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AFBI Affinity Bancshares

Filed: 31 Mar 21, 8:00pm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2020

 

OR

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from             to                  

 

Commission File Number: 001-39914

 

Affinity Bancshares, Inc.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

Maryland

 

86-1339773

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification Number)

 

3175 Highway 278, Covington, Georgia

 

30014

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip code)

 

(770) 786-7088

(Registrant’s telephone number including area code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

         Title of each class                                          Trading Symbols

Name of exchange on which registered

Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share              AFBI

The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

Yes    No 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act.

Yes    No 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes    No 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes    No 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

  

Accelerated filer

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

  

Smaller reporting company

 

Emerging growth company

 

 

 

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.  

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes    No 

 

The aggregate value of the voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant, computed by reference to the closing price of the common stock of $10.85 as of January 21, 2021 (the first day of trading of the Registrant’s common stock), was $71.8 million.

 

As of March 25, 2021 there were 6,755,160 shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock.

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

1.  Portions of the Proxy Statement for the 2020 Annual Meeting of Stockholders. (Part III)

 

 

 

 

 


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

1


 

 

PART I

ITEM 1.

Business

Forward Looking Statements

This annual report contains forward-looking statements, which can be identified by the use of words such as “estimate,” “project,” “believe,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “assume,” “plan,” “seek,” “expect,” “will,” “may,” “should,” “indicate,” “would,” “contemplate,” “continue,” “potential,” “target” and words of similar meaning.  These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to:

 

statements of our goals, intentions and expectations;

 

statements regarding our business plans, prospects, growth and operating strategies;

 

statements regarding the quality of our loan and investment portfolios; and

 

estimates of our risks and future costs and benefits.

These forward-looking statements are based on current beliefs and expectations of our management and are inherently subject to significant business, economic and competitive uncertainties and contingencies, many of which are beyond our control. In addition, these forward-looking statements are subject to assumptions with respect to future business strategies and decisions that are subject to change.  Accordingly, you should not place undue reliance on such statements.  We are under no duty to and do not take any obligation to update any forward-looking statements after the date of this annual report.

The following factors, among others, could cause actual results to differ materially from the anticipated results or other expectations expressed in the forward-looking statements:

 

conditions relating to the COVID-19 pandemic, including the severity and duration of the associated economic slowdown either nationally or in our market areas, that are worse than expected;

 

general economic conditions, either nationally or in our market areas, that are worse than expected;

 

changes in the level and direction of loan delinquencies and write-offs and changes in estimates of the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses;

 

our ability to access cost-effective funding;

 

fluctuations in real estate values and both residential and commercial real estate market conditions;

 

demand for loans and deposits in our market area;

 

our ability to implement and change our business strategies;

 

competition among depository and other financial institutions;

 

inflation and changes in the interest rate environment that reduce our margins and yields, our mortgage banking revenues, the fair value of financial instruments or our level of loan originations, or increase the level of defaults, losses and prepayments on loans we have made and make;

 

adverse changes in the securities or secondary mortgage markets;

 

changes in laws or government regulations or policies affecting financial institutions, including changes in regulatory fees, capital requirements and insurance premiums;

 

changes in tax laws;

 

the effects of any Federal government shutdown;

 

changes in the quality or composition of our loan or investment portfolios;

2


 

 

 

technological changes that may be more difficult or expensive than expected;

 

failure or breaches of information technology security systems;

 

the inability of third-party providers to perform as expected;

 

a failure or breach of our operational or security systems or infrastructure, including cyberattacks;

 

our ability to manage market risk, credit risk and operational risk in the current economic environment;

 

our ability to introduce new products and services, enter new markets successfully and capitalize on growth opportunities;

 

our ability to successfully integrate into our operations any assets, liabilities, customers, systems and management personnel we have acquired or may acquire and our ability to realize related revenue synergies and cost savings within expected time frames, and any goodwill charges related thereto;

 

changes in consumer spending, borrowing and savings habits;

 

changes in accounting policies and practices, as may be adopted by the bank regulatory agencies, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, the Securities and Exchange Commission or the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board;

 

our ability to retain key employees;

 

our compensation expense associated with equity allocated or awarded to our employees;

 

changes in the financial condition, results of operations or future prospects of issuers of securities that we own; and

 

the effects of any pandemic disease, natural disaster, war, act of terrorism, accident, or similar action or event.

Further, given its ongoing and dynamic nature, it is difficult to predict the full impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on our business. The extent of such impact will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain, including when the novel coronavirus can be fully controlled and abated and when and how the economy may be fully reopened.  As the result of the COVID-19 pandemic and the related adverse local and national economic consequences, we could be subject to any of the following risks, any of which could have a material, adverse effect on our business, financial condition, liquidity, and results of operations:

3


 

 

demand for products and services may decline, making it difficult to grow assets and income;

 

if the economy is unable to substantially and successfully reopen, and high levels of unemployment continue for an extended period of time, loan delinquencies, problem assets, and foreclosures may increase, resulting in increased charges and reduced income;

 

collateral for loans, especially real estate, may decline in value, which could cause loan losses to increase;

 

the allowance for loan losses has been and may have to be increased if borrowers experience financial difficulties, which will adversely affect our net income;

 

we may experience losses on our PPP loans due to fraud or failures with respect to SBA guarantees;

 

the net worth and liquidity of loan guarantors may decline, impairing their ability to honor commitments;

 

as the result of the decline in the Federal Reserve Board’s target federal funds rate, the yield on assets may decline to a greater extent than the decline in the cost of interest-bearing liabilities, reducing net interest margin and spread and reducing net income;

 

cyber-security risks are increased as the result of an increase in the number of employees working remotely;

 

we have been subject to litigation, and we face increased regulatory enforcement risk and reputation risk regarding our participation in the PPP and the risk that the SBA may not fund some or all PPP loan guarantees;

 

we rely on third-party vendors for certain services and the unavailability of a critical service due to the COVID-19 outbreak could have an adverse effect on us; and

 

FDIC premiums may increase if the agency experiences additional resolution costs.

Because of these and other uncertainties, our actual future results may be materially different from the results indicated by these forward-looking statements.

Affinity Bancshares, Inc.

Affinity Bancshares, Inc. (“Affinity Bancshares”) is a Maryland corporation that was incorporated in September 2020 to be the successor corporation to Community First Bancshares, Inc., a federal corporation, upon completion of the second-step mutual-to-stock conversion (the “Conversion”) of Community First Bancshares, MHC, the top tier mutual holding company of Community First Bancshares, Inc. Community First Bancshares, Inc. was the former mid-tier holding company for Affinity Bank (formerly named Newton Federal Bank). Prior to completion of the Conversion, approximately 54% of the shares of common stock of Community First Bancshares, Inc. were owned by Community First Bancshares, MHC. In conjunction with the Conversion, Community First Bancshares, Inc. was merged into Affinity Bancshares, Inc. (and ceased to exist) and Affinity Bancshares, Inc. became its successor holding company for Affinity Bank.  

On January 20, 2021, Affinity Bancshares, Inc. completed the Conversion. Affinity Bancshares, Inc. raised gross proceeds of $37.0 million by selling a total of 3,701,509 shares of common stock at $10.00 per share in the second-step stock offering.  Affinity Bancshares, Inc. utilized $3.0 million of the proceeds to fund an addition to its Employee Stock Ownership Plan (“ESOP”) loan for the acquisition of additional shares at $10.00 per share. Expenses incurred related to the offering were $1.6 million, and have been recorded against offering proceeds. The Company invested $16.3 million of the net proceeds it received from the sale into Affinity Bank’s operations and has retained the remaining amount for general corporate purposes. Concurrent with the completion of the stock offering, each share of Community First Bancshares, Inc. common stock owned by public stockholders (stockholders other than Community First Bancshares, MHC) was exchanged for 0.90686 shares of Company common stock.

Affinity Bancshares, Inc. conducts its operations primarily through its wholly owned subsidiary, Affinity Bank, a federally chartered savings bank. Affinity Bancshares, Inc. manages its operations as one unit, and thus does not have separate operating segments. At December 31, 2020, Affinity Bancshares, Inc. had total assets of $850.6 million, loans of $592.3 million, deposits of $640.2 million, and stockholders’ equity of $80.8 million.

The executive offices of Affinity Bancshares, Inc. are located at 3175 Highway 278, Covington, Georgia 30014, and its telephone number is (770) 786-7088. Affinity Bancshares, Inc. is subject to comprehensive regulation and examination by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Federal Reserve Board”).

4


 

Affinity Bank

Affinity Bank is a federally chartered stock savings association headquartered in Covington, Georgia.  Affinity Bank changed its name from Newton Federal Bank in connection with the conversion.  Newton Federal Bank was originally chartered in 1928 as a Georgia-chartered mutual building and loan association under the name Newton County Building and Loan Association, and we continue to operate under the name “Newton Federal Bank, a Division of Affinity Bank” in Newton Federal Bank’s legacy market area.  

Our business consists primarily of taking deposits from the general public and investing those deposits, together with funds generated from operations, in commercial real estate loans, commercial and industrial loans and residential real estate loans and, to a lesser extent, construction and land loans and consumer loans.  We also invest in securities, which have historically consisted primarily of mortgage-backed securities and obligations issued by U.S. government sponsored enterprises and Federal Home Loan Bank stock.  We offer a variety of deposit accounts, including checking accounts, savings accounts and certificate of deposit accounts.  In addition, we gather deposits nationwide through our virtual bank, FitnessBank, which accepts deposits and provides higher interest rates based on customers meeting certain fitness goals.  We have also used Federal Home Loan Bank borrowings to fund our operations.

Affinity Bank is subject to comprehensive regulation and examination by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.  Affinity Bank is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank system.  We use three website addresses:  www.myaffinitybank.com,  www.newtonfederal.com, and FitnessBank.fit.  Information on our websites is not considered a part of this report.

Acquisition

On January 10, 2020, Community First Bancshares, Inc. and Newton Federal Bank completed their acquisition of ABB Financial Group, Inc. (“ABB”) and its wholly owned subsidiary, Affinity Bank.  At the effective time of the acquisition, each outstanding share of ABB common stock was converted into the right to receive $7.50 in cash.  Including consideration received by holders of options to purchase ABB common stock, the aggregate consideration paid in the transaction was approximately $40.3 million.  In addition, $5.9 million of preferred stock that had been issued by ABB were redeemed, and $1.4 million of trust preferred securities issued by a subsidiary of ABB were acquired by Community First Bancshares, Inc. and canceled.  All accrued but unpaid dividends and interest have been paid on the preferred stock and trust preferred securities.

Market Area

 

We conduct our operations from our main office, a separate operations center and one additional branch office in Covington, Georgia, which is located in Newton County, Georgia; and one branch office in Atlanta, Georgia, which is located in Cobb County, as well as a commercial loan production office located in Alpharetta, Georgia, which is in Fulton County.  Our indirect automobile lending division, Affinity Bank Dealer Select (formerly “Community First Auto”), operates out of an office in Monroe, Georgia.  In addition, we gather deposits nationwide through our virtual bank, FitnessBank.

 

Covington, Georgia is located 35 miles east of Atlanta, Georgia and 47 miles south of Athens, Georgia.  In Newton County, services are the largest employment sector and represent 24% of the non-farm, non-government labor force.  Other significant employer industries in the county include education/healthcare/social services, wholesale/retail trade, finance/insurance/real estate and construction.  There are approximately 1,400 businesses operating in Newton County.  Newton County’s total population was estimated at 114,228 as of January 1, 2021 and grew 14.3% from 2010 to 2021, while the population of the state of Georgia grew 11.2% during that same period.  Newton County’s population is projected to grow 6.1% between 2021 and 2026, compared to 4.7% for the State of Georgia.  As of January 1, 2021, the median household income in Newton County was approximately $62,098, which was lower than the Georgia state median of $64,850 and lower than the national median household income of $67,761.

 

Cobb County, with a total population of 768,828 as of January 1, 2021, grew 11.7% between 2010 and 2021, and is projected to grow another 4.7% by 2026.  In Cobb County, the services sector represents 32% of the non-farm, non-government labor force. Cobb County has approximately 21,000 businesses, with other significant employee representation including retail trade, health care and social assistance.  The median household income in Cobb County was approximately $88,072, which is higher than the Georgia and national medians.

 

Fulton County, with a total population of 1,084,382 as of January 1, 2021, grew 11.7% since 2010, and is projected to grow another 6.0% by 2026. It has approximately 37,000 businesses, with the most significant employee representation in professional, scientific, and technical services, health care and social assistance and retail trade.

 

5


 

The following table provides information with respect to unemployment rates for our market areas, the State of Georgia and the United States as a whole:

 

 

 

Unemployment Rate

 

 

 

 

 

Region

 

January 2021

 

 

January 2020

 

 

Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

United States

 

6.80%

 

 

4.00%

 

 

2.80%

 

Georgia

 

5.00%

 

 

3.50%

 

 

1.50%

 

Cobb County, Georgia

 

4.30%

 

 

3.00%

 

 

1.30%

 

Fulton County, Georgia

 

6.10%

 

 

3.40%

 

 

2.70%

 

Newton County, Georgia

 

5.60%

 

 

3.70%

 

 

1.90%

 

 

Unemployment rates have been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, but for all counties where we have a physical branch office or loan production office, the unemployment was below the national unemployment rate for January 2021 and, for Cobb County, was also below the unemployment rate for the State of Georgia.

We believe that we have developed products and services that will meet the financial needs of our current and future customer base, and we continually plan to enhance our products and services to meet the changing needs of customers. Marketing strategies focus on the strength of our knowledge of local consumer and small business markets, our understanding of the dental practice market and indirect automobile lending, as well as expanding relationships with current customers and reaching out to develop new, profitable business relationships.

Competition

We face competition within our local market area both in making loans and attracting deposits.  Our market area has a concentration of financial institutions that include large money center and regional banks, community banks and credit unions.  We also face competition from savings institutions, mortgage banking firms, consumer finance companies and credit unions and, with respect to deposits, from money market funds, brokerage firms, mutual funds and insurance companies.  As of June 30, 2020 (the most recent date for which data is available), our market share of deposits represented 22.65% of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation-insured deposits in Newton County and 2.01% in Cobb County, ranking us first and 14th, respectively, in market share of deposits out of nine institutions operating in Newton County and 23 institutions operating in Cobb County.

Lending Activities

General.  Our historical lending activity consists of originating commercial real estate loans, commercial and industrial loans and residential real estate loans and, to a lesser extent, construction and land loans and consumer loans.  We initiated indirect automobile lending in October 2018.  As a result of our acquisition of the former Affinity Bank, we have a specialized expertise in lending to dentists and dental practices, with dental practice loans totaling $170.8 million, or 29.2% of our loan portfolio, as of December 31, 2020.  Of this amount, 71% consisted of commercial business loans and 29% consisted of commercial real estate loans, with the remaining amount being unsecured loans.  

 

6


 

 

Loan Portfolio Composition.  The following table sets forth the composition of our loan portfolio by type of loan at the dates indicated.  In addition to the loans included in the table below, at December 31, 2020, we had no loans held for sale, $566,000 of loans in process and $2.0 million of deferred loan fees.

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

At September 30,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One- to four-family residential (1)

 

$

91,777

 

 

 

15.33

%

 

$

116,843

 

 

 

46.35

%

 

$

139,919

 

 

 

60.44

%

 

$

135,508

 

 

 

59.85

%

 

$

138,875

 

 

 

63.78

%

 

$

132,899

 

 

 

68.54

%

Commercial (2)

 

 

178,571

 

 

 

29.83

%

 

 

54,488

 

 

 

21.61

%

 

 

45,509

 

 

 

19.67

%

 

 

39,768

 

 

 

17.57

%

 

 

29,861

 

 

 

13.71

 

 

 

29,162

 

 

 

15.04

 

Construction and land

 

 

23,571

 

 

 

3.94

%

 

 

20,502

 

 

 

8.13

%

 

 

14,015

 

 

 

6.06

%

 

 

20,188

 

 

 

8.92

%

 

 

25,165

 

 

 

11.56

 

 

 

13,343

 

 

 

6.88

 

Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

155,554

 

 

 

25.99

%

 

 

28,613

 

 

 

11.35

%

 

 

27,408

 

 

 

11.84

%

 

 

28,375

 

 

 

12.53

%

 

 

21,060

 

 

 

9.67

 

 

 

16,221

 

 

 

8.37

 

      Paycheck Protection Program loans

 

 

101,749

 

 

 

17.00

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

47,393

 

 

 

7.91

%

 

 

31,644

 

 

 

12.56

%

 

 

4,595

 

 

 

1.99

%

 

 

2,555

 

 

 

1.13

%

 

 

2,783

 

 

 

1.28

 

 

 

2,262

 

 

 

1.17

 

 

 

 

598,615

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

252,090

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

231,446

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

226,394

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

217,744

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

193,887

 

 

 

100.00

%

Less:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Allowance for losses

 

 

6,361

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4,134

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4,022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,909

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4,551

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4,309

 

 

 

 

 

Total loans

 

$

592,254

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

247,956

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

227,424

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

222,485

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

213,193

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

189,578

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1)

Includes home equity loans and lines of credit, which totaled $2.3 million at December 31, 2020.

(2)

Includes multi-family residential real estate loans, which totaled $5.8 million at December 31, 2020.

 

 

 

7


 

 

Contractual Maturities.  The following tables set forth the contractual maturities of our total loan portfolio at December 31, 2020.  Demand loans, loans having no stated repayment schedule or maturity, and overdraft loans are reported as being due in one year or less. The tables present contractual maturities and do not reflect repricing or the effect of prepayments.  Actual maturities may differ.  

 

December 31, 2020

 

One- to

Four-Family

Residential

Real Estate

 

 

Commercial

Real Estate

 

 

Construction

and Land

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Amounts due in:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Due in one year or less

 

$

5,659

 

 

$

14,908

 

 

$

11,686

 

After one through five years

 

 

14,155

 

 

 

82,285

 

 

 

5,429

 

After five through 15 years

 

 

38,071

 

 

 

71,156

 

 

 

2,957

 

After 15 years

 

 

33,892

 

 

 

10,222

 

 

 

3,499

 

Total

 

$

91,777

 

 

$

178,571

 

 

$

23,571

 

 

December 31, 2020

 

Commercial

and

Industrial

 

 

Paycheck Protection Program

 

 

Consumer

 

 

Total

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Amounts due in:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Due in one year or less

 

$

4,960

 

 

$

 

 

$

201

 

 

$

37,414

 

After one through five years

 

 

54,669

 

 

 

101,749

 

 

 

43,330

 

 

$

301,617

 

After five through 15 years

 

 

94,088

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,862

 

 

$

210,134

 

After 15 years

 

 

1,837

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

49,450

 

Total

 

$

155,554

 

 

$

101,749

 

 

$

47,393

 

 

$

598,615

 

 

The following table sets forth our fixed and adjustable-rate loans at December 31, 2020 that are contractually due after December 31, 2021.

 

 

 

Due After December 31, 2021

 

 

 

Fixed

 

 

Adjustable

 

 

Total

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One- to four-family residential

 

$

79,933

 

 

$

6,185

 

 

$

86,118

 

Commercial

 

 

140,662

 

 

 

23,001

 

 

 

163,663

 

Construction and land

 

 

6,684

 

 

 

5,201

 

 

 

11,885

 

Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

141,744

 

 

 

8,850

 

 

 

150,594

 

      Paycheck Protection Program loans

 

 

101,749

 

 

 

 

 

 

101,749

 

Consumer loans

 

 

47,066

 

 

 

126

 

 

 

47,192

 

Total loans

 

$

517,838

 

 

$

43,363

 

 

$

561,201

 

 

 

(1)

Consists of home equity loans and lines of credit.

 

 

Commercial and Industrial Loans.  We make commercial and industrial loans, primarily in our market area, to a variety of professionals, sole proprietorships and small businesses, including dental loans, which are originated throughout the Southeastern United States.  These loans are generally secured by business assets, and we may support this collateral with junior liens on real property.  At December 31, 2020, commercial and industrial loans were $155.6 million, or 25.9% of our gross loans.  This total excludes $101.7 million of loans originated under the PPP, which are described below.  As part of our relationship driven focus, we encourage our commercial borrowers to maintain their primary deposit accounts with us, which enhances our interest rate spread and net interest margin.

Commercial lending products include term loans and revolving lines of credit. Commercial loans and lines of credit are made with either adjustable or fixed rates of interest. Adjustable rates and fixed rates are based on the prime rate as published in The Wall Street Journal, plus a margin. We are focusing our efforts on experienced, growing small- to medium-sized, privately-held companies with solid historical and projected cash flows that operate in our market areas.

8


 

When making commercial and industrial loans, we consider the financial statements of the borrower, our lending history with the borrower, the debt service capabilities and global cash flows of the borrower and other guarantors, the projected cash flows of the business and the value of the collateral, accounts receivable, inventory and equipment.  Depending on the collateral used to secure the loans, commercial and industrial loans are made in amounts of up to 80% of the value of the collateral securing the loan.

 

Our commercial business loans to dental professionals totaled $170.8 million at December 31, 2020.  The significant majority of these loans are secured by practice assets with the goodwill of each practice providing the value for lending.  We consider numerous factors when underwriting dental loans, including transactional risk related to the selling doctor in a practice purchase, if applicable, procedures performed, insurance taken and the good standing of the dentist by state boards.  We lend across all dental specialties: general, cosmetic, orthodontist, endodontist, periodontist, pediatric, and oral surgery.  The majority of our dental loans are originated to professionals and practices located in the State of Georgia, with the remainder originated through the contiguous states.  We target dental practice loans with principal balances between $350,000 and $500,000, although we will originate dental practice loans with principal balances in excess of $500,000.  The significant majority of our dental loans are to solo practitioners or small practices with two professionals.  We remain knowledgeable of trends in the dental industry through regular contact with our borrowers as well as through our participation in dental managers associations and our dental advisory board.

The CARES Act established the PPP through the SBA, which allowed us to lend money to small businesses to maintain employee payrolls through the COVID-19 crisis with guarantees from the SBA.  Under this program, loan amounts may be forgiven if the borrower maintains employee payrolls and meet certain other requirements.  PPP loans have a fixed interest rate of 1.00% and a maturity date of either two or five years.  Such loans totaled $101.7 million at December 31, 2020.

Our largest commercial and industrial loan at December 31, 2020 totaled $2.5 million, was originated in 2016 and is secured by accounts receivable.  At December 31, 2020, this loan was performing in accordance with its terms.

Commercial Real Estate Loans.  Our commercial real estate loans (which includes multi-family residential loans) are secured primarily by dental/medical professional properties, church campuses and other small businesses.  At December 31, 2020, we had $178.5 million in commercial real estate loans, representing 29.8% of our total loan portfolio.  At that date, $142.7 million, or 23.2% of our commercial real estate loans, were secured by owner-occupied properties.  This amount included $53.5 million of dental loans, $22.3 million of church loans and $6.7 million of multi-family residential real estate loans.  At December 31, 2020, our commercial real estate loans had an average balance of $482,000.

Most of our commercial real estate loans are balloon loans with a five-year initial term and a 20-year amortization period.  The maximum loan-to-value ratio of our commercial real estate loans is generally 80%.  All of our commercial real estate loans are subject to our underwriting procedures and guidelines.  At December 31, 2020, our largest commercial real estate loan totaled $8.0 million and is secured by an industrial warehouse currently under construction.  At December 31, 2020, this loan was performing in accordance with its terms.  

We consider a number of factors in originating commercial real estate loans.  We evaluate the qualifications and financial condition of the borrower, including credit history, profitability and expertise, as well as the value and condition of the property securing the loan.  When evaluating the qualifications of the borrower, we consider the financial resources of the borrower, the borrower’s experience in owning or managing similar property and the borrower’s payment history with us and other financial institutions.  In evaluating the property securing the loan, the factors we consider include the net operating income of the mortgaged property before debt service and depreciation, the ratio of the loan amount to the appraised value of the mortgaged property and the debt service coverage ratio (the ratio of net operating income to debt service).  The significant majority of our commercial real estate loans are appraised by outside independent appraisers approved by the board of directors, although we are only required to obtain independent appraisals on commercial real estate loans in amounts of $500,000 or greater.  Personal guarantees are generally obtained from the principals of commercial real estate borrowers.

One- to Four-Family Residential Real Estate Lending.  At December 31, 2020, we had $91.7 million of loans secured by one- to four-family real estate, representing 15.3% of our total loan portfolio.  We currently originate adjustable-rate and fixed-rate one- to four-family residential real estate loans, although our ability to originate adjustable-rate residential mortgage loans is significantly limited in the current interest rate environment.  We historically originated fixed-rate one- to four-family residential real estate loans with balloon terms, but recently began originating adjustable-rate one- to four-family residential real estate loans.  At December 31, 2020, $6.7 million, or 7.3%, of our one- to four-family residential real estate loans were adjustable-rate loans and at December 31, 2020, $21.8 million, or 23.8%, of our one- to four-family residential real estate loans were balloon loans.  

Our one- to four-family residential real estate loans are generally underwritten to internal guidelines, although we generally follow the documentation practices of Fannie Mae guidelines.  We generally originate one- to four-family residential real estate loans in amounts up to $150,000, although we will originate loans above this amount.  The significant majority of our one- to four-family residential real estate loans are secured by properties located in our primary market area.

9


 

We generally limit the loan-to-value ratios of our one- to four-family residential mortgage loans to 89.9% of the purchase price or appraised value, whichever is lower.  

We currently offer one- to four-family residential real estate loans with terms of up to 15 years.  Our adjustable-rate one- to four-family residential real estate loans have a five or seven year initial fixed rate.

We do not offer “interest only” mortgage loans on permanent one- to four-family residential real estate loans (where the borrower pays interest for an initial period, after which the loan converts to a fully amortizing loan).  We also do not offer loans that provide for negative amortization of principal, such as “Option ARM” loans, where the borrower can pay less than the interest owed on the loan, resulting in an increased principal balance during the life of the loan. We do not currently offer “subprime loans” on one- to four-family residential real estate loans (i.e., generally loans to borrowers with credit scores less than 620).

Construction and Land Loans.  We make construction loans, primarily to individuals for the construction of their primary residences and to contractors and builders of single-family homes. We also make a limited amount of land loans to complement our construction lending activities, as such loans are generally secured by lots that will be used for residential development.  Land loans also include loans secured by land purchased for investment purposes.  At December 31, 2020, our residential construction loans totaled $23.5 million, representing 3.9% of our total loan portfolio, and included $1.6 million of land loans.  At December 31, 2020, $2.1 million of our single-family construction loans were to individuals and $6.6 million were to contractors and builders.  In addition, we had $8.4 million of commercial construction and development loans as of December 31, 2020, which included $4.0 million of commercial development and land loans.

While we may originate loans to contractors and builders whether or not the collateral property underlying the loan is under contract for sale, we consider each project carefully in light of current residential real estate market conditions.  We actively monitor the number of unsold homes in our construction loan portfolio and local housing markets to attempt to maintain an appropriate balance between home sales and new loan originations.  We generally will limit the maximum number of speculative units (units that are not pre-sold) approved for each builder.  We have attempted to diversify the risk associated with speculative construction lending by doing business with experienced small and mid-sized builders within our market area.

We also originate construction loans for commercial development projects, including retail buildings, houses of worship, small industrial projects, hotels and office buildings.  Most of our construction loans are interest-only loans that provide for the payment of interest during the construction phase, which is usually up to 12 months.  At the end of the construction phase, the loan may convert to a permanent mortgage loan or the loan may be paid in full.

Construction loans generally can be made with a maximum loan-to-value ratio of 75% of the estimated appraised market value upon completion of the project.  Before making a commitment to fund a construction loan, we require an appraisal of the property by an independent licensed appraiser.  We also generally require inspections of the property before disbursements of funds during the term of the construction loan.

At December 31, 2020, our largest construction and land loan was for $8.0 million, of which $2.6 million was outstanding. This loan was originated in 2018 to construct a new industrial warehouse and is secured by land and improvements.  This loan was performing according to its terms at December 31, 2020.  

Consumer Loans.  We offer a limited range of consumer loans, principally to customers residing in our primary market area with other relationships with us and with acceptable credit ratings.  Our consumer loans generally consist of indirect loans on new and used automobiles, loans secured by deposit accounts and unsecured personal loans.  At December 31, 2020, consumer and other loans were $47.3 million, or 7.9% of gross loans.  

In October 2018, we established our indirect automobile lending division, Affinity Bank Dealer Select (“ABDS”, and formerly named Community First Auto), which currently operates from an office in Monroe, Georgia.  This division has an experienced manager and sales team to operate this line of business.  At December 31, 2020, we had $44.1 million in indirect automobile loans, and our internal policies limit such loans to 200% of capital and 25% of our loan portfolio.

ABDS purchases retail installment sales contracts from dealerships in the states of Georgia, Tennessee, North Carolina and South Carolina.  A dealership submits credit applications to ABDS for consideration.  ABDS fully underwrites each loan for creditworthiness, vehicle valuation, debt ratios and the consumer’s stability.  ABDS underwrites each loan to ensure all credit policy guidelines are followed.  Applications that are approved and counter-offered are submitted to ABDS for verification and funding.

All dealerships that submit retail installment contracts to ABDS sign a separate retail dealer agreement that makes representations and warranties to ABDS with respect to our security interest and the accuracy and validity of all information provided during the credit application and contract process.  Borrowers are responsible for carrying full coverage insurance during the life of the loan, but ABDS has a blanket Vendor Single Interest policy in place to cover all loans in case of lapse of coverage, skip or confiscation.

10


 

Loan Underwriting Risks

Commercial Real Estate Loans.  Loans secured by commercial real estate generally have larger balances and involve a greater degree of risk than one- to four-family residential real estate loans.  The primary concern in commercial real estate lending is the borrower’s creditworthiness and the feasibility and cash flow potential of the project.  Payments on loans secured by income properties often depend on successful operation and management of the properties.  As a result, repayment of such loans may be subject, to a greater extent than residential real estate loans, to adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy.  To monitor cash flows on income properties, we require borrowers and loan guarantors to provide quarterly, semi-annual or annual financial statements, depending on the size of the loan, on commercial real estate loans.  In reaching a decision on whether to make a commercial real estate loan, we consider and review a global cash flow analysis of the borrower and consider the net operating income of the property, the borrower’s expertise, credit history and profitability and the value of the underlying property.  We have generally required that the properties securing these real estate loans have an aggregate debt service ratio, including the guarantor’s cash flows and the borrower’s other projects, of at least 1.20x.  An environmental phase one report is obtained when the possibility exists that hazardous materials may have existed on the site, or the site may have been impacted by adjoining properties that handled hazardous materials.

If we foreclose on a commercial real estate loan, the marketing and liquidation period to convert the real estate asset to cash can be lengthy with substantial holding costs. In addition, vacancies, deferred maintenance, repairs and market stigma can result in prospective buyers expecting sale price concessions to offset their real or perceived economic losses for the time it takes them to return the property to profitability.  Depending on the individual circumstances, initial charge-offs and subsequent losses on commercial real estate loans can be unpredictable and substantial.  

Commercial and Industrial Loans.  Unlike residential real estate loans, which generally are made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayment from his or her employment or other income, and which are secured by real property whose value tends to be more easily ascertainable, commercial and industrial loans are of higher risk and typically are made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayment from the cash flows of the borrower’s business and the collateral securing these loans may fluctuate in value.  Our commercial and industrial loans are originated primarily based on the identified cash flows of the borrower and secondarily on the underlying collateral provided by the borrower.  With respect to dental practice loans, the goodwill of a practice provides the value for lending.   Most often, collateral for commercial and industrial loans consists of accounts receivable, inventory or equipment.  Credit support provided by the borrower for most of these loans is based on the liquidation of the pledged collateral and enforcement of a personal guarantee, if any.  Further, any collateral securing such loans may depreciate over time, may be difficult to appraise and may fluctuate in value.  As a result, the availability of funds for the repayment of commercial and industrial loans may depend substantially on the success of the business itself.  

Construction and Land Loans.  Our construction loans are based upon estimates of costs and values associated with the completed project.  Underwriting is focused on the borrowers’ financial strength, credit history and demonstrated ability to produce a quality product and effectively market and manage their operations.  

Construction lending involves additional risks when compared with permanent lending because funds are advanced upon the security of the project, which is of uncertain value prior to its completion.  Because of the uncertainties inherent in estimating construction costs, as well as the market value of the completed project and the effects of governmental regulation of real property, it is relatively difficult to evaluate accurately the total funds required to complete a project and the related loan-to-value ratio.  In addition, generally during the term of a construction loan, interest may be funded by the borrower or disbursed from an interest reserve set aside from the construction loan budget.  These loans often involve the disbursement of substantial funds with repayment substantially dependent on the success of the ultimate project and the ability of the borrower to sell or lease the property or obtain permanent take-out financing, rather than the ability of the borrower or guarantor to repay principal and interest.  If the appraised value of a completed project proves to be overstated, we may have inadequate security for the repayment of the loan upon completion of construction of the project and may incur a loss.  

Balloon Loans.  Although balloon mortgage loans may reduce to an extent our vulnerability to changes in market interest rates because they reprice at the end of the term, the ability of the borrower to renew or repay the loan and the marketability of the underlying collateral may be adversely affected if real estate values decline prior to the expiration of the term of the loan or in a rising interest rate environment.

Adjustable-Rate Loans.  While we anticipate that adjustable-rate loans will better offset the adverse effects of an increase in interest rates as compared to fixed-rate loans, an increased monthly payment required of adjustable-rate loan borrowers in a rising interest rate environment could cause an increase in delinquencies and defaults.  The marketability of the underlying collateral also may be adversely affected in a high interest rate environment.  

11


 

Consumer Loans.  Consumer loans may entail greater risk than residential real estate loans, particularly in the case of consumer loans that are unsecured or secured by assets that depreciate rapidly. Repossessed collateral for a defaulted consumer loan may not provide an adequate source of repayment for the outstanding loan and a small remaining deficiency often does not warrant further substantial collection efforts against the borrower.  Consumer loan collections depend on the borrower’s continuing financial stability, and therefore are likely to be adversely affected by various factors, including job loss, divorce, illness or personal bankruptcy.  Furthermore, the application of various federal and state laws, including federal and state bankruptcy and insolvency laws, may limit the amount that can be recovered on such loans.

Indirect automobile loans are inherently risky as they are often secured by assets that may be difficult to locate and can depreciate rapidly.  In some cases, repossessed collateral for a defaulted automobile loan may not provide an adequate source of repayment for the outstanding loan and the remaining deficiency may not warrant further substantial collection efforts against the borrower.  Automobile loan collections depend on the borrower’s continuing financial stability, and therefore, are more likely to be adversely affected by job loss, divorce, illness, or personal bankruptcy.  Additional risk elements associated with indirect lending include the limited personal contact with the borrower as a result of indirect lending through non-bank channels, namely automobile dealers.

Originations, Purchases and Sales of Loans

Lending activities are conducted by our salaried loan personnel operating at our main and branch office locations and our loan production office.  All loans originated by us are underwritten pursuant to our policies and procedures.  We originate fixed-rate loans and adjustable-rate loans.  Our ability to originate fixed-rate loans or adjustable-rate loans depends on relative customer demand for such loans, which is affected by current and expected future levels of market interest rates.  We originate real estate and other loans through our loan officers, marketing efforts, our customer base, walk-in customers and referrals from real estate brokers, builders and attorneys.  

We sometimes purchase whole loans from third parties to supplement our loan production.  These loans generally consist of loans to health care professionals and loans secured by manufactured housing.  At December 31, 2020, we had $2.5 million of whole loans that we purchased.  The majority of our purchased loans are to borrowers who are not located in our primary market area.  

In addition, from time to time, we may purchase or sell participation interests in loans.  We underwrite our participation interest in the loan that we are purchasing according to our own underwriting criteria and procedures.  At December 31, 2020, we had $3.9 million of committed funds for loan participation interests that we purchased, and at that date, we had $20.6 million of loans for which we had sold participation interests.  

We do not originate significant amounts of loans for sale, but we occasionally sell loans, primarily to generate fee income.  We currently broker loan sales through Quicken Loans and receive fees related to such sales.  For the year ended December 31, 2020, we received $167,000 in fee income.  At December 31, 2020, we had no loans held for sale.

Loan Approval Procedures and Authority

Pursuant to federal law, the aggregate amount of loans that Affinity Bank is permitted to make to any one borrower or a group of related borrowers is generally limited to 15% of Affinity Bank’s unimpaired capital and surplus.  December 31, 2020, based on the 15% limitation, Affinity Bank’s loans-to-one-borrower limit was approximately $10.0 million.  On the same date, Affinity Bank had no borrowers with outstanding balances in excess of this amount.  At December 31, 2020, our largest loan relationship with one borrower was for $8.0 million, which was for the construction of an industrial warehouse, and the underlying loan was performing in accordance with their terms on that date.  

Our lending is subject to written underwriting standards and origination procedures.  Decisions on loan applications are made on the basis of detailed applications submitted by the prospective borrower, credit histories that we obtain, and property valuations (consistent with our appraisal policy) prepared by outside independent licensed appraisers approved by our board of directors as well as internal evaluations, where permitted by regulations.  The loan applications are designed primarily to determine the borrower’s ability to repay the requested loan, and the more significant items on the application are verified through use of credit reports, bank statements and tax returns.  

All loan approval amounts are based on the aggregate loans (total credit exposure), including total balances of outstanding loans and the proposed loan to the individual borrower and any related entity. Our Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Credit Officer each has individual authorization to approve loans up to $1.0 million, and, combined, can approve loans up to $3.5 million. Two Senior Credit Managers and the President can approve loans up to $500,000 each, or any two of these individuals can approve loans up to $1.0 million combined. No individual loan officer has approval authority in excess of $300,000 individually, and such authority cannot be combined with other officers.  Loans in excess of $3.5 million require the approval of our full board of directors.  

12


 

Generally, we require title insurance or abstracts on our mortgage loans as well as fire and extended coverage casualty insurance in amounts at least equal to the principal amount of the loan or the value of improvements on the property, depending on the type of loan.  

Delinquencies and Asset Quality

Delinquency Procedures.  When a loan payment becomes 15 days past due, we contact the customer by mailing a late notice, and loan officers may contact their customers.  If a loan payment becomes 30 days past due, we mail an additional late notice and a loan-specific letter written by a collection representative, and we also place telephone calls to the borrower.  These loan collection efforts continue until a loan becomes 90 days past due, at which point we would refer the loan for foreclosure proceedings unless management determines that it is in the best interest of Affinity Bank to work further with the borrower to arrange a workout plan.  The foreclosure process would begin when a loan becomes 120 days delinquent.  From time to time we may accept deeds in lieu of foreclosure.  

Loans Past Due and Non-Performing Assets.  Loans are reviewed on a regular basis.  Management determines that a loan is impaired or non-performing when it is probable at least a portion of the loan will not be collected in accordance with the original terms due to a deterioration in the financial condition of the borrower or the value of the underlying collateral if the loan is collateral dependent.  When a loan is determined to be impaired, the measurement of the loan in the allowance for loan losses is based on present value of expected future cash flows, except that all collateral-dependent loans are measured for impairment based on the fair value of the collateral. Non-accrual loans are loans for which collectability is questionable and, therefore, interest on such loans will no longer be recognized on an accrual basis. All loans that become 90 days or more delinquent are placed on non-accrual status unless the loan is well secured and in the process of collection.  When loans are placed on non-accrual status, unpaid accrued interest is fully reversed, and further income is recognized only to the extent received on a cash basis or cost recovery method.  

When we acquire real estate as a result of foreclosure, the real estate is classified as real estate owned.  The real estate owned is recorded at the lower of carrying amount or fair value, less estimated costs to sell.  Soon after acquisition, we order a new appraisal to determine the current market value of the property.  Any excess of the recorded value of the loan satisfied over the market value of the property is charged against the allowance for loan losses, or, if the existing allowance is inadequate, charged to expense of the current period.  After acquisition, all costs incurred in maintaining the property are expensed.  Costs relating to the development and improvement of the property, however, are capitalized to the extent of estimated fair value less estimated costs to sell.

A loan is classified as a troubled debt restructuring if, for economic or legal reasons related to the borrower’s financial difficulties, we grant a concession to the borrower that we would not otherwise consider. This usually includes a modification of loan terms, such as a reduction of the interest rate to below market terms, capitalizing past due interest or extending the maturity date and possibly a partial forgiveness of the principal amount due. Interest income on restructured loans is accrued after the borrower demonstrates the ability to pay under the restructured terms through a sustained period of repayment performance, which is generally six consecutive months.

Under the CARES Act, COVID-19 related modifications to loans that were current as of December 31, 2019 are exempt from troubled debt restructuring classification under U.S. GAAP.  In addition, the bank regulatory agencies have issued interagency guidance stating that COVID-19 related short-term modifications (i.e., six months or less) for loans that were current as of the loan modification program implementation date are not troubled debt restructurings.  As of December 31, 2020, we had granted short-term deferrals on 737 loans that were otherwise performing, totaling approximately $186.9 million (including $115.0 million of dental practice loans).  As of December 31, 2020, all of these loans had returned to normal payment status.

13


 

Delinquent Loans. The following tables set forth our loan delinquencies, including non-accrual loans, by type and amount at the dates indicated.  We had no PPP loans delinquent at December 31, 2020.  

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

 

30-59

Days

Past

Due

 

 

60-89

Days

Past

Due

 

 

90

Days

or

More

Past

Due

 

 

30-59

Days

Past

Due

 

 

60-89

Days

Past

Due

 

 

90

Days

or

More

Past

Due

 

 

30-59

Days

Past

Due

 

 

60-89

Days

Past

Due

 

 

90

Days

or

More

Past

Due

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One- to four-family

   residential

 

$

4,308

 

 

$

1,094

 

 

$

1,444

 

 

$

3,087

 

 

$

2,040

 

 

$

643

 

 

$

196

 

 

$

1,039

 

 

$

228

 

Commercial

 

 

3,386

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,136

 

 

 

114

 

 

 

24

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction and land

 

 

1,392

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

29

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,085

 

 

 

1,270

 

 

 

30

 

 

 

395

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Paycheck Protection Program loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

78

 

 

 

 

 

 

73

 

 

 

58

 

 

 

34

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

 

Total

 

$

9,193

 

 

$

1,094

 

 

$

3,738

 

 

$

4,529

 

 

$

2,128

 

 

$

1,048

 

 

$

205

 

 

$

1,040

 

 

$

229

 

 

 

 

At September 30,

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

30-59

Days

Past

Due

 

 

60-89

Days

Past

Due

 

 

90

Days

or

More

Past

Due

 

 

30-59

Days

Past

Due

 

 

60-89

Days

Past

Due

 

 

90

Days

or

More

Past

Due

 

 

30-59

Days

Past

Due

 

 

60-89

Days

Past

Due

 

 

90

Days

or

More

Past

Due

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One- to four-family residential

 

$

167

 

 

$

980

 

 

$

1,115

 

 

$

173

 

 

$

3,236

 

 

$

1,559

 

 

$

32

 

 

$

3,382

 

 

$

1,955

 

Commercial

 

 

283

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

45

 

 

 

 

 

 

66

 

 

 

44

 

Construction and land

 

 

 

 

 

257

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19

 

 

 

45

 

 

 

 

 

 

194

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Paycheck Protection Program loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

 

 

 

30

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

24

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

450

 

 

$

1,270

 

 

$

1,122

 

 

$

216

 

 

$

3,288

 

 

$

1,604

 

 

$

246

 

 

$

3,448

 

 

$

1,999

 

 

14


 

Non-Performing Assets.  The following table sets forth information regarding our non-performing assets.  Non-accrual loans include non-accruing troubled debt restructurings of $241,000, $532,000, $287,000, $279,000, $620,000, and $810,000 as of December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018, and September 30, 2018, 2017 and 2016, respectively.  No PPP loans were considered non-performing at December 31, 2020.

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

At September 30,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Non-accrual loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One- to four-family residential

 

$

2,587

 

 

$

1,912

 

 

$

1,744

 

 

$

2,089

 

 

$

3,540

 

 

$

3,013

 

Commercial

 

 

1,157

 

 

 

246

 

 

 

56

 

 

 

70

 

 

 

129

 

 

 

230

 

Construction and land

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

1,085

 

 

 

395

 

 

 

27

 

 

 

29

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paycheck Protection Program loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

73

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total non-accrual loans

 

$

4,902

 

 

$

2,567

 

 

$

1,828

 

 

 

2,195

 

 

 

3,669

 

 

 

3,243

 

Accruing loans past due 90 days or more

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real estate owned:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One- to four-family residential

 

 

320

 

 

 

140

 

 

 

508

 

 

 

67

 

 

 

61

 

 

 

 

Commercial

 

 

972

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction and land

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total real estate owned

 

 

1,292

 

 

140

 

 

508

 

 

 

67

 

 

 

61

 

 

 

 

Total non-performing assets

 

$

6,194

 

 

$

2,707

 

 

$

2,336

 

 

$

2,262

 

 

$

3,730

 

 

$

3,243

 

Total accruing troubled debt restructured loans

 

$

3,462

 

 

$

3,286

 

 

$

3,773

 

 

$

4,136

 

 

$

4,956

 

 

$

5,815

 

Total non-performing loans to total loans

 

 

0.82

%

 

 

1.02

%

 

 

0.79

%

 

 

0.97

%

 

 

1.69

%

 

 

1.71

%

Total non-performing assets to total assets

 

 

0.73

%

 

 

0.85

%

 

 

0.76

%

 

 

0.74

%

 

 

1.34

%

 

 

1.39

%

 

Interest income that would have been recorded for the year ended December 31, 2020 had non-accruing loans been current according to their original terms amounted to $500,000.  We recognized $167,000 of interest income for these loans for the year ended December 31, 2020.  In addition, interest income that would have been recorded for the year ended December 31, 2020 had troubled debt restructurings been current according to their original terms amounted to $84,000.  We recognized $162,000 of interest income for these loans for the year ended December 31, 2020.  

Classified Assets.  Federal regulations provide for the classification of loans and other assets, such as debt and equity securities considered by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency to be of lesser quality, as “substandard,” “doubtful” or “loss.”  An asset is considered “substandard” if it is inadequately protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or of the collateral pledged, if any.  “Substandard” assets include those characterized by the “distinct possibility” that the insured institution will sustain “some loss” if the deficiencies are not corrected.  Assets classified as “doubtful” have all of the weaknesses inherent in those classified “substandard,” with the added characteristic that the weaknesses present make “collection or liquidation in full,” on the basis of currently existing facts, conditions, and values, “highly questionable and improbable.”  Assets classified as “loss” are those considered “uncollectible” and of such little value that their continuance as assets without the establishment of a specific loss allowance is not warranted.  Assets which do not currently expose the insured institution to sufficient risk to warrant classification in one of the aforementioned categories but possess weaknesses are designated as “special mention” by our management.  

When an insured institution classifies problem assets as either substandard or doubtful, it may establish general allowances in an amount deemed prudent by management to cover probable accrued losses.  General allowances represent loss allowances which have been established to cover probable accrued losses associated with lending activities, but which, unlike specific allowances, have not been allocated to particular problem assets.  When an insured institution classifies problem assets as “loss,” it is required either to establish a specific allowance for losses equal to 100% of that portion of the asset so classified or to charge-off such amount.  An institution’s determination as to the classification of its assets and the amount of its valuation allowances is subject to review by the regulatory authorities, which may require the establishment of additional general or specific loss allowances.

15


 

In connection with the filing of our periodic reports with the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and in accordance with our classification of assets policy, we regularly review the problem loans in our portfolio to determine whether any loans require classification in accordance with applicable regulations.

On the basis of this review of our assets, our classified and special mention assets at the dates indicated were as follows:

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Substandard assets

 

$

6,280

 

 

$

7,041

 

Doubtful assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loss assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total classified assets

 

$

6,280

 

 

$

7,041

 

Special mention assets

 

$

847

 

 

$

229

 

 

Allowance for Loan Losses

The allowance for loan losses is maintained at a level which, in management’s judgment, is adequate to absorb probable credit losses inherent in the loan portfolio. The amount of the allowance is based on management’s evaluation of the collectability of the loan portfolio, including the nature of the portfolio, credit concentrations, trends in historical loss experience, specific impaired loans, and economic conditions. Allowances for impaired loans are generally determined based on collateral values or the present value of estimated cash flows. Because of uncertainties associated with regional economic conditions, collateral values, and future cash flows on impaired loans, it is reasonably possible that management’s estimate of probable credit losses inherent in the loan portfolio and the related allowance may change materially in the near-term. The allowance is increased by a provision for loan losses, which is charged to expense and reduced by full and partial charge-offs, net of recoveries. Changes in the allowance relating to impaired loans are charged or credited to the provision for loan losses. Management’s periodic evaluation of the adequacy of the allowance is based on various factors, including, but not limited to, management’s ongoing review and grading of loans, facts and issues related to specific loans, historical loan loss and delinquency experience, trends in past due and non-accrual loans, existing risk characteristics of specific loans or loan pools, the fair value of underlying collateral, current economic conditions and other qualitative and quantitative factors which could affect potential credit losses.

As an integral part of their examination process, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency will periodically review our allowance for loan losses, and as a result of such reviews, we may have to adjust our allowance for loan losses.  However, regulatory agencies are not directly involved in the process for establishing the allowance for loan losses as the process is our responsibility and any increase or decrease in the allowance is the responsibility of management.

16


 

The following table sets forth activity in our allowance for loan losses for the periods indicated.  We have not provided for loan losses on Paycheck Protection Program loans due to the government guarantee associated with such loans.

 

 

 

Years Ended December 31,

 

 

Three Months Ended December 31,

 

 

Years Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Allowance at beginning of period

 

$

4,134

 

 

$

4,022

 

 

$

3,909

 

 

$

4,551

 

 

$

4,309

 

 

$

5,874

 

Provision for loan losses

 

 

2,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charge offs:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One- to four-family residential

 

 

(126

)

 

 

(254

)

 

 

(11

)

 

 

(1,425

)

 

 

(41

)

 

 

(337

)

Commercial

 

 

(30

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6

)

 

 

 

 

 

(1,796

)

Construction and land

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

 

 

 

(163

)

 

 

(14

)

 

 

(1,275

)

 

 

(66

)

 

 

 

Paycheck Protection Program loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

(29

)

 

 

(36

)

 

 

(2

)

 

 

(33

)

 

 

(60

)

 

 

(12

)

Total charge-offs

 

 

(185

)

 

 

(453

)

 

 

(27

)

 

 

(2,739

)

 

 

(167

)

 

 

(2,145

)

Recoveries:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One- to four-family residential

 

 

100

 

 

 

367

 

 

 

93

 

 

 

1,287

 

 

 

333

 

 

 

341

 

Commercial

 

 

246

 

 

 

130

 

 

 

33

 

 

 

172

 

 

 

52

 

 

 

233

 

Construction and land

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

36

 

 

 

68

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

121

 

 

 

15

 

 

 

 

Paycheck Protection Program loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

6

 

Total recoveries

 

 

412

 

 

 

565

 

 

 

140

 

 

 

1,597

 

 

 

409

 

 

 

580

 

Net (charge-offs) recoveries

 

 

227

 

 

 

112

 

 

 

113

 

 

 

(1,142

)

 

 

242

 

 

 

(1,565

)

Allowance at end of period

 

$

6,361

 

 

$

4,134

 

 

$

4,022

 

 

$

3,909

 

 

$

4,551

 

 

$

4,309

 

Allowance to non-performing loans (1)

 

 

129.78

%

 

 

161.07

%

 

 

220.02

%

 

 

178.10

%

 

 

124.04

%

 

 

132.87

%

Allowance to total loans outstanding at the end of

   the period (1)

 

 

1.06

%

 

 

1.64

%

 

 

1.73

%

 

 

1.73

%

 

 

2.10

%

 

 

2.22

%

Net (charge-offs) recoveries to average loans

   outstanding during the period

 

 

0.04

%

 

 

0.05

%

 

 

0.20

%

 

 

(0.52

)%

 

 

0.12

%

 

 

(0.86

)%

 

(1)

The ratios of the allowance for loan losses to total loans and the allowance for loan losses to non-performing assets decreased in 2020 due to recording the former Affinity Bank’s loan portfolio at fair value with no carryover of its allowance for loan losses at the time of the merger.

17


 

 

Allocation of Allowance for Loan Losses.  The following tables set forth the allowance for loan losses allocated by loan category and the percent of the allowance in each category to the total allocated allowance at the dates indicated.  The allowance for loan losses allocated to each category is not necessarily indicative of future losses in any particular category and does not restrict the use of the allowance to absorb losses in other categories.  

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

 

Allowance

for

Loan

Losses

 

 

Percent

of

Allowance

in Each

Category

to Total

Allocated

Allowance

 

 

Percent

of Loans

in Each

Category

to Total

Loans

 

 

Allowance

for

Loan

Losses

 

 

Percent

of

Allowance

in Each

Category

to Total

Allocated

Allowance

 

 

Percent

of Loans

in Each

Category

to Total

Loans

 

 

Allowance

for

Loan

Losses

 

 

Percent

of

Allowance

in Each

Category

to Total

Allocated

Allowance

 

 

Percent

of Loans

in Each

Category

to Total

Loans

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One- to four-family residential

 

$

970

 

 

 

15.36

%

 

 

15.33

%

 

$

369

 

 

 

8.95

%

 

 

46.35

%

 

$

641

 

 

 

15.97

%

 

 

60.44

%

Commercial

 

 

3,084

 

 

 

48.82

%

 

 

29.83

%

 

 

1,661

 

 

 

40.23

%

 

 

21.61

%

 

 

1,619

 

 

 

40.32

 

 

 

19.67

 

Construction and land

 

 

224

 

 

 

3.55

%

 

 

3.94

%

 

 

153

 

 

 

3.71

%

 

 

8.13

%

 

 

108

 

 

 

2.69

 

 

 

6.06

 

Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

1,320

 

 

 

20.91

%

 

 

25.99

%

 

 

1,478

 

 

 

35.82

%

 

 

11.35

%

 

 

1,520

 

 

 

37.86

 

 

 

11.84

 

Paycheck Protection Program loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17.00

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

719

 

 

 

11.38

%

 

 

7.91

%

 

 

466

 

 

 

11.29

%

 

 

12.56

%

 

 

127

 

 

 

3.16

 

 

 

1.99

 

Total allocated allowance

 

 

6,317

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

4,127

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

4,015

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

100.00

%

Unallocated

 

 

44

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

6,361

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

4,135

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

4,022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At September 30,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

Allowance

for Loan

Losses

 

 

Percent of

Allowance

in Each

Category to

Total

Allocated

Allowance

 

 

Percent of

Loans

in Each

Category to

Total Loans

 

 

Allowance

for Loan

Losses

 

 

Percent of

Allowance

in Each

Category to

Total

Allocated

Allowance

 

 

Percent of

Loans

in Each

Category to

Total Loans

 

 

Allowance

for Loan

Losses

 

 

Percent of

Allowance

in Each

Category to

Total

Allocated

Allowance

 

 

Percent of

Loans

in Each

Category to

Total Loans

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Real estate loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One- to four-family residential

 

$

687

 

 

 

17.58

%

 

 

59.85

%

 

$

1,704

 

 

 

37.50

%

 

 

63.78

%

 

$

1,882

 

 

 

43.78

%

 

 

68.54

%

Commercial

 

 

1,312

 

 

 

33.57

 

 

 

17.57

 

 

 

1,548

 

 

 

34.07

 

 

 

13.71

 

 

 

1,595

 

 

 

37.10

 

 

 

15.04

 

Construction and land

 

 

178

 

 

 

4.55

 

 

 

8.92

 

 

 

349

 

 

 

7.68

 

 

 

11.56

 

 

 

143

 

 

 

3.32

 

 

 

6.88

 

Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

1,670

 

 

 

42.73

 

 

 

12.53

 

 

 

863

 

 

 

19.00

 

 

 

9.67

 

 

 

643

 

 

 

14.96

 

 

 

8.37

 

Paycheck Protection Program loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

61

 

 

 

1.57

 

 

 

1.13

 

 

 

79

 

 

 

1.75

 

 

 

1.28

 

 

 

36

 

 

 

0.84

 

 

 

1.17

 

Total allocated allowance

 

 

3,908

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

4,543

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

4,299

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

100.00

%

Unallocated

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

3,909

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

4,551

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

4,309

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18


 

 

Investment Activities

General.  The goals of our investment policy are to provide liquidity, meet pledging requirements, generate a reasonable rate of return, and minimize risk.  Subject to loan demand and our interest rate risk analysis, we will increase the balance of our investment securities portfolio when we have excess liquidity.  We have invested a substantial portion of the proceeds of the offering in short-term and other investments, including U.S. government securities.  

Our investment policy was adopted by the board of directors and is reviewed annually by the board of directors.  All investment decisions are made by our Asset/Liability Management Committee, consisting of our President and Chief Executive Officer, the Chairman of the Board, another member of the board of directors, and other members of senior management.  The Chief Financial Officer provides an investment schedule detailing the investment portfolio, which is reviewed at least monthly by the board of directors.

At December 31, 2020, our investment portfolio consisted of securities and obligations issued by U.S. government-sponsored enterprises as well as trust preferred securities.  

Our current investment policy permits, with certain limitations, investments in: U.S. Treasury securities; securities issued by the U.S. government and its agencies or government sponsored enterprises including mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations issued by Fannie Mae, Ginnie Mae and Freddie Mac; corporate and municipal bonds; certificates of deposit in other financial institutions; federal funds and money market funds.

At December 31, 2020, our investment portfolio consisted of securities and obligations issued by U.S. government-sponsored enterprises and the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta.  At December 31, 2020, we owned $1.3 million of Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta stock.  As a member of Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta, we are required to purchase stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta, which stock is carried at cost and classified as restricted equity securities.  In addition, at December 31, 2020, we owned $250,000 of First National Bankers Bank stock.  We purchased the stock of First National Bankers Bank in connection with a $5.0 million loan from First National Bankers Bank to Community First Bancshares, Inc., which was repaid in January 2021.

The following table sets forth the amortized cost and estimated fair value of our held-to-maturity securities portfolio at the dates indicated.  

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

At September 30,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Estimated

Fair Value

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Estimated

Fair Value

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Estimated

Fair Value

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Estimated

Fair Value

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

U.S. Government sponsored enterprises

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

1,000

 

 

$

993

 

 

$

1,000

 

 

$

990

 

Total

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

1,000

 

 

$

993

 

 

$

1,000

 

 

$

990

 

 

The following table sets forth the amortized cost and estimated fair value of our available-for-sale securities portfolio at the dates indicated.  

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

At September 30,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2018

 

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Estimated

Fair Value

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Estimated

Fair Value

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Estimated

Fair Value

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Estimated

Fair Value

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Municipal securities – tax exempt

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

5,670

 

 

$

5,609

 

 

$

5,687

 

 

$

5,521

 

Municipal securities – taxable

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,119

 

 

 

2,987

 

 

 

3,122

 

 

 

2,925

 

U.S. Government sponsored enterprises

 

 

11,870

 

 

 

11,859

 

 

 

501

 

 

 

500

 

 

 

501

 

 

 

491

 

 

 

502

 

 

 

488

 

Government agency mortgage-backed securities

 

 

9,206

 

 

 

9,532

 

 

 

3,305

 

 

 

3,318

 

 

 

12,451

 

 

 

12,058

 

 

 

12,988

 

 

 

12,426

 

Trust preferred securities

 

 

2,715

 

 

 

2,614

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

23,791

 

 

$

24,005

 

 

$

3,806

 

 

$

3,818

 

 

$

21,741

 

 

$

21,145

 

 

$

22,299

 

 

$

21,360

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2020, there were no securities with an amortized cost or estimated fair value that exceeded 10% of our total equity.  

19


 

 

Portfolio Maturities and Yields.  The composition and maturities of the investment securities portfolio at December 31, 2020, are summarized in the following table.  Maturities are based on the final contractual payment dates, and do not reflect the effect of scheduled principal repayments, prepayments, or early redemptions that may occur.  There were no held-to-maturity securities at December 31, 2020.  Following is a maturity schedule at December 31, 2020 for available-for-sale securities.

 

 

 

One Year or Less

 

 

More than One

Year through Five

Years

 

 

More than Five

Years through Ten

Years

 

 

More than Ten

Years

 

 

Total

 

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Weighted

Average

Yield

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Weighted

Average

Yield

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Weighted

Average

Yield

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Weighted

Average

Yield

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Fair

Value

 

 

Weighted

Average

Yield

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

U.S. Government sponsored enterprises

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

11,870

 

 

 

0.66

%

 

$

11,870

 

 

$

11,859

 

 

 

0.66

%

Government agency mortgage-backed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,297

 

 

 

2.00

%

 

 

7,909

 

 

 

2.06

%

 

 

9,206

 

 

 

9,532

 

 

 

2.05

%

Trust preferred securities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,215

 

 

 

3.66

%

 

 

500

 

 

 

3.50

%

 

 

2,715

 

 

 

2,614

 

 

 

3.63

%

Total

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

3,512

 

 

 

3.05

%

 

$

20,279

 

 

 

1.28

%

 

$

23,791

 

 

$

24,005

 

 

 

1.54

%

 

 

Following is a maturity schedule at December 31, 2019 for available-for-sale securities:

 

 

 

One Year or Less

 

 

More than One

Year through Five

Years

 

 

More than Five

Years through Ten

Years

 

 

More than Ten

Years

 

 

Total

 

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Weighted

Average

Yield

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Weighted

Average

Yield

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Weighted

Average

Yield

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Weighted

Average

Yield

 

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Fair

Value

 

 

Weighted

Average

Yield

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. Government sponsored enterprises

 

$

501

 

 

 

1.46

%

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

501

 

 

$

500

 

 

 

1.46

%

Government agency mortgage-backed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,305

 

 

 

2.14

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,305

 

 

 

3,318

 

 

 

2.14

%

Total

 

$

501

 

 

 

1.46

%

 

$

3,305

 

 

 

2.14

%

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

 

 

$

3,806

 

 

$

3,818

 

 

 

2.05

%

 

 

Sources of Funds

General.  Deposits have traditionally been our primary source of funds for use in lending and investment activities.  We also may use borrowings to supplement cash flow needs, lengthen the maturities of liabilities for interest rate risk purposes and to manage the cost of funds.  In addition, we receive funds from scheduled loan payments, investment maturities, loan prepayments, retained earnings and income on earning assets.  While scheduled loan payments and income on earning assets are relatively stable sources of funds, deposit inflows and outflows can vary widely and are influenced by prevailing interest rates, market conditions and levels of competition.

Deposits. Our deposits are generated primarily from our primary market area.  We also generate deposits nationwide through our virtual bank, FitnessBank, which accepts deposits and provides higher interest rates based on customers meeting certain fitness goals.  We offer a selection of deposit accounts, including savings accounts, checking accounts, certificates of deposit and individual retirement accounts.  Deposit account terms vary, with the principal differences being the minimum balance required, the amount of time the funds must remain on deposit and the interest rate.  We have the authority to accept brokered deposits but had no such deposits as of December 31, 2020.  We also offer a Kasasa (rewards) deposit program, which promotes free checking accounts with either attractive interest rates or cash-back rewards.

Interest rates paid, maturity terms, service fees and withdrawal penalties are established on a periodic basis.  Deposit rates and terms are based primarily on current operating strategies and market rates, liquidity requirements, rates paid by competitors and growth goals. We rely upon personalized customer service, long-standing relationships with customers, and the favorable image of Affinity Bank in the community to attract and retain deposits.  We also seek to obtain deposits from our commercial loan customers.

20


 

The flow of deposits is influenced significantly by general economic conditions, changes in money market and other prevailing interest rates and competition. The variety of deposit accounts offered allows us to be competitive in obtaining funds and responding to changes in consumer demand. Based on experience, we believe that our deposits are relatively stable. However, the ability to attract and maintain deposits and the rates paid on these deposits, has been and will continue to be significantly affected by market conditions.

The following table sets forth the distribution of total deposits by account type at the dates indicated.

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

At September 30,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2018

 

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Average

Rate

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Average

Rate

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Average

Rate

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Average

Rate

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Noninterest-bearing checking

   accounts

 

$

160,819

 

 

 

25.12

%

 

 

 

 

$

29,549

 

 

 

12.41

%

 

 

 

 

$

28,472

 

 

 

12.99

%

 

 

%

 

$

29,797

 

 

 

13.77

%

 

 

%

Statement savings accounts

 

 

96,591

 

 

 

15.09

%

 

 

0.99

%

 

 

22,691

 

 

 

9.53

%

 

 

0.13

%

 

 

24,511

 

 

 

11.18

%

 

 

0.06

%

 

 

24,508

 

 

 

11.33

%

 

 

0.06

%

Interest-bearing checking

   accounts

 

 

129,813

 

 

 

20.28

%

 

 

0.40

%

 

 

47,324

 

 

 

19.87

%

 

 

0.69

%

 

 

53,752

 

 

 

24.52

%

 

 

0.63

%

 

 

53,244

 

 

 

24.61

%

 

 

0.63

%

Money market checking accounts

 

 

121,317

 

 

 

18.95

%

 

 

0.86

%

 

 

33,380

 

 

 

14.01

%

 

 

0.99

%

 

 

24,936

 

 

 

11.38

%

 

 

0.47

%

 

 

23,140

 

 

 

10.69

%

 

 

0.47

%

Certificates of deposit

 

 

131,625

 

 

 

20.56

%

 

 

1.70

%

 

 

105,237

 

 

 

44.18

%

 

 

1.73

%

 

 

87,510

 

 

 

39.93

%

 

 

1.20

%

 

 

85,698

 

 

 

39.60

%

 

 

1.20

%

Total

 

$

640,165

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

0.74

%

 

$

238,181

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

1.05

%

 

$

219,181

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

0.81

%

 

$

216,387

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

 

0.81

%

 

As of December 31, 2020, the aggregate amount of all our certificates of deposit in amounts greater than or equal to $250,000 was approximately $32.9 million.  The following table sets forth the maturity of these certificates as of December 31, 2020.  

 

 

 

 

At

December 31,

2020

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Maturity Period:

 

 

 

 

Three months or less

 

$

3,443

 

Over three through six months

 

 

8,474

 

Over six through twelve months

 

 

9,095

 

Over twelve months

 

 

11,847

 

Total

 

$

32,859

 

 

21


 

Borrowings.  As of December 31, 2020, we had a $303.8 million line of credit with the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta.  The following table sets forth information concerning balances and interest rates on Federal Home Loan Bank advances at and for the year ended December 31, 2020.  

 

At or For the Year Ended December 31, 2020

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

Balance outstanding at end of period

$

19,117

 

Weighted average interest rate at end of period

 

2.46

%

Maximum amount of borrowings outstanding at any month end during the period

$

54,431

 

Average balance outstanding during the period

$

44,574

 

Weighted average interest rate during the period

 

1.28

%

 

Other than annual testing of the line of credit where we borrow $5.0 million for one day, we did not have any outstanding borrowings during the year ended December 31, 2019.  

In addition to the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta line of credit, we have two unsecured federal funds lines of credit, in the amounts of $7.5 million and $5.0 million.  No amount was outstanding on these lines of credit at December 31, 2020 or 2019, or during the years ended December 31, 2020 or 2019, except for amounts required for annual testing.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2020, Affinity Bank borrowed $100.8 million from the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta under the Paycheck Protection Program Liquidity Facility to fund PPP loans under the CARES Act.  These borrowings were secured by Paycheck Protection Program loans totaling $101.7 million originated during the year ended December 31, 2020.  These borrowings had a fixed interest rate of 0.35% and a maturity date equal to the maturity date of the related PPP loans, with the PPP loans maturing either two or five years from the origination date of the PPP loan.  In January 2021, we repaid the Federal Reserve Bank PPP Liquidity Facility loans.  

 

The following table sets forth information concerning balances and interest rates on Paycheck Protection Program Liquidity Facility borrowings at and for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

At or For the Year Ended December 31, 2020

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

Balance outstanding at end of period

$

101,814

 

Weighted average interest rate at end of period

 

0.35

%

Maximum amount of borrowings outstanding at any month end during the period

$

129,230

 

Average balance outstanding during the period

$

20,324

 

Weighted average interest rate during the period

 

0.35

%

 

On June 30, 2020, Community First Bancshares, Inc, borrowed $5.0 million from another financial institution.  The loan was secured by the stock of Affinity Bank. The loan had a ten-year term with a floating interest rate equal to the Wall Street Journal Prime Rate.  The initial interest payment was due September 30, 2020 and the initial principal payment is due June 29, 2021.  The loan was repaid January 2021.  There was no prepayment penalty.  

Subsidiary Activities

Affinity Bancshares, Inc. has no subsidiaries other than Affinity Bank.

Personnel

As of December 31, 2020, we had 79 full-time employees and four part-time employee.  Our employees are not represented by any collective bargaining group.  Management believes that we have good working relations with our employees.

22


 

TAXATION

Affinity Bancshares Inc. and Affinity Bank are subject to federal and state income taxation in the same general manner as other corporations, with some exceptions discussed below.  The following discussion of federal and state taxation is intended only to summarize material income tax matters and is not a comprehensive description of the tax rules applicable to Affinity Bancshares, Inc. and Affinity Bank.

Our federal and state tax returns have not been audited for the past five years.

Federal Taxation

Method of Accounting.  Affinity Bancshares, Inc. and Affinity Bank currently report income and expenses on the accrual method of accounting and use a tax year ending December 31 for filing their federal income tax returns.  Affinity Bancshares, Inc. and Affinity Bank file a consolidated federal income tax return.  The Small Business Protection Act of 1996 eliminated the use of the reserve method of accounting for income taxes on bad debt reserves by savings institutions.  For taxable years beginning after 1995, Affinity Bank has been subject to the same bad debt reserve rules as commercial banks.  It currently utilizes the specific charge-off method under Section 582(a) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Internal Revenue Code”).

Alternative Minimum Tax.  The Internal Revenue Code imposes an alternative minimum tax at a rate of 20% on a base of regular taxable income plus certain tax preferences, less an exemption amount, referred to as “alternative minimum taxable income.”  The alternative minimum tax is payable to the extent tax computed this way exceeds tax computed by applying the regular tax rates to regular taxable income.  Net operating losses can, in general, offset no more than 90% of alternative minimum taxable income.  Certain payments of alternative minimum tax may be used as credits against regular tax liabilities in future years.  The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act repealed the alternative minimum tax for income generated after January 1, 2018.  At December 31, 2020 and 2019, Affinity Bancshares, Inc. had no minimum tax credit carryovers.  

Net Operating Loss Carryovers.  As a result of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act generally, a financial institution may carry net operating losses forward indefinitely.  At December 31, 2020 and 2019, Affinity Bancshares, Inc. had no federal net operating loss carryforwards.

Capital Loss Carryovers.  A corporation cannot recognize capital losses in excess of capital gains generated.  Generally, a financial institution may carry back capital losses to the preceding three taxable years and forward to the succeeding five taxable years.  Any capital loss carryback or carryover is treated as a short-term capital loss for the year to which it is carried.  As such, it is grouped with any other capital losses for the year to which it is carried and is used to offset any capital gains.  Any undeducted loss remaining after the five-year carryover period is not deductible.  At December 31, 2020 and 2019, Affinity Bancshares, Inc. had no capital loss carryovers.  

Corporate Dividends.  Affinity Bancshares, Inc. may generally exclude from its income 100% of dividends received from Affinity Bank as a member of the same affiliated group of corporations.

State Taxation

Affinity Bank is treated as a financial institution under Georgia state income tax law. The state of Georgia subjects financial institutions to all state and local taxes in the same manner and to the same extent as other business corporations in Georgia. Additionally, depository financial institutions are subject to local business license taxes and a special occupation tax.

Consolidated Group Return. Georgia is not a unitary business state. Affiliated corporations that file a consolidated federal income tax return must file separate income tax returns unless they have prior approval or have been requested to file a consolidated return by the Commissioner of the Georgia Department of Revenue.  For state income tax purposes, Affinity Bancshares, Inc. and Affinity Bank file a consolidated federal income tax return.  

Net Operating Loss Carryovers.  Generally, Georgia law conforms to federal law and a financial institution may carry back Georgia net operating losses to the preceding two taxable years and forward to the succeeding 20 taxable years.  At December 31, 2020 and 2019, Affinity Bank had no Georgia net operating loss carryforwards.

Bank Tax Credit. All financial depositary institutions that conduct business or own property in Georgia are required to file a Georgia Financial Institutions Business Occupation Tax based on Georgia gross receipts. Any local license tax and state occupation tax paid a depository financial institution is credited dollar for dollar against any state corporate income tax liability of such institution for the tax year during which any such tax is paid. Any unused credits may be carried forward for five years. At December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, Affinity Bank had $453,000 and $375,000 of bank tax credits available for future use.

23


 

Maryland State Taxation.  As a Maryland business corporation, Affinity Bancshares is required to file an annual report with and pay franchise taxes to the State of Maryland.

SUPERVISION AND REGULATION

General

As a federal savings association, Affinity Bank is subject to examination and regulation by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, and is also subject to examination by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. The federal system of regulation and supervision establishes a comprehensive framework of activities in which Affinity Bank may engage and is intended primarily for the protection of depositors and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s Deposit Insurance Fund.  This regulation and supervision establishes a comprehensive framework of activities in which an institution may engage and is intended primarily for the protection of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s deposit insurance fund and depositors, and not for the protection of security holders.  Affinity Bank also is a member of and owns stock in the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta, which is one of the 11 regional banks in the Federal Home Loan Bank System.  

Under this system of regulation, the regulatory authorities have extensive discretion in connection with their supervisory, enforcement, rulemaking and examination activities and policies, including rules or policies that: establish minimum capital levels; restrict the timing and amount of dividend payments; govern the classification of assets; determine the adequacy of loan loss reserves for regulatory purposes; and establish the timing and amounts of assessments and fees.  Moreover, as part of their examination authority, the banking regulators assign numerical ratings to banks and savings institutions relating to capital, asset quality, management, liquidity, earnings and other factors.  These ratings are inherently subjective and the receipt of a less than satisfactory rating in one or more categories may result in enforcement action by the banking regulators against a financial institution.  A less than satisfactory rating may also prevent a financial institution, such as Affinity Bank or its holding company, from obtaining necessary regulatory approvals to access the capital markets, pay dividends, acquire other financial institutions or establish new branches.

In addition, we must comply with significant anti-money laundering and anti-terrorism laws and regulations, Community Reinvestment Act laws and regulations, and fair lending laws and regulations.  Government agencies have the authority to impose monetary penalties and other sanctions on institutions that fail to comply with these laws and regulations, which could significantly affect our business activities, including our ability to acquire other financial institutions or expand our branch network.

As a savings and loan holding company, Affinity Bancshares, Inc. is required to comply with the rules and regulations of the Federal Reserve Board.  It is required to file certain reports with the Federal Reserve Board and is subject to examination by and the enforcement authority of the Federal Reserve Board.  Affinity Bancshares, Inc. is also subject to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission under the federal securities laws.  

Any change in applicable laws or regulations, whether by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Federal Reserve Board, the Securities and Exchange Commission or Congress, could have a material adverse impact on the operations and financial performance of Affinity Bancshares, Inc. and Affinity Bank.  

Set forth below is a brief description of material regulatory requirements that are or will be applicable to Affinity Bank and Affinity Bancshares, Inc.  The description is limited to certain material aspects of the statutes and regulations addressed, and is not intended to be a complete description of such statutes and regulations and their effects on Affinity Bank and Affinity Bancshares, Inc.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”)

The CARES Act, which became law on March 27, 2020, provided over $2 trillion to combat the coronavirus (COVID-19) and stimulate the economy. The law had several provisions relevant to depository institutions, including:

 

Allowing institutions not to characterize loan modifications relating to the COVID-19 pandemic as a troubled debt restructuring and also allowing them to suspend the corresponding impairment determination for accounting purposes;

 

 

Temporarily reducing the community bank leverage ratio alternative available to institutions of less than $10 billion of assets to 8%;

 

 

The ability of a borrower of a federally-backed mortgage loan (VA, FHA, USDA, Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae) experiencing financial hardship due, directly or indirectly, to the COVID-19 pandemic, to request forbearance from

24


 

 

paying their mortgage by submitting a request to the borrower’s servicer affirming their financial hardship during the COVID-19 emergency. Such a forbearance could be granted for up to 180 days, subject to extension for an additional 180-day period upon the request of the borrower. During that time, no fees, penalties or interest beyond the amounts scheduled or calculated as if the borrower made all contractual payments on time and in full under the mortgage contract could accrue on the borrower’s account.  Except for vacant or abandoned property, the servicer of a federally-backed mortgage was prohibited from taking any foreclosure action, including any eviction or sale action, for not less than the 60-day period beginning March 18, 2020, extended by federal mortgage-backing agencies to at least December 31, 2020; and

 

 

The ability of a borrower of a multi-family federally-backed mortgage loan that was current as of February 1, 2020, to submit a request for forbearance to the borrower’s servicer affirming that the borrower is experiencing financial hardship during the COVID-19 emergency. A forbearance would be granted for up to 30 days, which could be extended for up to two additional 30-day periods upon the request of the borrower.  Later extensions were made available, for a total of six months, for certain federally-backed multi-family mortgage loans.  During the time of the forbearance, the multi-family borrower could not evict or initiate the eviction of a tenant or charge any late fees, penalties or other charges to a tenant for late payment of rent.  Additionally, a multi-family borrower that received a forbearance could not require a tenant to vacate a dwelling unit before a date that is 30 days after the date on which the borrower provided the tenant notice to vacate and may not issue a notice to vacate until after the expiration of the forbearance.

The Paycheck Protection Program

The CARES Act and the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act provided $659 billion to fund loans by depository institutions to eligible small businesses through the Small Business Administration’s (“SBA”) 7(a) loan guaranty program. These loans are 100% federally guaranteed (principal and interest). An eligible business could apply under the Paycheck Protection Program (“PPP”) during the applicable covered period and receive a loan up to 2.5 times its average monthly “payroll costs” limited to a loan amount of $10.0 million.  The proceeds of the loan could be used for payroll (excluding individual employee compensation over $100,000 per year), mortgage, interest, rent, insurance, utilities and other qualifying expenses.  PPP loans have: (a) an interest rate of 1.0%, (b) a two-year loan term (or five-year loan term for loans made after June 5, 2020) to maturity; and (c) principal and interest payments deferred until the date on which the SBA remits the loan forgiveness amount to the borrower’s lender or, alternatively, notifies the lender no loan forgiveness is allowed.  If the borrower did not submit a loan forgiveness application to the lender within 10 months following the end of the 24-week loan forgiveness covered period (or the 8-week loan forgiveness covered period with respect to loans made prior to June 5, 2020 if such covered period is elected by the borrower), the borrower would begin paying principal and interest on the PPP loan immediately after the 10-month period.  The SBA guarantees 100% of the PPP loans made to eligible borrowers.  The entire principal amount of the borrower’s PPP loan, including any accrued interest, is eligible to be fully reduced by the loan forgiveness amount under the PPP so long as, during the applicable loan forgiveness covered period, employee and compensation levels of the business are maintained and 60% of the loan proceeds are used for payroll expenses, with the remaining 40% of the loan proceeds used for other qualifying expenses.

   On December 27, 2020, the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 (the “Relief Act”) became law and provides an additional $284 billion for the PPP, and extends the PPP through March 31, 2021.  PPP changes as a result of the Relief Act include: (1) an opportunity for a second PPP forgivable loan for small businesses and nonprofits with 300 or fewer employees that can demonstrate a loss of 25 percent of gross receipts in any quarter during 2020 compared to the same quarter in 2019; (2) allowing qualified borrowers to apply for a PPP loan up to 2.5 times (or 3.5 times for small businesses in the restaurant and hospitality industries) the borrower’s average monthly payroll costs in the one-year period prior to the date on which the loan is made or calendar year 2019, limited to a loan amount of $2.0 million; (3) the addition of personal protective equipment expenses, costs associated with outdoor dining, uninsured costs related to property damaged and vandalism or looting due to 2020 public disturbances and supplier costs as eligible and forgivable expenses; (4) simplifying the loan forgiveness process for loans of $150,000 or less; and (5) eliminating the requirement that Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) Advances will reduce the borrower’s PPP loan forgiveness amount.  Additionally, expenses paid with the proceeds of PPP loans that are forgiven are now tax-deductible, reversing previous guidance from the U.S. Department of the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service, which did not allow deductions on expenses paid for with PPP loan proceeds.

Federal Banking Regulation

Business Activities.  A federal savings association derives its lending and investment powers from the Home Owners’ Loan Act, as amended, and applicable federal regulations.  Under these laws and regulations, Affinity Bank may invest in mortgage loans secured by residential and commercial real estate, commercial business and consumer loans, certain types of debt securities and certain other assets, subject to applicable limits.  The Dodd-Frank Act authorized, for the first time, the payment of interest on commercial checking accounts.  Affinity Bank may also establish, subject to specified investment limits, service corporation

25


 

subsidiaries that may engage in certain activities not otherwise permissible for Affinity Bank, including real estate investment and securities and insurance brokerage.  Federal savings associations are also subject to a “Qualified Thrift Lender Test,” or “QTL Test,” which generally requires that a specified percentage of overall assets be residential mortgages and related investments.  However, these limitations do not apply to Affinity Bank, as described below.

Effective July 1, 2019, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency issued a final rule, pursuant to a provision of the Economic Growth Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act (“EGRRCPA”), that permits  a federal savings association to elect to exercise national bank powers without converting to a national bank charter.  The election is available to federal savings associations that had total consolidated assets of $20 billion or less as of December 31, 2017.  Affinity Bank exercised the covered savings association election effective May 1, 2020.

 

The effect of the “covered savings association” election is that a federal savings association generally has the same rights and privileges as a national bank that has its main office in the same location as the home office of the covered savings association.  The covered savings association is also subject to the same duties, restrictions, liabilities and limitations applicable to a national bank.  A covered savings association retains its federal savings association charter and continues to be subject to the corporate governance laws and regulations applicable to such associations, including as to its bylaws, board of directors and stockholders, capital distributions and mergers.  

 

A covered savings association may make loans to its customers without regard to the lending restrictions applicable to federal savings associations, such as the percentage of capital or assets limits on various types of loans and the QTL Test.  However, federal savings associations that have made such an election are subject to the narrower authority of national banks in certain areas such as branching and subsidiary activities in certain respects.  A covered savings association may generally not retain any assets, subsidiaries or activities not permitted for national banks.  

Applicable regulations authorize a federal association that has exercised the covered savings association election to terminate the election and thereby again operate as a federal savings association that has not made a covered savings association election.   Affinity Bank has no current plans to terminate its election.

 

Capital Requirements.  Federal regulations require federally insured depository institutions to meet several minimum capital standards:  a common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-based assets ratio of 4.5%, a Tier 1 capital to risk-based assets ratio of 6.0%, a total capital to risk-based assets ratio of 8.0%, and a 4.0% Tier 1 capital to total assets leverage ratio.

In determining the amount of risk-weighted assets for calculating risk-based capital ratios, all assets, including certain off-balance sheet assets (e.g., recourse obligations, direct credit substitutes, residual interests) are multiplied by a risk-weight factor assigned by the regulations based on the risks believed inherent in the type of asset.  Higher levels of capital are required for asset categories believed to present greater risk.  Common equity Tier 1 capital is generally defined as common stockholders’ equity and retained earnings.  Tier 1 capital is generally defined as common equity Tier 1 and additional Tier 1 capital.  Additional Tier 1 capital includes certain non-cumulative perpetual preferred stock and related surplus and minority interests in equity accounts of consolidated subsidiaries.  Total capital includes Tier 1 capital (common equity Tier 1 capital plus additional Tier 1 capital) and Tier 2 capital.  Tier 2 capital is comprised of capital instruments and related surplus, meeting specified requirements, and may include cumulative preferred stock and long-term perpetual preferred stock, mandatory convertible securities, intermediate preferred stock and subordinated debt.  Also included in Tier 2 capital is the allowance for loan and lease losses limited to a maximum of 1.25% of risk-weighted assets.  Calculation of all types of regulatory capital is subject to deductions and adjustments specified in the regulations.  In assessing an institution’s capital adequacy, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency takes into consideration not only these numeric factors, but qualitative factors as well, and has the authority to establish higher capital requirements for individual institutions where deemed necessary.

In addition to establishing the minimum regulatory capital requirements, the regulations limit capital distributions and certain discretionary bonus payments to management if the institution does not hold a “capital conservation buffer” consisting of 2.5% of common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets above the amount necessary to meet its minimum risk-based capital requirements.

EGRRCPA required the federal banking agencies, including the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, to establish a “community bank leverage ratio” of between 8% and 10% for institutions with assets of less than $10 billion.  Institutions with capital complying with the ratio and otherwise meeting the specified requirements and electing the alternative framework are considered to comply with the applicable regulatory capital requirements, including the risk-based requirements.  The community bank leverage ratio was established at 9% Tier 1 capital to total average assets, effective January 1, 2020.  A qualifying institution may opt in and out of the community bank leverage ratio framework on its quarterly call report.  An institution that temporarily ceases to meet any qualifying criteria is provided with a two quarter grace period to regain compliance.  Failure to meet the qualifying criteria within the

26


 

grace period or maintain a leverage ratio of 8% or greater requires the institution to comply with the generally applicable regulatory capital requirements.

The CARES Act lowered the community bank leverage ratio to 8%, with federal regulation making the reduced ratio effective April 23, 2020.  Another rule was issued to transition back to the 9% community bank leverage ratio by increasing the ratio to 8.5% for calendar year 2021 and to 9% thereafter.

At December 31, 2020 and 2019, Affinity Bank’s capital exceeded all applicable requirements.

Loans-to-One Borrower.  Generally, a federal savings association, including a covered savings association, may not make a loan or extend credit to a single or related group of borrowers in excess of 15% of unimpaired capital and surplus.  An additional amount may be loaned, equal to 10% of unimpaired capital and surplus, if the excess is secured by readily marketable collateral, which generally does not include real estate.  At December 31, 2020 and 2019, Affinity Bank was in compliance with the loans-to-one borrower limitations.

 

Capital Distributions.  Federal regulations govern capital distributions by a federal savings association, which include cash dividends, stock repurchases and other transactions charged to the savings association’s capital account.  A federal savings association must file an application with the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency for approval of a capital distribution if:

 

 

the total capital distributions for the applicable calendar year exceed the sum of the savings association’s net income for that year to date plus the savings association’s retained net income for the preceding two years;

 

 

the savings association would not be at least adequately capitalized following the distribution;

 

 

the distribution would violate any applicable statute, regulation, agreement or regulatory condition; or

 

 

the savings association is not eligible for expedited treatment of its filings, generally due to an unsatisfactory CAMELS rating or being subject to a cease and desist order or formal written agreement that requires action to improve the institution’s financial condition.

 

Even if an application is not otherwise required, every savings association that is a subsidiary of a savings and loan holding company, such as Affinity Bank, must still file a notice with the Federal Reserve Board at least 30 days before the board of directors declares a dividend or approves a capital distribution.

 

A notice or application related to a capital distribution may be disapproved if:

 

 

the federal savings association would be undercapitalized following the distribution;

 

 

the proposed capital distribution raises safety and soundness concerns; or

 

 

the capital distribution would violate a prohibition contained in any statute, regulation or agreement.

 

In addition, the Federal Deposit Insurance Act generally provides that an insured depository institution may not make any capital distribution if, after making such distribution, the institution would fail to meet any applicable regulatory capital requirement.  A federal savings association also may not make a capital distribution that would reduce its regulatory capital below the amount required for the liquidation account established in connection with its conversion to stock form.

Community Reinvestment Act and Fair Lending Laws. All insured depository institutions have a responsibility under the Community Reinvestment Act and related regulations to help meet the credit needs of their communities, including low- and moderate-income borrowers.  The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency is required to assess the federal savings association’s record of compliance with the Community Reinvestment Act.  A savings association’s failure to comply with the provisions of the Community Reinvestment Act could, at a minimum, result in denial of certain corporate applications such as branches or mergers, or in restrictions on its activities.  In addition, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Housing Act prohibit lenders from discriminating in their lending practices.  The failure to comply with the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Housing Act could result in enforcement actions by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, as well as other federal regulatory agencies and the Department of Justice.

 

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In June 2020, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency issued a final rule clarifying and expanding the activities that qualify for Community Reinvestment Act credit and, according to the agency, seeking to create a more consistent and objective method for evaluating Community Reinvestment Act performance.  The final rule was effective October 1, 2020, but compliance with the revised requirements is not mandatory until January 1, 2024 for institutions of Affinity Bank’s asset size.

 

The Community Reinvestment Act requires all institutions insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation to publicly disclose their rating.  Affinity Bank received a “satisfactory” Community Reinvestment Act rating in its most recent federal examination.

 

Transactions with Related Parties.  An insured depository institution’s authority to engage in transactions with its affiliates is limited by Sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act and federal regulation.  An affiliate is generally a company that controls, or is under common control with, an insured depository institution such as Affinity Bank. Affinity Bancshares will be an affiliate of Affinity Bank because of its control of Affinity Bank.  In general, transactions between an insured depository institution and its affiliates are subject to certain quantitative limits and collateral requirements.  In addition, federal regulations prohibit a savings association from lending to any of its affiliates that are engaged in activities that are not permissible for bank holding companies and from purchasing the securities of any affiliate, other than a subsidiary.  Finally, transactions with affiliates must be consistent with safe and sound banking practices, not involve the purchase of low-quality assets and be on terms that are as favorable to the institution as comparable transactions with non-affiliates.

 

Affinity Bank’s authority to extend credit to its directors, executive officers and 10% stockholders, as well as to entities controlled by such persons, is currently governed by the requirements of Sections 22(g) and 22(h) of the Federal Reserve Act and Regulation O of the Federal Reserve Board. Among other things, these provisions generally require that extensions of credit to insiders:

 

 

be made on terms that are substantially the same as, and follow credit underwriting procedures that are not less stringent than, those prevailing for comparable transactions with unaffiliated persons and that do not involve more than the normal risk of repayment or present other unfavorable features; and

 

 

not exceed certain limitations on the amount of credit extended to such persons, individually and in the aggregate, which limits are based, in part, on the amount of Affinity Bank’s capital.

 

In addition, extensions of credit in excess of certain limits must be approved by Affinity Bank’s board of directors.  Extensions of credit to executive officers are subject to additional limits based on the type of extension involved.

Enforcement.  The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency has primary enforcement responsibility over federal savings associations and has authority to bring enforcement action against all “institution-affiliated parties,” including directors, officers, stockholders, attorneys, appraisers and accountants who knowingly or recklessly participate in wrongful action likely to have an adverse effect on a federal savings association.  Formal enforcement action by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency may range from the issuance of a capital directive or cease and desist order to removal of officers and/or directors of the institution and the appointment of a receiver or conservator.  Civil penalties cover a wide range of violations and actions and range up to $50,000 per day (as adjusted for inflation), unless a finding of reckless disregard is made, in which case penalties may be as high as $2 million per day.  The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation also has the authority to terminate deposit insurance or recommend to the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency that enforcement action be taken with respect to a particular federal savings association.  If such action is not taken, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation has authority to take the action under specified circumstances.

 

Standards for Safety and Soundness.  Federal law requires each federal banking agency to prescribe certain standards for all insured depository institutions.  These standards relate to, among other things, internal controls, information systems and audit systems, loan documentation, credit underwriting, interest rate risk exposure, asset growth, compensation and other operational and managerial standards as the agency deems appropriate.  Interagency guidelines set forth the safety and soundness standards that the federal banking agencies use to identify and address problems at insured depository institutions before capital becomes impaired.  If the appropriate federal banking agency determines that an institution fails to meet any standard prescribed by the guidelines, the agency may require the institution to submit to the agency an acceptable plan to achieve compliance with the standard.  If an institution fails to meet these standards, the appropriate federal banking agency may require the institution to implement an acceptable compliance plan.  Failure to implement such a plan can result in further enforcement action, including the issuance of a cease and desist order or the imposition of civil money penalties.

Branching.  A federal savings association that has elected covered savings association status is subject to the laws and regulations governing the establishment of branches by national banks.  Generally, intrastate and interstate branching is authorized to

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the extent that the law of the state involved authorizes branching for banks that it charters.  Such authority is subject to Office of the Comptroller of the Currency approval for new branches.

Prompt Corrective Action.  Federal law requires, among other things, that federal bank regulators take “prompt corrective action” with respect to institutions that do not meet minimum capital requirements.  For this purpose, the law establishes five capital categories:  well capitalized, adequately capitalized, undercapitalized, significantly undercapitalized and critically undercapitalized.  Under applicable regulations, an institution is deemed to be “well capitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of 10.0% or greater, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 8.0% or greater, a leverage ratio of 5.0% or greater and a common equity Tier 1 ratio of 6.5% or greater.  An institution is “adequately capitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of 8.0% or greater, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 6.0% or greater, a leverage ratio of 4.0% or greater and a common equity Tier 1 ratio of 4.5% or greater.  An institution is “undercapitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of less than 8.0%, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of less than 6.0%, a leverage ratio of less than 4.0% or a common equity Tier 1 ratio of less than 4.5%.  An institution is deemed to be “significantly undercapitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of less than 6.0%, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of less than 4.0%, a leverage ratio of less than 3.0% or a common equity Tier 1 ratio of less than 3.0%.  An institution is considered to be “critically undercapitalized” if it has a ratio of tangible equity (as defined in the regulations) to total assets that is equal to or less than 2.0%.

At each successive lower capital category, an insured depository institution is subject to more restrictions and prohibitions, including restrictions on growth, restrictions on interest rates paid on deposits, restrictions or prohibitions on the payment of dividends, and restrictions on the acceptance of brokered deposits.  Furthermore, if an insured depository institution is classified in one of the undercapitalized categories, it is required to submit a capital restoration plan to the appropriate federal banking agency, and the holding company must guarantee the performance of that plan.  Based upon its capital levels, a bank that is classified as well-capitalized, adequately capitalized, or undercapitalized may be treated as though it were in the next lower capital category if the appropriate federal banking agency, after notice and opportunity for hearing, determines that an unsafe or unsound condition, or an unsafe or unsound practice, warrants such treatment.  An undercapitalized bank’s compliance with a capital restoration plan is required to be guaranteed by any company that controls the undercapitalized institution in an amount equal to the lesser of 5.0% of the institution’s total assets when deemed undercapitalized or the amount necessary to achieve the status of adequately capitalized. If an “undercapitalized” bank fails to submit an acceptable plan, it is treated as if it is “significantly undercapitalized.” “Significantly undercapitalized” banks must comply with one or more of a number of additional restrictions, including a regulatory order to sell sufficient voting stock to become adequately capitalized, requirements to reduce total assets, ceasing receipt of deposits from correspondent banks, dismissal of directors or officers, and restrictions on interest rates paid on deposits, compensation of executive officers and capital distributions by the parent holding company.  “Critically undercapitalized” institutions are subject to additional measures including, subject to a narrow exception, the appointment of a receiver or conservator within 270 days after it obtains such status.

The previously referenced final rule establishing an elective “community bank leverage ratio” regulatory capital framework provides that a qualifying institution whose capital exceeds the community bank leverage ratio and opts to use that framework will be considered “well-capitalized” for purposes of prompt corrective action.

At December 31, 2020 and 2019, Affinity Bank met the criteria for being considered “well capitalized.”

 

Insurance of Deposit Accounts.  The Deposit Insurance Fund of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation insures deposits at Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation-insured financial institutions such as Affinity Bank, generally up to a maximum of $250,000 per separately insured depositor.  The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation charges insured depository institutions premiums to maintain the Deposit Insurance Fund.

 

Under the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s risk-based assessment system, institutions deemed less risky of failure pay lower assessments. Assessments for institutions of less than $10 billion of assets are based on financial measures and supervisory ratings derived from statistical modeling estimating the probability of an institution's failure within three years.  

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation has authority to increase insurance assessments.  Any significant increases would have an adverse effect on the operating expenses and results of operations of Affinity Bank.  We cannot predict what assessment rates will be in the future.

 

Insurance of deposits may be terminated by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation upon a finding that an institution has engaged in unsafe or unsound practices, is in an unsafe or unsound condition to continue operations, or has violated any applicable law, regulation, rule, order or condition imposed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.  We do not know of any practice, condition or violation that may lead to termination of our deposit insurance.

 

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Privacy Regulations.  Federal regulations generally require that Affinity Bank disclose its privacy policy, including identifying with whom it shares a customer’s “non-public personal information,” to customers at the time of establishing the customer relationship and annually thereafter. In addition, Affinity Bank is required to provide its customers with the ability to “opt-out” of having their personal information shared with unaffiliated third parties and not to disclose account numbers or access codes to non-affiliated third parties for marketing purposes.  Affinity Bank currently has a privacy protection policy in place and believes that such policy is in compliance with the regulations.

USA PATRIOT Act.  Affinity Bank is subject to the USA PATRIOT Act, which gives federal agencies additional powers to address terrorist threats through enhanced domestic security measures, expanded surveillance powers, increased information sharing, and broadened anti-money laundering requirements.  The USA PATRIOT Act contains provisions intended to encourage information sharing among bank regulatory agencies and law enforcement bodies and imposes affirmative obligations on financial institutions, such as enhanced recordkeeping and customer identification requirements.

Prohibitions Against Tying Arrangements.  Federal savings associations are prohibited, subject to some exceptions, from extending credit to or offering any other service, or fixing or varying the consideration for such extension of credit or service, on the condition that the customer obtain some additional service from the institution or its affiliates or not obtain services of a competitor of the institution.

  

Other Regulations

Interest and other charges collected or contracted for by Affinity Bank are subject to state usury laws and federal laws concerning interest rates.  Affinity Bank’s operations are also subject to federal laws applicable to credit transactions, such as the:

 

Truth-In-Lending Act, governing disclosures of credit terms to consumer borrowers;

 

Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, requiring financial institutions to provide information to enable the public and public officials to determine whether a financial institution is fulfilling its obligation to help meet the housing needs of the community it serves;

 

Equal Credit Opportunity Act, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, creed or other prohibited factors in extending credit;

 

Fair Credit Reporting Act, governing the use and provision of information to credit reporting agencies;

 

Fair Debt Collection Act, governing the manner in which consumer debts may be collected by collection agencies;

 

Truth in Savings Act; and

 

rules and regulations of the various federal agencies charged with the responsibility of implementing such federal laws.

The operations of Affinity Bank also are subject to the:

 

Right to Financial Privacy Act, which imposes a duty to maintain confidentiality of consumer financial records and prescribes procedures for complying with administrative subpoenas of financial records;

 

Electronic Funds Transfer Act and Regulation E promulgated thereunder, which govern automatic deposits to and withdrawals from deposit accounts and customers’ rights and liabilities arising from the use of automated teller machines and other electronic banking services;

 

Check Clearing for the 21st Century Act (also known as “Check 21”), which gives “substitute checks,” such as digital check images and copies made from that image, the same legal standing as the original paper check;

 

The USA PATRIOT Act, which requires savings associations to, among other things, establish broadened anti-money laundering compliance programs, and due diligence policies and controls to ensure the detection and reporting of money laundering. Such required compliance programs are intended to supplement existing compliance requirements that also apply to financial institutions under the Bank Secrecy Act and the Office of Foreign Assets Control regulations; and

30


 

 

The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, which places limitations on the sharing of consumer financial information by financial institutions with unaffiliated third parties. Specifically, the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act requires all financial institutions offering financial products or services to retail customers to provide such customers with the financial institution’s privacy policy and provide such customers the opportunity to “opt out” of the sharing of certain personal financial information with unaffiliated third parties.

Holding Company Regulation

Affinity Bancshares is a unitary savings and loan holding company subject to regulation and supervision by the Federal Reserve Board.  The Federal Reserve Board has enforcement authority over Affinity Bancshares and its non-savings institution subsidiaries.  Among other things, this authority permits the Federal Reserve Board to restrict or prohibit activities that are determined to be a risk to Affinity Bank.  

 

As a savings and loan holding company, Affinity Bancshares’ activities are limited to those activities permissible by law for financial holding companies (if Affinity Bancshares makes an election to be treated as a financial holding company and meets the other requirements to be a financial holding company) or multiple savings and loan holding companies.  Affinity Bancshares has no present intention to make an election to be treated as a financial holding company.  A financial holding company may engage in activities that are financial in nature, incidental to financial activities or complementary to a financial activity.  Such activities include lending and other activities permitted for bank holding companies under Section 4(c)(8) of the Bank Holding Company Act, insurance and underwriting equity securities.  Multiple savings and loan holding companies are authorized to engage in activities specified by federal regulation, including activities permitted for bank holding companies under Section 4(c)(8) of the Bank Holding Company Act.

 

Federal law prohibits a savings and loan holding company, directly or indirectly, or through one or more subsidiaries, from acquiring more than 5% of another savings institution or savings and loan holding company without prior written approval of the Federal Reserve Board, and from acquiring or retaining control of any depository institution not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.  In evaluating applications by holding companies to acquire savings institutions, the Federal Reserve Board must consider such factors as the financial and managerial resources and future prospects of the company and institution involved, the effect of the acquisition on and the risk to the federal deposit insurance fund, the convenience and needs of the community and competitive factors.  A savings and loan holding company may not acquire a savings institution in another state and hold the target institution as a separate subsidiary unless it is a supervisory acquisition or the law of the state in which the target is located authorizes such acquisitions by out-of-state companies.

 

Savings and loan holding companies with less than $3 billion in consolidated assets are exempt from consolidated regulatory capital requirements, unless the Federal Reserve Board determines otherwise in particular cases.

 

The Federal Reserve Board has promulgated regulations implementing the “source of strength” doctrine that require holding companies, including savings and loan holding companies, to act as a source of strength to their subsidiary depository institutions by providing capital, liquidity and other support in times of financial stress.

 

The Federal Reserve Board has issued supervisory policies regarding the payment of dividends and the repurchase of shares of common stock by bank holding companies and savings and loan holding companies.  In general, the policy provides that dividends should be paid only out of current earnings and only if the prospective rate of earnings retention by the holding company appears consistent with the organization’s capital needs, asset quality and overall financial condition.  Regulatory guidance provides for prior regulatory consultation with respect to capital distributions in certain circumstances such as where the company’s net income for the past four quarters, net of capital distributions previously paid over that period, is insufficient to fully fund the dividend or the company’s overall rate of earnings retention is inconsistent with the company’s capital needs and overall financial condition.  The ability of a holding company to pay dividends may be restricted if a subsidiary bank becomes undercapitalized.  The policy statement also states that a holding company should inform the Federal Reserve Board supervisory staff before redeeming or repurchasing common stock or perpetual preferred stock , to provide opportunity for supervisory review and possible objection, if the holding company is experiencing financial weaknesses or if the repurchase or redemption would result in a net reduction, at the end of a quarter, in the amount of such equity instruments outstanding compared with the beginning of the quarter in which the redemption or repurchase occurred.  These regulatory policies may affect the ability of Affinity Bancshares to pay dividends, repurchase shares of common stock or otherwise engage in capital distributions.

Change in Control Regulations

Under the Change in Bank Control Act, no person may acquire “control” of a savings and loan holding company, such as Affinity Bancshares, unless the Federal Reserve Board has been given 60 days’ prior written notice and has not issued a notice disapproving the proposed acquisition, taking into consideration certain factors, including the financial and managerial resources of

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the acquirer and the competitive effects of the acquisition.  Control, as defined under federal law, means ownership, control of or holding irrevocable proxies representing more than 25% of any class of voting stock, control in any manner of the election of a majority of the institution’s directors, or a determination by the regulator that the acquirer has the power, directly or indirectly, to exercise a controlling influence over the management or policies of the institution.  There is a presumption of control upon the acquisition of 10% or more of a class of voting stock if the holding company involved has its shares registered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or, of the holding company involved does now have its shares registered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, if no other persons will own, control or hold the power to vote a greater percentage of that class of voting security after the acquisition.

 

The Federal Reserve Board has adopted a final rule, effective September 30, 2020, that revises its framework for determining whether a company, under the Bank Holding Company Act, has a “controlling influence” over a bank or savings and loan holding company.

Federal Securities Laws

Affinity Bancshares, Inc. common stock is registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission.  Affinity Bancshares, Inc. is subject to the information, proxy solicitation, insider trading restrictions and other requirements under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

The registration under the Securities Act of 1933 of shares of common stock issued in Affinity Bancshares, Inc.’s public offering does not cover the resale of those shares.  Shares of common stock purchased by persons who are not affiliates of Affinity Bancshares, Inc. may be resold without registration.  Shares purchased by an affiliate of Affinity Bancshares, Inc. are subject to the resale restrictions of Rule 144 under the Securities Act of 1933.  If Affinity Bancshares, Inc. meets the current public information requirements of Rule 144 under the Securities Act of 1933, each affiliate of Affinity Bancshares, Inc. that complies with the other conditions of Rule 144, including those that require the affiliate’s sale to be aggregated with those of other persons, would be able to sell in the public market, without registration, a number of shares not to exceed, in any three-month period, the greater of 1% of the outstanding shares of Affinity Bancshares, Inc., or the average weekly volume of trading in the shares during the preceding four calendar weeks. In the future, Affinity Bancshares, Inc. may permit affiliates to have their shares registered for sale under the Securities Act of 1933.

Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 is intended to improve corporate responsibility, to provide for enhanced penalties for accounting and auditing improprieties at publicly traded companies and to protect investors by improving the accuracy and reliability of corporate disclosures pursuant to the securities laws.  We have policies, procedures and systems designed to comply with these regulations, and we review and document such policies, procedures and systems to ensure continued compliance with these regulations.

Emerging Growth Company Status

Affinity Bancshares, Inc. is an emerging growth company under the JOBS Act.  We will cease to be an emerging growth company upon the earliest of: (i) the end of the fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of the completion of our initial stock offering, (ii) the first fiscal year after our annual gross revenues are $1.07 billion or more, (iii) the date on which we have, during the previous three-year period, issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt securities or (iv) the end of any fiscal year in which the market value of our common stock held by non-affiliates exceeded $700 million as of the end of the second quarter of that fiscal year.  We expect to lose our status as an emerging growth company effective December 31, 2022, which is the end of the fifth year after the completion of our stock offering.  An “emerging growth company” may choose not to hold stockholder votes to approve annual executive compensation (more frequently referred to as “say-on-pay” votes) or executive compensation payable in connection with a merger (more frequently referred to as “say-on-golden parachute” votes). An emerging growth company also is not subject to the requirement that its auditors attest to the effectiveness of the company’s internal control over financial reporting, and can provide scaled disclosure regarding executive compensation; however, Affinity Bancshares, Inc. will also not be subject to the auditor attestation requirement or additional executive compensation disclosure so long as it remains a “smaller reporting company” under Securities and Exchange Commission regulations (generally a company with less than $250 million of voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates). Finally, an emerging growth company may elect to use the extended transition period to delay adoption of new or revised accounting pronouncements applicable to public companies until such pronouncements are made applicable to private companies, but must make such election when the company is first required to file a registration statement.  Affinity Bancshares, Inc. has elected to use the extended transition period to delay adoption of new or revised accounting pronouncements applicable to public companies until such pronouncements are made applicable to private companies.  Accordingly, our financial statements may not be comparable to the financial statements of public companies that comply with such new or revised accounting standards.

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ITEM 1A.

Risk Factors

Not applicable, as Affinity Bancshares, Inc. is a “smaller reporting company.”

ITEM 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

ITEM 2.

Properties

As of December 31, 2020, the net book value of our office properties was $6.5 million, and the net book value of our furniture, fixtures and equipment was $2.0 million.  The following table sets forth information regarding our offices.

 

Location

 

Leased or

Owned

 

Year Acquired

or Leased

 

Net Book Value

of Real

Property

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Main Office:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3175 Highway 278

 

Owned

 

1974

 

$

1,896

 

Covington, Georgia 30014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Properties:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eastside Branch

 

Owned

 

2000

 

 

635

 

8278 Highway 278

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Covington, Georgia 30014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Former Southside Branch

 

Building

 

2006

 

 

927

 

Bypass Road & Highway 36

 

Owned/Land

 

 

 

 

 

 

10131 Carlin Avenue

 

Leased

 

 

 

 

 

 

Covington, Georgia 30014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operations Center

 

Owned

 

2017

 

 

3,007

 

8460 Dr. M. L. King, Jr. Avenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Covington, Georgia 30014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Affinity Bank Office:

 

Leased

 

2017

 

N/A

 

400 Galleria Parkway SE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Suite 900

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Atlanta, Georgia 30339

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loan Production Office

 

Leased

 

2019

 

N/A

 

5755 North Point Parkway

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Suite 91

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alpharetta, Georgia 30022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Affinity Bank Dealer Select Office

 

Leased

 

2021

 

N/A

 

310 North Broad Street

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monroe, Georgia 30655

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We believe that current facilities are adequate to meet our present and foreseeable needs, subject to possible future expansion.

ITEM 3.

Legal Proceedings

Periodically, we are involved in claims and lawsuits, such as claims to enforce liens, condemnation proceedings on properties in which we hold security interests, claims involving the making and servicing of real property loans and other issues incident to our business. We are not a party to any pending legal proceedings that we believe would have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

ITEM 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

Not applicable.

 

33


 

 

PART II

ITEM 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Our common stock is traded on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the symbol “AFBI.” As of March 25, 2021 we had 356 stockholders of record (excluding the number of persons or entities holding stock in street name through various brokerage firms), and 6,755,160 shares of common stock outstanding.

The payment and amount of any dividend payments will be subject to statutory and regulatory limitations, and will depend upon a number of factors, including the following: regulatory capital requirements; our financial condition and results of operations; our other uses of funds for the long-term value of stockholders; tax considerations; the Federal Reserve Board’s current regulations restricting the waiver of dividends by mutual holding companies; and general economic conditions.

The Federal Reserve Board has issued a policy statement providing that dividends should be paid only out of current earnings and only if our prospective rate of earnings retention is consistent with our capital needs, asset quality and overall financial condition.  Regulatory guidance also provides for prior regulatory consultation with respect to capital distributions in certain circumstances such as where the holding company’s net income for the past four quarters, net of dividends previously paid over that period, is insufficient to fully fund the dividend or the holding company’s overall rate or earnings retention is inconsistent with its capital needs and overall financial condition. In addition, Affinity Bank’s ability to pay dividends will be limited if it does not have the capital conservation buffer required by the new capital rules, which may limit our ability to pay dividends to stockholders.  No assurances can be given that any dividends will be paid or that, if paid, will not be reduced or eliminated in the future.  Special cash dividends, stock dividends or returns of capital, to the extent permitted by regulations and policies of the Federal Reserve Board and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, may be paid in addition to, or in lieu of, regular cash dividends.

There were no sales of unregistered securities during the quarter ended December 31, 2020.

There were no repurchases of shares of the Company’s common stock during the three months Ended December 31, 2020.

On January 20, 2021, Affinity Bancshares, Inc. (the “Company”) completed the sale of 3,701,509 shares of its common stock, par value $0.01 per share, in connection with the mutual-to-stock conversion of Community First Bancshares, MHC. As of March 15, 2021, the Company had invested $16.3 million of the net proceeds it received from the sale into the Bank's operations and has retained the remaining amount for general corporate purposes.

The effective date of the Company’s registration statement (Commission No. 333-248745) was November 10, 2020. The Company registered for offer and sale shares of common stock, par value $0.01, at a sales price of $10.00 per share.

The selling agent who assisted the Company in the sale of its common stock was Performance Trust Capital Partners, LLC (“PTCP”).  For its services in the subscription and community offerings, PTCP received a fee of 1.0% of the aggregate dollar amount of all shares of common stock sold in the subscription offering. No fee was paid on any shares purchased by the Company’s and Newton Federal Bank’s directors, trustees, officers, employees or their immediate families and their personal trusts, and shares purchased by the Company’s employee benefit plans or trusts.

From the effective date of the registration statement until March 26, 2021 the Company incurred expenses in connection with the offer and sale of the common stock totaling $1.6 million, resulting in net proceeds to the Company of $32.4 million.

 

34


 

ITEM 6.

Selected Financial Data

The summary information presented below at each date or for each of the periods presented is derived in part from the financial statements of Community First Bancshares, Inc. and Affinity Bank.  The financial condition data at December 31, 2020 and 2019, and the operating data for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, were derived from the audited consolidated financial statements of Community First Bancshares, Inc. included elsewhere in this annual report.  The information at and for the three months ended December 31, 2018 and the years ended September 30, 2018, 2017 and 2016 was derived in part from audited financial statements that are not included in this annual report.  The following information is only a summary, and should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and notes included in this annual report.

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

At September 30,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Selected Financial Condition Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

850,628

 

 

$

319,294

 

 

$

307,695

 

 

$

305,984

 

 

$

277,815

 

 

$

232,832

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

 

178,253

 

 

 

48,117

 

 

 

37,029

 

 

 

40,796

 

 

 

35,943

 

 

 

25,693

 

Securities held-to-maturity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,000

 

 

 

1,000

 

 

 

1,000

 

 

 

7,499

 

Securities available-for-sale

 

 

24,005

 

 

 

3,818

 

 

 

21,145

 

 

 

21,360

 

 

 

14,345

 

 

 

 

Other investments

 

 

1,596

 

 

 

278

 

 

 

580

 

 

 

580

 

 

 

216

 

 

 

205

 

Loans receivable, net

 

 

592,254

 

 

 

247,956

 

 

 

227,424

 

 

 

222,485

 

 

 

213,310

 

 

 

190,050

 

Other real estate owned

 

 

1,292

 

 

 

140

 

 

 

508

 

 

 

67

 

 

 

61

 

 

 

 

Premises and equipment, net

 

 

8,617

 

 

 

8,513

 

 

 

8,896

 

 

 

9,040

 

 

 

8,454

 

 

 

4,556

 

Deposits

 

 

640,165

 

 

 

238,181

 

 

 

219,181

 

 

 

216,387

 

 

 

194,613

 

 

 

181,699

 

FHLB advances

 

 

19,117

 

 

 

 

 

 

7,570

 

 

 

7,570

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paycheck Protection Program Liquidity Facility borrowings

 

 

100,813

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other borrowings

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders' equity

 

 

80,785

 

 

 

77,167

 

 

 

76,398

 

 

 

76,383

 

 

 

76,796

 

 

 

45,081

 

 

 

 

For the Years Ended December 31,

 

 

For the Three Months Ended

December 31,

 

 

For the Years Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Selected Operating Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income

 

$

30,632

 

 

$

14,997

 

 

$

3,592

 

 

$

14,292

 

 

$

12,421

 

 

$

11,248

 

Interest expense

 

 

5,490

 

 

 

2,312

 

 

 

506

 

 

 

1,556

 

 

 

1,083

 

 

 

1,415

 

Net interest income

 

 

25,142

 

 

 

12,685

 

 

 

3,086

 

 

 

12,736

 

 

 

11,338

 

 

 

9,833

 

Provision for loan losses

 

 

2,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

500

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest income after provision for loan losses

 

 

23,142

 

 

 

12,685

 

 

 

3,086

 

 

 

12,236

 

 

 

11,338

 

 

 

9,833

 

Noninterest income

 

 

2,156

 

 

 

1,645

 

 

 

316

 

 

 

1,908

 

 

 

1,258

 

 

 

1,185

 

Noninterest expenses

 

 

21,418

 

 

 

14,004

 

 

 

3,211

 

 

 

12,490

 

 

 

10,525

 

 

 

9,164

 

Income before income tax benefit (expense)

 

 

3,880

 

 

 

326

 

 

 

191

 

 

 

1,654

 

 

 

2,071

 

 

 

1,854

 

Income tax benefit (expense)

 

 

(792

)

 

 

29

 

 

 

(43

)

 

 

(1,205

)

 

 

(706

)

 

 

(697

)

Net income (loss)

 

$

3,088

 

 

$

355

 

 

$

148

 

 

$

449

 

 

$

1,365

 

 

$

1,157

 

Earnings per share (basic and diluted)

 

$

0.41

 

 

$

0.05

 

 

$

0.02

 

 

$

0.06

 

 

$

0.08

 

 

N/A

 

 

35


 

 

 

At or For the Years Ended December 31,

 

 

At or For the Three Months Ended December 31,

 

 

At or For the Years Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Performance Ratios:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return on average assets

 

 

0.42

%

 

 

0.11

%

 

 

0.19

%

 

 

0.15

%

 

 

0.52

%

 

 

0.51

%

Return on average equity

 

 

3.97

%

 

 

0.46

%

 

 

0.77

%

 

 

0.59

%

 

 

2.32

%

 

 

2.60

%

Interest rate spread (1)

 

 

3.49

%

 

 

4.17

%

 

 

4.22

%

 

 

4.49

%

 

 

4.42

%

 

 

4.15

%

Net interest margin (2)

 

 

3.77

%

 

 

4.51

%

 

 

4.51

%

 

 

4.76

%

 

 

4.63

%

 

 

4.39

%

Noninterest expense to average assets

 

 

2.94

%

 

 

4.53

%

 

 

4.22

%

 

 

4.31

%

 

 

4.04

%

 

 

4.00

%

Efficiency ratio (3)

 

 

78.46

%

 

 

97.73

%

 

 

94.40

%

 

 

85.29

%

 

 

83.56

%

 

 

83.17

%

Average interest-earning assets to average

   interest-bearing liabilities

 

 

133.67

%

 

 

141.27

%

 

 

139.50

%

 

 

146.37

%

 

 

147.37

%

 

 

138.46

%

Capital Ratios:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Average equity to average assets

 

 

10.70

%

 

 

24.77

%

 

 

25.09

%

 

 

26.32

%

 

 

22.62

%

 

 

19.41

%

Total capital to risk weighted assets

 

 

13.00

%

 

 

29.00

%

 

 

31.00

%

 

 

31.07

%

 

 

34.68

%

 

 

32.13

%

Tier 1 capital to risk weighted assets

 

 

12.00

%

 

 

27.00

%

 

 

29.00

%

 

 

29.82

%

 

 

33.42

%

 

 

30.86

%

Common equity tier 1 capital to risk weighted

   assets

 

 

12.00

%

 

 

27.00

%

 

 

29.00

%

 

 

29.82

%

 

 

33.42

%

 

 

30.86

%

Tier 1 capital to average assets

 

 

10.00

%

 

 

20.00

%

 

 

20.00

%

 

 

20.11

%

 

 

21.55

%

 

 

19.32

%

Asset Quality Ratios:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Allowance for loan losses as a percentage of total

   loans

 

 

1.06

%

 

 

1.64

%

 

 

1.73

%

 

 

1.73

%

 

 

2.10

%

 

 

2.22

%

Allowance for loan losses as a percentage of

   non-performing loans

 

 

129.79

%

 

 

161.07

%

 

 

220.02

%

 

 

178.10

%

 

 

124.04

%

 

 

132.87

%

Net (charge-offs) recoveries to average outstanding

   loans during the year

 

 

0.04

%

 

 

0.05

%

 

 

0.20

%

 

 

(0.52

)%

 

 

0.12

%

 

 

(0.86

)%

Non-performing loans as a percentage of total

   loans

 

 

0.82

%

 

 

1.02

%

 

 

0.79

%

 

 

0.97

%

 

 

1.69

%

 

 

1.67

%

Non-performing loans as a percentage of total

   assets

 

 

0.58

%

 

 

0.80

%

 

 

0.59

%

 

 

0.72

%

 

 

1.32

%

 

 

1.39

%

Total non-performing assets as a percentage of

   total assets

 

 

0.73

%

 

 

0.85

%

 

 

0.76

%

 

 

0.74

%

 

 

1.34

%

 

 

1.39

%

Other:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of offices

 

 

3

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

3

 

Number of full-time employees

 

 

79

 

 

 

80

 

 

 

84

 

 

 

83

 

 

 

81

 

 

 

65

 

Number of part-time employees

 

 

4

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

0

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

2

 

 

(1)

Represents the difference between the weighted average yield on interest-earning assets and the weighted average cost of interest-bearing liabilities.

(2)

Represents net interest income as a percentage of average interest-earning assets.

(3)

Represents noninterest expenses divided by the sum of net interest income and noninterest income.

 

36


 

ITEM 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

This discussion and analysis reflects our consolidated financial statements and other relevant statistical data, and is intended to enhance your understanding of our financial condition and results of operations.  The information in this section has been derived from the consolidated financial statements, which appear elsewhere in this annual report.  You should read the information in this section in conjunction with the other business and financial information provided in this annual report.

Our financial performance between the 2020 and 2019 periods was generally impacted by our acquisition of ABB Financial Group, Inc. (“ABB”) and its wholly owned banking subsidiary, Affinity Bank, in January 2020.  Our results of operations and average balances for the 2020 periods include partial period contributions from the acquisition, as compared to no contribution from the acquisition in the 2019 periods.  

Overview

Total assets increased $531.3 million, or 166.4%, to $850.6 million at December 31, 2020 from $319.3 million at December 31, 2019.  The increase was primarily due to increases in loans and cash and cash equivalents, as a result of our acquisition of ABB and Affinity Bank in January 2020, the origination of PPP loans, and increases in cash equivalents resulting from the deposit of PPP loan proceeds into customers’ accounts at Affinity Bank.  Loans increased $344.3 million, or 138.9%, to $592.3 million at December 31, 2020 from $248.0 million at December 31, 2019.  Cash and cash equivalents increased to $178.3 million at December 31, 2020, from $48.1 million at December 31, 2019.  Securities available-for-sale increased to $24.0 million at December 31, 2020, from $3.8 million at December 31, 2019 due to the acquisition of ABB Financial and Affinity Bank.  

Net income increased $2.7 million, or 769.9%, to $3.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to $355,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019.  The increase was due primarily to an increase in interest income on loans, due to our acquisition of ABB and Affinity Bank in January 2020, partially offset by increases in interest expense on deposits and noninterest expenses. Net interest income before provision for loan losses increased $12.5 million, primarily as a result of an increase in interest income on loans.  The provision for loan losses increased to $2.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and its effects on economic conditions, compared to no provision for the year ended December 31, 2019.  Noninterest income increased $511,000, or 31.1%, to $2.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 from $1.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, primarily as a result of an increase in service charges on deposit accounts.  Noninterest expenses increased $7.4 million, or 52.9%, to $21.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, from $14.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, primarily as a result of increases in salaries and employee benefits, occupancy, data processing, legal and accounting, and other noninterest expenses.  Income tax expense increased by $821,000 for the year ended December 31, 2020, as a result of increased income before income taxes.

A rise in interest rates will present us with a slight challenge in managing our interest rate risk.  As a general matter, our interest-bearing liabilities reprice or mature more quickly than our interest-earning assets, which can result in interest expense increasing more rapidly than increases in interest income as interest rates rise.  Therefore, increases in interest rates may adversely affect our net interest income and net economic value, which in turn would likely have an adverse effect on our results of operations.  As described in “—Management of Market Risk,” our net interest income and our net economic value would decrease as a result of an instantaneous increase in interest rates.  To help manage interest rate risk, we promote core deposit products, we continue to diversify our loan portfolio by adding more commercial-related loans, and we proactively manage the liability-side of the balance sheet by adjusting rates offered on our interest-bearing accounts and reviewing long-term funding options to help minimize the compression on our net interest margin.  See “—Management of Market Risk.”  

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

The discussion and analysis of the financial condition and results of operations are based on our consolidated financial statements, which are prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“U.S. GAAP”). The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions affecting the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities, and the reported amounts of income and expenses. We consider the accounting policies discussed below to be significant accounting policies. The estimates and assumptions that we use are based on historical experience and various other factors and are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions, resulting in a change that could have a material impact on the carrying value of our assets and liabilities and our results of operations.

The JOBS Act contains provisions that, among other things, reduce certain reporting requirements for qualifying public companies. As an “emerging growth company” we may delay adoption of new or revised accounting pronouncements applicable to public companies until such pronouncements are made applicable to private companies. We determined to take advantage of the

37


 

benefits of this extended transition period. Accordingly, our financial statements may not be comparable to companies that comply with such new or revised accounting standards.

The following represent our significant accounting policies:

Business Combinations and Valuation of Loans Acquired in Business Combinations.  We account for acquisitions under Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) ASC Topic 805, Business Combinations, which requires the use of the acquisition method of accounting.  Assets acquired and liabilities assumed in a business combination are recorded at estimated fair value on their purchase date.  As provided for under U.S. GAAP, management has up to 12 months following the date of the acquisition to finalize the fair values of acquired assets and assumed liabilities, where it is not possible to estimate the acquisition date fair value upon consummation.

In particular, the valuation of acquired loans involves significant estimates, assumptions and judgment based on information available as of the acquisition date.  Substantially all loans acquired in the transaction are evaluated in pools of loans with similar characteristics; and since the estimated fair value of acquired loans includes a credit consideration, no carryover of any previously recorded allowance for loan losses is recorded at acquisition.  A number of factors are considered in determining the estimated fair value of purchased loans including, among other things, the remaining life of the acquired loans, estimated prepayments, estimated loss ratios, estimated value of the underlying collateral, estimated holding periods, contractual interest rates compared to market interest rates, and net present value of cash flows expected to be received.

In determining the Day 1 Fair Values of acquired loans, which are the fair value on all acquired loans at the time of the acquisition, management calculates a nonaccretable difference (the credit mark component of the acquired loans) and an accretable difference (the market rate or yield component of the acquired loans).  The nonaccretable difference is the difference between the undiscounted contractually required payments and the undiscounted cash flows expected to be collected in accordance with management’s determination of the Day 1 Fair Values. Subsequent decreases to the expected cash flows will generally result in a provision for loan losses.  Subsequent increases in cash flows will result in a reversal of the provision for loan losses to the extent of prior charges and then an adjustment to accretable yield, and nonaccretable difference which would have a positive impact on interest income.

The accretable yield on acquired loans is the difference between the expected cash flows and the initial investment in the acquired loans. The accretable yield is recognized into earnings using the effective yield method over the term of the loans.  Management separately monitors the acquired loan portfolio and periodically reviews loans contained within this portfolio against the factors and assumptions used in determining the Day 1 Fair Values.

Allowance for Loan Losses.  The allowance for loan losses is a reserve for estimated credit losses on individually evaluated loans determined to be impaired as well as estimated credit losses inherent in the loan portfolio.  Actual credit losses, net of recoveries, are deducted from the allowance for loan losses.  Loans are charged off when management believes that the collectability of the principal is unlikely.  Subsequent recoveries, if any, are credited to the allowance for loan losses. A provision for loan losses, which is a charge against earnings, is recorded to bring the allowance for loan losses to a level that, in management’s judgment, is adequate to absorb probable losses in the loan portfolio.  Management’s evaluation process used to determine the appropriateness of the allowance for loan losses is subject to the use of estimates, assumptions, and judgment.  The evaluation process involves gathering and interpreting many qualitative and quantitative factors which could affect probable credit losses.  Because interpretation and analysis involves judgment, current economic or business conditions can change, and future events are inherently difficult to predict, the anticipated amount of estimated loan losses and therefore the appropriateness of the allowance for loan losses could change significantly.

The allocation methodology applied by Affinity Bank is designed to assess the appropriateness of the allowance for loan losses and includes allocations for specifically identified impaired loans and loss factor allocations for all remaining loans, with a component primarily based on historical loss rates and a component primarily based on other qualitative factors.  The methodology includes evaluation and consideration of several factors, such as, but not limited to, management’s ongoing review and grading of loans, facts and issues related to specific loans, historical loan loss and delinquency experience, trends in past due and non-accrual loans, existing risk characteristics of specific loans or loan pools, the fair value of underlying collateral, current economic conditions and other qualitative and quantitative factors which could affect potential credit losses.  While management uses the best information available to make its evaluation, future adjustments to the allowance may be necessary if there are significant changes in economic conditions or circumstances underlying the collectability of loans.  Because each of the criteria used is subject to change, the allocation of the allowance for loan losses is made for analytical purposes and is not necessarily indicative of the trend of future loan losses in any particular loan category.  The total allowance is available to absorb losses from any segment of the loan portfolio.  Management believes the allowance for loan losses is appropriate at December 31, 2020 and 2019. The allowance analysis is reviewed by the board of directors on a quarterly basis in compliance with regulatory requirements.  In addition, various regulatory agencies periodically review the allowance for loan losses.  As a result of such reviews, we may have to adjust our allowance for loan losses.  

38


 

However, regulatory agencies are not directly involved in the process of establishing the allowance for loan losses as the process is the responsibility of Affinity Bank and any increase or decrease in the allowance is the responsibility of management.  

Income Taxes.  The assessment of income tax assets and liabilities involves the use of estimates, assumptions, interpretation, and judgment concerning certain accounting pronouncements and federal and state tax codes. There can be no assurance that future events, such as court decisions or positions of federal and state taxing authorities, will not differ from management’s current assessment, the impact of which could be significant to the results of operations and reported earnings.

The Company files a consolidated federal and a state income tax return.  Amounts provided for income tax expense are based on income reported for financial statement purposes and do not necessarily represent amounts currently payable under tax laws.  Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are computed annually for differences between the financial statement and tax bases of assets and liabilities that will result in taxable or deductible amounts in the future based on enacted tax law rates applicable to the periods in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income.  As changes in tax laws or rates are enacted, deferred tax assets and liabilities are adjusted through the provision for income tax expense.  Valuation allowances are established when it is more likely than not that a portion of the full amount of the deferred tax asset will not be realized.  In assessing the ability to realize deferred tax assets, management considers the scheduled reversal of deferred tax liabilities, projected future taxable income and tax planning strategies.  The Company may also recognize a liability for unrecognized tax benefits from uncertain tax positions.  Unrecognized tax benefits represent the differences between a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return and the benefit recognized and measured in the consolidated financial statements.  Penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits are classified as income tax expense.

Impact of COVID-19 Outbreak

During 2020, global financial markets experienced significant volatility resulting from the spread of COVID-19.  In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 outbreak a global pandemic and the United States declared a National Public Health Emergency.  The COVID-19 pandemic has restricted the level of economic activity in our markets.  In response to the pandemic, the governments of the state of Georgia and of most other states have taken preventative or protective actions, such as imposing restrictions on travel and business operations, advising or requiring individuals to limit or forego time outside of their homes, and ordering temporary closures of businesses that have been deemed to be non-essential.  These measures have dramatically increased unemployment in the United States and have negatively impacted many businesses, and thereby threatened the repayment ability of some of our borrowers.

To address the economic impact in the United States, the CARES Act was signed into law on March 27, 2020.  The CARES Act included a number of provisions that affected us, including accounting relief for troubled debt restructurings (“TDRs”).  The CARES Act also established the PPP through the SBA, which allowed us to lend money to small businesses to maintain employee payrolls through the crisis with guarantees from the SBA.  Under this program, loan amounts may be forgiven if the borrower maintains employee payrolls and meet certain other requirements.  During the year ended December 31, 2020, we received SBA authorization for 1,171 PPP loans totaling $130.3 million.  We had $101.7 million in PPP loans outstanding as of December 31, 2020.

In addition, the Federal Reserve took steps to bolster the economy by, among other things, reducing the federal funds rate and the discount-window borrowing rate to near zero.

In response to the pandemic, we have implemented protocols and processes to help protect our employees, customers and communities.  These measures include:

 

Operating our branches under a drive-through model with appointment-only lobby service for a period of time, leveraging our business continuity plans and capabilities that include critical operations teams being divided and dispersed to separate locations and, when possible, having employees work from home.

 

 

Offering assistance to our customers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, which includes payment deferrals, waiving certain fees, suspending property foreclosures, and participating in the CARES Act and lending programs for businesses, including the PPP.

We have implemented various consumer and commercial loan modification programs to provide our borrowers relief from the economic impacts of COVID-19.  Based on guidance in the CARES Act, COVID-19 related modifications to loans that were current as of December 31, 2019 are exempt from TDR classification under U.S. GAAP.  In addition, the bank regulatory agencies issued interagency guidance stating that COVID-19 related short-term modifications (i.e., nine months or less) granted for loans that were current as of the loan modification program implementation date are not TDRs.  During the year ended December 31, 2020, we

39


 

granted short-term deferrals on 737 loans totaling $186.9 million that were otherwise performing (including $115.0 million of dental practice loans).  As of December 31, 2020, all of these loans had returned to normal payment status.

Given the unprecedented uncertainty and evolving economic effects and social impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, the future direct and indirect impact on our business, results of operations and financial condition are highly uncertain.  Should current economic conditions persist or continue to deteriorate, we expect that this macroeconomic environment will have a continued adverse effect on our business and results of operations, which could include, but not be limited to:  decreased demand for our products and services, protracted periods of lower interest rates, increased noninterest expenses, including operational losses, and increased credit losses due to deterioration in the financial condition of our consumer and commercial borrowers, including declining asset and collateral values, which may continue to increase our provision for credit losses and net charge-offs.

Comparison of Financial Condition at December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2019

Total assets increased $531.3 million, or 166.4%, to $850.6 million at December 31, 2020 from $319.3 million at December 31, 2019.  The increase was primarily due to increases in loans and cash and cash equivalents, as a result of our acquisition of ABB and Affinity Bank in January 2020, the origination of PPP loans, and increases in cash equivalents resulting from the deposit of PPP loan proceeds into customers’ accounts at Affinity Bank.  We expect our assets to decrease as customers withdraw the cash proceeds from PPP loans, and as PPP loans are forgiven by the SBA.  In January 2021, we repaid the related Federal Reserve Bank PPP Liquidity Facility loans we obtained to fund the PPP loans.

Cash and cash equivalents increased $130.1 million, or 270.5%, to $178.3 million at December 31, 2020 from $48.1 million at December 31, 2019, resulting from our acquisition of ABB and Affinity Bank, borrowings obtained from the Federal Reserve Bank’s PPP Liquidity Facility to fund PPP loans, and the deposit of PPP loan proceeds into customers’ accounts at Affinity Bank.  As of December 31, 2020, much of the PPP loan proceeds remained in customers’ deposit accounts.  

Loans increased $344.3 million, or 138.9%, to $592.3 million at December 31, 2020 from $248.0 million at December 31, 2019.  Commercial real estate loans increased $124.1 million, or 227.7%, to $178.6 million at December 31, 2020 from $54.5 million at December 31, 2019, and commercial and industrial loans, excluding PPP loans, increased $126.9 million, or 443.6%, to $155.6 million at December 31, 2020 from $28.6 million at December 31, 2019.  Construction loans increased $3.1 million, or 15.0%, to $23.6 million at December 31, 2020 from $20.5 million at December 31, 2019.  Consumer loans increased $15.7 million, or 49.8%, to $47.4 million at December 31, 2020 from $31.6 million at December 31, 2019.  These increases were primarily attributable to our acquisition of ABB Financial and Affinity Bank in January 2020.  In addition, commercial and industrial loans increased as $101.7 million in PPP loans were outstanding as of December 31, 2020.  These increases were partially offset by a decrease in one- to four-family residential real estate loans of $25.1 million, or 21.5%, to $91.8 million at December 31, 2020 from $116.8 million at December 31, 2019, as mortgage loans continue to be refinanced elsewhere at lower rates than we offer.  The acquisition of ABB Financial and Affinity Bank shifted the composition of the loan portfolio towards increased commercial and industrial lending and commercial real estate lending, and away from one- to four-family mortgage lending.

Securities available-for-sale increased to $24.0 million at December 31, 2020, from $3.8 million at December 31, 2019, due to our acquisition of ABB Financial and Affinity Bank in January 2020.  

Total deposits increased $402.0 million, or 168.8%, to $640.2 million at December 31, 2020 from $238.2 million at December 31, 2019.  The increase in total deposits included increases of $131.3 million, or 444.2%, in noninterest-bearing checking accounts; $87.9 million, or 263.4%, in market rate checking accounts; $82.5 million, or 174.3%, in interest-bearing checking accounts; $73.9 million, or 325.7%, in savings accounts; and $26.4 million, or 25.1%, in certificates of deposit.  These increases are primarily attributable to our acquisition of ABB Financial and Affinity Bank in January 2020.  In addition, many of our customers receiving PPP loans deposited the loan proceeds in their accounts at Affinity Bank.

We had $19.1 million of Federal Home Loan Bank advances, $100.8 million in Federal Reserve Bank PPP Liquidity Facility funds, and $5.0 million of other borrowings at December 31, 2020, compared to no borrowings at December 31, 2019.  We acquired Federal Home Loan Bank advances in our acquisition of ABB Financial and Affinity Bank in January 2020.  We also borrowed $20.0 million from the Federal Home Loan Bank in January 2020 to help fund the acquisition.  We borrowed $5.0 million from First National Bankers Bank during the quarter ended June 30, 2020.  The loan has a ten-year term with a floating interest rate equal to the Wall Street Journal Prime Rate.  The initial interest payment was paid as of September 30, 2020 and the initial principal payment is due June 29, 2021.  There is no prepayment penalty.

Stockholders’ equity increased $3.6 million or 4.7%, to $80.8 million at December 31, 2020 from $77.2 million at December 31, 2019.  The increase was due primarily to net income of $3.1 million recognized during the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

40


 

 

Average Balance Sheets

The following tables set forth average balance sheets, average yields and costs, and certain other information for the years indicated.  No tax-equivalent yield adjustments have been made, as the effects would be immaterial.  All average balances are monthly average balances.  Non-accrual loans were included in the computation of average balances.   The yields set forth below include the effect of deferred fees, discounts, and premiums that are amortized or accreted to interest income or interest expense.

 

 

 

For the Year Ended December 31,

 

 

For the Year Ended September 30,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

 

Average

Outstanding

Balance

 

 

Interest

 

 

Average

Yield/Rate

 

 

Average

Outstanding

Balance

 

 

Interest

 

 

Average

Yield/Rate

 

 

Average

Outstanding

Balance

 

 

Interest

 

 

Average

Yield/Rate

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Interest-earning assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loans

 

$

575,548

 

 

$

29,933

 

 

 

5.20

%

 

$

241,650

 

 

$

14,022

 

 

 

5.80

%

 

$

219,272

 

 

$

13,301

 

 

 

6.07

%

Securities

 

 

19,917

 

 

 

380

 

 

 

1.91

%

 

 

15,129

 

 

 

335

 

 

 

2.21

%

 

 

22,998

 

 

 

542

 

 

 

2.35

%

Interest-earning deposits and federal funds

 

 

69,137

 

 

 

212

 

 

 

0.31

%

 

 

24,045

 

 

 

619

 

 

 

2.57

%

 

 

24,811

 

 

 

418

 

 

 

1.69

%

Other investments

 

 

2,523

 

 

 

107

 

 

 

4.24

%

 

 

329

 

 

 

21

 

 

 

6.38

%

 

 

531

 

 

 

31

 

 

 

5.84

%

Total interest-earning assets

 

 

667,125

 

 

 

30,632

 

 

 

4.59

%

 

 

281,153

 

 

 

14,997

 

 

 

5.33

%

 

 

267,612

 

 

 

14,292

 

 

 

5.34

%

Noninterest-earning assets

 

 

60,601

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

28,109

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22,256

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

727,726

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

309,262

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

289,868

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest-bearing liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Savings accounts

 

$

88,425

 

 

 

878

 

 

 

0.99

%

 

$

24,530

 

 

 

31

 

 

 

0.13

%

 

$

23,987

 

 

 

15

 

 

 

0.06

%

Interest-bearing checking accounts

 

 

70,678

 

 

 

286

 

 

 

0.40

%

 

 

51,406

 

 

 

352

 

 

 

0.69

%

 

 

43,660

 

 

 

274

 

 

 

0.63

%

Money market checking accounts

 

 

112,863

 

 

 

965

 

 

 

0.86

%

 

 

27,568

 

 

 

274

 

 

 

0.99

%

 

 

22,907

 

 

 

107

 

 

 

0.47

%

Certificates of deposit

 

 

154,020

 

 

 

2,623

 

 

 

1.70

%

 

 

94,219

 

 

 

1,629

 

 

 

1.73

%

 

 

85,360

 

 

 

1,024

 

 

 

1.20

%

Total interest-bearing deposits

 

 

425,986

 

 

 

4,752

 

 

 

1.12

%

 

 

197,723

 

 

 

2,286

 

 

 

1.16

%

 

 

175,914

 

 

 

1,420

 

 

 

0.81

%

Federal Home Loan Bank advances

 

 

44,574

 

 

 

569

 

 

 

1.28

%

 

 

1,288

 

 

 

26

 

 

 

2.02

%

 

 

6,921

 

 

 

136

 

 

 

1.97

%

Paycheck Protection Program Liquidity Facility borrowings

 

 

20,324

 

 

 

72

 

 

 

0.35

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other borrowings

 

 

8,184

 

 

 

97

 

 

 

1.18

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total interest-bearing liabilities

 

 

499,068

 

 

 

5,490

 

 

 

1.10

%

 

 

199,011

 

 

 

2,312

 

 

 

1.16

%

 

 

182,835

 

 

 

1,556

 

 

 

0.85

%

Noninterest-bearing liabilities

 

 

150,781

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

33,645

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30,733

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities

 

 

649,849

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

232,656

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

213,568

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total stockholders' equity

 

$

77,877

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

76,606

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

76,300

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total liabilities and retained earnings

 

$

727,726

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

309,262

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

289,868

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest income

 

 

 

 

 

$

25,142

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

12,685

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

12,736

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest rate spread (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.49

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.17

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.49

%

Net interest-earning assets (2)

 

$

168,057

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

82,142

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

84,777

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net interest margin (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.77

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.51

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.76

%

Average interest-earning assets to interest- bearing liabilities

 

 

133.67

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

141.27

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

146.37

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1)

Net interest rate spread represents the difference between the weighted average yield on interest-earning assets and the weighted average rate of interest-bearing liabilities.

(2)

Net interest-earning assets represent total interest-earning assets less total interest-bearing liabilities.

(3)

Net interest margin represents net interest income divided by average total interest-earning assets.

 

 

41


 

 

Rate/Volume Analysis

The following table presents the effects of changing rates and volumes on our net interest income for the years indicated.  The rate column shows the effects attributable to changes in rate (changes in rate multiplied by prior volume).  The volume column shows the effects attributable to changes in volume (changes in volume multiplied by prior rate).  The total column represents the sum of the prior columns.  For purposes of this table, changes attributable to both rate and volume, which cannot be segregated, have been allocated proportionately based on the changes due to rate and the changes due to volume.  

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2020 vs. 2019

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 2019 vs. September 30, 2018

 

 

 

Increase (Decrease)

Due to

 

 

Total

Increase

 

 

Increase (Decrease)

Due to

 

 

Total

Increase

 

 

 

Volume

 

 

Rate

 

 

(Decrease)

 

 

Volume

 

 

Rate

 

 

(Decrease)

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Interest-earning assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loans

 

$

17,501

 

 

$

(1,590

)

 

$

15,911

 

 

$

1,276

 

 

$

(555

)

 

$

721

 

Securities

 

 

95

 

 

 

(50

)

 

 

45

 

 

 

(176

)

 

 

(31

)

 

 

(207

)

Interest-earning deposits and federal funds

 

 

463

 

 

 

(870

)

 

 

(407

)

 

 

(13

)

 

 

214

 

 

 

201

 

Other investments

 

 

95

 

 

 

(9

)

 

 

86

 

 

 

(14

)

 

 

3

 

 

 

(10

)

Total interest-earning assets

 

 

18,154

 

 

 

(2,519

)

 

 

15,635

 

 

 

1,073

 

 

 

(369

)

 

 

705

 

Interest-bearing liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Savings accounts

 

 

239

 

 

 

608

 

 

 

847

 

 

 

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

16

 

Interest-bearing checking accounts

 

 

109

 

 

 

(175

)

 

 

(66

)

 

 

51

 

 

 

27

 

 

 

78

 

Money market checking accounts

 

 

732

 

 

 

(41

)

 

 

691

 

 

 

29

 

 

 

138

 

 

 

167

 

Certificates of deposit

 

 

1,023

 

 

 

(29

)

 

 

994

 

 

 

118

 

 

 

487

 

 

 

605

 

Total deposits

 

 

2,103

 

 

 

363

 

 

 

2,466

 

 

 

198

 

 

 

668

 

 

 

866

 

Federal Home Loan Bank advances

 

 

556

 

 

 

(13

)

 

 

543

 

 

 

(114

)

 

 

4

 

 

 

(110

)

Paycheck Protection Program Liquidity Facility borrowings

 

 

72

 

 

 

 

 

 

72

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other borrowings

 

 

97

 

 

 

 

 

 

97

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total interest-bearing liabilities

 

 

2,828

 

 

 

350

 

 

 

3,178

 

 

 

84

 

 

 

672

 

 

 

756

 

Change in net interest income

 

$

15,326

 

 

$

(2,869

)

 

$

12,457

 

 

$

989

 

 

$

(1,040

)

 

$

(51

)

 

Comparison of Operating Results for the Years Ended December 31, 2020 and 2019

General. Net income increased $2.7 million, or 769.9%, to $3.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to $355,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019.  The increase was due primarily to an increase in interest income on loans, due to our acquisition of ABB and Affinity Bank in January 2020, partially offset by increases in interest expense on deposits and noninterest expenses.  

Interest Income. Interest income increased $15.6 million, or 104.3%, to $30.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 from $15.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2019.  The increase was due primarily to a $15.9 million, or 113.5%, increase in interest income on loans, which represented a significant majority of our interest income and included $4.1 million of interest and fee income on PPP loans.  Our average balance of loans, including PPP loans, increased $333.9 million, or 138.2%, to $575.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 from $241.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2019.  The increase in the average balance of loans resulted primarily from our acquisition of ABB Financial and Affinity Bank in January 2020 and, to a lesser degree, the origination of PPP loans.  Our average yield on loans decreased 60 basis points to 5.20% for the year ended December 31, 2020 from 5.80% for the year ended December 31, 2019, due primarily to a decrease in market interest rates.  

Interest income on securities (excluding Federal Home Loan Bank stock) increased $45,000 to $380,000 for the year ended December 31, 2020 from $335,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019.  Our average balance of securities increased $4.8 million, or 31.6%, to $19.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 from $15.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, due to securities included in the acquisition of ABB Financial and Affinity Bank in January 2020. The average rate earned on securities decreased 30 basis points during 2020, to 1.91% from 2.21%, as a result of continued decreases in market interest rates.  

Interest income on interest-earning deposits decreased $407,000, or 65.8%, to $212,000 for the year ended December 31, 2020 from $619,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019.  The decrease in interest income on interest-earning deposits was due to a 226 basis point decrease in yield, as interest rates dropped significantly in 2020, while our average balance of interest-earning deposits

42


 

increased $45.1 million, or 187.5%, to $69.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 from $24.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, as a result of the acquisition of ABB Financial and Affinity Bank in January 2020.

 

Interest Expense. Interest expense increased $3.2 million, or 137.5%, to $5.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 compared to $2.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, due to increases of $2.5 million in interest expense on deposits and $712,000 in interest expense on borrowings.  Interest expense on certificates of deposit increased $994,000, or 61.0%, to $2.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 from $1.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2019.  The increase in expense on certificates of deposit was a result of a $59.8 million increase in the average balance of certificates of deposit during the year ended December 31, 2020, partially offset by a three basis point decrease in the average rate paid on certificates of deposit.  Interest expense on market rate checking accounts increased $691,000, to $965,000 for the year ended December 31, 2020 from $274,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019.  The average balance of market rate checking accounts increased by $85.3 million during the year ended December 31, 2020, while the average rate we paid on market rate checking accounts decreased by 13 basis points.  Interest expense on statement savings accounts increased by $847,000, to $878,000 for the year ended December 31, 2020 from $31,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019.  The average balance of statement savings accounts increased by $63.9 million during the year ended December 31, 2020 and the average rate we paid on statement savings accounts increased by 86 basis points. These increases in average balances were primarily due to deposits assumed in the acquisition of ABB Financial and Affinity Bank in January 2020. These increases were partially offset by a decrease of $66,000, or 18.8%, in interest expense on interest-bearing checking accounts, to $286,000 for the year ended December 31, 2020 from $352,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019.  The average balance of interest-bearing checking accounts increased by $19.3 million during the year ended December 31, 2020, while the average rate we paid on interest-bearing checking accounts decreased by 29 basis points.

Interest expense on borrowings increased to $738,000 for the year ended December 31, 2020 compared to $26,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019, as the average balance of borrowings increased to $73.1 million for 2020 from $1.3 million for the prior year, primarily as a result of the acquisition of ABB Financial and Affinity Bank in January 2020, Federal Home Loan Bank advances used to fund the acquisition, Federal Reserve Bank borrowings to fund PPP loans, and the $5.0 million loan to the Company during the second quarter of 2020.

Net Interest Income. Net interest income before provision for loan losses increased $12.5 million, or 98.2%, to $25.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 from $12.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2019.  Our average net interest-earning assets increased by $85.9 million, or 104.6%, to $168.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 from $82.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2019, while our net interest rate spread decreased by 68 basis points to 3.49% for the year ended December 31, 2020 from 4.17% for the year ended December 31, 2019, reflecting a 74 basis point decrease in the weighted average yield on interest-earning assets during 2020, compared to a six basis point decrease in the average rate paid on interest-bearing liabilities.  Our net interest margin was 3.77% for the year ended December 31, 2020 compared to 4.51% for the year ended December 31, 2019.

Provision for Loan Losses.  Provisions for loan losses are charged to operations to establish an allowance for loan losses at a level necessary to absorb known and inherent losses in our loan portfolio that are both probable and reasonably estimable at the date of the consolidated financial statements. In evaluating the level of the allowance for loan losses, management analyzes several qualitative loan portfolio risk factors including, but not limited to, management’s ongoing review and grading of loans, facts and issues related to specific loans, historical loan loss and delinquency experience, trends in past due and non-accrual loans, existing risk characteristics of specific loans or loan pools, the fair value of underlying collateral, current economic conditions and other qualitative and quantitative factors which could affect potential credit losses. See “—Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” for additional information.

After an evaluation of these factors, particularly in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, we recorded a provision for loan losses of $2.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to no provision for the year ended December 31, 2019.  Our allowance for loan losses was $6.4 million at December 31, 2020 compared to $4.1 million at December 31, 2019.  The allowance for loan losses to total loans was 1.06% at December 31, 2020 compared to 1.64% at December 31, 2019, while the allowance for loan losses to non-performing loans was 129.79% at December 31, 2020 compared to 161.07% at December 31, 2019.  We had charge-offs of $185,000 and recoveries of $412,000 during the year ended December 31, 2020.  To the best of our knowledge, we have recorded all loan losses that are both probable and reasonable to estimate at December 31, 2020.  However, future changes in the factors described above, including, but not limited to, actual loss experience with respect to our loan portfolio, could result in material increases in our provision for loan losses. In addition, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, as an integral part of its examination process, will periodically review our allowance for loan losses, and as a result of such reviews, we may have to adjust our allowance for loan losses.  However, regulatory agencies are not directly involved in the process of establishing the allowance for loan losses as the process is our responsibility and any increase or decrease in the allowance is the responsibility of management.

43


 

Noninterest Income. Noninterest income increased $511,000, or 31.1%, to $2.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2020 from $1.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2019.  The increase resulted primarily from an increase in service charges on deposit accounts of $437,000, to $1.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to $922,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019, supplemented by an increase in other noninterest income of $266,000 during the year ended December 31, 2020, partially offset by decreases in SBA loan fees and gains on sales of investment securities available-for-sale of $65,000 and $127,000, respectively, for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

Noninterest Expenses. Noninterest expenses information is as follows.

 

 

 

Year Ended

    December 31,

 

 

Change

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Salaries and employee benefits

 

$

$10,969

 

 

$

7,254

 

 

$

3,715

 

 

 

51.2

%

Deferred compensation

 

 

  279

 

 

 

236

 

 

 

  43

 

 

 

18.1

 

Occupancy

 

 

  2,820

 

 

 

1,830

 

 

 

990  

 

 

 

54.1

 

Advertising

 

 

  200

 

 

 

147

 

 

 

53

 

 

 

36.3

 

Data processing

 

 

  2,343

 

 

 

1,577

 

 

 

766  

 

 

 

48.6

 

Other real estate owned

 

 

20  

 

 

 

23

 

 

 

  (3)

 

 

 

(13.0)

    

Net loss on sale of other real estate owned

 

 

289  

 

 

 

(21)

 

 

 

  310

 

 

 

(1,476.2)

 

Legal and accounting

 

 

  1,447

 

 

 

1,213

 

 

 

  234

 

 

 

19.3

 

Organizational dues and subscriptions

 

 

  306

 

 

 

294

 

 

 

  12

 

 

 

4.4

 

Director compensation

 

 

  203

 

 

 

192

 

 

 

  11

 

 

 

5.7

 

Federal deposit insurance premiums

 

 

  401

 

 

 

48

 

 

 

  353

 

 

 

735.6

 

Other

 

 

  2,141

 

 

 

1,211

 

 

 

  930

 

 

 

76.8

 

Total noninterest expenses

 

$

$21,418

 

 

$

14,004

 

 

$

7,414

 

 

 

52.9

%

 

Salaries and employee benefits expense, occupancy expense, advertising expense, federal deposit insurance premiums and other noninterest expense all increased due to our acquisition of ABB Financial and Affinity Bank and the related growth.  Data processing expense decreased due to prior expenditures in connection with our planned core data conversion but did include additional costs associated with the system conversion from our acquisition of ABB Financial and Affinity Bank, while legal and accounting expense increased due to expenses related to our acquisition of ABB Financial and Affinity Bank. 

Income Tax Expense.  We recorded income tax expense of $792,000 for the year ended December 31, 2020 compared to an income tax benefit of $29,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019.  The increase in income tax expense was due to increased income before income taxes in the 2020 period.

Management of Market Risk

General.  Our most significant form of market risk is interest rate risk because, as a financial institution, the majority of our assets and liabilities are sensitive to changes in interest rates.  Therefore, a principal part of our operations is to manage interest rate risk and limit the exposure of our financial condition and results of operations to changes in market interest rates.  Our Asset/Liability Management Committee is responsible for evaluating the interest rate risk inherent in our assets and liabilities, for determining the level of risk that is appropriate, given our business strategy, operating environment, capital, liquidity and performance objectives, and for managing this risk consistent with the policy and guidelines approved by our board of directors.  We currently utilize a third-party modeling program, prepared on a quarterly basis, to evaluate our sensitivity to changing interest rates, given our business strategy, operating environment, capital, liquidity and performance objectives, and for managing this risk consistent with the guidelines approved by the board of directors.

We have sought to manage our interest rate risk in order to minimize the exposure of our earnings and capital to changes in interest rates.  We have implemented the following strategies to manage our interest rate risk:

 

limiting our reliance on non-core/wholesale funding sources;

 

growing our volume of transaction deposit accounts;

44


 

 

 

increasing our investment securities portfolio, with an average maturity of less than 15 years;

 

diversifying our loan portfolio by adding more commercial-related loans, which typically have shorter maturities and/or balloon payments; and

 

continuing to price our one- to four-family residential real estate loan products in a way that encourages borrowers to select our balloon loans as opposed to longer-term, fixed-rate loans.  

By following these strategies, we believe that we are better positioned to react to increases and decreases in market interest rates.  In addition, beginning in calendar 2018, we introduced adjustable-rate, one- to four-family residential real estate loans (in addition to our existing home equity loans and lines of credit, which are originated with adjustable interest rates).

We do not engage in hedging activities, such as engaging in futures, options or swap transactions, or investing in high-risk mortgage derivatives, such as collateralized mortgage obligation residual interests, real estate mortgage investment conduit residual interests or stripped mortgage backed securities.

Net Interest Income.  We analyze our sensitivity to changes in interest rates through a net interest income model.  Net interest income is the difference between the interest income we earn on our interest-earning assets, such as loans and securities, and the interest we pay on our interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowings.  We estimate what our net interest income would be for a 12-month period.  We then calculate what the net interest income would be for the same period under the assumptions that the United States Treasury yield curve increases or decreases instantaneously by 200 and 400 basis point increments, with changes in interest rates representing immediate and permanent, parallel shifts in the yield curve.  A basis point equals one-hundredth of one percent, and 100 basis points equals one percent.  An increase in interest rates from 3% to 4% would mean, for example, a 100 basis point increase in the “Change in Interest Rates” column below.

The table below sets forth, as of December 31, 2020, the calculation of the estimated changes in our net interest income that would result from the designated immediate changes in the United States Treasury yield curve.

 

Change in Interest Rates

(basis points) (1)

 

Net Interest Income

Year 1 Forecast

 

 

Year 1 Change

from Level

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

+400

 

$

21,900

 

 

 

(3.11

)%

+200

 

 

22,355

 

 

 

(1.09

)%

Level

 

 

22,602

 

 

 

-200

 

 

23,316

 

 

 

3.16

%

-400

 

 

22,950

 

 

 

1.54

%

 

(1)

Assumes an immediate uniform change in interest rates at all maturities.

The table above indicates that at December 31, 2020, in the event of an instantaneous parallel 200 basis point increase in interest rates, we would experience a 1.09% decrease in net interest income, and in the event of an instantaneous 200 basis point decrease in interest rates, we would experience a 3.16% increase in net interest income.  At December 31, 2019, in the event of an instantaneous parallel 200 basis point increase in interest rates, we would have experienced a 5.02% increase in net interest income, and in the event of an instantaneous 200 basis point decrease in interest rates, we would have experienced an 8.47% decrease in net interest income.

Net Economic Value.  We also compute amounts by which the net present value of our assets and liabilities (net economic value or “NEV”) would change in the event of a range of assumed changes in market interest rates.  This model uses a discounted cash flow analysis and an option-based pricing approach to measure the interest rate sensitivity of net portfolio value.  The model estimates the economic value of each type of asset, liability and off-balance sheet contract under the assumptions that the United States Treasury yield curve increases or decreases instantaneously by 200 and 400 basis point increments, with changes in interest rates representing immediate and permanent, parallel shifts in the yield curve.

45


 

The table below sets forth, as of December 31, 2020, the calculation of the estimated changes in our NEV that would result from the designated immediate changes in the United States Treasury yield curve.  

 

Change in Interest

 

 

 

 

 

Estimated Increase (Decrease) in NEV

 

 

NEV as a Percentage of Present

Value of Assets (3)

 

Rates (basis

points) (1)

 

Estimated

NEV (2)

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

NEV

Ratio (4)

 

 

Increase (Decrease)

(basis points)

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

+400

 

$

92,398

 

 

$

(8,169

)

 

 

(8.12

)%

 

 

11.42

%

 

 

(14

)

+200

 

 

96,651

 

 

 

(3,916

)

 

 

(3.89

)%

 

 

11.53

%

 

 

(3

)

 

 

100,567

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11.56

%

 

 

-200

 

 

97,210

 

 

 

(3,357

)

 

 

(3.34

)%

 

 

11.10

%

 

 

(46

)

-400

 

 

95,794

 

 

 

(4,773

)

 

 

(4.75

)%

 

 

10.96

%

 

 

(60

)

 

(1)

Assumes an immediate uniform change in interest rates at all maturities.

(2)

NEV is the discounted present value of expected cash flows from assets, liabilities and off-balance sheet contracts.

(3)

Present value of assets represents the discounted present value of incoming cash flows on interest-earning assets.

(4)

NEV Ratio represents NEV divided by the present value of assets.

The table above indicates that at December 31, 2020, in the event of an instantaneous parallel 200 basis point increase in interest rates, we would experience a 3.89% decrease in net economic value, and in the event of an instantaneous 200 basis point decrease in interest rates, we would experience a 3.34% decrease in net economic value.  At December 31, 2019, in the event of an instantaneous parallel 200 basis point increase in interest rates, we would have experienced an 3.02% decrease in net economic value, and in the event of an instantaneous 200 basis point decrease in interest rates, we would have experienced a 4.49% increase in net economic value.  

GAP Analysis.  In addition, we analyze our interest rate sensitivity by monitoring our interest rate sensitivity “gap.” Our interest rate sensitivity gap is the difference between the amount of our interest-earning assets maturing or repricing within a specific time period and the amount of our interest-bearing liabilities maturing or repricing within that same time period.  A gap is considered positive when the amount of interest rate sensitive assets maturing or repricing during a period exceeds the amount of interest rate sensitive liabilities maturing or repricing during the same period, and a gap is considered negative when the amount of interest rate sensitive liabilities maturing or repricing during a period exceeds the amount of interest rate sensitive assets maturing or repricing during the same period.

46


 

The following table sets forth our interest-earning assets and our interest-bearing liabilities at December 31, 2020, which are anticipated to reprice or mature in each of the future time periods shown based upon certain assumptions. The amounts of assets and liabilities shown which reprice or mature during a particular period were determined in accordance with the earlier of term to repricing or the contractual maturity of the asset or liability.  The table sets forth an approximation of the projected repricing of assets and liabilities at December 31, 2020, on the basis of contractual maturities, anticipated prepayments and scheduled rate adjustments. The loan amounts in the table reflect principal balances expected to be redeployed and/or repriced as a result of contractual amortization and as a result of contractual rate adjustments on adjustable-rate loans.   Amounts are based on a preliminary balance sheet as of December 31, 2020, and may not equal amounts included in our audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2020.  However, we believe that there would be no material changes in the results of the gap analysis if audited financial results had been utilized.

 

 

 

Time to Repricing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zero to 90 Days

 

 

Zero to 180 Days

 

 

Zero Days to

One Year

 

 

Zero Days to

Two Years

 

 

Zero Days to

Five Years

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and due from banks

 

$

172,701

 

 

$

172,701

 

 

$

172,701

 

 

$

172,701

 

 

$

172,701

 

 

$

178,253

 

Investments

 

 

16,965

 

 

 

17,667

 

 

 

18,906

 

 

 

20,789

 

 

 

23,592

 

 

 

25,601

 

Net loans

 

 

71,517

 

 

 

100,596

 

 

 

153,092

 

 

 

331,805

 

 

 

490,894

 

 

 

592,238

 

Other assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

54,402

 

Total (1)

 

$

261,183

 

 

$

290,964

 

 

$

344,699

 

 

$

525,295

 

 

$

687,187

 

 

$

850,494

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-maturity deposits

 

$

181,755

 

 

$

202,614

 

 

$

244,334

 

 

$

293,735

 

 

$

421,417

 

 

$

508,845

 

Certificates of deposit

 

 

15,941

 

 

 

42,687

 

 

 

68,717

 

 

 

92,399

 

 

 

124,095

 

 

 

131,668

 

Borrowings

 

 

104,547

 

 

 

104,547

 

 

 

104,547

 

 

 

104,547

 

 

 

104,547

 

 

 

122,547

 

Other liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5,430

 

Equity capital

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

82,004

 

Total (1)

 

$

302,243

 

 

$

349,848

 

 

$

417,598

 

 

$

490,681

 

 

$

650,059

 

 

$

850,494

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asset/liability gap

 

$

(41,060

)

 

$

(58,884

)

 

$

(72,899

)

 

$

34,614

 

 

$

37,128

 

 

 

 

 

Gap/assets ratio (2)

 

 

-4.83

%

 

 

-6.92

%

 

 

-8.57

%

 

 

4.07

%

 

 

4.37

%

 

 

 

 

 

(1)

Amounts do not foot due to rounding.

(2)

Gap/assets ratio equals the asset/liability gap for the period divided by total assets ($850.6 million).

At December 31, 2020, our asset/liability gap from zero days to one year was $(72.9) million, resulting in a gap/assets ratio of -8.57%.

Certain shortcomings are inherent in the methodologies used in the above interest rate risk measurements. Modeling changes require making certain assumptions that may or may not reflect the manner in which actual yields and costs respond to changes in market interest rates. In this regard, the net interest income and net economic value tables presented assume that the composition of our interest-sensitive assets and liabilities existing at the beginning of a period remains constant over the period being measured and assumes that a particular change in interest rates is reflected uniformly across the yield curve regardless of the duration or repricing of specific assets and liabilities. Accordingly, although the net interest income and NEV tables provide an indication of our interest rate risk exposure at a particular point in time, such measurements are not intended to and do not provide a precise forecast of the effect of changes in market interest rates on net interest income and NEV and will differ from actual results.  Furthermore, although certain assets and liabilities may have similar maturities or periods to repricing, they may react in different degrees to changes in market interest rates.  Additionally, certain assets, such as adjustable-rate loans, have features that restrict changes in interest rates both on a short-term basis and over the life of the asset. In the event of changes in interest rates, prepayment and early withdrawal levels would likely deviate significantly from those assumed in calculating the gap table.

Interest rate risk calculations also may not reflect the fair values of financial instruments. For example, decreases in market interest rates can increase the fair values of our loans, deposits and borrowings.

47


 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Liquidity describes our ability to meet the financial obligations that arise in the ordinary course of business.  Liquidity is primarily needed to meet the borrowing and deposit withdrawal requirements of our customers and to fund current and planned expenditures.  Our primary sources of funds are deposits, principal and interest payments on loans and securities, proceeds from the sale of loans, and proceeds from maturities of securities.  We also have the ability to borrow from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta.  At December 31, 2020, we had a $303.8 million line of credit with the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta and had $18.0 million in borrowings outstanding and $16.0 million in letters of credit outstanding, used to collateralize public deposits.  In addition, at December 31, 2020, we had a $5.0 million unsecured federal funds line of credit and a $7.5 million unsecured federal funds line of credit.  No amount was outstanding on these lines of credit at December 31, 2020.  We also have a line of $53.8 million with the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta Discount Window secured by $99.5 million in loans.  No amount was outstanding on the unsecured lines of credit or the Discount Window December 31, 2020.  Under the Federal Reserve Bank’s PPP Liquidity Funding program we have borrowed $100.8 million to fund PPP loans that is secured by the $101.7 million amount of PPP loans.  The Company also has a revolving loan with First National Bankers Bank for $5.0 million.  The loan is secured by the stock of the Company’s wholly owned subsidiary, Affinity Bank. The loan has a ten-year term with a floating interest rate equal to the Wall Street Journal Prime Rate.  The initial interest payment is due September 30, 2020 and the initial principal payment is due June 29, 2021.  There is no prepayment penalty.

While maturities and scheduled amortization of loans and securities are predictable sources of funds, deposit flows and loan prepayments are greatly influenced by general interest rates, economic conditions, and competition. Our most liquid assets are cash and short-term investments including interest-bearing demand deposits. The levels of these assets are dependent on our operating, financing, lending, and investing activities during any given period.

Our cash flows are comprised of three primary classifications: cash flows from operating activities, investing activities, and financing activities.  Net cash provided by operating activities was $1.4 million and $1.6 million for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. Net cash used in investing activities, which consists primarily of disbursements for loan originations and the purchase of investment securities and net cash paid in business combination, offset by principal collections on loans, proceeds from the sale of securities and proceeds from maturing securities and pay downs on securities, was $110.4 million and $1.4 million for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. Net cash provided by financing activities, consisting primarily of activity in deposit accounts and proceeds from the FHLB and PPPLF borrowings, offset by repayment of FHLB borrowings, was $239.1 million and $10.8 million for the years December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

We are committed to maintaining a strong liquidity position.  We monitor our liquidity position on a daily basis.  We anticipate that we will have sufficient funds to meet our current funding commitments.  Based on our deposit retention experience and current pricing strategy, we anticipate that a significant portion of maturing time deposits will be retained.

At December 31, 2020, we exceeded all of our regulatory capital requirements, and we were categorized as well capitalized at December 31, 2020 and 2019.  Management is not aware of any conditions or events since the most recent notification that would change our category.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements and Aggregate Contractual Obligations

Commitments.  As a financial services provider, we routinely are a party to various financial instruments with off-balance-sheet risks, such as commitments to extend credit and unused lines of credit.  While these contractual obligations represent our future cash requirements, a significant portion of commitments to extend credit may expire without being drawn upon.  Such commitments are subject to the same credit policies and approval process accorded to loans we make.  At December 31, 2020, we had outstanding commitments to originate loans of $63.5 million.  We anticipate that we will have sufficient funds available to meet our current lending commitments.  Time deposits that are scheduled to mature in less than one year from December 31, 2020 totaled $68.7 million.  Management expects that a substantial portion of the maturing time deposits will be renewed.  However, if a substantial portion of these deposits is not retained, we may utilize Federal Home Loan Bank advances or raise interest rates on deposits to attract new accounts, which may result in higher levels of interest expense.

Contractual Obligations.  In the ordinary course of our operations, we enter into certain contractual obligations.  Such obligations include data processing services, operating leases for premises and equipment, agreements with respect to borrowed funds and deposit liabilities.

Future Accounting Pronouncements

Please refer to Note 1 to the financial statements included as Item 8 in this Annual Report for a description of future accounting pronouncements that may affect our financial condition and results of operations.  

48


 

Impact of Inflation and Changing Price

The financial statements and related data presented herein have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP, which requires the measurement of financial position and operating results in terms of historical dollars without considering changes in the relative purchasing power of money over time due to inflation.  The primary impact of inflation on our operations is reflected in increased operating costs. Unlike most industrial companies, virtually all of the assets and liabilities of a financial institution are monetary in nature. As a result, interest rates, generally, have a more significant impact on a financial institution’s performance than does inflation. Interest rates do not necessarily move in the same direction or to the same extent as the prices of goods and services.

ITEM 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

For information regarding market risk, see “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”.

 

 

 

49


 

 

ITEM 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

 

F-1


 

      

235 Peachtree Street NE

Suite 1800

Atlanta, GA 30303

404 588 4200

wipfli.com

 

 

 

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Stockholders and the Board of Directors of Affinity Bancshares, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Consolidated Financial Statements

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Affinity Bancshares, Inc. and subsidiary (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, changes in stockholders’ equity and cash flows for the years then ended and the related notes to the consolidated financial statements. In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for the years then ended, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/s/ Wipfli LLP

 

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2004.

 

Atlanta, Georgia

March 31, 2021

 

 

 

 

F-2


 

AFFINITY BANCSHARES, INC.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

 

 

December 31,

2020

 

 

December 31, 2019

 

 

 

(In thousands except share amounts)

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and due from banks, including reserve requirement of $0 and $1,523 at December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively

 

$

5,552

 

 

 

3,965

 

Interest-earning deposits in other depository institutions

 

 

172,701

 

 

 

44,152

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

 

178,253

 

 

 

48,117

 

Investment securities available-for-sale

 

 

24,005

 

 

 

3,818

 

Other investments

 

 

1,596

 

 

 

278

 

Loans, net

 

 

592,254

 

 

 

247,956

 

Other real estate owned

 

 

1,292

 

 

 

140

 

Premises and equipment, net

 

 

8,617

 

 

 

8,513

 

Bank owned life insurance

 

 

15,311

 

 

 

7,462

 

Intangible assets

 

 

18,940

 

 

 

 

Accrued interest receivable and other assets

 

 

10,360

 

 

 

3,010

 

Total assets

 

$

850,628

 

 

 

319,294

 

Liabilities and Stockholders' Equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities :

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Savings accounts

 

$

96,591

 

 

 

22,691

 

Interest-bearing checking

 

 

129,813

 

 

 

47,324

 

Market rate checking

 

 

121,317

 

 

 

33,380

 

Noninterest-bearing checking

 

 

160,819

 

 

 

29,549

 

Certificate of deposits

 

 

131,625

 

 

 

105,237

 

Total deposits

 

 

640,165

 

 

 

238,181

 

Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) advances

 

 

19,117

 

 

 

 

Paycheck Protection Program Liquidity Facility (PPPLF) borrowings

 

 

100,813

 

 

 

 

Other borrowings

 

 

5,000

 

 

 

 

Accrued interest payable and other liabilities

 

 

4,748

 

 

 

3,946

 

Total liabilities

 

 

769,843

 

 

 

242,127

 

Commitments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders' equity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock (par value $0.01 per share, 19,000,000 shares authorized, 7,684,173 issued and 7,570,797 outstanding at December 31, 2020, and 7,671,224 issued and 7,557,848 outstanding at December 31, 2019)

 

 

77

 

 

 

77

 

Preferred stock (1,000,000 shares authorized, no shares outstanding)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional paid in capital

 

 

33,620

 

 

 

33,358

 

Treasury stock, 113,376 shares at December 31, 2020 and 2019, at cost

 

 

(1,268

)

 

 

(1,268

)

Unearned ESOP shares

 

 

(2,453

)

 

 

(2,571

)

Retained earnings

 

 

50,650

 

 

 

47,562

 

Accumulated other comprehensive income

 

 

159

 

 

 

9

 

Total stockholders' equity

 

 

80,785

 

 

 

77,167

 

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity

 

$

850,628

 

 

 

319,294

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

F-3


 

AFFINITY BANCSHARES, INC.

Consolidated Statements of Income

 

 

 

For the Year Ended December 31,

 

 

For the Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

 

(In thousands except per share amounts)

 

Interest income:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loans, including fees

 

$

29,933

 

 

 

14,022

 

Investment securities, including dividends

 

 

487

 

 

 

356

 

Interest-earning deposits

 

 

212

 

 

 

619

 

Total interest income

 

 

30,632

 

 

 

14,997

 

Interest expense:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deposits

 

 

4,752

 

 

 

2,286

 

Borrowings

 

 

738

 

 

 

26

 

Total interest expense

 

 

5,490

 

 

 

2,312

 

Net interest income before provision for loan losses

 

 

25,142

 

 

 

12,685

 

Provision for loan losses

 

 

2,000

 

 

 

 

Net interest income after provision for loan losses

 

 

23,142

 

 

 

12,685

 

Noninterest income:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Service charges on deposit accounts

 

 

1,359

 

 

 

922

 

Small Business Administration (SBA) loan fees

 

 

 

 

 

65

 

Gain on sales of investment securities available-for-sale

 

 

20

 

 

 

147

 

Other

 

 

777

 

 

 

511

 

Total noninterest income

 

 

2,156

 

 

 

1,645

 

Noninterest expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salaries and employee benefits

 

 

10,969

 

 

 

7,254

 

Deferred compensation

 

 

279

 

 

 

236

 

Occupancy

 

 

2,820

 

 

 

1,830

 

Advertising

 

 

200

 

 

 

147

 

Data processing

 

 

2,343

 

 

 

1,577

 

Other real estate owned

 

 

20

 

 

 

23

 

Net loss (gain) on sale and write-down of other real estate owned

 

 

289

 

 

 

(21

)

Legal and accounting

 

 

1,447

 

 

 

1,213

 

Organizational dues and subscriptions

 

 

306

 

 

 

294

 

Director compensation

 

 

203

 

 

 

192

 

Federal deposit insurance premiums

 

 

401

 

 

 

48

 

Other

 

 

2,141

 

 

 

1,211

 

Total noninterest expenses

 

 

21,418

 

 

 

14,004

 

Income before income taxes

 

 

3,880

 

 

 

326

 

Income tax expense (benefit)

 

 

792

 

 

 

(29

)

Net income

 

$

3,088

 

 

 

355

 

Basic and diluted earnings per share

 

$

0.41

 

 

$

0.05

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

F-4


 

AFFINITY BANCSHARES, INC.

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income

 

 

 

For the Year Ended December 31,

 

 

For the Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

Net income

 

$

3,088

 

 

$

355

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other comprehensive income (loss):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net unrealized gain on available-for-sale securities, net of taxes of $57 and $196

 

 

165

 

 

 

559

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      Reclassification adjustment for gain included in net income, net of taxes of $(5) and $(38)

 

 

(15

)

 

 

(109

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total other comprehensive income

 

 

150

 

 

 

450

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total comprehensive income

 

$

3,238

 

 

$

805

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

F-5


 

AFFINITY BANCSHARES, INC.

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other

 

 

 

 

Common

 

Paid In

 

Treasury

 

Unearned

 

Retained

 

Comprehensive

 

 

 

 

Stock

 

Capital

 

Stock

 

ESOP Shares

 

Earnings

 

Income (Loss)

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning balance December 31, 2018

 

$

75

 

 

$

33,078

 

 

$

(668

)

 

$

(2,689

)

 

$

47,043

 

 

$

(441

)

 

$

76,398

 

Issuance of restricted stock awards

 

 

2

 

 

 

177

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

179

 

ESOP loan payment and

   release of ESOP shares

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

118

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

122

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

 

 

 

99

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

99

 

Purchase of treasury stock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(600

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(600

)

Change in unrealized gain

   on investment securities

   available-for-sale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

450

 

 

 

450

 

ASC 606 adoption adjustment, net of tax ($57)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

164

 

 

 

 

 

 

164

 

Net income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

355

 

 

 

 

 

 

355

 

Ending balance December 31, 2019

 

$

77

 

 

$

33,358

 

 

$

(1,268

)

 

$

(2,571

)

 

$

47,562

 

 

$

9

 

 

$

77,167

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning balance December 31, 2019

 

$

77

 

 

$

33,358

 

 

$

(1,268

)

 

$

(2,571

)

 

$

47,562

 

 

$

9

 

 

$

77,167

 

Issuance of restricted stock awards

 

 

1

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

 

ESOP loan payment and

   release of ESOP shares

 

 

(1

)

 

 

(35

)

 

 

 

 

 

118

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

82

 

Stock-based compensation

 

 

 

 

 

281

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

281

 

Change in unrealized gain

   on investment securities

   available-for-sale

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

150

 

 

 

150

 

Net income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,088

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,088

 

Ending balance December 31, 2020

 

$

77

 

 

$

33,620

 

 

$

(1,268

)

 

$

(2,453

)

 

$

50,650