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FTDR Frontdoor

Filed: 6 May 21, 5:23pm

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

________________________________________________

FORM 10-Q

________________________________________________

x

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2021

or

o

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                    to                    

Commission file number 001-38617

________________________________________________

Picture 1

frontdoor, inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware

82-3871179

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

(IRS Employer Identification No.)

150 Peabody Place, Memphis, Tennessee 38103

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

901-701-5000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of Each Class

Trading Symbol

Name of Each Exchange on which Registered

Common stock, par value $0.01 per share

FTDR

The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes  x  No  o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).

Yes  x  No  o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer x

Accelerated filer o

Non-accelerated filer o

Smaller reporting company o

Emerging growth company o

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

Yes  o  No  x

The number of shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding as of April 30, 2021: 85,685,092 shares of common stock, par value $0.01 per share.


frontdoor, inc.

Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q

GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND SELECTED ABBREVIATIONS

In order to aid the reader, we have included certain terms and abbreviations used throughout this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q below:

Term/Abbreviation

Definition

2020 Form 10-K

frontdoor, inc. Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020

2026 Notes

6.750% senior notes in the aggregate principal amount of $350 million

AOCI

Accumulated other comprehensive income or loss

ASC

FASB Accounting Standards Codification

ASC 740

ASC Topic 740, Income Taxes

ASU

FASB Accounting Standards Update

Credit Agreement

The agreements governing the Term Loan Facility and the Revolving Credit Facility

Credit Facilities

The Term Loan Facility together with the Revolving Credit Facility

Exchange Act

Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended

FASB

U.S. Financial Accounting Standards Board

HVAC

Heating, ventilation and air conditioning

Indenture

The indenture and supplemental indenture between frontdoor, inc. and Wilmington Trust, National Association as trustee, that governs the 2026 Notes

IRS

Internal Revenue Service

Omnibus Plan

frontdoor, inc. 2018 Omnibus Incentive Plan

ProConnect

Our membership-based home services business, which includes on-demand home services offerings, marketed under the American Home Shield ProConnect and HSA ProConnect brand names and other names

Revolving Credit Facility

$250 million revolving credit facility

SEC

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission

Securities Act

Securities Act of 1933, as amended

Spin-off

Terminix’s separation and distribution of the ownership and operations of the businesses operated under the American Home Shield, HSA, OneGuard and Landmark brand names into frontdoor, inc., which was completed on October 1, 2018

Streem

Streem, LLC, our technology business that uses augmented reality, computer vision and machine learning to provide services

Term Loan Facility

$650 million senior secured term loan facility

Terminix

Terminix Global Holdings, Inc. (formerly known as ServiceMaster Global Holdings, Inc.), a Delaware corporation, and its consolidated subsidiaries

U.S. or United States

United States of America

U.S. GAAP

Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America

In this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, unless the context indicates otherwise, references to “Frontdoor,” “we,” “our,” or “us” refer to frontdoor, inc. and all of its subsidiaries. Frontdoor is a Delaware corporation with its principal executive offices in Memphis, Tennessee.

We hold various service marks, trademarks and trade names, such as frontdoor™, American Home Shield®, HSA™, OneGuard®, Landmark Home Warranty®, ProConnect™, Streem® and the Frontdoor logo. Solely for convenience, the service marks, trademarks and trade names referred to in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are presented without the SM, ®, and TM symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate, in any way, that we will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights or the rights of the applicable licensors to these service marks, trademarks and trade names. All service marks, trademarks and trade names appearing in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are the property of their respective owners. 

Certain amounts presented in the tables in this report are subject to rounding adjustments and, as a result, the totals in such tables may not sum.


2


PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income (Unaudited)

(In millions, except per share data)

Three Months Ended

March 31,

2021

2020

Revenue

$

329

$

294

Cost of services rendered

181

147

Gross Profit

148

147

Selling and administrative expenses

118

105

Depreciation and amortization expense

9

8

Restructuring charges

1

3

Interest expense

13

15

Interest and net investment income

0

(2)

Loss on extinguishment of debt

1

0

Income before Income Taxes

5

17

Provision for income taxes

1

4

Net Income

$

5

$

13

Other Comprehensive Income (Loss), Net of Income Taxes:

Net unrealized gain (loss) on derivative instruments

7

(15)

Total Comprehensive Income (Loss)

$

12

$

(2)

Earnings per Share:

Basic

$

0.06

$

0.15

Diluted

$

0.06

$

0.15

Weighted-average Common Shares Outstanding:

Basic

85.4

85.1

Diluted

86.0

85.4

See accompanying Notes to the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.


3


Condensed Consolidated Statements of Financial Position (Unaudited)

(In millions, except share data)

As of

March 31,

December 31,

2021

2020

Assets:

Current Assets:

Cash and cash equivalents

$

538

$

597

Receivables, less allowance of $2 in each period

4

5

Prepaid expenses and other assets

30

24

Total Current Assets

573

626

Other Assets:

Property and equipment, net

61

60

Goodwill

512

512

Intangible assets, net

167

170

Operating lease right-of-use assets

20

15

Deferred customer acquisition costs

20

19

Other assets

3

3

Total Assets

$

1,355

$

1,405

Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity:

Current Liabilities:

Accounts payable

$

66

$

55

Accrued liabilities:

Payroll and related expenses

19

23

Home service plan claims

85

90

Interest payable

3

9

Other

32

32

Deferred revenue

227

187

Current portion of long-term debt

7

7

Total Current Liabilities

439

403

Long-Term Debt

868

968

Other Long-Term Liabilities:

Deferred taxes

41

38

Operating lease liabilities

23

18

Other long-term obligations

30

40

Total Other Long-Term Liabilities

94

96

Commitments and Contingencies (Note 8)

 

 

Shareholders' Equity:

Common stock, $0.01 par value; 2,000,000,000 shares authorized; 85,680,630 shares issued and 85,679,700 shares outstanding at March 31, 2021 and 85,477,779 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2020

1

1

Additional paid-in capital

49

46

Accumulated deficit

(70)

(75)

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

(26)

(33)

Total Deficit

(46)

(61)

Total Liabilities and Shareholders' Equity

$

1,355

$

1,405

See accompanying Notes to the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

4


Condensed Consolidated Statement of Changes in (Deficit) Equity (Unaudited)

(In millions)

Three Months Ended

March 31,

2021

2020

Common Stock

Balance at beginning of period

$

1

$

1

Balance at end of period

1

1

Additional Paid-in Capital

Balance at beginning of period

46

29

Exercise of stock options

1

Taxes paid related to net share settlement of equity awards

(4)

(1)

Stock-based employee compensation

6

3

Balance at end of period

49

31

Accumulated Deficit

Balance at beginning of period

(75)

(188)

Net income

5

13

Balance at end of period

(70)

(174)

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss

Balance at beginning of period

(33)

(21)

Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax

7

(15)

Balance at end of period

(26)

(36)

Total Deficit

$

(46)

$

(178)

See accompanying Notes to the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

5


Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (Unaudited)

(In millions)

Three Months Ended

March 31,

2021

2020

Cash and Cash Equivalents at Beginning of Period

$

597

$

428

Cash Flows from Operating Activities:

Net Income

5

13

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided from operating activities:

Depreciation and amortization expense

9

8

Stock-based compensation expense

6

3

Restructuring charges

1

3

Payments for restructuring charges

(1)

(3)

Loss on extinguishment of debt

1

0

Change in working capital, net of acquisitions:

Receivables

1

3

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

1

2

Accounts payable

11

7

Deferred revenue

40

40

Accrued liabilities

(8)

(15)

Accrued interest payable

(6)

(6)

Current income taxes

(8)

4

Net Cash Provided from Operating Activities

52

60

Cash Flows from Investing Activities:

Purchases of property and equipment

(7)

(8)

Purchases of available-for-sale securities

0

(2)

Sales and maturities of available-for-sale securities

0

7

Net Cash Used for Investing Activities

(7)

(3)

Cash Flows from Financing Activities:

Payments of debt

(102)

(2)

Other financing activities

(3)

(1)

Net Cash Used for Financing Activities

(105)

(3)

Cash (Decrease) Increase During the Period

(59)

54

Cash and Cash Equivalents at End of Period

$

538

$

482

See accompanying Notes to the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

6


frontdoor, inc.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(UNAUDITED)

 

Note 1. Basis of Presentation

Frontdoor is the leading provider of home service plans in the United States, as measured by revenue, and operates under the American Home Shield, HSA, OneGuard and Landmark brands. Our customizable home service plans help customers protect and maintain their homes, typically their most valuable asset, from costly and unplanned breakdowns of essential home systems and appliances. Our home service plan customers subscribe to an annual service plan agreement that covers the repair or replacement of major components of more than 20 home systems and appliances, including electrical, plumbing, central HVAC systems, water heaters, refrigerators, dishwashers and ranges/ovens/cooktops, as well as optional coverages for electronics, pools, spas and pumps. Our operations also include our ProConnect on-demand home services business and Streem, a technology platform that uses augmented reality, computer vision and machine learning to, among other things, help home service professionals more quickly and accurately diagnose breakdowns and complete repairs. At March 31, 2021, we had over 2 million active home service plans across all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

We recommend that the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated and combined financial statements and the notes thereto included in our 2020 Form 10-K. The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements reflect all normal and recurring adjustments that are, in the opinion of management, necessary for the fair presentation of the financial position, results of operations and cash flows for the interim periods presented. The results of operations for any interim period are not indicative of the results that might be achieved for a full year.

Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization (“WHO”) characterized the novel coronavirus disease (“COVID-19”) as a pandemic, and on March 13, 2020, the United States declared a national emergency concerning the outbreak. The broader implications of the COVID-19 pandemic on our results of operations and overall financial performance remain uncertain. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we have taken a number of steps to protect the well-being of our employees, customers and contractors, and we continue to respond to the real-time needs of our business. The COVID-19 situation remains very fluid, and we continue to adjust our response in real time.

While we did not experience a material impact on our results of operations and overall financial performance during the first quarter of 2020, during the first quarter of 2021, our financial condition and results of operations were adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic as follows:

Revenue in the first-year real estate channel has continued to be adversely impacted by the decline in U.S. existing home sales in the second quarter of 2020. Due to the annual nature of our home service plan agreements, the impact of this decline carried forward into the first quarter of 2021. Additionally, a strong existing home seller’s market has constrained demand for home service plans in this channel.

We experienced an increase in appliance and plumbing claims primarily due to the increased usage of home systems and appliances driven by state and local shelter at home orders and recommendations. In addition, industry-wide availability challenges in the appliance trade have caused increased cost pressure, and, more specifically, appliance parts availability challenges drove additional replacements, contributing to the increased costs.

We incurred incremental wages at our customer care centers due to a higher number of service requests in the appliance and plumbing trades, which is primarily a result of customers sheltering at home in response to COVID-19.

Note 2. Significant Accounting Policies

Our significant accounting policies are described in Note 2 to the audited consolidated and combined financial statements included in our 2020 Form 10-K. There have been no material changes to the significant accounting policies for the three months ended March 31, 2021.

7


Note 3. Revenue

We enter into annual home service plan agreements with our customers. We have one performance obligation, which is to provide for the repair or replacement of essential home systems and appliances, as applicable per the contract. We recognize revenue at the agreed upon contractual amount over time using the input method in proportion to the costs expected to be incurred in performing services under the contracts. Those costs bear a direct relationship to the fulfillment of our obligations under the contracts and are representative of the relative value provided to the customer. As the costs to fulfill the obligations of the home service plans are incurred on an other-than-straight-line basis, we utilize historical evidence to estimate the expected claims expense and related timing of such costs. This adjustment to the straight-line revenue creates a contract asset or contract liability, as described under the heading “Contract balances” below. We regularly review our estimates of claims costs and adjust our estimates when appropriate. We derive substantially all of our revenue from customers in the United States.

We disaggregate revenue from contracts with customers into major customer acquisition channels. We determined that disaggregating revenue into these categories depicts how the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows are affected by economic factors. Revenue by major customer acquisition channel is as follows:

___

Three Months Ended

March 31,

(In millions)

2021

2020

Renewals

$

224

$

200

Real estate(1)

57

56

Direct-to-consumer(1)

41

35

Other

8

3

Total

$

329

$

294

_____________________________

(1)First-year revenue only.

Renewals

Revenue from all customer renewals, whether initiated via the real estate or direct-to-consumer channel, are classified as renewals above. Customer payments for renewals are received either at the commencement of the renewal period or in installments over the contract period.

Real estate

Real estate home service plans are sold through annual contracts in connection with a real estate sale, and payments are typically paid in full at closing. First-year revenue from the real estate channel is classified as real estate above.

Direct-to-consumer

Direct-to-consumer home service plans are sold through annual contracts when customers request a service plan in response to marketing efforts or when third-party resellers make a sale. Customer payments are received either at the commencement of the contract or in installments over the contract period. First-year revenue from the direct-to-consumer channel is classified as direct-to-consumer above.

Costs to obtain a contract with a customer

We capitalize the incremental costs of obtaining a contract with a customer, primarily sales commissions, and recognize the expense using the input method in proportion to the costs expected to be incurred in performing services under the contract, over the expected customer relationship period. Deferred customer acquisition costs were $20 million and $19 million as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. Amortization of these deferred acquisition costs was $4 million for each of the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020. There were 0 impairment losses in relation to these capitalized costs.

Contract balances

Timing of revenue recognition may differ from the timing of invoicing to customers. Contracts with customers, including contracts resulting from customer renewals, are generally for a period of one year. We record a receivable related to revenue recognized on services once we have an unconditional right to invoice and receive payment in the future related to the services provided. All accounts receivable are recorded within Receivables, less allowances, in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of financial position. We invoice our monthly-pay customers on a straight-line basis over the contract term. As a result, a contract asset is created when revenue is recognized on monthly-pay customers before being billed.

8


Deferred revenue represents a contract liability and is recognized when cash payments are received in advance of the performance of services, including when the amounts are refundable. Amounts are recognized as revenue in proportion to the costs expected to be incurred in performing services under our contracts. Deferred revenue was $227 million and $187 million as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively, and as of March 31, 2021, includes a net contract liability of $45 million related to the recognition of monthly-pay customer revenue on an other-than-straight-line basis to match the timing of cost recognition.

Changes in deferred revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2021 were as follows:

(In millions)

Deferred

Revenue

Balance as of December 31, 2020

$

187

Deferral of revenue

123

Recognition of deferred revenue

(84)

Balance as of March 31, 2021

$

227

There was approximately $71 million of revenue recognized in the three months ended March 31, 2021 that was included in the deferred revenue balance as of December 31, 2020.

Note 4. Goodwill and Intangible Assets

Goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets are not amortized and are subject to assessment for impairment on an annual basis or more frequently if circumstances indicate a potential impairment. An assessment for impairment is performed on October 1 of every year. The balance of goodwill was $512 million as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. There were 0 goodwill or trade name impairment charges recorded in the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020. There were 0 accumulated impairment losses recorded as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

The table below summarizes the other intangible asset balances:

As of March 31, 2021

As of December 31, 2020

(In millions)

Gross

Accumulated
Amortization

Net

Gross

Accumulated
Amortization

Net

Trade names(1)

$

141

$

$

141

$

141

$

$

141

Customer relationships

173

(171)

1

173

(171)

2

Developed technology

25

(8)

18

25

(6)

19

Other

37

(29)

7

37

(29)

8

Total

$

375

$

(208)

$

167

$

375

$

(205)

$

170

___________________________________

(1)Not subject to amortization.

Amortization expense was $3 million for each of the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020. The following table outlines expected amortization expense for existing intangible assets for the remainder of 2021 and the next five years:

(In millions)

2021 (remainder)

$

8

2022

8

2023

6

2024

4

2025

0

2026

0

Total

$

26

9


Note 5. Leases

We have operating leases primarily for our corporate offices, customer care centers and engineering and technology campuses. Our leases have remaining lease terms of two years to 14 years, some of which include options to extend the leases for up to five years. Renewal options that are reasonably certain to be exercised are included in the lease term. An incremental borrowing rate is used in determining the present value of lease payments unless an implicit rate is readily determinable. Incremental borrowing rates are determined based on our secured borrowing rating and the lease term.

The weighted-average remaining lease term and weighted-average discount rate related to operating leases is as follows:

As of

March 31,

December 31,

2021

2020

Weighted-average remaining lease term (years)

9

9

Weighted-average discount rate

5.5

%

6.0

%

We recognized operating lease expense of $1 million for each of the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020. These expenses are included in Selling and administrative expenses in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income.

Supplemental cash flow information related to operating leases is as follows:

z

Three Months Ended

March 31,

(In millions)

2021

2020

Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities(1)

$

1

$

3

Leased assets obtained in exchange for new lease liabilities

6

_____________________________

(1)For the three months ended March 31, 2020, amounts include $2 million of lease termination costs related to the decision to consolidate certain operations of Landmark Home Warranty, LLC (“Landmark”) with those of OneGuard Home Warranties (“OneGuard”). See Note 7 to the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements for further information.

Supplemental balance sheet information related to operating leases is as follows:

As of

March 31,

December 31,

(In millions)

2021

2020

Operating lease right-of-use assets

$

26

$

21

Less lease incentives

(6)

(6)

Operating lease right-of-use assets, net

$

20

$

15

Other accrued liabilities

$

4

$

3

Operating lease liabilities

23

18

Total operating lease liabilities

$

26

$

21

The following table presents maturities of our operating lease liabilities as of March 31, 2021.

(In millions)

2021 (remainder)

$

4

2022

5

2023

5

2024

3

2025

2

2026

2

Thereafter

12

Total lease payments

34

Less imputed interest

(8)

Total

$

26

10


Note 6. Income Taxes

As required by ASC 740, we compute interim period income taxes by applying an anticipated annual effective tax rate to our year-to-date income or loss from operations before income taxes, except for significant unusual or infrequently occurring items. Our estimated tax rate is adjusted each quarter in accordance with ASC 740. The effective tax rate on income was 9.8 percent and 25.0 percent for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The decrease in the effective tax rate for the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to 2020 is primarily due to excess tax benefits for share-based awards.

We are subject to taxation in the United States, various states and foreign jurisdictions. Pursuant to the terms of the tax matters agreement entered into with Terminix in connection with the Spin-off, we are not subject to federal examination by the IRS or examination by state taxing authorities where a unitary or combined state income tax return is filed for the years prior to 2018. We are not subject to state and local income tax examinations by tax authorities in jurisdictions where separate income tax returns are filed for the years prior to 2016. Substantially all of our income before income taxes for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 was generated in the United States.

Our policy is to recognize potential interest and penalties related to our tax positions within the tax provision. Total interest and penalties included in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income are immaterial.

Note 7. Restructuring Charges

We incurred restructuring charges of $1 million ($1 million, net of tax) and $3 million ($2 million, net of tax) for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

For the three months ended March 31, 2021, restructuring charges primarily comprised accelerated depreciation of certain technology systems driven by efforts to enhance our technological capabilities. For the three months ended March 31, 2020, restructuring charges comprised lease termination costs and severance and other costs related to the decision to consolidate certain operations of Landmark with those of OneGuard.

The pre-tax charges discussed above are reported in “Restructuring charges” in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income.

As of December 31, 2020, there were $1 million of restructuring charges accrued, which were paid or otherwise settled during the three months ended March 31, 2021. As of March 31, 2021, there were less than $1 million in accrued restructuring charges in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of financial position.

Note 8. Commitments and Contingencies

Accruals for home service plan claims are made using internal actuarial projections, which are based on current claims and historical claims experience. Accruals are established based on estimates of the ultimate cost to settle claims. Home service plan claims take approximately three months to settle, on average, and substantially all claims are settled within six months of incurrence. The amount of time required to settle a claim can vary based on a number of factors, including whether a replacement is ultimately required. In addition to our estimates, we engage a third-party actuary to perform an accrual analysis utilizing generally accepted actuarial methods that incorporate cumulative historical claims experience and information provided by us. We regularly review our estimates of claims costs along with the third-party analysis and adjust our estimates when appropriate. We believe the use of actuarial methods to account for these liabilities provides a consistent and effective way to measure these judgmental accruals.

We have certain liabilities with respect to existing or potential claims, lawsuits and other proceedings. We accrue for these liabilities when it is probable that future costs will be incurred and such costs can be reasonably estimated. Any resulting adjustments, which could be material, are recorded in the period the adjustments are identified.

In January 2021, a lawsuit was filed in the Superior Court of the State of Arizona by the Arizona Attorney General (the "AZ Attorney General") against Landmark, alleging, among other things, that Landmark violated the Arizona Consumer Fraud Act by engaging in deceptive, misleading or unfair practices with respect to the provision of expedited services to its customers during extreme temperatures from January 2017 to July 2020. The AZ Attorney General sought $14.7 million in damages plus penalties, costs, interest and attorneys’ fees in this matter. Although Landmark disagreed with the allegations that it violated Arizona law, as litigation is inherently unpredictable, Landmark fully settled this matter with the AZ Attorney General in March 2021 for $1.8 million. As we recorded an estimate of loss with respect to this matter during the year ended December 31, 2020 equal to the amount of the settlement, 0 additional expense was recognized in the three months ended March 31, 2021.

11


Due to the nature of our business activities, we are also at times subject to pending and threatened legal and regulatory actions that arise out of the ordinary course of business. In the opinion of management, based in part upon advice of legal counsel, the disposition of any such matters is not expected, individually or in the aggregate, to have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations or cash flows. However, the results of legal actions cannot be predicted with certainty. Therefore, it is possible that our business, financial position, results of operations or cash flows could be materially adversely affected in any particular period by the unfavorable resolution of one or more legal actions.

Note 9. Stock-Based Compensation

We recognized stock-based compensation expense of $6 million ($4 million, net of tax) and $3 million ($3 million, net of tax) for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. These charges are included in Selling and administrative expenses in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income.

A summary of awards granted under the Omnibus Plan during the three months ended March 31, 2021 is presented below:

Number of

Weighted Avg.

Weighted Avg.

Weighted Avg.

Awards

Exercise

Grant Date

Vesting

Granted

Price

Fair Value

Period

Stock options

245,599

$

54.81

$

28.09

4 years

Restricted stock units

368,202

54.83

3 years

Performance shares(1)

98,017

54.81

3 years

_____________________________

(1)The number of performance shares granted during the three months ended March 31, 2021 represents the target value of the awards. The performance shares contain a performance condition that is based on our revenue target, and the ultimate number of performance shares to be earned depends on the achievement of this performance condition.

As of March 31, 2021, there was $61 million of total unrecognized compensation cost, net of estimated forfeitures, related to unvested stock options, restricted stock units (“RSUs”), performance shares and restricted stock awards (“RSAs”). These remaining costs are expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 2.68 years.

Note 10. Long-Term Debt

Long-term debt is summarized in the following table:

As of

March 31,

December 31,

(In millions)

2021

2020

Term Loan Facility maturing in 2025(1)

$

529

$

629

Revolving Credit Facility maturing in 2023

0

0

2026 Notes(2)

346

346

Less current portion

(7)

(7)

Total long-term debt

$

868

$

968

___________________________________

(1)As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, presented net of $4 million and $5 million, respectively, in unamortized debt issuance costs and $1 million in unamortized original issue discount paid.

(2)As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, presented net of $4 million in unamortized debt issuance costs. 

On February 17, 2021, we repaid $100 million of the outstanding principal amount of the Term Loan Facility. In connection with the repayment, we recorded a loss on extinguishment of debt of $1 million, which included the write-off of debt issuance costs and original issue discount. 

12


Note 11. Supplemental Cash Flow Information

Supplemental information relating to the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of cash flows is presented in the following table:

Three Months Ended

March 31,

(In millions)

2021

2020

Cash paid for (received from):

Interest expense

$

18

$

20

Income tax payments, net of refunds

8

0

Interest income

0

(2)

Note 12. Comprehensive Income (Loss)

Comprehensive income (loss), which includes net income (loss) and unrealized gain (loss) on derivative instruments, is disclosed in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income and condensed consolidated statements of changes in equity.

The following tables summarize the activity in AOCI, net of the related tax effects.

Unrealized

Loss

(In millions)

on Derivatives

Total

Balance as of December 31, 2020

$

(33)

$

(33)

Other comprehensive income (loss) before reclassifications:

Pre-tax amount

7

7

Tax provision (benefit)

2

2

After-tax amount

5

5

Amounts reclassified from accumulated
  other comprehensive income (loss)(1)

2

2

Net current period other comprehensive income (loss)

7

7

Balance as of March 31, 2021

$

(26)

$

(26)

Balance as of December 31, 2019

$

(21)

$

(21)

Other comprehensive income (loss) before reclassifications:

Pre-tax amount

(21)

(21)

Tax provision (benefit)

(5)

(5)

After-tax amount

(16)

(16)

Amounts reclassified from accumulated
  other comprehensive income (loss)(1)

1

1

Net current period other comprehensive income (loss)

(15)

(15)

Balance as of March 31, 2020

$

(36)

$

(36)

___________________________________

(1)Amounts are net of tax. See reclassifications out of AOCI below for further details.

Reclassifications out of AOCI included the following components for the periods indicated.

Amounts Reclassified from Accumulated

Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)

Three Months Ended

March 31,

Consolidated Statements of

(In millions)

2021

2020

Operations and Comprehensive Income Location

Loss on interest rate swap contract

$

(3)

$

(1)

Interest expense

Impact of income taxes

1

0

Provision for income taxes

Total reclassifications related to derivatives

$

(2)

$

(1)

Total reclassifications for the period

$

(2)

$

(1)

13


Note 13. Derivative Financial Instruments

We currently use a derivative financial instrument to manage risks associated with changes in interest rates. We do not hold or issue derivative financial instruments for trading or speculative purposes. In designating derivative financial instruments as hedging instruments under accounting standards for derivative instruments, we formally document the relationship between the hedging instrument and the hedged item, as well as the risk management objective and strategy for the use of the hedging instrument. This documentation includes linking the derivatives to forecasted transactions. We assess at the time a derivative contract is entered into, and at least quarterly thereafter, whether the derivative item is effective in offsetting the projected cash flows of the associated forecasted transaction.

We hedge the interest payments on a portion of our variable rate debt through the use of an interest rate swap agreement. Our interest rate swap contract is classified as a cash flow hedge, and, as such, it is recorded in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of financial position as either an asset or liability at fair value, with changes in fair value recorded in AOCI. Cash flows related to the interest rate swap contract are classified as operating activities in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of cash flows.

The effective portion of the gain or loss on our interest rate swap contract is recorded in AOCI. These amounts are reclassified into earnings in the same period or periods during which the hedged forecasted debt interest settlement affects earnings. See Note 12 to the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements for the effective portion of the gain or loss on derivative instruments recorded in AOCI and for the amounts reclassified out of AOCI and into earnings. As the underlying forecasted transactions occur during the next 12 months, the unrealized hedging loss in AOCI expected to be recognized in earnings is $8 million, net of tax, as of March 31, 2021. The amounts that are ultimately reclassified into earnings will be based on actual interest rates at the time the positions are settled and may differ materially from the amount noted above.

Note 14. Fair Value Measurements

We estimate fair value at a price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants in the principal market for the asset or liability. The valuation techniques require inputs that the business categorizes using a three-level hierarchy, from highest to lowest level of observable inputs, as follows: unadjusted quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in active markets ("Level 1"); direct or indirect observable inputs, including quoted prices or other market data, for similar assets or liabilities in active markets or identical assets or liabilities in less active markets ("Level 2"); and unobservable inputs that require significant judgment for which there is little or no market data ("Level 3"). When multiple input levels are required for a valuation, we categorize the entire fair value measurement according to the lowest level of input that is significant to the measurement, even though we may have also utilized significant inputs that are more readily observable.

The period-end carrying amounts of cash and cash equivalents, receivables, accounts payable and accrued liabilities approximate fair value because of the short maturity of these instruments. The carrying amount of total debt was $875 million and $975 million, and the estimated fair value was $902 million and $1,004 million as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. The fair value of our debt is estimated based on available market prices for the same or similar instruments that are considered significant other observable inputs (Level 2) within the fair value hierarchy. The fair values presented reflect the amounts that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date (exit price). The fair value estimates presented in this report are based on information available to us as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

We value our interest rate swap contract using a forward interest rate curve obtained from a third-party market data provider. The fair value of the contract is the sum of the expected future settlements between the contract counterparties, discounted to present value. The expected future settlements are determined by comparing the contract interest rate to the expected forward interest rate as of each settlement date and applying the difference between the two rates to the notional amount of debt in the interest rate swap contract.

We have not changed our valuation techniques for measuring the fair value of any financial assets and liabilities during the three months ended March 31, 2021. Transfers between levels, if any, are recognized at the end of the reporting period. There were 0 transfers between levels during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020.

14


The carrying amount and estimated fair value of our financial instruments that are recorded at fair value on a recurring basis for the periods presented are as follows:

Estimated Fair Value Measurements

(In millions)

Statement of Financial
Position Location

Carrying
Value

Quoted
Prices
In Active
Markets
(Level 1)

Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level 2)

Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
(Level 3)

As of March 31, 2021:

Financial Liabilities:

Interest rate swap contract

Other accrued liabilities

$

10

$

0

$

10

$

0

Other long-term obligations

24

0

24

0

Total financial liabilities

 

$

34

$

0

$

34

$

0

As of December 31, 2020:

Financial Liabilities:

Interest rate swap contract

Other accrued liabilities

$

10 

$

0

$

10 

$

0

Other long-term obligations

33 

0

33 

0

Total financial liabilities

 

$

43 

$

0

$

43 

$

0

Note 15. Earnings Per Share

Basic earnings per share is computed by dividing net income by the weighted-average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per share is computed by dividing net income by the weighted-average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period, increased to include the number of shares of common stock that would have been outstanding had potential dilutive shares of common stock been issued. The dilutive effect of stock options, RSUs, performance shares and RSAs are reflected in diluted earnings per share by applying the treasury stock method.

Basic and diluted earnings per share are calculated as follows:

Three Months Ended

March 31,

(In millions, except per share data)

2021

2020

Net Income

$

5

$

13

Weighted-average common shares outstanding

85.4

85.1

Effect of dilutive securities:

RSUs

0.4

0.1

Stock options(1)

0.2

0.1

Weighted-average common shares outstanding - assuming dilution

86.0

85.4

Basic earnings per share

$

0.06

$

0.15

Diluted earnings per share

$

0.06

$

0.15

___________________________________

(1)Options to purchase 0.3 million shares for the three months ended March 31, 2020 were not included in the diluted earnings per share calculation because their effect would have been anti-dilutive. There were 0 such anti-dilutive options for the three months ended March 31, 2021.     

15


CAUTIONARY STATEMENT CONCERNING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act and Section 21E of the Exchange Act, regarding business strategies, market potential, future financial performance and other matters. The words “believe,” “expect,” “estimate,” “could,” “should,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “seek,” “anticipate,” “project,” “will,” “shall,” “would,” “aim,” and similar expressions, among others, generally identify “forward-looking statements,” which speak only as of the date the statements were made. The matters discussed in these forward-looking statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected, anticipated or implied in the forward-looking statements. Where, in any forward-looking statement, an expectation or belief as to future results or events is expressed, such expectation or belief is based on the current plans and expectations of our management and expressed in good faith and believed to have a reasonable basis, but there can be no assurance that the expectation or belief will result or be achieved or accomplished. Whether any such forward-looking statements are in fact achieved will depend on future events, some of which are beyond our control.

You should read this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q completely and with the understanding that actual future results may be materially different from expectations. All forward-looking statements made in this report are qualified by these cautionary statements. These forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this report, and we do not undertake any obligation, other than as may be required by law, to update or revise any forward-looking or cautionary statements to reflect changes in assumptions, the occurrence of events, unanticipated or otherwise, and changes in future operating results over time or otherwise. For a discussion of other important factors that could cause our results to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied by, the forward-looking statements included in this report, you should refer to the risks and uncertainties detailed from time to time in our periodic reports filed with the SEC, including the disclosure included in Item 1A. Risk Factors in our 2020 Form 10-K.

Factors, risks, trends and uncertainties that make an investment in us speculative or risky and that could cause actual results or events to differ materially from those anticipated in our forward-looking statements include the matters described under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included in this report as well as Item 1A. Risk Factors in our 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC, in addition to the following other factors, risks, trends and uncertainties:

risks related to the COVID-19 pandemic;

changes in the source and intensity of competition in our market;

weakening general economic conditions, especially as they may affect existing home sales, unemployment and consumer confidence or spending levels;

our ability to successfully implement our business strategies;

our ability to attract, retain and maintain positive relations with third-party contractors and vendors;

adverse weather conditions and Acts of God;

failure of our marketing efforts to be successful or cost-effective;

our ability to attract and retain key personnel;

our dependence on labor availability, third-party vendors, including business process outsourcers, and third-party component suppliers;

special risks applicable to operations outside the United States by us or our business process outsource providers;

compliance with, or violation of, laws and regulations, including consumer protection laws, increasing our legal and regulatory expenses;

increases in tariffs or changes to import/export regulations;

cybersecurity breaches, disruptions or failures in our technology systems and our failure to protect the security of personal information about our customers;

increases in parts, appliance and home system prices and other operating costs;

our ability to protect our intellectual property and other material proprietary rights;

negative reputational and financial impacts resulting from acquisitions or strategic transactions;

requirement to recognize impairment charges;

failure to maintain our strategic relationships with the real estate brokerages and agents that comprise our real estate customer acquisition channel;

third-party use of our trademarks as search engine keywords to direct our potential customers to their own websites;

16


inappropriate use of social media by us or other parties to harm our reputation;

our limited history of operating as an independent company;

tax liabilities and potential indemnification of Terminix for material taxes if the distribution fails to qualify as tax-free;

the effects of our substantial indebtedness and the limitations contained in the agreements governing such indebtedness;

increases in interest rates increasing the cost of servicing our substantial indebtedness; 

increased borrowing costs due to lowering or withdrawal of the ratings, outlook or watch assigned to us, our debt securities or our Credit Facilities;

our ability to generate the significant amount of cash needed to fund our operations and service our debt obligations; and

other factors described in this report and from time to time in documents that we file with the SEC.

Available Information

Our website address is www.frontdoorhome.com. We use our website as a channel of distribution for company information. We will make available free of charge on the Investor section of our website our Annual Report Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and all amendments to those reports as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act. We also make available through our website other reports filed with or furnished to the SEC under the Exchange Act, including our proxy statements and reports filed by officers and directors under Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act, as well as our Code of Conduct and Financial Code of Ethics. Financial and other material information regarding Frontdoor is routinely posted on our website and is readily accessible. We do not intend for information contained in our website to be part of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

17


ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following information should be read in conjunction with the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and related notes included in Part I, Item 1 of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, the audited consolidated and combined financial statements and related notes thereto included in our 2020 Form 10-K and with the information under the heading “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in our 2020 Form 10-K. The cautionary statements discussed in “Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Statements” and elsewhere in this report should be read as applying to all forward-looking statements wherever they appear in this report. Our actual results could differ materially from those discussed in these forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to these differences include those factors discussed below and elsewhere in this report, particularly in “Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Statements” as well as those factors discussed in “Risk Factors” included in Part I, Item 1A. “Risk Factors” in our 2020 Form 10-K.

Overview

Frontdoor is the leading provider of home service plans in the United States, as measured by revenue, and operates under the American Home Shield, HSA, OneGuard and Landmark brands. Our customizable home service plans help customers protect and maintain their homes, typically their most valuable asset, from costly and unplanned breakdowns of essential home systems and appliances. Our home service plan customers subscribe to an annual service plan agreement that covers the repair or replacement of major components of more than 20 home systems and appliances, including electrical, plumbing, central HVAC systems, water heaters, refrigerators, dishwashers and ranges/ovens/cooktops, as well as optional coverages for electronics, pools, spas and pumps. Our operations also include our ProConnect on-demand home services business and Streem, a technology platform that uses augmented reality, computer vision and machine learning to, among other things, help home service professionals more quickly and accurately diagnose breakdowns and complete repairs. At March 31, 2021, we had over two million active home service plans across all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

For the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, we generated revenue, net income and Adjusted EBITDA of $329 million, $5 million and $36 million, respectively, and $294 million, $13 million and $47 million, respectively.

For the three months ended March 31, 2021, our total operating revenue included 68 percent of revenue derived from existing customer renewals, while 17 percent and 12 percent were derived from new home service plan sales made in conjunction with existing home resale transactions and direct-to-consumer sales, respectively, and two percent was derived from other revenue streams.

For the three months ended March 31, 2020, our total operating revenue included 68 percent of revenue derived from existing customer renewals, while 19 percent and 12 percent were derived from new home service plan sales made in conjunction with existing home resale transactions and direct-to-consumer sales, respectively, and one percent was derived from other revenue streams.

Key Factors and Trends Affecting Our Results of Operations

Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic

On March 11, 2020, the WHO characterized COVID-19 as a pandemic, and on March 13, 2020, the United States declared a national emergency concerning the outbreak. The broader implications of the COVID-19 pandemic on our results of operations and overall financial performance remain uncertain. Included under the heading “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in our 2020 Form 10-K are the steps we took in 2020 and have continued to take in response to the COVID-19 pandemic to protect the well-being of our employees, customers and contractors. We continue to respond to the real-time needs of our business.

18


While we did not experience a material impact on our results of operations and overall financial performance during the first quarter of 2020, during the first quarter of 2021, our financial condition and results of operations were adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic as follows:

Revenue in the first-year real estate channel has continued to be adversely impacted by the decline in U.S. existing home sales in the second quarter of 2020. Due to the annual nature of our home service plan agreements, the impact of this decline carried forward into the first quarter of 2021. Additionally, a strong existing home seller’s market has constrained demand for home service plans in this channel.

We experienced an increase in appliance and plumbing claims primarily due to the increased usage of home systems and appliances driven by state and local shelter at home orders and recommendations. In addition, industry-wide availability challenges in the appliance trade have caused increased cost pressure, and, more specifically, appliance parts availability challenges drove additional replacements, contributing to the increased costs.

We incurred incremental wages at our customer care centers due to a higher number of service requests in the appliance and plumbing trades, which is primarily a result of customers sheltering at home in response to COVID-19.

Although there are effective vaccines for COVID-19 that have been approved for use, we are unable to predict how widely utilized the vaccines will be, whether they will be effective in preventing the spread of COVID-19 (including its variant strains) and when or if normal economic activity and business operations will resume. We expect that a significant number of people will continue to work remotely from home, which may result in a continued increase in usage of home systems and appliances and demand for our services and a resulting increase in service-related costs. Accordingly, the COVID-19 situation remains very fluid, and we continue to adjust our response in real time. It remains difficult to predict the overall impact the COVID-19 pandemic will have on our business.

Macroeconomic Conditions

Macroeconomic conditions that may affect customer spending patterns, and thereby our results of operations, include home sales, consumer confidence and employment rates. The COVID-19 pandemic has increased economic uncertainty in these areas. We believe our ability to acquire customers through the direct-to-consumer channel helps to mitigate the effects of downturns in the real estate market, while our nationwide presence limits the risk of poor economic conditions in any particular geography.

Seasonality

Our business is subject to seasonal fluctuations, which drives variations in our revenue, net income and Adjusted EBITDA for interim periods. Seasonal fluctuations are primarily driven by a higher number of central HVAC work orders in the summer months. In the first quarter of 2021 and throughout 2020, additional variations were experienced as the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in an elevated level of service requests, primarily in the appliance and plumbing trades, as our customers spent more time at home. In 2020, approximately 20 percent, 28 percent, 30 percent and 22 percent of our revenue, approximately 12 percent, 43 percent, 43 percent and 2 percent of our net income, and approximately 17 percent, 37 percent, 34 percent and 12 percent of our Adjusted EBITDA was recognized in the first, second, third and fourth quarters, respectively.

Effect of Weather Conditions

The demand for our services, and our results of operations, are affected by weather conditions. Extreme temperatures can lead to an increase in service requests related to home systems, particularly central HVAC systems, resulting in higher claim frequency and costs and lower profitability. Weather conditions that have a potentially favorable impact to our business include mild winters or summers, which can lead to lower home systems claim frequency. For example, unfavorable weather trends, as compared to 2020, negatively impacted contract claims costs in the first quarter of 2021.

While weather variations as described above may affect our business, major weather events and other similar Acts of God, such as hurricanes, flooding and tornadoes, typically do not increase our obligations to provide service. As a rule, repairs associated with such isolated events are addressed by homeowners’ and other forms of insurance as opposed to home service plans that we offer, and such insurance coverage in fact reduces our obligations to provide service to home systems and appliances damaged by insured, catastrophic events.

Tariff and Import/Export Regulations

Changes in U.S. tariff and import/export regulations may impact the costs of parts, appliances and home systems. Import duties or restrictions on components and raw materials that are imposed, or the perception that they could occur, may materially and adversely affect our business by increasing our costs. For example, rising costs due to blanket tariffs on imported steel and aluminum could increase the costs of our parts, appliances and home systems.

19


Competition

We compete in the U.S. home service plan category and the broader U.S. home services industry. The home service plan category is highly competitive. The principal methods of competition, and by which we differentiate ourselves from our competitors, are quality and speed of service, contract offerings, brand awareness and reputation, customer satisfaction, pricing and promotions, contractor network and referrals.

Acquisition Activity

We anticipate that the highly fragmented nature of the home service plan category will continue to create strategic opportunities for acquisitions. In particular, we intend to focus strategically on underserved regions where we can enhance and expand service capabilities. Historically, we have used acquisitions to cost-effectively grow our customer base in high-growth geographies, and we intend to continue to do so. We may also explore opportunities to make strategic acquisitions that will expand our service offering in the broader home services industry. We have also used acquisitions to enhance our technological capabilities. In 2019, we acquired Streem to support the service experience for our customers, reduce costs and create potential new revenue opportunities across a variety of channels. We expect to use Streem’s services in our core home service plan business and in ProConnect’s on-demand business to deliver a superior service experience and reduce our costs. In 2020, we acquired a business to expand our ProConnect on-demand offering via their intellectual capital and know-how, technology platform capabilities and geographic presence.

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

To supplement our results presented in accordance with U.S. GAAP, we have disclosed non-GAAP financial measures that exclude or adjust certain items. We present within this “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” section the non-GAAP financial measure of Adjusted EBITDA. See “Results of Operations — Adjusted EBITDA” for a reconciliation of net income to Adjusted EBITDA, as well as “Key Business Metrics — Adjusted EBITDA” for further discussion of Adjusted EBITDA. Management uses Adjusted EBITDA to facilitate operating performance comparisons from period to period. We believe this non-GAAP financial measure provides investors, analysts and other interested parties useful information to evaluate our business performance as it facilitates company-to-company operating performance comparisons. While we believe this non-GAAP financial measure is useful in evaluating our business, it should be considered as supplemental in nature and is not meant to be considered in isolation or as a substitute for the related financial information prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP. In addition, this non-GAAP financial measure may not be the same as similarly entitled measures reported by other companies, limiting its usefulness as a comparative measure.

Key Business Metrics

We focus on a variety of indicators and key operating and financial metrics to monitor the financial condition and performance of the continuing operations of our business. These metrics include:

revenue,

operating expenses,

net income,

earnings per share,

Adjusted EBITDA, 

Adjusted EBITDA margin,

net cash provided from operating activities,

Free Cash Flow,

growth in number of home service plans, and 

customer retention rate.

Revenue. Home service plan contracts are typically one year in duration. We recognize revenue at the agreed upon contractual amount over time using the input method in proportion to the costs expected to be incurred in performing services under the contracts. Our revenue is primarily a function of the volume and pricing of the services provided to our customers, as well as the mix of services provided. Our revenue volume is impacted by new home service plan sales, customer retention and acquisitions. We derive substantially all of our revenue from customers in the United States.

20


Operating Expenses. In addition to changes in our revenue, our operating results are affected by, among other things, the level of our operating expenses. Our operating expenses primarily include contract claims costs and expenses associated with sales and marketing, customer service and general corporate overhead. A number of our operating expenses are subject to inflationary pressures, such as salaries and wages, employee benefits and health care; contractor costs; home systems, appliances and repair costs; tariffs; insurance premiums; and various regulatory compliance costs.

Net Income and Earnings Per Share. The presentation of net income and basic and diluted earnings per share provides measures of performance which are useful for investors, analysts and other interested parties in company-to-company operating performance comparisons. Basic earnings per share is computed by dividing net income by the weighted-average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per share is computed by dividing net income by the weighted-average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period, increased to include the number of shares of common stock that would have been outstanding had potentially dilutive shares of common stock been issued. The dilutive effect of stock options, RSUs, performance shares (which are contractual rights to receive a share of our common stock (or the cash equivalent thereof) upon the achievement, in whole or in part, of the applicable performance goals, pursuant to the terms of the Omnibus Plan and the award agreement) and RSAs are reflected in diluted earnings per share by applying the treasury stock method.

Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin. We evaluate performance and allocate resources based primarily on Adjusted EBITDA, which is a financial measure not calculated in accordance with U.S. GAAP. We define Adjusted EBITDA as net income before: provision for income taxes; interest expense; depreciation and amortization expense; non-cash stock-based compensation expense; restructuring charges; loss on extinguishment of debt; and other non-operating expenses. We define “Adjusted EBITDA margin” as Adjusted EBITDA divided by revenue. We believe Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin are useful for investors, analysts and other interested parties as they facilitate company-to-company operating performance comparisons by excluding potential differences caused by variations in capital structures, taxation, the age and book depreciation of facilities and equipment, restructuring initiatives and equity-based, long-term incentive plans.

Net Cash Provided from Operating Activities and Free Cash Flow. We focus on measures designed to monitor cash flow, including net cash provided from operating activities and Free Cash Flow, which is a financial measure not calculated in accordance with U.S. GAAP and represents net cash provided from operating activities less property additions.

Growth in Number of Home Service Plans and Customer Retention Rate. We report our growth in number of home service plans and customer retention rate in order to track the performance of our business. Home service plans represent our recurring customer base, which includes customers with active contracts for recurring services. Our customer retention rate is calculated as the ratio of ending home service plans to the sum of beginning home service plans, new home service plan sales and acquired accounts for the applicable period. These measures are presented on a rolling, 12-month basis in order to avoid seasonal anomalies.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

Our critical accounting policies and estimates are described under the heading “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in our 2020 Form 10-K. There have been no material changes to our critical accounting policies for the three months ended March 31, 2021, certain of which are described below.

Goodwill and Intangible Assets

In accordance with applicable accounting standards, goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets are not amortized and are subject to assessment for impairment on an annual basis, or more frequently, if circumstances indicate a potential impairment. As of March 31, 2021, we do not believe there are any circumstances, including those related to COVID-19, that would indicate a potential impairment of our goodwill or indefinite-lived intangible assets. We will continue to monitor the macroeconomic impacts on our business in our ongoing evaluation of potential impairments. 


21


Results of Operations

Three Months Ended March 31, 2021 Compared to the Three Months Ended March 31, 2020

Three Months Ended

Increase

March 31,

(Decrease)

% of Revenue

(In millions)

2021

2020

2021 vs. 2020

2021

2020

Revenue

$

329

$

294

12

%

100

%

100

%

Cost of services rendered

181

147

23

55

50

Gross Profit

148

147

1

45

50

Selling and administrative expenses

118

105

13

36

36

Depreciation and amortization expense

9

8

14

3

3

Restructuring charges

1

3

*

1

Interest expense

13

15

(11)

4

5

Interest and net investment income

(2)

*

(1)

Loss on extinguishment of debt

1

*

Income before Income Taxes

5

17

(69)

2

6

Provision for income taxes

1

4

(88)

1

Net Income

$

5

$

13

(63)

%

1

%

4

%

________________________________

*     not meaningful

Revenue

We reported revenue of $329 million and $294 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Revenue by major customer acquisition channel is as follows:

Three Months Ended March 31, 2021 Compared to the Three Months Ended March 31, 2020

Three Months Ended

March 31,

(In millions)

2021

2020

Increase (Decrease)

Renewals

$

224

$

200

$

24

12

%

Real estate(1)

57

56

1

2

Direct-to-consumer(1)

41

35

6

16

Other

8

3

5

*

Total revenue

$

329

$

294

$

35

12

%

________________________________

* not meaningful

(1)First-year revenue only.

Revenue increased 12 percent for the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to the three months ended March 31, 2020, primarily driven by higher renewal revenue due to improved price realization and growth in the number of renewed home service plans, due, in part, to customer retention initiatives. The increase in real estate revenue primarily reflects improved price realization. Due to the annual nature of our home service plan agreements, real estate revenue has continued to be adversely impacted by the decline in U.S. existing home sales in the second quarter of 2020. Additionally, the strong existing home seller’s market has constrained demand for home service plans in this channel. The increase in direct-to-consumer revenue primarily reflects growth in the number of first-year direct-to-consumer home service plans, mostly driven by increased investments in marketing. The increase in other revenue was driven by growth in ProConnect and Streem.

Number of home service plans, growth in number of home service plans and customer retention rate are presented below.

As of

March 31,

(In millions)

2021

2020

Number of home service plans

2.25

2.17

Growth in number of home service plans

4

%

3

%

Customer retention rate

75

%

75

%

22


Cost of Services Rendered

We reported cost of services rendered of $181 million and $147 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The following table provides a summary of changes in cost of services rendered:

Three Months Ended March 31, 2021 Compared to the Three Months Ended March 31, 2020

(In millions)

Three Months Ended March 31, 2020

$

147

Impact of change in revenue

8

Contract claims costs

26

Three Months Ended March 31, 2021

$

181

The increase in contract claims costs reflects higher incidence in the appliance and plumbing trades, primarily a result of customers sheltering at home in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, increased cost pressures in the appliance trade due to industry-wide availability challenges and inflation, offset, in part, by process improvement benefits. Appliance parts availability challenges continued to drive additional replacements, contributing to the increased cost pressures. Contract claims costs also reflects an unfavorable weather impact of approximately $5 million.

Selling and Administrative Expenses

We reported selling and administrative expenses of $118 million and $105 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. For the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, selling and administrative expenses comprised sales, marketing and customer service costs of $81 million and $75 million, respectively, and general and administrative expenses of $37 million and $30 million, respectively. The following table provides a summary of changes in selling and administrative expenses:

Three Months Ended March 31, 2021 Compared to the Three Months Ended March 31, 2020

(In millions)

Three Months Ended March 31, 2020

$

105

Sales and marketing costs

5

Customer service costs

2

Stock-based compensation expense

2

General and administrative costs

4

Three Months Ended March 31, 2021

$

118

The increase in sales and marketing costs was primarily driven by higher targeted marketing spend to drive sales growth in the direct-to-consumer channel and ProConnect and investments in Streem. The increase in customer service costs was primarily related to managing a higher number of service requests and investments in customer retention initiatives. General and administrative costs increased compared to prior year primarily due to increased personnel costs and investments in technology.

Depreciation Expense

Depreciation expense was $6 million and $5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

Amortization Expense

Amortization expense was $3 million for each of the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020.

Restructuring Charges

Restructuring charges were $1 million and $3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

For the three months ended March 31, 2021, restructuring charges primarily comprised accelerated depreciation of certain technology systems driven by efforts to enhance our technological capabilities. For the three months ended March 31, 2020, restructuring charges comprised lease termination costs and severance and other costs related to the decision to consolidate certain operations of Landmark with those of OneGuard.

23


Interest Expense

Interest expense was $13 million and $15 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. For the three months ended March 31, 2021, the decrease was primarily due to a decline in interest rates on the unhedged portion of our variable rate debt.

Interest and Net Investment Income

Interest and net investment income was less than $1 million and $2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, and comprised interest on our investment portfolio.

Loss on Extinguishment of Debt

Loss on extinguishment of debt was $1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, which was recorded in connection with the partial repayment of the Term Loan Facility and includes the write-off of debt issuance costs and original issue discount. There were no such charges for the three months ended March 31, 2020.

Provision for Income Taxes

The effective tax rate on income was 9.8 percent and 25.0 percent for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The decrease in the effective tax rate for the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to 2020 is primarily due to excess tax benefits for share-based awards.

Net Income

Net income was $5 million and $13 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. For the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to 2020, the decrease was driven by the aforementioned operating results, offset, in part, by a decrease in the provision for income taxes as a result of lower income before income taxes.

Adjusted EBITDA

Adjusted EBITDA was $36 million and $47 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The following table provides a summary of changes in our Adjusted EBITDA:

Three Months Ended March 31, 2021 Compared to the Three Months Ended March 31, 2020

(In millions)

Three Months Ended March 31, 2020

$

47

Impact of change in revenue

28

Contract claims costs

(26)

Sales and marketing costs

(5)

Customer service costs

(2)

General and administrative costs

(4)

Other

(1)

Three Months Ended March 31, 2021

$

36

The increase in contract claims costs reflects higher incidence in the appliance and plumbing trades, primarily a result of customers sheltering at home in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, increased cost pressures in the appliance trade due to industry-wide availability challenges and inflation, offset, in part, by process improvement benefits. Appliance parts availability challenges continued to drive additional replacements, contributing to the increased cost pressures. Contract claims costs also reflects an unfavorable weather impact of approximately $5 million.

The increase in sales and marketing costs was primarily driven by higher targeted marketing spend to drive sales growth in the direct-to-consumer channel and ProConnect and investments in Streem. The increase in customer service costs was primarily related to managing a higher number of service requests and investments in customer retention initiatives. General and administrative costs increased compared to prior year primarily due to increased personnel costs and investments in technology. Other primarily consists of interest and net investment income.

24


A reconciliation of Net Income to Adjusted EBITDA is presented below.

Three Months Ended

March 31,

(In millions)

2021

2020

Net Income

$

5

$

13

Depreciation and amortization expense

9

8

Restructuring charges

1

3

Provision for income taxes

1

4

Non-cash stock-based compensation expense

6

3

Interest expense

13

15

Loss on extinguishment of debt

1

Adjusted EBITDA

$

36

$

47

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Liquidity

A substantial portion of our liquidity needs are due to debt service requirements on our indebtedness. The Credit Agreement, as well as the Indenture, contain covenants that limit or restrict our ability, including the ability of certain of our subsidiaries, to incur additional indebtedness, repurchase debt, incur liens, sell assets, make certain payments (including dividends) and enter into transactions with affiliates. As of March 31, 2021, we were in compliance with the covenants under the agreements that were in effect on such date. Based on current conditions, we do not believe the COVID-19 pandemic will affect our ongoing ability to meet the covenants in our debt instruments, including our Credit Agreement and Indenture.

Cash and cash equivalents totaled $538 million and $597 million as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. Our cash and cash equivalents include balances associated with regulatory requirements in our business. See “—Limitations on Distributions and Dividends by Subsidiaries.” As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the total net assets subject to these third-party restrictions was $175 million and $180 million, respectively. As of March 31, 2021, there were $2 million of letters of credit outstanding and $248 million of available borrowing capacity under the Revolving Credit Facility. The letters of credit are posted in lieu of cash to satisfy regulatory requirements in certain states in which we operate. Available liquidity was $611 million at March 31, 2021, consisting of $363 million of cash not subject to third-party restrictions and $248 million of available borrowing capacity under the Revolving Credit Facility. We currently believe that cash generated from operations, our cash on hand and available borrowing capacity under the Revolving Credit Facility at March 31, 2021 will provide us with sufficient liquidity to meet our obligations for the foreseeable future.

On February 17, 2021, we repaid $100 million of outstanding principal amount of the Term Loan Facility. In connection with the repayment, we recorded a loss on extinguishment of debt of $1 million, which included the write-off of debt issuance costs and original issue discount.

We closely monitor the performance of our investment portfolio. From time to time, we review the statutory reserve requirements to which our regulated entities are subject and any changes to such requirements. These reviews may result in identifying current reserve levels above or below minimum statutory reserve requirements, in which case we may adjust our reserves. The reviews may also identify opportunities to satisfy certain regulatory reserve requirements through alternate financial vehicles.

We may, from time to time, repurchase or otherwise retire or extend our debt and/or take other steps to reduce our debt or otherwise improve our financial position, gross leverage, results of operations or cash flows. These actions may include open market debt repurchases, negotiated repurchases, other retirements of outstanding debt and/or opportunistic refinancing of debt. The amount of debt that may be repurchased or otherwise retired or refinanced, if any, and the price of such repurchases, retirements or refinancings will depend on market conditions, trading levels of our debt, our cash position, compliance with debt covenants and other considerations.

Limitations on Distributions and Dividends by Subsidiaries

We depend on our subsidiaries to distribute funds to us so that we may pay obligations and expenses, including satisfying obligations with respect to indebtedness. The ability of our subsidiaries to make distributions and dividends to us depends on their operating results, cash requirements, financial condition and general business conditions, as well as restrictions under the laws of our subsidiaries’ jurisdictions.

25


Our subsidiaries are permitted under the terms of the Credit Agreement and other indebtedness to incur additional indebtedness that may restrict or prohibit the making of distributions, the payment of dividends or the making of loans by such subsidiaries to us.

Furthermore, there are third-party restrictions on the ability of certain of our subsidiaries to transfer funds to us. These restrictions are related to regulatory requirements. The payments of ordinary and extraordinary dividends by certain of our subsidiaries (through which we conduct our business) are subject to significant regulatory restrictions under the laws and regulations of the states in which they operate. Among other things, such laws and regulations require certain subsidiaries to maintain minimum capital and net worth requirements and may limit the amount of ordinary and extraordinary dividends and other payments that these subsidiaries can pay to us. We expect that such limitations will be in effect for the foreseeable future. In Texas, we are relieved of the obligation to post 75 percent of our otherwise required reserves because we operate a captive insurer approved by Texas regulators in order to satisfy such obligations. None of our subsidiaries are obligated to make funds available to us through the payment of dividends.

Cash Flows

Cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities, as reflected in the condensed consolidated statements of cash flows included in Part I, Item 1 of this report, are summarized in the following table.

Three Months Ended

March 31,

(In millions)

2021

2020

Net cash provided from (used for):

Operating activities

$

52

$

60

Investing activities

(7)

(3)

Financing activities

(105)

(3)

Cash (decrease) increase during the period

$

(59)

$

54

Operating Activities

Net cash provided from operating activities was $52 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, compared to $60 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020.

Net cash provided from operating activities in 2021 comprised $21 million in earnings adjusted for non-cash charges and a $31 million decrease in cash required for working capital. The decrease in cash required for working capital was driven by growth in our underlying business.

Net cash provided from operating activities in 2020 comprised $25 million in earnings adjusted for non-cash charges and a $35 million decrease in cash required for working capital. The decrease in cash required for working capital was driven by growth in our underlying business.

Investing Activities

Net cash used for investing activities was $7 million and $3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

Capital expenditures were $7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, compared to $8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020, and included recurring capital needs and technology projects. We expect capital expenditures for the full year 2021 relating to recurring capital needs and the continuation of investments in information systems and productivity enhancing technology to be approximately $35 million to $45 million. We have no additional material capital commitments at this time.

Cash flows provided from purchases, sales and maturities of securities, net, for the three months ended March 31, 2020 were $5 million and were driven by the maturities of marketable securities. There were no cash flows provided from purchases, sales and maturities of securities, net, for the three months ended March 31, 2021. There were no sales of marketable securities in the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020.

Financing Activities

Net cash used for financing activities was $105 million and $3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, and primarily consisted of payments on debt. For the three months ended March 31, 2021, amounts include the partial repayment of $100 million of the Term Loan Facility.

26


Contractual Obligations

Our 2020 Form 10-K includes disclosures of our contractual obligations and commitments as of December 31, 2020. We continue to make the contractually required payments, and, therefore, the 2021 obligations and commitments described in our 2020 Form 10-K have been reduced by the required payments.

During the three months ended March 31, 2021, we repaid $100 million of the outstanding principal amount of the Term Loan Facility. This amount was disclosed in our 2020 Form 10-K as a required principal payment in 2025. Based on applicable rates at March 31, 2021 plus specified margins, this partial repayment results in a reduction in interest expense of approximately $12 million in total for the years 2021 through 2025.

Financial Position

The following discussion describes changes in our financial position from December 31, 2020 to March 31, 2021:

Cash and cash equivalents decreased during the three months ended March 31, 2021, primarily due to the repayment of $100 million of outstanding principal amount of the Term Loan Facility, offset, in part, by cash provided from operating activities.

Accounts payable increased during the three months ended March 31, 2021, reflecting the timing of trade payables due to the seasonality of our business.

Deferred revenue increased during the three months ended March 31, 2021, primarily due to the recognition of a contract liability of $45 million related to the recognition of monthly-pay customer revenue on an other-than-straight-line basis to match the timing of cost recognition.

Long-term debt decreased during the three months ended March 31, 2021, due to the repayment of $100 million of outstanding principal amount of the Term Loan Facility.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

As of March 31, 2021, we did not have any significant off-balance sheet arrangements.

We do not have any relationships with unconsolidated entities or financial partnerships, such as entities often referred to as structured finance or special purpose entities, established for the purpose of facilitating off-balance sheet arrangements or other contractually narrow or limited purposes. Accordingly, we are not materially exposed to any financing, liquidity, market or credit risk that could arise if we had engaged in such relationships.

 

27


ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

The economy and its impact on discretionary consumer spending, labor wages, material costs, home resales, unemployment rates, insurance costs and medical costs could have a material adverse impact on future results of operations.

We are exposed to the impact of interest rate changes and manage this exposure through the use of variable-rate and fixed-rate debt and by utilizing an interest rate swap. There have been no material changes to the market risk associated with debt obligations and other significant instruments from the risks described in Part II, Item 7A in our 2020 Form 10-K.

 

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

We maintain a set of disclosure controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in SEC rules and forms. The design of any disclosure controls and procedures is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance of achieving the desired control objectives. In accordance with Rule 13a-15(b) of the Exchange Act, as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, an evaluation was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures. Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report, were effective to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed by us in reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in SEC rules and forms and is accumulated and communicated to our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

No changes in our internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) and Rule 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act, occurred during our most recently completed fiscal quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

28


PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

The information required with respect to this Part II, Item 1 can be found under Note 8 to the condensed consolidated financial statements included in Part I, Item 1 of this report.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

For information regarding factors that could affect our business, financial condition or results of operations, see the risk factors discussed in Part I, Item 1A. “Risk Factors” in our 2020 Form 10-K. There have been no material changes to the risk factors disclosed in our 2020 Form 10-K. The risks described in our 2020 Form 10-K are not the only risks we face. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or those we currently view to be immaterial may also materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations. 

29


ITEM 6. EXHIBITS

Exhibit
Number

Description

2.1

Separation and Distribution Agreement, dated as of September 28, 2018, by and between Terminix Global Holdings, Inc. (formerly ServiceMaster Global Holdings, Inc.) and frontdoor, inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.1 to Frontdoor’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on October 1, 2018).

3.1

Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of frontdoor, inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to Frontdoor’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on October 1, 2018).

3.2

Amended and Restated Bylaws of frontdoor, inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 to Frontdoor’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on October 1, 2018).

10.1#

Form of Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement under the frontdoor, inc. Omnibus Plan, effective March 2021.

10.2#

Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement under the frontdoor, inc. Omnibus Plan, effective March 2021.

10.3#

Form of Performance Shares Agreement under the frontdoor, inc. Omnibus Plan, effective March 2021.

31.1*

Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a - 14, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

31.2*

Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a - 14, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

32.1*

Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 1350 of Chapter 63 of Title 18 of the United States Code, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

32.2*

Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 1350 of Chapter 63 of Title 18 of the United States Code, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

101.INS*

Inline XBRL Instance Document - the instance document does not appear in the Interactive Data File because its XBRL tags are embedded within the Inline XBRL document.

101.SCH*

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema

101.CAL*

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase

101.DEF*

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase

101.LAB*

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase

101.PRE*

Inline XBRL Extension Presentation Linkbase

104*

Cover page formatted as Inline XBRL and included in Exhibit 101.

___________________________________

# Denotes management compensatory plans, contracts or arrangements.

* Filed herewith.

The agreements and other documents filed as exhibits to this report are not intended to provide factual information or other disclosure other than the terms of the agreements or other documents themselves, and you should not rely on them for that purpose. In particular, any representations and warranties made by Frontdoor in these agreements or other documents were made solely within the specific context of the relevant agreement or document and may not describe the actual state of affairs as of the date they were made or at any other time.

 

30


SIGNATURE

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

Date: May 6, 2021

frontdoor, inc.

(Registrant)

By:

/s/ Brian K. Turcotte

Brian K. Turcotte

Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

(Principal Financial Officer)

 

31