Loading...
Docoh

Vtex (VTEX)

Filed: 8 Jun 21, 12:00am
Table of Contents

As confidentially submitted to the Securities and Exchange Commission on June 8, 2021. This draft registration statement has not been publicly filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and all information herein remains strictly confidential.

Registration No. 333-            

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

AMENDMENT NO. 1

TO

FORM F-1

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER

THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

 

 

VTEX

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

 

 

The Cayman Islands 7372 N/A

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

Incorporation or Organization)

 

(Primary Standard Industrial

Classification Code Number)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

125 Kingsway, WC2B 6NH

London, United Kingdom

(Address, including Zip Code, and Telephone Number, including Area Code, of Registrant’s Principal Executive Offices)

 

 

(Name, Address, including Zip Code, and Telephone Number, including Area Code, of Agent for Service)

 

 

Copies to:

 

S. Todd Crider

Grenfel S. Calheiros

Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP

425 Lexington Avenue

New York, NY 10017

(212) 455-2000

 

Byron B. Rooney

Maurice Blanco

Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP

450 Lexington Avenue

New York, New York 10017

(212) 450-4000

 

 

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public: As soon as practicable after the effective date of this registration statement.

If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, check the following box.  ☐

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is an emerging growth company as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act of 1933.

Emerging growth company  ☒

If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards† provided pursuant to Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act.  ☐

† The term “new or revised financial accounting standard” refers to any update issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to its Accounting Standards Codification after April 5, 2012.

 

 

CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE

 

 

Title of Each Class of

Securities to be Registered

 

Proposed

Maximum
Aggregate

Offering Price(1)(2)

 Amount of
Registration
Fee(3)

Class A common shares, par value US$ per share

 US$             US$            

 

 

(1)

Includes Class A common shares to be sold pursuant to the underwriters’ option to purchase additional Class A common shares. See “Underwriting.”

(2)

Estimated solely for the purpose of determining the amount of registration fee pursuant to Rule 457(o) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

(3)

Calculated pursuant to Rule 457(o) based on an estimate of the proposed maximum aggregate offering price.

 

 

The Registrant hereby amends this registration statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the Registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this registration statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or until the registration statement shall become effective on such date as the Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

The information in this preliminary prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This preliminary prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION, DATED                    , 2021

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS

Class A common shares

 

LOGO

(incorporated in the Cayman Islands)

This is an initial public offering of our Class A common shares, US$ par value per share of VTEX. We are offering                Class A common shares to be sold in this offering.

Prior to this offering, there has been no public market for our Class A common shares. The estimated initial public offering price for the Class A common shares in the offering is expected to be between US$                and US$                per Class A common share. We intend to apply to list our Class A common shares on the                under the symbol “VTEX.”

Upon consummation of this offering, we will have two classes of common shares: our Class A common shares and our Class B common shares. The rights of the holders of Class A common shares and Class B common shares will be identical, except with respect to voting, conversion, pre-emptive rights and transfer restrictions applicable to the Class B common shares. Each Class A common share will be entitled to one (1) vote. Each Class B common share will be entitled to ten (10) votes and will be convertible into one Class A common share automatically upon transfer, subject to certain exceptions. Class B common shares shall not be listed on any stock exchange and will not be publicly traded. Holders of Class A common shares and Class B common shares will vote together as a single class on all matters unless otherwise required by law.

Following this offering, our issued and outstanding Class B common shares, which will be beneficially owned by                , will represent     % of the combined voting power of our outstanding common shares and    % of our total equity ownership, assuming no exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional Class A common shares. For further information, see “Description of Share Capital.”

We are a “foreign private issuer” and an “emerging growth company” under the U.S. federal securities laws as that term is used in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 and, as a result, have elected to comply with certain reduced public company disclosure and reporting requirements. In addition, for as long as we remain an emerging growth company, we will qualify for certain limited exceptions from the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Additionally, following the offering, we will be a “controlled company” within the meaning of the corporate governance standards and as such plan to rely on available exemptions from certain corporate governance requirements. See “Risk Factors—Risks Relating to the Offering and Our Class A Common shares—Our status as a controlled company and a foreign private issuer exempts us from certain of the corporate governance standards of the                , limiting the protections afforded to investors” and “Risk Factors—Certain Risks Relating to this Offering and Our Class A Common shares—As a foreign private issuer and an “emerging growth company” (as defined in the JOBS Act), we will have different disclosure and other requirements from U.S. domestic registrants and non-emerging growth companies. We may take advantage of exemptions from certain corporate governance regulations of the                , and this may result in less protection for the holders of our Class A common shares.”

Investing in our Class A common shares involves a high degree of risk. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 19 of this prospectus.

 

   
    Per Class A
Common
Share
   Total 

Initial public offering price(1)

  US$                US$              

Underwriting discount and commissions(1)(2)

  US$    US$  

Proceeds to us (before expenses)(1)(3)

  US$    US$  
(1) Assumes no exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional Class A common shares.
(2) See “Underwriting” for a description of all compensation payable to the underwriters.
(3) See “Expenses of the Offering” for a description of all expenses (other than total underwriting discounts and commissions) payable in connection to this offering.

We have granted the underwriters the right to purchase up to                additional Class A common shares from us and have granted the underwriters the right to purchase up to                additional Class A common shares, in each case, within 30 days from the date of this prospectus, at the initial public offering price, less underwriting discounts and commissions.

Neither the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

We expect to deliver the Class A common shares against payment in New York, New York, on or about                , 2021, through the book-entry facilities of The Depository Trust Company.

Global Coordinators

 

J.P. Morgan Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC  BofA Securities

Joint Bookrunners

 

KeyBanc Capital Markets Morgan Stanley  Itaú BBA

The date of this prospectus is                , 2021.


Table of Contents

LOGO

 


Table of Contents

LOGO


Table of Contents

LOGO


Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

   Page 

CONTENTS

 

A LETTER FROM THE FOUNDERS

   iii 

PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

   1 

RISK FACTORS

   19 

PRESENTATION OF FINANCIAL AND OTHER INFORMATION

   69 

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

   75 

MARKET AND INDUSTRY DATA

   77 

USE OF PROCEEDS

   78 

DIVIDENDS AND DIVIDEND POLICY

   79 

CAPITALIZATION

   80 

DILUTION

   81 

SELECTED FINANCIAL AND OTHER INFORMATION

   83 

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

   85 

BUSINESS

   113 

MANAGEMENT

   138 

PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS

   144 

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

   147 

DESCRIPTION OF SHARE CAPITAL

   148 

CLASS A COMMON SHARES ELIGIBLE FOR FUTURE SALE

   168 

CERTAIN TAX CONSIDERATIONS

   172 

UNDERWRITING

   177 

EXPENSES OF THE OFFERING

   191 

LEGAL MATTERS

   192 

EXPERTS

   193 

CHANGE IN REGISTRANT’S CERTIFYING ACCOUNTANT

   194 

ENFORCEABILITY OF CIVIL LIABILITIES

   195 

WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

   198 

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

   F-1 

 

 

Unless the context otherwise requires, references in this prospectus to “VTEX,” “Company,” “we,” “our,” “ours,” “us” or similar terms refer to VTEX, together with its consolidated subsidiaries; references to the “Issuer” refer to VTEX, the company whose Class A common shares are being offered by this prospectus; and references to “controlling shareholders” are to Geraldo do Carmo Thomaz Júnior and Mariano Gomide de Faria.

 

 

Neither we, the underwriters, nor any of our or their respective agents have authorized anyone to give any information or make any representation about the offering that is different from, or in addition to that contained in the prospectus, the related registration statement, any free writing prospectus prepared by or on behalf of us or we may refer to you or in any of the materials that we have incorporated by reference into this prospectus. Neither we, the underwriters, nor any of our or their respective agents will have or take responsibility and can provide no assurance as to the reliability of any other information that others may give you.

This prospectus is being used in connection with the offering of the Class A common shares in the United States and, to the extent described below, elsewhere. This offering is being made in the United States and elsewhere based solely on the information contained in this prospectus. You should assume that the information appearing in this prospectus is accurate only as of the date on the front cover of this

 

i


Table of Contents

prospectus, regardless of the time of delivery of this prospectus or of any sale of the Class A common shares. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since the date on the front cover of this prospectus.

Neither we, the underwriters, nor any of our or their respective agents are offering or seeking offers to purchase the Class A common shares in any jurisdiction where such offers or sales are not permitted. We have not undertaken any efforts to qualify this offering for offers and sales to the public in any jurisdiction outside the United States, and we do not expect to make offers and sales to the public in jurisdictions located outside the United States (including Brazil). However, we may make offers and sales outside the United States in circumstances that do not constitute a public offer or distribution under applicable laws and regulations.

This offering is being made in the United States and elsewhere based solely on the information contained in this prospectus.

Notice to Investors Outside the United States. Neither we, the underwriters, nor any of our or their respective agents have done anything that would permit this offering or possession or distribution of this prospectus or any free writing prospectus in connection with this offering in any jurisdiction, other than the United States, where action for that purpose is required. Persons outside the United States who come into possession of this prospectus or any such free writing prospectus must inform themselves about, and observe any restrictions relating to, the offering of our Class A common shares and the distribution of this prospectus and any such free writing prospectus outside the United States.

Notice to EEA Investors. In any European Economic Area, or EEA, Member State that has implemented the Prospectus Regulation, this communication is addressed only to and is only directed at qualified investors in that Member State within the meaning of the Prospectus Regulation.

This prospectus has been prepared on the basis that any offer of our Class A common shares in any Member State of the European Economic Area, or EEA (each, a “Relevant Member State”), will be made pursuant to an exemption under the Prospectus Regulation from the requirement to publish a prospectus for offers of shares. Accordingly, any person making or intending to make any offer within the EEA of our Class A common shares which are the subject of this offering may only do so in circumstances in which no obligation arises for us or any of the underwriters to publish a prospectus pursuant to Article 3 of the Prospectus Regulation in relation to such offer. Neither we nor the underwriters have authorized, nor do they authorize, the making of any offer of our Class A common shares in circumstances in which an obligation arises for us or the underwriters to publish a prospectus for such offer.

For the purposes of this provision, the expression “Prospectus Regulation” means Regulation (EU) 2017/1129, and includes any relevant implementing measure in each Relevant Member State.

Notice to UK Investors. In the United Kingdom, this prospectus is addressed only to and directed at qualified investors who are (1) investment professionals falling within Article 19(5) of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (Financial Promotion) Order 2005 (the “Order”); or (2) high net worth entities and other persons

to whom it may lawfully be communicated, falling within Article 49(2)(a) to (d) of the Order (all such persons together being referred to as “relevant persons”). Any investment or investment activity to which this prospectus relates is available only to relevant persons and will only be engaged with relevant persons. Any person who is not a relevant person should not act or rely on this prospectus or any of its contents.

 

ii


Table of Contents

A LETTER FROM THE FOUNDERS

VTEX is where commerce happens. Our platform is designed to be the Operating System for the commerce ecosystem. We enable enterprise brands and retailers to orchestrate their complex network of consumers, business partners, suppliers, and fulfillment relationships. We are building the global digital commerce infrastructure that enables enterprises to be relevant for the modern, convenience-driven consumer.

This journey started over twelve years ago, when the largest retailer in the world chose us for a daring project: to implement their first online store in Brazil, one of the least penetrated, albeit fastest growing ecommerce markets globally. We had a track record of successful ecommerce projects, and we offered them something few others could: speed to market. We promised to launch it within eight months, from kick-off to go-live. What we learned delivering on that promise shaped our vision for the industry — and for the future of VTEX.

During those intense eight months, we realized that the challenges we encountered had nothing to do with generating revenue for our customer. Security, privacy, scalability, servers, deployment, testing — we tackled every issue, except how to engage with and amaze the end consumer. We were inspired by this complex challenge: how can a large, blue-chip company keep up with the fast-paced digital world while dealing with so much overhead? It became obvious to us that enterprises had to find a way to move online without wasting time and resources on unnecessary complexities. The industry needed a scalable solution. We knew that VTEX could transform technology from being a burden into serving as a powerful accelerator for enterprises’ revenue growth.

Two years after we successfully launched the Walmart project, we took steps towards executing on this opportunity. This is VTEX today. Our platform provides the perfect combination of customization and speed-to market for enterprises. By deploying our extensive out-of-the-box set of commerce capabilities, we enable even the most complex enterprises to move online and unlock the potential to start generating revenue quickly. They then learn from real-world scenarios what works and they adapt, doubling down on their core competencies. Finally, they turn their limitations into potential by leveraging the knowledge of natively integrated solutions provided by an ecosystem of digital commerce experts. All of this is powered by a reliable, cloud-based platform designed to provide security, privacy and scalability.

From day one, all we do is commerce. The decisions we made a decade ago laid the foundation for us to get here. Choosing software as a service over ad-hoc, on-premise installations meant renouncing quick cash flow in favor of developing a homogeneous, multi-tenant platform that improves with every new customer demand, for all customers at once. When we chose to foster an ecosystem of partners for implementation instead of delivering full-service projects, we created expansive reach, crucial for supporting our fast growth. Choosing revenue sharing as a central part of our business model aligns our incentives with those of our customers and encourages us to focus on their success. We grow as they grow. Finally, choosing to be a high-performance team of digital commerce experts allows us to help guide our customers to success as we package industry knowledge into software.

We are committed to creating a future-proof platform that makes collaboration scalable. This is only possible by establishing a self-reinforcing cycle of success. Customers evolve their business by reconfiguring composable building blocks of commerce capabilities, just like installing apps on your phone. Partners meet this demand by building and distributing products and services through our platform to scale faster. As our customers grow, our ecosystem grows.

Our customers transacted just under US$8 billion of GMV through our platform last year alone. We are leaders in Latin America, the fastest growing region for ecommerce in the world in 2020. This is a region six years behind other global economies in digital commerce penetration. We know what is coming and we are prepared to capture that growth. We learned how to scale in a complex region, comprised of multiple countries, cultures, tax systems, and local payment and logistics providers.

 

 

iii


Table of Contents

Expanding from Brazil to Latin America and, more recently, to the rest of the world has prepared us to embrace challenges as intense opportunities to evolve as a team. Over the past 20 years, we have fostered a culture that values clear and precise communication: we strive to speak the truth and listen to each other with commitment. This requires great courage and vulnerability from our team members. The results are well worth it for everyone involved: we foster a no-blame environment that enables fast-paced evolution. This allows us to realize our declared future, no matter the challenges we face.

In the future, we envision being at the center of a vast network that natively connects every part of the global digital commerce ecosystem. We see VTEX as the single control panel to manage all aspects of brands and retailers’ sales life-cycle, from engaging to selling and fulfilling. No matter what happens, one thing is certain: technology is just the first step — the future is about talent. We have taken it upon ourselves to create an abundance of diverse talent for our company and for our ecosystem. We are investing heavily in historically under-served, yet high potential regions, co-creating centers of academic excellence to develop world-class, global-citizen digital workers. We are fostering the emerging market leaders who will build the next generation of disruptive technologies and global businesses.

We are here for the long run. We would like to invite future-driven investors to join us on this exciting journey as we build long lasting foundations for the digital transformation of commerce. Our invitation goes beyond our organization’s (very much virtual) walls. It speaks to the size of the opportunity of digitalization in the emerging world: value creation is increasingly geographically distributed. We are witnessing a wave of emerging technology companies, hungry for the opportunity to create prosperity in their respective regions. We know there is a transformative future ahead. We are here to accelerate it.

— Geraldo Thomaz Jr. & Mariano Gomide de Faria, 2021

 

iv


Table of Contents

PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

This summary highlights selected information contained elsewhere in this prospectus. This summary may not contain all of the information that may be important or relevant to you in making your investment decision. Before you decide to invest in our Class A common shares, we urge you to read this entire prospectus carefully, including our consolidated financial statements, and the notes thereto included elsewhere in this prospectus and the information set forth under the sections “Risk Factors,” “Business” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

Overview

VTEX provides a software-as-a-service digital commerce platform for enterprise brands and retailers. Our platform enables our customers to execute their commerce strategy, including building online stores, integrating and managing orders across channels, and creating marketplaces to sell products from third-party vendors. Founded in Brazil, we have been a leader in accelerating the digital commerce transformation in Latin America and are expanding globally. Our platform is engineered to enterprise-level standards and functionality with the majority of our revenue coming from large, blue-chip companies. We are trusted by more than 2,000 customers with over 2,500 active online stores across 32 countries to connect with their consumers in a meaningful way.

Global online retail spend has grown rapidly. Over the past decade, ecommerce spend has grown to US$3.0 trillion, and is projected to double to US$6.0 trillion over the next five years, according to Insider Intelligence. Latin America, in particular, was the fastest-growing region in the world in 2020, and yet ecommerce still represents a small fraction of the total retail market in the region. Accelerating ecommerce growth, evolving consumer expectations and the proliferation of digital shopping alternatives are raising the bar for brands and retailers to stay relevant. Legacy structures developed over years force enterprises to choose between deep customization and speed to market. Our technology combined with our ecosystem of partners solves this problem. We deliver flexibility and simplicity to complex, mission-critical commerce operations.

We enable our customers to implement multiple go-to-market strategies. Our platform natively combines commerce, order management and marketplace functionality, allowing enterprises to sell a wider assortment of products across more channels than ever before. By integrating with suppliers, distributors, third-party vendors, franchisees, warehouses, and brick-and-mortar stores, enterprises can rapidly implement new business models and digital experiences, including direct-to-consumer, marketplace, ship from store, endless aisle and drop-ship. We call this set of deep integrations “Collaborative Commerce.”

Our Collaborative Commerce approach benefits from a powerful ecosystem with significant network effects. Our ecosystem includes more than 1,000 integrated solutions, 200 systems integrators, 100 marketplaces, 80 payments solutions, and 50 logistics companies. Our partners’ solutions are embedded within our platform, allowing our customers to seamlessly execute their commerce vision and strategy. The more customers adopt our platform and partners join our network, the more efficiently we can help facilitate the future of commerce.

Our technology is flexible and extensible. Our open, API-first, multi-tenant commerce platform allows enterprises to adopt new commerce capabilities with minimal risk. Combined with our low-code development platform, VTEX IO, we enable our customers to build proprietary technology, seamlessly integrated with extensive out-of-the-box functionality. In essence, our “Composable Commerce” approach allows enterprises to leverage the knowledge of highly specialized talents from the VTEX ecosystem while focusing their own talent on what makes them unique. Composable Commerce enables our customers to rapidly deploy our solutions and quickly iterate and customize the entire commerce experience at scale.



 

1


Table of Contents

We serve a diversified mix of global enterprise brands and retailers executing on innovative opportunities. We enable manufacturers and CPG companies to execute their direct-to-consumer strategy on a global scale. We help fashion, grocery and other retailers to expand their reach through omnichannel, marketplace and drop-ship models. Our platform offers a variety of capabilities, including web, mobile and in-store sales, distributed order management, channel management, seller management, content and catalog management and fulfillment channel integrations. We help our customers rapidly execute their bespoke commerce strategies, and provide unprecedented time to revenue. VTEX was named a leader in the IDC MarketScape: Worldwide B2C Digital Commerce Platforms 2020 Vendor Assessment, and Gartner named us as a Visionary in its 2020 report, Magic Quadrant for Digital Commerce, Worldwide.

We have succeeded in attracting, developing and accelerating the careers of top talent from Latin America and across the globe. Throughout our history, we have carefully developed a high-performance culture that creates the conditions for individual growth and values the diversity of perspectives that challenges the status quo. Beyond attracting, we cultivate new talent through key partnership programs with top universities and world-class educational initiatives on digital commerce. We are proud to positively impact our society through education, nurturing a new generation of global digital citizens.

We guide our customers to success. Enterprises choose us as a strategic partner to accelerate their digital commerce transformation and deliver on revenue-generating initiatives. We deliver our platform through a subscription revenue model that includes both fixed and GMV-based variable components. This revenue model strategically aligns us with our customers: we grow by enabling them to grow. In the three months ended March 31, 2021 and in the year ended December 31, 2020, our customers generated US$2.0 billion and US$7.5 billion of GMV within our platform, respectively, up from US$1.0 billion and US$3.8 billion during the prior periods, representing, respectively a growth rate of 113.8% and 95.0%, or 142.3 and 134.9% on an FX neutral basis.

Our business has experienced significant growth. In the three months ended March 31, 2021, our revenue increased to US$25.9 million from US$16.6 million in the three months ended March 31, 2020 representing an increase of 55.8% and 77.0% on an FX neutral basis. In the same periods, we generated net losses of US$12.5 million and US$5.2 million, net cash used by operating activities of US$7.4 million and US$9.3 million and a negative Free Cash Flow of US$8.0 million and US$9.9 million, respectively. In the year ended December 31, 2020, our revenue increased to US$98.7 million from US$61.3 million in the year ended December 31, 2019, representing an increase of 60.9% and 95.3% on an FX neutral basis. In the same periods, we generated net losses of US$0.8 million and US$4.6 million, net cash provided by operating activities of US$11.2 million and US$2.1 million and Free Cash Flow of US$9.5 million and US$0.2 million, respectively.

Industry Overview and Trends

Ecommerce has evolved to meet the needs of the modern day customer. Today’s scalable platforms enable bespoke frameworks for customization and are often supported by a deep ecosystem of third-party functionality. Additionally, brands are seeing the importance of a direct-to-consumer channel that helps them control the consumer relationship and brand messaging. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic accelerated the adoption of ecommerce, shifting significant shopping behavior from offline to online. Consumers now expect brands to make the shopping experience as convenient and seamless as possible across product discovery, purchasing and fulfillment. As such, retailers require enablement platforms with the scalability and flexibility to serve their consumer.



 

2


Table of Contents

Rapidly changing consumer preferences driving need for retailers to innovate

How consumers discover, learn about and ultimately purchase products is evolving due to digital transformation and advances in technology. The internet has enabled consumers to interact with merchants around the globe to find and purchase products that fit their specific needs and tastes.

Enterprises must address the breadth of consumer interaction points and potential sales channels, ensuring a satisfying consumer experience from discovery through delivery. Without an effective digital presence, retailers are often overlooked by consumers, lag behind competitors and have difficulty generating growth. Robust omnichannel solutions are now standard for an effective digital transformation strategy. However, significant ongoing innovation across marketing, inventory, payments and delivery are required to ensure enterprises are empowered to meaningfully connect with consumers and deliver seamless brand experiences across the entire shopping lifecycle.

Convenience-driven economy requires deep changes to complex, legacy supply chain networks

Consumers seek frictionless online experiences and the convenience and speed provided by on-demand delivery. Growing expectations for shorter on-demand delivery times require significant planning, coordination and execution to ensure supply chain networks are aligned to meet distribution and fulfillment. The intensity of global online and brick-and-mortar competition in retail drives businesses to meet the consumer where they are: at home or at work, and on-demand.

The technical requirements for fulfillment are complex and involve the synchronization of back-end systems, including those related to customer information, inventory, orders, products, payments and other data that originate in different sales channels. Brands and retailers have historically operated in silos based mostly on direct buy and sell transactions, and did not have the tools to collaborate in real-time around complex value chains. Additionally, many brands and retailers have supply chains with existing networks of in-store and warehouse distribution facilities, adding another level of complexity to optimize operational efficiency. As brands and retailers navigate these deep challenges, digital collaboration has emerged as a potential path for brands, retailers, suppliers and third-party providers to stay in constant contact with consumers to ensure frictionless distribution and fulfillment.

The need to deliver an authentic brand experience requires platforms that enable retailers to customize, build and scale businesses

Increasingly, consumers seek personalized experiences with brands, not just a point of sale for purchase. This has created a need for retailers to focus on design, simplicity and experience. Ecommerce has driven the proliferation of more personalized, direct-to-consumer brands. Vertically-integrated digitally native brands, or DNBs, sell products directly to consumers online, frequently bypassing third-party distribution and retailers, and often obviating the need for their own brick-and-mortar stores.

The growth in DNBs has corresponded with demand for turnkey ecommerce platforms that support both rapid product launch and scaling. Brands now have greater control over the narrative and image they convey to their customers. The proliferation of DNBs is driving the need for existing manufacturing brands to innovate in order to effectively compete. Strong manufacturing brands are generally ill-equipped to go direct-to-consumer. However, through collaboration and effective partnerships across areas, including payments, shipping, marketplace and POS, these retailers can remain competitive in delivering authentic brand experiences.



 

3


Table of Contents

Legacy software solutions are inadequate to serve the needs of 21st century brands and retailers

Legacy approaches to ecommerce software, consisting of open sourced licensed, owned and/or managed technology behind their ecommerce sites, are still prevalent in enterprises. We believe that while the market for digital commerce software solutions may be large and growing, the legacy solutions for enterprises do not effectively address the needs of digitizing brands, manufacturers and retailers in a fast-paced, evolving and competitive environment. Legacy solutions are largely characterized as:

 

  

On-premise. Legacy on-premise solutions lack the flexibility and adaptability of SaaS solutions. These solutions are challenging, time intensive and expensive to update.

 

  

Lengthy deployment cycle. Traditional enterprise solutions typically have long and costly deployment cycles. In addition, legacy solutions tend to become overly complex and are not nimble enough to adapt to evolving market trends, new software requirements and emerging technologies.

 

  

Static. Enterprises test strategies and evolve rapidly as they transform digitally and discover new ways to engage and convert customers. Legacy solutions lack the flexibility to adapt to these requirements.

 

  

Disparate point solutions. Brands and retailers need integrated, seamless solutions that leverage data across multiple sources to optimize operational efficiencies. Legacy vendors typically provide point solutions that often fail to provide multi-channel sales capabilities, creating a complex patchwork of disparate technologies.

 

  

Security vulnerabilities. Security threats have become more sophisticated and continue to evolve such that enterprises continually face new and emerging security threats. Legacy solutions were not designed to handle these evolving threats. As a result, upgrading the protections in legacy software is challenging.

Our Market Opportunity

Market opportunity in Latin America

Latin America is one of the largest and most diverse regions in the world. It is also among the largest growing economies in the world, with estimated GDP growth rate of 3.0% to US$4.0 trillion by 2025, according to IHS Markit, driven by technological advances and an emerging middle class. Comprised of over 40 countries with a total population of over 600 million, the region encompasses multiple languages, currencies and regulatory regimes. The size and complexity of the region present us with a significant opportunity as the geographic incumbent leader and a competitive advantage relative to solution providers that are less familiar with the intricacies of the region.

Latin America ecommerce is growing rapidly, yet still represents a small fraction of the total retail market. According to Insider Intelligence, ecommerce in Latin America grew to US$85.0 billion in 2020, a growth rate of 37% over 2019, making it the fastest-growing region among all major world regions. At the same time, it represents only approximately 6.2% of all total retail sales in the region, a lag of 6 years compared to current global ecommerce penetration of 18.0%, presenting an enormous opportunity and runway for growth as more sales shift online.

Market opportunity globally

The global ecommerce market has experienced rapid growth, driven by an acceleration of online penetration over the past 15 years. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic further accelerated the adoption of ecommerce, which drove broader business growth while brick-and-mortar stores were closed and consumers increased their ecommerce spending due to extensive stay at home orders.



 

4


Table of Contents

Global GMV was estimated to be approximately US$4.0 trillion in 2020, and is expected to grow to approximately US$6.0 trillion by 2024, representing a compounded annual growth rate of 11.0%, according to Insider Intelligence. In the three months March 31, 2021 and in the year ended December 31, 2020, our platform processed US$2.0 billion and US$7.5 billion in GMV, respectively, the latter representing less than 0.5% of global GMV. As we continue to expand our platform offerings as well as our global reach, we expect to capture more of this GMV. We believe that our market will expand as consumers continue to shift purchases to online channels and brands and retailers adapt to evolving consumer preferences.

Our Solution

VTEX provides a SaaS digital commerce platform for enterprise brands and retailers. Our platform enables our customers to execute their commerce strategy, including building online stores, integrating and managing orders across channels, and creating marketplaces to sell products from third-party vendors. Our platform fully integrates commerce, marketplace and OMS solutions that enable our customers to manage product catalogs, optimize inventory, process orders and payments, and build even stronger brands that connect with their customers. We provide our customers with an innovative platform that:

 

  

Drives comprehensive digital transformation. We provide a robust omnichannel commerce platform that can optimize existing in-store and distribution networks, integrate and manage multiple sales channels and seamlessly connect multiple fulfillment points. We deliver our solution through a Composable Commerce architecture that comprises a low-code development platform with a customizable and flexible back-end, decoupled storefront and pre-built integrations. Our fully extensible, API-first business capabilities enable customers to rapidly deploy commerce solutions and provide flexibility to build and customize the entire commerce experience at scale.

 

  

Collaborates with suppliers and partners. We provide a commerce platform that embraces digital collaboration to fuel growth, power innovation and build relationships online.

 

  

Strengthens the relationship between brands and their consumers. Our platform enables brands to offer compelling and consistent digital experiences across multiple channels and deliver their full brand experience directly to consumers. Our platform also offers the opportunity for manufacturers to build their own direct to consumer commerce capabilities to leverage the trust inspired by their products and reduce reliance on retailers for sales.

 

  

Provides a centralized technology hub. We provide a single point of control platform that integrates data across operations, and through our distributed OMS solution, we provide a 360-degree view of inventory and orders. Data generated by a direct digital commerce channel can be leveraged to increase sales, add new customers and maintain tighter control of a customer’s brand portfolio.

 

  

Provides security, scalability, reliability. Our pricing model, cloud infrastructure and built-in developer tooling helps ensure the VTEX platform is prepared to support our customers’ growth. The power of the VTEX platform comes from an auto-scaling, elastic cloud infrastructure that helps brands and retailers respond to market changes and customer demands in real-time.

Our Competitive Strengths

We built our modern platform from the ground up to address the growing needs of enterprises, with the aim of creating simple, yet not simplistic, solutions. We guide our customers to success. Enterprises choose us as a strategic partner to accelerate their digital commerce transformation and deliver on revenue-generating initiatives. Our core strengths are:

 

  

Market leadership in Latin America. We are the largest provider of digital commerce technology in Latin America. Our market leadership is driven by the strength and functionality of our platform and



 

5


Table of Contents
 

our expertise in delivering solutions that accommodate differences across regions, tax jurisdictions, and specific local consumer preferences. We are leveraging our regional expertise to enable our customers to reach global markets.

 

  

Highly embedded, deep relationships with enterprises. We have a large, blue-chip customer base across a broad range of end markets, with over 2,000 customers across 32 countries. Approximately 84.1% of our ARR is derived from enterprise customers with active online stores, each generating more than US$25,000 in ARR and with an average ARR per active online store of US$127,428 as of December 31, 2020. Additionally, 85.6% of our enterprise revenues came from customers who have been on the VTEX platform for over one year, for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

  

Strong alignment with our customers’ success. We deliver our platform through a subscription revenue model that includes both fixed and GMV-based variable components. This revenue model strategically aligns us with our customers: we grow as they grow.

 

  

Collaborative Commerce provides deep network effects from a powerful ecosystem of partners. We help unlock new revenue streams for our customers through collaborative opportunities with their suppliers and partners, as well as a rich ecosystem of hundreds of integrated solutions, SIs, and payments solutions. Our partners’ solutions are embedded within our platform, allowing our customers to seamlessly execute their commerce vision and strategy, and build valuable networks and effective marketplaces. It also lowers our customer acquisition costs through organic lead generation.

 

  

Composable Commerce enables rapid adaptability in a digital world and faster time to market. We provide our customers with a platform that is flexible, fast and easy to scale. We have a low-code development platform with fully extensible API-first business capabilities. Our customers operate on a single, global, continuously deployed, multi-tenant architecture that ensures that they are always using the latest technology.

 

  

High-performance culture based on commitment to innovation and execution. A strong passion for success motivates our team, and we embrace cooperation and collaboration to achieve our business goals. Our high-performance culture is driven by a commitment to listening, learning and diversity of perspectives that challenges the status quo.

Growth Strategy

We have strong market leadership in Latin America, and expect to continue scaling with enterprise customers in high-growth markets across the broader Latin America region and across the world. Our growth strategy is driven by our mission to accelerate commerce transformation. Key elements of our strategy include:

 

  

Grow our customer base. We believe that we have a significant opportunity to increase the size of our current customer base. We intend to continue to strategically invest in sales and marketing programs that enhance our customer reach as well as increase the awareness of our brand.

 

  

Grow GMV within existing customer base. Our goals are closely aligned with the goals of our customers. We grow with our existing customers in two primary ways: (1) we help our customers grow their GMV from existing online stores; and (2) we enable our customers to expand across regions or across brands by opening additional online stores.

 

  

Continuous innovation and expansion. We have invested and intend to continue to invest in our platform, including broadening our capabilities to meet the future needs of enterprises and their brands. We help our customers incorporate cutting-edge technologies and capabilities that emerge from our partners and the broader commerce ecosystem and therefore, meet the evolving needs of consumers.

 

  

Geographic expansion: We support the growth of our customers around the world by delivering a world-class platform and by expanding our regional capabilities, including sales and marketing,



 

6


Table of Contents
 

development and operations. Given our strong brand awareness and market position, we have historically focused geographic expansion to other regions within Latin America and believe that most of our growth will continue to come from Latin America. Over time, we believe our platform can compete successfully around the world, and, as such, we plan to continue investing in our operations across the Unites States and Europe.

 

  

Continue to grow and develop our ecosystem. We have a thriving third-party ecosystem, including providers for shipping, marketplaces, point-of-sale, omnichannel, marketing automation, search, merchandising, SIs, agencies, payments, anti-fraud and lending. We believe that growing our ecosystem will help to further expand our customer base by providing greater revenue opportunities from collaboration.

Summary of Risk Factors

An investment in our Class A common shares is subject to a number of risks, including risks relating to our business and industry, risks related to Brazil and risks related to the offering and our Class A common shares. The following list summarizes some, but not all, of these risks. Please read the information in the section entitled “Risk Factors” for a more thorough description of these and other risks.

Risks Relating to Our Business and Industry

 

  

We have experienced significant growth in recent periods; however, we may be unable to sustain it. Our recent levels of growth may not be indicative of our future growth and will depend on our ability to attract new customers, retain existing customers and increase sales to both new or existing customers, particularly if the growth in ecommerce during the COVID-19 pandemic fails to continue after the COVID-19 pandemic ends.

 

  

If we are unable to attract new customers in a cost-effective manner, then our business, results of operations and financial condition would be adversely affected.

 

  

The COVID-19 pandemic could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

  

If we fail to improve, enhance or innovate the features, functionality, performance, reliability, design, security and scalability of our platform in a manner that responds to our customers’ evolving needs or preferences, our business may be adversely affected and we may become subject to performance or warranty claims, and we may incur significant costs. Our services must also integrate with a variety of operating systems, software, hardware and networks. If we are unable to ensure that our services or hardware interoperate with such operating systems, software, hardware and networks, our business may be materially and adversely affected.

 

  

Failure to effectively develop and expand our marketing and sales capabilities could harm our ability to increase our customer base and achieve broader market acceptance of our platform. If we are not able to hire, develop and retain talented marketing personnel, or if our new marketing personnel are unable to develop and execute efficient inbound and branding marketing programs in a reasonable period of time, or if our sales and marketing strategies are not effective to generate traffic and build a top of mind brand, our ability to attract new customers may be impaired.

 

  

A cyberattack, security breach or other unauthorized access or interruption to our information technology systems or those of our third-party service providers could delay or interrupt service to our customers and their consumers, harm our reputation or subject us to significant liability.

 

  

Our business is subject to United States and foreign data privacy, data protection and information security laws, regulations, rules, standards, policies and contractual and other legal obligations, and our



 

7


Table of Contents
 

customers may also be subject to such laws and regulations. Any actual or perceived failure of our products to comply with or enable our customers to comply with such applicable laws and regulations would harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

  

If we fail to maintain or grow our brand recognition, our ability to expand our customer base will be impaired and our financial condition may suffer.

 

  

We could incur substantial costs in maintaining, enforcing, protecting or defending our intellectual property and proprietary rights. Failure to adequately obtain, maintain, enforce and protect our intellectual property and proprietary rights could impair our competitive position and cause us to lose valuable assets, experience reduced revenue and incur costly litigation.

 

  

In connection with the preparation of our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2020, we identified a number of material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2020. The material weaknesses identified relate to our insufficient accounting resources and processes necessary to comply with the reporting and compliance requirements of IFRS and the SEC. We are in the process of adopting a remediation plan to improve our internal control over financial reporting, but there is no assurance that our efforts will be effective or prevent any future material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting.

Risks Relating to Latin America

 

  

Governments have a high degree of influence in Brazil and the other economies in which we operate. The effects of this influence and political and economic conditions in Brazil and Latin America could harm us and the trading price of our Class A common shares.

 

  

Significant foreign currency exchange controls and currency devaluation in certain countries in which we operate, which may have adverse effects on the economies of such countries, us and the price of our Class A common shares.

 

  

The ongoing economic uncertainty and political instability in Brazil and the other countries in which we operate, including as a result of ongoing investigations, may harm us and the price of our Class A common shares.

 

  

Inflation and certain government measures to curb inflation may have adverse effects on the economies of the countries where we operate, our business and the price of our Class A common shares.

 

  

Any further downgrading of the credit rating of Brazil or of other countries in which we operate could reduce the trading price of our Class A common shares.

Risks Relating to the Offering and Our Class A Common Shares

 

  

There is no existing market for our common shares, and we do not know whether one will develop to provide you with adequate liquidity. If our share price fluctuates after this offering, you could lose a significant part of your investment.

 

  

The market price of our shares may be volatile or may decline sharply or suddenly, regardless of our operating performance, and we may not be able to meet investors’ or analysts’ expectations. You may not be able to resell your shares for the initial offer price or above it and you may lose all or part of your investment.

 

  

Requirements associated with being a public company in the United States will require significant company resources and management attention.



 

8


Table of Contents
  

Our controlling shareholders will, in the aggregate, own    % of our outstanding Class A common shares and    % of our outstanding Class B common shares, which represent approximately    % of the voting power of our issued capital and    % of our total equity ownership following the offering, and will control all matters requiring shareholder approval. Our controlling shareholders also have the right to nominate a majority of our board of directors and consent rights over certain corporate transactions. This concentration of ownership limits your ability to influence corporate matters.

 

  

The disparity in voting rights among classes of our shares may have a potential adverse effect on the price of our Class A common shares, and may limit or preclude your ability to influence corporate matters.

Our Corporate Structure and Information

The following chart presents our corporate structure, including controlling shareholders and subsidiaries immediately after the completion of this offering.

 

 

LOGO

 

(1)

Includes common shares held of record by Imbetiba Fund Inc., Mira Limited, Abrolhos One Limited, and Mr. do Carmo Thomaz. Júnior Mr. Gomide de Faria and Mr. do Carmo Thomaz Júnior may be deemed to beneficially own shares held of record by these entities and individual. In addition, Mr. do Carmo Thomaz Júnior and Mr. Gomide de Faria may be deemed to beneficially own                shares held of record by individuals pursuant to an irrevocable power-of-attorney.

(2)

Consists of common shares held by Data Center Holding II LLC, IT Brazil Group II LLC, RCP II Brazil Holdings LLC and RCP II (Parallel B) Brazil Holdings LLC. See “Principal Shareholders” for additional information.

Our principal executive office is located at 125 Kingsway, London, England – WC2B 6NH, UK. Our registered office is located at 4th floor, Harbour Place, 103 South Church Street, PO Box 10240, Grand Cayman, KYI-1002, Cayman Islands. Our principal website is www.vtex.com. The information contained in, or accessible



 

9


Table of Contents

through, our website is not incorporated into this prospectus or the registration statement of which it forms a part and does not form part of, this prospectus, and you should not consider such information to be part of this prospectus or in deciding whether to invest in our Class A common shares.

We own or have rights to trademarks, service marks and trade names that we use in connection with the operation of our business, including our corporate name, logos and website names. Other trademarks, service marks and trade names appearing in this prospectus are the property of their respective owners. Solely for convenience, some of the trademarks, service marks and trade names referred to in this prospectus are listed without the ® and symbols, but we will assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights to our trademarks, service marks and trade names.

Emerging Growth Company Status

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in Section 2(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, as modified by the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act. We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the completion of this offering, (b) in which we have total annual revenues of at least US$1.07 billion, or (c) in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of our shares that is held by non-affiliates exceeds US$700.0 million as of the prior June 30, and (2) the date on which we have issued more than US$1.07 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period. As an emerging growth company, we are eligible to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies in the United States that are not emerging growth companies including, but not limited to, exemptions from the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and any Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or PCAOB, rules, including any future audit rule promulgated by the PCAOB (unless the SEC determines otherwise). Accordingly, the information about us available to you will not be the same as, and may be more limited than, the information available to shareholders of a non-emerging growth company. In addition, under the JOBS Act, emerging growth companies can delay adopting new or revised U.S. GAAP accounting standards until such time as those standards apply to private companies. Given that we currently report and expect to continue to report under IFRS as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board, or IASB, we will not be able to avail ourselves of this extended transition period and, as a result, we will adopt new or revised accounting standards on the relevant dates on which adoption of such standards is required by the IASB.

Conventions that Apply to this Prospectus

Except as otherwise indicated or the context requires, all information in this prospectus assumes:

 

  

the further amendment and restatement of our Articles of Association, each of which will occur immediately prior to the completion of this offering;

 

  

an initial public offering price of US$                per Class A common share, the midpoint of the estimated offering price range per Class A common share set forth on the cover page of this prospectus; and

 

  

no exercise by the underwriters of their option to purchase up to                additional Class A common shares, in connection with the offering.



 

10


Table of Contents

The Offering

This summary highlights information presented in greater detail elsewhere in this prospectus. This summary is not complete and does not contain all the information you should consider before investing in our Class A common shares. You should carefully read this entire prospectus before investing in our Class A common shares including “Risk Factors,” our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements and our consolidated financial statements.

 

Issuer

VTEX

 

Class A common shares offered by us

        Class A common shares (or                Class A common shares if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional Class A common shares from us).

 

Class A common shares outstanding before the offering

Class A common shares.

 

Class A common shares outstanding after the offering

Class A common shares.

 

Class B common shares outstanding before the offering

Class B common shares.

 

Class B common shares outstanding after the offering

Class B common shares.

 

Offering price range

Between US$ and US$ per Class A common share.

 

Voting rights

The Class A common shares will be entitled to one vote per share, whereas the Class B common shares (which are not being sold in this offering) will be entitled to 10 votes per share.

 

 Each Class B common share may be converted into one Class A common share at the option of the holder.

 

 If, at any time, the total number of the issued and outstanding Class B common shares is less than 10% of the total number of shares outstanding, then each Class B common share will convert automatically into one Class A common share.

 

 In addition, each Class B common share will convert automatically into one Class A common share upon any transfer, except for certain transfers to other holders of Class B common shares or their affiliates or to certain unrelated third parties as described under “Description of Share Capital—Conversion.”

 

 Holders of Class A common shares and Class B common shares will vote together as a single class on all matters unless otherwise required by law and subject to certain exceptions set forth in our Articles of Association as described under “Description of Share Capital—Voting Rights.”


 

11


Table of Contents
 Upon consummation of this offering, assuming no exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares, (1) holders of Class A common shares will hold approximately    % of the combined voting power of our outstanding common shares and approximately % of our total equity ownership and (2) holders of Class B common shares will hold approximately % of the combined voting power of our outstanding common shares and approximately % of our total equity ownership.

 

 If the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional shares in full, (1) holders of Class A common shares will hold approximately    % of the combined voting power of our outstanding common shares and approximately % of our total equity ownership and (2) holders of Class B common shares will hold approximately % of the combined voting power of our outstanding common shares and approximately % of our total equity ownership.

 

 The rights of the holders of Class A common shares and Class B common shares are identical, except with respect to voting, conversion, pre-emptive rights and transfer restrictions applicable to the Class B common shares, and holders of Class B common shares are entitled to preemptive rights to purchase additional Class B common shares in the event that additional Class A common shares are issued, upon the same economic terms and at the same price, in order to maintain such holder’s proportional ownership interest in us. See “Description of Share Capital” for a description of the material terms of our common shares and the difference between Class A and Class B common shares.

 

Option to purchase additional Class A common shares

We have granted the underwriters the right to purchase up to an additional Class A common shares from us within 30 days of the date of this prospectus, at the public offering price, less underwriting discounts and commissions, on the same terms as set forth in this prospectus.

 

Listing

We intend to apply to list our Class A common shares on the                , under the symbol “VTEX.”

 

Use of proceeds

We estimate that the net proceeds to us from the offering will be approximately US$        million (or US$        million if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional shares), assuming an initial public offering price of US$        per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, and after deducting the estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering for general corporate purposes, which may include investments for the development of software, products or technologies, investments in the international expansion of our



 

12


Table of Contents
 

operations, funding future opportunistic mergers, acquisitions or investments in complementary businesses, and maintaining liquidity. We will have broad discretion in allocating a portion of the net proceeds from this offering. See “Use of Proceeds.”

 

Share capital before and after offering

As of the date of this prospectus, our authorized share capital is consisting of                shares of par value                each. Of those authorized shares, (1) are designated as Class A common shares, (2) are designated as Class B common shares, and (3) are as yet undesignated and may be issued as common shares or shares with preferred rights.

 

 Immediately after the offering, we will have         Class A common shares outstanding and                Class B common shares outstanding, assuming no exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional class A common shares.

 

Dividend policy

The amount of any distributions will depend on many factors, such as our results of operations, financial condition, cash requirements, prospects and other factors deemed relevant by our board of directors and shareholders. We currently intend to retain all available funds and future earnings, if any, to fund the development and expansion of our business and we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. See “Dividends and Dividend Policy.”

 

Lock-up agreements

We and our executive officers, directors and certain of our current shareholders have agreed with the underwriters, subject to certain exceptions, not to offer, sell, or dispose of any shares of our share capital or securities convertible into or exchangeable or exercisable for any shares of our share capital during the period of up to 180 days following the date of this prospectus. Members of our board of directors and our executive officers have agreed to substantially similar lock-up provisions, subject to certain exceptions. See “Underwriting.”

 

Risk factors

See “Risk Factors” and the other information included in this prospectus for a discussion of factors you should consider before deciding to invest in our Class A common shares.

 

Cayman Islands exempted company with limited liability

We are a Cayman Islands exempted company with limited liability. The rights of shareholders and the responsibilities of members of our board of directors may be different from the rights of shareholders and responsibilities of directors in companies governed by the laws of U.S. jurisdictions. In particular, as a matter of Cayman Islands law, directors of a Cayman Islands company owe fiduciary duties to the company and separately a duty of care, diligence and skill to the company. Under Cayman Islands law, directors and officers owe the following fiduciary duties: (1) duty to act in good faith in what the director or officer believes to be in the best interests of the company as a whole; (2) duty to exercise powers for the purposes for which



 

13


Table of Contents
 

those powers were conferred and not for a collateral purpose; (3) directors should not properly fetter the exercise of future discretion; (4) duty to exercise powers fairly as between different sections of shareholders; (5) duty to exercise independent judgment; and (6) duty not to put themselves in a position in which there is a conflict between their duty to the company and their personal interests. Our Articles of Association have varied this last obligation by providing that a director must disclose the nature and extent of his or her interest in any contract or arrangement, and following such disclosure and subject to any separate requirement under applicable law or the listing rules of the                 , and unless disqualified by the chairman of the relevant meeting, such director may vote in respect of any transaction or arrangement in which he or she is interested and may be counted in the quorum at the meeting. In comparison, under the Delaware General Corporation Law, a director of a Delaware corporation owes fiduciary duties to the corporation and its shareholders comprised of the duty of care and the duty of loyalty. Such duties prohibit self-dealing by a director and mandate that the best interest of the corporation and its shareholders take precedence over any interest possessed by a director, officer or controlling shareholder and not shared by the shareholders generally. See “Description of Share Capital—Principal Differences between Cayman Islands and U.S. Corporate Law.”

Unless otherwise indicated, all information contained in this prospectus assumes no exercise of the option granted to the underwriters to purchase up to additional                Class A common shares in connection with the offering.



 

14


Table of Contents

Summary Financial and Other Information

The following tables set forth, for the periods and as of the dates indicated, our summary financial and operating data. The financial information presented herein has been derived from (1) our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements as of March 31, 2021 and 2020, together with the accompanying notes thereto, prepared in accordance with IAS 34 – Interim Financial Reporting as issued by IASB and (2) audited consolidated financial statements for and as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, together with the accompanying notes thereto, prepared in accordance with IFRS as issued by the IASB, and included elsewhere in this prospectus.

The summary consolidated historical financial data should be read in conjunction with “Presentation of Financial and Other Information,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements and our consolidated financial statements, including the notes thereto, included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Consolidated Statements of Profit or Loss

 

  For the Three Months ended
March 31,
  For the Year ended
December 31,
 
      2021          2020          2020          2019     
  (in US$ millions, except for per share amounts) 

Subscription revenue

          24.7           15.4           93.4           58.3 

Services revenue

  1.3   1.2   5.3   3.0 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total revenue

  25.9   16.6   98.7   61.3 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Subscription cost

  (8.7  (5.1  (27.8  (15.8

Services cost

  (2.1  (1.7  (7.1  (4.4
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total cost

  (10.8  (6.7  (34.9  (20.2
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Gross profit

  15.1   9.9   63.8   41.1 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Operating expenses

    

General and administrative

  (7.2  (3.1  (14.0  (10.7

Sales and marketing

  (11.0  (5.7  (23.8  (20.2

Research and development

  (8.4  (4.1  (19.0  (12.7

Other income (losses)

  (0.4  (0.0  (0.5  0.7 

Income (loss) from operation

  (12.0  (3.1  6.5   (1.8
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Finance income

  0.5   0.4   3.9   1.3 

Finance expense

  (1.9  (3.2  (7.0  (3.2
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Finance result

  (1.4  (2.8  (3.1  (1.9

Equity results

  0.1   (0.0  0.1   0.0 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Income (loss) before income tax

  (13.3  (5.9  3.5   (3.7
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Current income tax

  (0.2  (0.2  (4.9  (1.0

Deferred income tax

  1.0   0.8   0.6   0.1 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net loss of the period

  (12.5  (5.2  (0.8  (4.6
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Attributable to controlling shareholders

  (12.5  (5.2  (0.9  (4.6

Non-controlling interest

  (0.0  0.0   0.1   0.0 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Loss per share

   

Basic and diluted loss per share (US$)

  (0.07  (0.03  (0.005  (0.029
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 


 

15


Table of Contents

Consolidated Balance Sheet

 

   As of March 31,   As of December 31, 
     2021       2020       2019   
   (in US$ millions) 

Cash and cash equivalents

               40.3    58.6    29.8 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Marketable securities

   16.1    17.0    14.5 

Total current assets

   91.1    108.7    65.9 

Total non-current assets

   47.8    31.3    31.8 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   138.8    140.0    97.7 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

   54.5    47.1    29.2 

Total non-current liabilities

   18.6    17.2    21.4 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

   73.0    64.3    50.6 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net assets

   65.8    75.7    47.1 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Issued capital

   0.0    0.0    0.0 

Capital reserve

   82.1    78.9    50.1 

Other reserves

   (0.4   0.1    (0.6

Retained earnings (accumulated losses)

   (15.9   (3.4   (2.5
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Equity attributable to VTEX’s shareholders

   65.8    75.6    47.0 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-controlling interest

   —      0.1    0.0 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total shareholders’ equity

   65.8    75.7    47.1 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

   138.8    140.0    97.7 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flow Data

 

   For the Three Months
ended March 31,
   For the Year Ended
December 31,
 
     2021       2020       2020       2019   
   (in millions of US$) 

Net cash provided (used) by operating activities

   (7.4   (9.3   11.2    2.1 

Net cash provided (used) by investing activities

   0.3    (1.0   (6.1   (19.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided (used) by financing activities

   (9.7   (0.4   25.0    43.5 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

   (16.9   (10.8   30.0    26.4 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Key Operating and Other Financial Metrics

Gross Merchandise Value

Gross merchandise value is the total value of customer orders processed through our platform, including value-added taxes and shipping. Our GMV does not include the value of orders processed by our SMB customers or B2B transactions. Due to our transaction-based subscription model, we believe that GMV growth is linked with our revenue growth and we track GMV as an indicator of the success of our customers, the performance of the platform and our market share. For more information, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Key Metric—Gross Merchandise Value.”



 

16


Table of Contents
   Q1 2019  Q2 2019  Q3 2019  Q4 2019  Q1 2020  Q2 2020  Q3 2020  Q4 2020  Q1 2021 
   (in millions of U.S. Dollars, unless otherwise indicated)    

GMV

   802.7   836.2   894.4   1,307.2   952.4   1,870.8   2,131.7   2,533.9   2,036.1 

GMV Growth FX Neutral (%)

   51.4  33.6  46.7  45.9  36.3  178.0  190.2  130.2  142.3

Financial Metrics

For convenience of investors, this prospectus presents certain non-GAAP financial measures, which are not recognized under IFRS, specifically Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operations, Free Cash Flow and FX Neutral measures. We understand that Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operations, Free Cash Flow and FX Neutral measures have limitations as analytical tools, and you should not consider them in isolation or as substitutes for analysis of our results of operations presented in accordance with IFRS. Additionally, our calculations of Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operations, Free Cash Flow and FX Neutral measures may be different from the calculation used by other companies, including our competitors, and therefore, our measures may not be comparable to those of other companies. For more information, see “Presentation of Financial and Other Information—Special Note Regarding Non-GAAP Financial Measures.”

Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operations

The following table presents a reconciliation of our Non-GAAP Income (loss) from operation to our Income (loss) from operation for the following periods:

 

   For the three
months ended

March 31,
   For the year
ended
December 31,
 
     2021       2020     2020   2019 
   

(in US$ millions)

 

Income (loss) from operation

   (12.0   (3.1   6.5    (1.8
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Share-based compensation expense(1)

   3.2    0.3    3.3    0.7 

Amortization of intangibles related to acquisitions

   0.4    0.4    0.8    0.7 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operations

   (8.5   (2.4   10.6    (0.4
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1)

Includes payroll taxes relating to our restricted stock units granted from October 2020, in the amount of US$1.6 million and US$0.5 million as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.

Free Cash Flow

The following table presents a reconciliation of our Free Cash Flow to Net cash provided by operating activities for the following periods:

 

   For the three
months ended

March 31,
   For the year
ended
December 31,
 
     2021       2020       2020       2019   
   

(in US$ millions)

 

Net cash provided (used) by operating activities

   (7.4   (9.3   11.2    2.1 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Acquisitions of property and equipment

   (0.5   (0.5   (1.6   (1.8
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Free Cash Flow

   (8.0   (9.9   9.5    (0.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 


 

17


Table of Contents

FX Neutral measures

The following table sets forth selected income statement line items on an FX Neutral basis for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, and years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

   For the three months ended March 31, 
   As reported  On an FX Neutral basis(1) 
   2021  2020  % variation  2021  2020  % variation 
   (in US$ millions except as otherwise indicated) 

Subscription revenue

   24.7   15.4   59.7  28.1   15.4   81.9

Services revenue

   1.3   1.2   5.5  1.4   1.2   13.6
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total revenue

   25.9   16.6   55.8  29.5   16.6   77.0
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Subscription cost

   (8.7  (5.1  72.2  (9.1  (5.1  80.3

Services cost

   (2.1  (1.7  25.6  (2.2  (1.7  33.5
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total cost

   (10.8  (6.7  60.6  (11.4  (6.7  68.6
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Gross profit

   15.1   9.9   52.5  18.1   9.9   82.7

Operating expenses

   (27.1  (13.0  109.3  (30.1  (13.0  132.6
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Income (loss) from operation

   (12.0  (3.1  293.8  (12.0  (3.1  294.3
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

   For the year ended December 31, 
   As reported  On an FX Neutral basis(1) 
   2020  2019  % variation  2020  2019  % variation 
   (in US$ millions except as otherwise indicated) 

Subscription revenue

   93.4   58.3   60.2  113.4   58.3   94.6

Services revenue

   5.3   3.0   74.8  6.4   3.0   110.2
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total revenue

   98.7   61.3   60.9  119.8   61.3   95.3
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Subscription cost

   (27.8  (15.8  75.5  (29.7  (15.8  87.2

Services cost

   (7.1  (4.4  60.1  (7.9  (4.4  78.5
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total cost

   (34.9  (20.4  72.1  (37.5  (20.2  85.3
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Gross profit

   63.8   41.1   55.4  82.3   41.1   100.3

Operating expenses

   (57.3  (42.9  33.6  (67.7  (42.9  57.9
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Income (loss) from operation

   6.5   (1.8  (460.4)%   14.6   (1.8  (904.6)% 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

(1)

We calculate FX Neutral measures by using the average monthly exchange rates for each month during 2020 or 2019, as the case may be, and applying them to the corresponding months in 2021 or 2020, respectively, so as to calculate what our results would have been had exchange rates remained stable from one financial year to the next.



 

18


Table of Contents

RISK FACTORS

An investment in our Class A common shares involves significant risks. Before you decide to invest in our Class A common shares, you should carefully consider all of the information set forth in this prospectus, including the risks described below. Note that an investment in the securities of issuers whose operations are located in emerging market regions such as Latin America involves a higher degree of risk than an investment in the securities of issuers whose operations are located in the United States or other more developed countries. In the event that any of these risks occurs, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may be materially adversely affected and, as a result, the value of our Class A common shares may decline and you may lose all or part of your investment. We currently believe that the risks described below are those that may adversely affect us. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us, or that we currently believe to be immaterial, may have a material adverse effect on us in the future.

When determining whether to invest, you should also refer to the other information contained in this prospectus, including our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements and our consolidated financial statements and the related notes thereto. You should also carefully review the cautionary statements referred to under “Forward-looking statements.” Our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those anticipated in this prospectus.

For the purposes of this section, the indication that a risk, uncertainty or problem may or will have an “adverse effect on us” or will “adversely affect us” means that the risk, uncertainty or problem could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows, prospects and/or the liquidity or trading price of our Class A common shares, except as otherwise indicated or as the context may otherwise require. You should view similar expressions in this section as having a similar meaning.

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

Although we have experienced significant growth in recent periods, we have a recent history of net losses and we expect to continue to record a net losses for the foreseeable future as we continue to implement our growth strategy. Consequently, may not be able to generate sufficient revenue to achieve and sustain profitability; our recent levels of growth may not be indicative of our future growth and will depend on our ability to attract new customers, retain existing customers and increase sales to both new and existing customers, particularly if the growth in ecommerce during the COVID-19 pandemic fails to continue after the COVID-19 pandemic ends.

We have a recent history of net losses and we expect to continue to record a net losses for the foreseeable future as we continue to implement our growth strategy. Consequently, we may not be able to generate sufficient revenue to achieve and sustain profitability. We incurred a net loss of US$11.9 million, US$5.2 million, US$0.8 million and US$4.6 million in the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 and in the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. However, we experienced significant growth in revenue, recording a 55.8% increase in total revenue to US$25.9 million in the three months ended March 31, 2021, from US$16.6 million in the three months ended March 31, 2019, respectively, and 60.9% increase in total revenue to US$98.7 million in year ended December 31, 2020, from US$61.3 million in year ended December 31, 2019, respectively. We principally generate revenues through subscriptions plans, where we have a fixed fee and a revenue-sharing component based on a percentage charged on the customer’s GMV. Our subscription plans typically have 12-to-36-month terms. Our customers have no obligation to renew their subscriptions after their subscription term expires and have the ability to terminate their subscriptions upon short notice. As a result, even though the number of customers using our platform has grown rapidly in recent years, there can be no assurance that we will attract new customers, retain existing customers or increase sales to both new and existing customers. In addition, our results may be affected if we lose or forego income derived from commission fees charged to marketplace partners, payment providers and any other service provided through our app store with which we operate.

Our ability to grow and generate incremental revenue also depends, in part, on our ability to maintain and grow our relationships with existing customers (including any customers acquired in connection with our acquisitions) and to have them increase their usage of our platform. If our customers do not increase their use of

 

19


Table of Contents

our products, our revenue may decline, and our results of operations may be harmed. Customers are charged based on the usage of our products. Most of our customers do not have long-term contractual arrangements with us, and, therefore, most of our customers may reduce or cease their use of our products at any time without penalty or termination charges. Customers may terminate or reduce their use of our products for any number of reasons, including if they are not satisfied with our products, the value proposition of our products or our ability to meet their needs and expectations. The loss of customers or reductions in their usage levels of our products may have a negative impact on our business, results of operations and financial condition. If a significant number of customers cease using or reduce their usage of our products, we may be required to spend significantly more on sales and marketing than we currently plan to spend in order to maintain or increase revenue from customers. Such additional sales and marketing expenditures could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Furthermore, in future periods, we may not be able to attract new customers and sustain revenue growth consistent with our recent growth, or at all. We believe our ability to attract new customers and our revenue growth depends on a number of factors, including:

 

  

reductions in our current or potential customers’ spending levels;

 

  

competitive factors affecting the software as a service, or SaaS, business software applications market, including the introduction of competing platforms, discount pricing and other strategies that may be implemented by our competitors;

 

  

our ability to execute our growth strategy and operating plans;

 

  

a decline in our customers’ level of satisfaction with our platform and customers’ usage of our platform;

 

  

changes in our relationships with third parties, including our business partners, app developers, theme designers, referral sources and payment processors;

 

  

the timeliness and success of our solutions;

 

  

the frequency and severity of any system outages;

 

  

technological change;

 

  

our ability to adequately obtain, maintain, protect and enforce our intellectual property and proprietary rights;

 

  

concerns relating to actual or perceived privacy or security breaches;

 

  

the continued willingness of the end-consumers of our customers to use the internet for commerce; and

 

  

our focus on long-term value over short-term results, through strategic decisions that may not maximize our short-term revenue or profitability if we believe that the decisions are consistent with our mission and will improve our financial performance over the long term.

As a result of the foregoing factors, it is difficult for us to forecast our future revenue or revenue growth. If our assumptions are incorrect or change in reaction to changes in our market, or if we are unable to maintain consistent revenue or revenue growth, the price of our class A common shares could be volatile, and it may be difficult to achieve and maintain profitability. You should not rely on our revenue for any prior periods as any indication of our future revenue or revenue growth.

In addition, the restrictions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic have prompted a shift in sales from traditional brick-and-mortar commerce to ecommerce that benefited our business in 2020. There can be no assurance that once the COVID-19 pandemic is sufficiently controlled, this shift in sales will continue and that we will continue to benefit from it. For further information, see “—The COVID-19 pandemic could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.”

 

20


Table of Contents

If we are unable to attract new customers in a cost-effective manner, then our business, results of operations and financial condition would be adversely affected.

We may be unable to attract new customers in a cost-effective manner. We use a variety of marketing channels to promote our products and platform, such as participating in and sponsoring industry events, developer events and developer evangelism, as well as search engine marketing and optimization. We periodically adjust the mix of our other marketing initiatives such as regional customer events, email campaigns, billboard advertising and public relations initiatives. If the cost of the marketing channels we use increase dramatically, then we may choose to use alternative and less expensive channels, which may not be as effective as the channels we currently use. As we add to, or change, the mix of our marketing strategies, we may also need to expand into more expensive channels than those we are currently in, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. We incur marketing expenses before we are able to recognize any revenue that the relating marketing initiatives may generate, and these expenses may not result in increased revenue or brand awareness. We have made in the past, and may make in the future, significant expenditures and investments in new marketing campaigns, and we cannot guarantee that any such investments will lead to the cost-effective acquisition of new customers. If we are unable to maintain effective marketing initiatives, our ability to attract new customers could be materially and adversely affected, our advertising and marketing expenses could increase significantly, and our results of operations may suffer.

The COVID-19 pandemic could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The COVID-19 pandemic, the measures attempting to contain and mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, including stay-at-home, business closure, and other restrictive orders, and the resulting changes in consumer behavior, have disrupted our normal operations and impacted our employees, suppliers, partners and customers. We expect these disruptions and impacts to continue until the COVID-19 pandemic is sufficiently controlled. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we have taken a number of actions that have impacted, and continue to impact, our business, including transitioning employees across all our offices (including our corporate headquarters) to remote work-from-home arrangements and imposing travel and other related restrictions. Given the continued spread of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting personal, economic and governmental reactions, we may have to implement additional measures in the future that could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. While we have a distributed workforce and our employees are accustomed to working remotely or working with other remote employees, our workforce has not historically been fully remote. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, certain of our employees traveled frequently to establish and maintain relationships with one another and with our customers, partners and investors. We continue to monitor the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and may adjust our current policies as more information and guidance become available. Suspending travel and the lack of doing business in-person on a long-term basis could negatively impact our marketing efforts, our ability to enter into subscription deals in a timely manner, our international expansion efforts and our ability to recruit employees across our organization. These changes could negatively impact our sales and marketing in particular, which could have longer-term effects on our sales pipeline, or create operational or other challenges as our workforce remains predominantly remote. Any of these impacts could harm our business. In addition, our management team has spent, and will likely continue to spend, significant time, attention, and resources monitoring the COVID-19 pandemic and associated global economic uncertainty and seeking to manage its effects on our business and workforce.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, governments across the countries in which we operate have instituted lockdowns, social distancing and similar measures to slow infection rates. These restrictions have prompted shifts in sales from traditional brick-and-mortar commerce to ecommerce, which has increased usage of our services. When the COVID-19 pandemic abates, our customers’ end-consumers may resume purchasing from brick-and-mortar stores to the detriment of our customers’ ecommerce stores, and as such, their online channels may experience decreases or decreased growth rates in transactions, which would negatively affect our business, financial condition and operating results. Similarly, once the COVID-19 pandemic is sufficiently

 

21


Table of Contents

controlled, we may also generally experience decreases or decreased growth rates in sales of new subscriptions plans to customers, as our prospective and existing customers’ end-consumers may be less inclined to purchase online, which would negatively affect our business, financial condition and operating results. For more information about the impacts of the COVID-19 on our activities, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

The degree to which COVID-19 will affect our business and results of operations will depend on future developments that are highly uncertain and cannot currently be predicted. These developments include, but are not limited to, the duration, extent and severity of the COVID-19 pandemic, actions taken to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictions on economic activity and domestic and international trade, and the extent of the impact of these and other factors on our employees, suppliers, partners and customers. The COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictions could limit our customers’ ability to continue to operate, to obtain inventory, generate sales, or make timely payments to us. It could disrupt or delay the ability of employees to work because they become sick or are required to care for those who become sick, or for dependents for whom external care is not available. It could cause delays or disruptions in services provided by key suppliers and vendors, make us, our partners and our service providers more vulnerable to security breaches, denial of service attacks or other hacking or phishing attacks, or have other unpredictable effects.

The COVID-19 pandemic has also caused heightened uncertainty in the global economy. If economic conditions further deteriorate, consumers may not have the financial means to make purchases from our customers and may delay or reduce discretionary purchases, negatively impacting our customers and our results of operations. Uncertainty from the COVID-19 pandemic may cause prospective or existing customers to defer investment in ecommerce. Since the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic is ongoing, the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and the related impact on the global economy may not be fully reflected in our results of operations until future periods. Volatility in the capital markets has been heightened during recent months and such volatility may continue, which may cause declines in the price of our Class A common shares.

To the extent there is a sustained general economic downturn and our software is perceived by customers and potential customers as costly, or too difficult to deploy or migrate to, our revenue may be disproportionately affected. Our revenue may also be disproportionately affected by delays or reductions in general information technology spending. Competitors, many of whom are larger and more established than we are, may respond to market conditions by lowering prices and attempting to lure away our customers. We cannot predict the timing, strength, or duration of any economic slowdown, instability, or recovery, generally or within any particular industry. If the economic conditions of the general economy or markets in which we operate worsen from present levels, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be materially and adversely affected.

If we fail to improve, enhance or innovate the features, functionality, performance, reliability, design, security and scalability of our platform in a manner that responds to our customers’ evolving needs or preferences, our business may be adversely affected and we may become subject to performance or warranty claims, and we may incur significant costs. Our services must also integrate with a variety of operating systems, software, hardware and networks. If we are unable to ensure that our services or hardware interoperate with such operating systems, software, hardware and networks, our business may be materially and adversely affected.

The markets in which we compete are characterized by constant change and innovation, and we expect them to continue to evolve rapidly. Our success has been based primarily on our ability to identify and anticipate the needs of our customers and design a platform that provides them with the tools they need to operate and grow their businesses by giving them the ability to access our platform 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, without interruption or performance degradation. Our ability to attract new customers, retain existing customers and increase sales to both new and existing customers will depend in large part on our ability to continue to improve and enhance the functionality, performance, reliability, design, security and scalability of our platform, as well as offering new solutions that appeal to our customers as their business needs evolve.

 

22


Table of Contents

Our platform must also integrate with a variety of third-party network, hardware, mobile, and software platforms and technologies. We need to continuously modify, enhance and introduce new features to our platform to adapt to changes and innovation in these technologies. Any changes in these systems or networks that degrade the functionality of our platform, impose additional costs or requirements on us, or give preferential treatment to competitive services, including their own services, could materially and adversely affect usage of our platform. If businesses widely adopt new ecommerce technologies, we would have to develop new functionalities for our platform to be compatible with those new technologies, which we may not be able to do in a timely and cost-effective manner. These development efforts may require significant engineering, marketing and sales resources, all of which would affect our business and operating results, and there can be no assurance that such efforts will be successful. Any failure of our platform to operate effectively with future technologies could reduce the demand for our platform. If we are unable to respond to these changes in a cost-effective manner, our platform may become less marketable and less competitive or obsolete, and our operating results may be negatively affected.

Our customers use our services for processes that are critical to their businesses. Errors, defects, security vulnerabilities, service interruptions or software bugs in our platform, whether in connection with day-to-day operation, upgrades or otherwise, could result in losses to our customers, harm our reputation, and result in reduced sales or a loss of, or delay in, the market acceptance of our solutions. Prolonged interruption in the availability, or the reduction in functionality, of our platform or solutions, or frequent or persistent interruptions in accessing our platform, could cause customers to believe that our platform is unreliable and could materially harm our reputation and business. Our customers may seek significant compensation from us for any losses they suffer in connection with such performance issues or cease conducting business with us altogether by terminating their contracts or electing not to renew their subscriptions. Further, a customer could share information about bad experiences on social media, which could result in damage to our reputation and loss of future sales. There can be no assurance that provisions typically included in our agreements with our customers that attempt to limit our exposure to claims related to our platform would be enforceable or adequate or would otherwise protect us from liabilities or damages with respect to any particular claim, and our insurance policies may be insufficient to cover such claims. Even if not successful, a claim brought against us by any of our customers would likely be time-consuming and costly to defend and could seriously damage our reputation and brand, making it harder for us to sell our solutions.

From time to time, we have found defects or errors in our platform and may discover additional defects or errors in the future that could result in, among other issues, data unavailability, unauthorized access to, loss, corruption, or other harm to our customers’ data. We may not be able to detect and correct defects or errors before the release of solutions on our platform. Consequently, we or our customers may discover defects or errors after such solutions have been released on our platform. We implement bug fixes and upgrades as part of our regularly scheduled system maintenance, but such maintenance may adequately address all defects or errors in our platform. Furthermore, if we do not complete this maintenance according to schedule or if customers are otherwise dissatisfied with the frequency and/or duration of our maintenance services and related system outages, customers could terminate their contracts, or delay or withhold payment to us, or cause us to issue credits, make refunds, or pay penalties. The costs incurred or delays resulting from the correction of defects or errors in our software or other performance problems may be substantial and could adversely affect our operating results.

In such events, we may be also required, or may choose, for customer relations or other reasons, to expend additional resources in order to help correct the problem. In addition, we may not carry insurance sufficient to compensate us for any losses that may result from claims arising from defects or disruptions in our products. As a result, our reputation and our brand could be harmed, and our business, results of operations and financial condition may be adversely affected.

 

23


Table of Contents

Failure to effectively develop and expand our marketing and sales capabilities could harm our ability to increase our customer base and achieve broader market acceptance of our platform. If we are not able to hire, develop and retain talented marketing personnel, or if our new marketing personnel are unable to develop and execute efficient inbound and branding marketing programs in a reasonable period of time, or if our sales and marketing strategies are not effective to generate traffic and build a top of mind brand, our ability to attract new customers may be impaired.

Our ability to increase our customer base and achieve broader market acceptance of our platform will depend on our ability to expand our marketing and sales operations. We plan to continue expanding our sales force and strategic business partners, both domestically and internationally. We may not achieve anticipated revenue growth from expanding our sales force if we are unable to hire, develop and retain talented sales personnel, if our new sales personnel are unable to achieve desired productivity levels in a reasonable period of time, or if our sales and marketing programs are not effective. Our business and operating results may be adversely affected if our sales and marketing efforts do not generate a corresponding increase in revenue.

We also plan to dedicate significant resources to sales and marketing programs, including search engine and other online advertising with respect to our small and medium business, or SMB, online stores, which represented less than 8% of our revenues in the year ended December 31, 2020. The effectiveness of our online advertising may continue to vary due to competition for key search terms, changes in search engine use, and changes in search algorithms used by major search engines and other digital marketing platforms. If the cost of marketing our platform over search engines or other digital marketing platforms increases, our business and operating results could be adversely affected. Competitors also may bid on the search terms that we use to drive traffic to our website. Such actions could increase our marketing costs and result in decreased traffic to our website.

If we fail to maintain or grow our brand recognition, our ability to expand our customer base will be impaired and our financial condition may suffer.

We believe that maintaining and growing the VTEX brand is important to supporting continued acceptance of our existing and future solutions, attracting new customers to our platform, and retaining existing customers. We also believe that the importance of brand recognition will increase as competition in our market increases. Successfully maintaining our brand will depend largely on the effectiveness of our marketing efforts, our ability to provide a reliable and useful platform to meet the needs of our customers at competitive prices, our ability to maintain our customers’ trust, our ability to continue to develop new functionalities and solutions, and our ability to successfully differentiate our platform from competitive products and services. Additionally, our business partners’ performance may affect our brand and reputation if customers do not have a positive experience. Our efforts to build and maintain our brand have involved and will continue to involve significant expense. Brand promotion activities may not generate customer awareness or yield increased revenue. Even if they do, any increased revenue may not offset the expenses we incurred in building our brand. We strive to establish and maintain our brand in part by obtaining trademark rights. However, if our trademarks are not adequately protected, we may not be able to build name recognition in our markets of interest and our competitive position may be harmed. If we fail to successfully promote, protect and maintain our brand, we may fail to attract enough new customers or retain our existing customers to realize a sufficient return on our brand-building efforts, and our business could suffer.

We face intense competition, especially from well-established companies offering solutions and related applications. We may lack sufficient financial or other resources to maintain or improve our competitive position, which may harm our ability to add new customers, retain existing customers and grow our business.

The market for ecommerce solutions is evolving and highly competitive. We expect competition to increase in the future from established competitors and new market entrants. With the introduction of new technologies and the entry of new companies into the market, we expect competition to persist and intensify in the future. This

 

24


Table of Contents

could harm our ability to increase sales, maintain or increase renewals and maintain our prices. We face intense competition from other software companies that may offer related ecommerce platform software solutions and services. Our competitors include larger companies that have acquired ecommerce platform solution providers in recent years. We also compete with custom software internally developed within ecommerce businesses. Our primary competitors are SAP Hybris, Oracle Commerce, Magento (an Adobe company), Salesforce Commerce Cloud (formerly known as Demandware), and Shopify Plus. In addition, we face competition from niche companies that offer point products that attempt to address certain of the problems that our platform solves.

Many of our existing competitors have, and our potential competitors could have, substantial competitive advantages such as greater name recognition, longer operating histories, larger sales and marketing budgets and resources, greater customer support resources, lower labor and development costs, larger and more mature intellectual property portfolios, and substantially greater financial, technical and other resources.

Some of our larger competitors also have substantially broader product lines that may allow them to offer a broader suite of products to retailers than we can. Conditions in our market could change rapidly and significantly as a result of technological advancements, partnering by our competitors, or continuing market consolidation. New start-up companies that innovate, and large companies that are making significant investments in research and development, may invent similar or superior products and technologies that compete with our platform.

Mergers and acquisition activity in the technology industry could increase the likelihood that we compete with other large technology companies. In addition, some of our competitors may enter into new alliances with each other or may establish or strengthen cooperative relationships with agency partners, technology and application providers in complementary categories, or other parties. Furthermore, ecommerce on large online marketplaces could increase as a percentage of all ecommerce activity, thereby reducing customer traffic to individual customer websites. Any such consolidation, acquisition, alliance or cooperative relationship could lead to pricing pressure, a loss of market share, or a smaller addressable share of the market. It could also result in a competitor with greater financial, technical, marketing, service and other resources, all of which could harm our ability to compete.

Some of our larger competitors use broader product offerings to compete by bundling their product, or by closing access to their technology platform. Our potential customers may worry about disadvantages associated with switching platform providers, such as a loss of accustomed functionality, increased costs and business disruption. As a result, certain potential customers may resist changing vendors. We will seek to overcome this resistance through strategies such as making investments to improve the functionality of our solutions vis-à-vis the products and solutions offered by our competitors. However, there can be no assurance that our strategies for overcoming potential customers’ reluctance to change vendors will be successful, and this resistance may adversely affect our growth plans. These competitive pressures in our market, or our failure to compete effectively, may result in price reductions, less orders, reduced revenue and gross margins, increased net losses and loss of market share. Any failure to meet and address these factors could harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We may need to reduce or change our pricing model to remain competitive.

We price our fixed subscription fee and our transaction-based fee with our customers based on a combination of GMV they transact on our platform. We expect that we may need to change our pricing from time to time. As new or existing competitors introduce products that compete with ours or reduce their prices, we may be unable to attract new customers or retain existing customers. We must also determine the appropriate price to enable us to compete effectively internationally. Small, mid-market and large enterprise customers may demand substantial price discounts as part of the negotiation of sales contracts. As a result, we may be required or choose to reduce our prices or otherwise change our pricing model, which could adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition.

 

25


Table of Contents

Our sales cycle with our customers can be long and unpredictable, and our sales efforts require considerable time and expense.

The timing of our sales with our customers and related revenue recognition is difficult to predict because of the length and unpredictability of the sales cycle for these customers. Mid-market and large enterprise customers, particularly those in highly regulated industries and those requiring customized applications, may have an even further lengthy sales cycle for the evaluation and implementation of our platform. If these customers maintain work-from-home arrangements for a significant period of time as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic or otherwise, it may cause a lengthening of these sales cycles. This may cause a delay between increasing operating expenses for such sales efforts and, upon successful sales, the generation of corresponding revenue. We are often required to spend significant time and resources to better educate our potential customers and familiarize them with our platform. The length of our sales cycle for these customers, from initial evaluation to contract execution, is generally 8 to 12 months for large enterprise customers and 4 to 8 months for small and mid-market customers, but can vary substantially.

As a result, a significant portion of our revenue is generated from the recognition of contract liabilities from contracts entered into with customers during prior periods. Customers often view our revenue sharing arrangements and subscription to our ecommerce platform and services as a strategic decision requiring significant investment. As a result, customers frequently require considerable time to evaluate, test and qualify our platform prior to entering into or expanding a subscription. During the sales cycle, we spend significant time and resources on sales and marketing and contract negotiation activities, which may not result in a sale. Additional factors that may influence the length and variability of our sales cycle include:

 

  

the effectiveness of our sales force, as we hire and train our new salespeople to sell to mid-market and large enterprise customers;

 

  

the discretionary nature of purchasing and budget cycles and decisions;

 

  

the obstacles placed by customers’ procurement process;

 

  

economic conditions and other factors impacting customers’ budgets, including as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic;

 

  

customers’ integration complexity;

 

  

customers’ familiarity with SaaS ecommerce solutions;

 

  

customers’ evaluation of competing products during the purchasing process; and

 

  

evolving customer demands.

Given these factors, it is difficult to predict whether and when a sale will be completed, and when revenue from a sale will be recognized. Consequently, a shortfall in demand for our solutions and services or a decline in new or renewed contracts in a given period may not significantly reduce our revenue for that period but could negatively affect our revenue in future periods.

The estimates of market opportunity and forecasts of market growth included in this prospectus may prove to be inaccurate. Even if the market in which we compete achieves the forecasted growth, our business could fail to grow at similar rates, if at all.

The market for ecommerce solutions is relatively new and will experience changes over time. Ecommerce market estimates and growth forecasts are uncertain and based on assumptions and estimates that may be inaccurate. Our addressable market depends on a number of factors, including businesses’ desire to differentiate themselves through ecommerce, partnership opportunities, changes in the competitive landscape, technological changes, data security or privacy concerns, customer budgetary constraints, changes in business practices, changes in the regulatory environment, and changes in economic conditions. Our estimates and forecasts relating

 

26


Table of Contents

to the size and expected growth of our market may prove to be inaccurate and our ability to produce accurate estimates and forecasts may in the future be impacted by the economic uncertainty associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Even if the market in which we compete meets the size estimates and growth rates we forecast, our business could fail to grow at similar rates, if at all.

Our business is susceptible to risks associated with international sales and the use of our platform in various countries.

We currently have customers in approximately 32 countries. In the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 we generated 42.8% and 29.2%, of our total revenue from customers outside Brazil. We currently have operations in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, Portugal, Romania, Italy, the United Kingdom and the United States. We are continuing to adapt and develop strategies to address international markets, but such efforts may not be successful. In addition, the COVID-19 pandemic and related stay-at-home, business closures, and other restrictive orders and travel restrictions may pose additional challenges for international expansion and may impact our ability to launch into new regions and further expand geographically.

In addition, part of our growth strategy is to further expand our operations and customer base internationally. Business expansion and development in new jurisdictions may expose us to risk related to staffing and managing cross border operations, reduced brand awareness in new markets and lack of acceptance of our products and services, competition with established local competitors and increased costs and difficulty protecting intellectual property and sensitive data, tariffs and other trade barriers, differing and potentially adverse tax consequences, increased and conflicting regulatory compliance requirements (including with respect to privacy, security and labor), challenges caused by distance, language and cultural differences, exchange rate risk and political instability. Accordingly, our efforts to develop and expand the geographic footprint of our operations may not be successful, which could limit our ability to grow our business.

Our sales and the use of our platform in various countries subject us to risks that include, but are not limited to:

 

  

the difficulty of managing and staffing international operations and the increased operations, travel, infrastructure and legal compliance costs associated with servicing international customers and operating numerous international locations;

 

  

difficulties in managing systems integrators and technology partners;

 

  

differing technology standards;

 

  

our ability to effectively price our products in competitive international markets;

 

  

new and different sources of competition or other changes to our current competitive landscape;

 

  

understanding and reconciling different technical standards, data privacy and telecommunications regulations, registration and certification requirements outside of Brazil, which could prevent customers from deploying our products or limit their usage;

 

  

our ability to comply with Brazilian Federal Law No. 13,709/2018, as amended (Lei Geral de Proteção de Dados Pessoais), or the LGPD, and laws, regulations and industry standards relating to data privacy, data localization and security enacted in countries and other regions in which we operate or do business;

 

  

potentially greater difficulty collecting trade receivable and longer payment cycles;

 

  

higher or more variable network service provider fees outside of Brazil;

 

  

the need to adapt and localize our products for specific countries;

 

  

the need to offer customer support in various languages;

 

27


Table of Contents
  

lack of familiarity and burdens and complexity involved with complying with multiple, conflicting and changing foreign laws, standards, regulatory requirements, tariffs, export controls and other barriers;

 

  

greater difficulty in enforcing contracts, including our universal terms of service and other agreements;

 

  

differing labor regulations, where labor laws are generally more advantageous to employees as compared to the United States, including deemed hourly wage and overtime regulations in these locations;

 

  

reduced or uncertain protection for intellectual property rights in some countries;

 

  

compliance with various anti-bribery and anti-corruption laws such as the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the U.S. domestic bribery statute contained in 18 U.S.C. § 201, the U.S. Travel Act, the Brazilian Federal Law No. 12,846/2013, as amended, or the Brazilian Anticorruption Law, the UK Bribery Act of 2010, the UK Proceeds of Crime Act 2002, and similar laws and regulations in other jurisdictions;

 

  

changes in international trade policies, tariffs and other non-tariff barriers, such as quotas and local content rules;

 

  

more limited protection for intellectual property rights in some countries;

 

  

compliance with (1) tax regulations in the countries in which we operate, including the complexities of foreign value-added tax (or other tax) systems and restrictions on the repatriation of earnings, which may lead to unintended abusive planning, penalties and reputational risk, or being deemed a permanent establishment and (2) payment obligations of tax on digital services in jurisdictions where we do not have legal presence;

 

  

currency exchange rate fluctuations and the resulting effect on our revenue and expenses, and the cost and risk of entering into hedging transactions if we chose to do so in the future;

 

  

restrictions on the transfer of funds;

 

  

deterioration of political relations between Brazil and other countries;

 

  

the impact of natural disasters and public health epidemics such as COVID-19 on employees, contingent workers, partners, travel and the global economy and the ability to operate freely and effectively in a region that may be fully or partially on lockdown; and

 

  

political or social unrest or economic instability in a specific country or region in which we operate, which could have an adverse impact on our operations in that location.

These factors may cause our international costs of doing business to exceed our comparable domestic costs and may also require significant management attention and financial resources. Our future expansion efforts that we undertake may not be successful. Our failure to manage any of these risks successfully could harm our international operations, and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. If we invest substantial time and resources to expand our international operations and are unable to do so successfully, our business and operating results will suffer.

We typically provide monthly uptime service level commitments of up to 99.5% under our agreements with customers. If we fail to meet these contractual commitments, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected.

Our agreements with customers typically provide for service level commitments of up to 99.5%. If we suffer extended periods of downtime for our products or platform and we are unable to meet these commitments, we are contractually obligated to provide our customer a service credit of up to 20% of the monthly fees payable to us by such customer. In addition, the performance and availability of our third-party service providers, including Amazon Web Services, or AWS, which provides our cloud infrastructures, is outside of our control and,

 

28


Table of Contents

therefore, we are not in full control of whether we can meet our service level commitments. Any of the above circumstances or events may harm our reputation, cause customers to terminate their agreements with us, impair our ability to grow our customer base, subject us to financial liabilities under our service level agreements, or SLAs, and otherwise harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.

If we fail to offer high-quality customer support, our business and reputation could suffer.

Our customers rely on our personnel for support related to their subscription and customer solutions. High-quality support is important for the renewal and expansion of our agreements with existing customers. The importance of high-quality support, including with respect to multiple cloud support, will increase as we expand our business and pursue new customers, particularly mid-market and large enterprise customers. If we do not help our customers quickly resolve issues and provide effective ongoing support, our ability to sell new software to existing and new customers could suffer and our reputation with existing or potential customers could be harmed.

If we are unable to hire, retain and motivate qualified personnel, our business will suffer.

Our future success depends, in part, on our ability to continue to attract and retain highly skilled personnel. The inability to attract or retain qualified personnel or delays in hiring required personnel may seriously harm our business, financial condition and operating results. Our ability to continue to attract and retain highly skilled personnel, specifically employees with technical and engineering skills and employees with high levels of experience in designing and developing software and internet-related services, will be critical to our future success. Competition for highly skilled personnel in Brazil and some of the countries in which we operate can be intense due in part to the more limited pool of qualified personnel as compared to other places in the world, and we have experienced difficulties hiring employees from foreign jurisdictions to work in our offices. In addition, to the extent we hire personnel from competitors, we may be subject to allegations that they have been improperly solicited by us or divulged proprietary or other confidential information to us.

As our operations expand, we will require additional engineering support staff to sustain the increased use of our platform and services. If we are unable to adequately and timely grow our engineering support team or the overall quality of our current team diminishes significantly, our resources may be diverted to fixing existing errors, defects, security vulnerabilities, service interruptions or software bugs, instead of providing additional services to customers. While we may enhance our offering through acquisitions, the overall quality and cohesiveness of our product may be impaired. Failure to properly integrate the engineering support staff and activities of any of our acquired companies may result in the diversion of attention of staff to migrations and integrations issues rather than focusing on the continued improvement of our platform and services.

While we intend to issue stock options or other equity awards as key components of our overall compensation and employee attraction and retention efforts, we are required under IFRS to recognize compensation expense in our operating results for employee stock-based compensation under our equity grant programs, which may increase the pressure to limit stock-based compensation and jeopardize our ability to hire, retain and motivate qualified personnel.

The loss of our qualified personnel, as well as any difficulty to attract and replace them in a timely manner, may cause an adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

We are dependent on the continued services and performance of our senior management and other key employees, the loss of any of whom could adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition.

Our future performance depends on the continued services and contributions of our senior management, including our Co-Chief Executive Officers, Geraldo do Carmo Thomaz Júnior and Mariano Gomide de Faria,

 

29


Table of Contents

and other key employees to execute on our business plan and to identify and pursue new opportunities and product innovations. The loss of one or more of our executive officers or key employees (including any limitation on the performance of their duties or short-term or long-term absences as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic) could have a serious adverse effect on our business causing significant delays or prevent the achievement of our strategic objectives. We do not have employment agreements with our executive officers or other key personnel that require them to continue to work for us for any specified period; therefore, they could terminate their employment with us at any time. In addition, some of the members of our current senior management team have only been working together for a short period of time, which could adversely impact our ability to achieve our goals. From time to time, there may be changes in our senior management team resulting from the hiring or departure of executives, which could disrupt our business. The loss of the services of one or more of our senior management or other key employees for any reason could adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results and require significant amounts of time, training and resources to find suitable replacements and integrate them within our business, and could affect our corporate culture. In addition, if the perceived value of our stock awards declines, it may adversely affect our ability to recruit and retain highly skilled employees. If we fail to attract new personnel or fail to retain and motivate our current personnel, it could adversely affect our business and future growth prospects.

Our success depends in part on our business partner-centric strategy. Our business would be harmed if we fail to maintain or expand our partner relationships.

Strategic technology business partnerships are essential to our competitive strategy. A significant percentage of our customers choose to integrate our ecommerce platform with third-party application providers using our open APIs and software development kits. The functionality and popularity of our platform depends, in part, on our ability to integrate our platform with third-party applications and platforms, including marketplaces and social media sites. We are dependent on strategic technology partner solutions for major ecommerce categories, including payments, shipping, tax, accounting, ERP, marketing, fulfillment, cross-channel commerce and point of sale system, or POS. We will continue to depend on various third-party relationships to sustain and grow our business. Third-party application providers may change the features of their applications and platforms, alter their governing terms, and restrict our ability to add, customize or integrate systems, functionality and consumer experiences. Such changes could limit or terminate our ability to use these third-party applications and platforms as part of our effort to provide our customers a highly extensible and customizable experience. This could negatively impact our offerings and harm our business. Marketplaces or social networks that have allowed limited integration into their platforms, such as Dafiti, Mercado Libre, Amazon, Facebook and Instagram, may discontinue our access or allow other platforms to integrate with their platforms more easily, which would increase competition for ecommerce platforms across their solutions. Our business will be negatively impacted if we fail to retain our technology partner relationships for any reason, including contractual disputes, failure to support their or our technology or integrations, errors, bugs, or defects in our or their technology, or changes in our or their platforms. Any failure to maintain such relationships could harm our relationship with our customers, our reputation and brand, our revenue, our business and our results of operations.

Strategic technology partners and third parties may not be successful in building integrations, co-marketing our platform to provide a significant volume and quality of lead referrals, or continuing to work with us as their products evolve. Identifying, negotiating and documenting relationships with additional strategic technology partners requires significant resources. Integrating third-party technology can be complex, costly and time-consuming, and third parties may be unwilling to build such necessary integrations. Consequently, we may be required to devote additional resources to develop integrations for business applications on our own. Providers of business applications with which we have integrations may decide to compete with us or enter into arrangements with our competitors, resulting in such providers withdrawing support for our integrations. Any failure of our platform to operate effectively with third-party business applications could reduce the demand for our platform, resulting in customer dissatisfaction and harm to our business. If we are unable to respond to these changes or failures in a cost-effective manner, our platform may become less marketable, less competitive, or obsolete, and our results of operations may be negatively impacted.

 

30


Table of Contents

We also leverage the sales and referral resources of agency and referral partners through a variety of programs. If we are unable to effectively utilize, maintain and expand these relationships, our revenue growth would slow, we would need to devote additional resources to the development, sales and marketing of our platform, and our financial results and future growth prospects would be harmed. Our referral partners may also demand greater referral fees or commissions, which would increase our costs.

A cyberattack, security breach or other unauthorized access or interruption to our information technology systems or those of our third-party service providers could delay or interrupt service to our customers and their customers, harm our reputation or subject us to significant liability.

We collect, transmit, use, disclose, store and process personal information, including credit card information and other confidential information, of our employees, our business partners, our customers and their end-consumers. Third-party applications available on our platform and mobile applications may also collect, transmit, use, disclose, store and process such personal information, credit card information and other confidential information. We cannot and do not proactively monitor the content that our customers upload or the information provided to us through the applications integrated with our ecommerce platform; therefore, we do not control the substance of the content on our servers, which may include personal information. We also use third-party service providers and subprocessors to help us deliver services to customers and their end-consumers. These service providers and subprocessors may also collect, transmit, use, disclose, store and process personal information, credit card information and/or other confidential information of our employees and customers. This information, and the information technology systems that store such information, have in the past and may in the future be the target of unauthorized access or intrusion, or subject to security breaches and other incidents, including as a result of third-party action, employee or contractor error, nation state malfeasance, malware, phishing, computer hackers, system error, software bugs or defects, process failure or otherwise. Cybersecurity threats, privacy breaches, insider threats or other incidents and malicious internet-based activity continue to increase, evolve in nature and become more sophisticated. Information security risks for companies such as ours have significantly increased in recent years in part because of the proliferation of new technologies, the use of internet and telecommunications technologies to conduct financial transactions, and the increased sophistication and activities of organized crime, hackers, terrorists and other external parties, as well as nation-state and nation-state-supported actors. For example, in February 2021, our subsidiary, Ciashop Soluções para Comércio Eletrônico S.A., or Ciashop, was subject to a ransomware attack that corrupted certain operating system files. Ciashop’s site reliability engineering team was ultimately able to restore all services and applications and recover the corrupted data and Ciashop adopted a number of actions in an effort to prevent future incidents, including, among others, upgrading its antivirus software, a review of firewall rules of its production environment and a scan for vulnerabilities in its environment. While our platform was not affected as it is segregated from that of Ciashop’s, we cannot guarantee that any similar incidents may not occur again and adversely affect our operations.

Many companies that provide services similar to ours have also reported a significant increase in cyberattack activity since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, in the past, some of our customers have been subject to distributed denial of service, or DDoS, attacks, a technique used by hackers to take an internet service offline by overloading its servers. Our platform may be subject to similar DDoS attacks in the future. In addition, because we leverage third-party partners and service providers, including cloud, software, data center and other critical technology vendors to deliver our solutions, we rely heavily on the data security practices and policies adopted by these third-party service providers. Our ability to monitor our third-party service providers’ data security is limited. A vulnerability in our third-party service providers’ software or systems, a failure of our third-party service providers’ safeguards, policies or procedures, or a breach of a third-party service provider’s software or systems could result in the compromise of the confidentiality, integrity or availability of our systems or the data housed in our third-party solutions. In addition, we may also become liable in the event our third-party service providers and subprocessors are subject to security breaches, privacy breaches or other cybersecurity threats. For example, in May 2021, the server of one of our third-party service providers in Chile that stores, among other things, certain of our customer’s consumer personal information processed through our platform, was accidentally made publicly available on the internet and data of approximately 3,500

 

31


Table of Contents

of one of our customer’s consumers was accessed without authorization. Although our customer is the data controller of its consumers’ data and ultimately responsible for any privacy or security breaches involving such personal data, as our customer’s data processor, we may be held jointly or severally liable if we (or our third-party service provider) are found to not have instituted adequate data security measures on our platform. As of the date of this prospectus, the incident is under investigation. We cannot guarantee that any similar incidents may not occur again and adversely affect our operations. We and our third-party service providers and partners may be unable to anticipate or prevent techniques used in the future to obtain unauthorized access or to sabotage systems and cannot guarantee that applicable recovery systems, security protocols, network protection mechanisms and other procedures are or will be adequate to prevent network and service interruption, system failure or data loss. Since techniques used to obtain unauthorized access change frequently and the sophistication and size of DDoS and other cybersecurity attacks is increasing, we may be unable to implement adequate preventative measures or stop the attacks while they are occurring. Any actual or perceived DDoS attack or other security breach or incident could delay or interrupt service to our customers and their customers, could result in loss, compromise, corruption or disclosure of confidential information, intellectual property and sensitive and personal data or data we rely on to provide our solutions, may deter consumers from visiting our customers’ shops, damage our reputation and brand, expose us to a risk of litigation, indemnity obligations and damages for breach of contract, cause us to incur significant liability and financial loss and be subject to regulatory scrutiny, investigations, proceedings and penalties, and require us to expend significant capital and other resources to alleviate problems caused by any such DDoS attack or other security breach or incident and implement additional security measures.

Some jurisdictions, including Brazil and all 50 states in the United States, have enacted laws requiring companies to notify individuals of data security breaches involving certain types of personal data, and our agreements with certain customers require us to notify them in the event of a security incident. Such mandatory disclosures could lead to negative publicity and may cause our customers to lose confidence in the effectiveness of our data security measures. Moreover, if a high-profile security breach occurs with respect to another SaaS provider, customers may lose trust in the security of the SaaS business model generally, which could adversely impact our ability to retain existing customers or attract new ones. In addition, if our security measures fail to protect credit card information adequately, we could be liable to our business partners, the payment card associations, our customers, their end-consumers and consumers with whom we have a direct relationship. We could be subject to fines and higher transaction fees, we could face regulatory or other legal action, and our customers could end their relationships with us. The limitations of liability in our contracts may not be enforceable or adequate or would otherwise protect us from any such liabilities or damages with respect to any particular claim. Our failure to comply with legal, contractual, or standards-based requirements around the security of personal information could lead to significant fines and penalties, as well as claims by our customers, their end-consumers, or other stakeholders. These proceedings or violations could force us to spend money in defense or settlement of these proceedings, result in the imposition of monetary liability or injunctive relief, divert management’s time and attention, increase our costs of doing business, and materially adversely affect our reputation and the demand for our platform.

We currently do not maintain cybersecurity insurance, and in the event we were to seek to obtain such insurance coverage, it may not be available on acceptable terms or may not be available in sufficient amounts to cover one or more large claims in connection with cybersecurity liabilities. Insurers could also deny coverage as to any future claim. The successful assertion of one or more large claims against us, or changes in any insurance policies we may enter into, including premium increases or the imposition of large deductible or co-insurance requirements, could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We are also subject to federal, state and foreign laws regarding cybersecurity and the protection of data. See “—Our business is subject to Brazilian, United States and other foreign data privacy, data protection and information security laws, regulations, rules, standards, policies and contractual and other legal obligations, and our customers may also be subject to such laws and regulations. Any actual or perceived failure of our products

 

32


Table of Contents

to comply with or enable our customers to comply with such applicable laws and regulations would harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.”

We depend on third-party data hosting and transmission services. Increases in cost, interruptions or delays in service, latency, or poor service from our third-party data center or internet service providers could impair the functionality of our platform. This could result in customer or consumer dissatisfaction, damage to our reputation, loss of customers, limited growth and reduction in revenue.

We currently host the majority of our platform functions on third-party data center hosting facilities operated by AWS, located in the United States of America. Our ability to deliver our solutions also depends on the development and maintenance of internet infrastructure by third parties, including the maintenance of reliable networks with the necessary speed, data capacity and bandwidth. Our platform is deployed to multiple data centers primarily located in the United States in multiple locations, including some for the purpose of disaster recovery. However, despite precautions taken and disaster recovery arrangements we have in place at our data centers or those of our third-party service providers, natural disaster, acts of terrorism, vandalism, fraud, security attacks or sabotage, closure of a facility by public authorities without adequate notice, or other unanticipated problems could result in lengthy interruptions or performance degradation of our platform. Our third-party service providers are ultimately responsible for maintaining their own network security, disaster recovery and system management procedures, and our review processes for such providers may be insufficient to identify, prevent or mitigate adverse events. The owners and operators of our current and future hosting facilities do not guarantee that our customers’ access to our solutions will be uninterrupted, error-free or secure. Our operations depend, in part, on our third-party providers’ protection of their facilities and infrastructure against damage, interruption and other performance problems, including from natural disasters, power or telecommunications failures, criminal acts, infrastructure changes, human or software errors, cybersecurity attacks, or similar events (such as the COVID-19 pandemic). If any of our third-party service providers experience disruptions or service lapses, or if our third-party infrastructure services agreements are terminated, we could experience interruptions in our platform, latency, as well as delays and additional expenses in arranging new facilities and services. Any prolonged service disruption affecting our platform caused by our third-party service providers could result in lengthy interruptions in the delivery of our platform and solutions, cause system interruptions, damage our reputation with current and potential customers, expose us to liability, cause us to lose customers, cause the loss of critical data, prevent us from supporting our platform and otherwise harm our business.

Our customers often draw significant numbers of end-consumers to their online stores over short periods of time, including from events such as new product releases, holiday shopping seasons and flash sales, which significantly increases the traffic on our servers and the volume of transactions processed on our platform. Our servers may be unable to achieve or maintain data transmission capacity sufficient for timely service of increased traffic or order processing and the failure of data centers, internet service providers or other third-party service providers to meet our capacity requirements could result in interruptions or delays in access to our platform and impede our ability to grow our business and scale our operations. Our failure to achieve or maintain sufficient and performant data transmission capacity could significantly reduce demand for our platform. In the future, we may be required to allocate resources, including spending substantial amounts of money, to build, purchase or lease additional data centers and equipment and upgrade our technology and network infrastructure in order to handle the increased load. If one of these third parties suffers from capacity constraints, our business may be adversely affected. In addition, because we and our customers generate a disproportionate amount of revenue in the fourth quarter as a result of customary seasonality, any disruption in our customers’ ability to process and fulfill customer orders in the fourth quarter could have a disproportionately negative effect on our operating results.

Furthermore, a significant portion of our operating cost is from our third-party data hosting and transmission services. If the costs for such services increase due to vendor consolidation, regulation, contract renegotiation or otherwise, we may not be able to increase the fees for our ecommerce platform or professional services to cover the changes. As a result, our operating results may be significantly worse than forecasted.

 

33


Table of Contents

We rely on third-party and open source software for our platform. Our inability to obtain third-party licenses for such software, or obtain them on favorable terms, or any errors or failures caused by such software could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, our use of open source software could negatively affect our ability to sell our products and subject us to possible litigation.

Some of our offerings include software or other intellectual property licensed from third parties. It may be necessary in the future to renew our license agreements relating to various aspects of our offerings or to seek new licenses for existing or new offerings. Necessary licenses may not be available on acceptable terms that allow our platform and offerings to remain competitive, or at all. In addition, a third party may assert that we or our customers are in breach of the terms of a license, which could, among other things, give such third party the right to terminate a license or seek damages from us, or both. Our inability to obtain certain licenses or other rights, or to obtain such licenses or rights on favorable terms, could result in delays in product releases until equivalent technology can be identified, licensed or developed, if at all, and integrated into our platform, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, we may be subject to liability if third-party software that we license is found to infringe, misappropriate or otherwise violate intellectual property rights of others. Third parties may also allege that we are infringing, violating or otherwise misappropriating their intellectual property rights and that additional licenses are required for our use of their software or intellectual property, and we may be unable to obtain such licenses on commercially reasonable terms or at all. The inclusion in our offerings of software or other intellectual property licensed from third parties on a non-exclusive basis could also limit our ability to differentiate our offerings from those of our competitors. To the extent that our platform depends upon the successful operation of third-party software, any undetected errors or defects in, or failures of, such third-party software could also impair the functionality of our platform, delay new feature introductions, result in a failure of our platform, and injure our reputation. Many third-party software providers attempt to impose limitations on their liability for such errors, defects or failures, and if enforceable, we may have additional liability to our customers that could harm our reputation and increase our operating costs.

In addition, our platform and some of our products incorporate open source software, and we expect to continue to incorporate open source software in our products and platform in the future. Open source software is generally freely accessible, usable and modifiable. Few of the licenses applicable to open source software have been interpreted by courts, and there is a risk that these licenses could be construed in a manner that could impose unanticipated conditions or restrictions on our ability to commercialize our products and platform. Moreover, although we have implemented policies to regulate the use and incorporation of open source software into our products and platform, we cannot be certain that we have not incorporated open source software in our products or platform in a manner that is inconsistent with such policies. If we fail to comply with open source licenses, we may be subject to certain requirements, including requirements that we offer our products that incorporate the open source software for no cost, that we discontinue our products that incorporate the open source software, that we make available source code for modifications or derivative works we create based upon, incorporating or using the open source software and that we license such modifications or derivative works under the terms of applicable open source licenses. If an author or other third party that distributes such open source software were to allege that we had not complied with the conditions of one or more of these licenses, we could be required to incur significant legal expenses defending against such allegations and could be subject to significant damages, enjoined from generating revenue from customers using products that contained the open source software and required to comply with onerous conditions or restrictions on these products. In any of these events, we and our customers could be required to seek licenses from third parties in order to continue offering our products and platform and to re-engineer our products or platform or discontinue offering our products to customers in the event we cannot re-engineer them on a timely basis. Any of the foregoing could require us to devote additional research and development resources to re-engineer our products or platform, could result in customer dissatisfaction and may adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. Additionally, the use of certain open source software can lead to greater risks that the use of third-party commercial software, as open source licensors

 

34


Table of Contents

generally make their open source software available “as-is” and do not provide updates, warranties, support, indemnities or other contractual protections regarding infringement claims or quality of the code.

We could incur substantial costs in maintaining, enforcing, protecting or defending our intellectual property and proprietary rights. Failure to adequately obtain, maintain, enforce and protect our intellectual property and proprietary rights could impair our competitive position and cause us to lose valuable assets, experience reduced revenue and incur costly litigation.

Our success is dependent, in part, upon obtaining, maintaining, protecting and enforcing our proprietary technology and other intellectual property. We rely on a combination of trade secret laws, contractual provisions with our employees, consultants, independent contractors and third parties with whom we have relationships, trademarks, service marks and copyrights in an effort to establish and protect our intellectual property and proprietary rights. However, the steps we take to protect our intellectual property and intellectual property laws may be inadequate, breached, may offer only limited protection and may not adequately permit us to gain or keep any competitive advantage. Despite our efforts, third parties have in the past and may in the future attempt to disclose, obtain, copy or use our intellectual property or other proprietary rights or technology without our authorization. To the extent we expand our international activities, our exposure to unauthorized copying and use of our platform and proprietary information may increase. Moreover, effective trademark, copyright, patent and trade secret protection may not be available or commercially feasible in every country in which we conduct business, as the laws of certain foreign countries may not protect intellectual property rights and technology to the same extent as the laws of the United States. Further, intellectual property law, including statutory and case law, is constantly developing and changes in, or unexpected interpretations of, intellectual property laws could make it harder for us to enforce our rights. Third parties may also legitimately and independently develop products, services and technology similar to or duplicative of our products and solutions.

The process of obtaining trademark, copyright and patent protection is expensive and time-consuming, and may not always be successful depending on the intellectual property laws of the applicable jurisdiction in which we seek protection or other circumstances, in which case we may be unable to secure intellectual property protection for all of our technology. We may not be able to obtain protection for our technology and even if we are successful in obtaining effective patent, copyright, trademark and trade secret protection, it is expensive to maintain these rights, both in terms of application and maintenance costs and the time and cost required to defend our rights. If we elect to file patent applications in the future, we may be unable to obtain patent protection for technology covered in our patent applications or obtain the coverage originally sought. In addition, any patents issued in the future may not provide us with competitive advantages or may be successfully challenged by third parties, which could result in them being narrowed in scope or declared invalid or unenforceable. It is also possible that third parties, including our competitors, may obtain patents relating to technologies that overlap or compete with our technology. If third parties obtain patent protection with respect to such technologies, they may assert that our technology infringes their patents and seek to charge us a licensing fee or otherwise preclude the use of our technology or file suit against us. Any of our patents, trademarks or other intellectual property rights may lapse, be abandoned, be challenged or circumvented by others or invalidated through administrative process or litigation. We also may be unable to obtain trademark protection for our products and brands, and our existing trademark registrations and applications, and any trademarks that may be used in the future, may not provide us with competitive advantages or distinguish our products and services from those of our competitors. In addition, our trademarks may be contested or found unenforceable, weak or invalid, and we may not be able to prevent third parties from infringing or otherwise violating them. Our failure to develop and properly manage and protect our intellectual property could hurt our market position and business opportunities. We also may choose not to pursue registrations in every jurisdiction or allow certain of our registered intellectual property rights, or our pending applications for intellectual property rights, to lapse or to become abandoned if we determine that obtaining or maintaining the applicable registered intellectual property rights is not worthwhile. Despite our efforts to protect our intellectual property and proprietary rights, there can be no guarantee that such rights will be sufficient to protect against others offering products or services that are substantially similar to ours, independently developing similar products, duplicating any of our

 

35


Table of Contents

products, other adopting trade names similar to ours, competing with our business or attempting to copy aspects of our technology and using information that we consider proprietary, thereby impeding our ability to promote our platform and possibly leading to customer confusion.

In addition to registered intellectual property rights, we rely on non-registered proprietary information and technology. We make business decisions about when to seek patent protection for a particular technology and when to rely upon trade secret protection and the approach we select may ultimately prove to be inadequate. In order to protect our proprietary information and technology, we rely in part on invention assignment and confidentiality agreements with our employees, consultants and other parties who create intellectual property on our behalf and enter into confidentiality agreements with our employees, consultants, strategic and business partners and other parties who have access to our confidential information. However, these agreements may not be effective in controlling access to and distribution of our proprietary information and intellectual property, may not be self-executing, sufficient in scope or enforceable, and these agreements do not prevent our competitors or partners from independently developing technologies that are equivalent or superior to our platform. We also cannot guarantee that we have entered into such agreements with all parties who may have or have had access to our proprietary and confidentiality information or otherwise developed intellectual property for us or that the agreements we have entered into will not be breached. Enforcing a claim that a third party illegally disclosed or misappropriated our proprietary information is difficult, expensive and time-consuming, and the outcome is unpredictable. In addition, some courts inside and outside the United States are less willing or unwilling to protect trade secrets. If any of our trade secrets were to be unlawfully obtained or independently developed by a competitor or other third party, we would have no right to prevent them from using that technology or information to compete with us, which could harm our competitive position, business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Despite our efforts to protect our intellectual property, third parties have in the past and may in the future infringe, misappropriate or otherwise violate our intellectual property and proprietary rights and we may be required to spend significant resources to monitor, protect and enforce our intellectual property rights. Policing unauthorized use of our technologies, trade secrets and intellectual property is difficult, expensive and time-consuming, particularly in foreign countries where the laws may not be protective of intellectual property rights and where mechanisms for enforcement of intellectual property rights may be weak. We have in the past and may in the future also be subject to claims by third parties that we have infringed, misappropriated or otherwise violated their intellectual property. Litigation may be necessary to enforce our intellectual property rights and protect our trade secrets. Litigation brought to defend, protect or enforce our intellectual property rights could be costly, time-consuming and distracting to management, regardless of the outcome. Enforcement of our intellectual property rights may be met with defenses, counterclaims and countersuits attacking the validity and enforceability of our intellectual property. Such litigation could result in the impairment or loss of portions of our intellectual property and require us to, among other things, redesign or stop providing our products, pay substantial amounts to satisfy judgments or settle claims or lawsuits, pay substantial royalty or licensing fees, or satisfy indemnification obligations that we have with certain parties with whom we have commercial relationships. In addition, many companies may have the capability to dedicate greater resources to enforce their intellectual property rights and to defend claims that may be brought against them. In addition, because of the substantial discovery required in connection with intellectual property litigation, our confidential or sensitive information could be compromised by disclosure in such litigation. There could also be public announcements regarding the results of such litigation and if securities analysts or investors perceive these results to be negative, it could have a substantial adverse effect on the price of our Class A common shares.

Our inability to protect our proprietary technology against unauthorized copying or use, as well as any costly litigation or diversion of our management’s attention and resources in connection with intellectual property related disputes, could delay further sales or the implementation of our platform, impair the functionality of our platform, delay introductions of new functionality to our platform, result in the substitution of inferior or more costly technologies into our platform, or injure our reputation. We will not be able to protect our intellectual property if we are unable to adequately maintain and enforce our rights or if we do not detect

 

36


Table of Contents

unauthorized use of our intellectual property. If we fail to meaningfully protect our intellectual property and proprietary rights, our business, operating results and financial condition could be adversely affected.

Evolving global laws, regulations and standards, including data privacy regulations and data localization requirements, may limit the use and adoption of our services, expose us to liability, or otherwise adversely affect our business.

Federal, state, or foreign governmental bodies or agencies have in the past adopted, and may in the future adopt, laws and regulations affecting the use of the internet as a commercial medium. These laws and regulations could impact taxation, internet neutrality, tariffs, content, copyright protection, distribution, electronic contracts and other communications, consumer protection and data privacy, and the characteristics and quality of services we offer. Legislators and regulators may make legal and regulatory changes or apply existing laws in ways that require us to incur substantial costs, expose us to unanticipated civil or criminal liability, or cause us to change our business practices. Also, such laws and regulations are often inconsistent and may be subject to amendment or re-interpretation, which may cause us to incur significant costs and expend significant effort to ensure compliance. These laws and regulations and resulting increased compliance and operational costs could materially harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.

For instance, we continue to see jurisdictions imposing data localization laws, which require personal information, or certain subcategories of personal information, to be stored in the jurisdiction of origin. These regulations may inhibit our ability to expand into those markets or prohibit us from continuing to offer services in those markets without significant additional costs.

As we expand into new industries and regions, we will likely need to comply with new requirements to compete effectively. The uncertainty and changes in the requirements of multiple jurisdictions may increase the cost of compliance, delay or reduce demand for our services, restrict our ability to offer services in certain locations, impact our customers’ ability to deploy our solutions in certain jurisdictions, or subject us to sanctions regulators, all of which could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. Additionally, although we endeavor to have our products and platform comply with applicable laws and regulations, these and other obligations may be modified, they may be interpreted and applied in an inconsistent manner from one jurisdiction to another, and they may conflict with one another, other regulatory requirements, contractual commitments or our internal practices.

Our business is subject to Brazilian, United States and other foreign data privacy, data protection and information security laws, regulations, rules, standards, policies and contractual and other legal obligations, and our customers may also be subject to such laws and regulations. Any actual or perceived failure of our products to comply with or enable our customers to comply with such applicable laws and regulations would harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.

The privacy and security of personally identifiable, personal, sensitive, regulated or confidential information is a major focus in our industry and we and our customers that use our products are subject to federal, state, local and foreign privacy and data protection-related laws and regulations that impose obligations in connection with the collection, storage, use, processing, disclosure, protection, transmission, retention and disposal of confidential or sensitive information, including personal data, such as financial data, health or other similar data. Laws and regulations governing data privacy, data protection and information security are constantly evolving and there has been an increasing focus on privacy and data protection issues with the potential to affect our business. The nature of our business exposes us to risks related to compliance with data protection and information security laws and regulations. Any perceived or actual failure to comply with any of these laws and regulations could result in litigation, enforcement actions, damages, fines and penalties and could harm our reputation and impair our ability to attract and retain our customers, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects.

 

37


Table of Contents

For example, in Brazil, current practices involving the treatment of personal data are governed by certain sector laws, such as Law No. 8,078/1990, or the Brazilian Consumer Defense Code, and Law No. 12,965/2014, or the Brazilian Civil Rights Framework for the Internet. In addition, Law No. 13,709/2018 (Lei Geral de Proteção de Dados Pessoais), or LGPD, came into force on September 18, 2020 to regulate the processing of personal data. Law No. 14,010/ 2020 amended certain provisions of the LGPD and postponed its enforcement to August 2021. However, because the LGPD also allows for a private right of action, we may still be subject to individual claims for violations of the LGPD as of its enactment. The LGPD applies to individuals or legal entities and private or government entities who processes personal data in Brazil or collect personal data in Brazil or, further, when their processing activities have the purpose of offering or supplying goods or services to data subjects located in Brazil. The LGPD establishes detailed rules for processing personal data, which includes the collection, use, transfer and storage of personal data and affects all economic sectors, including the relationship between clients and suppliers of goods and services, employees and employers and other relationships in which personal data is collected, whether in a digital or physical environment.

The LGPD requires us to adapt our data processing activities to comply with this regime, and we have implemented changes with respect to our policies and procedures designed to facilitate our compliance with the relevant requirements under the LGPD. However, the interpretation and application of the LGPD is still uncertain.

The penalties and fines for violations of the LGPD include: warnings, with the imposition of a deadline for the adoption of corrective measures; a daily fine, up to a maximum amount of R$50.0 million per violation; the restriction of access to the personal data to which the violation relates up to a six-month period, which can be extended until the processing activities are compliant with the regulation; and in case of repetition of the violation, a temporary block and/or deletion of the relevant personal data, and a partial or complete prohibition of processing activities and a fine of up to 2.0% of gross sales of the company or group of companies in violation, up to a maximum amount of R$50.0 million per violation. Pursuant to the LGPD, security breaches that may result in significant risk or damage to personal data must be reported to the National Data Protection Authority (Autoridade Nacional de Proteção de Dados), or ANPD, Brazil’s data protection regulatory body, within a reasonable time period. The notice to the ANPD must include a description of the nature of the personal data affected by the breach; the affected data subjects; the technical and security measures adopted by the impacted entity; the risks related to the breach; the reasons for any delays in reporting the breach, if applicable; and the measures adopted to revert or mitigate the effects of the damage caused by the breach. Moreover, the ANPD could establish additional obligations related to data protection in the future. The LGPD and any additional privacy laws or regulations enacted or approved in Brazil or in other jurisdictions in which we operate could significantly impact our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Similarly, many foreign countries and governmental bodies, including in the countries in which we currently operate, have laws and regulations concerning the collection, use and other processing of sensitive and personal data obtained from individuals located in their jurisdiction or by businesses operating within their jurisdiction. Laws and regulations in these jurisdictions apply broadly to the collection, use, storage, disclosure, transmission, processing and security of personal data that identifies or may be used to identify an individual, such as names, telephone numbers, email addresses and, in some jurisdictions, IP addresses and other online identifiers. For example, the General Data Protection Regulation, or the GDPR, went into effect in May 2018 and implemented more stringent administrative requirements for controllers and processors of personal data of EU residents, including, for example, data breach notification requirements, limitations on retention of information, and rights for individuals over their personal data, and creates a range of new compliance obligations. The GDPR also provides that EU member states may make their own further laws and regulations limiting the processing of personal data. Ensuring compliance with the GDPR is an ongoing commitment that involves substantial costs, and despite our efforts, governmental authorities or others may assert that our business practices fail to comply with its requirements. If our operations are found to violate GDPR requirements, we may incur substantial fines and other penalties, including bans on processing and transferring personal data, have to change our business

 

38


Table of Contents

practices, and face reputational harm, any of which could have an adverse effect on our business. In particular, serious breaches of the GDPR can result in administrative fines of up to 4.0% of annual worldwide revenues or up to €20 million, whichever is higher. Fines of up to 2.0% of annual worldwide revenues can be levied for other specified violations, and violations of the GDPR may also lead to damages claims by data controllers and data subjects. Such penalties are in addition to any civil litigation claims by data controllers, customers and data subjects. Recent legal developments in Europe have created compliance uncertainty regarding transfers of personal data from Europe to the United States. In July 2020, the Court of Justice of the European Union, or CJEU, invalidated the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Framework, a mechanism for the transfer of personal information from the EU to the United States, and made clear that reliance on Standard Contractual Clauses, an alternative mechanism for the transfer of personal information outside of the EU alone may not be sufficient in all circumstances. Further, the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union and ongoing developments in the United Kingdom have created uncertainty regarding data protection regulation in the United Kingdom. Following the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU on January 31, 2020, pursuant to the transitional arrangements agreed to between the United Kingdom and European Union, the GDPR continued to have effect in law in the United Kingdom, and continued to do so until December 31, 2020, as if the United Kingdom remained a member state of the EU for such purposes. Following December 31, 2020, and the expiry of those transitional arrangements, the data protection obligations of the GDPR continue to apply to United Kingdom-related processing of personal data in substantially unvaried form by virtue of section 3 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, as amended, which, together with the amended UK Data Protection Act of 2018, retains the GDPR in UK national law. However, going forward, there may be increasing scope for divergence in application, interpretation and enforcement of the data protection law as between the United Kingdom and the EEA, and the relationship between the United Kingdom and the EEA in relation to certain aspects of data protection law remains uncertain.

In the United States, California enacted the California Consumer Privacy Act, or CCPA, which took effect in January 2020 and imposes several obligations on companies that do business in California that are different from the obligations set forth in the GDPR. For example, the CCPA provides that covered companies must provide new disclosures to California consumers and afford such consumers new data privacy rights that include the right to request a copy from a covered company of the personal information collected about them, the right to request deletion of such personal information, and the right to request to opt-out of certain sales of such personal information. The California Attorney General can enforce the CCPA, including seeking an injunction and civil penalties for violations. The CCPA also provides a private right of action for certain data breaches, which is expected to increase data breach litigation. Further, in November 2020, California voters passed the California Privacy Rights and Enforcement Act, or the CPRA. Effective beginning January 1, 2023, the CPRA imposes additional obligations on companies covered by the legislation and will significantly modify the CCPA, including by expanding California residents’ rights with respect to certain sensitive personal information. The CPRA also creates a new state agency that will be vested with authority to implement and enforce the CCPA and CPRA. It remains unclear how various provisions of the CCPA and CPRA will be interpreted and enforced, and we may be required to modify our data practices and policies and incur substantial costs in an effort to comply. Certain other state laws, including the recently enacted Virginia Consumer Data Protection Act, impose similar privacy obligations and all 50 states have laws including obligations to provide notification of certain security breaches to affected individuals, state officials and others.

We also may be bound by contractual obligations relating to our collection, use, processing and disclosure of personal, financial and other data or may find it necessary or desirable to join industry or other self-regulatory bodies or other privacy or data protection-related organizations that require compliance with their rules pertaining to privacy and data protection.

While we strive to comply with all applicable privacy, data protection and information security laws and regulations, as well as our contractual obligations, posted privacy policies and applicable industry standards, such laws, regulations, obligations and standards continue to evolve and are becoming increasingly complex, and sometimes conflict among the various jurisdictions and countries in which we operate, which makes compliance

 

39


Table of Contents

challenging and expensive. We expect that there will continue to be new proposed laws, rules of self-regulatory bodies, regulations and industry standards concerning privacy, data protection and information security in Brazil and other jurisdictions, and we cannot yet determine the impact such future laws, rules, regulations and standards may have on our business. Moreover, existing Brazilian and foreign privacy and data protection-related laws and regulations are evolving and subject to potentially differing interpretations, and various legislative and regulatory bodies may expand current or enact new laws and regulations regarding privacy and data protection-related matters. Additionally, our customers may be subject to differing privacy laws, rules and legislation, which may mean that they require us to be bound by varying contractual requirements application to certain other jurisdictions. Because global laws, regulations and industry standards concerning privacy and data security have continued to develop and evolve rapidly, it is possible that we or our products or platform may not be, or may not have been, compliant with each such applicable law, regulation and industry standard and compliance with such new laws or to changes to existing laws may impact our business and practices, require us to expend significant resources to adapt to these changes, or to stop offering our products in certain countries. These developments could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Any failure or perceived failure by us, or any third parties with whom we do business, to comply with laws, regulations, policies, industry standards or contractual or other legal obligations relating to privacy, data protection or information security may result in governmental investigations, inquiries, enforcement actions and prosecutions, private litigation, fines and penalties, adverse publicity or potential loss of business. Future restrictions on the collection, use, processing, storage, sharing or disclosure of sensitive or personal information could require us to incur additional costs or modify our platform, and could limit our ability to develop new functionality. Complying with these requirements and changing our policies and practices may be onerous and costly, and we may not be able to respond quickly or effectively to regulatory, legislative or other developments. Any of the foregoing could adversely affect our business and operating results.

There are risks for which our insurance policies may not adequately cover or for which we have no insurance coverage. Insufficient insurance coverage or the materialization of such uninsured risks could adversely affect us.

Our insurance policies may not adequately cover all risks to which we are exposed. In addition, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to maintain our insurance policies in the future or that we will be able to renew them at reasonable prices or on acceptable terms, which may adversely affect our business and the trading price of our Class A common shares. Moreover, we are subject to risks for which we are uninsured, such as war, acts of God, including hurricanes, other force majeure events and breaches of the security of our systems by hackers. The occurrence of a significant loss that is not insured or compensable, or that is only partially insured or compensable, may require us to commit significant cash resources to cover such losses, which may adversely affect us.

Our operating results are subject to seasonal fluctuations.

Our subscription revenues are directly linked to the level of GMV that our customers process through our platform. Our customers historically have processed additional GMV during the holiday season. As a result, we have historically generated higher subscription revenues in the fourth quarter in each year compared to other quarters. While we believe that this seasonality has affected and will continue to affect our quarterly results, our rapid growth has largely masked seasonal trends to date. However, as a result of the continued growth of our subscription revenue offerings, we believe that our business may become more seasonal in the future and that historical patterns in our business may not be a reliable indicator of our future sales activity or performance. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Seasonality” for additional information.

 

40


Table of Contents

We face exposure to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, and such fluctuations could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

As our international operations expand, our exposure to the effects of fluctuations in currency exchange rates grows. For example, global political events, including Brexit, trade tariff developments and other geopolitical events have caused global economic uncertainty and variability in foreign currency exchange rates. While we have primarily transacted with customers and business partners in Brazilian reais, in light of our international expansion we expect to transact with customers in Argentine pesos, Colombian pesos and British pounds, among others. We expect to significantly expand the number of transactions with customers that are denominated in foreign currencies in the future as we continue to expand our business internationally. We also incur expenses for some of our network service provider costs outside of Brazil in local currencies and for employee compensation and other operating expenses at our non-Brazil locations in the local currency for such locations. Fluctuations in the exchange rates between the Brazilian real and other currencies could result in an increase to the Brazilian equivalent of such expenses.

In addition, our international subsidiaries may maintain net assets that are denominated in currencies other than the functional operating currencies of these entities. As we continue to expand our international operations, we become more exposed to the effects of fluctuations in currency exchange rates. The results of operations in the countries where we operate are exposed to foreign exchange rate fluctuations as the financial results of the applicable subsidiaries are translated from the local currency into U.S. dollars upon consolidation. If the U.S. dollar weakens against foreign currencies, which occurred between 2004 and 2006, the translation of these foreign-currency-denominated transactions will result in increased revenues, operating expenses and net income. Similarly, our revenues, operating expenses and net income will decrease if the U.S. dollar strengthens against foreign currencies. In the three months ended March 31, 2021 and in the year ended December 31, 2020, 17.9% and 14.0% of our revenues were denominated in, or linked to, U.S. dollars, respectively. Although total revenue in the three months ended March 31, 2021 and in the year ended December 31, 2020 grew 77.0% and 95.3% on an FX neutral basis and 55.8% and 60.9% in U.S. dollars, our reporting currency, the foreign currency exchange rates in 2021 relative to 2020 and 2020 relative to 2019 resulted in a decrease of 13.6% and 21.4% in our revenue growth, respectively.

Accordingly, changes in the value of foreign currencies relative to the U.S. dollar can affect our results of operations due to transactional and translational remeasurements. As a result of such foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, it could be more difficult to detect underlying trends in our business and results of operations. In addition, to the extent that fluctuations in currency exchange rates cause our results of operations to differ from our expectations or the expectations of our investors and securities analysts who follow our stock, the trading price of our Class A common shares could be adversely affected.

We do not currently maintain a program to hedge transaction exposures in foreign currencies. However, in the future, we may use derivative instruments, such as foreign currency forward and option contracts, to hedge certain exposures to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. The use of such hedging activities may not offset any or more than a portion of the adverse financial effects of unfavorable movements in foreign exchange rates over the limited time the hedges are in place. Moreover, the use of hedging instruments may introduce additional risks if we are unable to structure effective hedges with such instruments. See “—Risks Related to Latin America—Significant foreign currency exchange controls and currency devaluation in certain countries in which we operate which may have adverse effects on the economies of such countries, us and the price of our Class A common shares.”

 

41


Table of Contents

We rely on search engines and social networking sites to attract a meaningful portion of our SMB customers. If we are not able to generate traffic to our website through search engines and social networking sites, our ability to attract new SMB customers may be impaired. In addition, if our customers are not able to conclude their online store setup and generate traffic to their online stores through search engines and social networking sites, their ability to attract consumers may be impaired.

Many of our customers locate our website through internet search engines, such as Google, and advertisements on social networking sites, such as Facebook. The prominence of our website in response to internet searches is a critical factor in attracting potential customers to our platform. If we are listed less prominently or fail to appear in search results for any reason, visits to our website could decline significantly, and we may not be able to replace this traffic.

Similarly, many consumers locate our customers’ shops through internet search engines and advertisements on social networking sites. If our customers’ shops are listed less prominently or fail to appear in search results for any reason, visits to our customers’ shops could decline significantly. As a result, our customers’ businesses may suffer, which would affect the GMV that they process through our platform and could affect the ability of such customers to pay for our solutions.

Search engines revise their algorithms from time to time in an attempt to optimize their search results. If search engines modify their algorithms, our website and our customers’ shops may appear less prominently or not at all in search results, which could result in reduced traffic to our website and to our customers’ shops.

Additionally, if the price of marketing our solutions over search engines or social networking sites increases, we may incur additional marketing expenses or may be required to allocate a larger portion of our marketing spend to search engine marketing and our business and operating results could be adversely affected. Furthermore, competitors may in the future bid on the search terms that we use to drive traffic to our website. Such actions could increase our marketing costs and result in decreased traffic to our website. In addition, search engines or social networking sites may change their advertising policies from time to time. If any change to these policies delays or prevents us from advertising through these channels, it could result in reduced traffic to our website and sales of our solutions. As well, new search engines or social networking sites may develop, particularly in specific jurisdictions, that reduce traffic on existing search engines and social networking sites, and if we are not able to achieve prominence through advertising or otherwise, we may not achieve significant traffic to our website through these new platforms and our business and operating results could be adversely affected.

We are dependent upon customers’ and their end-consumer willingness to use the internet for commerce.

Our success depends upon the general public’s continued willingness to use the internet as a means to pay for purchases, communicate, access social media, research and conduct commercial transactions, including through mobile devices. If customers and their consumers become unwilling or less willing to use the internet for commerce for any reason, including lack of access to high-speed communications equipment, congestion of traffic on the internet, internet outages or delays, disruptions or other damage to customers’ and end-consumers’ computers, increases in the cost of accessing the internet and security and privacy risks or the perception of such risks, our customers and prospective customers could be less inclined to adopt the services offered by a SaaS company like us, and our business prospects could be adversely affected.

In addition, the restrictions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic have prompted a shift in sales from traditional brick-and-mortar commerce to ecommerce that benefited our business in 2020. There can be no assurance that once the COVID-19 pandemic is sufficiently controlled, this shift in sales will continue and that we will continue to benefit from it. For further information, see “—The COVID-19 pandemic could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.”

 

42


Table of Contents

Activities of customers or the content of their shops could damage our brand, subject us to liability and harm our business and financial results.

Our terms of service prohibit our customers from using our platform to engage in illegal activities and our terms of service permit us to take down a customer’s online shop if we become aware of such illegal use. Customers may nonetheless engage in prohibited or illegal activities or upload store content in violation of applicable laws, which could subject us to liability. We could also be subject to liability under applicable law, which may not be fully mitigated by our terms of service. Any liability attributed to us could adversely affect our brand, reputation, ability to expand our subscriber base, and financial results. Furthermore, our brand may be negatively impacted by the actions of customers that are deemed to be hostile, offensive, inappropriate or illegal. We do not proactively monitor or review the appropriateness of the content of our customers’ shops and we do not have control over customer activities. The safeguards we have in place may not be sufficient for us to avoid liability or avoid harm to our brand, especially if such hostile, offensive, inappropriate or illegal use is high profile, which could adversely affect our business and financial results.

If we are unable to maintain our corporate culture as we grow, we could lose the innovation, teamwork, passion and focus on execution that we believe contribute to our success, and our business may be harmed.

We believe a critical component to our success has been our corporate culture. We have invested substantial time and resources in building our team. As we grow and develop our infrastructure as a public company, our operations may become increasingly complex. We may find it difficult to maintain these important aspects of our corporate culture. We maintain work-from-home arrangements for a growing number of our employees, which may impact our ability to preserve our corporate culture. Any failure to preserve our culture could negatively affect our future success, including our ability to retain and recruit personnel, and to effectively focus on and pursue our corporate objectives.

We have in the past made, and may in the future make, acquisitions and investments, which could divert management’s attention, result in operating difficulties and dilution to our shareholders and otherwise disrupt our operations and adversely affect our business, operating results or financial position.

From time to time, we evaluate potential strategic acquisition or investment opportunities. Any transactions that we enter into could be material to our financial condition and results of operations. The process of acquiring and integrating another company or technology could create unforeseen operating difficulties and expenditures. We may also experience difficulties integrating personnel of the acquired company into our business and culture. Acquisitions may also disrupt our business, divert our resources and require significant management attention that would otherwise be available for development of our existing business. Key personnel of the acquired companies may choose not to work for us, their software may not be easily adapted to work with ours, or we may have difficulty retaining the customers of any acquired business due to changes in ownership, management, or otherwise. The anticipated benefits of any acquisition, investment, or business relationship may not be realized or we may be exposed to unknown risks or liabilities, such as:

 

  

use of resources that are needed in other areas of our business;

 

  

in the case of an acquisition, implementation or remediation of controls, procedures and policies of the acquired company;

 

  

in the case of an acquisition, difficulty integrating the accounting systems and operations of the acquired company, including potential risks to our corporate culture;

 

  

in the case of an acquisition, coordination of product, engineering and selling and marketing functions, including difficulties and additional expenses associated with supporting legacy services and products and hosting infrastructure of the acquired company and difficulty converting the customers of the acquired company onto our platform and contract terms, including disparities in the revenues, licensing, support or professional services model of the acquired company;

 

43


Table of Contents
  

in the case of an acquisition, retention and integration of employees from the acquired company;

 

  

unforeseen costs or liabilities;

 

  

adverse effects to our existing business relationships with partners and customers as a result of the acquisition or investment;

 

  

the possibility of adverse tax consequences;

 

  

litigation or other claims arising in connection with the acquired company or investment; and

 

  

in the case of foreign acquisitions, the need to integrate operations across different cultures and languages and to address the particular economic, currency, political and regulatory risks associated with specific countries.

In addition, a significant portion of the purchase price of companies we acquire may be allocated to acquired goodwill and other intangible assets, which must be assessed for impairment at least annually. In the future, if our acquisitions do not yield expected returns, we may be required to take charges to our operating results based on this impairment assessment process, which could adversely affect our results of operations.

Acquisitions and investments may also result in dilutive issuances of equity securities, which could adversely affect our share price, or result in issuances of securities with superior rights and preferences to our Class A common shares or the incurrence of debt with restrictive covenants that limit our future uses of capital in pursuit of business opportunities.

Also, in the context of our acquisitions, we may face contingent liabilities in connection with, among others things, (1) judicial and/or administrative proceedings of the business we acquire, including civil, regulatory, tax, labor, social security, environmental and intellectual property proceedings, and (2) financial, reputational and technical issues, including with respect to accounting practices, financial statement disclosures and internal controls, as well as other regulatory matters, all of which may not be sufficiently indemnifiable under the relevant acquisition agreement and may impact our financial reporting obligations and the preparation of our consolidated financial statements, resulting in delays to such preparation.

We may not be able to identify acquisition or investment opportunities that meet our strategic objectives, or to the extent such opportunities are identified, we may not be able to negotiate terms with respect to the acquisition or investment that are acceptable to us. At this time we have made no commitments or agreements with respect to any such transaction.

Our holding company structure makes us dependent on the operations of our subsidiaries.

We are a Cayman Islands exempted company with limited liability. Our material assets are our direct and indirect equity interests in our subsidiaries. We are, therefore, dependent upon payments, dividends and distributions from our subsidiaries for funds to pay our holding company’s operating and other expenses and to pay future cash dividends or distributions, if any, to holders of our Class A common shares. The amount of any dividends or distributions which may be paid to us from time to time will depend on many factors including, for example, such subsidiaries results of operations and financial condition; limits on dividends under applicable law; its constitutional documents; documents governing any indebtedness; applicability of tax treaties; and other factors which may be outside our control. Furthermore, exchange rate fluctuation will affect the U.S. dollar value of any distributions our subsidiaries (which are currently mostly located in Brazil, Argentina and Colombia) make with respect to our equity interests in those subsidiaries. See “—Risks Related to Latin America—Significant foreign currency exchange controls and currency devaluation in certain countries in which we operate which may have adverse effects on the economies of such countries, us and the price of our Class A common shares,” “The ongoing economic uncertainty and political instability in Brazil and the other countries in which we operate, including as a result of ongoing investigations, may harm us and the price of our Class A common shares” and “Dividends and Dividend Policy.”

 

44


Table of Contents

We may require additional financing to support our future capital requirements. Our ability to timely raise capital in the future may be limited, or may be unavailable on acceptable terms, if at all. Our failure to raise capital when needed could harm our business, operating results and financial condition. Debt or equity issued to raise additional capital may reduce the value of our Class A common shares.

We have funded our operations since inception primarily through equity financings and payments by our customers for use of our platform and related services. We cannot be certain when or if our operations will generate sufficient cash to fund our ongoing operations or the growth of our business.

We intend to continue to make investments to support our business and may require additional funds. In particular, we may seek additional funds to develop new products and enhance our platform and existing products, expand our operations, including our sales and marketing organizations and our presence outside of Brazil, improve our infrastructure or acquire complementary businesses, technologies, services, products and other assets. Accordingly, we may need to engage in equity or debt financings to secure additional funds. Additional financing may not be available on favorable terms, if at all. If adequate funds are not available on acceptable terms, we may be unable to invest in future growth opportunities, which could harm our business, operating results and financial condition. If we incur additional debt, the debt holders could have rights senior to holders of Class A common shares to make claims on our assets. If we raise additional funds through future issuances of equity or convertible debt securities, our shareholders may experience dilution, and the new equity securities could have rights senior to those of our Class A common shares. Because our decision to issue securities in the future offering will depend on numerous considerations, including factors beyond our control, we cannot predict or estimate the amount, timing or nature of any future issuances of debt or equity securities. As a result, our shareholders bear the risk of future issuances of debt or equity securities reducing the value of our Class A common shares and diluting their interest.

Payment transactions on our commerce platform subject us to regulatory requirements and other risks that could be costly and difficult to comply with or that could harm our business.

We are required by our payment processors to comply with payment card network operating rules and standards and we have agreed to reimburse our payment processors for any fees or fines they are assessed by payment card networks as a result of any rule violations by us or our customers. We may also be directly liable to the payment card networks for rule violations. Payment card networks set and interpret such operating rules and standards, which govern a variety of areas, including how customers may use their cards, the security features of cards, security standards for processing, data protection and information security and allocation of liability for certain acts or omissions, including liability in the event of a data breach. Participants are subject to audit by the payment card networks to ensure compliance with applicable rules and standards. The payment card networks could adopt new operating rules or interpret or reinterpret existing rules that we or our processors might find difficult or even impossible to follow or costly to implement.

Our subsidiary, Loja Integrada Tecnologia para Software LTDA, or Loja Integrada, utilizes our platform, which we believe currently complies with the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard, or PCI DSS, to process payments of its customers’ consumers. However, Loja Integrada does not use our platform to process payments of its customers’ subscription fees, and maintains its customers’ payment information in an encrypted database managed by Loja Integrada that is not compliant with PCI DSS. Loja Integrada is in the process of migrating its entire billing system to a PCI DSS compliant third-party payment processing service provider.

If we or any of our subsidiaries fail to migrate our billing system to a PCI DSS compliant third-party payment processing service provider, and/or otherwise fail to comply with applicable payment card network rules, including the PCI DSS, and those of each of the credit card brands, we could breach our contractual obligations to our payment processors, financial institutions, partners and customers. Such a failure may subject us to fines, penalties, damages, higher transaction fees, and civil liability and prevent us from processing or

 

45


Table of Contents

accepting payment cards or lead to a loss of payment processor partners, even if customer or end-consumer information has not been compromised. This would have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operating results.

We provide our ecommerce platform to businesses in highly regulated industries, which subjects us to a number of challenges and risks.

We provide our ecommerce platform to customers in highly regulated industries, such as pharmaceuticals, insurance, healthcare and life sciences, and we may have customers in other highly regulated industries in the future. Providing our ecommerce platform to such entities subjects us to a number of challenges and risks. Selling to such entities can be highly competitive, expensive and time consuming, often requiring significant upfront time and expense without any assurance that these efforts will generate a sale. Customers in highly regulated industries may demand shorter subscription periods or other contract terms that differ from our standard arrangements, including terms that can lead those customers to obtain broader rights in our offerings than would be standard. Such entities may have statutory, contractual, or other legal rights to terminate contracts with us or our business partners due to a default or for other reasons. Any such termination may adversely affect our reputation, business, results of operations and financial condition. Additionally, due to the heightened regulatory environment in which they operate, potential customers in these industries may encounter additional difficulties when trying to move away from legacy ecommerce platforms to an open SaaS platform like the one we provide.

Changes in tax laws or regulations or differing interpretations may be applied adversely to us or our customers. We may be subject to tax liability for past sales or become subject to tax laws or regulations that are applied adversely to us or our customers, which could harm our business.

New income, sales, use, or other tax laws, statutes, rules, regulations, or ordinances could be enacted at any time in the jurisdictions in which we operate. Any new taxes could adversely affect our domestic and international business operations and our business and financial performance. Existing tax laws, statutes, rules, regulations, or ordinances could be interpreted, changed, modified or applied adversely to us. These events could require us or customers using our ecommerce platform to pay additional tax amounts on a prospective or retroactive basis. They could require us or our customers to pay fines and/or penalties and interest for past amounts deemed to be due. If we raise our prices to offset the costs of these changes, existing and potential future customers may elect not to continue to subscribe or elect not to subscribe to our ecommerce platform in the future. Additionally, new or modified tax laws could increase our customers’ and our compliance, operating and other costs, as well as the costs of our platform. Any or all of these events could adversely impact our business and financial performance.

Moreover, our application of certain tax laws may be subject to controversial interpretation by tax authorities. In the event that tax authorities interpret tax laws in a manner that is inconsistent with our interpretations, we may be adversely affected.

With sales in various countries, we are subject to taxation in several jurisdictions around the world with increasingly complex tax laws, the application of which can be uncertain. The amount of taxes we pay in these jurisdictions could increase substantially as a result of changes in the applicable tax principles, including increased tax rates, new tax laws or revised interpretations of existing tax laws and precedents, which could have an adverse impact on our liquidity and results of operations.

In addition, we may be subject to additional obligations to collect and remit sales tax and other taxes. The jurisdictions in which we operate have differing rules and regulations governing sales, use, value-added and other taxes, and these rules and regulations are subject to varying interpretations that may change over time. In particular, the applicability of such taxes to our ecommerce platform in various jurisdictions is unclear (particularly with respect to taxes on digital services in jurisdictions where we do not have legal presence). These jurisdictions’ rules regarding tax nexus are complex and vary significantly. As a result, we could face tax

 

46


Table of Contents

assessments and audits. Our liability for these taxes and associated penalties could exceed our original estimates. Jurisdictions in which we have not historically collected or accrued sales, use, value-added, or other taxes could assert our liability for such taxes. This could result in substantial tax liabilities and related penalties for past sales. It could also discourage customers from using our platform or otherwise harm our business and operating results.

Our future effective tax rates could be subject to volatility or adversely affected by a number of factors, including:

 

  

changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities;

 

  

expected timing and amount of the release of any tax valuation allowances;

 

  

tax effects of stock-based compensation;

 

  

costs related to intercompany restructurings;

 

  

changes in tax laws, regulations or interpretations thereof; or

 

  

future earnings being lower than anticipated in countries where we have lower statutory tax rates and higher than anticipated in countries where we have higher statutory tax rates.

We currently conduct activities in multiple jurisdictions through our subsidiaries pursuant to transfer pricing arrangements and may in the future conduct operations in other jurisdictions pursuant to similar arrangements. If two or more affiliated companies are located in different countries, the tax laws or regulations of each country generally will require that transfer prices be the same as those between unrelated companies dealing at arm’s length. While we believe that we operate in compliance with applicable transfer pricing laws and intend to continue to do so, our transfer pricing procedures are not binding on applicable tax authorities. If tax authorities in any of these countries were to successfully challenge our transfer prices as not reflecting arm’s length transactions, they could require us to adjust our transfer prices and thereby reallocate our income to reflect these revised transfer prices, which could result in a higher tax liability to us.

Loss of, or adverse modifications to, certain tax benefits that we enjoy in Brazil and Argentina could have a negative impact on our operating results and profitability.

VTEX Brasil Tecnologia para Ecommerce LTDA, or VTEX Brasil, one of our Brazilian subsidiaries, benefits from research and development, or R&D, tax credits that significantly reduce its income tax liability pursuant to Brazilian Federal Law 11,196/05, or Lei do Bem. If the relevant R&D tax benefit regulation is amended to reduce the current benefit or completely terminated, the profitability of VTEX Brasil will be significantly reduced.

VTEX Brasil also benefits from a social contribution program introduced by the Brazilian government in 2011 as a stimulus to labor intensive companies pursuant to Brazilian Federal Law 12,546/11, or Contribuição Previdenciária sobre a Receita Bruta. Under this program, employers can elect to pay their share of social contribution at rates of up to 4.5% on gross revenues instead of 20.0% on payroll. This program was originally supposed to be effective for a limited time but due to strong pressure from taxpayers, it has been extended on a yearly basis since its introduction. Nevertheless, according to the current wording of the relevant law, this tax benefit shall terminate on December 31, 2021, except if extended by the issuance of a new law. To the extent this tax benefit is discontinued or adversely modified in the future, the results of operations of VTEX Brasil will be adversely affected.

VTEX Informatica S.A., our Argentine subsidiary, is exempt from an indirect tax due in the city of Buenos Aires that applies on gross revenues at approximately 4.0%. This exemption applies to technology companies in general which are located in a technological district and will be in force until 2034. Failure to comply with the relevant requirements or an early termination of this exemption will significantly adversely affect the results of operations of VTEX Informatica S.A.

 

47


Table of Contents

We are subject to anti-corruption, anti-bribery, anti-money laundering and similar laws. Non-compliance with such laws can subject us to criminal and/or civil liability and harm our business.

We are subject to the FCPA, the U.S. domestic bribery statute contained in 18 U.S.C. § 201, the U.S. Travel Act, the Brazilian Anticorruption Law, the UK Bribery Act of 2010, the UK Proceeds of Crime Act 2002, and other anti-bribery and anti-money laundering laws in the countries in which we conduct activities. Anti-corruption and anti-bribery laws have been enforced aggressively in recent years. These laws are interpreted broadly to prohibit companies and their employees and third-party intermediaries from authorizing, promising, offering, or providing, directly or indirectly, improper payments or anything else of value to recipients in the public or private sector. As we increase our international sales and business and sales to the public sector, we may engage with partners and third-party intermediaries to market our services and to obtain necessary permits, licenses and other regulatory approvals. In addition, we or our third-party intermediaries may have direct or indirect interactions with officials and employees of government agencies or state-owned or affiliated entities. We can be held liable for corrupt or other illegal activities of these third-party intermediaries, our employees, representatives, contractors, partners and agents, even if we do not explicitly authorize such activities.

While we have policies and procedures to address compliance with such laws, our employees and agents could violate our policies and applicable law, for which we may be ultimately held responsible. As we increase our international sales and business, our risks under these laws may increase.

Non-compliance with anti-corruption, anti-bribery, or anti-money laundering laws could subject us to whistleblower complaints, investigations, sanctions, settlements, prosecution, other enforcement actions, disgorgement of profits, significant fines, damages, other civil and criminal penalties or injunctions, suspension and/or debarment from contracting with certain persons, the loss of export privileges, reputational harm, adverse media coverage and other collateral consequences. If any subpoenas or investigations are launched, or governmental or other sanctions are imposed, or if we do not prevail in any possible civil or criminal litigation, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be materially harmed. Responding to any action will likely result in a materially significant diversion of management’s attention and resources and significant defense costs and other professional fees. Enforcement actions and sanctions could further harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.

In preparing our consolidated financial statements, we have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting and, if we fail to implement and maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting, we may be unable to accurately report our results of operations, meet our reporting obligations or prevent fraud.

Prior to this offering, we were a private company with limited accounting personnel and other resources to address our internal control over financial reporting and procedures. Our management has not completed an assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting and our independent registered public accounting firm has not conducted an audit of our internal control over financial reporting. However, in connection with the preparation of our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2020, material weaknesses were identified in its internal control over financial reporting. A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

The material weaknesses identified relate to our insufficient accounting resources and processes necessary to comply with the reporting and compliance requirements of IFRS and the rules and regulations of the SEC. Specifically:

 

  

Lack of an effective control environment and monitoring of controls, as a result of (1) lack of formal policies and procedures to support the internal control over financial reporting and (2) failure to design and maintain internal controls over financial reporting in response to risks of material misstatements;

 

48


Table of Contents
  

Failure to design and maintain controls over the period-end financial reporting as a result of (1) failure to design and maintain controls related to consolidation and disclosure processes and (2) failure to design and maintain controls related to review and approval journal entries;

 

  

Failure to design and maintain controls related to restrict access management procedures, regarding granting, revoking and reviewing access and segregation of duties; and

 

  

Failure to identify and control data flow and end-user computing, or EUC, basically interfaces, spreadsheets and key reports related to key controls and relevant Likely Sources of Potential Misstatement, or LSPM.

These material weaknesses did not result in a material misstatement to our consolidated financial statements.

We have adopted a remediation plan with respect to the material weaknesses identified above, which includes hiring several new experienced personnel in our financial reporting and internal controls team, as well as engaging external advisors to assist the Company in addressing the material weaknesses. These measures include also the design, implementation of new processes, policies and procedures, improvements of the internal controls to provide additional levels of review and approval, enhancements of internal documentation, implementation of new software solutions and strengthening the training program for staff related to the requirements of IFRS, the rules and regulations of the SEC and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, as well as the guidelines of COSO’s Internal Control Integrated Framework. We cannot guarantee that the measures we have taken to date and may take in the future will be sufficient to remediate the control deficiencies that led to our material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting or that they will prevent or avoid potential future material weaknesses.

Under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, our management is not required to assess or report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting in our annual report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2021. We are only required to provide such a report for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2022. In addition, until we cease to be an “emerging growth company” as such term is defined in the JOBS Act, which may not be until after five full fiscal years following the date of this offering, our independent registered public accounting firm is not required to attest to and report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Even if our management concludes that our internal control over financial reporting is effective, our independent registered public accounting firm, after conducting its own independent testing, may disagree with our assessment or may issue a report that is qualified if it is not satisfied with our internal controls or the level at which our controls are documented, designed, operated, or reviewed, or if it interprets the relevant requirements differently from us. In addition, after we become a public company, our reporting obligations may place a significant strain on our management, operational and financial resources, and systems for the foreseeable future. We may be unable to timely complete our evaluation testing and any required remediation.

During documenting and testing our internal control procedures, in order to satisfy the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, we may identify other weaknesses and deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting. In addition, if we fail to maintain the adequacy of our internal control over financial reporting, as these standards are modified, supplemented, or amended from time to time, we may not be able to conclude on an ongoing basis that we have effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. If we fail to achieve and maintain an effective internal control environment, we could suffer material misstatements in our financial statements, fail to meet our reporting obligations or fail to prevent fraud, which would likely cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information. This could, in turn, limit our access to capital markets, harm our results of operations and lead to a decline in the trading price of our Class A common shares. Additionally, ineffective internal control over financial reporting could expose us to increased risk of fraud or misuse of corporate assets and subject us to potential delisting from                , regulatory investigations and civil or criminal sanctions.

 

49


Table of Contents

Our risk management policies and procedures may not be fully effective in mitigating our risk exposure in all market environments or against all types of risks, including risk of fraud, which could expose us to losses and liability and otherwise adversely affect our business.

We operate in a rapidly changing industry, and we have experienced significant growth in recent years. Accordingly, our risk management policies and procedures may not be fully effective in identifying, monitoring and managing our risks. Some of our risk evaluation methods depend upon information provided by others and public information regarding markets, customers or other matters that are otherwise inaccessible by us. In some cases, however, that information may not be accurate, complete or up-to-date. If our policies and procedures are not fully effective or we are not always successful in capturing all risks to which we are or may be exposed, we may suffer harm to our reputation or be subject to litigation or regulatory actions that could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We offer our platform to a large number of customers, and we are responsible for vetting and monitoring these customers and determining whether the transactions we process for them are lawful and legitimate. When our products and services are used to process illegitimate transactions, and we settle those funds to customers and are unable to recover them, we suffer losses and liability. For instance, we face risk of fraud with respect to our SMB business, as our customers may use our platform to create online stores that sell goods to end-consumers without actually delivering them or may use our platform to test illegally obtained credit card data. If we are unable to prevent these illicit uses of our platform, our business, financial condition, operating result and reputation may be adversely affected. These types of illegitimate, as well as unlawful, transactions can also expose us to governmental and regulatory sanctions, including outside of Brazil (e.g., U.S. AML and economic sanctions violations). The highly automated nature of, and liquidity offered by, our payments services make us a target for illegal or improper uses, including fraudulent or illegal sales of goods or services, money laundering and terrorist financing. Identity thieves and those committing fraud using stolen or fabricated credit card or bank account numbers, or other deceptive or malicious practices, potentially can steal significant amounts of money from businesses like ours. In configuring our payments services, we face an inherent trade-off between security and customer convenience. Our risk management policies, procedures, techniques and processes may not be sufficient to identify all of the risks to which we are exposed, to enable us to mitigate the risks we have identified, or to identify additional risks to which we may become subject in the future. In addition, when we introduce new services, focus on new business types, or begin to operate in markets in which we have a limited history of fraud loss, we may be less able to forecast and reserve accurately for those losses. Furthermore, if our risk management policies and processes contain errors or are otherwise ineffective, we may suffer large financial losses, we may be subject to civil and criminal liability, and our business may be materially and adversely affected.

We may be subject to various legal proceedings which could adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

We may be involved in various legal proceedings, investigations and similar matters from time to time arising from tax, civil and labor claims, amongst others. Such matters can be time-consuming, divert management’s attention and resources and cause us to incur significant expenses. Any insurance or indemnities that we may have may not cover all claims that may be asserted against us, and any claims asserted against us, regardless of merit or eventual outcome, may harm our reputation. If we are unsuccessful in our defense in these legal proceedings, we may be forced to pay damages or fines, enter into consent decrees or change our business practices, any of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

 

50


Table of Contents

Risks Related To Latin America

Governments have a high degree of influence in Brazil and the other economies in which we operate. The effects of this influence and political and economic conditions in Brazil and Latin America could harm us and the trading price of our Class A common shares.

Governments in many of the markets in which we currently, or may in the future, operate frequently exercise significant influence over their respective economies and occasionally make significant changes in policy and regulations. Government actions to control inflation and other policies and regulations have often involved, among other measures, increases or decreases in interest rates, changes in fiscal policies, wage and price controls, foreign exchange rate controls, blocking access to bank accounts, currency devaluations, capital controls and import and export restrictions. We have no control over and cannot predict what measures or policies governments may take in the future. We and the market price of our securities may be harmed by changes in government policies, as well as general economic factors, including, without limitation:

 

  

growth or downturn of the relevant economy;

 

  

interest rates and monetary policies;

 

  

exchange rates and currency fluctuations;

 

  

inflation;

 

  

liquidity of the capital and lending markets;

 

  

import and export controls;

 

  

exchange controls and restrictions on remittances abroad and payments of dividends;

 

  

modifications to laws and regulations according to political, social and economic interests;

 

  

fiscal policy and changes in tax laws and related interpretations by tax authorities;

 

  

economic, political and social instability, including general strikes and mass demonstrations;

 

  

the regulatory framework governing our industry;

 

  

labor and social security regulations;

 

  

public health, including as a result of epidemics and pandemics, such as the COVID-19 pandemic;

 

  

changes in demographics; and

 

  

other political, diplomatic, social and economic developments in or affecting Latin America.

Uncertainty over whether Brazil and other Latin American governments will implement reforms or changes in policy or regulation affecting these or other factors in the future may affect economic performance and contribute to economic uncertainty in Latin America, such as increased tax uncertainty regarding the tax authorities’ interpretations of applicable tax laws and exemptions, which may have an adverse effect on our activities and consequently our operating results, and may also adversely affect the trading price of our Class A common shares.

In addition, recent economic and political instability in Brazil in general has led to a negative perception of the Brazilian economy and higher volatility in the Brazilian securities markets, which also may adversely affect us and our Class A common shares. See “—The ongoing economic uncertainty and political instability in Brazil and the other countries in which we operate, including as a result of ongoing investigations, may harm us and the price of our Class A common shares” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Latin American Macroeconomic Environment.”

 

51


Table of Contents

Significant foreign currency exchange controls and currency devaluation in certain countries in which we operate which may have adverse effects on the economies of such countries, us and the price of our Class A common shares.

Certain Latin American economies have experienced shortages in foreign currency reserves and their respective governments have adopted restrictions on the ability to transfer funds out of the country and convert local currencies into U.S. dollars. This may increase our costs and limit our ability to convert local currency into U.S. dollars and transfer funds out of certain countries, including for the purchase of dollar-denominated inputs, the payment of dividends or the payment of interest or principal on our outstanding debt. In the event that any of our subsidiaries are unable to transfer funds to us due to currency restrictions, we are responsible for any resulting shortfall.

Since September 2019, the current Argentine government has tightened restrictions on capital flows and imposed exchange controls and transfer restrictions, substantially limiting the ability of companies to retain foreign currency or make payments outside of Argentina. Furthermore, the Central Bank of Argentina implemented regulations requiring its prior approval for certain foreign exchange transactions otherwise authorized to be carried out under the applicable regulations, such as dividend payments or repayment of principal of inter-company loans as well as the import of goods. As a consequence of the re-imposition of exchange controls, the spread between the official exchange rate and other exchange rates resulting implicitly from certain capital market operations usually effected to obtain U.S. dollars has broadened significantly, reaching a value of approximately 75% above the official exchange rate as of April 27, 2020. The implementation of the above-mentioned measures could impact our ability to transfer funds outside of Argentina and may prevent or delay payments that our Argentine subsidiary are required to make outside Argentina. As a result, if we are prohibited from transferring funds out of Argentina, or if we become subject to similar restrictions in other countries in which we operate, our results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected. In addition, the continuing devaluation of the Argentine peso since the end of 2015 has led to higher inflation levels, has significantly reduced competitiveness, real wages and consumption and has had a negative impact on businesses whose success is dependent on domestic market demand and supplies payable in foreign currency. Further currency devaluations in any of the countries in which we operate could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

In addition, the Brazilian, Mexican and Argentinian currencies (as well as the currency of other countries in which we operate) have been historically volatile and has been devalued frequently over the past three decades

Throughout this period, for example, the Brazilian government has implemented various economic plans and used various exchange rate policies, including sudden devaluations, periodic mini-devaluations (during which the frequency of adjustments has ranged from daily to monthly), exchange controls, dual exchange rate markets and a floating exchange rate system. In 2017, the real depreciated by 1.5%, with the exchange rate reaching R$3.308 per US$1.00 on December 31, 2017. In 2018, the real depreciated an additional 17.1%, to R$3.875 per US$1.00 on December 31, 2018. The real/U.S. dollar exchange rate reported by the Central Bank was R$4.031 per US$1.00 on December 31, 2019, which reflected a 4.0% depreciation of the real against the U.S. dollar for the year. Recently, due to the COVID-19 and the economic and political instability, the real depreciated 47.2% against the U.S. dollar since December 31, 2019, and reached R$5.937 per US$1.00 as of May 14, 2020, its lowest level since the introduction of the currency in 1994. The exchange rate reported by the Central Bank was R$5.197 per US$1.00 on December 31, 2020 and R$5.067 per US$1.00 on June 4, 2021. There can be no assurance that the real will not again depreciate against the U.S. dollar or other currencies in the future.

The value of the Mexican peso has also been subject to significant fluctuations with respect to the U.S. dollar in the past and may be subject to significant fluctuations in the future. In 2017, 2018 and 2019, the Mexican peso depreciated 4.6%, 0.2% and 4.0%, respectively, against the U.S. dollar in nominal terms. Recently, the Mexican peso depreciated 5.4% against the U.S. dollar since December 31, 2019, and reached 19.88 Mexican peso per

 

52


Table of Contents

US$1.00 as of December 31, 2020 and 19.96 Mexican peso per US$1.00 on June 4, 2021. There can be no assurance that the Mexican peso will not again depreciate against the U.S. dollar or other currencies in the future.

The value of the Colombian peso has also been subject to significant fluctuations with respect to the U.S. dollar in the past and may be subject to significant fluctuations in the future. In 2017, 2018 and 2019, the Colombian peso appreciated 0.6% and depreciated 8.9% and 1.3%, respectively, against the U.S. dollar in nominal terms. Recently, the Colombian peso depreciated 3.9% against the U.S. dollar since December 31, 2019, and reached 3,416.16 Colombian peso per US$1.00 as of December 31, 2020 and 3,610.75 Colombian peso per US$1.00 on June 4, 2021. There can be no assurance that the Colombian peso will not again depreciate against the U.S. dollar or other currencies in the future.

The value of the Argentine peso has been subject to significant devaluation against the U.S. Dollar in the past. In 2017, 2018 and 2019, the Argentine peso depreciated 18.9%, 100.2% and 58.8%, respectively, against the U.S. dollar in nominal terms. Recently, the Argentine peso depreciated 40.1% against the U.S. dollar since December 31, 2019, and reached 83.9 Argentine peso per US$1.00 as of December 31, 2020 and 94.9 Argentine peso per US$1.00 on June 4, 2021. There can be no assurance that the Argentine peso will not again depreciate against the U.S. dollar or other currencies in the future.

See “—We face exposure to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, and such fluctuations could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.”

The ongoing economic uncertainty and political instability in Brazil and the other countries in which we operate, including as a result of ongoing investigations, may harm us and the price of our Class A common shares.

The Brazilian political environment influenced and continues to influence the economic performance of the country. The political crises affected and continue to affect the trust of investors and general public, causing economic slowdowns and an increase in volatility of securities issued by Brazilian companies.

The Brazilian markets have seen an increase in volatility due to the uncertainties resulting from investigations in progress conducted by the Brazilian Federal Police and by the Brazilian Federal Prosecutor’s Office. These investigations have affected the country’s economic and political environment.

In addition, the Brazilian president, Jair Bolsonaro, has been criticized in Brazil and internationally, with destabilizing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, increasing the political uncertainty and the instability in Brazil, particularly after the withdrawal of many high-level federal ministers and allegations of corruption against President Bolsonaro and his family members.

Furthermore, the federal government’s difficulty in having a majority in the National Congress could result in a deadlock, political unrest and massive demonstrations and/or strikes, which may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Uncertainties regarding the current government’s implementation of changes in monetary, fiscal and social security policies, as well as the relevant legislation, may contribute to economic instability. These uncertainties and new measures may increase the volatility of the Brazilian securities market.

The president of Brazil has the power to establish policies and perform governmental acts related to the conduction of the Brazilian economy and, consequently, affect the operations and financial performance of companies, including ourselves. We cannot predict which policies the President will adopt, much less whether such policies or changes in current policies could have an adverse effect on us or on the Brazilian economy.

Any of the above factors may create additional political uncertainty, which could harm the Brazilian economy and, consequently, our business, and could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and the trading price of our Class A common shares.

 

53


Table of Contents

Inflation and certain government measures to curb inflation may have adverse effects on the economies of the countries where we operate, our business and the price of our Class A common shares.

Most Latin American countries have historically experienced, and may continue to experience in the future, high rates of inflation, which could lead to further government intervention in the economy, including the introduction of government policies that could adversely affect our results of operations. In countries with high rates of inflation, such as Brazil, or with hyperinflation, such as Argentina, we may not be able to adjust the price of our services sufficiently to offset the effects of inflation on our cost structures. A high inflation environment would also have negative effects on the level of economic activity, employment and adversely affect our business and results of operations.

In the past, Brazil has experienced extremely high rates of inflation. Inflation and some of the measures taken by the Brazilian government in an attempt to curb inflation have had significant negative effects on the Brazilian economy generally. Inflation, policies adopted to curb inflationary pressures and uncertainties regarding possible future governmental intervention have contributed to economic uncertainty and heightened volatility in the Brazilian capital markets.

According to the National Consumer Price Index (Índice Nacional de Preços ao Consumidor Amplo), or IPCA, which is published by the Brazilian Institute for Geography and Statistics (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística), or IBGE, Brazilian inflation rates were 4.6%, 4.3%, 3.8% and 3.0% for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Brazil may experience high levels of inflation in the future and inflationary pressures may lead to the Brazilian government’s intervening in the economy and introducing policies that could harm our business and the price of our Class A common shares. One of the tools used by the Brazilian government to control inflation levels is its monetary policy, specifically in regard to the official Brazilian interest rate. An increase in the interest rate restricts the availability of credit and reduces economic growth, and vice versa. During recent years, there has been significant volatility in the official Brazilian interest rate, which ranged from 14.25%, on December 31, 2015, to 4.50% on December 31, 2019 and it was 2.75% as of March 2021. As of the date hereof, the official Brazilian interest rate is 3.5%. This rate is set by the Monetary Policy Committee of the Central Bank of Brazil (Comitê de Política Monetária), or COPOM. Any change in interest rate, in particular any volatile swings, can adversely affect our growth, indebtedness and financial condition.

In recent years, Argentina’s foreign debt rating has been downgraded on multiple occasions based on concerns regarding economic conditions and rising fears of increased inflationary pressures and their ability to serve their debt obligations. In 2020, the Argentine government restructured its foreign currency external bonds and its foreign currency bonds governed by Argentine law. However, as of the date of this prospectus, the Argentine government still faces the challenge of restructuring its debt with the International Monetary Fund, or IMF, and the Paris Club. In August 2020, Argentina initiated formal discussions with the IMF with respect to its debt incurred under a precautionary Stand-By Arrangement pursuant to which, as of October 23, 2020, the government had drawn approximately US$43.9 billion. After postponing until May 5, 2021 the US$2.1 billion payment originally due on May 5, 2020, in April 2020, Argentina sent the Paris Club members a proposal to modify the existing terms of the settlement agreement that Argentina had reached with the Paris Club members on May 29, 2014. We cannot predict the outcome of these negotiations nor the impact of the result that those renegotiations will have in Argentina’s ability to access international capital markets, in the Argentine economy or in our economic and financial situation. This uncertainty may also adversely impact Argentina’s ability to attract capital.

The increasing level of inflation in Argentina has generated pressure for further depreciation of the Argentine peso, which depreciated against the U.S. dollar by an approximately average of 41.7% in 2019 and 31.7% in 2020. If the current Argentine government is unable to address Argentina’s structural inflationary imbalances, the prevailing high rates of inflation may continue, which would have an adverse effect on Argentina’s economy.

 

54


Table of Contents

Any further downgrading of the credit rating of Brazil or of other countries in which we operate could reduce the trading price of our Class A common shares.

We may be harmed by investors’ perceptions of risks related to the sovereign debt credit rating. Rating agencies regularly evaluate the credit rating of the countries in which we operate and their respective sovereign ratings, which are based on a number of factors, including macroeconomic trends, fiscal and budgetary conditions, indebtedness metrics and the perspective of changes in any of these factors. In recent years, the sovereign credit ratings of some of the countries in which they operate have experienced negative trends, which rating deteriorating in Argentina, Brazil and Colombia.

As of March 31, 2021, the sovereign credit ratings for Argentina were CCC+, Ca and CCC, as set by Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s Investors Service and Fitch Ratings, respectively.

As of March 31, 2021, the sovereign credit ratings for Brazil were BB-, Ba2 and BB-, as set by Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s Investors Service and Fitch Ratings, respectively.

As of March 31, 2021, the sovereign credit ratings for Colombia were BBB-, Baa2 and BBB-, as set by Standard & Poor’s, Moody’s Investors Service and Fitch Ratings, respectively.

Sovereign credit rating of Argentina, Brazil and Colombia are currently rated below investment grade by the three credit rating agencies. Consequently, the prices of securities offered by companies with significant operations in Argentina, Brazil and Colombia have been negatively affected. A prolongation or worsening of the current economic and political, among other factors, could lead to ratings downgrades. Any downgrade of Argentina, Brazil and Colombia’s sovereign credit ratings, or of any other country in which we operate, could heighten investors’ perception of risk and, as a result, cause the trading price of our Class A common shares to decline.

Infrastructure and workforce deficiency in many of the countries in Latin America in which we operate may impact economic growth and have a material adverse effect on us.

Our performance currently depends on the overall health and growth of the economies in which we operate in Latin America. On an aggregate, GDP growth of Latin American countries has fluctuated over the past few years, with a contraction of 0.5% between 2016 and 2020, according to IHS Markit. Growth is limited by inadequate infrastructure, including potential energy shortages and deficient transportation, logistics and telecommunication sectors, general strikes, the lack of a qualified labor force (particularly developers), and the lack of private and public investments in these areas, which limit productivity and efficiency. Additionally, despite the business continuity and crisis management policies currently in place, travel restrictions or potential impacts on personnel due to COVID-19 pandemic may disrupt our business and the markets in which we operate. Any of these factors could lead to labor market volatility and generally impact income, purchasing power and consumption levels, which could limit growth and ultimately have a material adverse effect on us.

Developments and the perceptions of risks in other countries, including other emerging markets, the United States and Europe, may harm the economy of Brazil and the other countries in which we operate and the trading price of our Class A common shares.

The market for securities offered by companies with significant operations in Brazil and Latin America is influenced by political, economic and market conditions in the region and, to varying degrees, market conditions in other emerging markets, as well as the United States, Europe and other countries. To the extent the conditions of the global markets or economy deteriorate, the business of companies with significant operations in Brazil and Latin America may be harmed. The weakness in the global economy has been marked by, among other adverse factors, lower levels of consumer and corporate confidence, decreased business investment and consumer spending, increased unemployment, reduced income and asset values in many areas, reduction of China’s growth

 

55


Table of Contents

rate, currency volatility and limited availability of credit and access to capital, in addition to significant uncertainty results from the current COVID-19 pandemic. Developments or economic conditions in other emerging market countries have at times significantly affected the availability of credit to companies with significant operations in Latin America and resulted in considerable outflows of funds from Latin American countries, decreasing the amount of foreign investments in the region.

Crises and political instability in other emerging market countries, the United States, Europe or other countries, including increased international trade tensions and protectionist policies, could decrease investor demand for securities offered by companies with significant operations in Brazil and Latin America, such as our Class A common shares. For example, in 2019, political and social unrest in Latin American countries, including Ecuador, Chile, Bolivia and Colombia, sparked political demonstrations and, in some instances, violence. In October 2019, presidential elections were held in Bolivia, Uruguay and Argentina. Controversial outcomes in Bolivia and Uruguay led to violent protests and claims of fraudulent elections in Bolivia and a runoff election in Uruguay. Similarly, Chile experienced political unrest and social strife, including a wave of protests and riots, beginning on October 18, 2019, sparked by an increase in the subway fare of the Santiago Metro and widened to reflect anger over living costs and inequality. In June 2016, the United Kingdom held a referendum in which the majority voted for the United Kingdom to leave the European Union (so called “Brexit”), and the British government will continue to negotiate the terms of its withdrawal. The exit officially occurred on January 31, 2020. Brexit has created significant economic uncertainty in the UK and in Europe, the Middle East and Asia. In addition, the terms of Brexit, once negotiated, could potentially disrupt the markets we serve and the tax jurisdictions in which we operate and adversely change tax benefits or liabilities in these or other jurisdictions, and may cause us to lose investors, investment opportunities and employees. In addition, Brexit could lead to legal uncertainty and potentially divergent national laws and regulations as the UK determines which EU laws to replace or replicate. These developments, as well as potential crises and other forms of political instability or any other as of yet unforeseen development, may harm our business and the trading price of our Class A common shares.

Additionally, on November 7, 2020, Joseph Biden won the presidential election in the United States and assumed office as the 46th President of the United States on January 20, 2021. The U.S. president has considerable influence, which may materially and adversely affect global economy and political stability. We cannot ensure that the Biden administration will adopt policies designed to promote macroeconomic stability, fiscal discipline, as well as domestic and foreign investment, which may materially and adversely impact the trading price of securities of Brazilian issuers, including our common shares. Growing economic uncertainty and news of a potentially recessive economy in the United States may also create uncertainty in the Brazilian economy. These developments, as well as potential crises and forms of political instability arising therefrom or any other as of yet unforeseen development, may harm our business and the price of our Class A common shares.

Risks Related to the Offering and Our Class A Common Shares

There is no existing market for our common shares, and we do not know whether one will develop to provide you with adequate liquidity. If our share price fluctuates after this offering, you could lose a significant part of your investment.

Prior to this offering, there has not been a public market for our Class A common shares. If an active trading market does not develop, investors may have difficulty selling any of our Class A common shares that they buy. We cannot predict the extent to which investor interest in our company will lead to the development of an active trading market on the                , or otherwise or how liquid that market might become. The initial public offering price for the Class A common shares will be determined by negotiations between us and the underwriters and may not be indicative of prices that will prevail in the open market following this offering. Consequently, you may not be able to sell our Class A common shares at prices equal to or greater than the price paid by you in this offering. In addition to the risks described above, the market price of our Class A common shares may be influenced by many factors, some of which are beyond our control, including:

 

  

technological innovations by us or competitors;

 

56


Table of Contents
  

the failure of financial analysts to cover our Class A common shares after this offering or changes in financial estimates by analysts;

 

  

actual or anticipated variations in our operating results;

 

  

changes in financial estimates by financial analysts, or any failure by us to meet or exceed any of these estimates, or changes in the recommendations of any financial analysts that elect to follow our Class A common shares or the shares of our competitors;

 

  

announcements by us or our competitors of significant contracts or acquisitions;

 

  

future sales of our shares;

 

  

investor perceptions of us and the industries in which we operate; and

 

  

difficulties experienced by our parent company and/or by any of our associate companies in Brazil, or direct or indirect subsidiaries of our parent company.

In addition, the stock market in general has experienced substantial price and volume fluctuations that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of particular companies affected. These broad market and industry factors may materially harm the market price of our Class A common shares, regardless of our operating performance. In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of certain companies’ securities, securities class action litigation has been instituted against these companies. Any such litigation, if instituted against us, could adversely affect our financial condition or results of operations. If a market does not develop or is not maintained, the liquidity and price of our Class A common shares could be materially adversely affected.

The market price of our shares may be volatile or may decline sharply or suddenly, regardless of our operating performance, and we may not be able to meet investors’ or analysts’ expectations. You may not be able to resell your shares for the initial offer price or above it and you may lose all or part of your investment.

The initial price of the public offering for our Class A common shares will be determined by means of negotiations between the underwriters and ourselves and may vary in relation to the market price of our common shares following this offering. If you purchase our Class A common shares in this offering, you may not be able to resell them at the initial price or at a higher price than that of the public offering. We cannot guarantee that the market price after this offering will be equal to or higher than prices in private traded transactions of our common shares that occurred from time to time prior to the offering. The market price of our Class A common shares may fluctuate or decline significantly in response to a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control, including, but not limited to:

 

  

actual or forecast fluctuations in revenue or in other operating and financial results;

 

  

variations between our actual operating results and the expectations of securities analysts, investors and the financial community;

 

  

action by securities analysts who begin or continue to cover us, changes in the financial estimates of any securities analysts who follow our company or our failure to meet these estimates or investors’ expectations;

 

  

announcements by us or by our competitors of significant products or features, technical innovations, acquisitions, strategic partnerships, joint ventures or capital commitments;

 

  

negative media coverage or publicity affecting us or our parent company, whether true or not;

 

  

changes in the operating performance and stock market valuations of SaaS ecommerce companies in general, including our competitors;

 

  

fluctuations in the price and volume of the stock market in general, including as a result of trends in the economy as a whole;

 

57


Table of Contents
  

threats of lawsuits and actions brought against us or decided against us;

 

  

developments in the legislation or regulatory action, including interim or final decisions by judicial or regulatory bodies;

 

  

changes in accounting standards, policies, guidelines, interpretations or principles;

 

  

any significant changes to our board of directors or management;

 

  

any security incidents or public reports of security incidents that occur in our platform or in our sector;

 

  

statements, comments or opinions from public officials that our product offerings are or may be illegal, regardless of interim or final decisions of judicial or regulatory bodies; and

 

  

other events or factors, including those resulting from war, terrorist incidents, natural disasters or responses to such events.

In addition, price and volume fluctuations in the stock markets have affected and continue to affect the stock prices of many CPaaS companies. Often, their stock prices fluctuate in ways that are unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of companies. In some instances, shareholders have filed a class action lawsuit after periods of market volatility. If we are involved in litigation regarding securities, this could subject us to substantial costs, divert resources and management attention from our business and seriously undermine our business. In addition, the occurrence of any of the factors listed above, along with others, may cause our share price to drop significantly and there is no guarantee that our share price will recover. As a result, you may not be able to sell your Class A common shares at or above the initial price of the public offering and you may lose some or all of your investment.

Requirements associated with being a public company in the United States will require significant company resources and management attention.

This offering will have a significant transformative effect on us. We expect to incur significant additional legal, accounting, reporting and other expenses as a result of having publicly traded Class A common shares. We will also incur costs, including, but not limited to, directors’ fees, increased directors’ and officers’ insurance, investor relations, and various other costs of a public company.

We also anticipate that we will incur costs associated with corporate governance requirements, including requirements under the Exchange Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and the Consumer Protection Act, listing requirements and other rules and regulations applying to companies with publicly listed securities. We expect these rules and regulations to increase our legal and financial compliance costs and make some management and corporate governance activities more difficult, time consuming and costly, particularly after we are no longer an “emerging growth company,” increasing the demands on our systems and resources. Among other things, the SEC rules applying to us, require we file annual and current reports on our business and operating results.

These rules and regulations may make it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain the same or similar coverage. This could have an adverse impact on our ability to recruit and bring on a qualified independent board.

Most members of our management team have limited experience managing a publicly traded company, interacting with public company investors and complying with the increasingly complex laws pertaining to public companies in the United States. The additional demands associated with being a public company in the United States may disrupt regular operations of our business by diverting the attention of some of our senior management team away from revenue producing activities to management and administrative oversight, adversely affecting our ability to attract and complete business opportunities and increasing the difficulty in both

 

58


Table of Contents

retaining professionals and managing and growing our businesses. Our management team may not successfully or efficiently manage our transition to being a public company subject to significant regulatory oversight and reporting obligations under the U.S. federal securities laws and the continuous scrutiny of securities analysts and investors.

In addition, the public reporting obligations associated with being a public company in the United States may subject us to litigation as a result of increased scrutiny of our financial reporting. If we are involved in litigation regarding our public reporting obligations, this could subject us to substantial costs, divert resources and management attention from our business and seriously undermine our business.

Our controlling shareholders will, in the aggregate, own                % of our outstanding Class A common shares and    % of our outstanding Class B common shares, which represent approximately                % of the voting power of our issued capital and                % of our total equity ownership following the offering, and will control all matters requiring shareholder approval. Our controlling shareholders also have the right to nominate a majority of our board of directors and consent rights over certain corporate transactions. This concentration of ownership limits your ability to influence corporate matters.

Immediately following this offering of Class A common shares, our controlling shareholders will own                % of our Class A common shares and                % of our Class B common shares, resulting in their ownership of                % of our outstanding shares, and, consequently,                % of the combined voting power of our Class A and Class B common shares. See “Principal Shareholders.” These shareholders may control a majority of our voting power and will have the ability to control matters affecting, or submitted to a vote of, our shareholders. As a result, these shareholders may be able to elect the members of our board of directors and set our management policies and exercise overall control over us. In addition, the rights granted pursuant to our Articles of Association mean that our controlling shareholders may be able to appoint a majority of our board despite owning a non-proportionate number of shares and will be able to control any transaction involving a merger or change of control until they own less than                % of the total share capital. See “Description of Share Capital” for more information.

The interests of these shareholders may conflict with, or differ from, the interests of other shareholders. For example, our current controlling shareholders may cause us to make acquisitions that increase the amount of our indebtedness or outstanding shares, sell revenue-generating assets or inhibit change of control transactions that benefit other shareholders. Our controlling shareholders’ decisions on these matters may be contrary to your expectations or preferences, and they may take actions that could be contrary to your interests. Our controlling shareholder will be able to prevent any other shareholders, including you, from blocking these actions. For further information regarding shareholdings in our company, see “Principal Shareholders.” So long as these shareholders continue to own a substantial number of our shares, they will significantly influence all our corporate decisions and together with other shareholders, they may be able to effect or inhibit changes in the control of our company.

The disparity in voting rights among classes of our shares may have a potential adverse effect on the price of our Class A common shares, and may limit or preclude your ability to influence corporate matters.

Each Class A common share will entitle its holder to one vote per share on all matters submitted to a vote of our shareholders. Each holder of our Class B common shares will be entitled to ten (10) votes per Class B common share so long as the Class B common shares represent is at least 10% of our outstanding shares. The difference in voting rights could adversely affect the value of our Class A common shares by, for example, delaying or deferring a change of control or, if investors view or any potential future purchaser of our company views, the superior voting rights of the Class B common shares have value. Given the ten-to-one voting ratio between our Class B ordinary and Class A common shares, the holders of our Class B common shares collectively will continue to control a majority of the combined voting power of our shares and therefore be able to control all matters submitted to our shareholders so long as the Class B common shares represent at least 10%

 

59


Table of Contents

of all outstanding shares of our Class A and Class B common shares in addition to certain other rights to which our controlling shareholders are entitled (see risk factor immediately above and “Description of Share Capital”). This concentrated control will limit or preclude your ability to influence corporate matters for the foreseeable future.

Future transfers by holders of Class B common shares will generally result in those shares converting to Class A common shares, subject to limited exceptions, such as certain transfers effected to permitted transferees (including certain transfers between our controlling shareholders) or for estate planning or charitable purposes as well as transfers between our controlling shareholders. The conversion of Class B common shares to Class A common shares will have the effect, over time, of increasing the relative voting power of those holders of Class B common shares who retain their shares in the long term. For a description of our dual class structure, see “Description of Share Capital.”

Our Class A common shares may not be a suitable investment for all investors, as investment in our Class A common shares presents risks and the possibility of financial losses.

The investment in our Class A common shares is subject to risks. Investors who wish to invest in our Class A common shares are thus subject to asset losses, including loss of the entire value of their investment, as well as other risks, including those related to our Class A common shares, us, the sector in which we operate, our shareholder structure and the general macroeconomic environment in Brazil, among other risks.

Each potential investor in our Class A common shares must therefore determine the suitability of that investment in light of its own circumstances. In particular, each potential investor should:

 

  

have sufficient knowledge and experience to make a meaningful evaluation of our Class A common shares, the merits and risks of investing in our Class A common shares and the information contained in this prospectus;

 

  

have access to, and knowledge of, appropriate analytical tools to evaluate, in the context of its particular financial situation, an investment in our Class A common shares and the impact our Class A common shares will have on its overall investment portfolio;

 

  

have sufficient financial resources and liquidity to bear all of the risks of an investment in our Class A common shares;

 

  

understand thoroughly the terms of our Class A common shares and be familiar with the behavior of any relevant indices and financial markets; and

 

  

be able to evaluate (either alone or with the help of a financial adviser) possible scenarios for economic, interest rate and other factors that may affect its investment and its ability to bear the applicable risks.

Class A common shares eligible for future sale may cause the market price of our Class A common shares to drop significantly.

The market price of our Class A common shares may decline as a result of sales of a large number of our Class A common shares in the market after this offering (including Class A common shares issuable upon conversion of Class B common shares) or the perception that these sales may occur. These sales, or the possibility that these sales may occur, also might make it more difficult for us to sell equity securities in the future at a time and at a price that we deem appropriate.

Following the completion of this offering, we will have                outstanding Class A common shares and                Class B common shares (or                Class A common shares and                Class B common shares, if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional shares). Subject to the lock up

 

60


Table of Contents

agreements described below, the Class A common shares sold in this offering will be freely tradable without restriction or further registration under the U.S. Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Act, by persons other than our affiliates within the meaning of Rule 144 of the Securities Act.

Our controlling shareholders or entities controlled by them or its permitted transferees will, subject to the lock up agreements described below, be able to sell their shares in the public market from time to time without registering them, subject to certain limitations on the timing, amount and method of those sales imposed by regulations promulgated by the SEC. If our controlling shareholders, the affiliated entities controlled by them or its permitted transferees were to sell a large number of Class A common shares, the market price of our Class A common shares may decline significantly. In addition, the perception in the public markets that sales by them might occur may also cause the trading price of our Class A common shares to decline.

Our executive officers, directors and certain of our current shareholders have entered into lock-up agreements with the underwriters under which they have agreed, subject to specific exceptions, not to directly or indirectly offer, sell, contract to sell, pledge, grant any option to purchase, make any short sale or otherwise dispose of any Class A common shares, or any options or warrants to purchase any Class A common shares, or any securities convertible into, exchangeable for or that represent the right to receive Class A common shares (including Class B common shares) for a period of time up to 180 days following the date of this prospectus. We refer to such period as the lock-up period.

The terms of the lock-up agreements will expire on 40% of each shareholder’s shares of Class A common shares or securities convertible into or exchangeable for Class A common shares (including our Class B commons shares) subject to the lock-up agreement (provided, that if the shareholder is a member of our board of directors (excluding affiliated funds) or management team, then such amount is 20%) if certain conditions are met and will become available for sale prior to the opening of trading on the third full trading day following the date on which all of the below conditions are satisfied.

All remaining Class A common shares or securities convertible into or exchangeable for Class A common shares (including our Class B commons shares) subject to the lock-up agreement and not released on the early lock-up expiration date will be released prior to the opening of trading on the first full trading day following the period of 180 days after the date of this prospectus. For additional information see “Shares Eligible for Future Sale—Lock-up Agreements.”

Sales of a substantial number of our Class A common shares upon expiration of the lock-up agreements, the perception that such sales may occur, or early release of these lock-up periods, could cause our market price to fall or make it more difficult for you to sell your Class A common shares at a time and price that you deem appropriate.

We may lose our foreign private issuer status which would then require us to comply with the Exchange Act’s domestic reporting regime and cause us to incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses.

In order to maintain our current status as a foreign private issuer, either (a) more than 50% of our Class A common shares must be either directly or indirectly owned of record by nonresidents of the United States or (b)(1) a majority of our executive officers or directors may not be U.S. citizens or residents, (2) more than 50% of our assets cannot be located in the United States and (3) our business must be administered principally outside the United States. If we lose this status, we would be required to comply with the Exchange Act reporting and other requirements applicable to U.S. domestic issuers, which are more detailed and extensive than the requirements for foreign private issuers. We may also be required to make changes in our corporate governance practices in accordance with various SEC rules and regulations. The regulatory and compliance costs to us under U.S. securities laws if we are required to comply with the reporting requirements applicable to a U.S. domestic issuer may be significantly higher than the costs we will incur as a foreign private issuer.

 

61


Table of Contents

Our status as a controlled company and a foreign private issuer exempts us from certain of the corporate governance standards of the                    , limiting the protections afforded to investors.

We are a “controlled company” and a “foreign private issuer” within the meaning of the corporate governance standards. Under the rules, a controlled company is exempt from certain corporate governance requirements. In addition, a foreign private issuer may elect to comply with the practice of its home country and not to comply with certain corporate governance requirements, including the requirements that (1) a majority of the board of directors consists of independent directors, (2) a nominating and corporate governance committee be established that is composed entirely of independent directors and has a written charter addressing the committee’s purpose and responsibilities, (3) a compensation committee be established that is composed entirely of independent directors and has a written charter addressing the committee’s purpose and responsibilities, and (4) an annual performance evaluation of the nominating and corporate governance and compensation committees be undertaken. Although we have similar practices, they do not entirely conform to the requirements; therefore, we currently use these exemptions and intend to continue using them. Accordingly, you will not have the same protections provided to shareholders of companies that are subject to all corporate governance requirements.

Our Articles of Association contain anti-takeover provisions that may discourage a third party from acquiring us and adversely affect the rights of holders of our Class A common shares.

Our Articles of Association contain certain provisions that could limit the ability of others to acquire our control, including a provision that grants authority to our board of directors to establish and issue from time to time one or more series of preferred shares without action by our shareholders and to determine, with respect to any series of preferred shares, the terms and rights of that series. These provisions could have the effect of depriving our shareholders of the opportunity to sell their shares at a premium over the prevailing market price by discouraging third parties from seeking to obtain our control in a tender offer or similar transactions.

We have not adopted a dividend policy with respect to future dividends. If we do not declare any dividends in the future, you will have to rely on the price appreciation of our Class A common shares in order to achieve a return on your investment.

We have not adopted a dividend policy with respect to future dividends. The amount of any distributions will depend on many factors such as our results of operations, financial condition, cash requirements, prospects and other factors deemed relevant by our board of directors or, where applicable, our shareholders. We may retain our future earnings, if any, for the foreseeable future, to fund the operation of our business and future growth.

Accordingly, if we do not declare dividends in the future, investors will most likely have to rely on sales of their Class A common shares, which may increase or decrease in value, as the only way to realize cash from their investment. There is no guarantee that the price of our Class A common shares will ever exceed the price that you pay.

Our dual-class structure may result in a lower or more volatile market price of our Class A common shares. Our dual-class capital structure means our shares will not be included in certain stock indices. We cannot predict the impact this may have on our Class A common share price.

We cannot predict whether our dual-class structure, combined with the concentrated control of our Company (see “Principal Shareholders”), will result in a lower or more volatile market price of our Class A common shares or in adverse publicity or other adverse consequences. FTSE Russell, S&P Dow Jones and MSCI announced changes to their eligibility criteria for the inclusion of shares of public companies on certain indices, namely, to exclude companies with multiple classes of common shares. FTSE Russell requires greater than five percent of the company’s voting rights (aggregated across all of its equity securities, including, where identifiable, those not listed or trading) in the hands of public shareholders whereas S&P Dow Jones announced

 

62


Table of Contents

that companies with multiple share class structures, such as ours, will not be eligible for inclusion in the S&P 500, S&P MidCap 400 and S&P SmallCap 600, which together comprise the S&P Composite 1500. MSCI also announced its review of no-vote and multi-class structures and temporarily barred new multi-class listings from its ACWI Investable Market Index and U.S. Investable Market 2500 Index. We cannot guarantee that other stock indices will not take a similar approach to FTSE Russell, S&P Dow Jones and MSCI in the future. Pursuant to these policies, our dual-class structure makes our Class A common shares ineligible for inclusion in such indices and mutual funds, exchange-traded funds and other investment vehicles that attempt to passively track these indices will not invest in our stock. Any such exclusion from indices could result in a less active trading market for our Class A common shares and depress the valuations of publicly traded companies excluded from the indices compared to those of similar companies that are included. In addition, several shareholder advisory firms have announced their opposition to the use of multiple share class structures. As a result, our dual-class structure may cause shareholder advisory firms to publish negative commentary about our corporate governance practices or otherwise seek to cause us to change our capital structure. Any actions or publications by shareholder advisory firms critical of our corporate governance practices or capital structure could also adversely affect the value of our Class A common shares.

If securities or industry analysts do not publish reports, or publish inaccurate or unfavorable reports about our business, the price of our Class A common shares and our trading volume could decline.

The trading market for our Class A common shares will depend in part on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. Securities and industry analysts currently cover our parent company, but they do not, and may never, publish research on our company. If no or too few securities or industry analysts commence coverage of our company, the trading price for our Class A common shares would likely be negatively affected. If one or more of the analysts who cover us downgrade their target price for our Class A common shares or publish inaccurate or unfavorable reports about our business, the price of our Class A common shares would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease coverage of our company or fail to publish reports on us regularly, demand for our Class A common shares could decrease, which might cause the price of our Class A common shares and trading volume to decline.

New investors in our Class A common shares will experience immediate and substantial book value dilution after this offering.

The initial public offering price of our Class A common shares will be substantially higher than the pro forma net tangible book value per share of the outstanding Class A common shares immediately after the offering. Based on an assumed initial public offering price of US$         per class A common share (the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus) and our net tangible book value as of March 31, 2021, if you purchase our Class A common shares in this offering you will pay more for your shares than the amounts paid by our existing shareholder for its shares and you will suffer immediate dilution of approximately US$         per share in pro forma net tangible book value. As a result of this dilution, investors purchasing shares in this offering may receive significantly less than the full purchase price that they paid for the shares purchased in this offering in the event of a liquidation. For more information, see “Dilution.”

We may need to raise additional capital in the future by issuing securities, use our Class A common shares as acquisition consideration, or may enter into corporate transactions with an effect similar to a merger, which may dilute your interest in our share capital, change the nature of our business and/or affect the trading price of our Class A common shares.

We may need to raise additional funds to grow our business, including through acquisitions, and implement our growth strategy going forward by engaging in public or private issuances of common shares or securities convertible into, or exchangeable for, our common shares, which may dilute your interest in our share capital or result in a decrease in the market price of our common shares. Any fundraising through the issuance of shares or securities convertible into or exchangeable for shares, the use of our Class A common shares as acquisition

 

63


Table of Contents

consideration, or the participation in corporate transactions with an effect similar to a merger, may dilute your interest in our capital stock, change the nature of our business from the business that you originally invested in (including as a result of merger or acquisition transactions) and/or result in a decrease in the market price of our Class A common shares.

As a foreign private issuer and an “emerging growth company” (as defined in the JOBS Act), we will have different disclosure and other requirements from U.S. domestic registrants and non-emerging growth companies. We may take advantage of exemptions from certain corporate governance regulations of the                 , and this may result in less protection for the holders of our Class A common shares.

As a foreign private issuer and emerging growth company, we may be subject to different disclosure and other requirements than domestic U.S. registrants and non-emerging growth companies. For example, as a foreign private issuer, in the United States, we are not subject to the same disclosure requirements as a domestic U.S. registrant under the Exchange Act, including the requirements to prepare and issue quarterly reports on Form 10-Q or to file current reports on Form 8-K upon the occurrence of specified significant events, the proxy rules applicable to domestic U.S. registrants under Section 14 of the Exchange Act or the insider reporting and short swing profit rules applicable to domestic U.S. registrants under Section 16 of the Exchange Act. In addition, we intend to rely on exemptions from certain U.S. rules which will permit us to follow Cayman Islands legal requirements rather than certain of the requirements that are applicable to U.S. domestic registrants.

We will follow Cayman Islands laws and regulations that are applicable to Cayman Islands companies. However, Cayman Islands laws and regulations applicable to Cayman Islands companies do not contain any provisions comparable to the U.S. proxy rules, the U.S. rules relating to the filing of reports on Form 10-Q or 8-K or the U.S. rules relating to liability for insiders who profit from trades made in a short period of time, as referred to above.

Furthermore, foreign private issuers are required to file their annual report on Form 20-F within 120 days after the end of each fiscal year, while U.S. domestic issuers that are accelerated filers are required to file their annual report on Form 10-K within 75 days after the end of each fiscal year. Foreign private issuers are also exempt from Regulation Fair Disclosure, aimed at preventing issuers from making selective disclosures of material information, although we will be subject to Cayman Islands laws and regulations having substantially the same effect as Regulation Fair Disclosure. As a result of the above, even though we are required to file reports on Form 6-K disclosing the limited information which we have made or are required to make public pursuant to Cayman Islands law, or are required to distribute to shareholders generally, and that is material to us, you may not receive information of the same type or amount that is required to be disclosed to shareholders of a U.S. company.

In addition, according to of the of the equity rules listed companies are required, among other things, to have a majority of independent board members, and to have independent director oversight of executive compensation, nomination of directors and corporate governance matters. As a foreign private issuer, however, we are permitted to, and we will, follow home country practice in lieu of the above requirements. For more information, see the section “Description of Share Capital—Principal Differences between Cayman Islands and U.S. Corporate Law.”

The JOBS Act contains provisions that, among other things, relax certain reporting requirements for emerging growth companies. Under this act, as an emerging growth company, we will not be subject to the same disclosure and financial reporting requirements as non-emerging growth companies. For example, as an emerging growth company we are permitted to, and intend to, take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies. Also, we will not have to comply with future audit rules promulgated by the U.S. Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or PCAOB (unless the SEC determines otherwise), and our auditors will not need to attest to our internal controls under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We may follow these reporting exemptions

 

64


Table of Contents

until we are no longer an emerging growth company. As a result, our shareholders may not have access to certain information that they deem important. We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the completion of this offering, (b) in which we have total annual revenue of at least US$1.07 billion, or (c) in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of our Class A common shares that is held by non-affiliates exceeds US$700.0 million as of the prior June 30, and (2) the date on which we have issued more than US$1.07 billion in non-convertible debt during the prior three-year period. Accordingly, the information about us available to you will not be the same as, and may be more limited than, the information available to shareholders of a non-emerging growth company. We could be an “emerging growth company” for up to five years, although circumstances could cause us to lose that status earlier, including if the market value of our Class A common shares held by non-affiliates exceeds US$700 million as of any June 30 (the end of our second fiscal quarter) before that time, in which case we would no longer be an “emerging growth company” as of the following December 31 (our fiscal year end).

We cannot predict if investors will find our Class A common shares less attractive because we may rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our Class A common shares less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our Class A common shares and the price of our Class A common shares may be more volatile.

Our shareholders may face difficulties in protecting their interests because we are a Cayman Islands exempted company.

Our corporate affairs will be governed by our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association, or Articles of Association, the Companies Act (Revised) of the Cayman (“Companies Act”) and the common law of the Cayman Islands. We will also be subject to the federal securities laws of the United States. The rights of shareholders to take action against the directors, actions by minority shareholders and the fiduciary responsibilities of our directors to us under Cayman Islands law are to a large extent governed by the common law of the Cayman Islands. The common law of the Cayman Islands is derived in part from comparatively limited judicial precedent in the Cayman Islands as well as from English common law, the decisions of whose courts are of persuasive authority, but are not binding on a court in the Cayman Islands. The rights of our shareholders and the fiduciary responsibilities of our directors under Cayman Islands law are different from what they would be under statutes or judicial precedent in some jurisdictions in the United States. In particular, the Cayman Islands has a different body of securities laws as compared to the United States, and certain states, such as Delaware, may have more fully developed and judicially interpreted bodies of corporate law.

While Cayman Islands law allows a dissenting shareholder to express the shareholder’s view that a court sanctioned reorganization of a Cayman Islands company would not provide fair value for the shareholder’s shares, Cayman Islands statutory law does not specifically provide for shareholder appraisal rights in connection with a merger or consolidation of a company that takes place by way of a scheme of arrangement. This may make it more difficult for you to assess the value of any consideration you may receive in a merger or consolidation that takes place by way of a court approved scheme of arrangement or to require that the acquirer gives you additional consideration if you believe the consideration offered is insufficient. However, Cayman Islands statutory law provides a mechanism for a dissenting shareholder in a merger or consolidation that does not take place by way of a scheme of arrangement to apply to the Grand Court for a determination of the fair value of the dissenter’s shares if it is not possible for the company and the dissenter to agree on a fair price within the time limits prescribed.

Shareholders of Cayman Islands exempted companies have no general rights under Cayman Islands law to inspect corporate records and accounts or to obtain copies of lists of shareholders. Our directors have discretion under our Articles of Association to determine whether or not, and under what conditions, our corporate records may be inspected by our shareholders, but are not obliged to make them available to our shareholders. This may

 

65


Table of Contents

make it more difficult for you to obtain information needed to establish any facts necessary for a shareholder motion or to solicit proxies from other shareholders in connection with a proxy contest.

Subject to limited exceptions, under Cayman Islands law, a minority shareholder may not bring a derivative action against the board of directors. Our Cayman Islands counsel is not aware of any reported class actions having been brought in a Cayman Islands court.

United States civil liabilities and certain judgments obtained against us by our shareholders may not be enforceable.

We are a Cayman Islands exempted company and substantially all of our assets are located outside of the United States. In addition, the majority of our directors and officers are nationals and residents of countries other than the United States. A substantial portion of the assets of these persons is located outside of the United States. As a result, it may be difficult to effect service of process within the United States upon these persons. It may also be difficult to enforce in U.S. courts judgments obtained in U.S. courts based on the civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal securities laws against us and our officers and directors who are not resident in the United States and the substantial majority of whose assets are located outside of the United States.

We have been advised by our Cayman Islands legal counsel, Harney, Westwood & Riegels, that the courts of the Cayman Islands are unlikely (1) to recognize or enforce against us judgments of courts of the United States predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the securities laws of the United States or any State; and (2) in original actions brought in the Cayman Islands, to impose liabilities against us predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the securities laws of the United States or any State, to the extent that the liabilities imposed by those provisions are penal in nature. In those circumstances, although there is no statutory enforcement in the Cayman Islands of judgments obtained in the United States, the courts of the Cayman Islands will recognize and enforce a foreign money judgment of a foreign court of competent jurisdiction without retrial on the merits based on the principle that a judgment of a competent foreign court imposes upon the judgment debtor an obligation to pay the sum for which judgment has been given provided certain conditions are met. For a foreign judgment to be enforced in the Cayman Islands, such judgment must be final and conclusive, and must not be in respect of taxes or a fine or penalty, inconsistent with a Cayman Islands judgment in respect of the same matter, impeachable on the grounds of fraud or obtained in a manner, and or be of a kind the enforcement of which is, contrary to natural justice or the public policy of the Cayman Islands (awards of punitive or multiple damages may well be held to be contrary to public policy). A Cayman Islands Court may stay enforcement proceedings if concurrent proceedings are being brought elsewhere.

Judgments of Brazilian courts to enforce our obligations with respect to our Class A common shares may be payable only in reais. The exchange rate in force at the time may not offer non-Brazilian investors full compensation for any claim arising from our obligations.

Most of our assets are located outside of the United States and the majority of them are located in Brazil. If proceedings are brought in the courts of Brazil seeking to enforce our obligations in respect of our Class A common shares, we may not be required to discharge our obligations in a currency other than the real. Under Brazilian exchange control laws, an obligation in Brazil to pay amounts denominated in a currency other than the real may only be satisfied in Brazilian currency at the exchange rate, as determined by the Central Bank, in effect on the date (1) of actual payment, (2) on which such judgment is rendered, or (3) on which collection or enforcement proceedings are started against us, and such amounts are then adjusted to reflect exchange rate variations through the effective payment date. The then prevailing exchange rate may not afford non-Brazilian investors with full compensation for any claim arising out of or related to our obligations under the Class A common shares.

 

66


Table of Contents

We are a Cayman Islands exempted company with limited liability. The rights of our shareholders, including with respect to fiduciary duties and corporate opportunities, may be different from the rights of shareholders governed by the laws of U.S. jurisdictions.

We are a Cayman Islands exempted company with limited liability. Our corporate affairs are governed by our Articles of Association, the Companies Act and by the laws of the Cayman Islands. The rights of shareholders and the responsibilities of members of our board of directors may be different from the rights of shareholders and responsibilities of directors in companies governed by the laws of U.S. jurisdictions. In particular, as a matter of Cayman Islands law, directors and officers owe the following fiduciary duties: (1) duty to act in good faith in what the director or officer believes to be in the best interests of the company as a whole; (2) duty to exercise powers for the purposes for which those powers were conferred and not for a collateral purpose; (3) duty not to fetter the exercise of future discretion; (4) duty to exercise powers fairly as between different sections of shareholders; (5) duty to exercise independent judgment; and (6) duty not to put themselves in a position in which there is a conflict between their duty to the company and their personal interests. With respect to the duty of directors to avoid conflicts of interest, our Articles of Association vary from the applicable provision of Cayman Islands law mentioned above by providing that a director must disclose the nature and extent of his or her interest in any contract or arrangement, and following such disclosure and subject to any separate requirement under applicable law or the listing rules of the                     , and unless disqualified by the chairman of the relevant meeting, such director may vote in respect of any transaction or arrangement in which he or she is interested and may be counted in the quorum at the meeting. In addition to the above, under Cayman Islands law, directors also owe a duty of care which is not fiduciary in nature. This duty has been defined as a requirement to act as a reasonably diligent person having both the general knowledge, skill and experience that may reasonably be expected of a person carrying out the same functions as are carried out by that director in relation to the company and the general knowledge skill and experience which that director has. As set out above, directors have a duty not to put themselves in a position of conflict and this includes a duty not to engage in self-dealing, or to otherwise benefit as a result of their position. However, in some instances what would otherwise be a breach of this duty can be forgiven and/or authorized in advance by the shareholders; provided, that there is full disclosure by the directors. This can be done by way of permission granted in the memorandum and articles of association or alternatively by shareholder approval at general meetings. Accordingly, as a result of multiple business affiliations, our officers and directors may have similar legal obligations relating to presenting business opportunities meeting the above-listed criteria to multiple entities. In addition, conflicts of interest may arise when our board evaluates a particular business opportunity with respect to the above-listed criteria We cannot guarantee that any of the above mentioned conflicts will be resolved in our favor. Furthermore, each of our officers and directors may have pre-existing fiduciary obligations to other businesses of which they are officers or directors. Conversely, under Delaware corporate law, a director has a fiduciary duty to the corporation and its shareholders (made up of two components) and the director’s duties prohibit self-dealing by a director and mandate that the best interest of the corporation and its shareholders take precedence over any interest possessed by a director, officer or controlling shareholder and not shared by the shareholders generally. For more information, see “Description of Share Capital—Principal Differences between Cayman Islands and U.S. Corporate Law.”

The Cayman Islands Economic Substance Acts may affect our operations.

The Cayman Islands has recently enacted the International Tax Co-operation (Economic Substance) Act (As Revised), or the Cayman Economic Substance Act. We are required to comply with the Cayman Economic Substance Act. As we are a Cayman Islands company, compliance obligations include filing annual notifications for us, which need to state whether we are carrying out any relevant activities and, if so, whether we have satisfied economic substance tests to the extent required under the Cayman Economic Substance Act. As it is a relatively new regime, it is anticipated that the Cayman Economic Substance Act will evolve and be subject to further clarification and amendments. We may need to allocate additional resources to keep updated with these developments, and may have to make changes to our operations in order to comply with all requirements under the Cayman Economic Substance Act. Failure to satisfy these requirements may subject us to penalties under the Cayman Economic Substance Act.

 

67


Table of Contents

The Cayman Islands Tax Information Authority shall impose a penalty of CI$10,000 (or US$12,500) on a relevant entity for failing to satisfy the economic substance test or CI$100,000 (or US$125,000) if it is not satisfied in the subsequent financial year after the initial notice of failure. Following failure after two consecutive years the Grand Court of the Cayman Islands may make an order requiring the relevant entity to take specified action to satisfy the economic substance test or ordering it that it is defunct or be struck off.

We have broad discretion in the use of the net proceeds from this offering and may not use them effectively.

Our management will have broad discretion in the application of the net proceeds from this offering and could spend the proceeds in ways that do not improve our results of operations or enhance the value of our Class A common shares. The failure by our management to apply these funds effectively could result in financial losses that could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Pending their use, we may invest the net proceeds from this offering in a manner that does not produce income or that loses value. For more information, see the section “Use of Proceeds.”

 

68


Table of Contents

PRESENTATION OF FINANCIAL AND OTHER INFORMATION

Financial Statements Presentation

VTEX, the company whose Class A common shares are being offered in this prospectus, was incorporated on July 25, 2018, as a Cayman Islands exempted company with limited liability duly registered with the Cayman Islands Registrar of Companies.

We maintain our books and records in U.S. dollars, the functional currency of our operations and the presentation currency for our financial statements. Unless otherwise noted, the financial information presented herein has been derived from (1) our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements as of March 31, 2021 and 2020, together with the accompanying notes thereto, prepared in accordance with IAS 34 – Interim Financial Reporting as issued by IASB and included elsewhere in this prospectus, or our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements, and (2) audited consolidated financial statements for and as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, together with the accompanying notes thereto, prepared in accordance with IFRS as issued by the IASB and included elsewhere in this prospectus, or our consolidated financial statements

We have made rounding adjustments to some of the figures included in this prospectus for ease of presentation. Accordingly, certain of the numerical figures shown as totals in the tables may not be the exact sum total of the figures that precede them.

Special Note Regarding Non-GAAP Financial Measures

For convenience of investors, this prospectus presents certain non-GAAP financial measures, which are not recognized under IFRS, specifically Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operations, Free Cash Flow and FX Neutral measures. A non-GAAP financial measure is generally defined as one that purports to measure financial performance but excludes or includes amounts that would not be so adjusted in the most comparable IFRS measure. Non-GAAP financial measures do not have standardized meanings and may not be directly comparable to similarly-titled measures adopted by other companies. These non-GAAP financial measures are used by our management for decision-making purposes and to assess our financial and operating performance, generate future operating plans and make strategic decisions regarding the allocation of capital.

We understand that Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operations, Free Cash Flow and FX Neutral measures have limitations as analytical tools, and you should not consider them in isolation or as substitutes for analysis of our results of operations presented in accordance with IFRS. Additionally, our calculations of Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operations, Free Cash Flow and FX Neutral measures may be different from the calculation used by other companies, including our competitors, and therefore, our measures may not be comparable to those of other companies.

Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operations

We calculate Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operations as our Income (loss) from operation, adjusted for the impact of share-based compensation expense and amortization of intangibles expense related to acquisitions. We believe that it is useful to investors to exclude those charges from Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operations because (1) the amount of such expenses in any specific period may not directly correlate to the underlying performance of our business operations and (2) such expenses can vary significantly between periods as a result of the timing of new share-based awards and secondary transactions.

Further, our definition of Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operation may differ from the definitions used by other companies and therefore comparability may be limited.

For a reconciliation of Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operations to the most directly comparable financial measure calculated and presented in accordance with IFRS, see “Summary Financial and Other Information.��

 

69


Table of Contents

Free Cash Flow

We calculate Free Cash Flow as our net cash used in operating activities minus acquisition of property and equipment. In the future, we will adjust Free Cash Flow also by the capitalization of internally developed software; however, currently we do not capitalize internally developed software. Free Cash Flow is a measure used by management to understand and evaluate our liquidity and to generate future operating plans. The reduction of capital expenditures facilitates comparisons of our liquidity on a period-to-period basis and excludes items that we do not consider to be indicative of our liquidity. We believe that Free Cash Flow is a measure of liquidity that provides useful information to investors and others in understanding and evaluating the strength of our liquidity and future ability to generate cash that can be used for strategic opportunities or investing in our business in the same manner as our management and board of directors. Further, our definition of Free Cash Flow may differ from the definitions used by other companies and therefore comparability may be limited. You should consider Free Cash Flow alongside our other IFRS-based financial performance measures, such as net cash used in operating activities, and our other IFRS financial results.

For a reconciliation of Free Cash Flow to the most directly comparable financial measure calculated and presented in accordance with IFRS, see “Summary Financial and Other Information.”

FX Neutral measures

We provide certain metrics on an FX Neutral basis to enhance overall understanding of our current financial performance and its prospects for the future, and we understand that this measure provides useful information to both our management and investors. In particular, we believe that those FX Neutral measures provide useful information to both our management and investors by excluding the foreign currency exchange rate impact that may not be indicative of our core operating results and business outlook.

The FX Neutral measures were calculated by using the average monthly exchange rates for each month during 2019 and 2020, adjusted by inflation in countries with hyper-inflation, and applying them to the corresponding months in 2020 and 2021, as applicable, so as to calculate what our results would have been had exchange rates remained stable from one year to the next.

The following table sets forth selected income statement line items on an FX Neutral basis for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, and years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

   For the three months ended March 31, 
   As reported  On an FX Neutral basis(1) 
   2021  2020  % variation  2021  2020  % variation 
   (in US$ millions except as otherwise indicated) 

Subscription revenue

   24.7   15.4   59.7  28.1   15.4   81.9

Services revenue

   1.3   1.2   5.5  1.4   1.2   13.6
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total revenue

   25.9   16.6   55.8%   29.5   16.6   77.0% 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Subscription cost

   (8.7  (5.1  72.2  (9.1  (5.1  80.3

Services cost

   (2.1  (1.7  25.6  (2.2  (1.7  33.5
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total cost

   (10.8  (6.7  60.6  (11.4  (6.7  68.6
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Gross profit

   15.1   9.9   52.5  18.1   9.9   82.7
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Operating expenses

   (27.1  (13.0  109.3  (30.1  (13.0  132.6
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Income (loss) from operation

   (12.0)   (3.1)   293.8%   (12.0)   (3.1)   294.3% 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

70


Table of Contents
   For the year ended December 31, 
   As reported  On an FX Neutral basis(1) 
   2020  2019  % variation  2020  2019  % variation 
   (in US$ millions except as otherwise indicated) 

Subscription revenue

   93.4   58.3   60.2  113.4   58.3   94.6

Services revenue

   5.3   3.0   74.8  6.4   3.0   110.2
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total revenue

   98.7   61.3   60.9  119.8   61.3   95.3
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Subscription cost

   (27.8  (15.8  75.5  (29.7  (15.8  87.2
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Services cost

   (7.1  (4.4  60.1  (7.9  (4.4  78.5
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total cost

   (34.9  (20.2  72.1  (37.5  (20.2  85.3
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Gross profit

   63.8   41.1   55.4  82.3   41.1   100.3
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Operating expenses

   (57.3  (42.9  33.6  (67.7  (42.9  57.9
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Income (loss) from operation

   6.5   (1.8  (460.4)%   14.6   (1.8  (904.6)% 
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

(1)

We calculate FX Neutral measures by using the average monthly exchange rates for each month during 2020 or 2019, as the case may be, and applying them to the corresponding months in 2021 or 2020, respectively, so as to calculate what our results would have been had exchange rates remained stable from one financial year to the next.

Certain Definitions

The following is a glossary of certain industry and other define terms used in this prospectus:

Active online stores means the number of unique domains generating gross merchandise value.

APIs means application programming interfaces, a set of clearly defined methods of communication between different software components, which, together with our SDKs and other tools, enables third parties to create applications that can easily connect and integrate with our technology platform;

ARR means annual recurring revenue, calculated as subscription revenue in the most recent quarter multiplied by four;

Black Friday means the day after Thanksgiving, regarded as the first day of the traditional Christmas shopping season on which retailers offer special reduced prices;

Black November means the commercial sale season introduced by Brazilian ecommerce websites in 2010, that is the long equivalent of Black Friday;

BNDES means the Brazilian Economic and Social Development Bank (Banco Nacional de Desenvolvimento Econômico e Social);

Brick-and-mortar means a business that operates physically in a building or other structure;

Business to business (“B2B”) means a form of transaction where businesses sell products to other businesses;

Business to consumer (“B2C”) means a form of transaction where businesses sell products to end consumers or individuals;

CCPA means the California Consumer Privacy Act ;

 

71


Table of Contents

CDI means the Brazilian interbank deposit (certificado de deposito interbancário) rate, which is an average of interbank overnight rates in Brazil;

CPG means consumer packaged goods that require routine replacement or replenishment, such as food, beverages, clothes, tobacco, makeup and household products;

Brazilian Central Bank means the Brazilian Central Bank (Banco Central do Brasil);

Digitally native brands (“DNBs”) means businesses that have only existed in the digital world primarily or entirely selling its products through an online channel;

Cohort means a group of customers that received the first invoice of our VTEX platform in the prior year;

Collaborative Commerce means an innovative approach that embraces digital collaboration with suppliers and partners enabling our customers to integrate their own proprietary software with our software and our deep network of solutions from best-of-breed partners and digital marketplaces;

Composable Commerce means our low-code development platform with a customizable and flexible back-end, decoupled storefront and pre-built integrations;

Consumers means our customers’ clients;

Content Management System (“CMS”) means a software that enables businesses to create, edit and publish digital website content without writing any code.

CPG means consumer packaged goods that are items used daily by average consumers that require routine replacement or replenishment;

Customer acquisition costs (“CAC”) means the total sales and marketing expenses incurred during the four quarters preceding the quarter in which the calculation is made;

Customer relationship management (“CRM”) means the technology for managing a company’s relationships and interactions with existing and potential new customers;

Customers means companies ranging from small and medium-sized businesses to larger enterprises that pay to use VTEX’s platform;

DevOps means the combination of practices and tools designed to increase a company’s ability to deliver applications and services faster than traditional software development processes;

FCPA means the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, a law enacted in 1977 for the purposes of making it unlawful for certain classes of persons and entities to make payments to foreign government officials to assist in obtaining or retaining business;

FX neutral means a way of using the average monthly exchange rates for each month during the previous year, adjusted by inflation in countries with hyper-inflation, and applying them to the corresponding months of the current year, so as to calculate what results would have been had exchange rates remained stable from one year to the next;

GDPR means General Data Protection Regulation, a law enacted in 2016 on data protection and privacy in the European Union and the European Economic Area;

 

72


Table of Contents

Graphical user interface (“GUI”) means a computer program that enables a person to communicate with a computer through the use of symbols, visual metaphors, used by most modern operating systems.

Gross merchandise value (“GMV”) means the total value of the orders processed through our platform, including value-added taxes and shipping;

Headless means the decoupling of the front-end customer experiences from back-end commerce services giving companies the flexibility and freedom to build commerce experiences that are aligned with their business and end-consumer;

Hyperinflation means the rapid increase in monetary inflation;

Internet of Things (“IoT”) means the network of interrelated, internet-connected objects that are able to collect and transfer data over a wireless network without human intervention;

Lei do Bem means Federal Law No. 11,196/05 regulating, among other things, the tax incentives for legal entities covering research and development projects in Brazil;

Low-code development means a platform providing a development environment used to create application software through graphical user interfaces and configuration instead of traditional computer programming;

LTV means lifetime value, calculated as gross profit from new sales during the four quarters of any given period divided by the subscription churn rate of the last 12 months;

Marketplaces means online businesses that connect sellers with buyers and manage all transactions;

Multi-tenant architecture means software architecture in which a single instance of a software application serves multiple groups of customers that share a single codebase;

NRR means net revenue retention, calculated on a monthly basis by dividing the subscription revenue from our platform during the current period by the subscription revenue in the same period of the previous year for the same base of online stores that were active in the same period of the previous year;

Order management system (“OMS”) means the VTEX platform feature designed to provide a 360-degree view of inventory and orders, allowing a customer to orchestrate sellers, manage inventory and develop tailor-made shipping strategies across a series of fulfilment scenarios;

Partners means the VTEX’s ecosystem of technology businesses that embed our solutions into their own offerings allowing our customers to conduct commerce more conveniently and include providers for shipping, marketplaces, point-of-sale, omnichannel, marketing automation, search, merchandising, system integrators, agencies, payment solutions, anti-fraud and lending;

Payment solutions means businesses that offer technology needed to accept an end-consumer transaction on a customer’s website;

PCI acquirers means payment card industry acquirer, typically a financial institution, that processes payment card transactions for merchants and is defined by a payment brand as an acquirer;

SKUs mean stock keeping unit, a distinct type of item for sale such as a product or service;

Small-to-medium-sized businesses (“SMBs”) means business that utilize our Loja Integrada on-demand commerce platform;

 

73


Table of Contents

SSS means same-store-sales calculated on a yearly basis by dividing the GMV of active online stores in the current period by the GMV of the same active online same stores in the prior period;

Subscription churn rate means the annual turnover of our customers;

Suppliers means businesses supplying materials to our customers.

System integrators (“SIs”) means business partners focused on optimizing back-end system performance;

Take rate means the percentage of the total value of the orders processed through our platform, including value-added taxes and shipping;

Two-factor authentication means a security process in which users provide two wo different authentication factors to verify themselves;

VTEX IO means our low-code server-less environment for our customers’ technology teams to extend our core components and build new components in an integrated environment with best-in-class scalability and security; and

VTEX Lab means our university partnership program that provides students with an immersive experience of continued learning.

 

74


Table of Contents

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus contains forward-looking statements subject to risks and uncertainties, generally set forth under the sections “Summary,” “Risk Factors,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Business.” Many of the forward-looking statements in this prospectus can be identified based on forward-looking words such as “aim,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “can,” “continue,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “likely,” “may,” “might,” “plan,” “potential,” “project,” “seek,” “should,” “target,” “would,” or the opposite of these terms or other similar expressions.

Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date on which they are made. There is no assurance that the expected events, trends or results will actually occur and we, and the underwriters undertake no obligation to update publicly or revise any forward-looking statements and estimates whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements regarding our current belief or expectations as of the date of this prospectus and estimates on future events and trends that affect or may affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity, prospects and the trading price of our Class A common shares. Although such forward-looking statements are based on assumptions and information currently available to us, which we believe to be reasonable, none of the forward-looking statements, whether expressed or implied, are indicative of or guarantee future results. Given such limitations, you should not make any investment decision on the basis of the forward-looking statements contained herein.

Our forward-looking statements may be affected by the following factors, among others:

 

  

our ability to attract new customers, retain existing customers and increase sales to both new or existing customers in a cost-effective manner;

 

  

the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on general economic and business conditions in Brazil, Latin America and the rest of the world and any restrictive measures imposed by governmental authorities in response to the outbreak;

 

  

our ability to innovate and respond to technological advances in a manner that responds to our customers’ evolving needs or preferences;

 

  

our ability to effectively develop and expand our marketing and sales capabilities and our ability to increase our customer base and achieve broader market acceptance of our platform;

 

  

our failure to enhance and maintain our brand recognition or maintain a positive public image;

 

  

the inherent risks related to the SaaS market, such as the interruption, failure or breach of our third-party service providers’ computer or information technology systems, resulting in the degradation of the quality or a decline in the use of the products and services we offer;

 

  

our ability to successfully acquire new businesses as clients, acquire clients in new industry verticals and appropriately manage our international expansion;

 

  

our ability to meet our contractual commitments with our customers and to offer high quality customer support;

 

  

general economic, political and business conditions in Latin America and their impact on our business, notably with respect to inflation and interest rates and their impact on the discretionary spending of businesses;

 

  

the impact of substantial and increasing competition in our market, innovation by our competitors, and our ability to compete effectively;

 

75


Table of Contents
  

our compliance with applicable regulatory and legislative developments and regulations and legislation that currently apply or become applicable to our business as we continue to grow;

 

  

our ability to attract and retain qualified personnel while controlling our personnel related expenses;

 

  

our ability to obtain, maintain, protect, enforce and enhance our brand and intellectual property and proprietary rights;

 

  

our ability to maintain our classification as an emerging growth company under the JOBS Act;

 

  

health crises, including due to pandemics such as the COVID-19 pandemic and government measures taken in response thereto;

 

  

other factors that may affect our financial condition, liquidity and results of operations; and

 

  

other risk factors discussed under “Risk Factors.”

We caution you that the foregoing list of significant factors may not contain all of the material factors that are important to you. In addition, in light of these risks and uncertainties, the matters referred to in the forward-looking statements contained in this prospectus may not in fact occur. Many of these risks are beyond our ability to control or predict. All forward-looking statements attributable to us or persons acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements contained throughout this prospectus.

 

76


Table of Contents

MARKET AND INDUSTRY DATA

This prospectus contains data related to economic conditions in the market in which we operate. The information contained in this prospectus concerning economic conditions is based on publicly available information from third-party sources that we believe to be reliable. Market data and certain industry forecast data used in this prospectus were derived from our management’s knowledge and our experience in the industry, internal reports and studies, where appropriate, as well as estimates, market research, publicly available information and industry publications. We obtained the information included in this prospectus relating to the Brazilian payment solutions markets, and more broadly, the industry in which we operate, as well as the estimates concerning market shares, through internal research, public information and publications on the industry prepared by official public sources, such as the Central Bank, Getúlio Vargas Foundation (Fundação Getúlio Vargas), or FGV, Brazilian Institute for Geography and Statistics (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística), or IBGE, International Data Corporation, or IDC MarketScape, Gartner, Inc., or Gartner, Insider Intelligence, Digital Commerce 360, IHS Markit, Capgemini and Economática, amongst others.

The sources of certain statistical data, estimates, and forecasts contained in this prospectus are the following independent industry publications or reports:

 

  

IDC MarketScape: Worldwide B2C Digital Commerce Platforms 2020 Vendor Assessment, doc #US45741420, September 2020;

 

  

Digital Commerce 360: Top 500 Report, Data and analysis on North America’s largest and fastest-growing e-retailers, April 2020; and

 

  

Capgemini Research Institute (2019): The last-mile delivery challenge: Giving retail and consumer product customers a superior delivery experience without impacting profitability. Capgemini Group.

The Gartner content described herein, or the Gartner Content, represents research opinion or viewpoints published, as part of a syndicated subscription service, by, and are not representations of fact. Gartner Content speaks as of its original publication date (and not as of the date of this prospectus) and the opinions expressed in the Gartner Content are subject to change without notice. Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings or other designation. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s Research & Advisory organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

The IHS Markit reports, data and information referenced herein, or the IHS Markit Materials, are the copyrighted property of IHS Markit Ltd. and its subsidiaries, or IHS Markit, and represent data, research, opinions or viewpoints published by IHS Markit, and are not representations of fact. The IHS Markit Materials speak as of the original publication date thereof and not as of the date of this document. The information and opinions expressed in the IHS Markit Materials are subject to change without notice and IHS Markit has no duty or responsibility to update the HIS Markit Materials. Moreover, while the IHS Markit Materials reproduced herein are from sources considered reliable, the accuracy and completeness thereof are not warranted, nor are the opinions and analyses which are based upon it. IHS Markit are trademarks of IHS Markit. Other trademarks appearing in the IHS Markit Materials are the property of HIS Markit or their respective owners.

Industry publications, governmental publications and other market sources, including those referred to above, generally state that the information they include has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable, but that the accuracy and completeness of such information is not guaranteed. We have no reason to believe any of this information or these reports are inaccurate in any material respect and believe and act as if they are reliable. Neither we, the underwriters, nor their respective agents have independently verified it and they are subject to change based on various factors, including those discussed in the section entitled “Risk Factors.” Estimates of market and industry data are based on statistical models, key assumptions and limited data sampling, and actual market and industry data may differ significantly from estimated industry data. In addition, the data that we compile internally and our estimates have not been verified by an independent source. Information derived from management’s knowledge and our experience is presented on a reasonable, good faith basis. Except as disclosed in this prospectus, none of the publications, reports or other published industry sources referred to in this prospectus were commissioned by us or prepared at our request. Except as disclosed in this prospectus, we have not sought or obtained the consent of any of these sources to include such market data in this prospectus.

 

77


Table of Contents

USE OF PROCEEDS

We estimate that the net proceeds from our issuance and sale of                Class A common shares in this offering will be approximately US$                (or US$                million if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional Class A common shares), assuming an initial public offering price of US$                per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, and after deducting the estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

Each US$1.00 increase (decrease) in the assumed initial public offering price of US$                per Class A common share would increase (decrease) the net proceeds to us from this offering by approximately US$                , assuming the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same and after deducting the estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. Each increase (decrease) of 1.0 million in the number of Class A common shares we are offering would increase (decrease) the net proceeds to us from this offering, after deducting the estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us, by approximately US$                million, assuming the assumed initial public offering price stays the same.

We believe that the offering will provide additional capital to support the development and growth of our business. The principal purposes of this offering are to increase our capitalization, provide us with greater financial flexibility, create a public market for our Class A common shares and facilitate our future access to the capital markets. We intend to use the net proceeds from this offering for general corporate purposes, which may include investments for the development of software, products or technologies, investments in the international expansion of our operations, funding future opportunistic mergers, acquisitions or investments in complementary businesses, and maintaining liquidity. We will have broad discretion in allocating the net proceeds from this offering.

Although we currently anticipate that we will use the net proceeds from this offering as described above, there may be circumstances where a reallocation of funds is necessary. The amounts and timing of our actual expenditures will depend upon numerous factors, including the factors described under “Risk Factors” in this prospectus. Accordingly, our management will have flexibility in applying the net proceeds from this offering. An investor will not have the opportunity to evaluate the economic, financial or other information on which we base our decisions on how to use the net proceeds.

Pending the determination of the net proceeds from this offering, we intend to invest them in a variety of capital preservation investments, including short-term, interest-bearing instruments and government securities. No assurance can be given that we will invest the net proceeds from this offering in a manner that produces income or that does not result in a loss in value.

 

78


Table of Contents

DIVIDENDS AND DIVIDEND POLICY

The amount of any dividends will depend on many factors, such as our results of operations, financial condition, cash requirements, prospects and other factors deemed relevant by our board of directors. We currently intend to retain all available funds and future earnings, if any, to fund the development and expansion of our business and we do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Any future determination to pay dividends will be made at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on various factors, including applicable laws, our results of operations, financial condition, cash requirements, future prospects and any other factors deemed relevant by our board of directors.

As a holding company, our ability to pay dividends depends on our receipt of cash dividends from our operating subsidiaries, which may further restrict our ability to pay dividends as a result of their respective jurisdictions of incorporation (including imposing legal restrictions on dividend distribution by subsidiaries), agreements of our subsidiaries or covenants under future indebtedness that we or they may incur. Our ability to pay dividends is therefore directly related to positive and distributable net results from our subsidiaries. See “Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Our Business and Industry—Our holding company structure makes us dependent on the operations of our subsidiaries.”

Certain Cayman Islands Legal Requirements Related to Dividends

Under the Companies Act and our Articles of Association, a Cayman Islands company may pay a dividend out of either its profit or share premium account, but a dividend may not be paid if this would result in the company being unable to pay its debts as they fall due in the ordinary course of business. According to our Articles of Association, dividends can be declared and paid out of funds lawfully available to us, which include the share premium account. Dividends, if any, would be paid in proportion to the number of common shares a shareholder holds. For further information, see “Certain Tax Considerations—Cayman Islands Tax Considerations.”

 

79


Table of Contents

CAPITALIZATION

The table below sets forth our current and non-current loans and financing, our total shareholders’ equity and total capitalization (defined as the sum of current and non-current loans and borrowing plus total equity) as of March 31, 2021, derived from our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements as follows:

 

  

on an as historical reported basis; and

 

  

as adjusted, to reflect the issuance and sale of                Class A common shares by us in this offering at the initial public offering price of US$        ��       per Class A common share (the midpoint of the estimated offering price per Class A common share set forth on the cover page of this prospectus), assuming no exercise of the option by the underwriters to purchase additional Class A common shares, and after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. Our total capitalization may be different in the event that we do not allocate the net proceeds of this offering in accordance with the assumption set forth under “Use of Proceeds.”

You should read this table in conjunction with “Use of Proceeds,” “Selected Financial and Other Information,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” our consolidated financial included elsewhere in this prospectus. Our capitalization following the closing of the offering will be adjusted based on the actual initial offering price and other terms of the offering determined at pricing.

 

   As of March 31, 2021 
   As Reported   As Adjusted 
   (in US$ millions)   (in millions of US$ millions) 

Loans and financing, current

   1.5             

Loans and financing, non-current

   3.4   

Total shareholders’ equity(1)

   65.8   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total capitalization(2)

   70.6             
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1)

It includes non-controlling interest and represents the total equity available to us.

(2)

It represents the sum of total shareholders’ equity and loans and financing, non-current.

An increase or reduction of US$1.00 in the assumed initial public offering price of US$    per Class A common shares, which is the midpoint of the price range indicated on the cover page of this prospectus, would, after the completion of this offering, increase (decrease) (1) the value of our total shareholders’ equity by US$    million, and (2) our total capitalization by US$    million, assuming that the number of Class A common shares offered herein, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same and assuming no exercise of the option to purchase additional Class A common shares, and after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

An increase (decrease) of 1.0 million shares in the number of Class A common shares sold in this offering by us would increase (decrease) (1) the value of our total shareholders’ equity by US$    million, and (2) our total capitalization by US$    million, assuming an initial public offering price of US$    per Class A common shares, the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, and after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and the estimated offering expenses payable by us.

Except as set forth above, there has been no material change to our capitalization since March 31, 2021.

To the extent that we grant options to our employees in the future and those options are exercised or other issuances of common shares are made, there will be further dilution to new investors.

 

80


Table of Contents

DILUTION

As of March 31, 2021, VTEX had a net tangible book value of US$29.1 million, corresponding to a net tangible book value of US$0.17 per share. Net tangible book value per common shares represents the amount of total assets (excluding goodwill and other intangible assets) less total liabilities, divided by 172,738,180, the total number of VTEX shares outstanding as of March 31, 2021.

After giving effect to the sale by us of the                Class A common shares offered by us in the offering at an assumed offering price of US$                per Class A common share (the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus), after deducting the estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us and assuming no exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional Class A common shares, our pro forma net tangible book value estimated at March 31, 2021 (based on the same exchange rate above) would have been US$                , representing US$                per common share. This represents an immediate increase in net tangible book value of US$                , or    % per common share to current shareholders and an immediate dilution in net tangible book value of US$                , or    % per common share to new investors purchasing Class A common shares in this offering. Dilution for this purpose represents the difference between the price per common shares paid by these investors and net tangible book value per common share immediately after the completion of the offering.

Assuming the underwriters’ option to purchase additional Class A common shares is exercised in full, our pro forma net tangible book value as of March 31, 2021 would have been US$                per common share. This represents an immediate increase in pro forma net tangible book value of US$                , or    % per common share to our current shareholders and an immediate dilution in the pro forma net tangible book value of US$                or    % per common share to new investors purchasing common shares in this offering.

If you invest in our Class A common shares, your interest will be diluted to the extent of the difference between the initial public offering price per Class A common share and the pro forma net tangible book value per Class A common share which accounts for the issuance and sale of new Class A common shares in this offering.

Because our Class A common shares and Class B common shares have the same dividend and other rights, except for voting, conversion, pre-emptive rights and transfer restrictions, we have counted the Class A common shares and Class B common shares equally for purposes of the dilution calculations below.

The following table illustrates this dilution to new investors purchasing Class A common shares in the offering assuming either no exercise or full exercise by the underwriters of their option to purchase additional Class A common shares.

 

   No Exercise
US$
   Full Exercise
US$
 

Assumed initial public offering price per Class A common shares(1)

    

Net tangible book value per common share at March 31, 2021

    

Pro forma net tangible book value per common share after completion of this offering(2)

    

Increase in pro forma net tangible book value per common share attributable to current shareholders

    

Dilution in pro forma net tangible book value per common share attributable to new shareholders(2)

    

 

(1)

Corresponds to the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus.

(2)

Dilution represents the difference between the offering price per common share paid by new shareholders and the pro forma net tangible book value per common share immediately after giving effect to this offering.

 

81


Table of Contents

The actual offering price per Class A common share is not based on the pro forma net tangible book value of our common shares, but will be established based through a book building process.

The following table summarizes, on the same pro forma basis at March 31, 2021, the number of common shares acquired from us, the total cash consideration paid and the average price per common share paid to us by our current shareholders and by new investors purchasing Class A common shares in this offering. As the table shows, new investors purchasing shares in this offering will pay an average price per common share substantially higher than our pre-IPO shareholders paid. This information is based on the assumed initial public offering price of US$                per Class A common share (which is the midpoint of the price range per common share set forth on the cover page of this prospectus), before deducting the underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us in connection with this offering.

 

   Common Shares Purchased   Total Consideration   Average
Price per
Common
Share
(US$)
 
   Amount   Percentage of
Total
Common
Shares (%)
   Amount
(US$
million)
   Percentage
(%)
 

Current shareholders

                                                            

New investors

          
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

               100                100             
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

If the underwriters were to fully exercise their option to purchase                additional Class A common shares, the total consideration paid by new shareholders and the average price per common share paid by new shareholders would be US$                million and US$                per common share, respectively, and the percentage of common shares purchased by new shareholder would be                %.

An increase (decrease) of US$1.00 in the assumed initial public offering price of US$                per common share, which is the midpoint of the price range indicated on the cover page of this prospectus, would, after the conclusion of this offering, increase (decrease) (1) the value of our total shareholders’ equity by US$                million, and (2) the value of our pro forma net tangible book value per common share to new investors by US$                , assuming that the number of common shares offered herein, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same and assuming no exercise of the option to purchase additional Class A common shares, and after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

 

82


Table of Contents

SELECTED FINANCIAL AND OTHER INFORMATION

The following tables set forth, for the periods and as of the dates indicated, our selected financial and operating data. The financial information presented herein has been derived from (1) our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements as of March 31, 2021 and 2020, together with the accompanying notes thereto, prepared in accordance with IAS 34 – Interim Financial Reporting as issued by IASB and (2) audited consolidated financial statements for and as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, together with the accompanying notes thereto, prepared in accordance with IFRS as issued by the IASB, and included elsewhere in this prospectus.

The selected consolidated historical financial data and should be read in conjunction with “Presentation of Financial and Other Information,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements and our consolidated financial statements, including the notes thereto, included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Consolidated Statements of Profit or Loss

 

   For the Three Months ended
March 31,
   For the Year ended
December 31,
 
       2021           2020           2020           2019     
   (in US$ millions, except for per share amounts) 

Subscription revenue

           24.7            15.4            93.4            58.3 

Services revenue

   1.3    1.2    5.3    3.0 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

   25.9    16.6    98.7    61.3 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Subscription cost

   (8.7   (5.1   (27.8   (15.8

Services cost

   (2.1   (1.7   (7.1   (4.4
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total cost

   (10.8   (6.7   (34.9   (20.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross profit

   15.1    9.9    63.8    41.1 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating expenses

        

General and administrative

   (7.2   (3.1   (14.0   (10.7

Sales and marketing

   (11.0   (5.7   (23.8   (20.2

Research and development

   (8.4   (4.1   (19.0   (12.7

Other income (losses)

   (0.4   (0.0   (0.5   0.7 

Income (loss) from operation

   (12.0   (3.1   6.5    (1.8
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Finance income

   0.5    0.4    3.9    1.3 

Finance expense

   (1.9   (3.2   (7.0   (3.2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Finance result

   (1.4   (2.8   (3.1   (1.9

Equity results

   0.1    (0.0   0.1    0.0 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) before income tax

   (13.3   (5.9   3.5    (3.7
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Current income tax

   (0.2   (0.2   (4.9   (1.0

Deferred income tax

   1.0    0.8    0.6    0.1 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss of the period

   (12.5   (5.2   0.8    (4.6
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Attributable to controlling shareholders

   (12.5   (5.2   (0.9   (4.6

Non-controlling interest

   (0.0   0.0    0.1    0.0 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Loss per share

      

Basic and diluted loss per share (US$)

   (0.07   (0.03   (0.005   (0.029
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

83


Table of Contents

Consolidated Balance Sheet

 

   As of March 31,   As of December 31, 
     2021       2020       2019   
   (in US$ millions) 

Cash and cash equivalents

   40.3    58.6    29.8 

Marketable securities

   16.1    17.0    14.5 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

   91.1    108.7    65.9 

Total non-current assets

   47.8    31.3    31.8 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total assets

   138.8    140.0    97.7 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

   54.5    47.1    29.2 

Total non-current liabilities

   
18.6
 
   17.2    21.4 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities

   73.0    64.0    50.6 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net assets

   
65.8
 
   76.8    47.1 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Issued capital

   0.0    0.0    0.0 

Capital reserve

   82.1    78.9    50.7 

Other reserves

   (0.4)    0.1    (0.6

Retained earnings (accumulated losses)

   (15.9)    (3.4   (3.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Equity attributable to VTEX’s shareholders

   65.8    76.6    47.0 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-controlling interest

   —      0.1    0.0 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total shareholders’ equity

   65.8    75.7    47.1 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

   138.8    140.0    97.7 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

84


Table of Contents

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

This section contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results and the timing of events may differ significantly from those expressed or implied in such forward-looking statements for several reasons, including those described under “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” and “Risk Factors” and other issues discussed herein.

The following analysis and discussion of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements and our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus, as well as the information set forth under the sections “Presentation of Financial and Other Information,” “Summary Financial and Other Information,” and “Selected Financial and Other Information.”

Overview

VTEX provides a software-as-a-service digital commerce platform for enterprise brands and retailers. Our platform enables our customers to execute their commerce strategy, including building online stores, integrating and managing orders across channels, and creating marketplaces to sell products from third-party vendors. Founded in Brazil, we have been a leader in accelerating the digital commerce transformation in Latin America and are expanding globally. Our platform is engineered to enterprise-level standards and functionality with the majority of our revenue coming from large, blue-chip companies. We are trusted by more than 2,000 customers with over 2,500 active online stores across 32 countries to connect with their consumers in a meaningful way.

Global online retail spend has grown rapidly. Over the past decade ecommerce spend has grown to US$3.0 trillion, and is projected to double to US$6.0 trillion over the next five years, according to Insider Intelligence. Latin America, in particular, was the fastest-growing region in the world in 2020, and yet ecommerce still represents a small fraction of the total retail market in the region. Accelerating ecommerce growth, evolving consumer expectations and the proliferation of digital shopping alternatives are raising the bar for brands and retailers to stay relevant. Legacy structures developed over years force enterprises to choose between deep customization and speed to market. Our technology combined with our ecosystem of partners solves this problem. We deliver flexibility and simplicity to complex, mission critical commerce operations.

 

85


Table of Contents

We benefit from the acceleration of digitalization globally, and in particular in Latin America, where ecommerce is still underpenetrated. We have achieved a number of significant milestones marking our expansion throughout our history:

 

LOGO

We have a deep history of delivering world-class commerce solutions throughout Brazil and the broader Latin America region. We are expanding our presence internationally and today we serve large e-chip enterprises. The majority of customers we serve are business-to-consumer, or B2C, enterprises powered through our core VTEX platform and represented 84.9% and 82.0% of our revenues for the years ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively. We help our customers operate over 2,500 active online stores, defined as unique domains generating GMV, across 32 countries globally. The number of active online stores we service increased by 31.7% from December 31, 2019 to December 31, 2020. As of December 31, 2020 25.5% of the active online stores on our platform generated annual recurring revenue, or ARR (calculated as subscription revenue in the most recent quarter multiplied by four) of US$25,000 or more, representing 84.1% of our ARR and with an average ARR per active online store of US$127,428, demonstrating our enterprise focus.

In addition, we also serve small-to-medium sized businesses, or SMBs, on a separate on-demand platform that represented 7.7% of our revenues in the year ended December 31, 2020. Our extensible and scalable platform also serves a smaller segment of business-to-business enterprises, or B2B. The remaining 7.4% of revenue in the year ended December 31, 2020 represented 5.4% service revenue and 2.0% other revenues, comprised of VTEX platform adjacencies, including payment, logistics and tracking solutions.

Our largest customer represented less than 3.0% of our revenue and our 10 largest customers represented less than 17.0% of our revenue in the year ended December 31, 2020.

Our go-to-market strategy is focused on acquiring new customers and driving continued use of our platform for existing customers. We primarily focus our selling efforts on large organizations and sell our platform through a direct sales force, which targets technical and business leaders who are leveraging ecommerce to improve their business performance. Our sales organization consists of business development representatives,

 

86


Table of Contents

account executives, and solution engineers. Our new customers in Latin America are well balanced between having VTEX as their first ecommerce platform and those switching to VTEX from other ecommerce solutions. Once our platform has been adopted, we focus on enabling GMV growth for our customers to drive increased transaction-based revenue, as evidenced by our net revenue retention rate.

We offer access to our platform on a subscription basis, which accounted for 95.1% and 94.6% of our revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and for the year ended December 31, 2020, respectively. Our subscription revenue is based on a fixed subscription fee and a transaction-based fee. The transaction-based fee accounts for most of our subscription revenues and is primarily structured as a take rate or percentage of the total value of the orders processed through our platform, including value added taxes and shipping, which we refer to as our GMV. Our transaction-based fee model aligns our success with our customers’ success and our revenue grows as our customers’ GMV grows. While historically the proportion of revenues from fixed fees and transaction-based fees has remained relatively stable, the revenue from transaction-based fees increased as a percentage of total revenues in 2020 as a result of the significant increase in GMV during the period. We serve customers with multiple tiers of subscription plans and transaction-based fees based on the size of the customer and their expected GMV. Our tiered pricing model allows customers that are generating higher GMV to move up and pay higher fixed fees and lower transaction-based fees, even though transaction-based fees continue to be the most significant portion of our subscription revenue.

Our business has experienced significant growth. In the three months ended March 31, 2021, our revenue increased to US$25.9 million from US$16.6 million in the three months ended March 31, 2020 representing an increase of 55.8% and 77.0% on an FX neutral basis. In the same periods, we generated net losses of US$12.5 million and US$5.2 million, net cash used by operating activities of US$7.4 million and US$9.3 million and a negative Free Cash Flow of US$8.0 million and US$9.9 million, respectively. In the year ended December 31, 2020, our revenue increased to US$98.7 million from US$61.3 million in the year ended December 31, 2019, representing an increase of 60.9% and 95.3% on an FX neutral basis. In the same periods, we generated net losses of US$0.8 million and US$4.6 million, net cash provided by operating activities of US$11.2 million and US$2.1 million and Free Cash Flow of US$9.5 million and US$0.2 million, respectively. See “Presentation of Financial and Other Information—Special Note Regarding Non-GAAP Financial Measures—Free Cash Flow,” for additional information.

Key Metric—Gross Merchandise Value

The key metric we use to measure our performance, identify trends affecting our business, formulate our business plan projections and support our strategic decisions is GMV. Due to the seasonality of ecommerce and the foreign exchange effects resulting from the volatility of the currencies of the jurisdictions where we operate (particularly Latin America countries) vis-à-vis the U.S. Dollar (which is our functional currency), our management compares GMV on a year-over-year and foreign exchange neutral basis. The foreign exchange neutral measures are calculated by using the average monthly exchange rates for each month during the previous year and applying them to the corresponding months of the current year, so as to calculate what our results would have been had exchange rates remained stable from one year to the next.

GMV is the total value of customer orders processed through our platform, including value added taxes and shipping. Our GMV does not include the value of orders processed by our SMB customers or B2B transactions. Due to our transaction-based subscription model, we believe that GMV growth is linked with our revenue growth and we track GMV as an indicator of the success of our customers, the performance of the platform and our market share.

 

   Q1 2019  Q2 2019  Q3 2019  Q4 2019  Q1 2020  Q2 2020  Q3 2020  Q4 2020  Q1 2021 
   (in millions of U.S. Dollars, unless otherwise indicated) 

GMV

   802.7   836.2   894.4   1,307.2   952.4   1,870.8   2,131.7   2,533.9   2,036.1 

GMV Growth FX Neutral (%)

   51.4  33.6  46.7  45.9  36.3  178.0  190.2  130.2  142.3

 

87


Table of Contents

Key Factors Affecting our Performance

We believe our future performance will depend on many factors, including the following:

Continued growth of ecommerce globally

The ecommerce market has experienced rapid growth over the past several years. Widespread access to the internet, the introduction of digital payment methods, and the increased use of smartphones have made online shopping more convenient worldwide, catalyzing the growth of the global ecommerce market. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic further accelerated the adoption of ecommerce, which drove broader business growth while brick-and-mortar stores were closed and consumers increased their ecommerce spending due to extended stay-at-home orders and restrictions on movements. According to Insider Intelligence, the global ecommerce market grew to more than US$4.0 trillion in 2020 and is estimated to grow to more than US$6.0 trillion by 2025. In Latin America specifically, the ecommerce market grew to US$85.0 billion in 2020 and, according to Insider Intelligence, is estimated to grow to more than US$130.0 billion by 2025 at an 11.0% compounded annual growth rate. The Latin American market was the fastest-growing regional retail ecommerce market in 2020, and there remains a significant runway for penetration. Insider Intelligence estimates Latin America ecommerce penetration was 6.2% in 2020, lagging US penetration of 14.4% and six years behind global ecommerce penetration of 18.0% within the same period. The region is forecasted to reach 8.4% penetration in 2024, reflecting a 35.0% increase in penetration in ecommerce in a region with over twice the population size of the United States. The size of the market, coupled with the relatively low level of penetration, presents a significant opportunity for continued growth.

Our business is dependent on the continued adoption of ecommerce globally and in Latin America in particular. As more enterprises choose to introduce and grow their ecommerce businesses, we expect to attract more customers and stores to our platform. Additionally, due to our shared success transaction-based fee model, our revenue is dependent on GMV transacted on our platform, which we believe will grow as our existing and new customers grow their ecommerce businesses, driven by continued growth in consumer demand.

Retention and growth of our existing customers

Our current business and long-term revenue growth are directly correlated with the success and growth in GMV of our existing customers’ online stores. We strive to maintain industry-leading platform capabilities to maximize customer success and retention. As our customers’ online stores generate more GMV, we directly generate more transaction-based fees and indirectly generate more fixed subscription fees through continuing to enhance platform functionality.

Our ability to help our customers increase their ecommerce revenue within their online stores is also demonstrated by our customers’ SSS, calculated on a yearly basis by dividing the GMV of active online stores in the current period by the GMV of the same active online stores in the prior period. Over the past three years and the three months ended March 31, 2021, SSS has exceeded 25% on a FX Neutral basis.

We also measure the retention and growth of our revenue from existing customers and their online stores through our customer’s NRR, which we calculate on a monthly basis by dividing the subscription revenue from our platform during the current period by the subscription revenue in the same period of the previous year for the same base of online stores that were active in the same period of the previous year. Our NRR includes the effect on subscription revenue of any online stores including renewals, expansion, contraction, and churn. Our calculation of NRR excludes any revenue from our SMB platform customers. Our NRR was 171.9% and 115.2% on a FX Neutral basis for the years ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively. Due to the effects of COVID-19, our NRR for the year ended December 31, 2020 was positively impacted and we expect it to be negatively impacted during 2021 before normalizing in the near-term. Given our subscription-based model, we generate most of our revenues in any given year from existing customers. For the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, we generated 85.6% and 80.3% of the revenue derived from the VTEX platform from customers who have been on our platform for over one year, respectively.

 

88


Table of Contents

We believe the strength of our value proposition to enterprises is also evidenced by our customer cohorts, which show revenue retention and growth over the past four years through 2020. For purposes of the following chart, we define net revenue retention as the percentage of the revenue, on a FX neutral basis, generated by a yearly cohort of customers in 2020, relative to the revenue generated in 2017, the reference year, or yearly vintage of such yearly cohort of customers. We define a yearly cohort of customers as the group of customers that received the first invoice of our VTEX platform in the prior year.

 

 

LOGO

Our business is also affected by our customers’ ability to launch additional online stores to serve additional brands, geographies, or use cases. We believe that our ability to continue to drive faster go-lives and expand the online store presence, regionally and globally, of our customers will drive revenue growth. As of December 31, 2020, only 8.1% of our enterprise customers had two or more stores, highlighting a significant opportunity for further expansion.

Efficient acquisition of new customers

Increasing our customer base is important to our continued revenue growth. We believe we are positioned to grow significantly through a combination of our own sales and marketing initiatives, customer referrals, agency and technology partner referrals, and word-of-mouth referrals from existing customers.

We measure the efficiency of new customer acquisition by comparing the lifetime value, or LTV, of newly-acquired enterprise customers to the customer acquisition costs, or CAC, of the associated time period to get an “LTV/CAC ratio.” We calculate LTV as the gross profit from new sales during the four quarters of any given period divided by the subscription churn rate of the last 12 months. We calculate CAC as total sales and marketing expenses incurred during the four quarters preceding the quarter in which the calculation is made. This calculation assumes that the actual subscription churn rate for the period will remain consistent in future years. For instance, the LTV/CAC ratio for 2020 includes the LTV for the year ended December 31, 2020 and CAC for the four quarters ended September 30, 2020. On this basis, we estimate that our annual LTV/CAC ratio is over 6x in both 2020 and 2019.

 

89


Table of Contents

Evolution of our business partner ecosystem

A key part of our strategy is to build a thriving technology partner ecosystem. The ecosystem around our platform is connected to over 1,000 integrated solutions, 200 SIs, 100 marketplaces, 80 payments solutions and 50 logistics companies, which use or embed our solutions into their own offerings to enable our customers to conduct commerce more conveniently. These integrated business partners include providers for shipping, marketplaces, point-of-sale, omnichannel, marketing automation, search, merchandising, SIs, agencies, payments, anti-fraud and lending services. We focus on collaborating with business partners in our ecosystem, by establishing mutually beneficial relationships, rather than competing with them. For instance, by allowing our customers to seamlessly start accepting online payments through one of our payment solutions partners, we are collaborating with our ecosystem and quickly generating revenue to our payments solutions partners and us. Our customers benefit from the expertise and best-of-breed offerings of our business partners, the flexibility to choose the best offerings for their needs, and the tailored programs developed with our strategic business partners. Our ecosystem of integrated applications and technology solutions is among the largest of any ecommerce platform and helps drive the growth of our customer base, which in turn accelerates growth of the ecosystem. We believe VTEX continues to innovate in an industry where many companies are providing outdated services.

Our ability to retain and grow our customers’ online stores often depends on the continuous improvement of our platform and the expansion of the capabilities of our strategic technology partners, including SIs, agencies and payment solutions to provide revenue generating services to our customers. As a result of our strong ecosystem and product capabilities, over half of the revenue potential of new contracts signed in the year ended December 31, 2020 was originated organically or through the ecosystem, including referrals, customers’ requests, or through partners and resellers.

Investment in innovation and growth

We have invested and intend to continue to invest in our platform, including broadening our capabilities to meet the future needs of enterprise customers and their brands. Our ability to incorporate innovative tools and features that improve our platform is critical to ensuring that the enterprises we support have the necessary capabilities to adapt to the influx of disruptive technologies impacting commerce and the enterprise, to incorporate cutting edge technologies and capabilities that emerge from our partners and the broader commerce ecosystem and to meet the evolving needs of consumers. As a result, we intend to use our Composable Commerce framework to expand our features, capabilities and partner integrations, including facilitating the extension of our platform to address the evolving needs of enterprises and to accelerate their commerce transformation as our customers expand their global commerce footprint. We also intend to continue to invest in enhancing awareness of our brand as we grow our enterprise customer base throughout Latin America and the rest of the world. We believe this strategy will provide new avenues for growth and allow us to continue to deliver differentiated, high-value outcomes to our customers, their consumers and stockholders.

As part of our commitment to invest in innovation and growth, we intend to continue to invest in (1) research and development to further bolster our platform and extend our capabilities; (2) sales and marketing, to promote our innovative platform to new and existing customers and in existing and expanded geographies; (3) professional services to ensure the success of our customers’ implementations of our platform; and (4) other operational and administrative functions to support our expected growth and our transition to a public company. We expect our total operating expenses will increase over time and, in some cases, have short-term negative impacts on our operating margin. We also intend to continue to evaluate strategic acquisitions and investments in businesses and technologies to improve our platform and accelerate our market expansion. Our future success is dependent, in part, on our ability to successfully develop, market, and sell our platform to new and existing customers and to help our customers capture omnichannel commerce opportunities both regionally and globally.

Successful rollout of new geographies

We are investing in the expansion of our regional sales and marketing capabilities in order to grow our business within new regions in Latin America and the rest of the world. In some cases, we are expanding with

 

90


Table of Contents

existing customers to new geographies. For instance, a global electronics brand manufacturer uses the VTEX platform to power its ecommerce direct to consumer initiatives in 19 countries. We started our operations in Brazil in 2000, opened our first office outside of Brazil in 2013 and expanded outside of Latin America to the United States in 2017. We have operations in five cities in Brazil, six cities in Latin America and eight cities in the rest of the world with 882, 231, and 125 employees, respectively, as of March 31, 2021.

For the three months ended March 31, 2021 and the year ended December 31, 2020, purchases originated from customers in Brazil represented 56.1% and 57.2% of our total revenue, compared to 72.8% and 70.8% for the same periods for the three months ended March 31, 2020 and the year ended December 31, 2019, respectively, highlighting our growing diversification outside of Brazil, in Latin America and the rest of the world. For the three months ended March 31, 2021 and the year ended December 31, 2020, revenues in Latin America, excluding Brazil increased 143.4% and 143.6%, respectively. Revenues from the rest of the world increased 185.6% and 95.8% in the same periods, respectively. Revenues from Latin America, excluding Brazil, and the rest of the world represented 34.3% and 9.6%, of our total revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2021, up from 22.0% and 5.2% for the three months ended March 31, 2020. Revenues from Latin America, excluding Brazil, and the rest of the world represented 37.0% and 5.8%, of our total revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020, up from 24.4% and 4.7% for the year ended December 31, 2019.

This rapid growth highlights the success of our platform’s expansion beyond Brazil. Although we believe our platform can compete successfully globally, we have historically focused on Latin America. Given our brand awareness and market position, we believe that most of our growth in the short to medium term will continue to come from Latin America where we have a leadership position and ecommerce is expected to accelerate given its current under penetration. Over the past several years we have invested, and plan to continue investing, in our operations in the United States and Europe, although only limited growth may result from these regions in the short to medium term.

Latin American Macroeconomic Environment

We operate across various countries, and in particular a number of emerging economies in Latin America. As a result, our revenues and profitability may be affected by political and economic developments in these countries and the effect that these factors have on the availability of credit, disposable income, employment rates, and average wages in these countries. Although we believe the ongoing secular shift to ecommerce strongly benefit our business, our operations may be impacted by changes in economic conditions in each of the countries in which we operate.

As of December 31, 2020, Latin America had a total GDP of US$3.5 trillion, over 600 million inhabitants, with an average GDP per capita of US$7,749.5. Important industries have consolidated their presence in the region and acquired scale, the most notable being retail, manufacturing, financial services, transportation and communication, construction, agribusiness and mining.

Brazil is the largest economy in Latin America, as measured by GDP, and we have historically carried out the majority of our operations in Brazil. While we have been growing our revenues outside of Brazil, our revenues and profitability may be affected by political and economic developments in Brazil and the effect that these factors have on the availability of credit, disposable income, employment rates and average wages in the country. Our operations in Brazil, and the financial services industry in general, are particularly sensitive to changes in Brazilian economic conditions. The real/U.S. dollar exchange rate reported by the Central Bank was R$5.197 per US$1.00 on December 31, 2020, which reflected a 29.0% depreciation of the real against the U.S. dollar during 2020 due primarily to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Brazilian economy. The exchange rate reported by the Central Bank was R$5.067 per US$1.00 on June 4, 2021, representing an appreciation of 2.6% of the real since December 31, 2020. There can be no assurance that the real will not appreciate or depreciate against the U.S. dollar or other currencies in the future.

 

91


Table of Contents

As for the business cycle, the Latin American region experienced a substantial slowdown after the end of the commodity super-cycle and poorer economic policies in large economies, notably Brazil. The real rate of GDP growth across Latin America trended down from growth of 7.2% in 2010 to a 1.2% contraction in 2016, according to IHS Markit. Since 2016, a combination of new governments pursuing better policies, further stabilizing reforms and improving terms of trade, has produced a gradual turnaround. Gradual economic expansion has been taking place since 2017, even with the recent market declines and increased volatility caused by COVID-19.

While these adverse shifts in general economic conditions may have a negative impact on our results of operations, the ongoing secular shift to ecommerce, as well as other industry trends, may offset most of this impact.

Seasonality and Quarterly Results of Operations

Due to our transaction-based subscription model, similar to most retail businesses, we experience seasonal fluctuations in our net sales and operating results. Historically, we have generated higher net sales in the fourth quarter, which includes the “Black November” period in Brazil (a commercial sales season, a month-long, introduced by Brazilian ecommerce websites in 2010 and equivalent to Black Friday in the United States) and other ecommerce events in Latin American countries. The first quarter of the year is our slowest period, as the months of January, February and March correspond to vacation time in Brazil and other Latin American countries, and the first quarter is impacted by Carnival in Brazil. See “Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business and Industry—Our operating results are subject to seasonal fluctuations.”

The following table sets forth our unaudited quarterly consolidated statement of profit or loss data for each of the last eight quarters of the period ended March 31, 2021. The unaudited consolidated statement of profit or loss data below has been prepared on the same basis as the audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus and, in our opinion, reflects all necessary adjustments, consisting only of ordinary course recurring adjustments, necessary to fairly and accurately present this information. These historical quarterly results of operations are not necessarily indicative of the results of operations for a full year or any future period. In particular, our quarterly results of operations have been positively affected by a significant growth in ecommerce sales in the markets in which we operate due to the widespread closure of brick-and-mortar stores and behavioral changes associated with social distancing as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. This increase in sales has bolstered our total revenue, driven predominantly by increases in our customer sales and revenue. We believe that the expansion of ecommerce may normalize once the COVID-19 pandemic is sufficiently controlled, which may adversely affect our financial performance and operating metrics in the future. See below “—Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic.”

 

  For the Three Months ended 
  March 31,
2019
  June 30,
2019
  September 30,
2019
  December 31,
2019
  March 31,
2020
  June 30,
2020
  September 30,
2020
  December 31,
2020
  March 31,
2021
 
  (in US$ millions) 

Subscription revenue

  12.4   13.2   13.6   19.1   15.4   23.9   26.3   27.7   24.7 

Services revenue

  0.5   1.1   0.5   0.9   1.2   1.3   1.3   1.4   1.3 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total revenue

  13.0   14.3   14.1   20.0   16.6   25.3   27.7   29.1   25.9 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Subscription cost

  (2.6  (3.5  (4.3  (5.5  (5.1  (5.8  (7.1  (9.8  (8.7

Services cost

  (1.0  (1.0  (0.9  (1.5  (1.7  (1.7  (1.7  (2.0  (2.1
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total cost

  (3.6  (4.5  (5.2  (7.0  (6.7  (7.5  (8.8  (11.9  (10.8
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Gross profit

  9.4   9.8   8.9   13.0   9.9   17.8   18.9   17.2   15.1 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

92


Table of Contents
  For the Three Months ended 
  March 31,
2019
  June 30,
2019
  September 30,
2019
  December 31,
2019
  March 31,
2020
  June 30,
2020
  September 30,
2020
  December 31,
2020
  March 31,
2021
 
  (in US$ millions) 

Operating expenses

         

General and administrative

  (1.8  (2.3  (3.1  (3.5  (3.1  (2.4  (3.3  (5.1  (7.2

Sales and marketing

  (4.8  (6.1  (4.1  (5.2  (5.7  (5.4  (5.3  (7.5  (11.0

Research and development

  (2.5  (2.6  (3.4  (4.1  (4.1  (3.6  (4.5  (6.8  (8.4

Other income (losses)

  0.1   0.6   (0.1  0.1   (0.0  (0.3  (0.3  0.1   (0.4

Income (loss) from operation

  0.4   (0.6  (1.8  0.2   (3.1  6.1   5.5   (2.1  (12.0
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Finance result

  (0.3  (0.5  0.0   (1.1  (2.8  1.6   (0.6  (1.3  (1.4

Equity results

  0.0   0.0   0.0   0.0   (0.0  0.0   0.0   0.1   0.1 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Income (loss) before income tax

  0.1   (1.1  (1.8  (0.9  (5.9  7.7   5.0   (3.3  (13.3
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Income tax

  (0.5  (0.2  0.4   (0.6  0.7   (2.0  (2.0  (0.9  0.8 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net loss of the period

  (0.4  (1.3  (1.4  (1.5  (5.2  5.7   3.0   (4.3  (12.5
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Loss per share

         

Basic and diluted income (loss) per share (US$)

  (0.03  (0.09  (0.09  (0.09  (0.03  0.03   0.02   (0.02  (0.07
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

The following table sets forth selected consolidated statement of profit or loss data for each of the periods indicated as a percentage of total revenue.

 

  For the Three Months ended 
  March 31,
2019
  June 30,
2019
  September 30,
2019
  December 31,
2019
  March 31,
2020
  June 30,
2020
  September 30,
2020
  December 31,
2020
  March 31,
2021
 

Total revenue

  100.0  100.0  100.0  100.0  100.0  100.0  100.0  100.0  100.0
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Subscription cost

  (20.3)%   (24.3)%   (30.3)%   (27.3)%   (30.4)%   (23.0)%   (25.6)%   (33.8)%   (33.6)% 

Services cost

  (7.4)%   (7.0)%   (6.5)%   (7.7)%   (10.1)%   (6.6)%   (6.1)%   (6.9)%   (8.1)% 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total cost

  (27.7)%   (31.4)%   (36.8)%   (35.0)%   (40.5)%   (29.6)%   (31.7)%   (40.7)%   (41.8)% 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Gross profit

  72.3  68.6  63.2  65.0  59.5  70.4  68.3  59.3  58.2

Operating expenses

         

General and administrative

  (13.8)%   (16.2)%   (21.7)%   (17.6)%   (18.6)%   (9.5)%   (12.1)%   (17.6)%   (27.9)% 

Sales and marketing

  (36.8)%   (42.4)%   (29.4)%   (26.0)%   (34.5)%   (21.2)%   (19.0)%   (25.7)%   (42.6)% 

Research and development

  (19.6)%   (18.4)%   (24.1)%   (20.6)%   (24.4)%   (14.4)%   (16.3)%   (23.5)%   (32.5)% 

Other income (losses)

  0.8  4.3  (0.7)%   0.3  (0.3)%   (1.0)%   (1.0)%   0.4  (1.7)% 

 

93


Table of Contents
  For the Three Months ended 
  March 31,
2019
  June 30,
2019
  September 30,
2019
  December 31,
2019
  March 31,
2020
  June 30,
2020
  September 30,
2020
  December 31,
2020
  March 31,
2021
 

Income (loss) from operation

  2.9  (4.2)%   (12.8)%   1.0  (18.4)%   24.3  19.9  (7.1)%   (46.4)% 

Finance result

  (2.2)%   (3.7)%   0.1  (5.5)%   (16.8)%   6.2  (2.1)%   (4.6)%   (5.2)% 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Equity results

  0.0  0.0  0.0  0.0  (0.1)%   0.0  0.1  0.2  0.4

Income (loss) before income tax

  0.6  (7.8)%   (12.6)%   (4.4)%   (35.2)%   30.5  17.9  (11.5)%   (51.3)% 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Income tax

  (3.8)%   (1.6)%   2.9  (2.9)%   4.0  (8.1)%   (7.2)%   (3.2)%   3.2
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Net loss of the period

  (3.2)%   (9.4)%   (9.7)%   (7.3)%   (31.2)%   22.4  10.8  (14.7)%   (48.1)% 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

The following table sets forth our Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operations for each of the periods indicated:

 

  For the Three Months ended 
  March 31,
2019
  June 30,
2019
  September 30,
2019
  December 31,
2019
  March 31,
2020
  June 30,
2020
  September 30,
2020
  December 31,
2020
  March 31,
2021
 
  (in US$ millions) 

Income (loss) from operation

  0.4   (0.6  (1.8  0.2   (3.1  6.1   5.5   (2.1  (12.0
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Share-based compensation expense

  0.0   0.1   0.2   0.5   0.3   0.4   0.6   2   3.2 

Amortization of intangibles related to acquisitions

  0.2   0.2   0.2   0.2   0.4   0.2   0.2   (0.1  0.3 
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Non-GAAP Income (Loss) from Operations

  0.6   (0.3  (1.4  0.9   (2.4  6.8   6.3   (0.1  (8.5
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, which was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020, the ecommerce market experienced a surge in growth. Governments encouraged consumers to stay at home for extended periods of time, and retail purchases shifted from offline and brick-and-mortar purchases to online ecommerce, as companies accelerated the digitalization of their businesses. Consequently, ecommerce sales in our major markets have increased significantly. Our business responded to the shifting commerce dynamics and enabled our customers to rapidly scale and digitally transform their businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic. This increase in GMV of our customers has resulted in significant revenue growth for us, driven predominantly by increases in our transaction-based fees.

We expect that our performance will be affected for the duration of the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on brick-and-mortar stores and consumer preferences. While we believe that the structural shifts that favor ecommerce will continue as the world recovers from COVID-19, we do not expect to experience the same growth in our business going forward. For example, in the year ended December 31, 2019, our revenue increased approximately 43% compared to 2018 on an FX neutral basis – while revenues increased 95.3% on an FX neutral basis in the year ended December 31, 2020 compared to 2019. We believe that the expansion of ecommerce may normalize once the COVID-19 pandemic is sufficiently controlled, which may adversely affect our financial performance and operating metrics. We expect that our total revenue may be subject to increased fluctuations in the near-term as a result. See note 28 of our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements and note 29 to our consolidated financial statements. See “Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business and Industry—The COVID-19 pandemic could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.”

 

94


Table of Contents

Components of Our Results of Operations

The following is a summary of the principal line items comprising consolidated statements of profit or loss.

Total revenue

Our total revenue consists of (1) subscription and support revenue, arising from a multichannel cloud and SaaS-based platform focused on ecommerce; and (2) revenue from professional services and other, arising substantially from consulting services.

Subscription revenue

Subscription revenue consists of revenue derived from (1) a mix of transaction-based fees and fixed subscription fees, in each case derived from customers using our platform; (2) our SMB business; and (3) other business units that generate recurring revenue to us.

Transaction-based fees comprise (a) commission fees charged to customers based on a percentage of the GMV or a fee per order processed on our platform; and (b) commission fees charged to marketplace partners, payment providers, and any other services provided through our app store.

Fixed subscription fees comprise (a) yearly or multi-year upfront fees paid by merchants to reduce future variable fees. In case of early termination of the annual upfront fees, we refund merchants for the remaining term of the contract; and (b) fixed monthly fee for using our platform in any given month. Fixed fees are paid to us at the beginning of the applicable subscription period, regardless of the length of the subscription period. As subscription fees are received in advance of providing the related services, we record deferred revenue on our consolidated balance sheet for the unearned revenue and recognize revenue ratably over the related subscription period.

Services revenue

Services revenue consists primarily of revenue derived from consulting services which are recognized over time during the period that services are performed. Services revenue represented 4.9% and 5.4% of our revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and the year ended December 31, 2020, respectively.

Cost of revenue

Our total cost consists of (1) subscription cost; and (2) services cost.

Subscription cost of revenue

Subscription cost consists mainly of costs related to hosting related and customer support costs. The hosting related costs includes third-party providers, software related platform operating costs, and compensation for our infrastructure team. Support costs are mostly driven by personnel cost, and represent expenses related to the support we provide to our customers.

Services cost of revenue

Services cost consist mainly of personnel costs and/or third-party expenses to provide the professional services advisory for a specific project of a customer project.

Operating expenses

Our operating expenses consist of general and administrative expenses, sales and marketing expenses, and research and development expenses.

 

95


Table of Contents

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of (1) personnel-related expenses (including stock-based compensation) for our finance, support operation departments, legal and compliance teams; (2) corporate expenses; and (3) corporate overhead allocation. General and administrative expenses also include costs related to business acquisitions, legal and other professional services fees and depreciation and amortization. We expect administrative expenses to increase as a result of becoming a publicly traded company and compliance requirements derived from the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Public company costs include expenses associated with annual and quarterly reporting, investor relations, registrar and transfer agent fees, incremental insurance costs, accounting and legal services, and other investments to strengthen corporate governance and internal controls.

Sales and marketing expenses consist primarily of (1) personnel-related expenses (including stock-based compensation) and commissions paid to the direct sales team, the success team, partnership sales team and sales enablement team; (2) travel-related expenses; (3) marketing and events expenses; (4) finder fee commissions; and (5) the allocation of corporate overhead. We plan to continue to incur sales and marketing expenses in the regions that we currently have a presence as well as in new regions over time in order to continue to enhance our brand to attract new customers.

Research and development expenses consist primarily of (1) personnel-related expenses (including stock-based compensation) for product development, product management and product design; (2) software subscription costs related to the product; and (3) the allocation of corporate overhead. We expect to increase the research and development expenses to continue investing in product innovation, and in the development of new products.

Financial result

Financial result consist of finance income and finance expenses. Finance income consists of interest earned on bank deposits, foreign exchange gains and other financial income. Finance expense is mostly comprised of foreign exchange losses, losses from fair value of derivative financial instruments, interest on lease liabilities and adjustment of hyperinflation in Argentina.

Income tax

Provision for income taxes consists primarily of income taxes, current and deferred, in certain foreign jurisdictions in which we conduct business. The current and deferred income taxes are calculated on the basis of the tax laws enacted or substantively enacted at the end of the reporting period in the countries in which we operate and generate taxable income. Our effective tax rate is mostly impacted by income tax benefits related to research and technological innovation expenses and non-deductible expenses.

VTEX Brazil benefits from tax incentives pursuant to the Lei do Bem aimed at companies that conduct research and development activities. This benefit allows an additional deduction of research and development expenditures ranging between 60% and 80% of the amounts originally spent, thereby reducing the income and social contribution tax base of VTEX Brazil. See “Risk Factors—Loss of, or adverse modifications to, certain tax benefits that we enjoy in Brazil and Argentina could have a negative impact on our operating results and profitability.”

 

96


Table of Contents

Historical Results of Operations

Comparison of Results of Operations for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2021 and 2020

The following table sets forth our consolidated statements of profit or loss for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020. The period-to-period comparison of financial results is not necessarily indicative of future results.

 

   For the Three Months ended
March 31,
 
   2021   2020   Variation 
   (in millions of US$)   % 

Subscription revenue

   24.7    15.4    59.7

Services revenue

   1.3    1.2    5.5
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

   25.9    16.6    55.8% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Subscription cost(1)

   (8.7   (5.1   72.2

Services cost(1)

   (2.1   (1.7   25.6
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total cost

   (10.8)    (6.7)    60.6% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross Profit

   15.1    9.9    52.5% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating Expenses

      

General and administrative(1)

   (7.2   (3.1   132.7

Sales and marketing(1)

   (11.0   (5.7   92.0

Research and development(1)

   (8.4   (4.1   107.4

Other income (losses)

   (0.4   (0.0   n.m. 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (loss) from operations

   (12.0)    (3.1)    293.9% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Financial result

   (1.4   (2.8   51.6

Equity results

   0.1    (0.0   n.m. 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Profit (loss) before income taxes

   (13.3)    (5.9)    126.7% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income tax

   0.8    0.7    24.7
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net loss for the period

   (12.5)    (5.2)    139.7% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1)

Includes stock-based compensation expense as follows:

 

   For the Three Months ended March 31, 
   2021   2020 
   (in millions of US$) 

Subscription cost

   (0.1   (0.0

Services cost

   (0.0   (0.0

General and administrative

   (1.2   (0.0

Sales and marketing

   (0.7   (0.1

Research and development

   (1.1   (0.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stock-based compensation

   (3.2)    (0.3) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

97


Table of Contents

Total revenue

The components of our total revenue during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 were as follows:

 

   For the Three Months ended March 31, 
   2021   2020   Variation 
   (in millions of US$)   % 

Subscription revenue

   24.7    15.4    59.7

Services revenue

   1.3    1.2    5.5
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

   25.9    16.6    55.8% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was US$25.9 million, an increase of US$9.3 million, or 55.8% (on a non-FX neutral basis) or 77.0% (on an FX neutral basis), from US$16.6 million in the same period of 2020. The increase in total revenue was primarily driven by: (1) an increase in GMV of 113.8% (on a non-FX neutral basis) or 142.3% (on an FX neutral basis) to US$2.0 billion for the three months ended March 31, 2021, from US$1.0 billion in the same period of 2020, which also led to higher revenues from transaction-based fees as percentage of total subscription revenues; (2) an increase in the number of active online stores using our platform during 2020 which we believe is mainly attributable to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic accelerating the digitalization plan of enterprises as a result of changing end-consumer purchase behavior (to favor online purchases); and (3) the expansion of our operations outside of Brazil. The increase was partially offset by exchange rate effects resulting from the appreciation of the U.S. Dollar against the currencies of the principal countries in which we operate, mostly in Brazil. While we believe that the structural shifts that favor ecommerce will continue as the world recovers from COVID-19, we do not expect to experience the same growth of GMV and revenue going forward. See “—Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic.”

Total cost

The components of our total cost during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 were as follows:

 

   For the Three Months ended March 31, 
   2021   2020   Variation 
   (in millions of US$)   % 

Subscription cost

   (8.7   (5.1   72.2

Services cost

   (2.1   (1.7   25.6
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs

   (10.8)    (6.7)    60.6% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total cost for the three months ended March 31, 2021 increased by US$4.1 million, or 60.6%, to US$10.8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from US$6.7 million in the same period of 2020, principally due to an increase in IT and hosting expenses, which increased by US$3.4 million, or 112.0%, to US$6.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from US$3.1 million in the same period of 2020, given the increased number of online stores and GMV processed on our platform, which was partially offset by exchange rate effects resulting from the appreciation of the U.S. Dollar against the currencies of the principal countries in which we operate, mainly in Brazil.

Gross profit

As a result of the above, our gross profit increased by US$5.2 million, or 52.5% to US$15.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from US$9.9 million in the same period of 2020. As a percentage of our total revenue, our gross profit decreased to 58.3% in 2021 from 58.2% in 2020, mainly due to the increase in hosting costs, impacting the subscription gross profit.

 

98


Table of Contents

Operating expenses

General and administrative

General and administrative expenses during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 were as follows:

 

   For the Three Months ended March 31, 
   2021  2020  Variation 
   (in millions of US$, except as otherwise provided)  % 

General and administrative

   (7.2  (3.1  132.7

Percentage of total revenue

   27.9  18.6  —   
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Our general and administrative expenses increased by US$4.1 million, or 132.7%, to US$7.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from US$3.1 million in the same period of 2020, primarily due to the increase in expenses related to compensation as our general and administrative workforce increased to 236 employees on March 31, 2021 from 124 employees on March 31, 2020 to support our growth globally.

Sales and marketing

Sales and marketing expenses during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 were as follows:

 

   For the Three Months ended March 31, 
   2021  2020  Variation 
   (in millions of US$, except as otherwise provided)  % 

Sales and marketing

   (11.0  (5.7  92.0

Percentage of total revenue

   42.6  34.5  —   
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Our sales and marketing expenses increased by US$5.3 million, or 92.0%, to US$11.0 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from US$5.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020, primarily due to the increase in expenses related to compensation as our sales and marketing workforce increased to 328 employees on March 31, 2021 from 215 employees on March 31, 2020 to support our growth.

Research and development

Research and development expenses during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 were as follows:

 

   For the Three Months ended March 31, 
   2021  2020  Variation 
   (in millions of US$, except as otherwise provided)  % 

Research and development

   (8.4  (4.1  107.4

Percentage of total revenue

   32.5  24.4  —   
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Our research and development expenses increased by US$4.3 million, or 107.4%, to US$8.4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from US$4.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020, primarily due to the increase in expenses related to compensation as our research and development workforce increased to 448 employees on March 31, 2021 from 271 on March 31, 2020 to support our growth, and the increase in certain other employee-related expenses.

 

99


Table of Contents

Financial result

The components of our financial result during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 were as follows:

 

   For the Three Months ended
March 31,
 
   2021   2020   Variation 
   (in millions of US$)   % 

Finance income

   0.5    0.4    35.5

Finance expense

   (1.9   (3.2   (40.9)% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Finance result

   (1.4)    (2.8)    51.6% 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Our finance result increased by US$1.4 million, or 51.6%, to an expense of US$1.4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from an expense of US$2.8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020, as a result of the following:

Finance income

Finance income increase by US$0.1 million, or 35.5%, to US$0.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from US$0.4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020.

Finance expense

Our finance expense decreased by US$1.3 million, or 40.9%, to US$1.9 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from US$3.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020, primarily due to a decrease in marketable securities losses to US$ 0.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from US$ 1.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020.

Income tax benefit

Our income tax benefit increased by US$0.1 million, or 24.7%, to US$0.8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from US$0.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020, primarily attributable to the increase in loss before income tax.

Net loss for the period

As a result of the above, our net loss amounted to US$12.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, compared to US$5.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020.

 

100


Table of Contents

Comparison of Results of Operations for the Years Ended December 31, 2020 and 2019

The following table sets forth our consolidated statements of profit or loss for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019. The period-to-period comparison of financial results is not necessarily indicative of future results.

 

   For the year ended December 31, 
   2020   2019   Variation 
   (in millions of US$)   % 

Subscription revenue

   93.4    58.3    60.2

Services revenue

   5.3    3.0    74.8
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

   98.7    61.3    60.9
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Subscription cost(1)

   (27.8   (15.8   75.5

Services cost(1)

   (7.0   (4.4   60.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total cost

   (34.9   (20.2   72.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Gross Profit

   63.8    41.1    55.4
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating Expenses

      

General and administrative(1)

   (14.0   (10.7   30.6

Sales and marketing(1)

   (23.8   (20.2   18.2

Research and development

   (19.0   (12.7   50.1

Other income (losses)(1)

   (0.5   0.7    (169.5%) 

Income (loss) from operations

   6.5    (1.8   (460.4%) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Financial result

   (3.1   (1.9   65.5

Equity results

   0.1    —      —   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Profit (loss) before income taxes

   3.5    (3.7   (193.8%) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income tax

   (4.3   (0.9   385.6
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net income (loss) for the year

   (0.8   (4.6   (82.0%) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1)

Includes stock-based compensation expense as follows:

 

   For the year ended December 31, 
   2020   2019 
   (in millions of US$) 

Subscription cost

   (0.1   0.0 

Services cost

   (0.1   (0.1

General and administrative

   (1.0   (0.2

Sales and marketing

   (1.0   (0.2

Research and development

   (1.1   (0.3
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stock-based compensation

   (3.3   (0.7
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

The components of our total revenue during the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 were as follows:

 

   For the year ended December 31, 
   2020   2019   Variation 
   (in millions of US$)   % 

Subscription revenue

   93.4    58.3    60.2

Services revenue

   5.3    3.0    74.8
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total revenue

   98.7    61.3    60.9
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

101


Table of Contents

Total revenue for the year ended December 31, 2020 was US$98.7 million, an increase of US$37.3 million, or 60.9% (on a non-FX neutral basis) or 95.3% (on an FX neutral basis), from US$61.3 million in 2019. The increase in total revenue was primarily driven by: (1) an increase in GMV of 95.0% (on a non-FX neutral basis) or 134.9% (on an FX neutral basis) to US$7.5 billion in 2020, from US$3.8 billion in 2019, which also resulted in higher revenues from transaction-based fees as percentage of total subscription revenues; (2) an increase of 31.7% in the number of active online stores using our platform during the year which we believe is mainly attributable to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic accelerating the digitalization plan of enterprises as a result of changing end-consumer purchase behavior (to favor online purchases); and (3) the expansion of our operations outside of Brazil. The increase was partially offset by exchange rate effects resulting from the appreciation of the U.S. Dollar against the currencies of the principal countries in which we operate, mostly in Brazil. While we believe that the structural shifts that favor ecommerce will continue as the world recovers from COVID-19, we do not expect to experience the same growth of GMV and revenue going forward. See “—Impacts of the COVID-19 Pandemic.”

Total cost

The components of our total cost during the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 were as follows:

 

   For the year ended December 31, 
   2020   2019   Variation 
   (in millions of US$)   % 

Subscription cost

   (27.8   (15.8   75.5

Services cost

   (7.0   (4.4   60.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total costs

   (34.9   (20.2   72.1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total cost for the year ended December 31, 2020 increased by US$14.7 million, or 72.1%, to US$34.9 million in 2020 from US$20.2 million in 2019, principally due to an increase in IT and hosting expenses, which increased by US$14.2 million, or 133.3%, to US$24.8 million in 2020 from US$10.6 million in 2019 given the increased number of online stores and GMV processed on our platform, which was partially offset by exchange rate effects resulting from the appreciation of the U.S. Dollar against the currencies of the principal countries in which we operate, mainly in Brazil.

Gross profit

As a result of the above, our gross profit increased by US$22.7 million, or 55.4% to US$63.8 million in 2020 from US$41.1 million in 2019. As a percentage of our total revenue, our gross profit decreased to 64.7% in 2020 from 67.0% in 2019, mainly due to the increase in hosting costs, impacting the subscription gross profit.

Operating expenses

General and administrative

General and administrative expenses during the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 were as follows:

 

   For the year ended December 31, 
   2020  2019  Variation 
   (in millions of US$, except as otherwise provided)  % 

General and administrative

   (14.0  (10.7  30.6

Percentage of total revenue

   14.1  17.4   
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Our general and administrative expenses increased by US$3.3 million, or 30.6%, to US$14.0 million in 2020 from US$10.7 million in 2019, primarily due to the increase in personnel expenses as our general and administrative workforce increased to 193 employees in 2020 from 96 in 2019 to support our growth globally. In 2020 we created our legal, tax, product operations, M&A, and workforce expansion department as well as increased our operating expenses relating to our finance and accounting team.

 

102


Table of Contents

Sales and marketing

Sales and marketing expenses during the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 were as follows:

 

   For the year ended December 31, 
   2020  2019  Variation 
   (in millions of US$, except as otherwise provided)  % 

Sales and marketing

   (23.8  (20.2  18.2

Percentage of total revenue

   24.2  32.9  —   
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Our sales and marketing expenses increased by US$3.7 million, or 18.2%, to US$23.8 million in 2020 from US$20.2 million in 2019, primarily due to personnel expenses as our sales and marketing workforce increased to 262 employees in 2020 from 153 in 2019 to support our growth. We invested mainly in new regions in the Latin America region, such as Colombia and Mexico, as well as other geographies, including Europe and the United States.

Research and development

Research and development expenses during the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 were as follows:

 

   For the year ended December 31, 
   2020  2019  Variation 
   (in millions of US$, except as otherwise provided)  % 

Research and development

   (19.0  (12.7  50.1

Percentage of total revenue

   19.3  20.7  —   
  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Our research and development expenses increased by US$6.4 million, or 50.1%, to US$19.0 million in 2020 from US$12.7 million in 2019, primarily due to the increase in personnel expenses as our research and development workforce increased to 374 employees in 2020 from 251 in 2019 to support our growth, and the increase in certain other employee-related expenses.

Financial result

The components of our financial result during the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019 were as follows:

 

   For the year ended December 31, 
   2020   2019   Variation 
   (in millions of US$)   % 

Finance income

   3.9    1.3    202.2

Finance expense

   (7.0   (3.2   120.9
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Finance result

   (3.1   (1.9   65.5
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Our finance result increased by US$1.2 million, or 65.5%, to US$3.1 million in 2020 from US$1.9 million in 2019, as a result of the following:

Finance income

Finance income increased by US$2.6 million, or 202.2%, to US$3.9 million in 2020 from US$1.3 million in 2019, primarily due to (1) an increase in interest earned on bank deposits given the increase in our cash and cash equivalents and marketable securities to US$75.5 million in 2020 from US$44.3 million in 2019; and (2) foreign exchange gains relating to U.S. dollar deposits of our Brazilian subsidiary resulting from the appreciation of the U.S. Dollar against the Brazilian real.

 

103


Table of Contents

Finance expense

Our finance expense increased by US$3.9 million, or 120.9%, to US$7.0 million in 2020 from US$3.2 million in 2019, primarily due to interest payments on loans contracted in June 2019, whose interest expenses were recorded for approximately six months in 2019 and for the full year 2020.

Income tax

Our income tax expense increased by US$3.4 million, or            385.6%, to US$4.3 million in 2020 from US$0.9 million in 2019, primarily attributable to a higher profit before income tax which was partially offset by a higher technological innovation tax incentive as a result of the application of the Lei do Bem, which reduced our annual corporate income tax expenses in Brazil as compared to 2019.

Net loss for the year

As a result of the above, our net loss amounted to US$0.8 million in 2020, compared to US$4.6 million in 2019.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

The following discussion of our liquidity and capital resources is based on the financial information derived from our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements and our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.

Liquidity

Our cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, immediate demand deposits with financial institutions and other short-term highly liquid investments, which have an immaterial risk of change in value. As of March 31, 2021 and December 30, 2020, our cash and cash equivalents amounted to US$40.3 million and US$58.6 million, respectively.

We regularly evaluate opportunities to enhance our financial flexibility through a variety of methods, including, without limitation, through loans and financing. As a result of any of these actions, we may be subject to restrictions and covenants in the agreements governing these transactions that may place limitations on us, and we may be required to pledge collateral to secure such instruments. See “—Indebtedness” for additional information.

We intend to increase our capital expenditures to support the growth in our business and operations. We believe that our existing cash and cash equivalents and the liquidity provided from other sources of funds (including the proceeds from this offering) will be sufficient to meet our anticipated cash needs for at least the next 12 months, considering organic growth. However, our liquidity assumptions may prove to be incorrect, and we could exhaust our available financial resources sooner than we currently expect. We may seek to raise additional funds at any time through equity, equity-linked or debt financing arrangements. Our future capital requirements and the adequacy of available funds will depend on many factors, including those described in the section of this prospectus captioned “Risk Factors.” We may not be able to secure additional financing to meet our operating requirements on acceptable terms, or at all.

 

104


Table of Contents

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

The following table sets forth certain consolidated cash flow information for the periods indicated:

 

  For the Three Months ended
March 31,
   For the Year Ended
December 31,
 
  2021  2020   2020   2019 
  (in millions of US$) 

Net cash provided (used) by operating activities

  (7.4  (9.3   11.2    2.1 

Net cash provided (used) by investment activities

  0.3   (1.0   (6.1   (19.2

Net cash provided (used) by financing activities

  (9.7  (0.4   25.0    43.5 

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

  (16.9  (10.8   30.0    26.4 
 

 

 

  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided (used) by operating activities

For the three months ended March 31, 2021, net cash used by operating activities decreased by US$1.9 million to US$7.4 million from US$9.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020, primarily as a result of:

 

  

working capital adjustments which consisted mainly of: (1) a decrease of accounts payable and accrual expenses in the amount of US$1.0 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, compared to a decrease of US$3.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020; (2) an increase in deferred revenue of US$2.8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, compared to an increase of US$1.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020; and (3) an increase in other liabilities of US$0.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, compared to a decrease of US$1.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020, which was partially offset by an increase in trade receivables of US$1.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, compared to a decrease of US$1.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020; and

 

  

(1) an increase in share-based compensation to US$1.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from US$0.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020, and (2) an increase in other costs and foreign exchange, net to an expense of US$1.0 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from an income of US$2.1 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020, which was offset by an increase in net loss of the period to US$12.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, from US$5.2 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020, primarily due to an increase of operating expenses of 109.3%, primary due to the expansion of our workforce; and

For the year ended December 31, 2020, net cash provided by operating activities increased by US$9.1 million to US$11.2 million from US$2.1 million in the year ended December 31, 2019, primarily as a result of:

 

  

decrease in net loss of the year to US$0.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, from a net loss of the year of US$4.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, primarily due to an increase in GMV of 95.0% (on a non-FX neutral basis) or 134.9% (on an FX neutral basis), combined with adjustments primarily consisting of an increase in stock-based compensation to US$2.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 from US$0.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2019; and

 

  

working capital adjustments primarily due to the above-mentioned increase in GMV, which consisted mainly of: (1) an increase in deferred revenue of US$9.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to an increase of US$4.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2019; (2) an increase of accounts payable and accrual expenses in the amount of US$8.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to an increase of US$3.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2019; and (3) an increase in taxes payable in the amount of US$5.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 compared to an increase of US$1.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, which was

 

105


Table of Contents
 

partially offset by an increase of trade receivable in the amount of US$10.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to an increase of US$6.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2019.

Net cash provided (used) by investing activities

For the three months ended March 31, 2021, net cash provided (used) by investing activities increased by US$1.3 million to US$0.3 million of net cash provided by investing activities from US$1.0 million of net cash used by investing activities for the three months ended March 31, 2020, primarily as a result of (1) an increase in the acquisition of subsidiaries net of cash acquired of US$0.01 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, compared to US$0.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020; and (2) a decrease in the redemption of marketable securities of US$0.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, compared to nil for the three months ended March 31, 2020.

For the year ended December 31, 2020, net cash provided (used) by investing activities decreased by US$13.1 million to US$6.1 million from US$19.2 million in the year ended December 31, 2019, primarily as a result of (1) a decrease in the purchase of marketable securities to US$3.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, from US$14.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2019; (2) a redemption of marketable securities of US$2.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2020; and (3) and increase of interest received to US$1.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, from US$0.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, which was partially offset by an increase in the amounts invested in business combinations that resulted in an increase in the acquisition of subsidiaries net of cash acquired to US$3.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, from US$3.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2019.

Net cash provided (used) by financing activities

For the three months ended March 31, 2021, net cash used by financing activities increased by US$9.3 million to US$9.7 million from US$0.4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020, primarily as a result of (1) an increase in payment of loans and financing in the amount of US$9.0 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from US$0.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020, (2) an increase in the buyback of shares in the amount of US$2.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from nil for the three months ended March 31, 2020, which was partially offset by an increase in the proceeds from the exercise of the amounts raised from capital increases to US$1.0 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 from nil for the three months ended March 31, 2020.

Net cash provided by financing activities decreased by US$18.5 million, to US$25.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 from US$43.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2019. This decrease is primarily attributable to: (1) an increase in the buyback of shares in the amount of US$129.0 million in the year ended December 31, 2020 from nil for the year ended December 31, 2019, which was partially offset by an increase in the amounts raised from capital increases to US$156.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 from US$40.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2019; and (2) the decrease of loans obtained to none for the year ended December 31, 2020 from US$7.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2019

Capital Expenditures

Our capital expenditures, consisting of purchase of property and equipment, for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 amounted to US$0.5 million and US$0.5 million, respectively, representing 2.1% and 3.3% of our total revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2021, and 2020, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, our capital expenditures amounted to US$1.6 million and US$1.8 million, respectively, representing 1.7% and 3.0% of our total revenue for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

We estimate that our capital expenditures for 2021 will be approximately US$3.0 million, primarily for the purchase of property and equipment.

 

106


Table of Contents

We expect to increase our capital expenditures to support the growth in our business and operations. We expect to meet our capital expenditure needs for the foreseeable future from our net cash provided by operating activities and our existing cash and cash equivalents. Our future capital requirements will depend on several factors, including mainly our growth rate and employee headcount.

Indebtedness

We had total indebtedness (consisting of loans and financings) in the amount of US$4.9 million and US$6.4 million as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. The decrease in indebtedness is primarily due to principal repayments to Itaú, BNDES and Totvs which occurred in 2020 and in 2021.

The table below sets forth selected information regarding our material outstanding indebtedness as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020:

 

  As of March 31,   As of December 31, 
  2021   2020 
  (in millions of US$) 

BNDES

  1.4    1.7 

Itaú

  3.4    4.1 

Totvs(1)

  —      0.5 

PSBank(2)

  0.1    —   
 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

  4.9    6.4 
 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

(1)

Prepaid in January 2021.

(2)

Refers to a loan under U.S. Paycheck Protection Program that was granted to WebLinc Corp, or WorkArea, before being acquired by us, to provide a direct incentive for small businesses to keep their workers on the payroll. This loan accrues an interest of 1% per annum.

BNDES Credit Facility

March 13, 2017, we entered into a credit facility with the BNDES, in the amount of R$15.6 million, to finance the development of new ecommerce technologies. The credit facility accrues interest at 8.5% per annum. Principal is repayable in 48 equal monthly instalments, with an additional 25 months grace period. This credit facility is scheduled to mature on March 15, 2023 and is secured by a bank guarantee equivalent to 100% of the total borrowed amount.

Itaú Unibanco S.A. Working Capital Loan

On June 14, 2019, we entered into a working capital loan agreement with Itaú Unibanco S.A. in the amount of €6.9 million. On the same date, a swap was contracted to hedge against foreign exchange rate, converting the financial charges of the loan (1.77% per annum) into an effective annual rate of CDI + 2.65%, designating the financial instrument as fair value hedge. The hedge was also contracted with Itaú Unibanco S.A. payments are on quarterly basis, with the last installment maturing in May 2023.

Under the terms of the working capital loan agreement, we are required to comply with the following financial covenant:

Net debt/EBITDA ratio must be not less than:

 

  

2020: 1.3x;

 

  

2021: 1.2x; and

 

  

2022: 1x.

As of March 31, 2021 and the date of this prospectus, we were in compliance with this covenant.

 

107


Table of Contents

Commitments and Contractual Obligations

The following table sets forth our contractual obligations as of March 31, 2021:

 

   Payments due by period 
   Total   Less than 1
year
   Between 1 and 2
years
   More than 2
years
 
   (in US$ millions) 

Loans and financing

   5.0    1.5    1.9    1.6 

Lease liabilities

   5.9    1.2    1.7    3.0 

Accounts payable - acquisition of subsidiary

   9.6    9.6    0.1    —   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

   20.5    12.3    3.7    4.6 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

The following table sets forth our contractual obligations as of December 31, 2020:

 

   Payments due by period 
   Total   Less than 1
year
   Between 1 and 2
years
   More than 2
years
 
   (in US$ millions) 

Loans and financing

   5.6    2.4    2.3    0.9 

Lease liabilities

   6.2    1.5    1.5    3.2 

Accounts payable — acquisition of subsidiary

   4.7    2.8    1.1    0.8 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

   16.5    6.7    4.9    4.9 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

As of March 31, 2021, we did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements.

Critical Estimates and Accounting Judgments and Significant Accounting Policies

Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in conformity with IFRS. In preparing our consolidated financial statements, we make assumptions, judgments and estimates that can have a significant impact on amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements. We base our assumptions, judgments and estimates on historical experience and various other factors that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results could differ materially from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. We regularly reevaluate our assumptions, judgments and estimates. Our critical estimates and accounting judgments are described in note 6 to our consolidated financial statements.

In addition, our significant accounting policies are described in note 2 to our consolidated financial statements, including the following:

Revenue recognition

Revenue is measured based on the consideration specified in a contract with a customer. We recognize revenue from two sources: (1) revenue from subscription and (2) revenue from services.

 

 (1)

Revenue from subscriptions: are originated from a cloud-based multichannel SaaS platform focused on Ecommerce. There is a single performance obligation corresponding to maintaining the access to the platform. Revenue is recognized over time and the transaction price consists on the following components:

 

  

Take rate is a fixed percentage charged on each costumer’s GMV. Revenue is recognized in the period in which the transaction with the end consumer occurs.

 

108


Table of Contents
  

Voucher revenue is a non-refundable upfront fee paid in exchange for reducing of take rate mentioned above during a predetermined period. Revenue is recognized ratably over the contractual period.

 

  

Fixed fee is a fixed amount billed on a monthly basis. Revenue is recognized ratably over the contract period.

 

  

Rebates represent our share from partnerships (such as marketplaces and payment providers) that is calculated as a fixed percentage of the end consumer’s gross merchandise value, or as a fixed fee. Revenue is recognized in the period in which the transaction with the end consumer occurs.

 

 (2)

Revenue from services: comprise revenues substantially from consulting and professional services, which primarily consist of digital commerce solutions architecting, education packages and others. Revenues from consulting services are recognized in the accounting period in which the services are rendered based on the actual service provided to the end of the reporting period as a proportion of the total services to be provided because the customer receives and uses the benefits simultaneously and the customer pays the service based on a payment schedule. We do not provide implementation services, which are provided by third party companies to our customers.

Estimates of revenues, costs, or extent of progress toward completion are revised if circumstances change. Any resulting increases or decreases in estimated revenues or costs are reflected in profit or loss in the period in which the circumstances that give rise to the revision become known by management. Payments received in advance of services being rendered are recorded as deferred revenue and recognized ratably over time.

Software development costs

Internal research and development costs are expensed as incurred. These costs primarily consist of personnel and related expenses, stock-based compensation and corporate overhead allocations, including depreciation. See note 21 to our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements and note 22 to our consolidated financial statements.

Deferred costs

Deferred costs include deferred sales commissions that are incremental costs of obtaining customer contracts. Sales commissions are not paid on subscription renewal. We amortize deferred sales commissions ratably over five years. We determined the period of benefit by taking into consideration our past experience with customers and industry peers.

Stock-based compensation

Prior to the completion of this offering, we have granted stock options and restricted stock units to certain employees, consultants, and members of our board of directors. Stock-based compensation is measured based on the fair value of the awards on the grant date. A stock-based compensation expense is recognized over the period the recipient is required to perform services in exchange for the award, generally the vesting period.

Estimating fair value for share-based payment transactions requires determination of the most appropriate valuation model and underlying assumptions, which depends on the terms and conditions of the grant and the information available at the grant date. We use certain methodologies to estimate fair value, which include third-party appraisals or private placements and equity transactions with third parties close to the applicable grant date and other valuation techniques, including option pricing models such as Black-Scholes and Binomial.

For a more detailed description of our stock-based compensation plan, see note 26 to our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements and note 27 to our consolidated financial statements.

 

109


Table of Contents

Impairment

Goodwill and intangible assets that have an indefinite useful life are not subject to amortization and are tested annually for impairment, or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that they might be impaired.

Other assets are tested for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable.

An impairment loss is recognized in profit or loss for the amount by which the asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount. The recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs of disposal and value in use. For the purposes of assessing impairment, assets are grouped at the lowest levels for which there are separately identifiable cash inflows that are largely independent of the cash inflows from other assets or groups of assets (cash-generating units).

Non-financial assets other than goodwill that suffered an impairment are reviewed for possible reversal of the impairment at the end of each reporting period. Therefore, impairment losses recognized for goodwill cannot be reversed in a subsequent period.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

We are exposed to market risks in the ordinary course of our business, including the effects of foreign currency fluctuations, derivative financial instruments, credit risk and liquidity risk. Information relating to quantitative and qualitative disclosures about these market risks is described below:

Interest rate risk

The interest risk arises from the possibility of us incurring losses due to fluctuations in interest rates in respect of fair value of future cash flows of a financial instrument.

Our main exposure to interest rate risk is related to loans and financing payable subject to variable interest rate, principally the CDI rate. Our investments are made for capital preservation purposes and we do not enter into investments for trading or speculative purposes. Our trade receivables, accounts payable and other liabilities do not bear interest.

The following table summarizes our financial instruments exposed to an interest rate risk as of March 31, 2021:

 

Transaction

  Interest rate risk   Book Value 
       (in millions of US$) 

Loans and financing

   SELIC, CDI and TJLP    (4.9

Accounts payable on acquisition of subsidiaries

   CDI    (2.7

As of March 31, 2021, we are not materially exposed to the risk of changes in market interest rates mostly due to the purpose of our investments.

Foreign currency exchange risk

We have significant operations internationally that are denominated in foreign currencies. Our exposure to foreign exchange risk is primarily related to fluctuations between the U.S. Dollar and the Latin American countries in which we operate (primarily the Brazilian real, Argentine peso, Colombian peso and Chilean peso). We transact business in various foreign currencies and have significant international revenues and costs. Our

 

110


Table of Contents

cash flows, results of operations and certain of our intercompany balances that are exposed to foreign exchange rate fluctuations may differ materially from expectations and we may record significant gains or losses due to foreign currency fluctuations and related hedging activities. For further information see note 28.2.(c)(i) of our consolidated financial statements. For further information see note 28.2.(c)(i) to our consolidated financial statements.

Our subsidiaries generate revenues and incur most of their expenses in the respective local currencies of the countries in which they operate. As a result, our subsidiaries use their local currency as their functional currency. In the three months ended March 31, 2021 and in the year ended December 31, 2020, 17.9% and 14.0% of our revenues were denominated in, or linked to, U.S. dollars, respectively. As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, our assets were represented by 48.1% and 44.7% in U.S. dollars, 51.9% and 55.3% in other currencies. As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, our liabilities, excluding our total shareholders’ equity, were represented by 28.9% and 10.2% in U.S. dollars, 71.1% and 89.8% in other currencies. For further information, see note 28.2.c to our consolidated financial statements.

We are exposed to foreign exchange fluctuations on the revaluation of foreign currency assets and liabilities. We use foreign exchange derivative products to hedge intercompany loans, and debt for operational purposes. By their nature, derivative financial instruments involve risk, including the credit risk of non-performance by counterparties. We use derivatives for hedging purposes and not as speculative investments. For further information on how such derivatives are recognized and classified, see note 27.1.ii to our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements and 28.1.b to our consolidated financial statements.

Public Company Cost

Upon the closing of our initial public offering, we will become a public company, and our Class A common shares will be publicly traded on the                . As a result, we will need to comply with new laws, regulations and requirements that we did not need to comply with as a private company, including provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, other applicable SEC regulations and the requirements of the                . Compliance with the requirements of being a public company will require us to increase our general and administrative expenses in order to pay our employees, legal counsel and independent registered public accountants to assist us in, among other things, instituting and monitoring a more comprehensive compliance and board governance function, establishing and maintaining internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and preparing and distributing periodic public reports in compliance with our obligations under the federal securities laws. In addition, as a public company, it will be more expensive for us to obtain directors’ and officers’ liability insurance.

Emerging Growth Company Status

On April 5, 2012, the JOBS Act was signed into law. The JOBS Act contains provisions that, among other things, reduce certain reporting requirements for qualifying public companies. We are in the process of evaluating the benefits of relying on the other reduced reporting requirements provided by the JOBS Act. Subject to certain conditions set forth in the JOBS Act, if, as an “emerging growth company,” we choose to rely on such exemptions we may not be required to, among other things, provide an auditor’s attestation report on our system of internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404, and these exemptions will apply until we are no longer an “emerging growth company.” See “Risk Factors—Risks Related to our Business and Industry—In preparing our consolidated financial statements, we have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting and, if we fail to implement and maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting, we may be unable to accurately report our results of operations, meet our reporting obligations or prevent fraud.”

 

111


Table of Contents

Material Weakness in Internal Controls and Remediation

We identified a number of material weaknesses in our internal controls over financial reporting as of December 31, 2020. Specifically, the following controls were not fully effective:

 

  

Lack of an effective control environment and monitoring of controls, as a result of: (1) lack of formal policies and procedures to support the internal control over financial reporting; and (2) failure to design and maintain internal controls over financial reporting in response to risks of material misstatements;

 

  

Failure to design and maintain controls over the period-end financial reporting as a result of: (1) failure to design and maintain controls related to consolidation and disclosure processes; and (2) failure to design and maintain controls related to review and approval journal entries;

 

  

Failure to design and maintain controls related to restrict access management procedures, regarding granting, revoking and reviewing access and segregation of duties; and

 

  

Failure to identify and control data flow and EUC, basically interfaces, spreadsheets and key reports related to key controls and relevant LSPM.

These material weaknesses did not result in a material misstatement to our consolidated financial statements. We have adopted a remediation plan with respect to the material weaknesses identified above, which includes hiring several new experienced personnel in our financial reporting and internal controls team, as well as engaging external advisors to assist the Company in addressing the material weaknesses. These measures include also the design, implementation of new processes, policies and procedures, improvements of the internal controls to provide additional levels of review and approval, enhancements of internal documentation, implementation of new software solutions and strengthening the training program for staff related to the requirements of IFRS, the rules and regulations of the SEC and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, as well as the guidelines of COSO’s Internal Control Integrated Framework. We cannot guarantee that the measures we have taken to date and may take in the future, will be sufficient to remediate the control deficiencies that led to our material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting or that they will prevent or avoid potential future material weaknesses. See “Risk Factors—In preparing our consolidated financial statements, we have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting and, if we fail to implement and maintain effective internal controls over financial reporting, we may be unable to accurately report our results of operations, meet our reporting obligations or prevent fraud.”

 

112


Table of Contents

BUSINESS

Overview

VTEX provides a software-as-a-service digital commerce platform for enterprise brands and retailers. Our platform enables our customers to execute their commerce strategy, including building online stores, integrating and managing orders across channels, and creating marketplaces to sell products from third-party vendors. Founded in Brazil, we have been a leader in accelerating the digital commerce transformation in Latin America and are expanding globally. Our platform is engineered to enterprise-level standards and functionality with the majority of our revenue coming from large, blue-chip companies (i.e. clients with more than US$5 million of GMV per year). We are trusted by more than 2,000 customers with over 2,500 active online stores across 32 countries to connect with their consumers in a meaningful way.

Global online retail spend has grown rapidly. Over the past decade, ecommerce spend has grown to US$3.0 trillion, and is projected to double to US$6.0 trillion over the next five years, according to Insider Intelligence. Latin America, in particular, was the fastest-growing region in the world in 2020, and yet ecommerce still represents a small fraction of the total retail market in the region. Accelerating ecommerce growth, evolving consumer expectations and the proliferation of digital shopping alternatives are raising the bar for brands and retailers to stay relevant. Legacy structures developed over years force enterprises to choose between deep customization and speed to market. Our technology combined with our ecosystem of partners solves this problem. We deliver flexibility and simplicity to complex, mission-critical commerce operations.

We enable our customers to implement multiple go-to-market strategies. Our platform natively combines commerce, order management and marketplace functionality, allowing enterprises to sell a wider assortment of products across more channels than ever before. By integrating with suppliers, distributors, third-party vendors, franchisees, warehouses, and brick-and-mortar stores, enterprises can rapidly implement new business models and digital experiences, including direct-to-consumer, marketplace, ship from store, endless aisle and drop-ship. We call this set of deep integrations “Collaborative Commerce.”

Our Collaborative Commerce approach benefits from a powerful ecosystem with significant network effects. Our ecosystem includes more than 1,000 integrated solutions, 200 systems integrators, 100 marketplaces, 80 payments solutions, and 50 logistics companies. Our partners’ solutions are embedded within our platform, allowing our customers to seamlessly execute their commerce vision and strategy. The more customers adopt our platform and partners join our network, the more efficiently we can help facilitate the future of commerce.

Our technology is flexible and extensible. Our open, API-first, multi-tenant commerce platform allows enterprises to adopt new commerce capabilities with minimal risk. Combined with our low-code development platform, VTEX IO, we enable our customers to build proprietary technology, seamlessly integrated with extensive out-of-the-box functionality. In essence, our “Composable Commerce” approach allows enterprises to leverage the knowledge of highly specialized talents from the VTEX ecosystem while focusing their own talent on what makes them unique. Composable Commerce enables our customers to rapidly deploy our solutions and quickly iterate and customize the entire commerce experience at scale.

We serve a diversified mix of global enterprise brands and retailers executing on innovative opportunities. We enable manufacturers and CPG companies to execute their direct-to-consumer strategy on a global scale. We help fashion, grocery and other retailers to expand their reach through omnichannel, marketplace and drop-ship models. Our platform offers a variety of capabilities, including web, mobile and in-store sales, distributed order management, channel management, seller management, content and catalog management and fulfillment channel integrations. We help our customers rapidly execute their bespoke commerce strategies, and provide unprecedented time to revenue. VTEX was named a leader in the IDC MarketScape: Worldwide B2C Digital Commerce Platforms 2020 Vendor Assessment, and Gartner named us as a Visionary in its 2020 report, Magic Quadrant for Digital Commerce, Worldwide.

 

113


Table of Contents

We have succeeded in attracting, developing and accelerating the careers of top talent from Latin America and across the globe. Throughout our history, we have carefully developed a high-performance culture that creates the conditions for individual growth and values the diversity of perspectives that challenges the status quo. Beyond attracting, we cultivate new talent through key partnership programs with top universities and world-class educational initiatives on digital commerce. We are proud to positively impact our society through education, nurturing a new generation of global digital citizens.

We guide our customers to success. Enterprises choose us as a strategic partner to accelerate their digital commerce transformation and deliver on revenue-generating initiatives. We deliver our platform through a subscription revenue model that includes both fixed and GMV-based variable components. This revenue model strategically aligns us with our customers: we grow by enabling them to grow. In the three months ended March 31, 2021 and in the year ended December 31, 2020, our customers generated US$2.0 billion and US$7.5 billion of GMV within our platform, respectively, up from US$1.0 billion and US$3.8 billion during the prior periods, representing, respectively a growth rate of 113.8% and 95.0%, or 142.3 and 134.9% on an FX neutral basis.

Our business has experienced significant growth. In the three months ended March 31, 2021, our revenue increased to US$25.9 million from US$16.6 million in the three months ended March 31, 2020 representing an increase of 55.8% and 77.0% on an FX neutral basis. In the same periods, we generated net losses of US$12.5 million and US$5.2 million, net cash used by operating activities of US$7.4 million and US$9.3 million and a negative Free Cash Flow of US$8.0 million and US$9.9 million, respectively. In the year ended December 31, 2020, our revenue increased to US$98.7 million from US$61.3 million in the year ended December 31, 2019, representing an increase of 60.9% and 95.3% on an FX neutral basis. In the same periods, we generated net losses of US$0.8 million and US$4.6 million, net cash provided by operating activities of US$11.2 million and US$2.1 million and Free Cash Flow of US$9.5 million and US$0.2 million, respectively.

Industry Overview and Trends

Ecommerce has evolved to meet the needs of the modern day customer. Early solutions had limited functionality to receive orders and fulfill deliveries. Today’s scalable platforms enable bespoke frameworks for customization and are often supported by a deep ecosystem of third-party functionality. Additionally, brands are seeing the importance of a direct-to-consumer channel that helps them control the consumer relationship and brand messaging. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic accelerated the adoption of ecommerce, shifting significant shopping behavior from offline to online. Consumers now expect brands to make the shopping experience as convenient and seamless as possible across product discovery, purchasing and fulfillment. As such, retailers require enablement platforms with the scalability and flexibility to serve their consumer.

Rapidly changing consumer preferences driving need for retailers to innovate

How consumers discover, learn about and ultimately purchase products is evolving due to digital transformation and advances in technology. A consumer may discover a product on social media, read reviews and blogs using a tablet, visit a nearby brick-and-mortar store to see the product in person, compare prices using a mobile phone and end up purchasing the product from yet a different merchant or through an online marketplace. The internet has enabled consumers to interact with merchants around the globe to find and purchase products that fit their specific needs and tastes. According to Insider Intelligence, in 2020, 18.0% of all retail spend was made through a digital channel in 2020, representing a penetration growth rate of 32.0% as compared to 2019.

Enterprises must address the breadth of consumer interaction points and potential sales channels, ensuring a satisfying consumer experience from discovery through delivery. The consumer expects a seamless experience, convenient and simple, yet not simplistic. Without an effective digital presence, retailers are often overlooked by consumers, lag behind competitors and have difficulty generating growth. Retailers of all sizes are required to invest in digital transformation to build out and test new business models and strategies. Robust omnichannel solutions are

 

114


Table of Contents

now standard for an effective digital transformation strategy. However, significant ongoing innovation across marketing, inventory, payments and delivery are required to ensure enterprises are empowered to meaningfully connect with consumers and deliver seamless brand experiences across the entire shopping lifecycle.

Convenience-driven economy requires deep changes to complex, legacy supply chain networks

Consumers seek frictionless online experiences and the convenience and speed provided by on-demand delivery. Growing expectations for shorter on-demand delivery times require significant planning, coordination and execution to ensure supply chain networks are aligned to meet distribution and fulfillment. According to Capgemini, 61.0% of consumers claim same-day delivery will increase their loyalty and 55% of consumers will switch to a competing retailer or brand if it offers a faster delivery service. The intensity of global online and brick-and-mortar competition in retail drives businesses to meet the consumer where they are: at home or at work, and on-demand.

The technical requirements for fulfillment are complex and involve the synchronization of back-end systems, including those related to customer information, inventory, orders, products, payments and other data that originate in different sales channels. Brands and retailers have historically operated in silos based mostly on direct buy and sell transactions, and did not have the tools to collaborate in real-time around complex value chains. Additionally, many brands and retailers have supply chains with existing networks of in-store and warehouse distribution facilities, adding another level of complexity to optimize operational efficiency. As brands and retailers navigate these deep challenges, digital collaboration has emerged as a potential path for brands, retailers, suppliers and third-party providers to stay in constant contact with consumers to ensure frictionless distribution and fulfillment.

The need to deliver an authentic brand experience requires platforms that enable retailers to customize, build and scale businesses

Increasingly, consumers seek personalized experiences with brands, not just a point of sale for purchase. This has created a need for retailers to focus on design, simplicity and experience. Ecommerce has driven the proliferation of more personalized, direct-to-consumer brands. Vertically-integrated digitally native brands, or DNBs, sell products directly to consumers online, frequently bypassing third-party distribution and retailers, and often obviating the need for their own brick-and-mortar stores. In 2020, DNBs comprised 38 of the Digital Commerce 360 Top 500 stores and grew year-over-year sales in 2019 at 33.0% compared to growth of 16.0% for the overall top 500, according to Digital Commerce 360.

The growth in DNBs has corresponded with demand for turnkey ecommerce platforms that support both rapid product launch and scaling. Brands now have greater control over the narrative and image they convey to their customers. The proliferation of DNBs is driving the need for existing manufacturing brands to innovate in order to effectively compete. Strong manufacturing brands are generally ill-equipped to go direct-to-consumer. However, through collaboration and effective partnerships across areas including payments, shipping, marketplace and POS, these retailers can remain competitive in delivering authentic brand experiences.

Legacy software solutions are inadequate to serve the needs of 21st century brands and retailers

Legacy approaches to ecommerce software, consisting of open sourced licensed, owned, and/or managed technology behind their ecommerce sites, are still prevalent in enterprises. We believe that while the market for digital commerce software solutions may be large and growing, the legacy solutions for enterprises do not effectively address the needs of digitizing brands, manufacturers and retailers in a fast-paced, evolving and competitive environment. Legacy solutions are largely characterized as:

 

  

On-premise. Legacy on-premise solutions lack the flexibility and adaptability of SaaS solutions. These solutions are challenging, time intensive and expensive to update. Businesses of all sizes often lack the time and resources required to upgrade, patch, and modernize their legacy software to address consumer and technology trends.

 

115


Table of Contents
  

Lengthy deployment cycle. Traditional enterprise solutions typically have long and costly deployment cycles. In addition, legacy solutions tend to become overly complex and are not nimble enough to adapt to evolving market trends, new software requirements and emerging technologies.

 

  

Static. Enterprises test strategies and evolve rapidly as they transform digitally and discover new ways to engage and convert customers. Even the most basic ecommerce sites require a wide range of integrated third-party applications, including payments, anti-fraud, and shipping. More sophisticated enterprises will often incorporate dozens of integrated third-party applications. Legacy solutions lack the flexibility to adapt to these requirements.

 

  

Disparate point solutions. Brands and retailers need integrated, seamless solutions that leverage data across multiple sources to optimize operational efficiencies. Legacy vendors typically provide point solutions that often fail to provide multi-channel sales capabilities. As enterprises scale and require greater functionality, they are forced to stitch together multiple products, creating a complex patchwork of disparate technologies, which can often be cumbersome, time-consuming and result in disjointed consumer experiences.

 

  

Security vulnerabilities: Security threats have become more sophisticated and continue to evolve such that enterprises continually face new and emerging security threats. Legacy solutions were not designed to handle these evolving threats. The approaches used by hackers are ever more clever and intelligent. Legacy software solutions are more vulnerable as their security protocols were not designed to handle the security threats of today. As a result, upgrading the protections in legacy software is challenging.

Our Market Opportunity

Market opportunity in Latin America

Latin America is one of the largest and most diverse regions in the world. It is also among the largest growing economies in the world, with estimated GDP growth rate of 3.0% to US$4.0 trillion by 2025, according to IHS Markit, driven by technological advances and an emerging middle class. Comprised of over 40 countries with a total population of over 600 million, the region encompasses multiple languages, currencies and regulatory regimes. The size and complexity of the region present us with a significant opportunity as the geographic incumbent leader and a competitive advantage relative to solution providers that are less familiar with the intricacies of the region.

Latin America ecommerce is growing rapidly, yet still represents a small fraction of the total retail market. According to Insider Intelligence, ecommerce in Latin America grew to US$85.0 billion in 2020, a growth rate of 37% over 2019, making it the fastest growing region among all major world regions. At the same time, it represents only approximately 6.2% of all total retail sales in the region, a lag of six years compared to current global ecommerce penetration of 18.0%, presenting an enormous opportunity and runway for growth as more sales shift online. This shift in online sales reflects expected growth in digital audiences from an expanding middle class and ongoing innovations in ecommerce payments systems and logistics in the region. Insider

 

116


Table of Contents

Intelligence estimates the Latin America ecommerce market will grow to more than US$130.0 billion by 2024 at a compounded annual growth rate of 11.0%.

 

 

LOGO

Market opportunity globally

The global ecommerce market has experienced rapid growth, driven by an acceleration of online penetration over the past 15 years. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic further accelerated the adoption of ecommerce, which drove broader business growth while brick-and-mortar stores were closed and consumers increased their ecommerce spending due to extensive stay at home orders.

 

 

LOGO

Global GMV was estimated to be approximately US$4.0 trillion in 2020, and is expected to grow to approximately US$6.0 trillion by 2024, representing a compounded annual growth rate of 11.0%, according to Insider Intelligence. In the three months ended March 31, 2021 and in the year ended December 31, 2020, our platform processed US$2.0 billion and US$7.5 billion in GMV, respectively, the latter representing less than 0.5% of global GMV. As we continue to expand our platform offerings as well as our global reach, we expect to capture more of this GMV. We believe that our market will expand as consumers continue to shift purchases to online channels and brands and retailers adapt to evolving consumer preferences.

 

117


Table of Contents

Our Solution

VTEX provides a SaaS digital commerce platform for enterprise brands and retailers. Our platform enables our customers to execute their commerce strategy, including building online stores, integrating and managing orders across channels, and creating marketplaces to sell products from third-party vendors. Our platform fully integrates commerce, marketplace and OMS solutions that enable our customers to manage product catalogs, optimize inventory, process orders and payments, and build even stronger brands that connect with their customers. We provide our customers with an innovative platform that:

 

  

Drives comprehensive digital transformation. We provide a robust omnichannel commerce platform that can optimize existing in-store and distribution networks, integrate and manage multiple sales channels and seamlessly connect multiple fulfillment points. Through our platform, we help our customers build out and test new business models and strategies and incorporate physical and online points of sale in personalized ways. We deliver our solution through a Composable Commerce architecture that comprises a low-code development platform with a customizable and flexible back-end, decoupled storefront and pre-built integrations. Our fully extensible, API-first business capabilities enable customers to rapidly deploy commerce solutions and provide flexibility to build and customize the entire commerce experience at scale.

 

  

Collaborates with suppliers and partners. We provide a commerce platform that embraces digital collaboration to fuel growth, power innovation and build relationships online. Our solutions enable our customers to digitally collaborate with suppliers and partners, to expand product assortment, test new products, explore new markets and attract new customers by coordinating with third-party suppliers and drop-ship partners for inventory and fulfillment.

 

  

Strengthens the relationship between brands and their consumers. Our platform enables brands to offer compelling and consistent digital experiences across multiple channels and deliver their full brand experience directly to consumers. Our platform also offers the opportunity for manufacturers to build their own direct to consumer commerce capabilities to leverage the trust inspired by their products and reduce reliance on retailers for sales.

 

  

Provides a centralized technology hub. We provide a single point of control platform that integrates data across operations and through our distributed OMS solution, we provide a 360-degree view of inventory and orders. Our platform enables our customers to manage their ecommerce operations with a seamless, easy-to-use interface to provide a holistic view of our customers’ business operations across CMS, pricing and promotions management and distributed OMS. Data generated by a direct digital commerce channel can be leveraged to increase sales, add new customers and maintain tighter control of a customer’s brand portfolio.

 

  

Provides security, scalability, reliability. Our pricing model, cloud infrastructure and built-in developer tooling helps ensure the VTEX platform is prepared to support our customers’ growth. The power of the VTEX platform comes from an auto-scaling, elastic cloud infrastructure that helps brands and retailers respond to market changes and customer demands in real-time. The platform is designed to be highly isolated and secure. We use firewalls, denial of service mitigation appliances, encryption, intrusion detection systems, two-factor authentication and other technology in an effort to keep our platform and customers’ data secure.

Our Competitive Strengths

We built our modern platform from the ground up to address the growing needs of enterprises, with the aim of creating simple, yet not simplistic, solutions. We guide our customers to success. Enterprises choose us as a strategic partner to accelerate their digital commerce transformation and deliver on revenue-generating initiatives. Our core strengths are:

 

  

Market leadership in Latin America. We are the largest provider of digital commerce technology in Latin America. Our market leadership is driven by the strength and functionality of our platform and

 

118


Table of Contents
 

our expertise in delivering solutions that accommodate differences across regions, tax jurisdictions, and specific local consumer preferences. Our scale and ten-year operating history of the VTEX platform enable us to build and grow a deep and distinctive ecosystem that would be difficult to replicate in the region. We are leveraging our regional expertise to enable our customers to reach global markets.

 

  

Highly embedded, deep relationships with enterprises. We have a large, blue-chip customer base across a broad range of end markets, with over 2,000 customers across 32 countries. Approximately 84.1% of our ARR is derived from enterprise customers with active online stores, each generating more than US$25,000 in ARR and with an average ARR per active online store of US$127,428 as of December 31, 2020. Additionally, 85.6% of our enterprise revenues came from customers who have been on the VTEX platform for over one year, for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

  

Strong alignment with our customers’ success. We deliver our platform through a subscription revenue model that includes both fixed and GMV-based variable components. This revenue model strategically aligns us with our customers: we grow as they grow. This model drives us to focus on what is most important to our customers and will help them maximize their revenue.

 

  

Collaborative Commerce provides deep network effects from a powerful ecosystem of partners. We help unlock new revenue streams for our customers through collaborative opportunities with their suppliers and partners, as well as a rich ecosystem of hundreds of integrated solutions, SIs, and payments solutions. Our ecosystem is difficult to replicate and includes more than 1,000 integrated solutions, 200 system integrators, 100 marketplaces, 80 payments solutions, and 50 logistics companies. Our partners’ solutions are embedded within our platform, allowing our customers to seamlessly execute their commerce vision and strategy, and build valuable networks and effective marketplaces. It also lowers our customer acquisition costs through organic lead generation.

 

  

Composable Commerce enables rapid adaptability in a digital world and faster time to market. We provide our customers with a platform that is flexible, fast and easy to scale. We have a low-code development platform with fully extensible API-first business capabilities that provides flexibility to build differentiated experiences and enables our customers to rapidly deploy our solutions as well as to quickly iterate and customize the entire commerce experience at scale. Our customers operate on a single, global, continuously deployed, multi-tenant architecture that ensures that they are always using the latest technology.

 

  

High performance culture based on commitment to innovation and execution. A strong passion for success motivates our team, and we embrace cooperation and collaboration to achieve our business goals. Our high-performance culture is driven by a commitment to listening, learning, and diversity of perspectives that challenges the status quo.

Growth Strategy

We have strong market leadership in Latin America, and expect to continue scaling with enterprise customers in high-growth markets across the broader Latin America region and across the world. Building on our distinctive heritage, we expect to continue our growth on multiple dimensions. Our growth strategy is driven by our mission to accelerate commerce transformation. Key elements of our strategy include:

 

  

Grow our customer base. We believe that we have a significant opportunity to increase the size of our current customer base. We intend to continue to strategically invest in sales and marketing programs that enhance our customer reach as well as increase the awareness of our brand. We believe it is important to establish strong relationships with new customers.

 

  

Grow GMV within existing customer base. Our goals are closely aligned with the goals of our customers. Our subscription revenue model includes both fixed and GMV-based variable components such that the more revenue our customers generate using our platform, the more revenue we generate. We grow with our existing customers in two primary ways: (1) we help our customers grow their GMV from existing online stores; and (2) we enable our customers to expand across regions or across brands by opening additional online stores.

 

119


Table of Contents
  

Continuous innovation and expansion. We have invested and intend to continue to invest in our platform, including broadening our capabilities to meet the future needs of enterprises and their brands. Our ability to incorporate innovations that improve our platform is critical to ensure that the enterprises we support have the necessary capabilities to adapt to the influx of disruptive technologies impacting commerce. We help our customers incorporate cutting edge technologies and capabilities that emerge from our partners and the broader commerce ecosystem and therefore, meet the evolving needs of consumers.

 

  

Geographic expansion: We support the growth of our customers around the world by delivering a world-class platform and by expanding our regional capabilities including sales and marketing, development and operations. Given our strong brand awareness and market position, we have historically focused geographic expansion to other regions within Latin America and believe that most of our growth will continue to come from Latin America. Over time, we believe our platform can compete successfully around the world, and, as such, we plan to continue investing in our operations across the Unites States and Europe.

 

  

Continue to grow and develop our ecosystem. We have a thriving third-party ecosystem, including providers for shipping, marketplaces, point-of-sale, omnichannel, marketing automation, search, merchandising, SIs, agencies, payments, anti-fraud and lending. We have built a strong network ecosystem with over 1,000 integrated solutions, 200 SIs, 100 marketplaces, 80 payments solutions and 50 logistics companies. We believe that growing our ecosystem will help to further expand our customer base by providing greater revenue opportunities from collaboration, which will in turn drive additional growth of our ecosystem.

The VTEX Platform

We built our modern, cloud-native platform based on open, multi-tenant architecture to address the growing challenges facing enterprises and with the aim of making previously complex tasks simple. The VTEX platform has been engineered to enterprise-level standards, functionality and support. The key capabilities of our single control panel platform are illustrated and summarized below.

 

 

LOGO

 

 (1)

Comprehensive commerce coverage: The VTEX platform creates a true omnichannel experience by connecting our enterprise customers across all their sales channels.

 

  

Web: VTEX customers can leverage our website store framework to quickly and efficiently launch and evolve web stores tailor-made for their business. We continually evolve our store

 

120


Table of Contents
 

framework to ensure that it delivers a superior web experience and performance for consumers. We offer more than 100 extensible, pre-built commerce capabilities and apps to compose an enterprise-level, industry-leading web store.

 

  

Mobile: Our customers can leverage store framework mobile-first components to create progressive web apps with the same look and feel as their web store. Customers can also build more sophisticated native apps by using our APIs and commerce micro-services together with their preferred mobile native or hybrid development framework.

 

  

Brick-and-mortar stores/field sales: Our VTEX inStore solution is built for field sales and store associates to enable them to sell products from the store they operate, as well as products and inventory connected to any store or fulfillment node connected to our customers’ network through the “endless aisle.” We also offer social selling extensions to allow sales associates to better serve their online and offline consumers across all channels.

 

  

Telesales: VTEX OMS has a GUI that allow telesales reps to easily incorporate past consumer behavior to pre-build orders on behalf of the consumer they are serving. With our social selling extensions, telesales reps can send payment links to customers on their preferred channel to complete their order in an environment with minimal friction.

 

  

Marketplace: We build technology that powers enterprise customers to launch their own marketplaces as well as to sell on third-party marketplace sites with ease. We offer a single platform for commerce that can launch an ecommerce marketplace by easily onboarding new sellers and automatically synchronizing products and inventory across both suppliers and brand partners.

 

  

Headless possibilities: From product catalog and CMS to checkout, VTEX offers a complete, well-documented, easy-to-use catalog of APIs with hundreds of endpoints to integrate any IoT and innovative new sales channels.

 

 (2)

Robust solution ecosystem: Powered by native solutions and best-of-breed, plug-and-play ecosystem solutions, the VTEX platform (1) provides enterprise customers with CMS, distributed OMS, and CRM and (2) allows integration with various digital marketplaces and payments solutions, connecting to PCI acquirers and anti-fraud providers.

 

  

Content management

 

  

Product catalog: Customers can upload thousands of SKUs and maintain data quality seamlessly. They can create and manage categories, brands, collections and extend product attributes with custom fields.

 

  

Pricing: Customers have flexibility in setting price rules based on distribution and marketing strategies. Multiple price tables can be created and used to achieve discriminating pricing in multiple business contexts.

 

  

Promotion: The VTEX platform offers a comprehensive module to manage multiple promotion use-cases for retail and CPG companies, such as “buy together bundles,” “more for less,” “progressive discounts” and “buy one get one free.” The module also allows our customers to create audiences, coupons, and gift cards.

 

  

Site editor: With VTEX’s site editor, business users can customize their storefront with a simple GUI and with no coding needs. Changes made can be immediately reflected in the store and every block of the storefront can have its own properties changed to create the shopping journey our customers want for their consumers.

 

  

Distributed order management

 

  

Orchestrating sellers: Customers can invite, onboard and manage new sellers with our third-party sellers and marketplaces modules. Product catalogs can be shared with sellers and sellers can send and link their offers to the customer.

 

121


Table of Contents
  

Managing inventory: Customers can manage and have an integrated view of inventory across fulfillment points, including distribution centers, traditional brick-and-mortar stores and dark stores. Customers can also allocate specific inventory to sell on a specific external marketplace.

 

  

Shipping strategies: The VTEX platform offers flexibility to develop tailor-made shipping strategies. Our platform allows our customers to set up multiple docks and warehouses where inventory is allocated as needed. In addition, we create and link shipping policies with selected carriers to serve these fulfillment nodes. This shipping strategy flexibility is extremely important to enterprise customers.

 

  

Customer relationship management

 

  

Customer management: Our solution registers consumer information and allows our customers to include new attributes they believe are relevant for their relationship with consumers. Our customers can also track customer orders and their purchase history and manage relationships and conversations with customers in a simple GUI.

 

  

Behavioral emails: The VTEX platform offers behavioral emails according to important shopping triggers, including order placement and cart abandonment.

 

  

Ecosystem of apps

 

  

We have business partners located in more than 15 countries that design and customize storefronts, develop apps and enable third-party integration for customers on the VTEX platform. Our partners span the following key areas: Payment, Shipping; Fraud & Lending; Marketplace; POS & Omnichannel; Search & Merchandising; and Marketing Automation.

 

 (3)

Fulfillment flexibility: The VTEX platform seamlessly integrates multiple fulfillment channels.

 

  

First party fulfillment: The VTEX platform allows retailers to natively configure shipping policies and carriers to perform fulfillment and integrate with multiple warehouses and loading docks where inventory can be allocated. This modularity allows for highly personalized logistics and fulfillment setups and possibilities critical to enterprise retailers.

 

  

Ship from store: The VTEX platform allows retailers to connect multiple stores to their digital commerce network, share or empower stores to run their catalog and set their own inventory and configure fulfillment nodes for last-mile carrier pick-up orders from stores, in order to deliver to consumers at their shipping addresses. Furthermore, our in-store picking solutions integrate into our OMS helping stores and sales associates to run a smooth and integrated in-store operation.

 

  

Pick-up in-store: The VTEX Platform allows retailers to connect their brick-and-mortar stores network to their digital commerce platform and offer pick-up solutions integrated to our OMS to run frictionless operations. This solution also allows in-store pick-up capabilities, arming sales associates with customer intelligence so they can identify customers and collect their orders. Extensions allow integration with lockers in-store or a predefined address.

 

  

Third-party seller/drop-shipping: The VTEX platform offers a simple seller portal with a smooth seller onboarding process to connect multiple, third-party sellers with our retail customers’ digital commerce platform. These sellers can leverage the retailer’s catalog, configure inventory and shipping policies.

 

  

Fulfillment integration protocols: Through our APIs, we offer a fulfillment integration protocol to connect any innovative fulfillment channels a customer may have. As an example, we used these protocols to integrate with Amazon’s Multichannel Fulfillment, or “MCF,” to customers.

 

  

Fulfillment partners: We also offer multiple fulfillment business partners, leaders in the regions we operate, that are integrated into the VTEX platform so our enterprise customers have the optionality to leverage them when it makes sense for their business needs.

 

122


Table of Contents

Customer experience/support

We provide 24/7 support options to our enterprise customers. We offer three types of support plans: standard support is included on all subscriptions; express routing for mid-tiered enterprise customers, and priority support for the highest-tiered enterprise customers. Our support team achieved a strong average customer satisfaction score of 95.6% for the three months ended March 31, 2021.

We also offer our customers three types of technical support: basic problem solving and solutions involving platform functionality; advanced solutions involving platform functionality, third-party applications or API integrations; and product support engineering for complex API or third-party integrations, developer inquiries and bug identification and triage.

Professional services

VTEX offers paid professional services that complement the capabilities of our customers and their implementation partners. Our services help speed customers’ time-to-market and improve the success and growth of their businesses. Optional services include project management, solutions architecting, and implementation consulting. We usually offer these services to our largest and most complex new enterprise customers. Regular enterprise customers generally rely on our ecosystem of partners across system integrators, agencies and implementation companies to implement our platform. Our professional service fees, charged mostly to help selected customers on the implementation of our platform, accounted for 4.9% and 5.4% of our total revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and the year ended December 31, 2020.

Our Customers

Our cloud-based platform accelerates the digital transformation of global enterprises powering over 2,500 other active online stores in 32 countries. We have a large, blue-chip customer base with over 2,000 customers. For the year ended December 31, 2020, approximately 84.1% of our ARR was derived from active online stores on our platform that generated ARR of US$25,000 or more and with an average ARR per active online store of US$127,428. Our platform is extensible across a wide range of end markets, including Home Appliances, Apparel & Accessories, Beauty & Health, Electronics, Grocery, Department Stores, Toys & Hobbies, and Home, Furniture & Decoration.

Our value proposition to our enterprise customers is demonstrated by our net revenue retention, which measures the retention and growth of our existing customers. Our NRR, on an FX Neutral basis was 171.9% and 115.2%, for the years ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively. Given our subscription-based model, we generate most of our revenues in any given year from existing customers. For the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, we generated 85.6% and 80.3% of the revenue derived from the VTEX platform from customers who have been on our platform for over one year. Our case studies demonstrate the differentiated capabilities of our platform and how we enable our customers to execute their commerce strategy to meaningfully connect with their consumers.

 

 

LOGO

 

123


Table of Contents

A global electronics brand manufacturer: Scaling Global Direct-to-Consumer Operations in 19 Countries

Situation

This global electronics brand manufacturer’s operations are structured to allow digital-first countries to run independently and become full-stack business entities. Realizing the importance of providing a premier direct-to-consumer experience, the company needed a partner that could provide a global solution given its broad customer base. The company’s global team is distributed across the world to both guide and support the evolution of their local endeavors.

Solution

From content to post-purchase, VTEX Commerce Platform enables the global electronics brand manufacturer to manage the relationship with its customers by combining native marketplace, headless front-end architecture, and distributed OMS. Operating with VTEX since 2018, this combination of capabilities led the company’s Brazilian subsidiary to place first in the company’s ecommerce performance ranks, which caught the attention of their global team.

Based on that success, in 2019, the company chose VTEX as its global provider and launched a migration plan from its homegrown platform to VTEX. Within 10 months, this global electronics brand manufacturer successfully launched fully functional, active online stores in 14 countries, including 11 in countries outside of Latin America.

The ability to integrate new capabilities faster without disrupting the existing business became a key competitive advantage for the company ecommerce. Leveraging the existing DevOps team and VTEX’s low-code development platform, VTEX IO, provided the company with the power to deploy new projects in a matter of weeks, not months, speeding up time to revenue and decreasing the total cost of ownership.

Outcome

As a manufacturer, selling direct-to-consumers became an effective strategy for the company to get to know its audience and offer a consistent brand experience. The VTEX platform assisted in a fast rollout with an average of 25 days between each country’s go-live. Given this success, the company has expanded its active online stores to 19 countries. In the US, the company saw an increase of 25.0% in conversion rates after the migration and in Europe average delivery time was reduced by 30.0%.

Leading global appliances manufacturer: Pioneering the ecommerce Journey through Fast Migration and Innovation

Situation

In 2015, a leading global appliances manufacturer began exploring changing its IT and operations with the goal of delivering innovative solutions with more agility through specialist partners. Focusing first on Latin America, their largest ecommerce market, the company set out to execute the fast migration of its 14 operating stores in 6 countries across the region. Partnering with VTEX, the company completed the migration in 79 days. As a result of the project’s success, the company partnered with VTEX again to expand the migration into other strategic regions around the world.

Solution

The VTEX Platform’s broad suite of solutions powers multiple business models across this leading global appliances manufacturer’s brands. For some brands, the company operates a direct-to-consumer model. VTEX’s collaborative commerce approach helped the company’s consumers select from a range of fulfilment channels and focused on the convenience of scheduled delivery.

 

124


Table of Contents

The company also offers its 78,000 employees discounts through its online employee store. In addition to being able to purchase new and refurbished products at large discounts, VTEX’s native marketplace architecture allows employees to also find lower priced products from brands that are not part of the company’s portfolio, including Samsung, Sony, Philips, and Motorola. This is only possible because of VTEX’s native marketplace architecture.

In 2017, in Brazil, the company launched an IoT smart fridge that has sensors to automatically identify if you are running out of beer. VTEX’s native marketplace capabilities enabled the company to connect with third party sellers and display their products inside the smart fridge’s native app. The seamless integration includes the products’ availability, price, promotions, available delivery times as well as allowing users to place orders.

Outcome

The company signed a global enterprise agreement with VTEX and uses the VTEX platform to standardize the technology powering its online sales. Starting with only one online store in Brazil, the relationship quickly grew to over five online stores in Brazil and subsequently expanded across the company’s portfolio of brands. Our relationship finally became a global agreement which greatly expanded VTEX’s ongoing work with the company over five countries in Latin America and two in Europe. This leading global appliances manufacturer and VTEX plan to continue expanding our global digital presence together.

C&A: Omnichannel and Marketplace Driving Long-Term Growth

Situation

C&A is a leading fashion retailer in Brazil with more than 300 stores in 125 cities. A very traditional brick-and-mortar retailer, C&A had a modest digital presence. In 2014, following their consumers’ behavioral change, C&A decided to invest heavily in ecommerce and digital transformation and to debut in the digital space, and chose VTEX to help them with this initiative.

Solution

Through the VTEX platform, C&A enabled an omnichannel experience to end-consumers and extended product assortment without adding inventory complexity. This enabled C&A’s customers to seamlessly shop online and choose between in-store pickup and home delivery. In addition, by leveraging our platform’s native marketplace capability, C&A now sells products from third parties through its marketplace. Our solution enabled C&A to ship products directly from the third party to the consumer, obviating the need to deal with complexities of inventory management.

Outcome

By seamlessly integrating channels, C&A is monetizing its digital traffic and seamlessly delivering its full brand experience to consumers. Today approximately 55.0% of sales came from omnichannel orders, of which 45.0% are ship-from-store orders. While many businesses downsized during the pandemic, C&A’s online sales grew by 350% between July and September 2020, showing the resilience of the unified commerce approach. In six years operating with VTEX, C&A’s online revenue increased 20-fold.

Grupo Éxito: Harnessing the Power of Unified Commerce

Situation

Owned by Groupe Casino since 2010, Grupo Éxito has established its position as the largest grocery retailer in Colombia by selling a wide range of food and non-food products. With more than 500 stores in the country, the retailer identified omnichannel as a path to increase sales and drive future growth. In 2018, after a demo of the VTEX platform functionalities, Grupo Éxito decided to choose VTEX to accelerate their commerce transformation.

 

125


Table of Contents

Solution

VTEX IO brought the Grupo Éxito’s team agility and autonomy. The company was able to create landing pages, change payment providers, and create new promotions directly. VTEX’s native capabilities allowed the Grupo Éxito’s marketplace resulting in sales growth of 54.0% in the channel in 2019.

Aiming to deliver a truly unified experience to its customers, Grupo Éxito tailored every step of the buying process—from a mobile-first discovery approach to the multiple delivery checkout store selection—to enable customers to choose the most convenient store to pick their orders. With more than 40 connected stores, Grupo Éxito expects to continue expansion and capitalize on their initial success.

Outcome

The multi-tenant SaaS architecture of the VTEX platform allowed the company to break records. Grupo Éxito was able to process more than 75,000 simultaneous sessions with no downtime, and more than 1,000 orders per minute on July 3, 2020 with no extra costs. Furthermore, sales increased 40% in the first 10 months operating with VTEX and overall conversion rates increased by 37.0%. After implementing VTEX Intelligent Search, in January 2020, overall sales increased by 22.4%.

Brazilian digital bank: Powering a Head-less Marketplace SuperApp that Blends Shopping and Banking

Situation

In 2014, a Brazilian digital bank began a profound restructuring of its twenty-year-old banking operations. It was time to diversify, digitalize and innovate. Since then, this digital bank has continuously progressed towards achieving its long-term vision: becoming a one-stop solution merging financial and non-financial services that would revolutionize the banking market, while putting the customer first, challenging other financial and ecommerce players alike.

Solution

The digital bank’s solution comes in the form of a superapp that enables anyone in Brazil to sign up for a digital account free of charge. With over 10 million Brazilians signed up already and a projected growth rate of 500,000 new members per month, this digital bank is set to reach 15 million users during 2021 taking Brazil by storm.

With its native marketplace and headless capabilities and fast time-to-revenue, VTEX was this digital bank’s partner-of-choice. With our leading API-first architecture, we were able to help tackle troublesome processes such as the importing of the sellers’ product catalogs and orchestrating fulfillment of orders with sellers’. Moreover, the digital bank was able to access a large group of sellers through tapping our client ecosystem. Today, the digital bank offers products and services from 138 partner stores.

This digital bank was also able to integrate a cashback program for customers built on the easy capture of the customer’s payments directly on the app. Additionally, the headless marketplace capabilities successfully incorporated all customer communication, including order invoicing and order tracking. With this capability, the digital’s bank dedicated customer service team could assist users with marketplace orders despite not being involved in the actual fulfilment.

Outcome

The digital bank’s headless marketplace app has delivered great results. Since its inception, in 2019, the platform has generated more than US$200 million in sales. The app was also able to scale to support users’ increased activity during the COVID-19 pandemic. In April 2020, monthly sales revenue reached US$5 million, a 240% increase compared to the entire fourth quarter in 2019.

 

126


Table of Contents

In July 2020, the digital bank held its very own “Day”, in which users could shop on the headless marketplace app and purchase items at discounted prices from brands like Carrefour, Samsung, Unilever, ViaVarejo and Magazine Luiza. The digital bank saw a significant increase in sales. The 24-hour event generated GMV that was 12% higher than that of the entire month of June 2020, not to mention a 2,574% increase compared to an average Tuesday in 2020. All in all, account holders saved approximately US$400,000 in cash back during the event.

Our Ecosystem of Technology Partners and Applications Driving Positive Network Effects

We have built a strong network ecosystem with over 1,000 integrated solutions, 200 SIs, 100 marketplaces, 80 payments solutions and 50 logistics companies. While our core platform is homogenous, we have developed it with low-code, server-less capabilities and fully extensible API-first capabilities, allowing enterprise customers to push code into our core platform and customize to their needs as well as allowing ecosystem partners to develop applications that run directly on our platform. This ecosystem includes app developers, theme designers, SIs, agencies, payment providers, marketplaces and other partners who are deeply embedded within our platform. We have business partners located in more than 15 countries that design and customize storefronts, develop apps and enable third-party integration for customers on the VTEX platform. Our partners span the following key areas:

 

  

Payment;

 

  

Shipping;

 

  

Fraud & lending;

 

  

Marketplace;

 

  

POS & omnichannel;

 

  

Search & Merchandising; and

 

  

Marketing automation.

Sales and Marketing

The VTEX sales team partners with companies globally to plan and implement transformative digital projects with VTEX’s solutions and products. Our sales team is structured across three key areas: business development representatives who discover and build target pipeline, account executives who engage with potential customers, and solution engineers who provide technical expertise and advice. As of March 31, 2021, we had a team of 328 sales and marketing professionals 43.3% in Brazil, 35.4% in Latin America, excluding Brazil, and 21.3% outside of Latin America.

We generate leads through three main channels: referrals and leads from existing customers and ecosystem partners; VTEX publications and events; and paid digital marketing campaigns. Our partner ecosystem generates significant new customer leads given the depth of our network. Our sales team focuses on top tier target customers. Our new customers in Latin America are well balanced between choosing VTEX as their first ecommerce platform adopted and those that had existing ecommerce solutions before switching to our platform. Our strategy with the latter group of customers is to highlight and resolve pain points with their existing platforms. VTEX’s entry into new markets is driven by our assessment of the region’s addressable market and our ability to win new flagship accounts. We will often expand into new geographies at the request of existing multinational customers that have operations in regions where VTEX does not currently operate. We have been successful at leveraging these deep relationships historically.

 

127


Table of Contents

Technology, Infrastructure and Operations

The VTEX platform is a multi-tenant SaaS, cloud-based system engineered for high security, scalability, reliability and performance. It is hosted on cloud-based servers and infrastructure. Maintaining the integrity and security of our technology infrastructure is critical to our business, and we plan to invest further in failovers, active monitoring, and computing, storage and network infrastructure to meet our customers’ needs and maintain their trust. The key attributes of the VTEX platform are as follows:

 

  

Security: The platform is designed to have isolated sensitive data. We use firewalls, denial of service mitigation appliances, encryption, intrusion detection systems, two-factor authentication and other technology in an effort to keep our platform and customers’ data secure.

 

  

Scalability: Our cloud-based platform is highly flexible and scalable. It can adjust processing capacity, storage, and other attributes, up or down depending on customers’ needs and requirements.

 

  

Reliability: Our platform includes servers in geographically dispersed, co-located data centers that are fault-tolerant in an effort to ensure that our platform is highly reliable. We employ a highly redundant, horizontally scalable, shared architecture to promote resiliency and high availability. Our platform is built to handle large spikes in traffic that accompany events such as new product releases, holiday shopping seasons and flash sales. Being cloud-native and tightly integrated with Amazon Web Services allows us to leverage Amazon’s global network to enhance performance and reliability. We scale our platform on demand to ensure ample capacity is available for our customers.

While our core platform is homogenous, allowing us to have a true multi-tenant SaaS business model and provide quick go-live to enterprise customers, we have developed it with low-code server-less capabilities and fully extensible API-first capabilities, allowing enterprise customers to push code into our core platform and customize for their needs as well as allowing ecosystem partners to develop applications that run directly on our platform. Our platform, VTEX IO, provides accelerator front-end components tightly integrated with our headless services, low-code development, composable back-end, and auto scalable cloud infrastructure. We typically integrate with our customers’ code and applications within six months.

 

 

LOGO

 

128


Table of Contents

Based on our Composable Commerce approach, we offer a mix of computing and usability paradigms for customers to build on top of VTEX:

 

  

VTEX Core Capabilities RESTful APIs: All our core commerce capabilities are exposed through well-documented APIs. Our catalog of APIs offers hundreds of interfaces for enterprise customers to customize based on their specific business needs and complex enterprise architectures.

 

  

VTEX Admin: Our VTEX Admin offers GUI so business users can easily manage all digital commerce core functions. VTEX admin offers modules for operators such as OMS GUI for call center-operators or catalog operators to manage their product catalogs; for creators, such as our site-editors for marketing creators, building distinctive customer journey; and for business and management to track business metrics and growth.

 

  

VTEX IO: VTEX IO offers a low-code server-less environment for our customers’ technology teams to extend our core components and build new components in an integrated environment with best-in-class scalability and security. All VTEX storefronts and VTEX Admin can be customized and extended through VTEX IO.

 

  

VTEX Data Services: VTEX data services offer an environment to extend and evolve our platform data modeling in a scalable and secure environment. Our data entities, such as customers and orders, can be extended and have new attributes added, and new entities can be created. These new entities can also be accessed by APIs and allow conceptual extensibility to serve edge cases and new industries, particularly where new and distinct data entities are needed.

Our infrastructure is supported by a research and development team consisting of architects, software engineers and designers. As of March 31, 2021 we had 448 employees in our research and development organization. Over the last two years we have spent US$31.7 million in R&D to scale this organization. We intend to continue to invest in our research and development capabilities to extend our platform.

International Presence

We currently power over 2,500 active online stores in 32 countries. Our platform enables businesses to create online stores in the consumer-facing language and currency of their choice. For the administrative control panel used by our customers to create and manage their stores, we currently allow our customers to select among a range of languages, including English, Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian and Japanese. We plan to add additional languages as we continue to expand internationally.

VTEX was founded in Rio de Janeiro. In Brazil, we have operations in Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Curitiba, João Pessoa, and Teresópolis. As of March 31, 2021, approximately 71.2% of our employees are located in Brazil, primarily in our R&D department. In Latin America, excluding Brazil, we have operations in Bogotá, Buenos Aires, Lima, Medellín, Santiago and Mexico City, where approximately 18.7% of our employees are located. Outside of Latin America, we have operations in Barcelona, Bucharest, London, Milan, Singapore, Fort Lauderdale, Philadelphia and New York, where approximately 10.1% of our employees are located. Outside of Brazil, most of our employees are part of our sales & marketing and customer experience departments.

For the three months ended March 31, 2021 and March 31, 2020, purchases originated from customers located in: (1) Brazil represented 56.1% and 72.8% of our total revenue, respectively; (2) Latin America (excluding Brazil) represented 34.3% and 22.0% of our total revenue, respectively; and (3) the rest of world represented 9.6% and 5.2% of our total revenue, respectively. For the years ended December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019, purchases originated from customers located in: (1) Brazil represented 57.2% and 70.8% of our total revenue, respectively; (2) Latin America (excluding Brazil) represented 37.0% and 24.4% of our total revenue, respectively; and (3) the rest of world represented 5.8% and 4.7% of our total revenue, respectively. Given our brand awareness and market position, we have historically focused geographic expansion to other regions within Latin America and believe that most of our growth will continue to come from Latin America. We

 

129


Table of Contents

believe our platform can compete successfully around the world over time. As such, we plan to continue investing in our operations across the United States and Europe, although only limited growth may result from this region in the short to medium term.

Culture and Values

A powerful network of conversations that move action forward

VTEX is built on a foundation of mutual trust. We discovered very soon that great people thrive in an environment where alignment enables autonomy. We trust these individuals to act in the best interests of the company because we provide them with the conditions for their accelerated self-development as independent decision makers. We are able to make consistent decentralized decisions thanks to our extraordinary commitment to a shared bold future.

We are eager to have difficult conversations. We actively communicate when promises made cannot be kept, dealing with the consequences and inviting impacted people to the playing field to face the brutal facts. We are not complainers; we are proposal makers and we are doers. We listen to each other with commitment, open to the possibility that a diverse perspective might lead us beyond what is predictable. It is everyone’s responsibility to create this environment.

We aim to build the VTEX that kills VTEX

We think differently about the same problems in order to achieve transformative solutions. The same mindset applies to our culture: we continue to learn and to expand our capacity to comprehend and impact the world. We are fascinated by the amount of impact that applying technology to business can have. For us, customers are bearers of exciting opportunities: we make ourselves responsible for their growth and success.

Diversity is key to this continued success: we choose to be able to add value in a diverse ecosystem and adapt to other cultures rather than imposing our views. With the help from the different perspectives we get from our peers, partners and customers, we are continuously invited to see beyond our biases. Collaborating with people that challenge the status quo—instead of fitting into it—is paramount for our continued success. We are rebels at heart.

Competition

Our primary competitors are SAP Hybris, Oracle Commerce, Magento (an Adobe company), Salesforce Commerce Cloud (formerly known as Demandware) and Shopify Plus. Our industry is highly competitive, yet enterprises are forced to choose between two paths to execute their commerce strategies:

 

  

Easy to use yet rigid software: software designed for smaller and medium business are typically restricted to limited use cases. The need for customization is absorbed by integration marketplaces with a wide range of partners, yet with varying standards of quality. Users face a difficult choice: remain simple or combine capabilities from multiple vendors with the risk of disrupted experiences and lack of scalability. We believe we compete favorably based on the following competitive factors:

 

  

Ability to manage all experiences in one place through a single control panel connecting all sales and fulfillment channels;

 

  

Ability to explore new strategies such as marketplace and omnichannel through a set of comprehensive functionalities;

 

  

Ability to scale through pre-built integrations and an auto-scalable cloud infrastructure.

 

  

Heavy customization which leads to slower evolution: on-premise and open-source platforms require a higher initial investment and time-consuming customization and integration periods, that leads to

 

130


Table of Contents
 

higher developer dependency and increasing total cost of ownership. Once implemented, re-platforming is complex, yet unavoidable as consumers’ demands increase over time. We believe we compete favorably based on the following factors:

 

  

Ability to quickly implement new strategies through a set of comprehensive functionalities (commerce, order management and marketplace) and pre-built integrations with channels and partner solutions;

 

  

Ability to custom-build capabilities and extend the platform through an open, API-first architecture and a proprietary low-code development platform, the VTEX IO;

 

  

Ability to continuously evolve through a multi-tenant, homogeneous platform;

 

  

Ability to enter highly complex markets through a platform with proven product-fit in Latin America.

While we believe we currently compare favorably to our competitors, we expect competition to increase in the future. See “Risk Factors—Risks Related to our Business and Industry—We face intense competition, especially from well-established companies offering solutions and related applications. We may lack sufficient financial or other resources to maintain or improve our competitive position, which may harm our ability to add new customers, retain existing customers, and grow our business.”

We offer a unique combination for our customers. Our platform delivers fast time-to-market and ease of use, while providing customization and extensibility for each of our clients.

Our Recent Acquisitions

UniteU Technologies, Inc.

On January 10, 2019, we acquired 100% of the capital of UniteU Technologies, Inc., or UniteU, company that has an ecommerce platform to provide clients with integrated ecommerce, mobile commerce, PCI compliance, centralized data management services, and other services related to the SaaS model.

The purchase price comprises: (1) cash consideration of US$1.2 million paid on January 10th 2019; and (2) a cash contingent consideration (earn-out) of up to US$2.3 million, to be paid within paid on 18 months from January 10, 2019, varies from nil, in case of no migration of clients to our platform, to US$2.3 million in case of all UniteU clients migrate to our platform.

Ciashop Soluções para Comercio Eletrônico S.A.

On May 9, 2019, we acquired 100% of the capital of Ciashop Soluções para Comercio Eletrônico S.A., or Ciashop, one of the pioneering ecommerce platforms in Brazil. We expect to migrate the Ciashop’s remaining clients by August 2021, after which, the Ciashop platform will be merged into our company and deactivated.

The purchase price comprises: (1) cash consideration of US$6.3 million to be paid in installments until February 28, 2022; (2) shares consideration, in the amount of US$1.1 million, or US$0.20 per share, to be paid on July 7, 2021; and (3) a cash contingent consideration (earn-out) that varies from US$0.0 million, in case of migration of less than 50% of Ciashop clients to our platform, to US$0.4 million in case of migration of more than 90% of Ciashop clients to our platform, to be paid on April 30 2021.

Atma Tecnologia e Inovação Ltda.

On September 5, 2019, we acquired 100% of the capital of Atma Tecnologia e Inovação Ltda., or Biggy, a company that offers customized search solutions for ecommerce platforms.

 

131


Table of Contents

The purchase price comprises: (1) cash consideration of US$0.9 million, paid up to September 5th, 2020; and (2) a cash contingent consideration (earn-out) of up to US$0.1 million, that corresponds to 2.5x the net revenue generated by the subscription of software services of the clients migrated from Biggy to our platform, which was due within 30 days of the client’s migration contract. Considering that there were no migration of contracts the amount due was nil.

Dlieve Tecnologia S.A.

On November 27, 2019, we acquired 100% of the capital of Dlieve Tecnologia S.A., or Dlieve, a company that offers a delivery management system and real-time monitoring.

The purchase price comprises: (1) cash consideration of US$1.8 million, to be paid up to November 27, 2021; (2) shares consideration, in the amount of US$1.0 million, or US$0.28 per share, to be paid on November 27, 2021; and (3) a cash contingent consideration (earn-out) that varies from nil, if the year over year net revenue increases less than 60%, to US$1.2 million if the year over year net revenue increases more than 140%, to be paid in two installments: January 11, 2021 and January 11, 2022 or February 25, 2022 (as applicable).

EI Education, S.A.P.I. De C.V.

On October 27, 2020, we acquired 100% of the capital of EI Education, S.A.P.I. De C.V., or EI Education., a Mexican company whose main purpose is to train professionals with digital knowledge as digital marketing, design, ecommerce and other digital skills for professionals in local and global companies.

The purchase price comprises: (1) cash consideration of US$100.0, paid on October 27, 2020; and (2) a cash contingent consideration (earn-out) of up to US$0.4 million, depending on the EBITDA of EI Education from November 2020 to October 2021 and from November 2021 to October 2022, to be paid on November 30, 2021 and November 30 2022, respectively

WebLinc Corp

On January 29, 2021, we acquired 100% of WebLinc Corp, or WorkArea, a U.S. based cloud commerce platform provider, to strengthen our presence in the U.S. and Canadian market.

As of the date of this prospectus we have paid US$7.1 million of the purchase price. The total estimated consideration payable by us for the acquisition of WorkArea may increase to up to US$25.0 million, If the assumptions of the earn-out consideration are achieved, up until January 29, 2023.

Suiteshare Tecnologia da Informação Ltda.

On April 16, 2021, we entered into a binding share purchase agreement to acquire Suiteshare Tecnologia da Informação Ltda., or Suiteshare, a Brazil-based technology company, to strengthen our presence in the nascent conversational commerce segment. The transaction was closed on May 28, 2021.

As of the date of this prospectus, we have paid US$3.1 million of the purchase price. The total estimated purchase price for the acquisition may increase up to US$4.7 million if the assumptions of the earn-out consideration to be paid are achieved.

Intellectual Property

Our intellectual property and proprietary rights are important to our business. In our efforts to safeguard them, we rely on a combination of copyrights, trade secrets, trademarks and other proprietary rights in several jurisdictions in which we conduct our business, including Brazil, the United States, Latin America, India, the

 

132


Table of Contents

United Kingdom and certain European countries. We also control access to our intellectual property and confidential information through internal and external controls. We rely on confidentiality and/or license agreements with employees, contractors, customers, vendors, distributors and other third parties, which limit access to and use of our proprietary intellectual property. We also require our employees and independent contractors to enter agreements assigning to us any inventions, trade secrets, works of authorship and other technology and intellectual property created for us. Though we rely, in part, upon these legal and contractual protections, we believe that factors such as the skills and ingenuity of our employees, as well as the functionality and frequent enhancements to our platform, make our intellectual property difficult to replicate.

As of March 26, 2021, we have been issued trademark registrations in Brazil covering trademarks including “VTEX,” “VTEX Day,” “TETRIX,” “Bora Vender,” “#BoraVender,” “WX7,” “Go Commerce,” “Bora Varejo,” “Bora Doar,” “Smartcheckout,” “True Cloud Commerce,” “Ciashop,” “FControl,” “Integrando-se,” “Loja Integrada,” “Xtech Commerce” and “Indeva.” We have also been issued trademark registrations in the United States of America covering trademarks including “VTEX,” “Grow With Confidence,” “Smart QR,” “UMO,” “UNITEU,” “Work Area,” and “Workarea.” We have also been issued trademark registrations in Mexico, Argentina, Colombia, Chile, India, Peru and Europe covering certain of our trademarks and have additional trademarks applications pending in several of these jurisdictions.

Human Resources

As of March 31, 2021, we had 1238 employees (including full-time employees, contractors, third-parties, and interns), including 448 in research and development, 328 in sales and marketing, 226 in professional services and customer support and 236 in general and administrative expenses. Of these employees, 882 are in Brazil and 356 are in our international locations.

In Brazil, it is mandatory to be affiliated with a workers union. Each year, we enter into an updated collective bargaining agreement. We believe we have a constructive relationship with these unions and we have not experienced any strikes, work stoppages or disputes leading to any form of downtime from our employees.

Talent acquisition strategy: Hiring is everyone’s job

We believe we are considered among the most impactful tech companies in the global industry and recognized among top students in the Latin American region as a career accelerator. We foster partnerships with top educational institutions across Brazil through VTEX Lab, our university partnership program we established in April 2018, that provides students with an immersive experience of continued learning and development. As of the date of this prospectus, our engineering team consists of approximately 9% of VTEX Lab graduates and we continue to cultivate the future of tech talent at VTEX.

 

133


Table of Contents

Facilities

We are headquartered in the United Kingdom. Our largest office is based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We do not own any real property. The following table outlines significant properties that we currently lease for office space:

 

Location

  Square meters (m2)   Lease Expiration Date 

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

   3099.6    05/31/2026 

São Paulo, Brazil

   1183.1    11/10/2027 

Curitiba, Brazil

   687.4    12/01/2024 

Teresópolis, Brazil

   88.6    07/31/2021 

João Pessoa, Brazil

   352.7    

04/01/2024

07/01/2024

11/30/2025

 

 

 

Bogota, Colombia

   70.0    04/30/2022 

Medellin, Colombia

   240.0    04/30/2022 

Buenos Aires, Argentina

   161.0    04/30/2022 

Santiago, Chile

   51.0    10/31/2022 

Lima, Peru

   82.0    11/30/2021 

Barcelona, Spain

   25.4    07/15/2021 

London, United Kingdom

   26.5    01/31/2022 

Philadelphia, United States

   232.0    automatic renewal 

Fort Lauderdale, United States

   90.0    automatic renewal 

Milan, Italy

   40.0    01/08/2021 

Bucharest, Romania

   66.0    09/01/2021 

Singapore, Singapore

   15.5    01/01/2022 

We lease all of our facilities and do not own any real property. We believe that our facilities are adequate for our current needs and anticipate that suitable additional space will be readily available to accommodate any foreseeable expansion of our operations. We also believe we will be able to obtain additional facilities on commercially reasonable terms.

Regulatory Considerations

Data protection and privacy

The customer data that our platform uses, collects, stores, transmits and processes to run our business is an integral part of our business model. As a result, our compliance with federal, state and foreign laws and regulations dealing with the use, collection, storage, transmission, disclosure, disposal and other processing of personal data is core to the operation of our business. Regulators around the world have adopted or proposed requirements regarding the collection, use, transfer, security, storage, destruction, and other processing of personal data. The applicability of these laws and regulations to us, and their scope and interpretation, are constantly evolving, often uncertain, and may conflict between jurisdictions, and we anticipate the number of data privacy laws and the scope of individual data privacy and protection rights will increase, and as a result, the associated compliance burdens and costs could increase in the future. It may be costly to implement security or other measures designed to comply with these laws and regulations, as well as any new or updated laws or regulations. Any actual or perceived failure to safeguard data adequately, destroy data securely, or otherwise comply with the requirements of these laws and regulations, may subject us to litigation, regulatory investigations or enforcement actions under federal, state or foreign data security, unfair practices or consumer protection laws and contractual penalties, and result in monetary damages, damage to our reputation or adversely affect our ability to retain customers or attract new customers.

 

134


Table of Contents

A number of the jurisdictions in which we operate have adopted or are considering adopting data protection and privacy laws and regulations, including, among others, Brazil, the United States, the European Union and the United Kingdom.

Brazil

In September 2020, Brazilian Federal Law No. 13,709/2018, the Brazilian General Data Protection Law (Lei Geral de Proteção de Dados Pessoais), or LGPD, came into effect to regulate the processing of personal data in Brazil. The LGPD establishes general principles, obligations and detailed rules to be observed by individuals or public or private companies in operations involving processing of personal data in Brazil, including the collection, use, processing and storage of personal data, which affects all economic sectors, including the relationship between customers and suppliers of goods and services, employees and employers and other relationships in which personal data is processed, whether in a digital or physical environment. The LGPD provides for, among others, the rights of holders of personal data, the legal bases applicable to the processing of personal data, the requisites to obtain consent, the obligations and requisites related to security incidents and leakages and transfers of data, either Brazilian or international, as well as the creation of the National Authority for Data Protection (Autoridade Nacional de Proteção de Dados), or ANPD, responsible for the inspection, promotion, disclosure, regulation, establishment of guidelines and application of the law.

Recently, Law No. 14,010/2020 amended certain provisions of the LGPD, and postponed the administrative sanctions effectiveness to August 2021. However, because the LGPD also allows for a private right of action, we may still be subject to individual claims for violations of the LGPD as of its enactment. In case of noncompliance with the LGPD, we can be subject to administrative sanctions applicable by the ANPD from August 1, 2021 onwards, on an isolated or cumulative basis, that can range from a warning, obligation to disclose incidents, temporary blocking and/or elimination of personal data related to the infraction, a simple fine of up to 2.0% of our revenue, or revenue of the company or group of companies in Brazil for the last fiscal year, excluding taxes, up to the global amount of R$50 million per violation, a daily fine, up to the aforesaid global limit, suspension of the operation of the database related to the infraction for a maximum period of six months, which can be extended for an equal period, up to the regularization of the processing by the controlling shareholder, suspension of activities related to processing of personal data related to the infraction for a period of six months, which can be extended for an equal period, and partial or total prohibition to exercise activities related to data processing.

The fact that the administrative sanctions of the LGPD will only be enforceable by the ANPD beginning in August 2021 does not prevent the imposition of administrative sanctions set forth by other laws that address issues related to data privacy and protection, such as the Brazilian Code of Consumer Defense and the Brazilian Civil Rights Framework for the Internet. These administrative sanctions can be applied by other public authorities, such as the Attorney General’s Office and consumer protection agencies. We can also be subject to civil liabilities for violation of these laws.

In addition to the administrative sanctions due to the noncompliance with the obligations established by the LGPD, we can be held liable for individual or collective material damages, and non-material damages caused to holders of personal data, including when caused by service providers, including SaaS partners, that serve as operators of personal data on our behalf.

European Union and the United Kingdom

The General Data Protection Regulation 2016/679, or the GDPR, became effective in May 2018, and is applicable to companies processing personal data of individuals in the European Union, or the EU, and the European Economic Area, or the EEA. The GDPR is wide-ranging in scope and implements stringent requirements in relation to the collection, use, retention, protection, disclosure, transfer and other processing of personal data relating to EU individuals, with substantial monetary penalties for violations. Personal data as defined under the GDPR includes any type of information that can identify a living individual, including name,

 

135


Table of Contents

identification number, email address, location, internet protocol addresses, and cookie identifiers. Among other requirements, the GDPR mandates more stringent administrative requirements for controllers and processors of personal data, including, for example, notice of and a lawful basis for data processing activities, data protection impact assessments, a right to “erasure” of personal data, and data breach reporting. If we do not comply with our obligations under the GDPR, we could be exposed to significant fines of up to €20 million or up to 4.0% of the total worldwide annual turnover of the preceding financial year, whichever is higher. The GDPR also provides that EU member states may enact their own additional laws and regulations in relation to certain data processing activities. Recent legal developments in the EU have also created complexity and uncertainty regarding transfers of personal information from the EU to “third countries,” especially the United States. For example, last year, the Court of Justice of the European Union, or CJEU, invalidated the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Framework, a mechanism for the transfer of personal information from the EU to the United States, and made clear that reliance on Standard Contractual Clauses, an alternative mechanism for the transfer of personal information outside of the EU alone may not be sufficient in all circumstances.

Further, the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union and ongoing developments in the United Kingdom have created uncertainty regarding data protection regulation in the United Kingdom. Following the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU on January 31, 2020, pursuant to the transitional arrangements agreed to between the United Kingdom and European Union, the GDPR continued to have effect in law in the United Kingdom, and continued to do so until December 31, 2020 as if the United Kingdom remained a member state of the EU for such purposes. Following December 31, 2020, and the expiry of those transitional arrangements, the data protection obligations of the GDPR continue to apply to United Kingdom-related processing of personal data in substantially unvaried form by virtue of section 3 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, as amended, which, together with the amended UK Data Protection Act of 2018, retains the GDPR in UK national law. However, going forward, there may be increasing scope for divergence in application, interpretation and enforcement of the data protection law as between the United Kingdom and the EEA, and the relationship between the United Kingdom and the EEA in relation to certain aspects of data protection law remains uncertain.

United States

In the United States, various laws and regulations apply to the security, collection, storage, use, disclosure and other processing of certain types of data. For example, California adopted the California Consumer Privacy Act, or CCPA, which became effective in January 2020. The CCPA establishes a privacy framework for covered businesses, including an expansive definition of personal information and data privacy rights for California residents. Among other requirements, the CCPA mandates new disclosure to California consumers and allows California consumers to request a copy of the personal information collected about them, request deletion of their personal information and request to opt out of certain sales of personal information. The CCPA includes a framework with potentially severe statutory damages and private rights of action. Further, in November 2020, California voters passed the California Privacy Rights Act, or CPRA, which expands the CCPA with additional data privacy compliance requirements and establishes a regulatory agency dedicated to enforcing those requirements. In addition, other states, such as Virginia, have also adopted or are considering adopting similar data privacy laws and all 50 states have adopted laws requiring notice to consumers of a security breach involving their personal information.

Anti-corruption and sanctions

We are subject to anti-corruption, anti-bribery, anti-money laundering and sanction laws and regulations, including the Brazilian Federal Law No. 12,846/2013, or the Clean Company Act, and the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977, as amended, or the FCPA. Both the Clean Company Act and the FCPA prohibits corporations and individuals from engaging in improper activities to obtain or retain business or to influence a person working in an official capacity. It prohibits, among other things, providing, directly or indirectly, anything of value to any foreign government official, or any political party or official thereof, or candidate for political

 

136


Table of Contents

influence to improperly influence such a person. Similar laws exist in other countries, such as the UK, that restrict improper payments to persons in the public or private sector. Many countries have laws prohibiting these types of payments within the respective country. Historically, technology companies have been the target of FCPA and other anti-corruption investigations and penalties.

In addition, we are subject to U.S. and foreign laws and regulations that restrict our activities in certain countries and with certain persons. These include the economic sanctions regulations administered by the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control and the export control laws administered by the U.S. Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry.

Legal Proceedings

From time to time, we may become involved in litigation or other legal proceedings relating to claims arising from the ordinary course of business.

On October 9, 2020, Mirakl, Incorporated, a competitor in the ecommerce SaaS market, filed a complaint for unspecified damages, preliminary and permeated injunctive relief in the United States District Course of Massachusetts against our subsidiary VTEX Commerce Cloud Solutions LLC, or VTEX U.S., and certain of its employees that were formerly employed by the plaintiff. The complaint alleges that such employees and VTEX U.S. misappropriated, retained and improperly failed to return to the plaintiff certain confidential and property information in violation of contractual, statutory and common law obligations to the plaintiff.

On April 14, 2021, the court denied our motion to dismiss. As of the date of this prospectus the parties are conducting discovery. Although we cannot predict with certainty the final result of this proceeding, we do not believe it will have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, cash flows or financial condition.

Material Contract

On December 11, 2020, our subsidiaries, VTEX Brazil and VTEX Informática S.A., entered into a private pricing addendum with Amazon Web Services, Inc. and its affiliate, or AWS, supplementing the standard AWS customer agreement entered into when initially acquiring AWS’s cloud storage services. We pay a monthly charge based on our usage and are subject to an annual commitment payment. The agreement is valid until December 31, 2025.

 

137


Table of Contents

MANAGEMENT

We are currently reviewing the composition of our board of directors, our committees and our corporate governance practices in light of this offering and applicable requirements of the SEC and the                . In subsequent filings with the SEC, we will update any relevant disclosure herein as appropriate.

Upon the consummation of this offering, we will be managed by our board of directors and by our senior management, pursuant to our Articles of Association and the Companies Act (Revised) of the Cayman Islands.

Board of Directors

We are managed by our board of directors. Our Articles of Association provide that, unless otherwise determined by an ordinary resolution of shareholders, the board of directors will be composed of four to 11 directors, with the number being determined by a majority of the directors then in office. See “Description of Share Capital” for further information.

Upon the consummation of this offering, our board of directors will be composed of seven members. Each director holds office for the term, if any, fixed by the shareholders or board of directors that appoints such director, or, if no term is fixed on the appointment of the director, until the earlier of his death, resignation or removal. Our directors do not have a retirement age requirement under our Articles of Association.

The table set forth below presents the name, age and title of the current members of our board of directors:

 

Name

 Age  

Position

Geraldo do Carmo Thomaz Júnior

 44              Co-Chairman

Mariano Gomide de Faria

 43              Co-Chairman

Paulo Thiago Passoni

 43              Board Member

Francisco Alvarez-Demalde

 42              Board Member

Alejandro Raul Scannapieco

 51              Independent Board Member

Arshad Matin

 57              Independent Board Member

Benoit Jean-Claude Marie Fouilland

 57              Independent Board Member

The following is a summary of the professional experience of our current directors. Unless otherwise indicated, the current business addresses of all members of our board of directors is 125 Kingsway, WC2B 6NH London, United Kingdom.

Geraldo do Carmo Thomaz Júnior. Mr. do Carmo Thomaz Júnior is our co-founder and Co-Chief Executive Officer, a position he has held since our inception. Mr. do Carmo Thomaz Júnior is also our co-chairman of our board of directors, a position he has held since 2019. Graduated in Mechanical Engineering at Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, or UFRJ. Geraldo developed the VTEX platform under the SaaS model, providing systems, servers, security, and infrastructure for enterprise-level companies. Since 2021, he has also served as a board member for Instituto Reditus, a non-profit organization in Brazil. He currently also leads the Research & Development team in the Rio de Janeiro office. We believe that Mr. do Carmo Thomaz Júnior is qualified to serve on our board of directors due to his considerable business experience in the technology industry and his experience serving as a director of other companies.

Mariano Gomide de Faria. Mr. Gomide de Faria is our co-founder and Co-Chief Executive Officer, a position he has held since our inception. Mr. Gomide de Faria is also our co-Chairman of our board of directors, a position he has held since 2019. Graduated in Mechanical Engineering at UFRJ. Mariano currently leads VTEX’s Sales and Marketing teams, overseeing the UK and Asia markets. He is a teacher and lecturer for events like ecommerce Day, Internet Retailer, eShow, and UNCTAD ecommerce Week. We believe that Mr. Gomide de Faria is qualified to serve on our board of directors due to his considerable business experience in the technology industry and his experience serving as a director of other companies.

 

138


Table of Contents

Paulo Thiago Passoni. Mr. Passoni is a member of our board of directors, a position he has held since 2019. Mr. Passoni has served as a member of management of SBLA Advisers Corp., the registered investment adviser of SoftBank Latin America Fund L.P., since April 2019. Previously, he spent over seven years, from May 2011 to January 2019, at Third Point LLC, as Managing Director of emerging markets focusing on Latin America across the capital structure. Prior to that, he was a founding member of Eton Park’s special situation effort in Latin America where he sourced, executed and monitored private investments. Mr. Passoni started his career at Morgan Stanley in the investment banking division based out of São Paulo. Mr. Passoni holds a joint degree in business from Harvard Business School (Baker Scholar) and in public administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government. He obtained his undergraduate degree with honors from Fundação Getulio Vargas in business in São Paulo, Brazil. We believe that Mr. Passoni is qualified to serve on our board of directors due to his considerable business experience in the technology industry and his experience serving as a director of other companies.

Francisco Alvarez-Demalde. Mr. Alvarez-Demalde is a member of our board of directors, a position he has held since 2019. He also acted as a member of the board of our subsidiary, VTEX Brazil from 2014 to 2019. He is a co-founder and co-managing partner of Riverwood Capital, a leading growth-capital private equity firm focused on the global technology industry, and one of the largest early investors in VTEX. Before starting Riverwood Capital, Mr. Alvarez-Demalde was an investment executive at Kohlberg Kravis Roberts & Co., where he focused on leveraged buyouts in the technology industry and other sectors, and was also with Eton Park Capital Management and Goldman Sachs & Co. Mr. Alvarez-Demalde is a former and current director of and/or advisor to several technology companies, including Alog Data Centers do Brasil, Billtrust (Nasdaq: BTRS), Conductor, Globant (NYSE: GLOB), Greenhouse, Industrious, LAVCA, Navent, Nubox, among others. Mr. Alvarez-Demalde holds a bachelor’s degree in economics from Universidad de San Andrés, Argentina, which included an exchange program at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Alvarez-Demalde is also a Global Ambassador with Endeavor, and interested in non-profit initiatives related to education. We believe that Mr. Alvarez-Demalde is qualified to serve on our board of directors due to his considerable business experience in the technology industry and his experience serving as a director of other companies.

Alejandro Raul Scannapieco. Mr. Scannapieco is an independent member of our board of directors and co-chairman of the Audit Committee, positions he has held since May 2021. Currently, he is managing director of the Business Hack-ing Studio at Globant. Prior to that, he led the U.S. East Region for Globant and was the chief financial officer from 2008-2018. Prior to joining Globant in 2008, Alejandro served as chief financial officer at Microsoft South Cone (2002-2008) and Patagon.com South America (1999-2002), an internet startup that was sold to Santander Bank. He also served as Senior Finance Analyst at JP Morgan (1994-1999) and Senior Auditor at EY (1990-1994). Mr. Scannapieco currently serves as a board member for RetailApp Inc., a performance management platform for retailers, a position he has held since 2016. Mr. Scannapieco holds a postgraduate degree in capital markets, a degree in public accounting and a bachelor’s degree in business administration from the Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina. He has also completed a postgraduate degree in finance from Torcuato Di Tella University.

Arshad Matin. Mr. Matin is an independent member of our board of directors, a position he has held since May 2021. Mr. Matin is the president and chief executive officer of Avetta, LLC, a private company providing cloud-based supply chain risk management solutions which he joined in October 2019. From November 2018 to September 2019, he was an entrepreneur-in-residence with Warburg Pincus LLC, a private equity firm. From 2013 to October 2018, he was the president, chief executive officer and a board member of Paradigm Ltd., a leading developer of software solutions to the global oil and gas industry, when it was acquired by Emerson Electric Co. From January 2012 to April 2013, Mr. Matin was executive vice president of IHS Inc., a publicly-traded company that is a leading global source of information and analytics. Mr. Matin joined IHS through the acquisition of Seismic Micro-Technology, Inc., or SMT, a global leader in the geology and geophysics software market. He joined SMT in July 2007 and was its president, chief executive officer and a board member. Before joining SMT, Mr. Matin was general manager of the enterprise security business unit at Symantec Corporation, which he joined in January 2006 upon the company’s acquisition of BindView Corporation, a global provider of

 

139


Table of Contents

agentless IT security compliance software. Mr. Matin also served as a partner of McKinsey & Company from 1995 to 2004 in their Houston offices. Mr. Matin also serves as chairman of the board of directors of NYSE-listed ASGN, a provider of information technology and professional services in the technology, digital, creative, engineering and life sciences fields across commercial and government sectors. Mr. Matin also served as a member of the board of directors of RS Energy Group, a Canadian company supporting companies in the oil and gas industry with its data analytics and forensic research, from December 2018 to January 2020. In addition, Mr. Matin serves as a board member or trustee on non-profit organizations including the Houston Endowment, Texas Children’s Hospital and Asia Society Texas Center. Mr. Matin brings extensive experience managing and advising public and private high-technology companies. Mr. Matin holds an MBA from the University of Pennsylvania – The Wharton School, a master’s degree in computer engineering from the University of Texas at Austin, and a bachelor’s of degree in electrical engineering from Regional Engineering College in India.

Benoit Jean-Claude Marie Fouilland. Mr. Fouilland is an independent member of our board of directors, a position he has held since May 2021. Mr. Fouilland is currently chief financial officer of Firmenich, one of the world’s largest fragrance and taste companies. From March 2012 to July 2020, he served as chief financial officer of Criteo SA, a global advertising technology company (NASDAQ: CRTO). From September 2009 to March 2012, he served as senior vice president and chief financial officer for the Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) region of SAP AG, a multinational software corporation. From April 2008 to September 2009, Mr. Fouilland was the chief financial officer of Business Objects S.A., an enterprise software company which was acquired by SAP AG in 2007. Mr. Fouilland has been a member of the board of Linp SAS since June 2018. Mr. Fouilland holds an MBA from INSEAD, a Diplôme d’Études Supérieures Spécialisées degree in Financial Audit from Université Paris Dauphine and a Business degree from the ESLSCA Graduate School of Business in Paris.

Executive Officers

Our executive officers are primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of our business and for implementing the general policies and directives established by our board of directors. See “Description of Share Capital” for further information.

The table set forth below presents the name, age and title of current executive officers:

 

Name

 Age  

Position

Geraldo do Carmo Júnior

 44  Co-Chief Executive Officer

Mariano Gomide de Faria

 43  Co-Chief Executive Officer

André Spolidoro Ferreira Gomes

 44  Chief Financial Officer

Amit R. Shah

 47  Chief Strategy Officer

Astha Malik

 41  Chief Operating Officer for Growth

Rafael do Amaral Forte

 40  Brazil Growth Officer

Santiago Naranjo Alvarez

 38  LatAm Growth Officer

Ricardo Camatta Sodré

 36  Finance Executive Officer

Geraldo do Carmo Thomaz Júnior. See “—Board of Directors.”

Mariano Gomide de Faria. See “—Board of Directors.”

André Spolidoro Ferreira Gomes. Mr. Spolidoro is our Chief Finance Officer, a position he has held since January 2016. Mr. Spolidoro worked from 1998 to 2015 in asset management firms as Equity Portfolio Manager where he consolidated his solid knowledge in finance, financial market, equity analysis and business. Mr. Spolidoro holds a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering at UFRJ and a graduate degree in finance and capital markets at PUC RJ School of Business.

 

140


Table of Contents

Amit R. Shah. Mr. Shah is our Chief Strategy Officer, a position he has held since February 2020. He also serves as chairman of the board of directors at Avora Ltd (UK), Fact Finder GmbH (Germany), Magnolia AG (Switzerland) and Stonebranch Inc (US), and is a member of the supervisory board of Doodle AG. Previously, he was chief revenue officer for Microservices at SAP. From 2010 to 2016 he served as CEO at Jirafe Inc., a company he founded, which was acquired by SAP Hybris in 2016. From 2009 to 2010, Mr. Shah served as VP of sales & Business Development at Magento Inc. Before Magento, he was co-founder of Joomlatools and OpenX. Mr. Shah holds a bachelor’s degree in Economics from University of Chicago.

Astha Malik. Mrs. Malik is our Chief Operating Officer for Growth, a position she has held since May 2021. She was VP of Global Go-to-market Strategy, Planning and Enablement from 2019 to 2021 and VP of Platform and Product Marketing from 2017 to 2019 at a high-growth SaaS company, Zendesk (NYSE: ZEN). Prior to that, she was vice-president of Marketing at PagerDuty (NYSE: PD). She has also held several other senior leadership positions across Sales and Marketing at Citrix, Prudential, Sumo Logic. Since November 2019, she also serves on the board of Greenhouse Software. Malik is an active advocate for diversity and leadership and recognized with awards by organizations committed to diversity initiatives, including Female Executive of the Year - Stevie awards for women in business and Business Leadership Award by the National Diversity Council. Mrs. Malik holds a Master of Science degree with the highest distinction along with a Director’s Award for academic excellence from Florida International University.

Rafael do Amaral Forte. Mr. Forte is the Brazil Growth Officer, a position he has held since 2019. From 2001 to 2011 he was the co-founder and Director of WX7, where he co-led the company’s growth and subsequent acquisition by VTEX. From 2016 to 2019, Mr. Forte served as our Head of Sales in Brazil. Since 2019, when VTEX and TOTVS announced the joint venture, Mr. Forte has been chairman of its Board of Directors. Mr. Forte holds a law degree from the University of São Judas, a MBA in Ecommerce Strategic Management from Anhembi University and a MBA in Strategic and Economic Business Management from FGV University. Mr. Forte is also a guest lecturer at the MBA in Strategic Retail Management at Ibmec University.

Santiago Naranjo Alvarez. Mr. Naranjo is our LatAm Growth Officer, a position he has held since June 2020. Mr. Naranjo served as Country Manager of Colombia from 2016 to 2020. Before joining VTEX, he served as Marketing Manager in Offcorss (CI Hermeco) for 10 years. Mr. Naranjo is a financial engineer and retail expert, passionate about Omnichannel and Cross Border ecommerce with more than 15 years of experience in ecommerce and retail, and 10 years of expertise leading the creation and expansion of successful brands, both physical and digital. Mr. Naranjo has also been a board member of the Colombian Chamber of Electronic Commerce (“CCCE”) since 2016 as a trusted advisor who shares knowledge that powers the ecommerce industry in Latin America. Santiago holds a B.S. degree in financial engineering with marketing at Universidad de Medellín.

Ricardo Camatta Sodré. Mr. Sodré is our Finance Executive Officer, a position he has held since February 2021. Previously, Mr. Sodré was a private equity investor at Advent International, where he joined as a trainee in 2009 before leaving as a director in January 2021. During his years at Advent, Mr. Sodré actively participated in more than 10 private equity investments, including CETIP, CCC Information Services and StoneCo, and in recent years he was a board member at Prisma Medios de Pago S.A., a leading payments company in Latin America, and GTM Holdings, a leading chemical distributor with presence in 11 countries in Latin America, where he was also a member of the Audit, Finance and M&A committees. Mr. Sodré holds a degree in Mechanical-Aeronautical Engineering with honors from Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica (“ITA”) and an MBA from Harvard Business School.

Committees

Audit Committee

Upon completion of this offering, our board of directors will have established an audit committee. Our audit committee will initially consist of                 , and                  will be the chairman of our audit committee, and

 

141


Table of Contents

                 satisfy the criteria of an audit committee financial expert as set forth under the applicable rules of the SEC, and                  will meet the criteria for independence set forth in Rule 10A-3 of the Exchange Act at the time of our initial public offering. Our audit committee will assist our board of directors in overseeing our accounting and financial reporting processes and the audits of our consolidated financial statements. In addition, the audit committee will be directly responsible for the appointment, compensation, retention and oversight of the work of our independent registered public accounting firm.

Compensation Committee

Our compensation committee consists of Paulo Thiago Passoni and Francisco Alvarez-Demalde. Our compensation committee is responsible for, among other things, establishing cash compensation levels, adopting and administering our bonus programs, reviewing and approving severance arrangements and employment agreements to maintain competitiveness and further our performance objectives, establishing and recommending to our board of directors corporate goals and objectives relevant to compensation for our executive officers (including the Co-Chief Executive Officers), as well as recommending to our board of directors the form and amount of cash-and equity-based and other compensation to be paid to the non-employee members of the board of directors.

Code of Ethics

We have adopted a code of ethics, which is applicable to all of our directors, officers and employees. We will make our code of ethics publicly available on our website upon the completion of this offering. We intend to disclose future amendments to, or waivers of, our code of conduct on the same page of our corporate website. Information contained on our website is not incorporated by reference into this prospectus, and you should not consider information contained on our website to be part of this prospectus or in deciding whether to invest in our Class A common shares.

Compensation of Directors and Officers

Our directors, executive officers and management in general receive fixed and variable compensation. They also receive benefits generally in line with market practice in Brazil and elsewhere where we operate. The fixed component of their compensation is set on market terms and adjusted annually.

The variable component consists of cash bonuses and awards of shares (or the cash equivalent). Cash bonuses are paid to executive officers and members of our management based on previously agreed targets for the business. Shares (or the cash equivalent) are awarded under our share options long term incentive program, as discussed below.

For the year ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, the aggregate compensation expense for the members of the board of directors and our executive officers for services in all capacities was US$3.4 million and US$1.8 million, respectively, which includes both benefits paid in kind and compensation.

Equity Incentive Plan

We have and, subject to certain amendments, will continue to have both a share option plan and a restricted share plan in which eligible participants include certain members of our management and our employees. Beneficiaries under the share option plan or the restricted share plan, as the case may be, are granted rights to buy our shares or shares of our subsidiaries based on certain criteria determined and disclosed prior to the commencement of this offering. The final eligibility of any beneficiary to participate in the share option plan or restricted share plan is determined by our board of directors. For further information, see note 26 to our unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements and note 27 to our consolidated financial statements.

 

142


Table of Contents

The maximum number shares that can be issued to beneficiaries under the share option plan and under restricted share plan may not exceed    % and    %, respectively of our total share capital at any time.

Agreements with our Executives

Certain of our executive officers have entered into employment agreements with us, certain of which provide for notice of termination periods and include restrictive covenants, including with respect to confidentiality, non-compete and exclusivity. None of our directors have entered into service agreements with us.

Directors’ and Officers’ Insurance

Prior to the consummation of this offering, we will obtain a directors’ and officers’ insurance coverage in reasonable and customary amounts with respect to general civil liability, including liabilities under the Securities Act, for acts carried out by our directors and executive officers in the course of their duties.

Share Ownership

The shares and any outstanding beneficially owned by our directors and officers and/or entities affiliated with these individuals are disclosed in the section entitled “Principal Shareholders.”

Family Relationships

There are no family relationships between our directors and executive officers and shareholders.

 

143


Table of Contents

PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS

The table below contains information regarding the beneficial ownership of our equity securities (1) immediately prior to the consummation of this offering; (2) following the offering of Class A common shares contemplated hereby, assuming no exercise of the option to purchase additional Class A common shares; and (3) following the sale of Class A common shares in this offering, assuming the underwriters’ option to purchase additional Class A common shares is exercised in full, by:

 

  

each person, or group of affiliated persons, known by us to own beneficially 5% or more of our common shares;

 

  

each person who is or will be a member of our board of directors and each of our executive officers as of the consummation of this offering, individually; and

 

  

all of the persons who are members of our board of directors and all of our executive officers, as a group.

Beneficial ownership is determined under SEC rules and generally includes voting or investment power over securities. Except in cases where community property laws apply or as indicated in the footnotes to this table, we believe that each shareholder identified in the table below possesses sole voting and investment power over all the Class A or Class B common shares shown as beneficially owned by the shareholder in the table.

Common shares subject to options, warrants or rights that are exercisable at the time of completion of this offering, or that will be exercisable within 60 days thereafter, are considered to be outstanding and beneficially owned by the person who holds such options, warrants or rights for purposes of computing that person’s common share ownership, but are not treated as outstanding for the purpose of computing the percentage ownership of any other person.

The percentages of beneficial ownership in the table below are calculated on the basis of the following numbers of shares outstanding:

 

  

immediately prior to the completion of this offering:                Class A common shares and                Class B common shares;

 

  

following the sale of Class A common shares in this offering, assuming no exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional Class A common shares:                Class A common shares and                Class B common shares; and

 

  

following the sale of Class A common shares in this offering, assuming exercise in full of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional Class A common shares:                Class A common shares and                Class B common shares.

The holders of our Class A common shares and Class B common shares have identical rights, except that holders of Class B common shares (1) are entitled to 10 votes per share, whereas holders of our Class A common shares are entitled to one vote per share; (2) has certain conversion rights; (3) is entitled to maintain a proportional ownership interest in the event that additional Class A common shares are issued and (4) are subject to certain transfer restrictions. For more information, see “Description of Share Capital.” Each Class B common share is convertible into one Class A common share.

 

144


Table of Contents
  Common shares
Beneficially Owned
Prior to Offering
  Total
Voting
Power
Before
Offering(1)
  Common Shares
Beneficially Owned
After Offering
without Exercise of
Underwriters’ Option
  Total
Voting Power
After
Offering
without
Exercise of
Underwriters’
Option(1)
  Common Shares
Beneficially
Owned After
Offering with Full
Exercise of
Underwriters’ Option
  Total Voting
Power After
Offering with
full exercise of
Underwriters’
Option(1)
 
  Class A  Class B  Class A  Class B  Class A  Class B 
  Shares %  Shares %  %  Shares %  Shares %  %  Shares %  Shares %  % 

5% Shareholders

         

Geraldo do Carmo Thomaz Júnior(1)

         

Mariano Gomide de Faria(1)

         

LA Holdings (Cayman) Ltd.(2)

         

Riverwood Managed Entities(3)

         

Directors and Executive Officers

         

Geraldo do Carmo Thomaz Júnior

         

Mariano Gomide de Faria

         

Paulo Thiago Passoni

         

Francisco Alvarez-Demalde

         

André Spolidoro Ferreira Gomes(4)

         

Amit R. Shah

         

Rafael do Amaral Forte(5)

         

Santiago Naranjo Alvarez

         

Ricardo Camatta Sodré

         

All directors and executive officers as a group (9 persons)

                                                                                                   
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

Total

         
 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

(1)

Includes common shares held of record by Imbetiba Fund Inc., Mira Limited, Abrolhos One Limited, and Mr. do Carmo Thomaz Júnior. Mr. Gomide de Faria and Mr. do Carmo Thomaz Júnior may be deemed to beneficially own shares held of record by these entities and individual. In addition, Mr. do Carmo Thomaz Júnior and Mr. Gomide de Faria may be deemed to beneficially own                shares held of record by individuals pursuant to an irrevocable power-of-attorney.

(2)

LA Holdings (Cayman) Ltd. is wholly owned by SoftBank Latin America Fund L.P., which in turn, is managed by SBLA Advisers Corp, the registered investment adviser. Paulo Thiago Passoni is a member of management of SBLA Advisers Corp. SBLA Advisers Corp has sole voting and dispositive power over the shares held by SoftBank Latin America Fund L.P. The business address for each of these entities is 600 Brickell Avenue, Suite 2650, Miami, Florida.

(3)

Consists of                common shares held by Data Center Holdings II LLC,                 common shares held by IT Brazil Group II LLC,                common shares held by RCP II Brazil Holdings LLC and                  common shares held by RCP II (Parallel B) Brazil Holdings LLC, entities incorporated under the laws of Delaware (together the “Riverwood-Managed Entities”), which are wholly owned by Data Center Holdings II AIV L.P., IT Brazil Group II AIV L.P., RCP II Brazil Holdings AIV L.P., and Riverwood Capital Partners II (Parallel-B) L.P., respectively (together, the “Riverwood-Managed Funds”), which management is controlled by Riverwood Capital II L.P., the general partner of each of the Riverwood-Managed Funds. Riverwood Capital GP II Ltd. is the general partner of Riverwood Capital II L.P. The Riverwood-Managed Funds, Riverwood Capital II L.P. and Riverwood Capital GP II Ltd. may be deemed to have shared voting and dispositive power over shares directly held by the Riverwood-Managed Entities (provided that the

 

145


Table of Contents