

 

4.3

 

 

13.9

 

18*/55

(32.7%)

38/55

(69.1%)

 

4.7

 

 

14.6

 

HER2 IHC3+/PD-L1+

12/25

(48.0%)

19/25

(76.0%)

 

4.8

 

 

20.5

 

12/23

(52.2%)

19/23

(82.6%)

 

5.5

 

 

20.5

 

 

*

Three unconfirmed responses; ORR includes complete responses (CR) and partial responses (PR); DCR=disease control rate and includes CR, PR and stable disease (SD).

Based on these results, in September 2019, MacroGenics initiated the MAHOGANY study, a Phase II/III registration-directed clinical trial to evaluate, in Module A, margetuximab in combination with MGA012, an anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody, in patients with tumors that are both HER2-positive and PD-L1 positive. This approach is designed as a chemotherapy-free regimen that engages both innate and adaptive immunity for the treatment of patients with GC or GEJ cancer in the first-line setting. The primary outcome measure for efficacy in Module A is ORR per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) v 1.1.  In Module B, is to evaluate margetuximab with chemotherapy and MGA012 or MGD-013, a PD-1 x LAG-3 bispecific DART molecule, compared to standard of care therapy of trastuzumab with chemotherapy in MAHOGANY study. In this portion of the randomized, controlled study, patients are planned to be enrolled irrespective of PD-L1 expression. The primary outcome measure for efficacy in Module B is planned to be OS.]

83


 

INCMGA0012 (PD-1)

INCMGA0012 (PD-1) is an investigational monoclonal antibody that inhibits PD-1. INCMGA0012 (PD-1) is currently being evaluated as monotherapy in registration-directed trials for patients with MSI-high endometrial cancer, Merkel cell carcinoma and anal cancer.

We obtained an exclusive license to develop and commercialize INCMGA0012 (PD-1) in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan in 2019.

Clinical Background

PD-1 is expressed on T cells (CD4+ and CD8+), B cells, NK cells, and myeloid-derived cells.  The interaction of PD-1 with its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, forms a negative signaling axis in T cells to suppress T cell function which is the mechanism utilized by the immune system to help maintain self-tolerance and modulate the duration and amplitude of physiological immune responses.  

PD-L1 and PD-L2 have also been found to be abnormally expressed by tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment. Extensive research has shown that cancer cells co-opt certain immune checkpoint pathways, including the PD-1 pathway, as a major mechanism of immune evasion/ resistance, particularly against T cells that are specific for tumor antigens.  Disruptors of this pathway using antibodies that inhibit PD-1 receptor-ligand interactions have been shown to inhibit tumor growth in murine models through enhancing T cell proliferation and restore immune responses. Moreover, blocking the PD-1–PD-L1/L2 pathway has been clinically validated as an effective cancer treatment in multiple clinical settings.

INCMGA00012 is an antibody that binds PD-1 and is currently under development as a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of multiple solid tumors, both as a monotherapy and in combination with other agents.

Clinical Pharmacology

Preliminary PK data from the 167 participants in the dose expansion cohorts receiving weight-based or flat doses of INCMGA00012 suggested that first dose INCMGA00012 exposure increased in a dose-proportional manner, consistent with the observations in participants receiving weight-based doses. A population PK analysis demonstrated that the concentrations of INCMGA00012 can be adequately described by a 2-compartment model, and body weight dependence of clearance was characterized by a power relationship with an exponent of 0.911.

Simulations demonstrated that the median steady-state concentration of INCMGA00012 500 mg Q4W was approximately 21.1 μg/mL, which is the median trough concentration for pembrolizumab 200 mg Q3W.

Clinical Safety

Adverse events in participants treated with INCMGA00012 monotherapy included fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, and pyrexia (very common), ALT increased, colitis, dysgeusia, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, influenza-like illness, infusion-related reaction, lipase increased, myalgia, pruritus, and rash (includes terms of rash, maculopapular rash, and macular rash) (common), and pneumonitis (uncommon). These AEs are similar to those observed with other anti‒PD-1 antibodies.

The 375 mg Q3W and 500 mg Q4W doses were selected for further development based on favorable safety and PK profiles.

Clinical Efficacy

Preliminary efficacy data demonstrate clinical activity of INCMGA00012 based on durable RECIST responses in multiple tumor types. Preliminary efficacy in terms of RECIST response has been shown in previously treated NSCLC, cervical, and endometrial cancers. Based on the available data, the preliminary efficacy profile of INCMGA00012 is consistent with that of other anti-PD-1 antibodies.

INCMGA00012 is currently in development as a single agent or in combinations in multiple tumor types including endometrial cancer, anal cancer, NSCLC, and others.

84


 

MGD-013

Overview

MGD-013 is designed to block the interaction of PD-1 or LAG-3 with their respective ligands, thereby contributing to sustain or restore the function of exhausted T cells. MGD-013 is an Fc-bearing bispecific tetravalent (bivalent for each antigen) DART protein engineered as a hinge stabilized IgG4 molecule designed to concomitantly bind PD-1 and LAG-3, 2 checkpoint molecules expressed by T lymphocytes following antigen-induced activation. MGD-013 is under development as a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of cancer.

In November 2018, under the terms of the collaboration agreement, MacroGenics exclusively licensed to Zai Lab regional development and commercialization rights to MGD-013 in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. In February 2020, the first patient was dosed in a Phase Ib dose escalation and expansion clinical study of MGD-013 in combination with niraparib, a PARP (poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase) inhibitor, for the treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic GC or GEJ cancer who failed prior treatment.

Our Clinical Trial Designs and Strategy for MGD-013 in the China Market

Our global partner, Macrogenics, is conducting a Phase I, open-label, dose escalation and cohort expansion study designed to characterize the safety, tolerability, PK, pharmacodynamics, immunogenicity, and preliminary antitumor activity of MGD-013 administered by IV infusion on a Q2W or Q3W schedule. The study consists of a Dose Escalation Phase to determine the MTD or MAD (if no MTD is defined) of MGD-013, followed by a Cohort Expansion Phase to further define the safety and initial antitumor activity of MGD-013 with the dose established in the Dose Escalation Phase. To date, the RP2D of MGD-013 on a Q2W or Q3W had been selected and the Cohort Expansion is ongoing in multiple tumor types.

In addition, Zai Lab plans to participate in the upcoming global MAHOGANY study of margetuximab in combination with INCMGA013 or MGD-013 in gastric cancer sponsored by MacroGenics in HER2+ first line treatment of gastric cancer and to initiate MAHOGANY Cohort B in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan in the second half of 2020.

MGD-013 Mechanism of Action

PD-1 and LAG-3 protein play an important role in immune response regulation. PD-1 is expressed on T (CD4+ and CD8+) cells, B cells, natural killer cells, and myeloid-derived cells. LAG-3 is a membrane protein that belongs to the Ig superfamily and binds to MHC-II. It enhances T regulatory cell activity and negatively regulates T cell proliferation and differentiation. LAG-3 has been shown to be expressed on dysfunctional T cells and is a marker for T regulatory cells. Upon interaction with their respective ligands, PD-1 and LAG-3 act as negative regulators of T cell function. The combined PD-1 and LAG-3 expression on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) or chronically viral-infected T cells have been correlated with immune dysfunction, also known as “T cell exhaustion”. LAG-3 appears to negatively regulate CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation, function, and homeostasis in a manner that is distinct from that of PD-1.

85


 

Cancer cells can co-opt certain immune-checkpoint pathways, including the PD-1 pathway, as a major mechanism of immune evasion/resistance, particularly against T cells that are specific for tumor antigens (seen in the Figure below). Blockade of PD-1 provides clinical benefit in patients with certain advanced tumors. Furthermore, combined blockade of 2 inhibitory receptors on T cells may exert greater efficacy than monotherapy. Studies in mouse tumor models have indicated that PD-1 and LAG-3 blockade can synergize to generate potent tumor eradicating immunity. Furthermore, translational studies using TILs from patients with ovarian cancer showed that NY-ESO-1 antigen-specific LAG-3+/PD-1+ CD8+ T cells were impaired in their ability to respond to antigen stimulation, but following combined LAG-3 and PD-1 blockade, T cell responsiveness could be restored to a greater extent than a single-agent blockade. Together, these data suggest that, in tumors in which PD-1 and/or LAG-3 are expressed on TILs, dual therapy may increase response rates and/or effectiveness of immunotherapy. Currently, several anti–LAG-3 mAbs are under investigation in clinical trials, either as a monotherapy or in combination with anti–PD-1.

 

 

Sadhna Shankar, et al. Abstract No. P244, SITC 2017

MGD-013 Pre-clinical Background

In vitro studies were performed to evaluate the ability of MGD-013 to co-engage PD-1 and LAG-3 receptors within an enzyme dimerization assay. Briefly, serial equal molar dilutions of MGD-013, nivolumab replica, and/or relatlimab replica (negative control antibodies) were incubated with the DiscoverX PathHunter® U2OS PD1/LAG-3 dimerization cell line. PathHunter cells are genetically engineered to over-express the two proteins, whereby one protein is fused to Prolink and the second protein is fused to the enzyme acceptor (EA) of the β-galactosidase enzyme. As shown in the figure below, co-engagement of two proteins by MGD-013, but not anti-PD-1 and/or anti-LAG-3 mAbs, drives complementation between PK and EA, resulting in the reconstitution of an active β-galactosidase enzyme that cleaves a substrate to generate chemiluminescent signal.

 

 

Sadhna Shankar, et al. Abstract No. P244, SITC 2017

86


 

Clinical background

MGD-013 is currently in Phase I development in a basket trial of multiple tumour types.  The specific indication for MGD-013 has not been defined and data from the basket trial may inform on the selection of specific indications for further development.

Bemarituzumab (FPA144)

Overview

Gastric cancer, including gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer, carries a poor prognosis, with five year OS rates below 30% for advanced stage disease (Stage III and IV) in the United States and China. China has one of the highest incidence rates of gastric cancer in the world, with approximately 680,000 new cases annually.

Bemarituzumab, which we licensed from Five Prime, is a humanized monoclonal antibody (IgG1 isotype) specific to the human FGFR2b receptor in clinical development as a targeted immuno-therapy for tumors that overexpress FGFR2b, including gastric and gastroesophageal cancer. In December 2017, Five Prime initiated dosing in a Phase I safety lead-in portion of its Phase I/III clinical trial of bemarituzumab in combination with the mFOLFOX6 chemotherapy regimen in patients with previously untreated, advanced gastric or gastroesophageal cancer. The randomized, controlled Phase III portion of the trial evaluating bemarituzumab plus chemotherapy, the FIGHT trial, was initiated in the second half of 2018 and Zai Lab enrolled the 1st patient in October 2018 in this global registrational study for the treatment of front-line gastric and gastroesophageal cancers. We and Five Prime intend to use the proposed global pivotal Phase III study and additional supportive data from clinical and nonclinical development to form the basis of an eventual marketing application for bemarituzumab both within and outside of China.

Five Prime has paused enrollment in the FIGHT trial pending the occurrence of a sufficient number of events to trigger a futility analysis that is expected to occur in mid-2020. Approximately 150 patients with newly diagnosed advanced stage gastric cancer were enrolled into the FIGHT trial before Five Prime paused enrollment in the fourth quarter of 2019. Five Prime expects that it will only resume enrollment in the FIGHT trial if the trial passes the futility analysis and Five Prime will look to enter into a collaboration or license agreement that will pay for all or substantially all of any future development and commercialization costs for bemarituzumab.

In March 2020, Five Prime announced the publication of results from the Phase I escalation and expansion study of bemarituzumab in patients with advanced solid tumors and FGFR2b-selected gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma in the digital edition of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The purpose of the Phase I trial was to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary activity of single-agent bemarituzumab in patients with FGFR2b-overexpressing GEA. Seventy-nine patients were enrolled in the trial and no dose-limiting toxicities were reported. Bemarituzumab was well tolerated and the most frequent treatment-related adverse events (TRAEs) were fatigue, nausea, and dry eye. The overall response rate observed in this study of advanced-stage patients with high FGFR2b-overexpressing GEA was 17.9% (95% CI 6.1% to 36.9%) with five of 28 patients achieving a confirmed partial response.

Our Clinical Trial Designs and Strategy for Bemarituzumab (FPA144) in the China Market

As bemarituzumab is a targeted biologic, the clinical development of bemarituzumab will ultimately be in selected patients with alterations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, or FGFR2, pathway that are most likely to respond to this novel agent. The tumor types most relevant to date include gastric, bladder, and possibly cholangiocarcinoma. Each of these cancers needs new therapeutic options. The FIGHT (bemarituzumab-004) study is designed to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and PK of bemarituzumab in combination with modified FOLFOX (infusional 5-FU, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin) (mFOLFOX6) chemotherapy treatment. Patients with gastrointestinal (GI) tumors will be enrolled in a Phase I safety run in, while the Phase III will enroll gastric cancer patients specifically selected for FGFR2 expression and/or FGFR2 gene amplification (FGFR2 selected) who are eligible for first-line mFOLFOX6 chemotherapy. The primary endpoint for Phase I part is the incidence of Grade 2 or higher AEs assessed as related to bemarituzumab by the Investigator and the incidence of clinical laboratory abnormalities defined as DLTs. The primary endpoint for the Phase III part is the OS, defined as time from enrollment until death from any cause.

China is participating in the Phase III part of above global trial and contributing largely on patient enrollment. In 2019, Five Prime suspended trial enrollment in order to conduct a futility analysis prior to continuing patient enrollment.  Patients enrolled into the trial are currently undergoing treatment and follow-up.

87


 

Bemarituzumab Mechanism of Action

Bemarituzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody (IgG1 isotype) specific to the human FGFR2b receptor (National Center for Biotechnology Information; NCBI; reference sequence ID NP_001138385.1) that blocks FGF ligand binding to the receptor. Bemarituzumab is directed against the third Ig region of the FGFR2b receptor isoform, the region that is alternatively spliced and regulates ligand specificity. This antibody is glycosylated, but is produced in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line that lacks the FUT8 gene (α1,6‑Fucosyltransferase) and therefore lacks a core fucose in the polysaccharide portion of the antibody. The absence of the core fucose results in higher affinity for the Fc receptor FcγRIIIa compared to the fucosylated molecule and potentially enhances immune cell-mediated tumor cell killing. The antibody has thus been glycoengineered for enhanced antibody‑dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Bemarituzumab inhibits FGF ligand-stimulated FGFR2b phosphorylation and cell proliferation in cell culture in FGFR2b overexpressing gastric and breast cancer cell lines. Bemarituzumab also inhibits tumor growth in FGFR2b overexpressing gastric and breast xenograft models. The 3 potential mechanisms of action of bemarituzumab thus include blocking ligand binding and downstream signaling, decreasing expression of the FGFR2b driver protein, and enhancing ADCC.

Bemarituzumab can produce complete and durable tumor growth inhibition in FGFR2b-overexpressing and FGFR2 gene-amplified gastric cancer xenografts in immune-compromised mice where FGFR2b is considered a driver of tumor growth. In addition, bemarituzumab demonstrates recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and concomitant tumor growth inhibition in the 4T1 syngeneic tumor model with modest expression of FGFR2b. These data suggest that ADCC may be efficacious in patients without FGFR2 gene amplification with moderate FGFR2b overexpression, and that ADCC activity may be a major contributor to the mechanism of action in these patients.

Additionally, since bemarituzumab is specific for the FGFR2b receptor, it does not interfere with signaling of the other FGFs/ FGFRs, including FGFR2c. In contrast to the FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), bemarituzumab does not inhibit FGF23 signaling. FGF23 is a ligand involved in calcium/phosphate metabolism. Thus, treatment with bemarituzumab is not expected to cause the dose‑limiting hyperphosphatemia associated with the FGFR TKIs.

Bemarituzumab Pre-clinical and Clinical Background

Nonclinical Pharmacology

The nonclinical pharmacology program for bemarituzumab has been designed to assess the in vitro and in vivo pharmacologic action of bemarituzumab with particular focus on efficacy and safety. In vitro pharmacodynamic (PD) studies have been performed to characterize the binding affinity of bemarituzumab to FGFR2b in vitro, as well as to assess the ability of bemarituzumab to inhibit FGFR2b ligand binding, downstream signaling, and cell proliferation. In addition, the ability of bemarituzumab to induce ADCC has been determined in vitro. The in vivo pharmacology of bemarituzumab has been studied in animal models of tumor growth. Safety pharmacology studies including CNS, cardiovascular, and respiratory rate assessments have been incorporated into the toxicology studies. Bemarituzumab inhibits FGF ligand-stimulated FGFR2b phosphorylation and cell proliferation of FGFR2b‑overexpressing gastric and breast cancer cell lines. Bemarituzumab also inhibits tumor growth in FGFR2b‑overexpressing gastric and breast xenograft models, including regression in some models. In addition, Five Prime has demonstrated in vitro that bemarituzumab mediates ADCC in cells expressing FGFR2b.

Nonclinical Pharmacokinetics

The PK characteristics of bemarituzumab were investigated as a part of both nonclinical TK and PK studies in rat and cynomolgus monkey. Single-dose and repeat-dose studies evaluated bemarituzumab doses of 1–150 mg/kg. In those studies, bemarituzumab was administered intravenously, either as a bolus injection or a 30-minute infusion, and given weekly in the repeat-dose studies. Determination of serum concentrations of bemarituzumab and anti-bemarituzumab antibodies were performed using immunoassay methods developed by Five Prime and validated for use in GLP toxicology studies in rat and monkey.

Between rat and cynomolgus monkey, bemarituzumab demonstrated consistent PK behavior following IV administration, and the PK characteristics observed were consistent across all studies. Half‑life was dose-dependent ranging from approximately 20‑40 hours at low doses (1‑1.5mg/kg) to 100‑200+ hours at the highest doses (100‑150 mg/kg) tested in cynomolgus monkey. Estimates of the initial volume of distribution approximated the plasma volume, suggesting that bemarituzumab did not distribute beyond the plasma compartment immediately after dosing, which is typical of large proteins including antibodies.

88


 

The majority of antibodies demonstrate dose-dependent elimination consistent with target-mediated elimination, where clearance decreases as a function of dose (eg, trastuzumab, rituximab, gemtuzumab, and panitumumab). Bemarituzumab demonstrated dose-dependent, nonlinear PK, similar to what has been observed for other mAbs. This was marked by a faster clearance at the terminal phase of the plasma concentration-time profile, a greater than dose-proportional increase in exposure with increasing dose, and a longer half-life with increasing dose. Target-mediated clearance was saturable at doses ≥ 10 mg/kg for single doses and doses ≥ 5 mg/kg following repeat doses, marked by dose-proportional increases in exposure at doses exceeding this level when dosed at weekly intervals. Since bemarituzumab binds equivalently to rat, monkey, and human FGFR2b, the nonclinical data provide a solid foundation to understanding the profile in clinical studies with bemarituzumab.

The PK studies supporting the TK studies showed dose-dependent increases in exposure supporting the reliability of these studies to assess toxicity. Anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) were confirmed in 6.0% of rats and 10.4% of monkeys after 13 weeks of dosing in the two 13‑week GLP toxicology studies. Thus, the low incidence of ADAs did not impede the validity of the toxicological evaluation and is not predictive of what will occur in humans.

Nonclinical Toxicology

Six nonclinical in vivo toxicology studies were performed using bemarituzumab: two studies in rat and four studies in monkey. In rat, a dose-range finding, repeat-dose toxicology study (four weekly doses of 1.5, 30, or 150 mg/kg and a repeat-dose GLP toxicity study of 13 weekly doses of 1, 5, or 100 mg/kg with a nine‑week recovery phase) were performed. In monkey, a single-dose PK/tolerability study (single dose of 10 mg/kg), a dose-range finding, repeat-dose toxicology study (four weekly doses of 1.5, 30, or 150 mg/kg), an ophthalmic–focused, repeat-dose tolerability study (four weekly doses of 1.5, 5, 15, 30, or 150 mg/kg), and a repeat-dose GLP toxicology study (13 weekly doses of 1, 5, or 100 mg/kg with a 15-week recovery phase) were performed.

Bemarituzumab was well-tolerated when administered intravenously once per week for 4 weeks at doses up to 150 mg/kg in rats. Corneal epithelium thinning was seen in animals receiving bemarituzumab at 1.5 mg/kg and higher, and these findings were considered treatment-related. The additional corneal changes were also considered treatment-related, but it is unclear whether they are a direct effect or secondary to the corneal thinning. For the hypertrophic changes in the RPE, it is unclear if the changes are a direct treatment-related effect since changes to the RPE can be caused by a multitude of factors. No pathological findings were detected in the RPE in the 13‑week GLP rat toxicity study.

Bemarituzumab was well tolerated when administered by IV once per week for 4 doses up to 150 mg/kg in cynomolgus monkeys. Findings potentially related to bemarituzumab were corneal epithelium thinning and a unilateral cataract in one high-dose animal.

Bemarituzumab administered to rats once per week for 13 weeks at 1, 5, or 100 mg/kg resulted in treatment-related findings at all dose levels, although most of the effects occurred or were more pronounced in animals given 5 and 100 mg/kg. The most prominent findings were tooth abnormalities (clinical, macroscopic, and microscopic findings) and body weight loss/lack of weight most likely secondary to the tooth findings that necessitated early euthanasia of three animals at 100 mg/kg, ocular findings (ophthalmic and microscopic findings), macroscopic and/or microscopic findings in the Harderian gland and oral mucosa at 5 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg, and macroscopic and/or microscopic findings in the tongue at all dose levels. Bemarituzumab-related but non-adverse microscopic findings were also noted in the mammary gland of animals in all dose groups. With the exception of bemarituzumab‑related effects on incisors, some degree of recovery was evident for all findings at the end of the recovery phase. Since all findings in the 1 mg/kg dose group were minimal, without clinical consequences, and recoverable, the HNSTD was determined to be 1 mg/kg when given weekly for 13 weeks.

Bemarituzumab given to male and female cynomolgus monkeys by IV infusion once per week for 13 weeks at 1, 5, or 100 mg/kg was well tolerated. Bemarituzumab-related effects were limited to microscopic findings of corneal atrophy in animals given 5 and 100 mg/kg and mammary gland atrophy in females from all dose groups. These findings were not associated with clinical sequelae and were not observed at the end of the recovery phase, indicating complete recovery. Therefore, based on the lack of other correlating findings or changes (eg, ophthalmic findings or clinical observations) and the demonstrated reversal, neither bemarituzumab-related microscopic finding was considered adverse. The HNSTD is considered to be above the 100 mg/kg level when given weekly for 13 weeks.

The data from the tissue cross-reactivity study demonstrated that the expression of the target of bemarituzumab is similar between the species used for toxicology studies and humans, and suggest that the safety findings from the nonclinical toxicology studies are likely to apply to the clinic.

89


 

Examinations of the reproductive organs in the toxicological studies demonstrated no evidence of reproductive target toxicity. No specific reproductive toxicity tests have been conducted for bemarituzumab to date.

Bemarituzumab is an IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against FGFR2b and is being developed for the treatment of malignancies that overexpress FGFR2b. The toxicology and TK studies with bemarituzumab were completed in rat and cynomolgus monkey to support the design of the clinical trial.

Clinical Background

Gastric cancer, including gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer, carries a poor prognosis, with five year OS rates below 30% for advanced stage disease (Stage III and IV) in the United States and China. Intensive multimodal therapy fails to cure the majority of patients with locoregional disease and for advanced stage disease, standard chemotherapy provides only short-term benefits. First-line chemotherapy used in metastatic or recurrent disease consists of a fluoropyrimidine (5FU, capecitabine, or S-1) with a platinum agent (usually oxaliplatin or cisplatin). This combination chemotherapy treatment prolongs survival by 6 months compared to best supportive care but still only provides short-term benefit, with a progression free survival (PFS) of five to six months and a median OS of nine to 10 months.

Attempts to improve upon standard platinum and fluoropyrimidine combinations include the addition of the targeted monoclonal antibody (mAb) trastuzumab in patients whose tumors overexpress human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2). Trastuzumab has been demonstrated to improve PFS of the approximately 20% of patients with gastric and GEJ tumors that overexpress HER-2 from 5.5 months to 6.7 months and OS from 11.1 months to 13.8 months when added to chemotherapy compared to chemotherapy alone. The addition of a targeted mAb to chemotherapy has also demonstrated improved PFS and OS in the second line setting. Ramucirumab (a mAb targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway) improved median OS to 9.6 months when added to paclitaxel chemotherapy compared to 7.4 months with paclitaxel chemotherapy alone.

FGFR2 amplification in gastric cancer results in high levels of FGFR2b expression, which is correlated with poor prognosis for OS with a hazard ratio (HR) reported as high as 4.59 when compared to patients without FGFR2b overexpression. FGFR2 is amplified in approximately 3% to 9% of tumors from patients with gastric cancer, with similar rates being observed across Japan, Korea, China, and the United Kingdom, and across platforms used to assess gene amplification (including reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction; RT‑PCR; fluorescence in situ hybridization; FISH; and single nucleotide polymorphism; SNP; arrays). Using a validated immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay to specifically detect FGFR2b expression in solid tumors, approximately 12% of gastric cancers from China express a range of FGFR2b protein. To date, no drug has been approved for the FGFR2b-overexpressing molecular subset of patients with gastric cancer including cancer of the GEJ.

Bemarituzumab is a recombinant, afucosylated, humanized immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) kappa monoclonal antibody directed against FGFR2b. bemarituzumab is glycoengineered for enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Pre-clinically, bemarituzumab blocks ligand binding and acts as a targeted immunotherapy that drives NK cells and recruits T cells into targeted tumors. As well as driving NK cells into tumors, in vivo pre-clinical studies have shown that bemarituzumab creates an “inflamed” tumor microenvironment consisting of recruited T cells and elevated levels of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). The three potential mechanisms of action of bemarituzumab include blocking ligand binding and downstream signaling, decreasing expression of the FGFR2b driver protein, and ADCC.

Bemarituzumab is being developed in combination with chemotherapy for the treatment of patients with unresectable, locally advanced, or metastatic gastric cancer including cancer of the GEJ whose tumors overexpress FGFR2b, as determined by an investigational device(s) being developed as a companion diagnostic test(s). Evaluation of this agent in patients with gastric cancer whose tumors have alterations of FGFR2 is an important strategy to improve the outcome for these patients.

A Phase I study, bemarituzumab-001, entitled “A Phase I Open-Label, Dose-Finding Study Evaluating Safety and Pharmacokinetics of bemarituzumab in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors” is ongoing in the United States, South Korea, and Taiwan. Safety and efficacy data in 74 patients, including preliminary data from an expansion cohort of 24 gastric cancer patients with high FGFR2b overexpression (IHC 3+ intensity in ≥ 10% of tumor cells as determined in a laboratory developed test), support further clinical investigation of bemarituzumab in patients with FGFR2b-selected tumors. Based on an August 7, 2017 data cut, treatment with bemarituzumab resulted in no dose-limiting toxicities

90


 

(DLTs) reported at doses up to 15 mg/kg administered every two weeks. Of the 74 patients who have received at least one dose of bemarituzumab, 50 patients had gastric cancer, of whom 24 had gastric cancer with high FGFR2b overexpression and were evaluable for response. Of these 24 patients, four, or 16.7% (95% CI 4.7-37.4%), reported a radiographically confirmed partial response (PR) per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria (version 1.1). The median duration of response (DoR) in these four patients was 15.4 weeks (95% CI 9.1 to 19.1 weeks). Conversely, no responses were reported in the 25 patients with gastric cancer who either had low or moderate FGFR2b overexpression, were IHC negative, or who had unknown FGFR2b status. One patient with gastric cancer did not have measurable disease and was inevaluable for response.

To address the unmet medical need of patients with unresectable, locally advanced, or metastatic gastric cancers and based on the preliminary Phase I data, Five Prime is proposing bemarituzumab‑004 (FIGHT), a double-blind, randomized, controlled, global Phase III study of bemarituzumab in combination with modified FOLFOX6 (mFOLFOX6) chemotherapy, preceded by a Phase I safety run-in. The Phase I safety run-in will be conducted in the United States and will assess safety and tolerability and identify the recommended dose (RD) of bemarituzumab as an add-on therapy to fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (mFOLFOX6, a combination that is used globally) for patients with gastrointestinal (GI) tumors. The global Phase III portion of the study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of bemarituzumab in combination with mFOLFOX6 versus placebo in combination with mFOLFOX6 in patients with unresectable, locally advanced, or metastatic gastric cancers whose tumors have FGFR2b overexpression, as determined by an IHC assay, and/or FGFR2 amplification, as determined by a circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) assay. The proposed Phase III study will enroll a majority of Asian patients, from countries including Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and China. The proposed Phase III study will employ 2 diagnostic assays, the Ventana Medical Systems, Inc. FGFR2b IHC assay and the Personal Genome Diagnostics (PGDx) next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay for FGFR2 testing. The goal is to establish the clinical utility of the IHC and NGS assays for use as companion diagnostic tests. The primary endpoint for the proposed Phase III study will be OS, supported by a principle secondary endpoint of investigator-assessed PFS. Other secondary and exploratory endpoints include overall response rate (ORR), DoR, and physical function, as measured by EQ-5D-5L and EORTC QLQ-C30. Additional development of bemarituzumab for the treatment of gastric cancer includes bemarituzumab-002, a Phase I pharmacokinetic (PK) safety study in Japan. This dose escalation study is designed to assess the PK and safety of single agent bemarituzumab and will identify the RD for single agent bemarituzumab in Japanese patients. The first cohort of three patients treated on bemarituzumab-002 had no DLTs reported at doses of 10 mg/kg administered every two weeks.

Omadacycline (ZL-2401)

Omadacycline is a broad-spectrum antibiotic in a new class of tetracycline derivatives, known as aminomethylcyclines. Omadacycline is primarily being developed for ABSSSI, CABP and UTI in both the hospital and community settings and is designed to overcome the two major mechanisms of tetracycline resistance, known as pump efflux and ribosome protection. Omadacycline has been granted QIDP and Fast Track status by the FDA. The drug has been administered to over 1,500 patients and has an established safety and tolerability profile. In October 2018, following priority review, Omadacycline was approved by FDA for both indications and for both the IV and oral once-daily formulations.

In June 2016, Paratek announced positive top-line efficacy data in a Phase III registration study in ABSSSI which demonstrated the efficacy and safety of IV to oral once-daily omadacycline compared to linezolid. In April 2017, Paratek announced positive top-line results from a global, pivotal Phase III clinical study in CABP which demonstrated the efficacy, general safety and tolerability of IV to oral omadacycline compared to moxifloxacin. In July 2017, Paratek also announced positive top-line results from a Phase III study comparing oral-only administration of omadacycline in ABSSSI compared to oral-only linezolid, which met all of its primary endpoints.

Omadacycline was approved by the FDA in October 2018 for both indications. It was launched as NUZYRA in the United States in February 2019. It is labeled for once-daily oral or intravenous administration for the treatment of adults with CABP and ABSSSI. The European Marketing Authorization Application for oral and IV omadacycline was submitted in October 2018.

In October 2019, Paratek announced that it is withdrawing its application in Europe for Nuzyra for business reasons. While approvable by EMA for skin infections, EMA requested a second study in CABP to meet current European regulatory standards of two Phase III studies in the indication. Paratek plans to re-submit application to EMA following completion of the planned Post-Marketing Approval CABP study already agreed with the FDA.Paratek conducted two exploratory studies in UTI for dose-finding purposes, one in women with acute cystitis (cUTI) and another in patients with pyelonephritis (cUTI). As per a press release in October 2019, Paratek plans to conduct additional analyses and investigations for these UTI indications.

91


 

We obtained the exclusive license to develop, manufacture and commercialize omadacycline in the field of all human therapeutic and preventative uses (other than biodefense) in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan in April 2017. In March 2020, Zai Lab entered into a contract sales agreement with Hanhui, a local pharmaceutical company with a strong commercial presence in antibiotics. The agreement allows us to leverage Hanhui’s existing infrastructure to optimize a potential future commercial launch of omadacycline in China given that omadacycline is a broad spectrum antibiotic in both the hospital and community setting.

Our Clinical Trial Designs and Strategy for Omadacycline in the China Market

We have completed the technology transfer stage and discussed with key opinion leaders our planned China development activities in preparation for NMPA interactions. We have submitted documents and filed for an investigational new drug application, or IND, with Chinese health authorities in January 2018 and submitted our NDA in December 2019.

Zai has actively engaged key opinion leaders in discussions on our planned China development strategy, on study design in China, and the interpretation or data from the program.

We have also completed a bioequivalence study for the oral tablet which showed almost identical PK exposures of the new China-produced formulation comparison to the formulation used by Paratek in the clinical trial program.

We have completed a microbiology study investigating the activity of omadacycline against pathogens obtained from Chinese and other Asian patients. In this pilot trial of 3,832 isolates, omadacycline activity was essentially identical to the susceptibility results obtained in a larger 2016 surveillance study of 21,000 isolates conducted outside China (mainly in the United States and the European Union). These data have been published in an article titled “Antimicrobial Activity of Omadacycline Tested against Clinical Bacterial Isolates from Hospitals in mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan: Results from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (2013 to 2016)” in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 2019 63 (3): e02262-18. doi: 10.1128/AAC.02262-18].  We have also completed a microbiology study against 1,041 more recent patient isolates from China. This study further confirmed the undiminished activity of omadacycline against ABSSSI and CABP pathogens; publication of this data is pending.

We have also conducted a PK study in Chinese patients with both the IV and oral formulation. This study showed similar exposure to Caucasians with the selected dosing regimens for the IV formulation and somewhat higher but well tolerated exposures with the PO formulation.  PK/PD analysis suggest that omadacycline IV and PO at standard doses will provide excellent coverage against pathogens from Chinese sources.

We have enrolled 125 patients in a ABSSSI in our clinical efficacy study with linezolid as comparator.  Results showed equal clinical efficacy in both treatment arms.  Likewise, the safety/tolerability of omadacycline in Chinese patients was excellent. These studies were part of our bridging plan for regulatory approval in China as discussed with regulators.  They also were designed, conducted and analyzed in collaboration with Chinese KOLs in PK, microbiology and infectious disease.  

Background on Tetracycline Antibiotics

The tetracycline class of antibiotics was introduced into the clinic in the 1960s and found considerable use in the treatment of respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. They are mostly bacteriostatic drugs interfering with protein synthesis by binding selectively to the bacterial 30S ribosomal subunit.

Tetracyclines provide excellent broad-spectrum coverage of Gram-positive, Gram-negative, anaerobes and special pathogens (e.g., malaria, anthrax, Lyme borrelia, nocardia). Resistance is due to efflux mechanisms and ribosomal mutations, but despite the gradual and inevitable increase in resistance over many decades of continued use, doxycycline is still an effective and commonly used drug today.

Omadacycline – Pharmacokinetics

Studies showed that oral doses of 300 mg provide bioequivalent exposure with the therapeutic IV dose of 100 mg. Like with other tetracyclines, absorption is affected by food and divalent cations. The drug has a long half-life (approximately 17 hours) and excellent penetration into tissues, including alveolar and epithelial lining fluid. In contrast to other tetracyclines, plasma protein binding is low (20%) and not dose-related. The drug is not metabolized and excretion is predominantly via the biliary route. There is no need for dose adjustment in hepatic or renal impairment.

92


 

Omadacycline  Clinical Results

Phase III Pivotal Trial—ABSSSI / OASIS—ABSI 1108

Omadacycline was statistically non-inferior to linezolid IV/PO in a direct comparison study following a protocol established under an SPA agreed to with the FDA as well as the criteria outlined by the EMA. In this trial, patients with wound infections, major abscesses, and erysipelas/cellulitis were enrolled in equal numbers. On average, patients received IV omadacycline for 4.4 days, and oral omadacycline for 5.5 days.

S. aureus (both MSSA and MRSA) was the predominant pathogen isolated from patients followed by streptococci. Clinical response and bacterial eradication rates showed the high efficacy of omadacycline against skin pathogens including MRSA.

Figure 7: Omadacycline vs Linezolid—ABSSSI Trial—Primary Efficacy Outcomes

 

 

 

Figure 8: Early Clinical Success by Pathogen—micro-mITT Population

 

 

 

The safety / tolerability profile was very similar between the treatment arms with only a slightly higher rate of gastrointestinal side effects and infusion site reactions in omadacycline recipients. There was no significant imbalance in treatment emergent adverse events, or TEAEs, serious TEAEs, premature discontinuations or deaths.

93


 

This study was recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine (W O’Riordan et al. Omadacycline for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin-Structure Infections, N Engl J Med 2019; 380:528-538).

Figure 9: Study ABSI-1108: Most Frequent TEAEs (> 3%)—Safety Population

 

 

Omadacycline

 

Linezolid

 

 

N = 323

 

N = 322

 

 

%

 

%

 

Subjects with Any TEAE

48.3

 

45.7

 

Nausea

 

12.4

 

 

9.9

 

Infusion Site Extravasation

 

8.7

 

 

5.9

 

Subcutaneous Abscess

 

5.3

 

 

5.9

 

Vomiting

 

5.3

 

 

5.0

 

Cellulitis

 

4.6

 

 

4.7

 

Headache

 

3.1

 

 

4.0

 

ALT Increased

 

2.8

 

 

4.3

 

AST Increased

 

2.5

 

 

3.7

 

Diarrhea

 

2.2

 

 

3.1

 

 

Phase III Pivotal Trial—CABP / OPTIC—CABP1200

Omadacycline was non-inferior to moxifloxacin IV/oral in this direct comparison study following a protocol established under an SPA agreed with the FDA as well as the criteria outlined by the EMA. In this trial, patients with PORT Class II—IV were recruited; less than 25% of patients had received non-study antibiotics before enrollment.

Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae were the predominant pathogens isolated, followed by H. influenzae, H. parainfluenzae, Legionella and Chlamydophila. The clinical response rates were high for all respiratory pathogens isolated at entry and very similar between omadacycline and moxifloxacin, a powerful respiratory fluoroquinolone. 

Figure 10: CABP Study—OPTIC: Primary Efficacy Results—FDA Analysis

 

 

 

94


 

Figure 11: CABP Study—OPTIC: Primary Efficacy Results—EMA Analysis

 

 

 

Figure 12: CABP Study—OPTIC: Clinical Success at PTE by Baseline Pathogen

 

 

 

Omadacycline

(N = 204)

 

Moxifloxacin

(N = 182)

Baseline Pathogen

 

N

 

 

Clinical

Success

n(%)

 

N1

 

 

Clinical

Success

n(%)

Atypical Pathogens

 

 

118

 

 

109 (92.4)

 

 

106

 

 

97 (91.5)

Mycoplasma Pneumoniae

 

 

70

 

 

66 (94.3)

 

 

57

 

 

50 (87.7)

Chlamydophila Pneumoniae

 

 

28

 

 

25 (89.3)

 

 

28

 

 

25 (89.3)

Legionella Pneumophila

 

 

37

 

 

35 (94.6)

 

 

37

 

 

36 (97.3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gram-Negative Bacteria (aerobes)

 

 

79

 

 

67 (84.8)

 

 

68

 

 

55 (80.9)

Haemophilus Influenzae

 

 

32

 

 

26 (81.3)

 

 

16

 

 

16 (100.0)

Haemophilus Parainfluenzae

 

 

18

 

 

15 (83.3)

 

 

17

 

 

13 (76.5)

Klebsiella Pneumoniae

 

 

13

 

 

10 (76.9)

 

 

13

 

 

11 (84.6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gram-Positive Bacteria (aerobes)

 

 

61

 

 

52 (85.2)

 

 

56

 

 

49 (87.5)

Steptococcus Pneumoniae

 

 

43

 

 

37 (86.0)

 

 

34

 

 

31 (91.2)

PSSP

 

 

26

 

 

23 (88.5)

 

 

22

 

 

21 (95.5)

Macrolide Resistant

 

 

10

 

 

10 (100.0)

 

 

5

 

 

5 (100.0)

Stephylococcus Aereus

 

 

11

 

 

8 (72.7)

 

 

11

 

 

9 (81.8)

*10 or More lsolates for Omadacycline

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neither gastrointestinal side effects nor IV infusion reactions occurred more frequently in the omadacycline arm than in the comparator arm. Cardiovascular signs and symptoms and liver function test abnormalities occurred in both study arms with similar frequency.

This study was recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine (R Stets et al.. Omadacycline for Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia, N Engl J Med 2019; 380:517-527).

95


 

Figure 13: TEAEs in CABP Trial

 

 

 

Omadacycline

(N = 382)

n(%)

 

Moxifloxacin

(N = 388)

n(%)

Subjects with at Least One TEAE

 

157 (41.1)

 

188 (48.5)

ALT Increased

 

14 (3.7)

 

18 (4.6)

Hypertension

 

13 (3.4)

 

11 (2.8)

GGT Increased

 

10 (2.6)

 

8 (2.1)

Insomnia

 

10 (2.6)

 

8 (2.1)

Vomiting

 

10 (2.6)

 

6 (1.5)

Constipation

 

9 (2.4)

 

6 (1.5)

Nausea

 

9 (2.4)

 

21 (5.4)

AST Increased

 

8 (2.1)

 

14 (3.6)

Headache

 

8 (2.1)

 

5 (1.3)

 

Phase III trial – ABSSSI /OASIS-2 

Paratek’s third Phase III clinical study (OASIS-2) was an oral-only administration of omadycline in ABSSSI compared to oral-only linezolid. Oral, once daily omadycline met the FDA-specified primary efficacy endpoint of statistical non-inferiority in the modified intent-to-treat, or mITT, population (10% non-inferiority margin, 95% confidence interval) compared to oral, twice daily linezolid at the early clinical response, or ECR, 48-72 hours after initiation of therapy. The ECR rates for the omadycline and linezolid treatment arms were 87.5% and 82.5%, respectively. In addition, omadycline met specified co-primary endpoints for the EMA, which are key secondary endpoints for the FDA. For these endpoints, non-inferiority in the mITT and clinically evaluable populations in at the post treatment evaluation, seven to 14 days after end of treatment, omadycline demonstrated a high response rate and met statistical non-inferiority to linezolid for both populations using a pre-specified 95% confidence interval. High success rates were observed with response rates of 84.2% (omadycline) vs. 80.8% (linezolid) and 97.9% (omadycline) vs. 95.5% (linezolid), respectively.

The most common TEAEs in omadycline-treated patients (occurring in ≥ 3% of patients) were gastrointestinal adverse events of omadycline vs. linezolid included: vomiting (16.8% vs. 3.0%), nausea (30.2% vs. 7.6%), diarrhea (4.1% vs. 2.7%). In addition, alanine aminotransferase, or ALT, increase (5.2% with omadycline vs. 3.0% with linezolid), aspartate aminotransferase increases (4.6% with omadycline vs. 3.3 for linezolid) and headache (3.5% with omadycline vs. 2.2% with linezolid). Drug-related TEAEs were 37.8% for omadycline vs. 14.2% for linezolid (including gastrointestinal events). Discontinuation for TEAEs was uncommon, 1.6% for omadycline vs. 0.8% for linezolid. Serious TEAEs occurred in 1.4% of omadycline patients and 1.4% of linezolid patients; only one serious TEAE was considered related to the study drug and the event occurred in a linezolid patient.

Phase II studies

In a small study (N=111) conducted in cSSSI patients omadycline showed comparable efficacy and safety to linezolid IV/PO ± aztreonam. However, the design of the Phase II study (and a truncated Phase III study with 68 patients) was no longer consistent with newer FDA guidance issued for ABSSSI in 2008 which required, among other changes, an early efficacy read-out at 48-72 hours.

In addition, this early omadycline program used a 200 mg oral step-down dose that proved to not be bioequivalent to the 100 mg IV dose. Hence, these data are now considered supportive and cannot be merged easily with the larger pivotal program trials in ABSSSI and CABP that were conducted with FDA guidance and bioequivalent IV to oral step-down dosing.

A Phase II study (IV and oral) in patients with acute pyelonephritis was initiated by Paratek in 2018.

Phase I studies

Omadycline has been evaluated in more than 20 Phase I studies, including food-effect, age and gender, and renal / hepatic insufficiency studies.

96


 

Omadycline has a very favorable PK profile. It was absorbed well; its plasma T 1/2 of 14-20 hours permitted once-daily dosing. The drug was not metabolized and drug-drug interactions were minimal. In contrast to other tetracyclines, which paradoxically display dose-dependent increases in protein binding, 80% of omadycline remained available as free drug. Excretion was via biliary and urinary routes. Data from hepatic and renal impairment studies showed that dose adjustments are not needed for patients with either condition.

In bioequivalence studies, the 300 mg oral dose was found to match the area under the curve of the 100 mg IV dose within the 80-125% range.

Omadycline was negative on hERG testing and had no appreciable effect on cardiac conduction in a Thorough QT trial at supra-therapeutic doses. However, in animal tests and during Phase I, a dose-dependent elevation of blood pressure (systolic and diastolic) and heart rate were observed. Omadycline was found to be an acetylcholine antagonist for muscarinic receptor subtype M2, essentially acting as a vagolytic agent. In subsequent patient studies, these effects were less pronounced or absent and clinically asymptomatic. All Phase II and III studies included systematic cardiovascular pre- and post-dose monitoring of blood pressure and heart rate to further characterize these effects both qualitatively and quantitatively.

An ELF study showed excellent penetration of omadycline into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and into alveolar macrophages.

A cystitis (uUTI) study was conducted by Paratek to obtain PK information for different oral dosing regimens of omadycline.

Durlobactam (ZL-2402)

Durlobactam is a novel β-lactamase inhibitor of class A, C, and D beta-lactamases. As such it is active against multiple members of the β-lactamases commonly found in Acinetobacter baumannii. In particular, it is a potent inhibitor of several Class D enzymes which confer MDR to many β-lactam antibiotics. In combination with sulbactam, durlobactam reduces the minimum inhibitory concentration, or MIC, against this organism and restores susceptibility to sulbactam. It is being developed by Entasis as SUL-DUR, a combination of durlobactam and sulbactam. The microbiologic efficacy of this combination was demonstrated in large studies of well-characterized MDR Acinetobacter isolates from diverse regions, including Asia. SUL-DUR was bactericidal and active against penem-resistant Acinetobacter organisms. SUL-DUR was synergistic with imipenem, further lowering MICs on in-vitro testing. The FDA has granted SUL-DUR QIDP, Fast Track and Priority Review status.

Durlobactam without sulbactam but in combination with other β-lactams lowered the MICs for E. coli, K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa compared to the partner β-lactam antibiotic alone. Entasis has conducted a comprehensive Phase I safety and PK program for durlobactam. Single ascending dose and multiple ascending dose studies showed that durlobactam alone and in combination with sulbactam or imipenem is well tolerated and safe. There were no noticeable drug-drug interactions.

Entasis plans to develop SUL-DUR for the treatment of severe A. baumannii infections. Entasis has finished a Phase II cUTI trial in 2018 and started enrollment in the pivotal Phase III trial in MDR Acinetobacter infections in the second half of 2019.

Background on Acinetobacters

Acinetobacter is one of the most resistant pathogens encountered in clinical practice. It is one of the ESKAPE pathogens, a leading cause of nosocomial infections throughout the world, for which new treatment options are needed as these organisms are MDR to most antibiotics currently available. Approximately 60% of Acinetobacter isolates are carbapenem resistant (so-called CRAB pathogens) and can only be treated with colistin, a rather toxic drug, or tigecycline which is often ineffective.

Of great concern, colistin resistance has been reported in recent years, especially from Asia, in E. coli and in K. pneumoniae. So far, there is only scattered report of mcr-1 resistance in Acinetobacter have been reported but the risk is high that chromosomal and – more ominously – plasmid mediated resistance may spread to other bacteria, especially in an environment with high veterinary colistin use like in China. Recent case reports of successful treatment with experimental phage therapy as a last resort when available antibiotics fail. Severe Acinetobacter infections are associated with mortality rates of 50-60% despite intensive medical care. These infections usually present as blood-stream infections or hospital-acquired pneumonia. Less severe infections of the skin and urinary tract are not uncommon.

97


 

The frequency of Acinetobacter infections is on the rise world-wide. In the United States and the European Union, the incidence of infection is between 80,000 and 120,000 patients per year in each region. The incidence is higher in the Asia Pacific region and especially in China where the organism ranks among the most frequent isolates in intensive care unit patients. In 2015, over 180,000 infections were reported from China alone. In Japan, over 30,000 cases were reported for 2015, which is an increase of approximately 50% since 2012.

Background on Sulbactam

Sulbactam, a β-lactam derivative, has been in use since the 1980s. It is a IV BLI used in combination with ampicillin, known in the United States as Unasyn and widely used since 1987. It is an β-lactam with a proven safety record. Sulbactam has antibiotic activity of its own, notably against Acinetobacter. However, β-lactamase-mediated resistance to sulbactam has developed and is now common in Acinetobacter.

Durlobactam is a non-β-lactam BLI of the DBO class. It has structural similarities to avibactam, a BLI recently approved in combination with ceftazidime (Avycaz). However, durlobactam has demonstrated much greater potency against many β-lactamases, especially the Class D OXA enzymes prevalent in Acinetobacter.

Overview of Our License Agreements

Tesaro (now GSK)

In September 2016, we entered into a collaboration, development and license agreement with Tesaro (now GSK) under which we obtained an exclusive sublicense under certain patents and know-how that Tesaro licensed from Merck Corp. and AstraZeneca UK Limited to develop, manufacture, use, sell, import and commercialize Tesaro’s proprietary PARP inhibitor, niraparib (ZEJULA), in mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau, or licensed territory, in the licensed field of treatment, diagnosis and prevention of any human diseases or conditions (other than prostate cancer). We also obtained the right of first negotiation to obtain a license to develop and commercialize certain follow-on compounds of niraparib being developed by Tesaro (now GSK) in our licensed field and licensed territory. Under the agreement, we agreed not to research, develop or commercialize certain competing products and we also granted Tesaro (now GSK) the right of first refusal to license certain immuno-oncology assets developed by us.

We are obligated to use commercially reasonable efforts to develop and commercialize the licensed products in our licensed field and licensed territory. We are also responsible for funding all development and commercialization of the licensed products in our licensed territory.

We also agree to take any action or omission reasonably requested by Tesaro (now GSK) that is necessary or advisable to maintain compliance with the terms of the license agreements between Tesaro (now GSK) and each of Merck Corp. and AstraZeneca UK Limited.

Under the terms of the agreement, we made an upfront payment of $15.0 million and accrued a development milestone payment of $3.5 million to Tesaro (now GSK). On top of those, if we achieve other specified regulatory, development and commercialization milestones, we may be additionally required to pay further milestone payments of up to $36.0 million to Tesaro (now GSK). In addition, if we successfully develop and commercialize the licensed products, we will pay Tesaro (now GSK) tiered royalties at percentage rates in the mid- to high-teens on the net sales of the licensed products, until the later of the expiration of the last-to-expire licensed patent covering the licensed product, the expiration of regulatory exclusivity for the licensed product, or the tenth anniversary of the first commercial sale of the licensed product, in each case on a product-by-product and region-by-region basis. In February 2018, we entered into an amendment with Tesaro (now GSK) to eliminate Tesaro’s option to co-market niraparib in the licensed territory.

The agreement with Tesaro (now GSK) will remain in effect until the expiration of the royalty term and may be earlier terminated by either party for the other party’s uncured material breach, bankruptcy or insolvency or by mutual agreement of the parties. In addition, we have the right to terminate the agreement for convenience at any time upon advance notice to Tesaro (now GSK). Upon early termination of the agreement, we must grant to Tesaro (now GSK) an exclusive license under certain of our intellectual property to develop and commercialize the licensed products outside the licensed territory.

98


 

Novocure

In September 2018, we entered into a license and collaboration agreement with Novocure. Under the terms of the agreement, Novocure exclusively licensed to us the rights to perform clinical studies, sublicensable to affiliates and third parties (subject to Novocure’s consent), sell, offer for sale and import Tumor Treating Fields products in the field of oncology, each, a licensed product and collectively, the licensed products, in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan, or the territory. In partial consideration for the license grant to us for the territory, we paid Novocure a non-refundable, upfront license fee in the amount of $15.0 million. We also agreed to pay certain development, regulatory and commercial milestone payments up to an aggregate of $78.0 million, and tiered royalties at percentage rates from ten up to the mid-teens on the net sales of the Licensed Products in the Territory.

We will purchase licensed products exclusively from Novocure at Novocure’s fully burdened manufacturing cost. The agreement continues, on a region-by-region and licensed product-by-licensed product basis, in effect until the expiration of and payment by us of all of our royalty payment obligations applicable to such licensed product and such region as specified in the agreement. Each party may terminate the agreement upon the material breach of the agreement by the other party, subject to certain cure periods. In addition, we may terminate the agreement for convenience on twelve months’ prior notice prior to commercializing a licensed product and on eighteen months’ prior notice after commercializing a licensed product, and Novocure may terminate the agreement due to our diligence failure or material FCPA violation, subject to certain cure periods and dispute resolution mechanisms if disputes arise with respect to such failure or material violation, each as defined in the agreement.

Deciphera

In June 2019, we entered into a license agreement with Deciphera. Under the terms of the agreement, Deciphera exclusively licensed to us the rights to perform clinical studies, sublicenseable to affiliates without Deciphera’s consent and third parties (subject to Deciphera’s consent), sell, offer for sale and import ripretinib, each, a licensed product, in the field of the prevention, prophylaxis, treatment, cure or amelioration of any disease or medical condition in humans in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. In partial consideration for the license grant to us for the territory, we paid Deciphera a non-refundable, up-front license fee in the amount of $20.0 million and a milestone payment of $5.0 million. We also agreed to pay certain additional development, regulatory and commercial milestone payments up to an aggregate of $180.0 million, and tiered royalties at percentage rates from low- to high-teens on the net sales of the licensed products in the territory.

We will purchase the licensed products exclusively from Deciphera at a certain mark up of Deciphera’s fully burdened manufacturing cost. The agreement continues, on a region-by-region and licensed product-by-licensed product basis, in effect until the expiration of and payment by us of all of our royalty payment obligations applicable to such licensed product and such region as specified in the agreement. Each party may terminate the agreement upon the material breach of a material term of the agreement by the other party, subject to the ability to cure. In addition, we may terminate the agreement for convenience on 180 days’ prior notice, and Deciphera may terminate the agreement due to our patent challenge against certain Deciphera’s patents, subject to the ability to cure and dispute resolution mechanisms if disputes arise with respect to such failure or material violation, each as defined in the agreement.

Regeneron

In April 2020, we entered into a Collaboration Agreement with a wholly-owned subsidiary of Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., or Regeneron. Under the terms of the agreement, Regeneron will receive a $30.0 million non-refundable, upfront payment and is eligible to receive up to $160.0 million in additional regulatory and sales milestones. We will contribute to the global development costs for REGN1979 for certain trials and will receive the rights to develop and exclusively commercialize REGN1979 in oncology in mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macau. Additionally, we will make payments to Regeneron based on net sales, such that Regeneron shares in a significant portion of any potential profits. Regeneron will be responsible for the manufacture and supply of REGN1979 for development and commercialization in the region.

MacroGenics

In November 2018, we entered into a collaboration agreement with MacroGenics. Under the terms of the collaboration agreement, MacroGenics exclusively licensed to us regional development and commercialization rights to margetuximab, MGD-013 and an undisclosed multi-specific TRIDENT molecule in pre-clinical development, or the TRIDENT molecule, and, together with margetuximab and MGD0213, each, a licensed product, in China, Hong Kong,

99


 

Macau and Taiwan, or the territory. In partial consideration for the license grant to us for the territory, we paid MacroGenics a non-refundable, up-front license fee in the amount of $25.0 million. We also agreed to pay certain development and regulatory-based milestone payments up to an aggregate of $140.0 million, and tiered royalties at percentage rates of mid-teens to 20% for net sales of Margetuximab in the territory, mid-teens for net sales of MGD-013 in the territory and 10% for net sales of TRIDENT molecule in the territory.

As part of the collaborative clinical development effort, we and MacroGenics intend to initiate a global study using combination regimens containing margetuximab in order to maximize potential clinical benefit in gastric cancer, the fifth most common cancer in the world and the second most common in China.

The collaboration agreement continues, on a region-by-region and licensed product-by-licensed product basis, in effect until the expiration of and payment by us of all of our payment obligations applicable to such licensed product and such region as specified in the collaboration agreement. Each party may terminate the collaboration agreement upon the material breach of the collaboration agreement by the other party, subject to certain cure periods. In addition, at any time after November 29, 2020, we may terminate the collaboration agreement for convenience with prior notice to MacroGenics. MacroGenics may terminate the collaboration agreement in its entirety or on a licensed product-by-licensed product basis with prior notice if one or more major safety issues have occurred with respect to such licensed product prior to the first commercial sale of such licensed product in the territory and MacroGenics has discontinued the global development, manufacturing and commercialization activities with respect to such licensed product.

Incyte

In July 2019, we entered into a collaboration and license Agreement with Incyte. Under the terms of the agreement, Incyte exclusively licensed to us the rights to perform clinical studies, sublicenseable to affiliates in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan without Incyte’s consent and other affiliates and third parties (subject to Incyte’s consent), sell, offer for sale and import INCMGA0012 (PD-1) in the filed of the treatment, palliation, diagnosis or prevention of diseases in the fields of hematology or oncology in humans in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan. In partial consideration for the license grant to us for the territory, we paid Incyte a non-refundable, up-front license fee in the amount of $17.5 million. We also agreed to pay certain development, regulatory and commercial milestone payments of up to an aggregate of $60.0 million, and tiered royalties at percentage rates from low- to high-twenties on the net sales of INCMGA0012 (PD-1) in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan.

We will purchase Licensed Products exclusively from Incyte at Incyte’s fully burdened manufacturing cost. The agreement continues, on a region-by-region and Licensed Product-by-Licensed Product basis, in effect until the expiration of and payment by us of all of our royalty payment obligations applicable to such Licensed Product and such region as specified in the agreement. Each party may terminate the agreement upon the material breach of a material term of the agreement by the other party, subject to the ability to cure. In addition, we may terminate the agreement for convenience on 60 days’ prior notice, and Incyte may terminate the agreement due to our development or commercialization diligence failures, subject to the ability to cure and dispute resolution mechanisms if disputes arise with respect to such failure or material violation, each as defined in the agreement.

Five Prime

In December 2017, we entered into a collaboration and license agreement with Five Prime, under which we obtained exclusive rights to develop and commercialize Five Prime’s proprietary afucosylated FGFR2b antibody known as bemarituzumab (FPA144), and all fragments, conjugates, derivatives and modifications thereof in China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan, or the licensed territory.

We are responsible for (i) developing and commercializing licensed products under a territory development plan (ii) performing certain development activities to support Five Prime’s global development and registration of licensed products, including Five Prime’s global Phase III registrational trial of bemarituzumab (FPA144) in combination with FOLFOX in front-line gastric and gastroesophageal cancer, or the bemarituzumab (FPA144)-004 Study, in the licensed territory under a global development plan.

Under the terms of the agreement, we made an upfront payment of $5.0 million and a milestone payment of $2.0 million to Five Prime. Additionally, we may be required to pay further development and regulatory milestone payments of up to an aggregate of $37.0 million to Five Prime.

100


 

We are also be obligated to pay Five Prime a royalty, on a licensed product-by-licensed product and region-by-region basis, in the high teens or low twenties, depending on the number of patients we enroll in the bemarituzumab (FPA144)-004 study, subject to reduction in certain circumstances, on net sales of each licensed product in the licensed territory until the latest of (i) the 11th anniversary of the first commercial sale of such licensed product in such region, (ii) the expiration of certain patents covering such licensed product in such region, and (iii) the date on which any applicable regulatory, pediatric, orphan drug or data exclusivity with respect to such licensed product expires in such region.

Under the terms of the agreement, provided that we enroll and treat a specified number of patients in the bemarituzumab (FPA144)-004 study in China, we are eligible to receive a low single-digit percentage royalty, on a licensed product-by-licensed product basis on net sales of a licensed product outside the licensed territory until the 10th anniversary of the first commercial sale of each such licensed product outside the licensed territory.

Unless earlier terminated by either party, the agreement will expire on a licensed product-by-licensed product and region-by-region basis upon the expiration of our payment obligations with respect to each licensed product under the agreement. We may terminate the agreement in its entirety at any time with advance written notice. Either party may terminate the agreement in its entirety with written notice for the other party’s material breach if such party fails to cure the breach. Five Prime may terminate the agreement in its entirety with written notice for the material breach of our diligence obligations with respect to development and obtaining marketing approval, and may terminate the agreement on a region-by-region basis for the breach of our diligence obligations with respect to timely commercialization of a licensed product in a region following marketing approval. Five Prime may terminate the agreement in its entirety if we or one of our affiliates or sublicensees commences a legal action challenging the validity, enforceability or scope of any of Five Prime’s patents in the licensed territory. Either party also may terminate the agreement in its entirety upon certain insolvency events involving the other party.

Paratek

In April 2017, we entered into a license and collaboration agreement with Paratek Bermuda, Ltd., a subsidiary of Paratek, under which we obtained both an exclusive license under certain patents and know-how of Paratek Bermuda Ltd. and an exclusive sub-license under certain intellectual property that Paratek Bermuda Ltd. licensed from Tufts University to develop, manufacture, use, sell, import and commercialize omadacycline (ZL-2401) in mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan, or licensed territory, in the field of all human therapeutic and preventative uses other than biodefense, or the licensed field. Under certain circumstances, our exclusive sub-license to certain intellectual property Paratek Bermuda Ltd. licensed from Tufts University may be converted to a non-exclusive license if Paratek Bermuda Ltd.’s exclusive license from Tufts University is converted to a non-exclusive license under the Tufts Agreement. We also obtained the right of first negotiation to be Paratek Bermuda Ltd.’s partner to develop certain derivatives or modifications of omadacycline in our licensed territory. Paratek Bermuda Ltd. retains the right to manufacture the licensed product in our licensed territory for use outside our licensed territory. We also granted to Paratek Bermuda Ltd. a non-exclusive license to certain of our intellectual property for Paratek Bermuda Ltd. to develop and commercialize licensed products outside of our licensed territory. Under the agreement, we agreed not to commercialize certain competing products in our licensed territory. We are obligated to use commercially reasonable efforts to develop and commercialize the licensed products in our licensed field and licensed territory, including making certain regulatory filings within a specified period of time.

Under the terms of the agreement, we made an upfront payment of $7.5 million and a milestone payment of $5.0 million to Paratek Bermuda Ltd. and we may be required to pay further milestone payments of up to an aggregate of $49.5 million to Paratek Bermuda Ltd. for the achievement of certain development and sales milestone events. In addition, we will pay to Paratek Bermuda Ltd. tiered royalties at percentage rates in the range of low- to mid-teens on the net sales of licensed products, until the later of the abandonment, expiration or invalidation of the last-to-expire licensed patent covering the licensed product, or the eleventh anniversary of the first commercial sale of the licensed product, in each case on a product-by-product and region-by-region basis.

The agreement with Paratek Bermuda Ltd. will remain in effect until the expiration of the royalty term and may be earlier terminated by either party for the other party’s uncured material breach, bankruptcy or insolvency. In addition, we have the right to terminate the agreement for convenience at any time upon advance notice to Paratek Bermuda Ltd. Paratek Bermuda Ltd. has the right to terminate the agreement if we challenge its patents. Upon termination of the agreement, our license of certain intellectual property to Paratek Bermuda Ltd. will continue for Paratek Bermuda Ltd. to develop and commercialize licensed products worldwide.

101


 

Entasis

In April 2018, we entered into a collaboration and license agreement with Entasis under which we obtained exclusive rights to develop and commercialize Entasis’ proprietary compounds known as durlobactam and SUL-DUR, with the possibility of developing and commercializing a combination of such compounds with Imipenem, in mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Korea, Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Singapore, Australia, New Zealand and Japan, or the territory. Our rights to develop and commercialize the licensed products are limited to the lead product (SUL-DUR) until such product receives FDA approval in the U.S.

Under the terms of the agreement, we are responsible for (i) developing and commercializing the licensed products in the territory under a mutually agreed development plan and (ii) providing Entasis (or its CRO) with clinical and financial support in the territory for the global pivotal Phase III clinical trial of SUL-DUR as set forth in mutually agreed development plans.

We made an upfront payment of $5.0 million and two development milestone payments of $7.0 million to Entasis. Additionally, we may be required to pay Entasis development, regulatory and research milestone payments (other than existing ones) and commercial milestone payments of up to an aggregate of $91.6 million. We are also responsible for a portion of the costs of the global pivotal Phase III clinical trial of SUL-DUR outside of the territory.

We are also obligated to pay Entasis a royalty based on a percentage of net sales of licensed products ranging from the high single digits to low teens, depending on the amount of net sales of licensed products in the territory, subject to reduction in certain circumstances, until, with respect to a licensed product in a region in the territory, the latest of (i) the 10th anniversary of the first commercial sale of such licensed product in such region, (ii) the expiration of certain patents covering such licensed product in such region, and (iii) the date on which any applicable regulatory, pediatric, orphan drug or data exclusivity with respect to such licensed product expires in such region.

Unless earlier terminated by either party, the agreement will expire on a country-by-country basis upon the expiration of our payment obligations applicable to such country under the agreement. We may terminate the agreement in its entirety at any time with advance written notice. Either party may terminate the agreement in its entirety with written notice for the other party’s material breach if such party fails to cure the breach. Entasis may terminate the agreement on a country-by-country basis if we cease to commercialize the licensed products in such country for a certain period of time. Entasis may terminate the agreement in its entirety if we or one of our affiliates or sublicensees commences a legal action challenging the validity, enforceability or scope of any of Entasis’s patents in the licensed territory. Either party also may terminate the agreement in its entirety upon certain insolvency events involving the other party.

Bristol-Myers Squibb

In March 2015, we entered into a collaboration and license agreement with BMS, under which we obtained an exclusive license under certain patents and know-how of BMS to develop, manufacture, use, sell, import and commercialize BMS’s proprietary multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, brivanib in mainland China, Hong Kong and Macau, or the licensed territory, in the field of diagnosis, prevention, treatment or control of oncology indications, or licensed field, with the exclusive right to expand our licensed territory to include Taiwan and Korea under certain conditions. BMS retains the non-exclusive right to use the licensed compounds to conduct internal research and the exclusive right to use the licensed compounds to manufacture compounds that are not brivanib. Under the agreement, we agreed not to develop and commercialize certain competing products for specified time periods.

We are obligated to use commercially reasonable efforts to develop and commercialize the licensed products in our licensed field and licensed territory. BMS has the option to elect to co-promote the licensed products in our licensed territory. If BMS exercises its co-promotion option, BMS will pay us an option exercise fee and we will share equally with BMS the operating profits and losses of the licensed products in our licensed territory.

If BMS does not exercise its co-promotion option, we may be required to pay BMS milestone payments for the achievement of certain development and sales milestone events of up to an aggregate of $114.5 million, and also tiered royalties at percentage rates in the mid- to high-teens on the net sales of the licensed products in our licensed territory, until the later of the expiration of the last-to-expire licensed patent covering the licensed product, the expiration of regulatory exclusivity for the licensed product, or the twelfth anniversary of the first commercial sale of the licensed product, in each case on a product-by-product and region-by-region basis.

102


 

We also have the right to opt-out of the commercialization of the licensed products in our licensed territory under certain conditions. If we elect to opt-out, BMS will have the right to commercialize the licensed products in our licensed territory and will pay us royalties on the net sales of the licensed products in our licensed territory.

BMS has the option to use the data generated by us from our development of the licensed products to seek regulatory approval of the licensed products outside our licensed territory, and if BMS exercises such option, BMS will be obligated to make certain payments to us, including upfront, milestone and royalty payments.

The agreement with BMS will remain in effect until the expiration of all payment obligations, and may be earlier terminated by either party for the other party’s uncured material breach, safety reasons or failure of the development of the licensed products. In addition, we have the right to terminate the agreement for convenience after a certain specified time period upon advance notice to BMS. BMS may also terminate the agreement for our bankruptcy or insolvency.

Sanofi

In July 2015, we entered into a license agreement with Sanofi, under which we obtained an exclusive and worldwide license under certain patents and know-how of Sanofi to develop, manufacture, use, sell, import and commercialize Sanofi’s ALK inhibitor, or the licensed compound, or ZL-2302, for any oncology indications in humans. Under the terms of the agreement, we made upfront payments to Sanofi totaling $0.5 million. Due to changes in the competitive landscape, we intend to terminate the license agreement in 2020. If we do not terminate our license agreement with Sanofi, we may be required to make milestone payments to Sanofi of up to an aggregate of $31.0 million for the achievement of certain development and regulatory milestone events and tiered royalties at percentage rates in the range of high single digits to low double digits on the net sales of the licensed products. Upon any termination of the agreement, in addition to other obligations, we must grant to Sanofi an exclusive license under certain of our intellectual property to commercialize the licensed product.

Competition

Our industry is highly competitive and subject to rapid and significant change. While we believe that our management’s research, development and commercialization experience provide us with competitive advantages, we face competition from global and China-based biopharmaceutical companies, including specialty pharmaceutical companies, generic and biosimilar drug companies, biologics drug companies, academic institutions, government agencies and research institutions.

For our global product candidates, we expect to face competition from a broad range of global and local pharmaceutical companies. Many of our competitors have significantly greater financial, technical and human resources than we have, and mergers and acquisitions in the biopharmaceutical industry may result in even more resources being concentrated among a smaller number of our competitors. Our commercial opportunity could be reduced or eliminated if our competitors develop or market products or other novel therapies that are more effective, safer or less costly than our current or future drug candidates, or obtain regulatory approval for their products more rapidly than we may obtain approval for our drug candidates.

Patents and Other Intellectual Property

Our commercial success depends in part on our ability to obtain and maintain proprietary or intellectual property protection for our drug candidates and our core technologies and other know-how to operate without infringing, misappropriating or otherwise violating on the proprietary rights of others and to prevent others from infringing, misappropriating or otherwise violating our proprietary or intellectual property rights. We expect that we will seek to protect our proprietary and intellectual property position by, among other methods, licensing or filing our own U.S., international and foreign patent applications related to our proprietary technology, inventions and improvements that are important to the development and implementation of our business. We also rely on trade secrets, know-how and continuing technological innovation to develop and maintain our proprietary and intellectual property position, which we generally seek to protect through contractual obligations with third parties.

103


 

Patents

Patents, patent applications and other intellectual property rights are important in the sector in which we operate. We consider on a case-by-case basis filing patent applications with a view to protecting certain innovative products, processes, and methods of treatment. We may also license or acquire rights to patents, patent applications or other intellectual property rights owned by third parties, academic partners or commercial companies which are of interest to us.

As with other biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, our ability to maintain and solidify our proprietary and intellectual property position for our drug candidates and technologies will depend on our success in obtaining effective patent claims and enforcing those claims if granted. However, our pending patent applications, and any patent applications that we may in the future file or license from third parties may not result in the issuance of patents. We also cannot predict the breadth of claims that may be allowed or enforced in our patents. Any issued patents that we may receive or license in the future may be challenged, invalidated or circumvented. For example, we cannot be certain of the priority of our patents and patent applications over third-party patents and patent applications. In addition, because of the extensive time required for clinical development and regulatory review of a drug candidate we may develop, it is possible that, before any of our drug candidates can be commercialized, any related patent may expire or remain in force for only a short period following commercialization, thereby limiting protection such patent would afford the respective product and any competitive advantage such patent may provide. For more information regarding the risks related to our intellectual property, please see “Item 3.D. Risk Factors—Risks Related to Intellectual Property.”

ZEJULA

As of December 31, 2019, we exclusively licensed two issued patents in China directed to ZEJULA’s free base compound, and salts thereof, and analogues of ZEJULA. These issued patents are projected to expire between 2027 and 2028. We also exclusively licensed one pending patent application in China directed to a salt that covers 4-methylbenzenesulfonate monohydrate, the active pharmaceutical ingredient, or API, of ZEJULA. If this patent application issues as a patent, such patent will be projected to expire in 2029. We have filed an application in China and a PCT application that cover intermediate synthesis process. The claims in China application had been allowed, and the PCT application is in the national phases, and will enter the United States, the European Union, Israel, Japan, Korea and India. Zai owns this PRC application and the PCT application.

Optune (Tumor Treating Fields)

As of December 31, 2019, we licensed eight issued patents in China and Hong Kong that relate to Optune (Tumor Treating Fields). An additional seven patent applications that relate to Optune (Tumor Treating Fields) are pending. We are pursuing patent rights to protect its rights in these technologies and has continued its efforts to secure patent rights in China for its devices and technologies for applying electric fields to a patient for treating a disease or condition, especially diseases that promote tumor growth. We are pursuing patent rights to protect its rights in these technologies.

Ripretinib

As of December 31, 2019, we exclusively licensed one issued patent and two pending patent applications in China directed to dihydronaphthyridines and related compounds, the API of ripretinib. These issued patent and pending patent applications are projected to expire between 2032. We do not own or have an exclusive license to any patents or patent applications in any jurisdictions outside of China.

Margetuximab

As of December 31, 2019, we exclusively licensed two pending patent applications in China and one issued patent in Hong Kong. The pending patent applications in this portfolio cover antibody sequences and therapeutic uses of margetuximab. The issued patent and any patents issuing from the currently pending applications are projected to expire in 2029.

104


 

INCMGA0012 (PD-1)

As of December 31, 2019, we exclusively licensed two pending patent applications in China, two pending patent applications in Taiwan and one pending patent application in Hong Kong directed to the API of INCMGA0012 (PD-1). If these patent applications issue as patents, such patents will be projected to expire in 2036 to 2039. We do not own or have an exclusive license to any patents or patent applications in any jurisdictions outside of China, Hong Kong or Taiwan.

MGD-013

As of December 31, 2019, we exclusively licensed three pending patent applications in China, two issued patents in Hong Kong and three pending patent applications in Taiwan. The pending patent applications in this portfolio cover antibody sequences and therapeutic uses of MGD-013. The issued patents and any patents issuing from the currently pending applications are projected to expire between 2035 and 2036.

Bemarituzumab (FPA144)

As of December 31, 2019, we exclusively licensed one issued patent in China and one issued patent in Hong Kong. These issued patents are directed to certain anti-FGFR2b antibodies, and are projected to expire in 2029. We have also exclusively licensed one pending patent application in China, two pending patent applications in Taiwan, one pending patent application in Hong Kong. If issued, claims of these patent applications are projected to expire between 2034 and 2036. We do not own or have an exclusive license to any patents or patent applications in any jurisdictions outside of China, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Omadacycline (ZL-2401)

As of December 31, 2019, we exclusively licensed four issued patents in China directed to omadacycline’s compound, formulations and crystal form and one pending patent application in China directed to other crystalline forms of omadacycline. The issued composition of matter patent covering omadacycline is projected to expire in 2021 and the other two issued patents are projected to expire in 2029. If the two patent applications are issued, they are expected to expire in 2029. We have also exclusively licensed two issued patents in Hong Kong and Taiwan, respectively that cover a crystalline salt form of omadacycline, which expire in 2029. We do not own or have an exclusive license to any patents or patent applications in any jurisdictions outside of China, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Durlobactam

As of December 31, 2019, we exclusively licensed one issued patent in China, one issued patent in Japan, and a corresponding issued patent or pending patent application in each of several additional jurisdictions in the territory covered by our agreement with Entasis, including Australia, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Korea. These issued patents or pending applications are directed to certain beta-lactamase inhibitor compounds, including durlobactam, and are projected to expire in 2033. We have also exclusively licensed a second family of patent applications having one pending patent application in each of China, Japan, Australia, Taiwan, Korea and four other jurisdictions in the territory. If issued, claims of these patent applications are projected to expire in 2035. We do not own or have an exclusive license to any patents or patent applications in any jurisdictions outside of the territory of the Entasis Agreement.

Brivanib (ZL-2301) 

As of December 31, 2019, we exclusively licensed five issued patents in China, one issued patent in Taiwan and one issued patent in Hong Kong that relate to brivanib. Of these issued patents, one patent in China is a composition-of-matter patent that covers the brivanib compound and its analogues. One patent in China covers the medical use of brivanib. These patents are projected to expire in 2023. Our exclusively licensed patents also include a patent in China that covers a manufacturing process for intermediates useful in the synthesis of brivanib’s API. This patent is projected to expire in 2027. In addition, one patent we exclusively licensed in China covers a crystal form of brivanib alaninate and is projected to expire in 2026. The issued patent in Hong Kong that we exclusively licensed is projected to expire in 2023. We do not own or have an exclusive license to any patents or patent applications in any jurisdictions other than China and Hong Kong.

105


 

Undisclosed multi-specific TRIDENT molecule

As of December 31, 2019, we exclusively licensed one pending international patent application and one pending patent application in Taiwan. Patents issuing from the pending applications are projected to expire in 2038.

Patent Term

The term of a patent depends upon the laws of the country in which it is issued. In most jurisdictions, a patent term is 20 years from the earliest filing date of a non-provisional patent application. Under China Patent Law, the term of patent protection starts from the date of application. Patents relating to inventions are effective for twenty years, and utility models and designs are effective for ten years from the date of application.

The above expiration dates are exclusive of any patent term adjustments or patent term extensions that may be available under applicable law. The laws of each jurisdiction vary, and patent term adjustment or patent term extension may not be available in any or all jurisdictions in which we own or license patents. For example, there are currently no patent term adjustments or patent term extensions available for issued patents in China. However, the government recently announced a proposal which is under consideration to allow a five-year patent term extension for innovative drugs if they will be concurrently reviewed for marketing authorizations in and outside China.

Trade Secrets

In addition to patents, we rely upon unpatented trade secrets and know-how and continuing technological innovation to develop and maintain our competitive position. However, trade secrets and know-how can be difficult to protect. We seek to protect our proprietary information, in part, by executing confidentiality agreements with our partners, collaborators, scientific advisors, employees, consultants and other third parties, and invention assignment agreements with our consultants and employees. We have also executed agreements requiring assignment of inventions with selected scientific advisors and collaborators. The confidentiality agreements we enter into are designed to protect our proprietary information and the agreements or clauses requiring assignment of inventions to us are designed to grant us ownership of technologies that are developed through our relationship with the respective counterparty. We cannot guarantee that we have entered into such agreements with each party that may have or have had access to our trade secrets or proprietary technology and processes or that these agreements will afford us adequate protection of our intellectual property and proprietary information rights. If any of the partners, collaborators, scientific advisors, employees and consultants who are parties to these agreements breaches or violates the terms of any of these agreements or otherwise discloses our proprietary information, we may not have adequate remedies for any such breach or violation, and we could lose our trade secrets as a result. For more information regarding the risks related to our trade secrets, please see “Item 3.D. Risk Factors—Risks Related to Intellectual Property—If we are unable to maintain the confidentiality of our trade secrets, our business and competitive position may be harmed.”

Trademarks and domain names

We conduct our business using trademarks with various forms of the “ZAI LAB” and “再鼎医药” brands, as well as domain names incorporating some or all of these trademarks.

Employees

As of December 31, 2019, we employed a total of 692 full-time employees, including a total of 125 employees with M.D. or Ph.D. degrees. Of our workforce, 300 employees are engaged in research and development and 298 employees are engaged in commercial and sales. None of our employees are represented by a labor union or covered by a collective bargaining agreement.

Raw Materials and Supplies

Currently, we obtain raw materials for our clinical trial activities from multiple suppliers who we believe have sufficient capacity to meet our demands. In addition, we believe that adequate alternative sources for such supplies exist. However, a risk exists that an interruption to supplies would materially harm our business. We typically order raw materials and services on a purchase order basis and do not enter into long-term dedicated capacity or minimum supply arrangements.

106


 

While we do experience price fluctuations associated with our raw materials, we have not experienced any material disruptions in the supply of these raw materials in the past.

Quality Control and Assurance

We have our own independent quality control system and devote significant attention to quality control for the designing, manufacturing and testing of our drug candidates. We have established a strict quality control system in accordance with NMPA regulations. Our laboratories are staffed with highly educated and skilled technicians to ensure quality of all batches of products released. We monitor our operations in real time throughout the entire production process, from inspection of raw and auxiliary materials, to manufacture and delivery of finished products to clinical testing at hospitals. Our quality assurance team is also responsible for ensuring that we are in compliance with all applicable regulations, standards and internal policies. Our senior management team is actively involved in setting quality policies and managing the internal and external quality performance of the Company.

Regulation

Government Regulation of Pharmaceutical Product Development and Approval

PRC regulation of pharmaceutical product development and approval

Since China’s entry into the World Trade Organization in 2001, the PRC government has made significant efforts to standardize regulations, develop its pharmaceutical regulatory system and strengthen intellectual property protection.

In October 2017, the drug regulatory system entered a new and significant period of reform. The General Office of the State Council and the General Committee of the PRC Communist Party jointly issued a mandatory plan to further the reform of the review and approval system and encourage the innovation of drugs and medical devices, or the Innovation Opinion. The expedited programs and other advantages under this and other recent reforms encourage drug manufacturers to seek marketing approval in China first and develop drugs in high priority disease areas, such as oncology, or rare disease areas.

To implement the regulatory reform introduced by Innovation Opinion, the Standing Committee of the NPC and the NMPA are currently revising the fundamental law, regulations and rules regulating pharmaceutical products and the industry, which includes the framework law known as the PRC Drug Administration Law. The newly amended PRC Drug Administration Law became effective on December 1, 2019. The NMPA has promulgated two key implementing regulations for the PRC Drug Administration Law: (i) the amended Drug Registration Regulation; and (ii) the amended PRC Drug Manufacturing Regulation. Both will take effect on July 1, 2020. However, as of April 29, 2020, detailed implementing rules on drug classification, patent linkage and patent term extension, among others, have not yet been promulgated.

Regulatory authorities

In China, the newly formed NMPA is the authority under the State Administration for Market Regulation that monitors and supervises the administration of pharmaceutical products, medical appliances and equipment, and cosmetics. The NMPA’s predecessor, the CFDA, was established in March 2013 and separated from the Ministry of Health of China, or the MOH, as part of the institutional reform of the State Council. Predecessors of the NMPA also include the former SFDA that was established in March 2003 and the State Drug Administration that was established in August 1998. The primary responsibilities of the NMPA include:

 

monitoring and supervising the administration of pharmaceutical products, medical appliances and equipment, as well as cosmetics in China;

 

formulating administrative rules and policies concerning the supervision and administration of the pharmaceutical, medical device, and cosmetics industry;

 

evaluating, registering and approving of new drugs, generic drugs, imported drugs and traditional Chinese medicine, or TCM;

107


 

 

approving and issuing permits for the manufacture and export/import of pharmaceutical products, as well as medical appliances and equipment, and approving the establishment of enterprises to be engaged in the manufacture and distribution of pharmaceutical products; and

 

examining and evaluating the safety of pharmaceutical products, medical devices, and cosmetics and handling significant accidents involving these products.

The National Health and Family Planning Commission, or NHFPC, is rebranded as the National Health Commission, or NHC. The NHC is an authority at the ministerial level under the State Council and is primarily responsible for national public health. The NHC combines the responsibilities of the former NHFPC, the Leading Group Overseeing Medical and Healthcare Reform under the State Council, the China National Working Commission on Aging, partial responsibilities of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology in relation to tobacco control, and partial responsibilities from the State Administration of Work Safety in relation to occupational safety. The predecessor of NHFPC is the MOH. Following the establishment of the former SFDA in 2003, the MOH was put in charge of the overall administration of the national health in China excluding the pharmaceutical industry. The NHC performs a variety of tasks in relation to the health industry such as establishing and overseeing the operation of medical institutes, which also serve as clinical trial sites, regulating the licensure of hospitals and producing professional codes of ethics for public medical personnel. The NHC plays a significant role in drug reimbursement. The NHC and its local counterparts at or below provincial-level local governments also oversee and organize public medical institutions’ centralized bidding and procurement process for pharmaceutical products, which is the chief means through which public hospitals and their internal pharmacies acquire drugs. The NHC is also responsible for overseas affairs, such as dealings with overseas companies and governments.

The restructuring at the state, municipal and county level authorities has been mostly completed as of July 2019.

Healthcare System Reform

The PRC government recently promulgated several healthcare reform policies and regulations to reform the healthcare system. On March 17, 2009, the Central Committee of the PRC Communist Party and the State Council jointly issued the Guidelines on Strengthening the Reform of Healthcare System. The State Council issued the Notice on the Issuance of the 13th Five-year Plan on Strengthening the Reform of Healthcare System on December 27, 2016. On April 21, 2016, the General Office of the State Council issued the Main Tasks of Healthcare System Reform in 2016. Highlights of these healthcare reform policies and regulations include the following:

 

One of the main objectives of the reform was to establish a basic healthcare system to cover both urban and rural residents and provide the Chinese people with safe, effective, convenient and affordable healthcare services. As of 2017, basic medical insurance coverage has reached more than 95% of the country’s population. By 2020, a basic healthcare system covering both urban and rural residents should be established.

 

Another main objective of reform was to improve the healthcare system, through the reform and development of a graded diagnosis and treatment system, modern hospital management, basic medical insurance, drug supply support and comprehensive supervision.

 

The reforms aimed to promote orderly market competition and improve the efficiency and quality of the healthcare system to meet the various medical needs of the Chinese population. From 2009, basic public healthcare services such as preventive healthcare, maternal and child healthcare and health education were to be provided to urban and rural residents. In the meantime, the reforms also encouraged innovations by pharmaceutical companies to eliminate pharmaceutical products that fail to prove definite efficacy and positive risk-benefit ratio.

 

The key tasks of the reform in the 13th five-year period were as follows: (1) to deepen the reform of public hospitals, (2) to accelerate the development of a graded diagnosis and treatment system, (3) to consolidate and improve the universal medical insurance system, (4) to guarantee drug supply, (5) to establish and improve a comprehensive supervision system, (6) to cultivate talented health-care practitioners, (7) to stabilize and perfect the basic public health service equalization system, (8) to advance the construction of health information technology, (9) to accelerate the development of the health services industry generally, and (10) to strengthen organization and implementation.

108


 

Drug Administration Laws and Regulations

The PRC Drug Administration Law as promulgated by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress in 1984 and the Implementing Measures of the PRC Drug Administration Law as promulgated by the MOH in 1989 have laid down the legal framework for the establishment of pharmaceutical manufacturing enterprises and pharmaceutical trading enterprises and for the administration of pharmaceutical products including the development and manufacturing of new drugs and medicinal preparations by medical institutions. The PRC Drug Administration Law also regulates the packaging, trademarks and advertisements of pharmaceutical products in China.

Certain amendments to the PRC Drug Administration Law took effect on December 1, 2001. Subsequent amendments were also made on December 28, 2013, April 24, 2015, and August 26, 2019. They were formulated to strengthen the supervision and administration of pharmaceutical products, and to ensure the quality of pharmaceutical products and the safety of pharmaceutical products for human use. The current PRC Drug Administration Law applies to entities and individuals engaged in the development, production, trade, application, supervision and administration of pharmaceutical products. It regulates and prescribes a framework for the administration of pharmaceutical manufacturers, pharmaceutical trading companies, and medicinal preparations of medical institutions and the development, research, manufacturing, distribution, packaging, pricing and advertisements of pharmaceutical products.

According to the current PRC Drug Administration Law, no pharmaceutical products may be produced in China without a pharmaceutical production license. A local manufacturer of pharmaceutical products must obtain a pharmaceutical production license from one of the provincial administration of medical products in order to commence production of pharmaceuticals. Prior to granting such license, the relevant government authority will inspect the manufacturer’s production facilities, and decide whether the sanitary conditions, quality assurance system, management structure and equipment within the facilities have met the required standards.

In August 2019, the Standing Committee of the NPC promulgated the latest Drug Administration Law, or the 2019 Amendment, which became effective in December 2019. The 2019 Amendment brought a series of changes to the drug supervision and administration system, including conditional approvals of drugs, traceability system of drugs, the cancellation of relevant certification in relation to Good Manufacturing Practice, and Good Supply Practice, and the formalization of the drug marketing authorization holder system, or the MAH system, pursuant to which the marketing authorization holder should assume responsibilities for non-clinical studies, clinical trials, manufacturing and marketing, post-marketing studies, monitoring, reporting and handling of adverse reactions of the drug. The 2019 Amendment also stipulates that the state supports the innovation of drugs with clinical value and specific or special effects on human diseases, encourages the development of drugs with new therapeutic mechanisms and have multi-targeted, systematic regulatory and intervention functions on human body and promotes the technological advancement of drugs.

China Implementing Regulations of the Drug Administration Law promulgated by the State Council took effect on September 15, 2002, were amended on February 6, 2016 and March 2, 2019 respectively, and serve to provide detailed implementation regulations for the PRC Drug Administration Law.

Good Laboratories Practice Certification for Nonclinical Research

To improve the quality of animal research, the former SFDA promulgated the Good Laboratories Practice of Pre-clinical Laboratory in 2003, or the GLP 2003, and began to conduct the certification program of the GLP. The GLP 2003 was then abolished and replaced by the Good Laboratories Practice of Pre-clinical Laboratory promulgated in 2017. In April 2007, the former SFDA promulgated the Administrative Measures for Certification of Good Laboratory Practice of Pre-clinical Laboratory, providing that the former SFDA (now the NMPA) is responsible for certification of nonclinical research institutions. According to the Administrative Measures for Certification of Good Laboratory Practice of Pre-clinical Laboratory, the former SFDA (now the NMPA) decides whether an institution is qualified for undertaking pharmaceutical nonclinical research upon the evaluation of the institution’s organizational administration, personnel, laboratory equipment and facilities and its operation and management of nonclinical pharmaceutical projects. If all requirements are met, a GLP Certification will be issued by the former SFDA (now the NMPA) and published on the government website.

109


 

Collecting and Using Patients’ Biospecimens and Derived Data

In June 1998, the Ministry of Science and Technology, or MOST, and the former MOH jointly established the Rules for Protecting and Utilizing Human Genetic Resources in China. In July 2015, the MOST issued the Service Guide for Administrative Licensing Items concerning Examination and Approval of Sampling, Collecting, Trading, Exporting Human Genetic Resources, or Taking Such Resources out of China, which provides that foreign-invested sponsors that collect and use patients’ biospecimens in clinical trials shall be required to file with the China Human Genetic Resources Administrative Office, or the HGRAO, through its online system.

In October 2017, the MOST issued the Circular on Optimizing the Administrative Examination and Approval of Human Genetic Resources, which simplified the approval for collecting and using human genetic resources for the purpose of commercializing a drug in China.

In June 2019, the State Council of PRC issued the Regulation on the Administration of PRC Human Genetic Resources, which formalized the approval requirements pertinent to research collaborations between Chinese and foreign-owned entities. Pursuant to this new rule, a new filing system (as opposed to the advance approval approach originally in place) is put in place for international clinical trials using PRC patients’ biospecimens at clinical study sites without involving the export of such biospecimens outside of China. Under the new rule, a notification filing specifying the type, quantity and usage of the biospecimens, among others, with the HGRAO is required before conducting such clinical trials. The collection and use of PRC patients’ biospecimens in international collaboration in basic scientific research involving export are still subject to the approval of the HGRAO.

Data Privacy and Data Protection

China continues to strengthen its regulation of network security, data protection, and personal information (including personal health information). For example, the Cyber Security Law of China, or the Cyber Security Law, which became effective in 2017, provides China’s first national-level network and data security regulation. The Cyber Security Law regulates network operators, a broad category that covers all organizations in China that own, operate or manage computer networks, and requires them to take certain organizational and technical measures to ensure the security of their networks and data stored on their networks.  Additional regulations, guidelines, and measures under the framework of the Cyber Security Law are expected to be adopted and require more stringent compliance requirements. Some of these measures have already been published in draft form, including the draft rules on cross-border data transfers published by the Cybersecurity Administration of China in 2017 and 2019, which if enacted, would require a security review before transferring personal health information out of mainland China. The Cyber Security Law, together with other industry-specific laws and regulations, also require us to obtain consent from clinical trial subjects, customers, and employees before collecting their personal information, including personal health information, take measures to keep personal information secure and confidential, and report security breaches involving personal information to competent industry regulators. These areas are expected to receive greater attention and focus from regulators.

Since our subsidiaries located in mainland China operate computer networks as part of their normal operations, we are required to comply with the requirements of the Cyber Security Law. In addition, in the ordinary course of our business, we collect and store personal information, including personal information about our clinical trial subjects, customers, and employees, in mainland China and we may need to share it with our subsidiaries, licensors, partners, or contractors located outside mainland China. China’s network and data protection regime is constantly evolving and we continue to face uncertainties as to whether our efforts to comply with these requirements will be sufficient. Although we develop and maintain compliance protocols and controls designed to maintain compliance with these requirements, development and maintenance of these protocols and controls is costly. In addition, our CROs, licensees, and partners are also required by law and our agreements with them to comply with these requirements, but there is always a risk that they may not fully comply with them. If our operations, or the operations of our CROs, licensees, or partners, are found to be in violation of these requirements, we may suffer loss or use of data, suffer a delay in obtaining regulatory approval for our products, be unable to transfer data out of mainland China, be unable to comply with our contractual requirements, suffer reputational harm, or be subject to penalties, including civil and criminal penalties, damages, fines and the curtailment or restructuring of our operations. If any of these were to occur, it could adversely affect our ability to operate our business and our financial results.

110


 

Animal Testing Permits

According to Regulations for the Administration of Affairs Concerning Experimental Animals promulgated by the State Science and Technology Commission in November 1988, as amended in January 2011, July 2013 and March 2017, and Administrative Measures on the Certificate for Animal Experimentation (Trial)  promulgated by the State Science and Technology Commission and other regulatory authorities in December 2001, performing experimentation on animals requires a Certificate for Use of Laboratory Animals. Applicants must satisfy the following conditions:

 

 

Laboratory animals must be qualified and sourced from institutions that have Certificates for Production of Laboratory Animals;

 

The environment and facilities for the animals’ living and propagating must meet state requirements;

 

The animals’ feed and water must meet state requirements;

 

The animals’ feeding and experimentation must be conducted by professionals, specialized and skilled workers, or other trained personnel;

 

The management systems must be effective and efficient; and

 

The applicable entity must follow other requirements as stipulated by Chinese laws and regulations.

Administrative measures for drug registration

In July 2007, the former SFDA released the Administrative Measures for Drug Registration which took effect on October 1, 2007. The Administrative Measures for Drug Registration covers (1) definitions of drug registration applications and regulatory responsibilities of the former CFDA; (2) general requirements for drug registration; (3) drug clinical trials; (4) application, examination and approval of drugs; (5) supplemental applications and re-registrations of drugs; (6) inspections; (7) registration standards and specifications; (8) time limit; (9) re-examination; and (10) liabilities and other supplementary provisions.

In January 2020, the SAMR released the Drug Registration Regulation, which will come into effect in July 2020. As compared to the current version, the Drug Registration Regulation provides detailed procedural and substantive requirements for the key regulatory concepts established by the PRC Drug Administration Law, confirms a number of reform actions that have been taken in the past years, including but not limited to: (i) the fully implementation of MAH System and implied approval of the commencement of clinical trial; (ii) implementing associated review of drugs, excipients and packaging materials; and (iii) introducing four procedures for expedited registration of drugs, which are procedures for ground-breaking therapeutic drugs, procedures for conditional approval, procedures for prioritized reviews and approval, and procedures for special examination and approval.

Regulations on the Clinical Trials and Registration of Drugs

Four Phases of Clinical Trials

According to the Administrative Measures for Drug Registration, a clinical development program consists of Phases I, II, III and IV. Phase I refers to the initial clinical pharmacology and safety evaluation studies in humans. Phase II refers to the preliminary evaluation of a drug candidate’s therapeutic effectiveness and safety for particular indication(s) in patients, which provides evidence and support for the design of Phase III clinical trials and settles the administrative dose regimen. Phase III refers to clinical trials undertaken to confirm the therapeutic effectiveness of a drug. Phase III is used to further verify the drug’s therapeutic effectiveness and safety on patients with target indication(s), to evaluate overall benefit-risk relationships of the drug, and ultimately to provide sufficient evidence for the review of drug registration application. Phase IV refers to a new drug’s post-marketing study to assess therapeutic effectiveness and adverse reactions when the drug is widely used, to evaluate overall benefit-risk relationships of the drug when used among the general population or specific groups and to adjust the administration dose, etc.

111


 

Approval Authority for Clinical Trial Applications

According to the Administrative Measures for Drug Registration, upon completion of its pre-clinical research, a research institution must apply for approval of a CTA before conducting clinical trials. As of May 1, 2017, the clinical trial approval can be directly issued by the Center for Drug Evaluation, or the CDE on behalf of the NMPA. This delegation of authority can shorten the approval timeline for the approval of a CTA.

In addition, pursuant to the Innovation Opinion and the Announcement on Adjusting the Evaluation and Approval Procedure of Drug Clinical Trial issued by the NMPA in July 2018, clinical trials may be commenced as long as the applicant has not received any objections from the CDE within 60 business days after the filing of the CTA, as opposed to the lengthier clinical trial pre-approval process, in which an affirmative approval from the NMPA must be obtained before the commencement of clinical trials. Such approval process has been further enacted into the 2019 Amendment.

Special Examination and Approval for Domestic Category 1 Drugs

According to the Administrative Measures for Drug Registration, drug registration applications are divided into three different types, namely Domestic New Drug Application, Domestic Generic Drug Application, and Imported Drug Application. Drugs fall into one of three general types divided by working mechanism, namely chemical medicine, biological product or traditional Chinese or natural medicine. Under the Administrative Measures for Drug Registration, a Category 1 drug refers to a new drug that has never been marketed in any country, and is eligible for special review or fast track approval by the former SFDA (now the NMPA).

In March 2016, the former CFDA issued the Reform Plan for Registration Category of Chemical Medicine, or the Reform Plan, which outlined the reclassifications of drug applications under the Administrative Measures for Drug Registration. Under the Reform Plan, Category 1 drugs refer to new drugs that have not been marketed anywhere in the world. Improved new drugs that are not marketed anywhere in the world fall into Category 2. Generic drugs, that have equivalent quality and efficacy to the originator’s drugs have been marketed abroad but not yet in China, fall into Category 3. Generic drugs, that have equivalent quality and efficacy to the originator’s drugs and have been marketed in China, fall into Category 4. Category 5 drugs are drugs which have already been marketed abroad, but are not yet approved in China. Category 1 drugs and Category 5 drugs can be registered through the Domestic New Drug Application and the Imported Drug Application procedures under the Administrative Measures for Drug Registration, respectively.

According to the Special Examination and Approval of Registration of New Drugs promulgated by the former SFDA on January 7, 2009, the former SFDA conducts special examination and approval for new drug registration applications when:

 

(1) the effective constituent of drug extracted from plants, animals, minerals, etc. as well as the preparations thereof have never been marketed in China, and the material medicines and the preparations thereof are newly discovered;

 

(2) the chemical raw material medicines as well as the preparations thereof and the biological product have not been approved for marketing home and abroad;

 

(3) the new drugs are for treating AIDS, malignant tumors and rare diseases, etc., and have obvious advantages in clinic treatment; or

 

(4) the new drugs are for treating diseases with no effective methods of treatment.

The Special Examination and Approval of Registration of New Drugs provide that the applicant may file for special examination and approval at the CTA stage if the drug candidate falls within items (1) or (2). The provisions provide that for drug candidates that fall within items (3) or (4), the application for special examination and approval cannot be made until filing for production.

We believe that our current drug candidates fall within items (2) and (3) above. Therefore, we may file an application for special examination and approval at the CTA stage, which may enable us to pursue a more expedited path to approval in China and bring therapies to patients more quickly.

112


 

Priority Review and Approval for Clinical Trial and Registration of Domestic Category 1 Drugs

The Circular Concerning Several Policies on Drug Registration Review and Approval issued by the former CFDA on November 11, 2015 further clarifies the following policies, potentially simplifying and accelerating the approval process of clinical trials: (x) a one-time umbrella approval procedure allowing the overall approval of all phases of clinical trials for a new drug, replacing the phase-by-phase application and approval procedure, will be adopted for new drugs’ clinical trial applications; and (y) a fast track drug registration or clinical trial approval pathway for the following applications: (1) registration of innovative new drugs treating AIDS, malignant tumors, serious infectious diseases and rare diseases; (2) registration of pediatric drugs; (3) registration of drugs treating specific or prevalent diseases in elders; (4) registration of drugs listed in national major science and technology projects or national key research and development plan; (5) registration of innovative drugs using advanced technology, using innovative treatment methods, or having distinctive clinical benefits; (6) registration of foreign innovative drugs to be manufactured locally in China; (7) concurrent applications for new drug clinical trials which are already approved in the United States or the European Union or concurrent drug registration applications for drugs which have applied to the competent drug approval authorities for marketing authorization and passed such authorities’ onsite inspections in the United States or the European Union and are manufactured using the same production line in China; and (8) CTA for drugs with urgent clinical need and patent expiry within three years, and manufacturing authorization applications for drugs with urgent clinical need and patent expiry within one year.

The Opinions on Encouraging Priority Review and Approval for Drug Innovations promulgated by the former CFDA on December 21, 2017 provides that a fast track clinical trial approval or drug registration pathway will be available to both innovative drugs with distinctive clinical benefits, which have not been sold within or outside China, and drugs using advanced technology, innovative treatment methods or having distinctive treatment advantages.

Drug Clinical Practice Reform and Compliance with GCP

In October 2017, the Chinese government announced an administrative reform of clinical trial institutions. Certification of clinical trial institutions by the former CFDA and the former NHFPC of the PRC is no longer required. Under this reform, a clinical trial institution can be engaged by a drug marketing authorization applicant (i.e., a sponsor) to conduct a drug clinical study after it has been duly recorded with the online platform designated by the NMPA. On November 29, 2019, pursuant to the 2019 Amendment, the NMPA and the NHC jointly released the Rules for Administration of the Drug Clinical Trial Institutions, which became effective on December 1, 2019.  The Rules specify requirements for clinical trial institutions and recordal procedures. Pursuant to the Rules, a clinical trial institution should comply with the requirements of the Good Clinical Practice, or GCP, and be capable of undertaking pharmaceutical clinical trials. It should evaluate or engage a third party to evaluate its clinical trial proficiency, facilities and expertise. According to the PRC Implementing Regulations of the Drug Administration Law, a drug marketing authorization applicant should only engage a duly recorded clinical trial institution to carry out a drug clinical trial.

The conduct of clinical trials must adhere to the GCP and the protocols approved by the ethics committees of each study site. Since 2015, the former CFDA has strengthened the enforcement against widespread data integrity issues associated with clinical trials in China. To ensure authenticity and reliability of the clinical data, the former CFDA mandated applicants of the pending drug registration submissions to conduct self-inspection and verification of their clinical trial data. Based on the submitted self-inspection results, the former CFDA also regularly launched onsite clinical trial audits over selected applications and reject those found with data forgery. The GCP audit has been ongoing and was able to curb the number of unreliable NDAs.

In April 2020, the NMPA and the NHC released the Amended GCP, which will take effect on July 1, 2020. Compared to the current GCP, the Amended GCP provides comprehensive and substantive requirements on the design and conduct of clinical trials in China. In particular, the Amended GCP enhances the protection for study subjects and tightens the control over bio-samples collected under clinical trials. We will need to review our current clinical trials and adapt the design and execution of our current clinical trials to any new requirements imposed by the Amended GCP.

The Marketing Authorization Holder System

Under the authorization of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress, the State Council issued the Pilot Plan for the Drug Marketing Authorization Holder Mechanism on May 26, 2016, which provides a detailed pilot plan for the MAH System, for drugs in 10 provinces in China. Under the MAH System, domestic drug research and development institutions and individuals in the piloted regions are eligible to be holders of drug registrations without having to become drug manufacturers. Drugs qualified for the MAH System are: (1) new drugs (including but not limited to Category 1 and 2 drugs under the Reform Plan) approved after the implementation of the MAH System; (2)

113


 

generic drugs approved as Category 3 or 4 drugs under the Reform Plan; (3) previously approved generics that have passed the equivalence assessments against originator drugs; and (4) previously approved drugs whose licenses were held by drug manufacturers originally located within the piloted regions, but have been moved out of the piloted regions due to corporate mergers or other reasons. The Pilot Plan was originally set for a 3-year period, and would end in December 2018. Effective as of November 5, 2018, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress decided to extend the pilot program for another year.

The newly amended PRC Drug Administration Law purports to roll out this MAH system nationwide. Companies and research and development institutions can be drug marketing authorization holders after they receive the drug registration certificates. The drug marketing authorization holder should be responsible for their products throughout the life cycle, including nonclinical studies, clinical trials, production and distribution, post-market studies, and the monitoring, reporting, and handling of adverse reactions in connection with pharmaceuticals in accordance with the PRC Drug Administration Law. The marketing authorization holders may engage contract manufacturers for manufacturing, provided that the contract manufacturers are licensed and may engage pharmaceutical distribution enterprises with drug distribution license for the distribution activities. Upon receiving the marketing authorizations from the NMPA, a drug marketing authorization holder may transfer its drug marketing authorization and the transferee should have the capability of quality management, risk prevention and control, and liability compensation to ensure the safety, effectiveness and quality controllability of drugs, and fulfill the obligations of the drug marketing authorization holder.  

Administrative Protection and Monitoring Periods for New Drugs

According to the Administrative Measures for Drug Registration, the PRC Implementing Regulations of the Drug Administration Law and the Reform Plan, the NMPA may, for the purpose of protecting public health, provide for an administrative monitoring period of not more than five years for Category 1 new drugs approved to be manufactured, commencing from the date of approval, to continually monitor the safety of those new drugs.

During the monitoring period of a new drug, the NMPA will not accept other applications for new drugs containing the same active ingredient. This renders an actual five-year exclusivity protection for Category 1 new drugs. The only exception is that the NMPA will continue to handle any application if, prior to the commencement of the monitoring period, the NMPA has already approved the applicant’s clinical trial for a similar new drug. If such application conforms to the relevant provisions, the NMPA may approve such applicant to manufacture or import the similar new drug during the remainder of the monitoring period. The Drug Registration Regulation, which will come into effect in July 2020, omits the provisions relating to the administrative exclusivity created by the new drug monitoring period.

Non-Inferiority Standard

In China, a drug may receive regulatory approval without showing superiority in its primary endpoint. Rather, a drug may be approved for use if it shows non-inferiority in its primary endpoint and superiority in one of its secondary endpoints.

New Drug Application

When Phases I, II and III of the clinical trials have been completed, the applicant may apply to the NMPA for approval of an NDA. The NMPA then determines whether to approve the application according to the comprehensive evaluation opinion provided by the CDE of the NMPA. We must obtain approval of an NDA before our drugs can be manufactured and sold in the China market.

According to the Opinions on Encouraging Priority Review and Approval for Drug Innovations, for new drugs which are developed for severe, life-threatening diseases currently lacking effective treatment and have great significance for meeting clinical needs, if, based on early-stage clinical trial data, the clinical benefits of such drugs can be reasonably predicted or decided and such drugs have distinctive advantages comparing with existing treatments, such new drugs may obtain a conditional approval for marketing before the completion of Phase III clinical trials undertaken to confirm its therapeutic effectiveness. Such conditional approval process has been further enacted into the 2019 Amendment.

114


 

International Multi-Center Clinical Trials Regulations

On January 30, 2015, the former CFDA promulgated Notice on Issuing the International Multi-Center Clinical Trial Guidelines (Tentative), or the Multi-Center Clinical Trial Guidelines, which took effect as of March 1, 2015, aiming to provide guidance for the regulation of application, implementation and administration of international multi-center clinical trials in China. Pursuant to the Multi-Center Clinical Trial Guidelines, international multi-center clinical trial applicants may simultaneously perform clinical trials in different centers using the same clinical trial protocol. Where the applicant plans to make use of the data derived from the international multi-center clinical trials for application to NMPA for approval of an NDA, such international multi-center clinical trials shall satisfy, in addition to the requirements set forth in the PRC Drug Administration Law and its implementation regulations, Administrative Measures for Drug Registration and relevant laws and regulations, the following requirements:

 

The applicant shall first conduct an overall evaluation on the global clinical trial data and further make trend analysis of the Asian and Chinese clinical trial data. In the analysis of Chinese clinical trial data, the applicant shall consider the representativeness of the research subjects, i.e., the participating patients;

 

The applicant shall analyze whether the amount of Chinese research subjects is sufficient to assess and adjudicate the safety and effectiveness of the drug under clinical trial, and satisfy the statistical and relevant legal requirements; and

 

The onshore and offshore international multi-center clinical trial research centers shall be subject to on-site inspections by competent PRC governmental agencies.

International multi-center clinical trials shall follow international prevailing GCP principles and ethics requirements. Applications shall ensure the truthfulness, reliability and trustworthiness of clinical trials results; the researchers shall have the qualification and capability to perform relevant clinical trials; and an ethics committee shall continuously review the trials and protect the subjects’ interests, benefits and safety. Before the performance of the international multi-center clinical trial, applicants shall obtain clinical trial approvals or complete filings pursuant to requirements under the local regulations where clinical trials are conducted, and register and disclose the information of all major researchers and clinical trial organizations on the NMPA’s drug clinical trial information platform.

Data derived from international multi-center clinical trials can be used for the NDAs with the NMPA. When using international multi-center clinical trial data to support NDAs in China, applicants shall submit the completed global clinical trial report, statistical analysis report and database, along with relevant supporting data in accordance with ICH-CTD (International Conference on Harmonization-Common Technical Document) content and format requirements; subgroup research results summary and comparative analysis shall also be conducted concurrently.

Leveraging the clinical trial data derived from international multi-center clinical trials conducted by our partners, we may avoid unnecessary repetitive clinical trials and thus further accelerate the NDA process in China.

In October, 2017, the former CFDA released the Decision on Adjusting Items concerning the Administration of Imported Drug Registration, which includes the following key points:

 

If the International Multicenter Clinical Trial, or IMCCT, of a drug is conducted in China, the IMCCT drug does not need to be approved or entered into either a Phase II or III clinical trial in a foreign country, except for preventive biological products. Phase I IMCCT is permissible in China.

 

If the IMCCT is conducted in China, the application for drug marketing authorization can be submitted directly after the completion of the IMCCT.

 

With respect to clinical trial and market authorization applications for imported innovative chemical drugs and therapeutic biological products, the marketing authorization in the country or region where the foreign drug manufacturer is located will not be required.

 

With respect to drug applications that have been accepted before the release of this Decision, if relevant requirements are met, importation permission can be granted if such applications request exemption of clinical trials for the imported drugs based on the data generated from IMCCT.

115


 

Trial Exemptions and Acceptance of Foreign Clinical Trial Data

On July 6, 2018, the NMPA issued the Technical Guidance Principles on Accepting Foreign Drug Clinical Trial Data, or Guidance Principles, as one of the implementing rules for the Innovation Opinion. According to the Guidance Principles, the data of foreign clinical trials must meet the authenticity, completeness, accuracy and traceability requirements, and such data must be obtained in consistency with the relevant requirements under the GCP of the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use. Clinical trial sponsors must be attentive to potentially meaningful ethnic differences in the subject population.

The NMPA now permits, and its predecessor agencies have permitted on a case-by-case basis in the past, drugs approved outside of China to be approved in China on a conditional basis without pre-approval clinical trials being conducted in China. Specifically, in 2018, the NMPA and NHC issued the Procedures for Reviewing and Approval of Clinical Urgently Needed Overseas New Drugs, permitting drugs that have been approved within the last ten years in the United States, the European Union or Japan and that prevent or treat orphan diseases or prevent or treat serious life-threatening illnesses for which there is either no effective therapy in China or for which the foreign-approved drug would have clear clinical advantages. Applicants will be required to establish a risk mitigation plan and may be required to complete trials in China after the drug has been marketed. The CDE has developed a list of qualifying drugs that meet the foregoing criteria.

Drug Technology Transfer Regulations

On August 19, 2009, the former SFDA promulgated the Administrative Regulations for Technology Transfer Registration of Drugs to standardize the registration process of drug technology transfer, which includes application for, and evaluation, examination, approval and monitoring of, drug technology transfer. Drug technology transfer refers to the transfer of drug production technology by the owner to a drug manufacturer and the application for drug registration by the transferee according to the provisions in the new regulations. Drug technology transfer includes new drug technology transfer and drug production technology transfer.

Conditions for the Application for New Drug Technology Transfer

Applications for new drug technology transfer may be submitted prior to the expiration date of the monitoring period of the new drugs with respect to:

 

drugs with new drug certificates only; or

 

drugs with new drug certificates and drug approval numbers.

For drugs with new drug certificates only and not yet in the monitoring period, or drug substances with new drug certificates, applications for new drug technology transfer should be submitted prior to the respective expiration date of the monitoring periods for each drug registration category set forth in the new regulations and after the issue date of the new drug certificates.

Conditions for the Application of Drug Production Technology Transfer

Applications for drug production technology transfer may be submitted if:

 

the transferor holds new drug certificates or both new drug certificates and drug approval numbers, and the monitoring period has expired or there is no monitoring period; or

 

with respect to drugs without new drug certificates, both the transferor and the transferee are legally qualified drug manufacturing enterprises, one of which holds over 50% of the equity interests in the other, or both of which are majority-owned subsidiaries of the same drug manufacturing enterprise.

With respect to imported drugs with imported drug licenses, the original applicants for the imported drug registration may transfer these drugs to domestic drug manufacturing enterprises.

116


 

Application for, and Examination and Approval of, Drug Technology Transfer

Applications for drug technology transfer should be submitted to the provincial administration of medical products where the transferee is located. If the transferor and the transferee are located in different provinces, the provincial administration of medical products where the transferor is located should provide examination opinions. The provincial administration of medical products where the transferee is located is responsible for examining application materials for technology transfer and organizing inspections on the production facilities of the transferee. Drug control institutes are responsible for testing three batches of drug samples.

The CDE should further review the application materials, provide technical evaluation opinions and form a comprehensive evaluation opinion based on the site inspection reports and the testing results of the samples. The NMPA should determine whether to approve the application according to the comprehensive evaluation opinion of the CDE. An approval letter of supplementary application and a drug approval number will be issued to qualified applications. A Clinical Trial Authorization will be issued when necessary. For rejected applications, a notification letter of the examination opinions will be issued with the reasons for rejection.

Permits and Licenses for Manufacturing of Drugs

Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Permit

To manufacture pharmaceutical products in the PRC, a pharmaceutical manufacturing enterprise must first obtain a Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Permit issued by the relevant pharmaceutical administrative authorities at the provincial level where the enterprise is located. Among other things, such a permit must set forth the permit number, the name, legal representative and registered address of the enterprise, the site and scope of production, issuing institution, date of issuance and effective period.

Each Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Permit issued to a pharmaceutical manufacturing enterprise is effective for a period of five years. Any enterprise holding a Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Permit is subject to review by the relevant regulatory authorities on an annual basis. The enterprise is required to apply for renewal of such permit within six months prior to its expiry and will be subject to reassessment by the issuing authorities in accordance with then prevailing legal and regulatory requirements for the purposes of such renewal.

Business Licenses

In addition to a Pharmaceutical Manufacturing permit, the manufacturing enterprise must also obtain a business license from the Administration of Market Regulation at the local level. The name, legal representative and registered address of the enterprise specified in the business license must be identical to that set forth in the Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Permit.

GMP Requirements

The World Health Organization encourages the adoption of good manufacturing practice, or GMP, standards in pharmaceutical production in order to minimize the risks involved in any pharmaceutical production that cannot be eliminated through testing the final products.

Pursuant to the newly amended PRC Drug Administration Law, the GMP certification has been cancelled. A GMP certification previously certifies that a manufacturer’s factory and quality management system have met certain criteria for engaging in the planning and manufacturing of drug products, which address institution and staff qualifications, production premises and facilities, equipment, hygiene conditions, production management, quality controls, product operation, maintenance of sales records and manner of handling customer complaints and adverse reaction reports. In January 2011, the former MOH issued an updated set of GMP standards, also known as the new GMP, to replace the previous version issued in 1998. There are also five annexes to the new GMP issued by the former SFDA in February 2011, with detailed requirements for the manufacture of sterile drugs, drug/substances/APIs, biologics, blood products and traditional Chinese medicines. Several additional annexes were published in the next few years in succession, including but not limited to annexes with respect to the requirements for IT systems, radiopharmaceuticals, biochemical drugs, etc.

117


 

With the cancellation of GMP certification, drug manufacturing enterprises are still required to strictly comply with GMP requirements. The NMPA and its provincial branches are authorized to monitor the continued compliance of pharmaceutical manufacturers, for example, by a follow-up inspection of implementation of the GMP requirements. Failure to continuously comply with the statutory requirements may lead to rectification orders imposed on the manufacturers. Penalties for breach of GMP compliance can vary depending on the degree of seriousness. Administrative sanctions range from a rectification notice to monetary fines, suspension of production and business operation, and revocation of the pharmaceutical manufacturing permit.

U.S. Regulation of Pharmaceutical Product Development and Approval

In the United States, the FDA regulates drugs under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, and its implementing regulations. Drugs are also subject to other federal, state and local statutes and regulations. The process of obtaining marketing approvals and the subsequent compliance with appropriate federal, state and local rules and regulations requires the expenditure of substantial time and financial resources. Failure to comply with the applicable U.S. regulatory requirements at any time during the product development process, approval process or after approval may subject an applicant and/or sponsor to a variety of administrative or judicial sanctions. These sanctions could include, among other actions, FDA’s refusal to approve pending applications, withdrawal of an approval, imposition of a clinical hold, issuance of warning letters and other types of enforcement-related letters, product recalls, product seizures, total or partial suspension of production or distribution, injunctions, fines, refusals of government contracts, restitution, disgorgement of profits, or civil or criminal investigations and penalties brought by FDA and the Department of Justice, or DOJ, or other governmental entities. Our drug candidates must be approved by the FDA through the NDA process before they may be legally marketed in the United States. The process required by the FDA before a drug may be marketed in the U.S. generally involves the following:

 

completion of extensive pre-clinical studies, sometimes referred to as pre-clinical laboratory tests, pre-clinical animal studies and formulation studies all performed in compliance with applicable regulations, including the FDA’s GLP regulations;

 

submission to the FDA of an IND which must become effective before human clinical trials may begin and must be updated annually;

 

approval by an independent IRB representing each clinical site before each clinical trial may be initiated;

 

performance of adequate and well-controlled human clinical trials in accordance with applicable good clinical practices, or GCPs and other clinical trial-related regulations, to establish the safety and efficacy of the proposed drug product for its proposed indication;

 

preparation and submission to the FDA of an NDA;

 

a determination by the FDA within 60 days of its receipt of an NDA to file the NDA for review and review by an FDA advisory committee, where appropriate or if applicable;

 

satisfactory completion of an FDA pre-approval inspection of the manufacturing facility or facilities at which the API and finished drug product are produced to assess compliance with the FDA’s cGMP;

 

potential FDA audit of the pre-clinical and/or clinical trial sites that generated the data in support of the NDA; and

 

payment of user fees and FDA review and approval of the NDA prior to any commercial marketing or sale of the drug in the United States.

Pre-clinical Studies

The data required to support an NDA is generated in two distinct development stages: pre-clinical and clinical. For new chemical entities, or NCEs, the pre-clinical development stage generally involves synthesizing the active component, developing the formulation and determining the manufacturing process, evaluating purity and stability, as well as carrying out non-human toxicology, pharmacology and drug metabolism studies in the laboratory, which support subsequent clinical testing. The conduct of the pre-clinical tests must comply with federal regulations, including GLPs

118


 

and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal Welfare Act. The sponsor must submit the results of the pre-clinical tests, together with manufacturing information, analytical data, any available clinical data or literature and a proposed clinical protocol, to the FDA as part of the IND. An IND is a request for authorization from the FDA to administer an investigational drug product to humans. The central focus of an IND submission is on the general investigational plan and the protocol(s) for human trials. The IND automatically becomes effective 30 days after receipt by the FDA, unless the FDA raises concerns or questions regarding the proposed clinical trials and places the IND on clinical hold within that 30-day time period. In such a case, the IND sponsor and the FDA must resolve any outstanding concerns or questions before the clinical trial can begin. Some long-term pre-clinical testing, such as animal tests of reproductive adverse events and carcinogenicity, may continue after the IND is submitted. The FDA may also impose clinical holds on a drug candidate at any time before or during clinical trials due to safety concerns or non-compliance. Accordingly, submission of an IND does not guarantee the FDA will allow clinical trials to begin, or that, once begun, issues will not arise that could cause the trial to be suspended or terminated.

Clinical Studies

The clinical stage of development involves the administration of the drug product to human subjects or patients under the supervision of qualified investigators, generally physicians not employed by or under the trial sponsor’s control, in accordance with GCPs, which establish standards for conducting, recording data from, and reporting the results of, clinical trials, and are intended to assure that the data and reported results are accurate, and that the rights, safety, and well-being of study participants are protected. GCPs also include the requirement that all research subjects provide their informed consent in writing for their participation in any clinical trial. Clinical trials are conducted under written study protocols detailing, among other things, the objectives of the clinical trial, dosing procedures, subject selection and exclusion criteria, and the parameters to be used to monitor subject safety and assess efficacy. Each protocol, and any subsequent amendments to the protocol, must be submitted to the FDA as part of the IND. Further, each clinical trial must be reviewed and approved by each institution at which the clinical trial will be conducted. An IRB is charged with protecting the welfare and rights of trial participants and considers such items as whether the risks to individuals participating in the clinical trials are minimized and are reasonable in relation to anticipated benefits. The IRB also reviews and approves the informed consent form that must be provided to each clinical trial subject or his or her legal representative and must monitor the clinical trial until completed. There are also requirements governing the reporting of ongoing clinical trials and completed clinical trial results to public registries. For example, information about certain clinical trials must be submitted within specific timeframes to the National Institutes of Health for public dissemination on their ClinicalTrials.gov website.

Clinical trials are generally conducted in three sequential phases that may overlap or be combined, known as Phase I, Phase II and Phase III clinical trials.

 

Phase I: The drug is initially introduced into a small number of healthy volunteers who are initially exposed to a single dose and then multiple doses of the drug candidate. The primary purpose of these clinical trials is to assess the metabolism, pharmacologic action, side effect tolerability and safety of the drug.

 

Phase II: The drug is administered to a limited patient population to determine dose tolerance and optimal dosage required to produce the desired benefits. At the same time, safety and further pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic information is collected, as well as identification of possible adverse effects and safety risks and preliminary evaluation of efficacy.

 

Phase III: The drug is administered to an expanded number of patients, generally at multiple sites that are geographically dispersed, in well-controlled clinical trials to generate enough data to demonstrate the efficacy of the drug for its intended use, its safety profile, and to establish the overall benefit/risk profile of the drug and provide an adequate basis for drug approval and labeling of the drug product. Phase III clinical trials may include comparisons with placebo and/or other comparator treatments. Post-approval trials, sometimes referred to as Phase IV clinical trials, may be conducted after initial marketing approval. These trials are used to gain additional experience from the treatment of patients in the intended therapeutic indication. In certain instances, FDA may mandate the performance of Phase IV clinical trials.

Progress reports detailing the results of the clinical trials must be submitted at least annually to the FDA, and more frequently if serious adverse events occur. Written IND safety reports must be submitted to the FDA and the investigators for serious and unexpected adverse events or any finding from tests in laboratory animals that suggests a significant risk to human subjects. The FDA, the IRB, or the clinical trial sponsor may suspend or terminate a clinical

119


 

trial at any time on various grounds, including a finding that the research subjects or patients are being exposed to an unacceptable health risk. The FDA will typically inspect one or more clinical sites to assure compliance with GCP and the integrity of the clinical data submitted. Similarly, an IRB can suspend or terminate approval of a clinical trial at its institution, or an institution it represents, if the clinical trial is not being conducted in accordance with the IRB’s requirements or if the drug has been associated with unexpected serious harm to patients. Additionally, some clinical trials are overseen by an independent group of qualified experts organized by the clinical trial sponsor, known as a data safety monitoring board or committee. This group provides authorization for whether or not a trial may move forward at designated check points based on access to certain data from the trial. Concurrent with clinical trials, companies usually complete additional animal studies and must also develop additional information about the chemistry and physical characteristics of the drug as well as finalize a process for manufacturing the drug in commercial quantities in accordance with cGMP requirements. The manufacturing process must be capable of consistently producing quality batches of the drug candidate and, among other things, cGMPs impose extensive procedural, substantive and recordkeeping requirements to ensure and preserve the long term stability and quality of the final drug product. Additionally, appropriate packaging must be selected and tested and stability studies must be conducted to demonstrate that the drug candidate does not undergo unacceptable deterioration over its shelf life.

NDA Submission and FDA Review Process

The results of non-clinical studies and of the clinical trials, together with other detailed information, including extensive manufacturing information and information on the composition of the drug and proposed labeling, are submitted to the FDA in the form of an NDA requesting approval to market the drug for one or more specified indications. The FDA reviews an NDA to determine, among other things, whether a drug is safe and effective for its intended use and whether the product is being manufactured in accordance with cGMP to assure and preserve the product’s identity, strength, quality and purity. FDA approval of an NDA must be obtained before a drug may be offered for sale in the United States.

Under the Prescription Drug User Fee Act, or PDUFA, as amended, each NDA must be accompanied by an application user fee. The FDA adjusts the PDUFA user fees on an annual basis. According to the FDA’s fee schedule, effective through September 30, 2020, the user fee for an application requiring clinical data, such as an NDA, is approximately $2.9 million. PDUFA also imposes an annual prescription drug program fee for human drugs of approximately $325,000. Fee waivers or reductions are available in certain circumstances, including a waiver of the application fee for the first application filed by a small business. Additionally, no user fees are assessed on NDAs for products designated as orphan drugs, unless the product also includes a non-orphan indication.

The FDA reviews all NDAs submitted before it accepts them for filing and may request additional information rather than accepting an NDA for filing. The FDA conducts a preliminary review of an NDA within 60 days of receipt. Once the submission is accepted for filing, the FDA begins an in-depth review of the NDA. Under the goals and policies agreed to by the FDA under PDUFA, the FDA aims to complete its initial review of an NDA and respond to the applicant within 10 months from the filing date for a standard NDA and, and within six months from the filing date for a priority NDA. The FDA does not always meet its PDUFA goal dates for standard and priority review NDAs, and the review process is often significantly extended by FDA requests for additional information or clarification.

After the NDA submission is accepted for filing, the FDA reviews the NDA to determine, among other things, whether the proposed drug is safe and effective for its intended use, and whether the drug is being manufactured in accordance with cGMP to assure and preserve the drug’s identity, strength, quality and purity. The FDA may refer applications for novel drugs or drug candidates that present difficult questions of safety or efficacy to an advisory committee, typically a panel that includes clinicians and other experts, for review, evaluation and a recommendation as to whether the application should be approved and under what conditions. The FDA is not bound by the recommendations of an advisory committee, but it considers such recommendations carefully when making decisions. The FDA may re-analyze the clinical trial data, which can result in extensive discussions between the FDA and us during the review process.

Before approving an NDA, the FDA will conduct a pre-approval inspection of the manufacturing facilities for the new drug to determine whether they comply with cGMPs. The FDA will not approve the drug unless it determines that the manufacturing processes and facilities are in compliance with cGMP requirements and adequate to assure consistent production of the drug within required specifications. In addition, before approving an NDA, the FDA may also audit data from clinical trials to ensure compliance with GCP requirements. After the FDA evaluates the application, manufacturing process and manufacturing facilities where the drug product and/or its API will be produced, it may issue

120


 

an approval letter or a Complete Response Letter, or CRL. An approval letter authorizes commercial marketing of the drug with specific prescribing information for specific indications. A CRL indicates that the review cycle of the application is complete and the application is not ready for approval. A CRL usually describes all of the specific deficiencies in the NDA identified by the FDA. The CRL may require additional clinical data and/or an additional pivotal clinical trial(s), and/or other significant, expensive and time-consuming requirements related to clinical trials, pre-clinical studies or manufacturing. If a CRL is issued, the applicant may either resubmit the NDA, addressing all of the deficiencies identified in the letter, or withdraw the application. Even if such data and information is submitted, the FDA may ultimately decide that the NDA does not satisfy the criteria for approval. Data obtained from clinical trials are not always conclusive and the FDA may interpret data differently than we interpret the same data.

If a drug receives marketing approval, the approval may be significantly limited to specific diseases, dosages, or patient populations or the indications for use may otherwise be limited. Further, the FDA may require that certain contraindications, warnings or precautions be included in the drug labeling or may condition the approval of the NDA on other changes to the proposed labeling, development of adequate controls and specifications, or a commitment to conduct post-market testing or clinical trials and surveillance to monitor the effects of approved drugs. For example, the FDA may require Phase IV testing which involves clinical trials designed to further assess a drug’s safety and effectiveness and may require testing and surveillance programs to monitor the safety of approved drugs that have been commercialized. The FDA may also place other conditions on approvals including the requirement for a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy, or REMS, to ensure that the benefits of a drug or biological product outweigh its risks. If the FDA concludes a REMS is needed, the sponsor of the NDA must submit a proposed REMS. The FDA will not approve the NDA without an approved REMS, if required. A REMS could include medication guides, physician communication plans, or elements to assure safe use, such as restricted distribution methods, patient registries and other risk minimization tools. Any of these limitations on approval or marketing could restrict the commercial promotion, distribution, prescription or dispensing of drugs. Drug approvals may be withdrawn for non-compliance with regulatory standards or if problems occur following initial marketing.

Pediatric Trials

Under the Pediatric Research Equity Act of 2003, a NDA or supplement thereto must contain data that are adequate to assess the safety and effectiveness of the drug product for the claimed indications in all relevant pediatric subpopulations, and to support dosing and administration for each pediatric subpopulation for which the product is safe and effective. With the enactment of FDASIA in 2012 , a sponsor who is planning to submit a marketing application for a drug that includes a new active ingredient, new indication, new dosage form, new dosing regimen or new route of administration must also submit an initial Pediatric Study Plan, or PSP, within sixty days of an end-of-Phase II meeting or as may be agreed between the sponsor and FDA. The initial PSP must include an outline of the pediatric study or studies that the sponsor plans to conduct, including study objectives and design, age groups, relevant endpoints and statistical approach, or a justification for not including such detailed information, and any request for a deferral of pediatric assessments or a full or partial waiver of the requirement to provide data from pediatric studies along with supporting information. FDA and the sponsor must reach agreement on the PSP. A sponsor can submit amendments to an agreed-upon initial PSP at any time if changes to the pediatric plan need to be considered based on data collected from pre-clinical studies, early phase clinical trials, and/or other clinical development programs.

Orphan Drug Designation and Exclusivity

Under the Orphan Drug Act, FDA may designate a drug product as an “orphan drug” if it is intended to treat a rare disease or condition (generally meaning that it affects fewer than 200,000 individuals in the United States, or more in cases in which there is no reasonable expectation that the cost of developing and making a drug product available in the United States for treatment of the disease or condition will be recovered from sales of the product). A company must request orphan product designation before submitting a NDA. If the request is granted, FDA will publicly disclose the identity of the therapeutic agent and its potential use. Orphan product designation does not convey any advantage in or shorten the duration of the regulatory review and approval process, but the product will be entitled to orphan product exclusivity, meaning that FDA may not approve any other applications for the same product for the same indication for seven years, except in certain limited circumstances. Competitors may receive approval of different products for the indication for which the orphan product has exclusivity and may obtain approval for the same product but for a different indication. If a drug or drug product designated as an orphan product ultimately receives marketing approval for an indication broader than what was designated in its orphan product application, it may not be entitled to exclusivity.

121


 

Post-Marketing Requirements

Following approval of a new drug, a pharmaceutical company and the approved drug are subject to continuing regulation by the FDA, including, among other things, monitoring and recordkeeping activities, reporting to the applicable regulatory authorities of adverse experiences with the drug, providing the regulatory authorities with updated safety and efficacy information, drug sampling and distribution requirements, and complying with applicable promotion and advertising requirements, which include, among others, standards for direct-to-consumer advertising, restrictions on promoting drugs for uses or in patient populations that are not described in the drug’s approved labeling (known as “off-label use”), limitations on industry-sponsored scientific and educational activities, and requirements for promotional activities involving the internet. Although physicians may legally prescribe drugs for off-label uses, manufacturers may not market or promote such off-label uses. Modifications or enhancements to the drug or its labeling or changes of the site of manufacture are often subject to the approval of the FDA and other regulators, which may or may not be received or may result in a lengthy review process.

FDA regulations also require that approved products be manufactured in specific approved facilities and in accordance with cGMP. We rely, and expect to continue to rely, on third parties for the production of clinical and commercial quantities of our products in accordance with cGMP regulations. NDA holders using contract manufacturers, laboratories or packagers are responsible for the selection and monitoring of qualified firms, and, in certain circumstances, qualified suppliers to these firms. These manufacturers must comply with cGMP regulations that require, among other things, quality control and quality assurance as well as the corresponding maintenance of records and documentation and the obligation to investigate and correct any deviations from cGMP. Drug manufacturers and other entities involved in the manufacture and distribution of approved drugs are required to register their establishments with the FDA and certain state agencies, and are subject to periodic unannounced inspections by the FDA and certain state agencies for compliance with cGMP and other laws. Accordingly, manufacturers must continue to expend time, money, and effort in the area of production and quality control to maintain cGMP compliance. The discovery of violative conditions, including failure to conform to cGMP, could result in enforcement actions that interrupt the operation of any such facilities or the ability to distribute products manufactured, processed or tested by them. Discovery of problems with a product after approval may result in restrictions on a product, manufacturer, or holder of an approved NDA, including, among other things, recall or withdrawal of the product from the market. Discovery of previously unknown problems with a drug or the failure to comply with applicable FDA requirements can have negative consequences, including adverse publicity, judicial or administrative enforcement, warning letters from the FDA, mandated corrective advertising or communications with doctors, and civil or criminal penalties, among others. Newly discovered or developed safety or effectiveness data may require changes to a drug’s approved labeling, including the addition of new warnings and contraindications, and also may require the implementation of other risk management measures. Also, new government requirements, including those resulting from new legislation, may be established, or the FDA’s policies may change, which could delay or prevent regulatory approval of our drugs under development.

Other U.S. Regulatory Matters

Manufacturing, sales, promotion and other activities following drug approval are also subject to regulation by numerous regulatory authorities in addition to the FDA, including, in the United States, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, other divisions of the Department of Health and Human Services, the Drug Enforcement Administration for controlled substances, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the Federal Trade Commission, the Occupational Safety & Health Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency and state and local governments. In the United States, the activities of pharmaceutical manufacturers are subject to federal and state laws designed to prevent “fraud and abuse” in the healthcare industry. The laws generally limit financial interactions between manufacturers and health care providers or other participants in the healthcare industry and/or require disclosure to the government and public of such interactions. Many of these laws and regulations contain ambiguous requirements or require administrative guidance for implementation. Pharmaceutical manufacturers are also required to provide discounts or rebates under government healthcare programs or to certain government and private purchasers in order to obtain coverage under federal healthcare programs such as Medicaid. Participation in such programs may require tracking and reporting of certain drug prices. Manufacturers are subject to fines and other penalties if such prices are not reported accurately. The handling of any controlled substances must comply with the U.S. Controlled Substances Act and Controlled Substances Import and Export Act. Drugs must meet applicable child-resistant packaging requirements under the U.S. Poison Prevention Packaging Act. Manufacturing, sales, promotion and other activities are also potentially subject to federal and state consumer protection and unfair competition laws.

122


 

The distribution of pharmaceutical drugs is subject to additional requirements and regulations, including extensive record-keeping, licensing, storage and security requirements intended to prevent the unauthorized sale of pharmaceutical drugs.

The failure to comply with regulatory requirements subjects manufacturers to possible legal or regulatory action. Depending on the circumstances, failure to meet applicable regulatory requirements can result in criminal prosecution, fines or other penalties, injunctions, recall or seizure of drugs, total or partial suspension of production, denial or withdrawal of product approvals, exclusion from participation in government healthcare programs or refusal to allow a firm to enter into supply contracts, including government contracts. In addition, even if a firm complies with FDA and other requirements, new information regarding the safety or efficacy of a product could lead the FDA to modify or withdraw product approval. Prohibitions or restrictions on sales or withdrawal of future products marketed by us could materially affect our business in an adverse way.

Changes in regulations, statutes or the interpretation of existing regulations could impact our business in the future by requiring, for example: (i) changes to our manufacturing arrangements; (ii) additions or modifications to product labeling; (iii) the recall or discontinuation of our products; or (iv) additional record-keeping requirements. If any such changes were to be imposed, they could adversely affect the operation of our business.

Rest of the World Regulation of Pharmaceutical Product Development and Approval

For other countries outside of China and the United States, such as countries in Europe, Latin America or other parts of Asia, the requirements governing the conduct of clinical trials, drug licensing, pricing and reimbursement vary from country to country. In all cases the clinical trials must be conducted in accordance with applicable GCP requirements and the applicable regulatory requirements and ethical principles.

If we fail to comply with applicable foreign regulatory requirements, we may be subject to, among other things, fines, suspension or withdrawal of regulatory approvals, product recalls, seizure of products, operating restrictions and criminal prosecution.

Coverage and Reimbursement

PRC Coverage and Reimbursement

Historically, most Chinese healthcare costs had been borne by patients out-of-pocket, which had limited the growth of more expensive pharmaceutical products. However, in recent years the number of people covered by government and private insurance has increased. According to the PRC National Bureau of Statistics, as of December 2018, approximately 1.3 billion urban employees and residents in China were enrolled in the national medical insurance program, representing a coverage rate of 95% of the total population. The PRC government has announced a plan to give every person in China access to basic healthcare by year 2020.

Reimbursement under the National Medical Insurance Program

The national medical insurance program was adopted pursuant to the Decision of the State Council on the Establishment of the Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance Program issued by the State Council on December 14, 1998, under which all employers in urban cities are required to enroll their employees in the basic medical insurance program and the insurance premium is jointly contributed by the employers and employees. The State Council promulgated Guiding Opinions of the State Council about the Pilot Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance on July 10, 2007, under which urban residents of the pilot district, rather than urban employees, may voluntarily join Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance. The State Council expects the pilot Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance to cover the whole nation by 2010.

123


 

Participants of the national medical insurance program and their employers, if any, are required to contribute to the payment of insurance premium on a monthly basis. Program participants are eligible for full or partial reimbursement of the cost of medicines included in the Medical Insurance Catalogue. The Notice Regarding the Tentative Measures for the Administration of the Scope of Medical Insurance Coverage for Pharmaceutical Products for Urban Employee, jointly issued by several authorities including the Ministry of Labor and Social Security and the Ministry of Finance, among others, on May 12, 1999, provides that a pharmaceutical product listed in the Medical Insurance Catalogue must be clinically needed, safe, effective, reasonably priced, easy to use, available in sufficient quantity, and must meet the following requirements:

 

it is set forth in the Pharmacopoeia of the PRC;

 

it meets the standards promulgated by the NMPA; and

 

if imported, it is approved by the NMPA for import.

Factors that affect the inclusion of a pharmaceutical product in the Medical Insurance Catalogue include whether the product is consumed in large volumes and commonly prescribed for clinical use in the PRC and whether it is considered to be important in meeting the basic healthcare needs of the general public.

The PRC Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security, together with other government authorities, previously had the power to determine the medicines included in the NRDL. In February 2017, the PRC Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security released the 2017 NRDL. The 2017 NRDL expands its scope and covers 2,535 drugs in total, including 339 drugs that are newly added. The 2017 NRDL reflects an emphasis on innovative drugs and drugs that treat cancer and other serious diseases. For instance, most of the innovative chemical drugs and biological products approved in China between 2008 and the first half of 2016 have been included in the 2017 NRDL or its candidate list. The NRDL was further expanded in October 2018 after the newly created NHSA, the successor agency to Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security, finalized the price negotiations with drug manufacturers for 18 oncology drugs. 10 of the 18 oncology drugs were approved after 2017. 17 of the 18 products were included in the NRDL. In August 2019, the PRC Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security released the 2019 NRDL. In November 2019, NHSA organized another round of price negotiation with drug companies for 119 new drugs that had not been included in the NRDL at the time of the negotiation, which resulted in an average price reduction by over 60% for 70 of the 119 drugs that passed the negotiation; subsequently, the NRDL was expanded to include the 70 new drugs.

Medicines included in the NRDL are divided into two parts, Part A and Part B.

Patients purchasing medicines included in Part A of the NRDL are entitled to reimbursement of the entire amount of the purchase price. Patients purchasing medicines included in Part B of the NRDL are required to pay a certain percentage of the purchase price and obtain reimbursement for the remainder of the purchase price. The percentage of reimbursement for Part B medicines differs from region to region in the PRC.

The total amount of reimbursement for the cost of medicines, in addition to other medical expenses, for an individual participant under the national medical insurance program in a calendar year is capped at the amounts in such participant’s individual account under such program. The amount in a participant’s account varies, depending on the amount of contributions from the participant and his or her employer.

According to the 2019 NRDL, all provinces shall implement the 2019 NRDL in a strict manner and shall not have the discretion to formulate the catalogue or increase the drugs of Part B in any form or adjust the scope of limited payment. For those drugs that were already added to Part B of the provincial catalogue in accordance with the 2017 NRDL, the drugs shall be gradually removed within 3 years.

 

National List of Essential Drugs

On August 18, 2009, the former MOH and eight other ministries and commissions in the PRC issued the Provisional Measures on the Administration of the National List of Essential Drugs and the Guidelines on the Implementation of the National List of Essential Drugs System, which aimed to promote essential medicines sold to consumers at fair prices in the PRC and ensured that the general public in the PRC has equal access to the drugs contained in the National List of Essential Drugs. The former MOH promulgated the National List of Essential Drugs (Catalog for the Basic Healthcare Institutions) on August 18, 2009, a revised National List of Essential Drugs on March

124


 

13, 2013 and another revised National List of Essential Drugs on September 30, 2018 which became effective on November 1, 2018. According to these regulations, basic healthcare institutions funded by government, which primarily include county-level hospitals, county-level Chinese medicine hospitals, rural clinics and community clinics, shall store up and use drugs listed in National List of Essential Drugs. The drugs listed in National List of Essential Drugs shall be purchased by centralized tender process and shall be subject to the price control by NDRC. Drugs listed in the National List of Essential Drugs are all listed in the Medical Insurance Catalogue. Historically, the entire amount of the purchase price of such drugs would be entitled to reimbursement. The recent revision in 2018 included several novel drugs, and their reimbursement ratios are subject to further negotiations between the drug manufacturers and local administration of healthcare security at the provincial level.

Commercial Insurance

On October 25, 2016, the State Council and the Communist Party of China jointly issued the Plan for Healthy China 2030. According to the Plan, the country will establish a multi-level medical security system built around basic medical insurance, with other forms of insurance supplementing the basic medical insurance, including serious illness insurance for urban and rural residents, commercial health insurance and medical assistance. Furthermore, the Plan encourages enterprises and individuals to participate in commercial health insurance and various forms of supplementary insurance. The evolving medical insurance system makes innovative drugs more affordable and universally available to the Chinese population, which renders greater opportunities to drug manufacturers that focus on the research and development of innovative drugs, such as high-cost cancer therapeutics.

Price Controls

Instead of direct price controls which were historically used in China but abolished in June 2016, the government regulates prices mainly by establishing a price negotiations, consolidated procurement mechanism, and revising medical insurance reimbursement standards as discussed below.

Price Negotiations

The Chinese government has initiated several rounds of price negotiations with manufacturers of patented drugs, drugs with an exclusive source of supply and oncology drugs since 2016. The average percentage of price reduction has been over 50%. Once the government agreed with the drug manufacturers on the supply prices, the drugs would be automatically listed in the NRDL and qualified for public hospital purchase.

Centralized Procurement and Tenders

The Guiding Opinions concerning the Urban Medical and Health System Reform, promulgated on February 21, 2000, aims to regulate the purchasing process of pharmaceutical products by medical institution. The MOH and other relevant government authorities have promulgated a series of regulations and releases in order to implement the tender requirements.

According to the Notice on Issuing Certain Regulations on the Trial Implementation of Centralized Tender Procurement of Drugs by Medical Institutions promulgated on July 7, 2000 and the Notice on Further Improvement on the Implementation of Centralized Tender Procurement of Drugs by Medical Institutions promulgated on August 8, 2001, medical institutions established by county or higher level government or state-owned enterprises (including state-controlled enterprises) are required to implement centralized tender procurement of drugs.

The former MOH promulgated the Working Regulations of Medical Institutions for Procurement of Drugs by Centralized Tender and Price Negotiations (for Trial Implementation), or the Centralised Procurement Regulations, on March 13, 2002, and promulgated Sample Document for Medical Institutions for Procurement of Drugs by Centralized Tender and Price Negotiations (for Trial Implementation), or the Centralized Tender Sample Document in November 2001, to implement the tender process requirements and ensure the requirements are followed uniformly throughout the country. The Centralized Tender Regulations and the Centralized Tender Sample Document provide rules for the tender process and negotiations of the prices of drugs, operational procedures, a code of conduct and standards or measures of evaluating bids and negotiating prices. On January 17, 2009, the former MOH, the former SFDA and other four national departments jointly promulgated the Opinions on Further Regulating Centralized Procurement of Drugs by Medical Institutions. According to the notice, public hospitals owned by the government at the county level or higher or owned by state-owned enterprises (including state-controlled enterprises) shall purchase pharmaceutical products by online centralized procurement. Each provincial government shall formulate its catalogue of drugs subject to centralized

125


 

procurement. Except for drugs in the National List of Essential Drugs (the procurement of which shall comply with the relevant rules on National List of Essential Drugs), certain pharmaceutical products which are under the national government’s special control, such as toxic, radioactive and narcotic drugs and traditional Chinese medicines, in principle, all drugs used by public medical institutions shall be covered by the catalogue of drugs subject to centralized procurement. On July 7, 2010, the former MOH and six other ministries and commissions jointly promulgated the Notice on Printing and Distributing the Working Regulations of Medical Institutions for Centralized Procurement of Drugs to further regulate the centralized procurement of drugs and clarify the code of conduct of the parties in centralized drug procurement.

The centralized tender process takes the form of public tender operated and organized by provincial or municipal government agencies. The centralized tender process is in principle conducted once every year in the relevant province or city in China. The bids are assessed by a committee composed of pharmaceutical and medical experts who will be randomly selected from a database of experts approved by the relevant government authorities. The committee members assess the bids based on a number of factors, including but not limited to, bid price, product quality, clinical effectiveness, product safety, qualifications and reputation of the manufacturer, after-sale services and innovation. Only pharmaceuticals that have won in the centralized tender process may be purchased by public medical institutions funded by the governmental or state-owned enterprise (including state-controlled enterprises) in the relevant region.

“4+7” Volume-based Drug Procurement and Tenders

In June 2018, the State Council decided to launch a new round of drug pricing and procurement reform. This reform is implemented mainly by the NHSA, a new agency established in 2018 as part of the institutional restructuring with a mandate for pricing and procurement of drugs and disposables. The NHC supports the reform by introducing policy that encourages purchasing and prescribing of the selected drug, and by managing the supplier’s behavior. The NMPA is responsible for the quality assurance of the drug.

On November 15, 2018, the Joint Procurement Office, the procurement alliance formed by representatives of procurement agencies in 11 pilot cities established to oversee the bidding and procurement process, published the Paper on Drug Centralized Procurement in “4+7”Regions, launching the national pilot scheme for centralized volume-based drug procurement and tenders. According to the papers, the initial procurement of 31 generic drugs was implemented in 4 municipalities, namely Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin and Chongqing, and 7 cities, namely Shenyang, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Xi’an, Dalian, Chengdu, and Xiamen. This pilot program is thus also referred to as the “4+7” procurement scheme. On January 17, 2019, the General Office of the State Council published a circular on National Pilot Program for Centralized Procurement and Use of Drug, which provides detailed implementing measures for the nation-wide centralized drug procurement and tender scheme.

The “4+7” pilot program puts special emphasis on procurement volume guarantee. Public hospitals in pilot regions are encouraged to form a group procurement organization to increase the negotiation leverage. The committed volume will be shared by all qualified bid-winners, and public hospitals should prioritize their use of drugs purchased through the volume-based procurement in order to realize the volume commitment. Under this program, a company is provided with a substantial volume guarantee. The selected drugs must pass the generic drug consistency evaluation on quality and effectiveness. The reform policy is aimed to lower drug costs for patients, reduce transaction costs for enterprises, regulate drug use of hospitals, and improve the centralized drug procurement and pricing system. The centralized volume-based procurement is open to all approved enterprises that manufacture drugs on the government-set procurement list in China. Clinical effects, adverse reactions, and batch stability of the drugs are considered, and their quality consistency with the originator drugs will be the main criteria for evaluation. Production capacity and stability of the supplier are also considered.

On December 17, 2018, the preliminary results of the “4+7” centralized volume-based procurement were announced: 25 out of 31 generic drugs were selected, of which there are 3 originator drugs and 22 generics. As of December 2019, many provinces have published regional implementation measures, expanding the pilot program. On January 17, 2020, the results of the second round of the national centralized volume-based procurement and tender program were published: the average price reduction reached more than 50%, and the highest reduction has reached 90%.

Two-invoice System

In addition to the centralized tender process, the Chinese government also rolled out a “two-invoice system” nationwide in 2018. In the two-invoice system, in principle there can be no more than two invoices issued for drug products supplied by manufacturers to public hospitals. To satisfy with this requirement, many drug manufacturers have reduced the tiers of distributors, or converted drug distributors into contracted service organizations. This excludes the

126


 

sale of products invoiced from the manufacturer to its wholly-owned or controlled distributors, or for imported drugs, to its exclusive distributor, or from a distributor to its wholly-owned or controlled subsidiary (or between its wholly-owned or controlled subsidiaries). However, the system still significantly limits the options for companies to use multiple distributors to reach a larger geographic area in China. The reduction in distribution tiers resulted in a decrease in distribution mark-ups, hence the supply prices to public hospitals would also be reduced. Compliance with the two-invoice system is a prerequisite for pharmaceutical companies to participate in the tender and procurement processes of public hospitals, which currently provide most of PRC healthcare services. Manufacturers and distributors that fail to implement the two-invoice system may lose their qualifications to participate in the tender and procurement process. Non-compliant manufacturers may also be blacklisted from engaging in drug sales to public hospitals. The two-invoice system has been implemented in all provinces, each with its own regional implementation rules.  

Medical Insurance Reimbursement Standards

The Opinions on Integrating the Basic Medical Insurance Systems for Urban and Rural Residents issued by the State Council on January 3, 2016, call for the integration of the urban resident basic medical insurance and the new rural cooperative medical care system and the establishment of a unified basic medical insurance system, which will cover all urban and rural residents other than rural migrant workers and persons in flexible employment arrangement who participate in the basic medical insurance for urban employees.

According to the Main Tasks of Healthcare System Reform in 2016 issued by the General Office of the State Council on April 21, 2016, the key tasks of the medical insurance reform are: (1) to advance the establishment of the mechanisms of stable and sustainable financing and security level adjustment, (2) to advance the integration of the basic medical insurance systems for urban and rural residents, (3) to consolidate and improve the system for serious illness insurance for urban and rural residents, (4) to reform medical insurance payment methods, and (5) to advance the development of commercial health insurance.

 

The General Office of the State Council further announced a master plan for the medical insurance reimbursement reform in June 2017. The main objectives are to implement a diversified reimbursement mechanism including DRGs, per-capita caps, and per-bed-day caps. These new reimbursement methods will be rolled out nationwide by 2020 to replace the current reimbursement method that is based on service category and product price. Local administration of healthcare security will introduce a total budget control for their jurisdictions and decide the amount of reimbursement to public hospitals based on hospitals’ performance and the spending targets of individual basic medical insurance funds. In June 2019, the NHSA, the Ministry of Finance, the NHC and the National Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine jointly issued the Notice on the National List of Pilot Cities for the DRG Payment Mechanism, identifying 30 cities as pilot cities for the DRG payment pilot program, proposing to further the medical insurance reimbursement reform. To further standardize payment in the national Basic Medical Insurance schemes, in October 2019, the NHSA issued two key technical documents for a pilot project that introduces DRGs—the Technical Guideline of the Classification and Payment for China Healthcare Security Diagnosis Related Groups (CHS-DRG) and the CHS-DRG Classification Plan. According to the classification plan, patients will be sorted into 26 major diagnostic categories and 376 adjacent diagnosis-related groups. DRG-based settlement is currently only applicable to expenses of inpatient care incurred by the insureds at designated hospitals participating in the DRG payment pilot programs and payable by regional medical insurance fund under the national Basic Medical Insurance schemes. DRG-based payments are made directly to the participating medical institutions, while the covered benefits enjoyed by the insureds, under the current public insurance schemes, are not affected by such settlement.

U.S. Coverage and Reimbursement

Successful sales of our drug candidates in the U.S. market, if approved, will depend, in part, on the extent to which our drugs will be covered by third-party payors, such as government health programs or private health insurance (including managed care plans). Patients who are provided with prescriptions as part of their medical treatment generally rely on such third-party payors to reimburse all or part of the costs associated with their prescriptions and therefore adequate coverage and reimbursement from such third-party payors are critical to new and ongoing product acceptance. These third-party payors are increasingly reducing reimbursements for medical drugs and services and implementing measures to control utilization of drugs (such as requiring prior authorization for coverage). Additionally, the containment of healthcare costs has become a priority of federal and state governments, and the prices of drugs have been a focus in this effort. The U.S. government, state legislatures and foreign governments have shown significant interest in implementing cost-containment programs, including price controls, restrictions on reimbursement and requirements for substitution of generic drugs. Adoption or expansion of price controls and cost-containment measures

127


 

could further limit our net revenue and results. Decreases in third-party reimbursement for our drug candidates, if approved, or a decision by a third-party payor to not cover our drug candidates could have a material adverse effect on our sales, results of operations and financial condition.

Health care reform initiatives have resulted in significant changes to the coverage, reimbursement and delivery of health care, including drugs.  Health care reform efforts are likely to continue and such efforts have included, and may include in the future, attempts to repeal prior healthcare reform.

General legislative cost control measures may also affect reimbursement for our products. The Budget Control Act, as amended, resulted in the imposition of 2% reductions in Medicare (but not Medicaid) payments to providers in 2013 and will remain in effect through 2029 unless additional Congressional action is taken. If we obtain approval to market a drug candidate in the United States, any significant spending reductions affecting Medicare, Medicaid or other publicly funded or subsidized health programs that may be implemented and/or any significant taxes or fees that may be imposed on us could have an adverse impact on our results of operations.

Other Healthcare Laws

Other PRC Healthcare Laws

Advertising of Pharmaceutical Products

Pursuant to the Interim Administrative Measures for the Review of Advertisements for Drugs, Medical Devices, Health Food and Formula Food for Special Medical Purposes promulgated in December 2019 and became effective in March 2020, an enterprise seeking to advertise its pharmaceutical products must apply for an advertisement approval number. The advertisement approval number is issued by the relevant local administrative authority. The validity term of the advertisement approval number for drugs shall be consistent with the shortest validity term of the production registration certificate, filing certificate or production license. If no valid term is prescribed in the production registration certificate, filing certificate or production license, the valid term of the advertisement approval number shall be two years. The content of an approved advertisement may not be altered without prior approval.

Insert Sheet and Labels of Pharmaceutical Products

According to the Measures for the Administration of the Insert Sheets and Labels of Drugs effective on June 1, 2006, the insert sheets and labels of drugs should be reviewed and approved by the former SFDA. A drug insert sheet should include the scientific data, conclusions and information concerning drug safety and efficacy in order to direct the safe and rational use if drugs. The inner label of a drug should bear such information as the drug’s name, indication or function, strength, dose and usage, production date, batch number, expiry date and drug manufacturer, and the outer label of a drug should indicate such information as the drug’s name, ingredients, description, indication or function, strength, dose and usage and adverse reaction.

Packaging of Pharmaceutical Products

According to the Measures for The Administration of Pharmaceutical Packaging effective on September 1, 1988, pharmaceutical packaging must comply with the national and industry standards. If no national or industry standards are available, the enterprise can formulate its own standards and put into implementation after obtaining the approval of the administration of medical products or bureau of standards at provincial level. The enterprise shall reapply with the relevant authorities if it needs to change its own packaging standard. Drugs that have not developed and received approval for packing standards must not be sold or traded in China (except for drugs for the military).

128


 

Other U.S. Healthcare Laws

We may also be subject to healthcare regulation and enforcement by the U.S. federal government and the states where we may market our drug candidates, if approved. These laws include, without limitation, state and federal anti-kickback, fraud and abuse, false claims, privacy and security and transparency laws, such as the following:

 

federal healthcare program anti-kickback laws, which prohibit, among other things, persons from knowingly and willfully offering, soliciting, receiving or providing remuneration, directly or indirectly, to induce either the referral of an individual, for an item or service or the purchasing or ordering of a good or service, for which payment may be made under federal healthcare programs such as Medicare and Medicaid;

 

federal false claims laws which prohibit, among other things, individuals or entities from knowingly presenting, or causing to be presented, information or claims for payment from Medicare, Medicaid, or other third-party payers that are false or fraudulent;

 

the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, which prohibits executing a scheme to defraud any healthcare benefit program (including private health plans) or making false statements relating to healthcare matters and which also imposes certain requirements relating to the privacy, security and transmission of individually identifiable health information;

 

the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, which among other things, strictly regulates drug product and medical device marketing, prohibits manufacturers from marketing such products prior to approval or for off-label use and regulates the distribution of samples;

 

federal laws that require pharmaceutical manufacturers to report certain calculated product prices to the government or provide certain discounts or rebates to government authorities or private entities, often as a condition of reimbursement under government healthcare programs;

 

the so-called “federal sunshine” law, which requires pharmaceutical and medical device companies to monitor and report certain financial interactions with physicians and teaching hospitals (and other healthcare professionals starting in 2021) to the federal government for re-disclosure to the public; and

 

state law equivalents of the above federal laws, such as anti-kickback and false claims laws which may apply to items or services reimbursed by any third-party payer, including private insurers, state transparency laws, state laws limiting interactions between pharmaceutical manufacturers and members of the healthcare industry, and state laws governing the privacy and security of health information in certain circumstances, many of which differ from each other in significant ways and often are not preempted by federal laws, thus complicating compliance efforts.

If and when we become subject to such laws, efforts to ensure that our activities comply with applicable healthcare laws may involve substantial costs. Many of these laws and their implementing regulations contain ambiguous requirements or require administrative guidance for implementation. Given the lack of clarity in laws and their implementation, our activities could be subject to challenge. If our operations were found to be in violation of any of these laws or any other governmental regulations that may apply to us, we could be subject to significant civil, criminal and administrative penalties, including, without limitation, damages, fines, imprisonment, exclusion from participation in government healthcare programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, and the curtailment or restructuring of our operations, which could significantly harm our business.

Other Significant PRC Regulation Affecting Our Business Activities in China

PRC Regulation of Foreign Investment

The establishment, operation and management of corporate entities in China are governed by the Company Law of the PRC, or the PRC Company Law, which was adopted by the Standing Committee of the NPC in December 1993, implemented in July 1994, and subsequently amended in December 1999, August 2004, October 2005, December 2013 and October 2018. Under the PRC Company Law, companies are generally classified into two categories: limited liability companies and companies limited by shares. The PRC Company Law also applies to foreign-invested limited liability companies. Pursuant to the PRC Company Law, where laws on foreign investment have other stipulations, such stipulations shall prevail.

129


 

Investment activities in the PRC by foreign investors are governed by the Guiding Foreign Investment Direction, which was promulgated by the State Council on February 11, 2002 and came into effect on April 1, 2002, and the Special Administrative Measures (Negative List) for Foreign Investment Access (2019), or the Negative List, which was promulgated by the Ministry of Commerce, or the MOFCOM and National Development and Reform Commission, or the NDRC on June 30, 2019 and took effect on July 30, 2019. The Negative List set out in a unified manner the restrictive measures, such as the requirements on shareholding percentages and management, for the access of foreign investments, and the industries that are prohibited for foreign investment. The Negative List covers 13 industries, and any field not falling in the Negative List shall be administered under the principle of equal treatment to domestic and foreign investment.

Foreign Investment Law of the People’s Republic of China, or the Foreign Investment Law was promulgated by the NPC in March 2019 and become effective in January 2020. After the Foreign Investment Law came into force, the Law on Wholly Foreign- Owned Enterprises, the Law on Sino-foreign Equity Joint Ventures and the Law on Sino-foreign Contractual Joint Ventures have been repealed simultaneously. The investment activities of foreign natural persons, enterprises or other organizations (hereinafter referred to as foreign investors) directly or indirectly within the territory of China shall comply with and be governed by the Foreign Investment Law: 1) establishing by foreign investors of foreign-invested enterprises in China alone or jointly with other investors; 2) acquiring by foreign investors of shares, equity, property shares, or other similar interests of Chinese domestic enterprises; 3) investing by foreign investors in new projects in China alone or jointly with other investors; 4) other forms of investment prescribed by laws, administrative regulations or the State Council.

In December 2019, the State Council issued the Regulations on Implementing the Foreign Investment Law of the PRC, which came into effect in January 2020. After the Regulations on Implementing the Foreign Investment Law of the PRC came into effect, the Regulation on Implementing the Sino-Foreign Equity Joint Venture Enterprise Law, Provisional Regulations on the Duration of Sino- Foreign Equity Joint Venture Enterprise, the Regulations on Implementing the Wholly Foreign-Invested Enterprise Law and the Regulations on Implementing the Sino-foreign Cooperative Joint Venture Enterprise Law have been repealed simultaneously.

In December 2019, the MOFCOM and the State Administration for Market Regulation issued the Measures for the Reporting of Foreign Investment Information, which came into effect in January 2020. After the Measures for the Reporting of Foreign Investment Information came into effect, the Interim Measures on the Administration of Filing for Establishment and Change of Foreign Investment Enterprises has been repealed simultaneously. Since January 1, 2020, for foreign investors carrying out investment activities directly or indirectly in China, the foreign investors or foreign-invested enterprises shall submit investment information to the commerce authorities pursuant to these measures.

PRC Regulation of Commercial Bribery

Pharmaceutical companies involved in a criminal investigation or administrative proceedings related to bribery are listed in the Adverse Records of Commercial Briberies by its provincial health and family planning administrative department. Pursuant to the Provisions on the Establishment of Adverse Records of Commercial Briberies in the Medicine Purchase and Sales Industry which became effective on March 1, 2014, provincial health and family planning administrative departments formulate the implementing measures for establishment of Adverse Records of Commercial Briberies. If a pharmaceutical company is listed in the Adverse Records of Commercial Briberies for the first time, their production is not required to be purchased by public medical institutions. A pharmaceutical company will not be penalized by the relevant PRC government authorities merely by virtue of having contractual relationships with distributors or third party promoters who are engaged in bribery activities, so long as such pharmaceutical company and its employees are not utilizing the distributors or third party promoters for the implementation of, or acting in conjunction with them in, the prohibited bribery activities. In addition, a pharmaceutical company is under no legal obligation to monitor the operating activities of its distributors and third party promoters, and will not be subject to penalties or sanctions by relevant PRC government authorities as a result of failure to monitor their operating activities.

PRC Regulation of Product Liability

In addition to the strict new drug approval process, certain PRC laws have been promulgated to protect the rights of consumers and to strengthen the control of medical products in the PRC. Under current PRC law, manufacturers and vendors of defective products in the PRC may incur liability for loss and injury caused by such products. Pursuant to the General Principles of the Civil Law of the PRC, or the PRC Civil Law, promulgated on April

130


 

12, 1986 and amended on August 27, 2009, a defective product which causes property damage or physical injury to any person may subject the manufacturer or vendor of such product to civil liability for such damage or injury.

On February 22, 1993, the Product Quality Law of the PRC, or the Product Quality Law, was promulgated to supplement the PRC Civil Law aiming to protect the legitimate rights and interests of the end-users and consumers and to strengthen the supervision and control of the quality of products. The Product Quality Law was revised by the Ninth National People’s Congress on July 8, 2000, by the Eleventh National People’s Congress on August 27, 2009 and by the Thirteenth National People’s Congress on December 29, 2018. Pursuant to the revised Product Quality Law, manufacturers who produce defective products may be subject to civil or criminal liability and have their business licenses revoked.

The Law of the PRC on the Protection of the Rights and Interests of Consumers was promulgated on October 31, 1993 and was amended on August 27, 2009 and October 25, 2013 to protect consumers’ rights when they purchase or use goods and accept services. All business operators must comply with this law when they manufacture or sell goods and/or provide services to customers. Under the amendment on October 25, 2013, all business operators shall pay high attention to protect the customers’ privacy and strictly keep it confidential any consumer information they obtain during the business operation. In addition, in extreme situations, pharmaceutical product manufacturers and operators may be subject to criminal liability if their goods or services lead to the death or injuries of customers or other third parties.

PRC Tort Law

Under the Tort Law of the PRC which became effective on July 1, 2010, if damages to other persons are caused by defective products due to the fault of a third party, such as the parties providing transportation or warehousing, the producers and the sellers of the products have the right to recover their respective losses from such third parties. If defective products are identified after they have been put into circulation, the producers or the sellers shall take remedial measures such as issuance of a warning, recall of products, etc. in a timely manner. The producers or the sellers shall be liable under tort if they fail to take remedial measures in a timely manner or have not made efforts to take remedial measures, thus causing damages. If the products are produced or sold with known defects, causing deaths or severe adverse health issues, the infringed party has the right to claim punitive damages in addition to compensatory damages.

PRC Regulation of Intellectual Property Rights

China has made substantial efforts to adopt comprehensive legislation governing intellectual property rights, including patents, trademarks, copyrights and domain names.

Patents

Pursuant to the PRC Patent Law, most recently amended in December 2008, and its implementation rules, most recently amended in January 2010, patents in China fall into three categories: invention, utility model and design. An invention patent is granted to a new technical solution proposed in respect of a product or method or an improvement of a product or method. A utility model is granted to a new technical solution that is practicable for application and proposed in respect of the shape, structure or a combination of both of a product. A design patent is granted to the new design of a certain product in shape, pattern or a combination of both and in color, shape and pattern combinations aesthetically suitable for industrial application. Under the PRC Patent Law, the term of patent protection starts from the date of application. Patents relating to invention are effective for twenty years, and utility models and designs are effective for ten years from the date of application. The PRC Patent Law adopts the principle of “first-to-file” system, which provides that where more than one person files a patent application for the same invention, a patent will be granted to the person who files the application first.

Existing patents can become narrowed, invalid or unenforceable due to a variety of grounds, including lack of novelty, creativity, and deficiencies in patent application. In China, a patent must have novelty, creativity and practical applicability. Under the PRC Patent Law, novelty means that before a patent application is filed, no identical invention or utility model has been publicly disclosed in any publication in China or overseas or has been publicly used or made known to the public by any other means, whether in or outside of China, nor has any other person filed with the patent authority an application that describes an identical invention or utility model and is recorded in patent application documents or patent documents published after the filing date. Creativity means that, compared with existing technology, an invention has prominent substantial features and represents notable progress, and a utility model has substantial features and represents any progress. Practical applicability means an invention or utility model can be manufactured or used and may produce positive results. Patents in China are filed with the SIPO. Normally, the SIPO publishes an

131


 

application for an invention patent within 18 months after the filing date, which may be shortened at the request of applicant. The applicant must apply to the SIPO for a substantive examination within three years from the date of application.

Article 20 of the PRC Patent Law provides that, for an invention or utility model completed in China, any applicant (not just Chinese companies and individuals), before filing a patent application outside of China, must first submit it to the SIPO for a confidential examination. Failure to comply with this requirement will result in the denial of any Chinese patent for the relevant invention. This added requirement of confidential examination by the SIPO has raised concerns by foreign companies who conduct research and development activities in China or outsource research and development activities to service providers in China.

Patent Enforcement

Unauthorized use of patents without consent from owners of patents, forgery of the patents belonging to other persons, or engagement in other patent infringement acts, will subject the infringers to infringement liability. Serious offences such as forgery of patents may be subject to criminal penalties.

When a dispute arises out of infringement of the patent owner’s patent right, Chinese law requires that the parties first attempt to settle the dispute through mutual consultation. However, if the dispute cannot be settled through mutual consultation, the patent owner, or an interested party who believes the patent is being infringed, may either file a civil legal suit or file an administrative complaint with the relevant patent administration authority. A Chinese court may issue a preliminary injunction upon the patent owner’s or an interested party’s request before instituting any legal proceedings or during the proceedings. Damages for infringement are calculated as the loss suffered by the patent holder arising from the infringement, and if the loss suffered by the patent holder arising from the infringement cannot be determined, the damages for infringement shall be calculated as the benefit gained by the infringer from the infringement. If it is difficult to ascertain damages in this manner, damages may be determined by using a reasonable multiple of the license fee under a contractual license. Statutory damages may be awarded in the circumstances where the damages cannot be determined by the above-mentioned calculation standards. The damage calculation methods shall be applied in the aforementioned order. Generally, the patent owner has the burden of proving that the patent is being infringed. However, if the owner of an invention patent for manufacturing process of a new product alleges infringement of its patent, the alleged infringer has the burden of proof.

Medical Patent Compulsory License

According to the PRC Patent Law, for the purpose of public health, the SIPO may grant a compulsory license for manufacturing patented drugs and exporting them to countries or regions covered under relevant international treaties to which PRC has acceded.

Exemptions for Unlicensed Manufacture, Use, Sale or Import of Patented Products

The PRC Patent Law provides five exceptions for unauthorized manufacture, use, sale or import of patented products. None of following circumstances are deemed an infringement of the patent rights, and any person may manufacture, use, sell or import patented products without authorization granted by the patent owner as follows:

 

Any person who uses, promises to sell, sells or imports any patented product or product directly obtained in accordance with the patented methods after such product is sold by the patent owner or by its licensed entity or individual;

 

Any person who has manufactured an identical product, has used an identical method or has made necessary preparations for manufacture or use prior to the date of patent application and continues to manufacture such product or use such method only within the original scope;

 

Any foreign transportation facility that temporarily passes through the territory, territorial waters or territorial airspace of China and uses the relevant patents in its devices and installations for its own needs in accordance with any agreement concluded between China and that country to which the foreign transportation facility belongs, or any international treaty to which both countries are party, or on the basis of the principle of reciprocity;

132


 

 

Any person who uses the relevant patents solely for the purposes of scientific research and experimentation; or

 

Any person who manufactures, uses or imports patented drug or patented medical equipment for the purpose of providing information required for administrative approval, or manufactures, uses or imports patented drugs or patented medical equipment for the abovementioned person.

However, if patented drugs are utilized on the ground of exemptions for unauthorized manufacture, use, sale or import of patented drugs prescribed in PRC Patent Law, such patented drugs cannot be manufactured, used, sold or imported for any commercial purposes without authorization granted by the patent owner.

Trade Secrets

According to the PRC Anti-Unfair Competition Law promulgated by the Standing Committee of the NPC on September 2, 1993, as amended on November 4, 2017 and on April 23, 2019 respectively, the term “trade secrets” refers to technical and business information that is unknown to the public that has utility and may create business interests or profits for its legal owners or holders, and is maintained as a secret by its legal owners or holders.

Under the PRC Anti-Unfair Competition Law, business persons are prohibited from infringing others’ trade secrets by: (1) obtaining the trade secrets from the legal owners or holders by any unfair methods such as theft, bribery, intimidation, solicitation or coercion; (2) disclosing, using or permitting others to use the trade secrets obtained illegally under item (1) above; (3) disclosing, using or permitting others to use the trade secrets, in violation of any contractual agreements or any requirements of the legal owners or holders to keep such trade secrets in confidence; or (4) instigating, inducing or assisting others to violate confidentiality obligation or to violate a rights holder’s requirements on keeping confidentiality of trade secrets, disclosing, using or permitting others to use the trade secrets of the rights holder. If a third party knows or should have known of the fact that an employee or former employee of the right owner of trade secrets or any other entity or individual conducts any of the illegal acts above mentioned, but still accepts, publishes, uses or allows any other to use such secrets, such practice shall be deemed as infringement of trade secrets. The parties whose trade secrets are being misappropriated may petition for administrative corrections, and regulatory authorities may stop any illegal activities and fine infringing parties in the amount of RMB100,000 to RMB500,000, where the circumstance is serious, the fine shall be between RMB500,000 to RMB3,000,000. Alternatively, persons whose trade secrets are being misappropriated may file lawsuits in a Chinese court for loss and damages incurred due to the misappropriation.

The measures to protect trade secrets include oral or written non-disclosure agreements or other reasonable measures to require the employees of, or persons in business contact with, legal owners or holders to keep trade secrets confidential. Once the legal owners or holders have asked others to keep trade secrets confidential and have adopted reasonable protection measures, the requested persons bear the responsibility for keeping the trade secrets confidential.

Trademarks and Domain Names

Trademark. According to the Trademark Law of the PRC, promulgated by the Standing Committee of the NPC in August 1982, as amended in February 1993, October 2001, August 2013 and April 2019 and its implementation rules, the PRC Trademark Office of the National Intellectual Property Administration is responsible for the registration and administration of trademarks throughout the PRC. The Trademark Law has adopted a “first-to-file” principle with respect to trademark registration. As of December 31, 2019, we had 25 registered trademarks and 9 trademark applications pending in China, and 15 registered trademarks and 35 trademark applications pending outside China.

Domain Name. Domain names are protected under the Administrative Measures on the Internet Domain Names promulgated by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology in August 2017 and effective from November 2017, and the Implementing Rules on Registration of Domain Names issued by China Internet Network Information Center in September 2002, and amended in June 2009 and May 2012. The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology is the main regulatory body responsible for the administration of PRC internet domain names. We have registered zaibio.com, zaibiotech.com, zailaboratory.com, zailab.com.cn, zaimedicine.com and zaipharma.com.

133


 

PRC Regulation of Labor Protection

Under the Labor Law of the PRC, effective on January 1, 1995 and subsequently amended on August 27, 2009 and December 29, 2018, the PRC Employment Contract Law, effective on January 1, 2008 and subsequently amended on December 28, 2012 and the Implementing Regulations of the Employment Contract Law, effective on September 18, 2008, employers must establish a comprehensive management system to protect the rights of their employees, including a system governing occupational health and safety to provide employees with occupational training to prevent occupational injury, and employers are required to truthfully inform prospective employees of the job description, working conditions, location, occupational hazards and status of safe production as well as remuneration and other conditions as requested by the Labor Contract Law of the PRC.

Pursuant to the Law of Manufacturing Safety of the PRC effective on November 1, 2002 and amended on August 27, 2009 and August 31, 2014, manufacturers must establish a comprehensive management system to ensure manufacturing safety in accordance with applicable laws, regulations, national standards, and industrial standards. Manufacturers not meeting relevant legal requirements are not permitted to commence their manufacturing activities.

Pursuant to the Administrative Measures Governing the Production Quality of Pharmaceutical Products effective on March 1, 2011, manufacturers of pharmaceutical products are required to establish production safety and labor protection measures in connection with the operation of their manufacturing equipment and manufacturing process.

Pursuant to applicable PRC laws, rules and regulations, including the Social Insurance Law which became effective on July 1, 2011 and amended on December 29, 2018, the Interim Regulations on the Collection and Payment of Social Security Funds which became effective on January 22, 1999 and amended on March 24, 2019, Interim Measures concerning the Maternity Insurance of Employees which become effective on January 1, 1995, and the Regulations on Work-related Injury Insurance which became effective on January 1, 2004 and was subsequently amended on December 20, 2010, employers are required to contribute, on behalf of their employees, to a number of social security funds, including funds for basic pension insurance, unemployment insurance, basic medical insurance, work-related injury insurance and maternity insurance. If an employer fails to make social insurance contributions timely and in full, the social insurance collecting authority will order the employer to make up outstanding contributions within the prescribed time period and impose a late payment fee at the rate of 0.05% per day from the date on which the contribution becomes due. If such employer fails to make the overdue contributions within such time limit, the relevant administrative department may impose a fine equivalent to one to three times the overdue amount.

Regulations Relating to Foreign Exchange Registration of Offshore Investment by PRC Residents

In July 2014, SAFE issued the SAFE Circular 37, and its implementation guidelines, which abolished and superseded the SAFE Circular 75. Pursuant to SAFE Circular 37 and its implementation guidelines, PRC residents (including PRC institutions and individuals) must register with local branches of SAFE in connection with their direct or indirect offshore investment in an overseas special purpose vehicle, or SPV, directly established or indirectly controlled by PRC residents for the purposes of offshore investment and financing with their legally owned assets or interests in domestic enterprises, or their legally owned offshore assets or interests. Such PRC residents are also required to amend their registrations with SAFE when there is a change to the basic information of the SPV, such as changes of a PRC resident individual shareholder, the name or operating period of the SPV, or when there is a significant change to the SPV, such as changes of the PRC individual resident’s increase or decrease of its capital contribution in the SPV, or any share transfer or exchange, merger, division of the SPV. Failure to comply with the registration procedures set forth in the Circular 37 may result in restrictions being imposed on the foreign exchange activities of the relevant onshore company, including the payment of dividends and other distributions to its offshore parent or affiliate, the capital inflow from the offshore entities and settlement of foreign exchange capital, and may also subject relevant onshore company or PRC residents to penalties under PRC foreign exchange administration regulations.

Regulations Relating to Employee Stock Incentive Plan

In February 2012, SAFE promulgated the Notices on Issues Concerning the Foreign Exchange Administration for Domestic Individuals Participating in Stock Incentive Plans of Overseas Publicly Listed Companies, or the Stock Option Rules, which replaced the Application Procedures of Foreign Exchange Administration for Domestic Individuals Participating in Employee Stock Ownership Plans or Stock Option Plans of Overseas Publicly Listed Companies issued by SAFE on March 28, 2007. In accordance with the Stock Option Rules and relevant rules and regulations, PRC citizens or non-PRC citizens residing in China for a continuous period of not less than one year, who participate in any

134


 

stock incentive plan of an overseas publicly listed company, subject to a few exceptions, are required to register with SAFE through a domestic qualified agent, which could be a PRC subsidiary of such overseas listed company, and complete certain procedures. We and our employees who are PRC citizens or who reside in China for a continuous period of not less than one year and who participate in our stock incentive plan will be subject to such regulation. In addition, the SAT has issued circulars concerning employee share options or restricted shares. Under these circulars, employees working in the PRC who exercise share options, or whose restricted shares vest, will be subject to PRC individual income tax, or the IIT. The PRC subsidiaries of an overseas listed company have obligations to file documents related to employee share options or restricted shares with relevant tax authorities and to withhold IIT of those employees related to their share options or restricted shares. If the employees fail to pay, or the PRC subsidiaries fail to withhold, their IIT according to relevant laws, rules and regulations, the PRC subsidiaries may face sanctions imposed by the tax authorities or other PRC government authorities.

Regulations Relating to Dividend Distribution

Pursuant to the PRC Company Law and Foreign Investment Law, and Regulations on Implementing the Foreign Investment Law, foreign investors may freely remit into or out of China, in renminbi or any other foreign currency, their capital contributions, profits, capital gains, income from asset disposal, intellectual property royalties, lawfully acquired compensation, indemnity or liquidation income and so on within the territory of China.

In January 2017, the SAFE issued the Notice on Improving the Check of Authenticity and Compliance to Further Promote Foreign Exchange Control, which stipulates several capital control measures with respect to outbound remittance of profits from domestic entities to offshore entities, including the following: (i) under the principle of genuine transaction, banks shall check board resolutions regarding profit distribution, the original version of tax filing records and audited financial statements; and (ii) domestic entities shall hold income to account for previous years’ losses before remitting the profits. Moreover, domestic entities shall provide detailed explanations of the sources of capital and the utilization arrangements and board resolutions, contracts and other proof when completing the registration procedures in connection with an outbound investment.

Regulations Relating to Foreign Exchange

The principal regulations governing foreign currency exchange in China are the Foreign Exchange Administration Regulations, most recently amended in August 2008. Under the Foreign Exchange Administration Regulations, payments of current account items, such as profit distributions and trade and service-related foreign exchange transactions can be made in foreign currencies without prior approval from SAFE by complying with certain procedural requirements. However, approval from or registration with appropriate government authorities is required where RMB is to be converted into foreign currency and remitted out of China to pay capital expenses such as the repayment of foreign currency-denominated loans.

In August 2008, SAFE issued the Circular on the Relevant Operating Issues Concerning the Improvement of the Administration of the Payment and Settlement of Foreign Currency Capital of Foreign-Invested Enterprises, or SAFE Circular No. 142, regulating the conversion by a foreign-invested enterprise of foreign currency-registered capital into RMB by restricting how the converted RMB may be used. SAFE Circular No. 142 provides that the RMB capital converted from foreign currency registered capital of a foreign-invested enterprise may only be used for purposes within the business scope approved by the applicable government authority and may not be used for equity investments within China. SAFE also strengthened its oversight of the flow and use of the RMB capital converted from foreign currency registered capital of foreign-invested enterprises. The use of such RMB capital may not be changed without SAFE’s approval, and such RMB capital may not in any case be used to repay RMB loans if the proceeds of such loans have not been used. In March 2015, SAFE issued SAFE Circular No. 19, which took effective and replaced SAFE Circular No. 142 on June 1, 2015. Although SAFE Circular No. 19 allows for the use of RMB converted from the foreign currency-denominated capital for equity investments in China, the restrictions continue to apply as to foreign-invested enterprises’ use of the converted RMB for purposes beyond the business scope, for entrusted loans or for inter-company RMB loans. SAFE promulgated the Notice of the State Administration of Foreign Exchange on Reforming and Standardizing the Foreign Exchange Settlement Management Policy of Capital Account, or Circular 16, effective on June 9, 2016, which reiterates some of the rules set forth in Circular 19, but changes the prohibition against using RMB capital converted from foreign currency-denominated registered capital of a foreign-invested company to issue RMB entrusted loans to a prohibition against using such capital to issue loans to nonassociated enterprises. Violations of SAFE Circular 19 or Circular 16 could result in administrative penalties.

135


 

In November 2012, SAFE promulgated the Circular of Further Improving and Adjusting Foreign Exchange Administration Policies on Foreign Direct Investment which substantially amends and simplifies the current foreign exchange procedure. Pursuant to this circular, the opening of various special purpose foreign exchange accounts (e.g., pre-establishment expenses accounts, foreign exchange capital accounts and guarantee accounts), the reinvestment of lawful incomes derived by foreign investors in China (e.g. profit, proceeds of equity transfer, capital reduction, liquidation and early repatriation of investment), and purchase and remittance of foreign exchange as a result of capital reduction, liquidation, early repatriation or share transfer in a foreign-invested enterprise no longer require SAFE approval, and multiple capital accounts for the same entity may be opened in different provinces, which was not possible before. In addition, SAFE promulgated the Circular on Printing and Distributing the Provisions on Foreign Exchange Administration over Domestic Direct Investment by Foreign Investors and the Supporting Documents in May 2013, which specifies that the administration by SAFE or its local branches over direct investment by foreign investors in the PRC shall be conducted by way of registration and banks shall process foreign exchange business relating to the direct investment in China based on the registration information provided by SAFE and its branches.

In February 2015, SAFE promulgated the Circular on Further Simplifying and Improving the Policies Concerning Foreign Exchange Control on Direct Investment, or SAFE Circular No. 13, which took effect on June 1, 2015. SAFE Circular No. 13 delegates the authority to enforce the foreign exchange registration in connection with the inbound and outbound direct investment under relevant SAFE rules to certain banks and therefore further simplifies the foreign exchange registration procedures for inbound and outbound direct investment.

Other PRC National- and Provincial-Level Laws and Regulations

We are subject to changing regulations under many other laws and regulations administered by governmental authorities at the national, provincial and municipal levels, some of which are or may become applicable to our business. For example, regulations control the confidentiality of patients’ medical information and the circumstances under which patient medical information may be released for inclusion in our databases, or released by us to third parties. These laws and regulations governing both the disclosure and the use of confidential patient medical information may become more restrictive in the future.

We also comply with numerous additional national and provincial laws relating to matters such as safe working conditions, manufacturing practices, environmental protection and fire hazard control in all material aspects. We believe that we are currently in compliance with these laws and regulations; however, we may be required to incur significant costs to comply with these laws and regulations in the future. Unanticipated changes in existing regulatory requirements or adoption of new requirements could therefore have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

C.

Organizational Structure

The following diagram illustrates our corporate structure, including our principal subsidiaries, as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 20-F:

 

 

136


 

 

D.

Property, Plant and Equipment

We are headquartered in Shanghai where we have our main administrative and laboratory offices, which is 3,632 square meters in size. The lease for this facility expires in 2023. We also have a 2,475 square meter commercial office for in Shanghai, the lease for which expires in 2022, and a 493 square meter office in Beijing, the lease for which expires in 2020. We have a 445 square meter commercial office in Hong Kong, the leases for which expire in 2022. We also have a 2,652 square feet administrative office and an 18,707 square feet laboratory office in San Francisco, the leases for which expire in 2021 and 2026, respectively. We also have an administrative office in Boston. In early 2017, we built a small molecule drug product facility in Suzhou, China capable of supporting clinical and commercial production and in 2018, we built a large molecule facility in Suzhou, China using GE Healthcare FlexFactory platform technology capable of supporting clinical production of our drug candidates. The cost to complete the small molecule facility was approximately $6.7 million and was paid with cash on hand. The construction of the large molecule facility was completed in 2018, which cost approximately $12.9 million and was financed with cash. We believe our current facilities are sufficient to meet our near-term needs.

E.

Land Use Right

In 2019, we acquired land use rights of 50,851 square meters in Suzhou for the purpose of constructing and operating the research center and biologics manufacturing facility in Suzhou. The terms of the land use rights are 30 years.

ITEM 4A. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

ITEM 5.  OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS

You should read the following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations together with “Item 3.A. Selected Financial Data” and our consolidated financial statements appearing elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form F-20. This report contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, and Section 21E of the Exchange Act, including, without limitation, statements regarding our expectations, beliefs, intentions or future strategies that are signified by the words “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “believe,” or similar language. All forward-looking statements included in this annual report are based on information available to us on the date hereof, and we assume no obligation to update any such forward-looking statements. In evaluating our business, you should carefully consider the information provided under “Item 3.D. Risk Factors.” Actual results could differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. The terms “Company”, “Zai Lab”, “we”, “our” or “us” as used herein refer to Zai Lab Limited and its consolidated subsidiaries unless otherwise stated or indicated by context.

A.

Operating Results.

Overview

We are an innovative, research-based, commercial-stage biopharmaceutical company focusing on discovering or licensing, developing and commercializing proprietary therapeutics that address areas of large unmet medical need in the China market, including in the fields of oncology, autoimmune and infectious diseases therapies. Our mission is to leverage our expertise and insight to address the expanding needs of patients in China and to utilize our China-based competencies to improve the lives of patients worldwide.

Since our founding in 2013 until December 31, 2019, we have constructed a broad and validated innovative pipeline consisting of two commercial products and eight clinical-stage drug assets with potentially differentiated profiles, in addition to other assets, through partnerships with global biopharmaceutical companies. In April 2020, our portfolio was expanded to eleven drug assets with the addition of REGN1979. Following the addition of REGN1979, our clinical-stage portfolio now includes seven late-stage clinical assets targeting large, fast growing segments of China’s pharmaceutical market. Across our broader portfolio, we currently have over 25 ongoing or planned clinical trials. We believe that our leadership team’s extensive global drug development expertise, combined with our demonstrated understanding of the pharmaceutical industry, clinical resources and regulatory system in China, has provided us, and will continue to provide us, with opportunities to bring innovative products to market in China efficiently.

137


 

Our consolidated net loss attributable to ordinary shareholders for the year ended December 31, 2017, 2018 and 2019 was $50.4 million, $139.1 million and $195.1 million, respectively.

Basis of Presentation

Our consolidated statement of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2018 and 2019 and our consolidated statement of financial position data as of December 31, 2017, 2018 and 2019 have been derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 20-F. Our consolidated financial statements appearing elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 20-F have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP.

Factors Affecting our Results of Operations

Innovation Platform

Research and Development Expenses

We believe our ability to successfully develop drug candidates will be the primary factor affecting our long-term competitiveness, as well as our future growth and development. Developing high quality drug candidates requires a significant investment of resources over a prolonged period of time, and a core part of our strategy is to continue making sustained investments in this area. As a result of this commitment, our pipeline of drug candidates has been steadily advancing and expanding, with seven late-stage clinical drug candidates being investigated. For more information on the nature of the efforts and steps necessary to develop our drug candidates, see “Business” and “Regulation.”

To date, we have financed our activities primarily through private placements, our initial public offering in September 2017 and various follow-on offerings. Through December 31, 2019, we have raised approximately $164.6 million in private equity financing and approximately $513.4 million in net proceeds after deducting underwriting commissions and the offering expenses payable by us in our initial public offering and our subsequent follow-on offerings. Our operations have consumed substantial amounts of cash since inception. The net cash used in our operating activities was $32.4 million, $97.5 million and $191.0 million, for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2018 and 2019, respectively. We expect our expenditures to increase significantly in connection with our ongoing activities, particularly as we advance the clinical development of our seven late-stage clinical drug candidates and continue research and development of our pre-clinical-stage drug candidates and initiate additional clinical trials of, and seek regulatory approval for, these and other future drug candidates. These expenditures include:

 

expenses incurred for payments to CROs, investigators and clinical trial sites that conduct our clinical studies;

 

employee compensation related expenses, including salaries, benefits and equity compensation expense;

 

expenses for licensors;

 

the cost of acquiring, developing, and manufacturing clinical study materials;

 

facilities, depreciation, and other expenses, which include office leases and other overhead expenses;

 

costs associated with pre-clinical activities and regulatory operations;

 

expenses associated with the construction and maintenance of our manufacturing facilities; and

 

costs associated with operating as a public company.

For more information on the research and development expenses incurred for the development of our drug candidates, see “Key Components of Results of Operations—Research and Development Expenses.”

138


 

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

Our selling, general and administrative expenses consist primarily of personnel compensation and related costs, including share-based compensation for commercial and administrative personnel. Other selling, general and administrative expenses include product distribution and promotion costs, professional service fees for legal, intellectual property, consulting, auditing and tax services as well as other direct and allocated expenses for rent and maintenance of facilities, insurance and other supplies used in selling, general and administrative activities. We anticipate that our selling, general and administrative expenses will increase in future periods to support increases in our commercial and research and development activities and as we continue to commercialize, develop, and manufacture our products and drug assets. These increases will likely include increased headcount, increased share compensation charges, increased product distribution and promotion costs, expanded infrastructure and increased costs for insurance. We also incur increased legal, compliance, accounting and investor and public relations expenses associated with being a public company.

Our Ability to Commercialize Our Drug Candidates

All of our drug candidates are still in development in China (including, with respect to ZEJULA, for indications not yet approved in China). As of December 31, 2019, ten of our drug candidates are in clinical development and various others are in pre-clinical development in China. Our ability to generate revenue from our drug candidates is dependent on their receipt of regulatory approval for and successful commercialization of such products, which may never occur. Certain of our drug candidates may require additional pre-clinical and/or clinical development, regulatory approval in multiple jurisdictions, manufacturing supply, substantial investment and significant marketing efforts before we generate any revenue from product sales.

Our License Arrangements

Our results of operations have been, and we expect them to continue to be, affected by our licensing, collaboration and development agreements. We are required to make upfront payments upon our entry into such agreements and milestone payments upon the achievement of certain development, regulatory and commercial milestones for the relevant drug product under these agreements as well as tiered royalties based on the net sales of the licensed products. These expenses are recorded in research and development expense in our consolidated financial statements and totalled $8.0 million, $59.2 million and $58.7 million for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2018 and 2019, respectively.

Key Components of Results of Operations

Taxation

Cayman Islands

Zai Lab Limited is incorporated in the Cayman Islands. The Cayman Islands currently levies no taxes on profits, income, gains or appreciation earned by individuals or corporations. In addition, our payment of dividends, if any, is not subject to withholding tax in the Cayman Islands. For more information, see “Taxation—Material Cayman Islands Taxation.”

People’s Republic of China

Our subsidiaries incorporated in China are governed by the EIT Law and regulations. Under the EIT Law, the standard EIT rate is 25% on taxable profits as reduced by available tax losses. Tax losses may be carried forward to offset any taxable profits for up to following five years. For more information, see “Taxation—Material People’s Republic of China Taxation.”

139


 

Results of Operations

The following table sets forth a summary of our consolidated results of operations for the periods indicated. This information should be read together with our consolidated financial statements and related notes included elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 20-F. Our operating results in any period are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for any future period.

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

Comprehensive Loss Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

$

12,985

 

 

$

129

 

 

$

 

Expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of sales

 

 

(3,749

)

 

 

(43

)

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

(142,221

)

 

 

(120,278

)

 

 

(39,342

)

Selling, general and administrative

 

 

(70,211

)

 

 

(21,576

)

 

 

(12,049

)

Loss from operations

 

 

(203,196

)

 

 

(141,768

)

 

 

(51,391

)

Interest income

 

 

8,232

 

 

 

3,261

 

 

 

527

 

Interest expenses

 

 

(293

)

 

 

(40

)

 

 

 

Changes in fair value of warrants

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

200

 

Other income, net

 

 

938

 

 

 

59

 

 

 

530

 

Loss before income tax and share of loss from equity

   method investment

 

 

(194,319

)

 

 

(138,488

)

 

 

(50,134

)

Income tax expense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share of loss from equity method investment

 

 

(752

)

 

 

(587

)

 

 

(250

)

Net loss attributable to ordinary shareholders

 

$

(195,071

)

 

$

(139,075

)

 

$

(50,384

)

Weighted-average shares used in calculating net loss

   per ordinary share, basic and diluted

 

 

64,369,490

 

 

 

52,609,810

 

 

 

21,752,757

 

Net loss per share, basic and diluted

 

$

(3.03

)

 

$

(2.64

)

 

$

(2.32

)

 

Year Ended December 31, 2019 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2018

Research and Development Expenses

The following table sets forth the components of our research and development expenses for the years indicated.

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

(in thousands)

 

2019

 

 

%

 

 

2018

 

 

%

 

Research and development expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Personnel compensation and related costs

 

$

30,820

 

 

 

21.6

 

 

$

16,755

 

 

 

13.9

 

Licensing fees

 

 

58,682

 

 

 

41.3

 

 

 

59,152

 

 

 

49.2

 

Payment to CROs/CMOs/Investigators

 

 

36,814

 

 

 

25.9

 

 

 

32,282

 

 

 

26.8

 

Other costs

 

 

15,905

 

 

 

11.2

 

 

 

12,089

 

 

 

10.1

 

Total

 

$

142,221

 

 

 

100.0

 

 

$

120,278

 

 

 

100.0

 

 

Research and development expenses increased by $21.9 million to $142.2 million for year ended December 31, 2019 from $120.3 million for year ended December 31, 2018. The increase in research and development expenses included the following:

 

$14.1 million for increased personnel compensation and related costs which was primarily attributable to increased employee compensation costs, due to hiring of more personnel during the year ended December 31, 2019 and the grants of new share options and vesting of restricted shares to certain employees;

 

$4.5 million for increased payment to CROs/CMOs/Investigators in fiscal year 2019 as we advanced our drug candidate pipeline; and

 

$3.8 million for increased lab consumables and professional service expenses.

140


 

The following table summarizes our research and development expenses by program for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively:

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

(in thousands)

 

2019

 

 

%

 

 

2018

 

 

%

 

Research and development expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clinical programs

 

$

96,442

 

 

 

67.8

 

 

$

89,556

 

 

 

74.5

 

Pre-clinical programs

 

 

8,268

 

 

 

5.8

 

 

 

8,102

 

 

 

6.7

 

Unallocated research and development expenses

 

 

37,511

 

 

 

26.4

 

 

 

22,620

 

 

 

18.8

 

Total

 

$

142,221

 

 

 

100.0

 

 

$

120,278

 

 

 

100.0

 

 

During the year ended December 31, 2019, 67.8% and 5.8% of our total research and development expenses were attributable to clinical programs and pre-clinical programs, respectively. During the year ended December 31, 2018, 74.5% and 6.7% of our total research and development expenses were attributable to clinical programs and pre-clinical programs, respectively. ZEJULA represented approximately 17% and 13% of our external research and development expense, which includes payments to CROs, CMOs and investigators, for the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Omadacycline (ZL-2401) represented approximately 7% and 12% of our external research and development expense, which includes licensing fees and payment to CROs, CMOs and investigators, for the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018. bemarituzumab (FPA144) represented approximately 5% and 12%, of our external research and development expense, which includes licensing fees and payment to CROs, CMOs and investigators, for the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018; ZL-1306 and ZL-2307 represented approximately 17% and 25% of our external research and development expense, which includes licensing fees and payment to CROs, CMOs and investigators, for the year ended December 31, 2019, respectively. No other programs represented a significant amount of research and development expense for the years ended December 31, 2019 or 2018. Though we manage our external research and development expenses by program we do not allocate our internal research and development expenses by program because our employees and internal resources may be engaged in projects for multiple programs at any time.

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

The following table sets forth the components of our selling, general and administrative expenses for the years indicated.

 

 

 

Year ended December 31,

 

(in thousands)

 

2019

 

 

%

 

 

2018

 

 

%

 

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Personnel compensation and related costs

 

$

43,572

 

 

 

62.1

 

 

$

13,410

 

 

 

62.2

 

Professional service fees

 

 

2,887

 

 

 

4.1

 

 

 

3,266

 

 

 

15.1

 

Other costs

 

 

23,752

 

 

 

33.8

 

 

 

4,900

 

 

 

22.7

 

Total

 

$

70,211

 

 

 

100.0

 

 

$

21,576

 

 

 

100.0

 

 

Selling, general and administrative expenses increased by $48.6 million to $70.2 million for year ended December 31, 2019 from $21.6 million for year ended December 31, 2018. The increase in general and administrative expenses included the following:

 

$30.2 million for increased personnel compensation and related costs which was primarily attributable to increased commercial and administrative personnel costs, due to hiring of more personnel during year ended December 31, 2019 and the grants of new share options and vesting of restricted shares to certain employees; and

 

$18.9 million for increased selling, rental, and travel expenses primary attributable to the commercial operation in Hong Kong and PRC for the year ended December 31, 2019.

Interest Income

Interest income increased by $5.0 million for year ended December 31, 2019 primary attributable to interest income on higher cash and short-term investments balance in 2019.

141


 

Interest Expenses

Interest expenses increased by $0.3 million for year ended December 31, 2019 primary attributable to more short-term borrowings balance in 2019.

Share of loss from equity method investment

In June 2017, we entered into an agreement with three third-parties to launch JING Medicine Technology (Shanghai) Ltd., or JING, an entity that will provide services for drug discovery and development, consultation and transfer of pharmaceutical technology. We account for our investment using the equity method of accounting because we do not control the investee but have the ability to exercise significant influence over the operating and financial policies of the investee. An investment loss of $0.8 million and $0.6 million related to this investment