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CDE Coeur Mining

Filed: 27 Oct 21, 5:03pm

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20549
___________________________________________ 
FORM 10-Q
___________________________________________
Quarterly Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2021
OR
Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the transition period from             to             
Commission file number 001-08641
____________________________________________
 cde-20210930_g1.jpg
COEUR MINING, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
____________________________________________
Delaware82-0109423
 (State or other jurisdiction of
    incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
104 S. Michigan Ave.
Suite 900Chicago,Illinois60603
(Address of principal executive offices)(Zip Code)
(312) 489-5800
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each classTrading Symbol(s)Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock (par value $.01 per share)CDENew York Stock Exchange
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days:    Yes      No  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files.)    Yes      No  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filerAccelerated filer
Non-accelerated filerSmaller reporting company
Emerging growth company



If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes      No  
The Company has 300,000,000 shares of common stock, par value of $0.01, authorized of which 256,953,858 shares were issued and outstanding as of October 25, 2021.



COEUR MINING, INC.
INDEX
 Page
Part I.Financial Information
Item 1. Financial Statements
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets (Unaudited)
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss) (Unaudited)
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (Unaudited)
Condensed Consolidated Statement of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity (Unaudited)
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Consolidated Financial Results
Results of Operations
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Non-GAAP Financial Performance Measures
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
Item 4. Controls and Procedures
Part II.Other Information
Item 1. Legal Proceedings
Item 1A. Risk Factors
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Item 5. Other Information
Item 6. Exhibits
Signatures


3


PART I

Item 1.        Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

COEUR MINING, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (UNAUDITED)
September 30, 2021December 31, 2020
ASSETSNotesIn thousands, except share data
CURRENT ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents$85,020 $92,794 
Receivables422,956 23,484 
Inventory552,334 51,210 
Ore on leach pads574,803 74,866 
Prepaid expenses and other17,846 27,254 
Assets held for sale1954,478 — 
307,437 269,608 
NON-CURRENT ASSETS
Property, plant and equipment, net298,006 230,139 
Mining properties, net783,097 716,790 
Ore on leach pads578,302 81,963 
Restricted assets9,160 9,492 
Equity securities6139,740 12,943 
Receivables4, 17— 26,447 
Other58,291 56,595 
TOTAL ASSETS$1,674,033 $1,403,977 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
CURRENT LIABILITIES
Accounts payable$119,583 $90,577 
Accrued liabilities and other1877,790 119,158 
Debt7,831,384 22,074 
Reclamation92,299 2,299 
Liabilities held for sale1911,477 — 
242,533 234,108 
NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES
Debt7,8411,042 253,427 
Reclamation9142,456 136,975 
Deferred tax liabilities22,280 34,202 
Other long-term liabilities41,983 51,786 
617,761 476,390 
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES17
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Common stock, par value $0.01 per share; authorized 300,000,000 shares, 256,928,852 issued and outstanding at September 30, 2021 and 243,751,283 at December 31, 20202,569 2,438 
Additional paid-in capital3,734,948 3,610,297 
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)4,904 (11,136)
Accumulated deficit(2,928,682)(2,908,120)
813,739 693,479 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY$1,674,033 $1,403,977 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.
4


COEUR MINING, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS) (UNAUDITED)
 Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
 2021202020212020
 NotesIn thousands, except share data
Revenue3$207,969 $229,728 $624,944 $557,144 
COSTS AND EXPENSES
Costs applicable to sales(1)
3134,340 112,772 375,082 321,704 
Amortization30,962 32,216 92,872 96,254 
General and administrative8,743 7,757 30,764 25,293 
Exploration15,391 12,818 37,503 31,059 
Pre-development, reclamation, and other10,506 15,031 36,956 40,261 
Total costs and expenses199,942 180,594 573,177 514,571 
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE), NET
Loss on debt extinguishment8— — (9,173)— 
Fair value adjustments, net12(26,440)2,243 7,000 3,491 
Interest expense, net of capitalized interest8(3,237)(5,096)(13,240)(15,989)
Other, net14(26,718)(6,312)(22,390)(4,310)
Total other income (expense), net(56,395)(9,165)(37,803)(16,808)
Income (loss) before income and mining taxes(48,368)39,969 13,964 25,765 
Income and mining tax (expense) benefit10(6,400)(13,113)(34,526)(12,018)
NET INCOME (LOSS)$(54,768)$26,856 $(20,562)$13,747 
OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS):
Change in fair value of derivative contracts designated as cash flow hedges1,349 (21,248)25,723 (28,139)
Reclassification adjustments for realized (gain) loss on cash flow hedges(3,902)2,642 (9,683)1,963 
Other comprehensive income (loss)(2,553)(18,606)16,040 (26,176)
COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)$(57,321)$8,250 $(4,522)$(12,429)
NET INCOME (LOSS) PER SHARE15
Basic$(0.21)$0.11 $(0.08)$0.06 
Diluted$(0.21)$0.11 $(0.08)$0.06 
(1) Excludes amortization.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.
5


COEUR MINING, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (UNAUDITED)
 Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
 2021202020212020
 NotesIn thousands
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
Net income (loss)$(54,768)$26,856 $(20,562)$13,747 
Adjustments:
Amortization30,962 32,216 92,872 96,254 
Accretion3,028 2,969 8,898 8,724 
Deferred taxes(5,964)(4,515)(740)(11,547)
Loss on debt extinguishment8— — 9,173 — 
Fair value adjustments, net1226,440 (2,243)(7,000)(3,491)
Stock-based compensation112,671 1,969 10,183 6,269 
Gain on modification of right of use lease— — — (4,051)
Write-downs31,249 1,232 31,249 16,821 
Deferred revenue recognition17(307)(5,485)(15,908)(21,167)
Other1,493 4,379 (339)2,374 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
Receivables(944)(1,497)1,016 (3,846)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets(80)(1,921)593 (1,186)
Inventory and ore on leach pads(3,820)(3,066)(18,047)(33,047)
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities(8,114)28,570 (15,842)15,566 
CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) OPERATING ACTIVITIES21,846 79,464 75,546 81,420 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
Capital expenditures(71,266)(22,996)(208,913)(61,886)
Proceeds from the sale of assets61 730 5,617 5,245 
Purchase of investments(1,079)(2,500)(1,955)(2,500)
Sale of investments— — 935 19,802 
Other(12)(25)(42)(225)
CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) INVESTING ACTIVITIES(72,296)(24,791)(204,358)(39,564)
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
Issuance of notes and bank borrowings, net of issuance costs820,000 — 387,493 150,000 
Payments on debt, finance leases, and associated costs7, 8(7,944)(48,557)(261,522)(150,171)
Silvertip contingent consideration17— — — (18,750)
Other(20)114 (4,178)(1,718)
CASH PROVIDED BY (USED IN) FINANCING ACTIVITIES12,036 (48,443)121,793 (20,639)
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents(253)(10)(360)293 
INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS AND RESTRICTED CASH(38,667)6,220 (7,379)21,510 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at beginning of period125,458 72,308 94,170 57,018 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at end of period$86,791 $78,528 $86,791 $78,528 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.
6


COEUR MINING, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (UNAUDITED)
In thousandsCommon
Stock
Shares
Common
Stock Par
Value
Additional
Paid-In Capital
Accumulated
Deficit
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
Total
Balances at December 31, 2020243,752 $2,438 $3,610,297 $(2,908,120)$(11,136)$693,479 
Net income (loss)— — — 2,060 — 2,060 
Other comprehensive income (loss)— — — — 24,636 24,636 
Common stock issued/canceled under long-term incentive plans and director fees and options, net(282)(3)334 — — 331 
Balances at March 31, 2021243,470 $2,435 $3,610,631 $(2,906,060)$13,500 $720,506 
Net income (loss)— — — 32,146 — 32,146 
Other comprehensive income (loss)— — — — (6,043)(6,043)
Common stock issued for investment12,786 128 118,649 118,777 
Common stock issued/canceled under long-term incentive plans and director fees and options, net792 3,016 — — 3,023 
Balances at June 30, 2021257,048 $2,570 $3,732,296 $(2,873,914)$7,457 $868,409 
Net income (loss)— — — (54,768)— (54,768)
Other comprehensive income (loss)— — — — (2,553)(2,553)
Common stock issued/canceled under long-term incentive plans and director fees and options, net(119)(1)2,652 — — 2,651 
Balances at September 30, 2021256,929 $2,569 $3,734,948 $(2,928,682)$4,904 $813,739 

In thousandsCommon
Stock
Shares
Common
Stock Par
Value
Additional
Paid-In Capital
Accumulated
Deficit
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
Total
Balances at December 31, 2019241,529 $2,415 $3,598,472 $(2,933,747)$(136)$667,004 
Net income (loss)— — — (11,900)— (11,900)
Other comprehensive income (loss)— — — — 206 206 
Common stock issued for Silvertip contingent consideration payment878 5,286 — — 5,295 
Common stock issued/canceled under long-term incentive plans and director fees and options, net1,179 12 27 — — 39 
Balances at March 31, 2020243,586 $2,436 $3,603,785 $(2,945,647)$70 $660,644 
Net income (loss)— — — (1,209)— (1,209)
Other comprehensive income (loss)— — — — (7,776)(7,776)
Common stock issued/canceled under long-term incentive plans and director fees and options, net146 2,197 — — 2,198 
Balances at June 30, 2020243,732 $2,437 $3,605,982 $(2,946,856)$(7,706)$653,857 
Net income (loss)— — — 26,856 — 26,856 
Other comprehensive income (loss)— — — — (18,606)(18,606)
Common stock issued/canceled under long-term incentive plans and director fees and options, net13 — 2,120 — — 2,120 
Balances at September 30, 2020243,745 $2,437 $3,608,102 $(2,920,000)$(26,312)$664,227 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.
7

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements


NOTE 1 - BASIS OF PRESENTATION
The interim condensed consolidated financial statements of Coeur Mining, Inc. and its subsidiaries (collectively, “Coeur” or the “Company”) are unaudited. In the opinion of management, all adjustments and disclosures necessary for the fair presentation of these interim statements have been included. The results reported in these interim statements may not be indicative of the results which will be reported for the year ending December 31, 2021. The condensed consolidated December 31, 2020 balance sheet data was derived from audited consolidated financial statements. Accordingly, these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020 (the “2020 10-K”).

NOTE 2 - SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Significant Accounting Policies
Please see Note 2 -- Summary of Significant Accounting Policies contained in the 2020 10-K.
Use of Estimates
The Company's Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with United States Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. The preparation of the Company's Consolidated Financial Statements requires the Company to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the Consolidated Financial Statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. The more significant areas requiring the use of management estimates and assumptions relate to metal prices and mineral reserves that are the basis for future cash flow estimates utilized in impairment calculations and units-of production amortization calculations, environmental, reclamation and closure obligations, estimates of recoverable silver and gold in leach pad inventories, estimates of fair value for certain reporting units and asset impairments, valuation allowances for deferred tax assets, and the fair value and accounting treatment of financial instruments, equity securities, asset acquisitions, the allocation of fair value to assets and liabilities assumed in connection with business combinations, and derivative instruments. The Company bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Accordingly, actual results will differ from the amounts estimated in these financial statements.
Ore on Leach Pads
The heap leach process extracts silver and gold by placing ore on an impermeable pad and applying a diluted cyanide solution that dissolves a portion of the contained silver and gold, which are then recovered in metallurgical processes.
The Company uses several integrated steps to scientifically measure the metal content of ore placed on the leach pads. As the ore body is drilled in preparation for the blasting process, samples are taken of the drill residue which are assayed to determine estimated quantities of contained metal. The Company then processes the ore through crushing facilities where the output is again weighed and sampled for assaying. A metallurgical reconciliation with the data collected from the mining operation is completed with appropriate adjustments made to previous estimates. The crushed ore is then transported to the leach pad for application of the leaching solution. As the leach solution is collected from the leach pads, it is continuously sampled for assaying. The quantity of leach solution is measured by flow meters throughout the leaching and precipitation process. After precipitation, the product is converted to doré at the Rochester mine and a form of gold concentrate at the Wharf mine, representing the final product produced by each mine. The inventory is stated at lower of cost or net realizable value, with cost being determined using a weighted average cost method.
The historical cost of metal expected to be extracted within 12 months is classified as current and the historical cost of metals contained within the broken ore expected to be extracted beyond 12 months is classified as non-current. Ore on leach pads is valued based on actual production costs incurred to produce and place ore on the leach pad, less costs allocated to minerals recovered through the leach process.
The estimate of both the ultimate recovery expected over time and the quantity of metal that may be extracted relative to the time the leach process occurs requires the use of estimates, which are inherently inaccurate due to the nature of the leaching process. The quantities of metal contained in the ore are based upon actual weights and assay analysis. The rate at which the leach process extracts gold and silver from the crushed ore is based upon laboratory testing and actual experience of more than 20 years of leach pad operations at the Rochester mine and 30 years of leach pad operations at the Wharf mine. The assumptions used by the Company to measure metal content during each stage of the inventory conversion process includes estimated recovery rates based on laboratory testing and assaying. The Company periodically reviews its estimates compared to actual experience and revises its estimates when appropriate. The ultimate recovery will not be known until leaching operations cease. Variations between actual and estimated quantities resulting from changes in assumptions and estimates that do not result in write-downs to net realizable value are accounted for on a prospective basis. In June 2021, the Company updated the
8

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

recovery rate assumption on the Stage IV leach pad at Rochester, based on the historical performance of the leach pad since the third quarter of 2019. This change resulted in an adjustment to the ending ore on leach pads balance with the resulting non-cash charges allocated between Costs Applicable to Sales and Amortization in the amounts of $8.6 million and $2.2 million, respectively.
Revenue Recognition
The Company’s gold stream agreement with a subsidiary of Franco-Nevada Corporation (“Franco-Nevada”) provided for a $22.0 million deposit paid by Franco-Nevada in exchange for the right and obligation, commencing in 2016, to purchase 50% of a portion of Palmarejo gold production at the lesser of $800 or market price per ounce. Because there is no minimum obligation associated with the deposit, it is not considered financing, and each shipment is considered to be a separate performance obligation. The streaming agreement represents a contract liability under ASC 606, which requires the Company to ratably recognize a portion of the deposit as revenue for each gold ounce delivered to Franco-Nevada. The remaining unamortized balance is included in Accrued liabilities and other and Other long-term liabilities on the Consolidated Balance Sheet. See Note 17 -- Commitments and Contingencies for additional detail.
The following table presents a rollforward of the Franco-Nevada contract liability balance:
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
In thousands2021202020212020
Opening Balance$8,775 $10,389 $9,376 $11,061 
Revenue Recognized(307)(393)(908)(1,065)
Closing Balance$8,468 $9,996 $8,468 $9,996 
In December 2020, the Company received a $15.0 million prepayment (the “December 2020 Prepayment”) for deliveries of gold concentrate from the Kensington mine pursuant to the Amended Sales Contract (as defined in Note 17). In the first half of 2021, the Kensington mine delivered $15.0 million of gold concentrate to the counterparty in satisfaction of this prepayment obligation. The Amended Sales Contract was further amended in July 2021, with an effective date as of June 28, 2021, to include options for Coeur to receive up to two additional prepayments of up to $15.0 million each for deliveries of gold concentrate from the Kensington mine, and Coeur exercised the option to receive the first $15.0 million prepayment in June 2021 (the “June 2021 Prepayment”), of which $7.5 million in gold ounces were delivered in the third quarter of 2021. The Amended Sales Contract represents a contract liability under ASC 606, which requires the Company to recognize ratably a portion of the deposit as revenue for each gold ounce delivered to the customer. The remaining contract liability is included in Accrued liabilities and other on the Consolidated Balance Sheet. See Note 17 -- Commitments and Contingencies for additional detail.
The following table presents a rollforward of the Amended Sales Contract liability balance:
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
In thousands2021202020212020
Opening Balance$15,004 $15,006 $15,003 $15,010 
Additions95 108 — 15,096 15,114 
Revenue Recognized(7,500)(5,200)(22,500)(20,210)
Closing Balance$7,599 $9,914 $7,599 $9,914 
Recently Adopted Accounting Standards
In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12, “Income Taxes - Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes (Topic 740)” which is intended to simplify various aspects related to accounting for income taxes. ASU 2019-12 removes certain exceptions to the general principles in Topic 740 and also clarifies and amends existing guidance to improve consistent application. ASU 2019-12 will be effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2020 (January 1, 2021 for the Company). Early adoption is permitted. The adoption of the new standard did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated net income, financial position or cash flows.

9

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

NOTE 3 – SEGMENT REPORTING
The Company’s operating segments include the Palmarejo, Rochester, Kensington, Wharf and Silvertip mines. Except for the Silvertip mine, all operating segments are engaged in the discovery, mining, and production of gold and/or silver. The Silvertip mine, which temporarily suspended mining and processing activities in February 2020, is engaged in the discovery, mining, and production of silver, zinc and lead. Other includes the Sterling/Crown and La Preciosa projects, other mineral interests, strategic equity investments, corporate office, elimination of intersegment transactions, and other items necessary to reconcile to consolidated amounts.
In June 2021, Silvertip repurchased from Silvertip Resources Investment Cayman Ltd. a net smelter returns royalty of 1.429% on the first 1,434,000 metric tonnes of mineralized material mined, and 1.00% thereafter for consideration of $7.0 million .
The 2019 novel strain of coronavirus causing a contagious respiratory disease known as COVID-19, which was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization on March 11, 2020, poses a material risk to Coeur’s business and operations and the Company expects costs associated with its COVID-19 mitigation and response efforts at each of its operations to continue.
Incremental costs associated with the Company’s COVID-19 health and safety protocols are recorded in Pre-development, reclamation, and other expenses in our Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income (Loss) and are included in Other operating expenses in the table below. Because of the highly uncertain and dynamic nature of events relating to the COVID-19 pandemic, it is not currently possible to estimate the impact of the pandemic on the Company’s operating segments. However, these effects could have a material impact on our operations, and Coeur will continue to monitor the COVID-19 situation closely.
Financial information relating to the Company’s segments is as follows (in thousands):
Three Months Ended September 30, 2021PalmarejoRochesterKensingtonWharfSilvertipOtherTotal
Revenue
Gold sales$33,237 $9,923 $51,881 $52,689 $— $— $147,730 
Silver sales41,410 18,402 — 427 — — 60,239 
Metal sales74,647 28,325 51,881 53,116 — — 207,969 
Costs and Expenses
Costs applicable to sales(1)
39,016 31,669 34,576 29,079 — — 134,340 
Amortization8,747 4,671 12,786 3,158 1,258 342 30,962 
Exploration2,777 2,394 2,681 — 4,592 2,947 15,391 
Other operating expenses855 1,433 515 539 6,090 9,817 19,249 
Other income (expense)
Fair value adjustments, net— — — — — (26,440)(26,440)
Interest expense, net(135)(149)(194)(39)396 (3,116)(3,237)
Other, net(3)
(26,868)(99)(62)460 (124)(25)(26,718)
Income and mining tax (expense) benefit(10,702)1,108 (65)(2,014)— 5,273 (6,400)
Net Income (loss)$(14,453)$(10,982)$1,002 $18,747 $(11,668)$(37,414)$(54,768)
Segment assets(2)
$285,277 $496,940 $149,774 $73,019 $209,498 $112,836 $1,327,344 
Capital expenditures$8,506 $40,056 $6,272 $1,045 $15,099 $288 $71,266 
(1) Excludes amortization
(2) Segment assets include receivables, prepaids, inventories, property, plant and equipment, and mineral interests
(3) See Note 14 -- Additional Comprehensive Income (Loss) Detail for additional detail

10

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Three months ended September 30, 2020PalmarejoRochesterKensingtonWharfSilvertipOtherTotal
Revenue
Gold sales$39,416 $12,860 $52,357 $62,499 $— $— $167,132 
Silver sales42,339 19,250 — 1,007 — — 62,596 
Zinc sales— — — — — — — 
Lead sales— — — — — — — 
Metal sales81,755 32,110 52,357 63,506 — — 229,728 
Costs and Expenses
Costs applicable to sales(1)
34,251 19,104 31,530 27,887 — — 112,772 
Amortization11,912 3,278 11,523 4,000 1,185 318 32,216 
Exploration1,978 465 3,397 534 3,920 2,524 12,818 
Other operating expenses2,378 1,376 3,448 127 5,916 9,543 22,788 
Other income (expense)
Fair value adjustments, net— — — — — 2,243 2,243 
Interest expense, net(201)(283)(296)(48)(124)(4,144)(5,096)
Other, net(3)
(1,168)(2,502)(34)451 (3,066)(6,312)
Income and mining tax (expense) benefit(6,841)(143)(380)(2,630)21 (3,140)(13,113)
Income (loss) from continuing operations$23,026 $4,959 $1,749 $28,287 $(10,673)$(20,492)$26,856 
Segment assets(2)
$302,599 $325,165 $177,700 $76,247 $155,932 $170,208 $1,207,851 
Capital expenditures$4,998 $9,773 $5,333 $545 $2,065 $282 $22,996 
(1) Excludes amortization
(2) Segment assets include receivables, prepaids, inventories, property, plant and equipment, and mineral interests
(3) See Note 14 -- Additional Comprehensive Income (Loss) Detail for additional detail

Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021PalmarejoRochesterKensingtonWharfSilvertipOtherTotal
Revenue
Gold sales$112,036 $36,389 $155,154 $128,631 $— $— $432,210 
Silver sales127,990 62,778 — 1,966 — — 192,734 
Metal sales240,026 99,167 155,154 130,597 — — 624,944 
Costs and Expenses
Costs applicable to sales(1)
114,922 93,733 95,173 71,254 — — 375,082 
Amortization26,077 14,754 38,941 8,627 3,529 944 92,872 
Exploration6,304 3,802 5,095 143 11,119 11,040 37,503 
Other operating expenses3,578 4,325 5,783 1,249 18,609 34,176 67,720 
Other income (expense)
Loss on debt extinguishment— — — — — (9,173)(9,173)
Fair value adjustments, net— — — — — 7,000 7,000 
Interest expense, net(471)(851)(568)(122)622 (11,850)(13,240)
Other, net(3)
(27,904)(252)(104)1,112 (463)5,221 (22,390)
Income and mining tax (expense) benefit(29,601)937 (1,106)(4,437)— (319)(34,526)
Net Income (loss)$31,169 $(17,613)$8,384 $45,877 $(33,098)$(55,281)$(20,562)
Segment assets(2)
$285,277 $496,940 $149,774 $73,019 $209,498 $112,836 $1,327,344 
Capital expenditures$28,284 $112,505 $19,519 $3,928 $44,011 $666 $208,913 
(1) Excludes amortization
(2) Segment assets include receivables, prepaids, inventories, property, plant and equipment, and mineral interests
(3) See Note 14 -- Additional Comprehensive Income (Loss) Detail for additional detail

11

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Nine months ended September 30, 2020PalmarejoRochesterKensingtonWharfSilvertipOtherTotal
Revenue
Gold sales$104,732 $30,508 $159,200 $128,199 $— $— $422,639 
Silver sales89,332 41,650 — 1,640 1,230 — 133,852 
Zinc sales— — — — (662)— (662)
Lead sales— — — — 1,315 — 1,315 
Metal sales194,064 72,158 159,200 129,839 1,883 — 557,144 
Costs and Expenses
Costs applicable to sales(1)
89,050 54,396 92,419 68,182 17,657 — 321,704 
Amortization32,357 9,194 36,298 9,625 7,761 1,019 96,254 
Exploration4,373 2,529 7,746 639 7,073 8,699 31,059 
Other operating expenses6,279 3,835 7,298 451 17,770 29,921 65,554 
Other income (expense)
Fair value adjustments, net— — — — — 3,491 3,491 
Interest expense, net(667)(851)(819)(149)(603)(12,900)(15,989)
Other, net(3)
(2,866)(2,580)(12)2,005 (858)(4,310)
Income and mining tax (expense) benefit(7,938)(186)(854)(4,806)(234)2,000 (12,018)
Income (loss) from continuing operations$50,534 $(1,413)$13,767 $45,975 $(47,210)$(47,906)$13,747 
Segment assets(2)
$302,599 $325,165 $177,700 $76,247 $155,932 $170,208 $1,207,851 
Capital expenditures$16,611 $20,634 $14,050 $1,219 $8,630 $742 $61,886 
(1) Excludes amortization
(2) Segment assets include receivables, prepaids, inventories, property, plant and equipment, and mineral interests
(3) See Note 14 -- Additional Comprehensive Income (Loss) Detail for additional detail


AssetsSeptember 30, 2021December 31, 2020
Total assets for reportable segments$1,327,344 $1,232,153 
Cash and cash equivalents85,020 92,794 
Other assets261,669 79,030 
Total consolidated assets$1,674,033 $1,403,977 

Geographic Information
Long-Lived AssetsSeptember 30, 2021December 31, 2020
United States$633,241 $503,818 
Mexico245,482 293,436 
Canada202,253 149,018 
Other127 657 
Total$1,081,103 $946,929 
RevenueThree months ended September 30,Nine months ended September 30,
2021202020212020
United States$133,322 $147,973 $384,918 $361,197 
Mexico74,647 81,755 240,026 194,064 
Canada— — — 1,883 
Total207,969 $229,728 $624,944 $557,144 

12

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

NOTE 4 – RECEIVABLES
    Receivables consist of the following:
In thousandsSeptember 30, 2021December 31, 2020
Current receivables:
Trade receivables$4,425 $3,293 
VAT receivable17,365 17,080 
Income tax receivable216 530 
Other950 2,581 
$22,956 $23,484 
Non-current receivables:
VAT receivable(1)
$— $26,447 
Total receivables$22,956 $49,931 
(1) Represents VAT that was paid to the Mexican government associated with Coeur Mexicana’s prior royalty agreement with a subsidiary of Franco-Nevada Corporation. While the Company continues to pursue recovery from the Mexican government (including through ongoing litigation and potential international arbitration), the Company wrote down the carrying value of the receivable at September 30, 2021. See Note 17 -- Commitments and Contingencies for additional detail.

NOTE 5 – INVENTORY AND ORE ON LEACH PADS
    Inventory consists of the following:
In thousandsSeptember 30, 2021December 31, 2020
Inventory:
Concentrate$2,740 $2,909 
Precious metals11,762 14,788 
Supplies37,832 33,513 
$52,334 $51,210 
Ore on Leach Pads:
Current$74,803 $74,866 
Non-current78,302 81,963 
$153,105 $156,829 
Long-term Stockpile (included in Other)
$16,636 $5,664 
Total Inventory and Ore on Leach Pads$222,075 $213,703 
    
Coeur reports the carrying value of metal and leach pad inventory at the lower of cost or net realizable value, with cost being determined using a weighted average cost method. At the end of the third quarter of 2021, the cost of metal and leach pad inventory at Rochester exceeded its net realizable value which resulted in a non-cash write down of $6.0 million (approximately $5.3 million was recognized in Costs Applicable to Sales and $0.7 million in Amortization).

13

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

NOTE 6 – INVESTMENTS
Equity Securities
    The Company makes strategic investments in equity securities of silver and gold exploration, development and royalty and streaming companies.
At September 30, 2021
In thousandsCostGross
Unrealized
Losses
Gross
Unrealized
Gains
Estimated
Fair Value
Equity Securities
Victoria Gold Corp.$128,710 $— $2,522 131,232 
Integra Resources Corp.9,455 (949)— 8,506 
Other— — 
Equity securities$138,167 $(949)$2,522 $139,740 
At December 31, 2020
In thousandsCostGross
Unrealized
Losses
Gross
Unrealized
Gains
Estimated
Fair Value
Equity Securities
Metalla Royalty & Streaming Ltd.$166 $— $875 $1,041 
Integra Resources Corp.7,500 — 4,401 11,901 
Other(1)— 
Equity securities$7,668 $(1)$5,276 $12,943 
Changes in the fair value of the Company’s investment in equity securities are recognized each period in the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income (Loss) in Fair value adjustments, net. See Note 12 -- Fair Value Measurements for additional details.
On January 4, 2021, the Company completed the sale of 83,556 shares of common stock of Metalla Royalty & Streaming Ltd. (“Metalla”) (“Metalla Common Shares”) at an average price (net of commission) of $11.19 per Metalla Common Share for net proceeds of $0.9 million, resulting in a realized gain of $0.8 million.
On May 10, 2021, the Company entered into a Share Exchange Agreement (the “Exchange Agreement”) with Orion Co-VI Ltd. (“Orion”). Pursuant to the Exchange Agreement, Orion sold 11,067,714 common shares of Victoria Gold Corp., a British Columbia company (“Victoria”) (representing approximately 17.8% of Victoria’s outstanding common shares) to the Company. As consideration for the purchase of Victoria shares, Coeur issued 12,785,485 shares of its common stock (approximately 4.9% of issued and outstanding shares) to Orion.
The Exchange Agreement provides that Orion may be entitled to additional Coeur shares in the event Coeur acquires Victoria in the future for a higher per share consideration, subject to the terms and conditions of the Exchange Agreement. The Company determined that the potential for additional share consideration pursuant to the terms of the Exchange Agreement represents an embedded derivative that requires bifurcation. The obligation to deliver additional Coeur shares pursuant to the Exchange Agreement expires on October 31, 2021. The accounting treatment of derivative financial instruments requires that the Company record the fair value of the embedded derivative as of the inception date of the Exchange Agreement and adjust the fair value as of each subsequent balance sheet date. See Note 12 -- Fair Value Measurements and Note 13 -- Derivative Financial Instruments for additional details.
    
NOTE 7 – LEASES
Right of Use Assets and Liabilities
The following table summarizes quantitative information pertaining to the Company’s finance and operating leases.
14

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

Three months ended September 30,Nine months ended September 30,
In thousands2021202020212020
Lease Cost
Operating lease cost$3,180 $3,067 $9,437 $8,969 
Short-term operating lease cost$2,441 $2,465 $7,614 $6,293 
Finance Lease Cost:
Amortization of leased assets$5,141 $4,109 $16,068 $16,506 
Interest on lease liabilities1,833 927 3,441 2,852 
Total finance lease cost$6,974 $5,036 $19,509 $19,358 
Supplemental cash flow information related to leases was as follows:
Three months ended September 30,Nine months ended September 30,
In thousands2021202020212020
Other Information
Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities:
Operating cash flows from operating leases$5,621 $5,850 $17,256 $16,201 
Operating cash flows from finance leases$1,833 $927 $3,441 $2,852 
Financing cash flows from finance leases$7,944 $8,557 $22,970 $20,171 
Supplemental balance sheet information related to leases was as follows:
In thousandsSeptember 30, 2021December 31, 2020
Operating Leases
Other assets, non-current$32,754 $40,511 
Accrued liabilities and other$11,202 $12,410 
Other long-term liabilities20,631 27,433 
Total operating lease liabilities$31,833 $39,843 
Finance Leases
Property and equipment, gross$113,732 $104,433 
Accumulated depreciation(58,153)(60,272)
Property and equipment, net$55,579 $44,161 
Debt, current$31,384 $22,074 
Debt, non-current23,004 25,837 
Total finance lease liabilities$54,388 $47,911 
Weighted Average Remaining Lease Term
Weighted-average remaining lease term - finance leases1.661.36
Weighted-average remaining lease term - operating leases3.404.00
Weighted Average Discount Rate
Weighted-average discount rate - finance leases5.11 %5.37 %
Weighted-average discount rate - operating leases5.19 %5.18 %
Minimum future lease payments under finance and operating leases with terms longer than one year are as follows:
15

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

As of September 30, 2021 (In thousands)
Operating leasesFinance leases
2021$3,107 $6,082 
202210,994 23,920 
202310,432 14,218 
20248,887 6,842 
2025213 5,298 
Thereafter1,165 3,386 
Total$34,798 $59,746 
Less: imputed interest(2,965)(5,358)
Net lease obligation$31,833 $54,388 

NOTE 8 – DEBT
 September 30, 2021December 31, 2020
In thousandsCurrentNon-CurrentCurrentNon-Current
2029 Senior Notes, net(1)
$— $368,038 $— $— 
2024 Senior Notes, net(2)
— — — 227,590 
Revolving Credit Facility(3)
— 20,000 — — 
Finance lease obligations31,384 23,004 22,074 25,837 
$31,384 $411,042 $22,074 $253,427 
(1) Net of unamortized debt issuance costs of $7.0 million and $0.0 million at September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.
(2) Net of unamortized debt issuance costs of $0.0 million and $2.4 million at September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.
(3) Unamortized debt issuance costs of $2.5 million and $1.5 million at September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively, included in Other Non-Current Assets.
2029 Senior Notes
In March 2021, the Company completed an offering of $375.0 million in aggregate principal amount of senior notes in a private placement conducted pursuant to Rule 144A and Regulation S under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, for net proceeds of approximately $367.5 million (the “2029 Senior Notes”). The 2029 Senior Notes are governed by an Indenture dated as of March 1, 2021 (the “Indenture”), among the Company, as issuer, certain of the Company's subsidiaries named therein, as guarantors thereto (the “Guarantors”), and The Bank of New York Mellon, as trustee (the “Trustee”). The 2029 Senior Notes bear interest at a rate of 5.125% per year from the date of issuance. Interest on the 2029 Senior Notes is payable semi-annually in arrears on February 15 and August 15 of each year, commencing on August 15, 2021. The 2029 Senior Notes will mature on February 15, 2029 and are fully and unconditionally guaranteed by the Guarantors.
At any time prior to February 15, 2024, the Company may redeem all or part of the 2029 Senior Notes upon not less than 30 nor more than 60 days’ prior notice at a redemption price equal to the sum of (i) 100% of the principal amount thereof, plus (ii) a make-whole premium as of the date of redemption, plus (iii) accrued and unpaid interest and additional interest, if any, thereon, to the date of redemption. In addition, the Company may redeem some or all of the 2029 Senior Notes on or after February 15, 2024, at redemption prices set forth in the Indenture, together with accrued and unpaid interest. At any time prior to February 15, 2024, the Company may use the proceeds of certain equity offerings to redeem up to 35% of the aggregate principal amount of the 2029 Senior Notes, including any permitted additional 2029 Senior Notes, at a redemption price equal to 105.125% of the principal amount.
The Indenture contains covenants that, among other things, limit the Company’s ability under certain circumstances to incur additional indebtedness, pay dividends or make other distributions or repurchase or redeem capital stock, prepay, redeem or repurchase certain debt, make loans and investments, create liens, sell, transfer or otherwise dispose of assets, enter into transactions with affiliates, enter into agreements restricting the Company's subsidiaries' ability to pay dividends and impose conditions on the Company’s ability to engage in mergers, consolidations and sales of all or substantially all of its assets. The Indenture also contains certain “Events of Default” (as defined in the Indenture) customary for indentures of this type. If an Event of Default has occurred and is continuing, the Trustee or the holders of not less than 25% in aggregate principal amount of the 2029 Senior Notes then outstanding may, and the Trustee at the request of the holders of not less than 25% in aggregate principal amount of the 2029 Senior Notes then outstanding shall, declare all unpaid principal of, premium, if any, and accrued interest on all the 2029 Senior Notes to be due and payable.
16

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

2024 Senior Notes
Concurrent with the offering of the 2029 Senior Notes, the Company commenced a cash tender offer (the “Tender Offer”) to purchase the outstanding $230.0 million in aggregate principal amount of its 5.875% Senior Notes due 2024 (the “2024 Senior Notes”). The Tender Offer was made on the terms and subject to the conditions set forth in the Offer to Purchase dated February 22, 2021. The Tender Offer expired at 5:00 p.m., New York City time, on February 26, 2021 (the “Expiration Time”). Holders of the 2024 Senior Notes who tendered (and did not validly withdraw) their notes at or prior to the Expiration Time were entitled to receive in cash $1,029.38 per $1,000 principal amount of 2024 Senior Notes validly tendered (and not validly withdrawn) and accepted for purchase by the Company in the Tender Offer, plus accrued and unpaid interest on such 2024 Senior Notes. $102.8 million aggregate principal amount of the 2024 Senior Notes were validly tendered and purchased by the Company on March 1, 2021. In accordance with the terms of the indenture governing the 2024 Senior Notes, the remaining $127.2 million aggregate principal amount of the 2024 Senior Notes were redeemed on March 31, 2021 at the redemption price specified in the indenture governing the 2024 Senior Notes ($1,029.38 per $1,000 principal amount redeemed, plus accrued and unpaid interest). The Company recorded a loss of $9.2 million as a result of the extinguishment of the 2024 Senior Notes.
Revolving Credit Facility
On March 1, 2021, the Company entered into a fifth amendment (the “Amendment”) to its credit agreement, dated as of September 29, 2017 (as previously amended, the “Credit Agreement”), by and among the Company, as borrower, certain subsidiaries of the Company, as guarantors, Bank of America, N.A., as administrative agent and Bank of America, N.A., Royal Bank of Canada, Bank of Montreal, Chicago Branch, the Bank of Nova Scotia and ING Capital LLC, as lenders. The Amendment, among other things, (i) extended the maturity date of the senior secured revolving credit facility (“Revolving Credit Facility” or “RCF”) provided under the Credit Agreement to March 2025 and (ii) permits the Company to obtain one or more increases of the RCF, which is currently in the amount of $300.0 million, in an aggregate amount of up to $100.0 million in incremental loans and commitments, subject to certain conditions, including obtaining commitments from relevant lenders to provide such increase.
At September 30, 2021, the Company had $20.0 million drawn at an interest rate of 2.3% and $35.0 million in outstanding letters of credit under the RCF.
Finance Lease Obligations
From time-to-time, the Company acquires mining equipment and facilities under finance lease agreements. In the nine months ended September 30, 2021, the Company entered into new lease financing arrangements primarily for mining equipment at Rochester and Kensington. Coeur secured a finance lease package for nearly $60 million during the quarter, a portion of which has been funded as of September 30, 2021. The package is earmarked for planned equipment purchases for the project in 2021 and 2022, and has an interest rate of 5.20%. All finance lease obligations are recorded, upon lease inception, at the present value of future minimum lease payments. See Note 7 -- Leases for additional qualitative and quantitative disclosures related to finance leasing arrangements.
Interest Expense
 Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
In thousands2021202020212020
2024 Senior Notes$— $3,378 $2,591 $10,134 
2029 Senior Notes4,805 — 11,211 — 
Revolving Credit Facility508 767 1,438 2,520 
Finance lease obligations1,833 927 3,441 2,852 
Amortization of debt issuance costs415 372 1,306 1,143 
Other debt obligations51 45 225 261 
Capitalized interest(4,375)(393)(6,972)(921)
Total interest expense, net of capitalized interest$3,237 $5,096 $13,240 $15,989 

17

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
NOTE 9 – RECLAMATION
Reclamation and mine closure costs are based principally on legal and regulatory requirements. Management estimates costs associated with reclamation of mining properties. On an ongoing basis, management evaluates its estimates and assumptions, and future expenditures could differ from current estimates.
Changes to the Company’s asset retirement obligations for its operating sites are as follows:
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
In thousands2021202020212020
Asset retirement obligation - Beginning$141,205 $138,904 $137,120 $134,543 
Accretion2,984 2,924 8,769 8,591 
Settlements(1,406)(930)(3,106)(2,236)
Asset retirement obligation - Ending$142,783 $140,898 $142,783 $140,898 
The Company accrued $2.0 million and $2.2 million at each of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively, for reclamation liabilities related to former mining activities, which are included in Reclamation.

NOTE 10 - INCOME AND MINING TAXES
    The following table summarizes the components of Income and mining tax (expense) benefit for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020 by significant jurisdiction:
Three months ended September 30,Nine months ended September 30,
 2021202020212020
In thousandsIncome (loss) before taxTax (expense) benefitIncome (loss) before taxTax (expense) benefitIncome (loss) before taxTax (expense) benefitIncome (loss) before taxTax (expense) benefit
United States$(30,247)$4,078 $24,592 $(6,003)$(9,131)$(4,775)$26,132 $(5,913)
Canada(13,879)— (12,895)— (39,643)— (54,544)232 
Mexico(4,138)(10,478)28,320 (7,110)59,603 (29,751)54,483 (6,366)
Other jurisdictions(104)— (48)— 3,135 — (306)29 
$(48,368)$(6,400)$39,969 $(13,113)$13,964 $(34,526)$25,765 $(12,018)
    During the third quarter of 2021, the Company reported estimated income and mining tax expense of approximately $6.4 million, resulting in an effective tax rate of (13.2)%. This compares to income tax expense of $13.1 million for an effective tax rate of 32.8% during the third quarter of 2020. The comparability of the Company’s income and mining tax (expense) benefit and effective tax rate for the reported periods was impacted by multiple factors, primarily: (i) variations in our income before income taxes; (ii) geographic distribution of that income; (iii) mining taxes; (iv) foreign exchange rates; (v) percentage depletion; (vi) the non-recognition of tax assets; and (vii) the impact of uncertain tax positions. Therefore, the effective tax rate will fluctuate, sometimes significantly, period to period.
A valuation allowance is provided for deferred tax assets for which it is more likely than not that the related tax benefits will not be realized. The Company analyzes its deferred tax assets and, if it is determined that the Company will not realize all or a portion of its deferred tax assets, it will record or increase a valuation allowance. Conversely, if it is determined that the Company ultimately will be more likely than not able to realize all or a portion of the related benefits for which a valuation allowance has been provided, all or a portion of the related valuation allowance will be reduced. There are a number of factors that impact the Company’s ability to realize its deferred tax assets. For additional information, please see the section titled “Risk Factors” in the 2020 10-K.
The Company or one of its subsidiaries files income tax returns in the U.S. federal jurisdiction, and various state and foreign jurisdictions. The statute of limitations remains open from 2016 forward for the U.S. federal jurisdiction and from 2011 forward for certain other foreign jurisdictions. As a result of statutes of limitation that will begin to expire within the next twelve months in various jurisdictions and possible settlements of audit-related issues with taxing authorities in various jurisdictions with respect to which none of the issues are individually significant, the Company believes that it is reasonably possible that the total amount of its net unrecognized income tax benefits will decrease between $0.5 million and $1.5 million in the next twelve months.
    At September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Company had $0.3 million and $0.7 million of total gross unrecognized tax benefits, respectively, that, if recognized, would positively impact the Company’s effective income tax rate. The Company’s continuing practice is to recognize potential interest and/or penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits as
18

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
part of its income tax expense. At September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the amount of accrued income-tax-related interest and penalties was $0.4 million and $1.1 million, respectively.

NOTE 11 – STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION
    The Company has stock incentive plans for executives, directors and eligible employees. Stock awards include performance shares, restricted stock and stock options. Stock-based compensation expense in the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 was $2.7 million and $10.2 million, respectively, compared to $2.0 million and $6.3 million in the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020. At September 30, 2021, there was $11.9 million of unrecognized stock-based compensation cost which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average remaining vesting period of 1.6 years.
    The following table summarizes the grants awarded during the nine months ended September 30, 2021:
Grant dateRestricted
stock
Grant date fair
value of
restricted stock
Performance
shares
Grant date fair
value of
performance
shares
February 24, 20215,000 $10.40 — $— 
May 12, 2021893,329 $9.40 593,577 $10.19 

NOTE 12 – FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS
 Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
In thousands2021202020212020
Unrealized gain (loss) on equity securities$(35,709)$2,276 $(3,702)$12,307 
Realized gain (loss) on equity securities— (33)769 (8,816)
Exchange agreement embedded derivative9,269 — 9,933 — 
Fair value adjustments, net$(26,440)$2,243 $7,000 $3,491 
Accounting standards establish a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1), secondary priority to quoted prices in inactive markets or observable inputs (Level 2), and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3).
The following table presents the Company’s financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis (at least annually) by level within the fair value hierarchy. Assets and liabilities are classified in their entirety based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement:
 Fair Value at September 30, 2021
In thousandsTotalLevel 1Level 2Level 3  
Assets:
Equity securities$139,740 $139,740 $— $— 
Gold zero cost collars1,560 — 1,560 — 
Foreign currency forward exchange contracts3,344 — 3,344 — 
Provisional metal sales contracts51 — 51 — 
$144,695 $139,740 $4,955 $— 
Liabilities:
Exchange agreement embedded derivative$— $— $— $— 
Provisional metal sales contracts255 — 255 — 
$255 $— $255 $— 
 
19

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
 Fair Value at December 31, 2020
In thousandsTotalLevel 1Level 2Level 3  
Assets:
Equity and debt securities$12,943 $12,943 $— $— 
Foreign currency forward exchange contracts13,747 — 13,747 — 
Provisional metal sales contracts481 — 481 — 
$27,171 $12,943 $14,228 $— 
Liabilities:
Gold zero cost collars$24,883 $— $24,883 $— 
Provisional metal sales contracts67 — 67 — 
$24,950 $— $24,950 $— 
The Company’s investments in equity securities are recorded at fair market value in the financial statements based primarily on quoted market prices. Such instruments are classified within Level 1 of the fair value hierarchy.
The Company’s foreign currency forward exchange contracts are valued using pricing models with inputs derived from observable market data, including forward market prices and other unobservable inputs. The Company’s gold zero cost collars are valued using pricing models with inputs derived from observable market data, including forward market prices, yield curves, credit spreads. The Company’s provisional metal sales contracts include concentrate and certain doré sales contracts that are valued using pricing models with inputs derived from observable market data, including forward market prices. The model inputs can generally be verified and do not involve significant management judgment. Such instruments are classified within Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy.
As described in Note 6 - Investments, the Exchange Agreement provides that Orion may be entitled to additional Coeur shares in the event Coeur acquires Victoria in the future for a higher per share consideration, subject to the terms and conditions of the Exchange Agreement. The Company determined that the potential for additional share consideration in the Exchange Agreement represents an embedded derivative that requires bifurcation. The obligation to deliver additional Coeur shares pursuant to the Exchange Agreement expires on October 31, 2021. The accounting treatment of derivative financial instruments requires that the Company record the fair value of the embedded derivative as of the inception date of the Exchange Agreement and adjust the fair value as of each subsequent balance sheet date. The fair value of the outstanding embedded derivative was determined using a pricing model with inputs derived from observable market data, including stock prices, stock price volatility and risk-free rates and other unobservable inputs such as Monte Carlo simulations and probabilities of Coeur being contractually obligated to make a payment. As the model inputs are estimated based on observable and unobservable data, the Company classifies this embedded derivative in Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy, a change in these unobservable inputs may result in a significantly higher or lower fair value measurement. As of September 30, 2021, the fair value of the exchange agreement embedded derivative was $0.
No assets or liabilities were transferred between fair value levels in the nine months ended September 30, 2021.
20

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
The following tables present the changes in the fair value of the Company's Level 3 financial assets and liabilities in the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021.
Three Months Ended September 30, 2021
In thousandsBalance at the beginning of the periodInitial valuationRevaluationSettlementsBalance at the
end of the
period
Liabilities:
Exchange agreement embedded derivative$9,269 $— $(9,269)$— $— 
Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021
In thousandsBalance at the beginning of the periodInitial valuationRevaluationSettlementsBalance at the
end of the
period
Liabilities:
Exchange agreement embedded derivative$— $9,933 $(9,933)$— $— 
The fair value of financial assets and liabilities carried at book value in the financial statements at September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 is presented in the following table:
 September 30, 2021
In thousandsBook ValueFair ValueLevel 1Level 2Level 3  
Liabilities:
2029 Senior Notes(1)
$368,038 $354,873 $— $354,873 $— 
Revolving Credit Facility(2)
$20,000 $20,000 $— $20,000 $— 
(1) Net of unamortized debt issuance costs of $7.0 million
(2) Unamortized debt issuance costs of $2.5 million included in Other Non-Current Assets.
 December 31, 2020
In thousandsBook ValueFair ValueLevel 1Level 2Level 3  
Liabilities:
2024 Senior Notes(1)
$227,590 $229,874 $— $229,874 $— 
Revolving Credit Facility(2)
$— $— $— $— $— 
(1) Net of unamortized debt issuance costs of $2.4 million.
(2) Unamortized debt issuance costs of $1.5 million included in Other Non-Current Assets.
The fair value of the 2024 Senior Notes was estimated using quoted market prices. The fair value of the RCF approximates book value as the liability is secured, has a variable interest rate, and lacks significant credit concerns.

NOTE 13 – DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS & HEDGING ACTIVITIES

The Company is exposed to various market risks, including the effect of changes in metal prices, foreign currency exchange rates and interest rates, and uses derivatives to manage financial exposures that occur in the normal course of business. The Company does not hold or issue derivatives for trading or speculative purposes.
The Company may elect to designate certain derivatives as hedging instruments under U.S. GAAP. The Company formally documents all relationships between designated hedging instruments and hedged items as well as its risk management objectives and strategies for undertaking hedge transactions. This process includes linking all derivatives designated as hedges to either recognized assets or liabilities or forecasted transactions and assessing, both at inception and on an ongoing basis, the effectiveness of the hedging relationships.
21

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
Derivatives Not Designated as Hedging Instruments
Provisional Metal Sales
The Company enters into sales contracts with third-party smelters, refiners and off-take customers which, in some cases, provide for a provisional payment based upon preliminary assays and quoted metal prices. The provisionally priced sales contracts contain an embedded derivative that is required to be separated from the host contract for accounting purposes. The host contract is the receivable recorded at the forward price at the time of sale. The embedded derivatives do not qualify for hedge accounting and are marked to market through earnings each period until final settlement.
Exchange Agreement Embedded Derivative
The Exchange Agreement provides that Orion may be entitled to additional Coeur shares in the event Coeur acquires Victoria in the future for a higher per share consideration, subject to the terms and conditions of the Exchange Agreement. The Company determined that the potential for additional share consideration in the Exchange Agreement represents an embedded derivative that requires bifurcation. The obligation to deliver additional Coeur shares pursuant to the Exchange Agreement expires on October 31, 2021. The accounting treatment of derivative financial instruments requires that the Company record the fair value of the embedded derivative as of the inception date of the Exchange Agreement and adjust the fair value as of each subsequent balance sheet date. As of September 30, 2021, the fair value of the exchange agreement embedded derivative was $0.
At September 30, 2021, the Company had the following derivative instruments that settle as follows:
In thousands except average prices and notional ounces20212022 and Thereafter
Provisional gold sales contracts$28,520 $— 
Average gold price per ounce$1,786 $— 
Notional ounces15,966 — 
    The following summarizes the classification of the fair value of the derivative instruments:
 September 30, 2021
In thousandsPrepaid expenses and otherAccrued liabilities and other
Provisional metal sales contracts$51 $255 
 December 31, 2020
In thousandsPrepaid expenses and otherAccrued liabilities and other
Provisional metal sales contracts$481 $67 
The following represent mark-to-market gains (losses) on derivative instruments in the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively (in thousands):
 Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
Financial statement lineDerivative2021202020212020
RevenueProvisional metal sales contracts$79 $(962)$(618)$250 
Fair value adjustments, netExchange agreement embedded derivative9,269 — 9,933 — 
$9,348 $(962)$9,315 $250 
Derivatives Designated as Cash Flow Hedging Strategies
To protect the Company’s exposure to fluctuations in metal prices the Company entered into Asian (or average value) put and call option contracts in net-zero-cost collar arrangements. The contracts are net cash settled monthly and, if the price of gold at the time of expiration is between the put and call prices, would expire at no cost to the Company. If the price of gold at the time of expiration is lower than the put prices or higher than the call prices, it would result in a realized gain or loss, respectively. The Company has elected to designate these instruments as cash flow hedges of forecasted transactions at their inception.
To protect the Company’s exposure to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates for subsidiaries whose functional currency is U.S dollar and are exposed to forecasted transaction denominated in the Mexican Peso and the Canadian Dollar, in March 2020, the Company entered into foreign currency forward exchange contracts to manage this risk and designated these instruments as cash flow hedges of forecasted foreign denominated transactions. The Company has elected to designate these instruments as cash flow hedges of forecasted transactions at their inception.
22

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
At September 30, 2021, the Company had the following derivative cash flow hedge instruments that settle as follows:
In thousands except average prices and notional ounces20212022 and Thereafter
Gold put options
Average gold strike price per ounce$1,600 $1,630 
Notional ounces39,675 132,000 
Gold call options
Average gold strike price per ounce$1,882 $2,038 
Notional ounces39,675 132,000 
Foreign currency forward exchange contracts - Mexican Peso
Average Mexican Peso exchange rate$25.43 $— 
Notional US dollar$15,000 $— 
The effective portions of cash flow hedges are recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) (“AOCI”) until the hedged item is recognized in earnings. Deferred gains and losses associated with cash flow hedges of metal sales revenue are recognized as a component of Revenue in the same period as the related sale is recognized. Deferred gains and losses associated with cash flow hedges of foreign currency transactions are recognized as a component of Costs Applicable to Sales or Pre-development, Reclamation and Other in the same period the related expenses are incurred.
At inception, the Company performed an assessment of the forecasted transactions and the hedging instruments and determined that the hedging relationships are considered perfectly effective. Future assessments are performed to verify that critical terms of the hedging instruments and the forecasted transactions continue to match, and the forecasted transactions remain probable, as well as an assessment of any adverse developments regarding the risk of the counterparties defaulting on their commitments. There have been no such changes in critical terms or adverse developments.
As of September 30, 2021, the Company had $4.9 million of net after-tax gain in AOCI related to losses from cash flow hedge transactions, of which $4.6 million of net after-tax gains is expected to be recognized in its Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income (Loss) during the next 12 months. Actual amounts ultimately reclassified to net income are dependent on the price of gold for metal contracts and the Canadian and Mexican exchange rates for foreign currency contracts.
The following summarizes the classification of the fair value of the derivative instruments designated as cash flow hedges:
 September 30, 2021
In thousandsPrepaid expenses and otherAccrued liabilities and other
Gold zero cost collars$1,560 $— 
Foreign currency forward exchange contracts3,344 — 
$4,904 $— 
 December 31, 2020
In thousandsPrepaid expenses and otherAccrued liabilities and other
Gold zero cost collars$— $24,883 
Foreign currency forward exchange contracts13,747 — 
$13,747 $24,883 
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Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
    The following table sets forth the pre-tax gains (losses) on derivatives designated as cash flow hedges that have been included in AOCI and the Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income (Loss) for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively (in thousands).

Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
2021202020212020
 Amount of Gain (Loss) Recognized in AOCI
Gold zero cost collars$1,614 $(24,003)$25,590 $(38,353)
Foreign currency forward exchange contracts(265)2,755 133 10,214 
$1,349 $(21,248)$25,723 $(28,139)
Amount of (Gain) Loss Reclassified From AOCI to Earnings
Gold zero cost collars$23 $4,563 $853 $4,563 
Foreign currency forward exchange contracts(3,925)(1,921)(10,536)(2,600)
$(3,902)$2,642 $(9,683)$1,963 

Credit Risk
The credit risk exposure related to any derivative instrument is limited to the unrealized gains, if any, on outstanding contracts based on current market prices. To reduce counter-party credit exposure, the Company enters into contracts with institutions management deems credit-worthy and limits credit exposure to each institution. The Company does not anticipate non-performance by any of its counterparties.

NOTE 14 – ADDITIONAL COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS) DETAIL
Pre-development, reclamation, and other consists of the following:
 Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
In thousands2021202020212020
COVID-19$617 $4,037 $5,937 $10,418 
Silvertip ongoing carrying costs5,589 3,913 18,957 11,704 
Silvertip temporary suspension costs— 2,768 — 10,107 
Gain on modification of right of use lease— — — (4,051)
Asset retirement accretion3,027 2,968 8,898 8,724 
Other1,273 1,345 3,164 3,359 
Pre-development, reclamation and other$10,506 $15,031 $36,956 $40,261 

Other, net consists of the following:
 Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
In thousands2021202020212020
Foreign exchange gain (loss)$(1,028)$(599)$(2,299)$(665)
Gain (loss) on sale of assets(92)(2,476)4,582 (2,458)
VAT write-down(25,982)— (25,982)— 
Gold zero cost collars novation fee— (3,819)— (3,819)
Gain (loss) on sale of Manquiri NSR consideration— — — 365 
Gain (loss) on Silvertip contingent consideration— — — 955 
Other384 582 1,309 1,312 
Other, net$(26,718)$(6,312)$(22,390)$(4,310)

24

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
NOTE 15 – NET INCOME (LOSS) PER SHARE
Basic net income (loss) per share is computed by dividing net income (loss) available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of the Company’s common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted net income (loss) per share reflects the potential dilution that would occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock.
For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, there were 1,513,288 and 1,489,158 common stock equivalents, respectively, related to equity-based awards were not included in the diluted earnings per share calculation as the shares would be antidilutive. Similarly, 182,803 and 1,722,014 common stock equivalents were excluded in the diluted earnings per share calculation for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2020, respectively.
Three months ended September 30,Nine months ended September 30,
In thousands except per share amounts2021202020212020
Net income (loss) available to common stockholders$(54,768)$26,856 $(20,562)$13,747 
Weighted average shares:
Basic254,744 240,983 247,675 240,729 
Effect of stock-based compensation plans— 2,866 — 1,277 
Diluted254,744 243,849 247,675 242,006 
Income (loss) per share:
Basic$(0.21)$0.11 $(0.08)$0.06 
Diluted(1)
$(0.21)$0.11 $(0.08)$0.06 
On April 23, 2020, the Company entered into an ATM Equity Offering Sales Agreement (the “Sales Agreement”) with BofA Securities, Inc. and RBC Capital Markets, LLC as sales agents (the “Sales Agents”) and filed a prospectus supplement for the sale of its common stock, par value $0.01 per share, by way of an “at the market” offering having an aggregate offering price of up to $100,000,000 (the “ATM Program”). Sales under the ATM Program, if any, will be made pursuant to the terms of the Sales Agreement. At September 30, 2021, the Company had not elected to sell any shares of its common stock under the ATM Program.

NOTE 16 - SUPPLEMENTAL GUARANTOR INFORMATION
The following summarized financial information is presented to satisfy disclosure requirements of Rule 13-01 of Regulation S-X resulting from the guarantees by Coeur Alaska, Inc., Coeur Explorations, Inc., Coeur Rochester, Inc., Coeur South America Corp., Wharf Resources (U.S.A.), Inc. and its subsidiaries, Coeur Capital, Inc., Coeur Sterling, Inc., Sterling Intermediate Holdco, Inc., and Coeur Sterling Holdings LLC (collectively, the “Subsidiary Guarantors”) of the 2029 Senior Notes. The following schedules present summarized financial information of (a) Coeur, the parent company and (b) the Subsidiary Guarantors (collectively the “Obligor Group”). The summarized financial information of the Obligor Group is presented on a combined basis with intercompany balances and transactions between entities in the Obligor Group eliminated. The Obligor Group’s amounts due from, amounts due to and transactions with certain wholly-owned domestic and foreign subsidiaries of the Company have been presented in separate line items, if they are material. Each of the Subsidiary Guarantors is 100% owned by Coeur and the guarantees are full and unconditional and joint and several obligations. There are no restrictions on the ability of Coeur to obtain funds from the Subsidiary Guarantors by dividend or loan.
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Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
SUMMARIZED BALANCE SHEET
SEPTEMBER 30, 2021
In thousandsCoeur Mining, Inc.Guarantor Subsidiaries
ASSETS
CURRENT ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents$5,176 $29,719 
Receivables(58)5,259 
Ore on leach pads— 74,803 
Inventory— 27,573 
Prepaid expenses and other11,621 1,009 
16,739 138,363 
NON-CURRENT ASSETS
Property, plant and equipment, net1,625 178,584 
Mining properties, net— 453,619 
Ore on leach pads— 78,302 
Restricted assets1,487 206 
Equity and debt securities139,740 — 
Net investment in subsidiaries606,776 60,813 
Other177,117 54,024 
TOTAL ASSETS$943,484 $963,911 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
CURRENT LIABILITIES
Accounts payable$2,757 $72,616 
Other accrued liabilities9,680 40,561 
Debt— 24,107 
Reclamation— 1,584 
12,437 138,868 
NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES
Debt388,038 47,035 
Reclamation— 96,364 
Deferred tax liabilities293 7,522 
Other long-term liabilities3,344 22,740 
Intercompany payable (receivable)(274,366)251,002 
117,309 424,663 
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Common stock2,569 19,356 
Additional paid-in capital3,734,948 340,700 
Accumulated deficit(2,928,683)40,324 
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)4,904 — 
813,738 400,380 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY$943,484 $963,911 

26

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
SUMMARIZED BALANCE SHEET
DECEMBER 31, 2020
In thousandsCoeur Mining, Inc.Guarantor Subsidiaries
ASSETS
CURRENT ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents$12,727 $28,515 
Receivables381 3,631 
Ore on leach pads— 74,866 
Inventory— 27,223 
Prepaid expenses and other20,872 1,375 
33,980 135,610 
NON-CURRENT ASSETS
Property, plant and equipment, net1,946 148,640 
Mining properties, net— 353,818 
Ore on leach pads— 81,963 
Restricted assets1,482 206 
Equity and debt securities12,943 — 
Net investment in subsidiaries514,705 72,785 
Other198,587 51,528 
TOTAL ASSETS$763,643 $844,550 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
CURRENT LIABILITIES
Accounts payable$1,978 $52,177 
Other accrued liabilities36,183 46,023 
Debt— 14,506 
Reclamation— 1,584 
38,161 114,290 
NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES
Debt227,592 33,321 
Reclamation— 93,349 
Deferred tax liabilities100 8,457 
Other long-term liabilities3,629 29,916 
Intercompany payable (receivable)(199,318)176,914 
32,003 341,957 
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Common stock2,438 20,401 
Additional paid-in capital3,610,297 340,700 
Accumulated deficit(2,908,120)27,202 
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)(11,136)— 
693,479 388,303 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY$763,643 $844,550 
27

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

SUMMARIZED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
NINE MONTHS ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2021
In thousandsCoeur Mining, Inc.Guarantor Subsidiaries
Revenue$— $384,918 
Gross profit (loss)$(507)$62,007 
Income (loss) from continuing operations$(20,560)$12,074 
Net income (loss)$(20,560)$12,074 

28

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
NOTE 17 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
Mexico Litigation Matters
As of September 30, 2021, $26.0 million is due from the Mexican government associated with VAT that was paid under Coeur Mexicana, S.A. de C.V.’s (“Coeur Mexicana’s”) prior royalty agreement with a subsidiary of Franco-Nevada Corporation, which was terminated in 2016. Coeur Mexicana applied for and initially received VAT refunds associated with the royalty payments in the normal course; however, in 2011 the Mexican tax authorities began denying Coeur Mexicana’s VAT refunds based on the argument that VAT was not legally due on the royalty payments. Accordingly, Coeur Mexicana began to request refunds of the VAT as undue payments, which the Mexican tax authorities also denied. The Company has since been engaged in ongoing efforts to recover the VAT from the Mexican government (including through litigation and potential arbitration as well as refiling VAT refund requests). Despite a favorable ruling from Mexican tax courts in this matter in 2018, litigation has continued at the administrative, appeals court and supreme court levels, most of which has been determined unfavorably to Coeur (including as recently as the third quarter of 2021) based on interpretations of applicable law and prior court decisions which the Company and its counsel believe are contrary to legal precedent, conflicting and erroneous. While the Company believes that it remains legally entitled to be refunded the full amount of the VAT receivable and intends to rigorously continue its VAT recovery efforts, based on the continued failure to recover the VAT receivable and recent unfavorable Mexican court decisions, the Company determined to write down the carrying value of the VAT receivable at September 30, 2021. The write down of $26.0 million is presented in Other, net on the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income (Loss). Coeur Mexicana may still elect to initiate an arbitration proceeding under Chapter 11 of the North American Free Trade Agreement, or NAFTA. Outcomes in NAFTA arbitration and the process for recovering funds even if there is a successful outcome in NAFTA arbitration can be lengthy and unpredictable.
In addition, ongoing litigation with the Mexican government associated with enforcement of water rights in Mexico, if unsuccessful, may impact Coeur Mexicana’s ability to access new sources of water to provide sufficient supply for its operations at Palmarejo and, if material, may have a material adverse impact on the Company’s operations and financial results.
Palmarejo Gold Stream
Coeur Mexicana sells 50% of Palmarejo gold production (excluding production from certain properties acquired in 2015) to a subsidiary of Franco-Nevada Corporation (“Franco-Nevada”) under a gold stream agreement for the lesser of $800 or spot price per ounce. In 2016, Coeur Mexicana received a $22.0 million deposit toward future deliveries under the gold stream agreement. In accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, although Coeur Mexicana has satisfied its contractual obligation to repay the deposit to Franco-Nevada, the deposit is accounted for as deferred revenue and is recognized as revenue on a units-of-production basis as ounces are sold to Franco-Nevada. At September 30, 2021 the remaining unamortized balance was $8.5 million, which is included in Accrued liabilities and other and Other long-term liabilities on the Consolidated Balance Sheet.
Kensington Prepayment
In June 2019, Coeur entered into a transaction with an existing metal sales counterparty whereby it amended its existing sales and purchase contract for gold concentrate from its Kensington mine (the “Amended Sales Contract”). From time to time, the Amended Sales Contract has been further amended to allow for additional prepayments, the latest occurring in July 2021, with an effective date as of June 28, 2021, to include options for Coeur to receive up to two additional prepayments of up to $15.0 million. In December 2020, Coeur exercised an option to receive the $15.0 million December 2020 Prepayment. In the first half of 2021, the Kensington mine delivered $15.0 million in satisfaction of the December 2020 Prepayment. In June 2021, Coeur exercised an option to receive the $15.0 million June 2021 Prepayment, and delivered $7.5 million against that $15.0 million in the third quarter of 2021. The remaining deliveries of $7.6 million under the June 2021 Prepayment are recognized as a deferred revenue liability and are presented in Accrued liabilities and other on the Consolidated Balance Sheet. Under the relevant terms of the Amended Sales Contract, Coeur maintains its exposure to the price of gold and expects to recognize the remaining value of the accrued liability by December 31, 2021.
Other Commitments and Contingencies
As part of its ongoing business and operations, the Company and its affiliates are required to provide surety bonds, bank letters of credit, bank guarantees and, in some cases, cash as financial support for various purposes, including environmental remediation, reclamation, collateral for gold hedges and other general corporate purposes. As of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Company had surety bonds totaling $314.5 million and $311.9 million, respectively, in place as financial support for future reclamation and closure costs. The obligations associated with these instruments are generally related to performance requirements that the Company addresses through its ongoing operations and from time-to-time, the Company may be required to post collateral, including cash or letters of credit which reduce availability under its revolving credit facility, to support these instruments. As the specific requirements are met, the beneficiary of the associated instrument
29

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
cancels and/or returns the instrument to the issuing entity. Certain of these instruments are associated with operating sites with long-lived assets and will remain outstanding until closure. The Company believes it is in compliance with all applicable bonding obligations and will be able to satisfy future bonding requirements through existing or alternative means, as they arise.

NOTE 18 – ADDITIONAL BALANCE SHEET DETAIL AND SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW INFORMATION
Accrued liabilities and other consist of the following:
In thousandsSeptember 30, 2021December 31, 2020
Accrued salaries and wages$28,788 $30,457 
Deferred revenue (1)
8,673 16,425 
Income and mining taxes14,078 26,118 
Accrued operating costs8,468 3,327 
Unrealized losses on derivatives255 24,950 
Taxes other than income and mining3,053 3,616 
Accrued interest payable3,273 1,855 
Operating lease liabilities11,202 12,410 
Accrued liabilities and other$77,790 $119,158 
(1) See Note 17 -- Commitments and Contingencies for additional details on deferred revenue liabilities
The following table provides a reconciliation of cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash reported within the statement of financial position that total the same such amounts shown in the statement of cash flows in the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020:
In thousandsSeptember 30, 2021September 30, 2020
Cash and cash equivalents$85,020 $77,148 
Restricted cash equivalents1,771 1,380 
Total cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash shown in the statement of cash flows$86,791 $78,528 

30

Coeur Mining, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
NOTE 19 – ASSET AND LIABILITIES HELD FOR SALE

On October 27, 2021, the Company entered into a definitive agreement (the “Agreement”) to sell its La Preciosa project located in the State of Durango, Mexico to Avino Silver & Gold Mines Ltd. (“Avino”). The transaction is subject to customary closing conditions, including required regulatory approvals and expected to close in the first quarter of 2022.

Under the Agreement, Avino will acquire the La Preciosa project from Coeur for the following consideration:

$15.0 million upon closing of the transaction,
$5.0 million promissory note that matures prior to the first anniversary of the transaction closing,
Equity consideration of 14.0 million units, payable on closing, each consisting of one share of Avino common stock and one half of one common share purchase warrant of Avino common stock, priced at a 25% premium to the 20 day volume weighted average price prior to announcement,
Deferred cash consideration of approximately $8.8 million to be paid no later than the first anniversary of initial production from any portion of the La Preciosa project,
Contingent payments of $0.25 per silver equivalent ounce (subject to an inflationary adjustment) on any new mineral reserves discovered and declared outside of the current resource area at the La Preciosa project, up to a maximum payment of $50.0 million, and
Two royalties covering the La Preciosa land package, including (i) a 1.25% net smelter returns royalty on properties covering the Gloria and Abundancia areas of the La Preciosa project and (ii) a 2.00% gross value royalty on all areas of the La Preciosa project other than the Gloria and Abundancia areas, offset by the amount of any new mineral reserve contingent payments made to Coeur.
The Company classified the La Preciosa project as held for sale as of September 30, 2021 and the associated assets and liabilities are classified separately on the consolidated balance sheets. The major classes of assets and liabilities associated with the La Preciosa project as of September 30, 2021 are as follows:

In thousandsSeptember 30, 2021
Cash and cash equivalents$393 
Receivables1,219
Prepaid expenses and other1,338
Property, plant and equipment, net1,633
Mining properties, net49,085
Other810 
TOTAL ASSETS$54,478 
Accounts payable$321 
Deferred tax liabilities11,156 
TOTAL LIABILITIES$11,477 

Item 2.        Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
The following Management’s Discussion and Analysis (“MD&A”) provides information that management believes is relevant to an assessment and understanding of the consolidated financial condition and results of operations of Coeur Mining, Inc. and its subsidiaries (collectively the “Company”, “our”, or “we”). We use certain non-GAAP financial performance measures in our MD&A. For a detailed description of these measures, please see “Non-GAAP Financial Performance Measures” at the end of this Item. We provide Costs applicable to sales (“CAS”) split, referred to as the co-product method, based on revenue contribution for Palmarejo, Rochester and Silvertip and based on the primary metal, referred to as the by-product method, for Wharf. Revenue from secondary metal, such as silver at Wharf, is treated as a cost credit.
31


Overview
We are primarily a gold and silver producer with five mines located in the United States, Mexico and Canada and several exploration projects in North America.     
Third Quarter Highlights
For the quarter, Coeur reported revenue of $208.0 million and cash flow from operating activities of $21.8 million. We reported GAAP net loss of $54.8 million, or $0.21 per diluted share. On an adjusted basis1, the Company reported EBITDA of $48.8 million and net loss of $2.6 million, or $0.01 per diluted share. For the nine months ended September 30, 2021, Coeur reported revenue of $624.9 million and cash flow from operating activities of $75.5 million. We reported GAAP net loss of $20.6 million, or $0.08 per diluted share. On an adjusted basis1, the Company reported EBITDA of $167.4 million and net income of $10.5 million or $0.04 per diluted share.
Solid production results and stronger fourth quarter expected to result in full-year production levels within 2021 guidance ranges – Third quarter gold and silver production totaled 87,083 and 2.5 million ounces, respectively. Production levels are expected to increase during the fourth quarter and finish the year within the Company’s guidance range of 322,500 - 367,500 ounces of gold and 9.7 - 12.2 million ounces of silver
Second consecutive quarterly exploration record – Coeur achieved another quarterly exploration record by investing approximately $20.0 million and drilling roughly 326,500 feet (99,500 meters) from up to 27 drill rigs at six locations. The Company continues to generate meaningful new discoveries and identify future growth opportunities from the largest exploration program in its history
Strong quarterly results at Wharf – Wharf’s gold production increased 17% quarter-over-quarter to 28,157 ounces, leading to $24.9 million and $23.9 million of operating and free cash flow1, respectively - the second highest quarterly cash flow figures since Coeur’s acquisition of the operation in early 2015. Cumulative operating and free cash flow1 since the acquisition for approximately $99.5 million now totals $319.6 million and $290.7 million, respectively, implying a current internal rate of return of approximately 43%
Rochester expansion now 42% complete; seeking to mitigate inflationary pressures on remaining unawarded work packages – Coeur achieved several key milestones at its Rochester expansion project during the quarter while also continuing to incorporate learnings from ongoing test work and operating activities to maximize future operating flexibility and de-risk the expansion. The Company currently estimates a likely 10% - 15% increase in the project’s overall total capital estimate due to the impact of inflationary pressures on the four remaining unawarded packages
Re-adjusting timing and scale of Silvertip expansion due to exploration success and current inflationary environment – The Company has elected to assess the potential for a larger-scale expansion of Silvertip given ongoing exploration success and the potential benefits of a larger-scale operation. Additionally, recently-received preliminary capital estimates targeting a smaller, accelerated expansion and re-start were higher than anticipated, reflecting current inflationary pressures, supply and labor disruptions, and schedule constraints. A potentially larger-scale expansion and restart is expected to follow the completion of the ongoing Rochester expansion project
Strategic sale of La Preciosa silver project to Avino Silver & Gold – Coeur has entered into a definitive agreement (the “Agreement”) with Avino Silver & Gold Mines Ltd. (“Avino”) (TSX/NYSE American: ASM) to sell its La Preciosa silver project, which is located near Avino’s existing operation in the State of Durango, Mexico for fixed consideration of approximately $34.7 million and contingent consideration of up to an additional $58.8 million for total potential consideration of up to $93.4 million plus two royalties that collectively cover the entire La Preciosa land package. The combination of equity ownership, contingent payments and royalties provides exposure to future upside potential
Maintaining balance sheet flexibility to support ongoing investments – The Company ended the third quarter with total liquidity of approximately $330.0 million, including $85.0 million of cash and $245.0 million of available capacity under its $300.0 million revolving credit facility (“RCF”)



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Selected Financial and Operating Results
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
In thousands2021202020212020
Financial Results:
Gold sales$147,730 $167,132 $432,210 $422,639 
Silver sales$60,239 $62,596 $192,734 $133,852 
Zinc sales$— $— $— $(662)
Lead sales$— $— $— $1,315 
Consolidated Revenue$207,969 $229,728 $624,944 $557,144 
Net income (loss)$(54,768)$26,856 $(20,562)$13,747 
Net income (loss) per share, diluted$(0.22)$0.11 $(0.08)$0.06 
Adjusted net income (loss)(1)
$(2,608)$38,248 $10,493 $39,932 
Adjusted net income (loss) per share, diluted(1)
$(0.01)$0.16 $0.04 $0.17 
EBITDA(1)
$(14,169)$77,281 $120,076 $138,008 
Adjusted EBITDA(1)
$48,807 $90,777 $167,411 $179,381 
Total debt(2)
$442,426 $298,720 $442,426 $343,109 
Operating Results:
Gold ounces produced87,083 95,995 259,583 259,301 
Silver ounces produced2,462,395 2,565,349 7,452,931 6,862,177 
Zinc pounds produced— — — 2,459,756 
Lead pounds produced— — — 2,176,847 
Gold ounces sold89,804 95,283 261,417 258,851 
Silver ounces sold2,491,003 2,591,779 7,509,409 6,913,585 
Zinc pounds sold— — — 3,203,446 
Lead pounds sold— — — 2,453,485 
Average realized price per gold ounce$1,645 $1,754 $1,653 $1,633 
Average realized price per silver ounce$24.18 $24.15 $25.67 $19.36 
Average realized price per zinc pound, gross(3)
$— $— $— NM
Average realized price per lead pound, gross(3)
$— $— $— NM
(1)See “Non-GAAP Financial Performance Measures.”
(2)Includes finance leases. Net of debt issuance costs and premium received.
(3)Due to the temporary suspension of mining and processing activities these amounts are not meaningful.

Consolidated Financial Results
Three Months Ended September 30, 2021 compared to Three Months Ended September 30, 2020
Revenue
Revenue decreased by $21.8 million, or 9%, as a result of a 6% decrease in average realized gold prices, and lower gold and silver ounces sold (6% and 4%, respectively). We sold 89,804 gold ounces and 2.5 million silver ounces, compared to 95,283 gold ounces and 2.6 million silver ounces in the prior year. Gold and silver accounted for 71% and 29% of third quarter 2021 sales revenue, respectively. This compares to gold and silver accounting for 73% and 27% of third quarter 2020 sales revenue, respectively.

33


The following table summarizes consolidated metal sales:
Three months ended September 30,Increase (Decrease)Percentage Change
In thousands20212020
Gold sales$147,730 $167,132 $(19,402)(12)%
Silver sales60,239 62,596 (2,357)(4)%
Metal sales$207,969 $229,728 $(21,759)(9)%
Costs Applicable to Sales
Costs applicable to sales increased $21.6 million, or 19%, primarily due to higher operating costs at Palmarejo, Rochester, Kensington and Wharf partially due to increased maintenance and consumable costs and lower of cost or market (“LCM”) adjustment of $5.3 million at Rochester, partially offset by the favorable impact of foreign currency hedges. For a complete discussion of costs applicable to sales, see Results of Operations below.
Amortization
Amortization decreased $1.3 million, or 4%, primarily due lower ounces sold and longer assumed mine life based on year-end 2020 mineral reserve growth at Palmarejo.
Expenses
General and administrative expenses increased $1.0 million, or 13%, primarily due to higher travel and outside service costs.
Exploration expense increased $2.6 million, or 20%, attributable to acceleration of drilling activity at Rochester and Kensington as well as the continuation of expansion and infill programs across the rest of the Company’s portfolio. The Company completed 243,500 feet (74,225 meters) of expansion drilling and 82,900 feet (25,275 meters) of infill drilling in the third quarter of 2021 compared to 217,768 feet (66,376 meters) of expansion drilling and 39,114 feet (11,922 meters) of infill drilling in the third quarter of 2020
Pre-development, reclamation, and other expenses decreased $4.5 million, or 30%, stemming from lower costs incurred in connection with the Company’s COVID-19 health and safety protocols.
The following table summarizes pre-development, reclamation, and other expenses:
Three months ended September 30,Increase (Decrease)Percentage Change
In thousands20212020
COVID-19$617 $4,037 $(3,420)(85)%
Silvertip ongoing carrying costs5,589 3,913 1,676 43 %
Silvertip temporary suspension costs— 2,768 (2,768)(100)%
Asset retirement accretion3,027 2,968 59 %
Other1,273 1,345 (72)(5)%
Pre-development, reclamation and other expense$10,506 $15,031 $(4,525)(30)%
Other Income and Expenses
Fair value adjustments, net, decreased to a loss of $26.4 million compared to a gain of $2.2 million as a result of reduction in value related to the Company’s equity investments, partially offset by a gain of $9.3 million related to a fair value adjustment to the Exchange Agreement embedded derivative liability. The estimated fair values of the Company’s equity investments in Victoria and Integra were $131.2 million and $8.5 million, respectively, at September 30, 2021. For additional details on the Exchange Agreement embedded derivative see Note 12 -- Fair Value Measurements and Note 13 -- Derivative Financial Instruments.
Interest expense (net of capitalized interest of $4.4 million) decreased to $3.2 million from $5.1 million due to higher capitalized interest associated with the POA 11 project at Rochester, and lower interest paid under the RCF, partially offset by higher interest paid under the 2029 Senior Notes compared to the 2024 Senior Notes and higher interest paid under finance lease obligations.
Other, net increased to a loss of $26.7 million compared to $6.3 million due to a write-down of a VAT receivable of $26.0 million due to uncertain collectability, partially offset by a one-time fee of $3.8 million related to the novation of certain
34


of the Company’s gold zero cost collars incurred in 2020. For additional details on the VAT receivable write-down, see Note 17 -- Commitments and Contingencies.
Income and Mining Taxes
During the third quarter of 2021, income and mining tax expense of approximately $6.4 million resulted in an effective tax rate of (13.2)% for 2021. This compares to income tax expense of $13.1 million or effective tax rate of 32.8% for 2020. The comparability of the Company’s income and mining tax (expense) benefit and effective tax rate for the reported periods was impacted by multiple factors, primarily: (i) variations in our income before income taxes; (ii) geographic distribution of that income; (iii) mining taxes; (iv) foreign exchange rates; (v) percentage depletion; (vi) the non-recognition of tax assets; and (vii) the impact of uncertain tax positions. Therefore, the effective tax rate will fluctuate, sometimes significantly, period to period.
The following table summarizes the components of the Company’s income (loss) before tax and income and mining tax (expense) benefit:
Three months ended September 30, 2021
 20212020
In thousandsIncome (loss) before taxTax (expense) benefitIncome (loss) before taxTax (expense) benefit
United States$(30,247)$4,078 $24,592 $(6,003)
Canada(13,879)— (12,895)— 
Mexico(4,138)(10,478)28,320 (7,110)
Other jurisdictions(104)— (48)— 
$(48,368)$(6,400)$39,969 $(13,113)
A valuation allowance is provided for deferred tax assets for which it is more likely than not that the related tax benefits will not be realized. The Company analyzes its deferred tax assets and, if it is determined that the Company will not realize all or a portion of its deferred tax assets, it will record or increase a valuation allowance. Conversely, if it is determined that the Company will ultimately be more likely than not able to realize all or a portion of the related benefits for which a valuation allowance has been provided, all or a portion of the related valuation allowance will be reduced. There are a number of factors that impact the Company’s ability to realize its deferred tax assets. For additional information, please see “Item 1A - Risk Factors” in the 2020 10-K.
Net Income (Loss)
Net loss was $54.8 million, or $0.21 per diluted share, compared to net income of $26.9 million, or $0.11 per share. The decrease in net income was driven by a 6% decrease in average realized gold prices, lower gold and silver ounces sold (6% and 4%, respectively), higher operating costs, a VAT write-down of $26.0 million, and unfavorable changes in value related to the Company’s equity investments. This was partially offset by lower costs incurred in connection with the Company’s COVID-19 health and safety protocols and a gain of $9.3 million related to a fair value adjustment to the Exchange Agreement embedded derivative liability. Adjusted net loss was $2.6 million, or $0.01 per diluted share, compared to adjusted net income of $38.2 million, or $0.16 per share (see “Non-GAAP Financial Performance Measures”).
Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021 compared to Nine Months Ended September 30, 2020
Revenue
Revenue increased by $67.8 million, or 12%, as a result of a 1% and 33% increase in average realized gold and silver prices, respectively, and higher gold and silver ounces sold (1% and 9%, respectively). In 2020, production was impacted by the temporary suspension of active mining operations at Palmarejo due to a government decree in response to COVID-19. We sold 261,417 gold ounces and 7.5 million silver ounces, compared to 258,851 gold ounces, 6.9 million silver ounces, 3.2 million zinc pounds and 2.5 million lead pounds in the prior year. Gold and silver accounted for 69% and 31% of 2021 sales revenue, respectively. This compares to gold and silver accounting for 76% and 23% of 2020 sales revenue, respectively, with zinc and lead accounting for the remaining 2020 sales revenue.

35


The following table summarizes consolidated metal sales:
Nine months ended September 30,Increase (Decrease)Percentage Change
In thousands20212020
Gold sales$432,210 $422,639 $9,571 %
Silver sales192,734 133,852 58,882 44 %
Zinc sales— (662)662 (100)%
Lead sales— 1,315 (1,315)(100)%
Metal sales$624,944 $557,144 $67,800 12 %
Costs Applicable to Sales
Costs applicable to sales increased $53.4 million, or 17%, primarily due to higher ounces sold resulting from the 2020 temporary suspension of active mining operations at Palmarejo in 2020, increased maintenance and consumable costs, the Rochester LCM adjustment of $5.3 million and a non-cash inventory charge of $8.6 million related to a change in the Company’s recovery rate assumption on the Stage IV leach pad at Rochester, partially offset by the favorable impact from foreign currency hedges. For a complete discussion of costs applicable to sales, see Results of Operations below.
Amortization
Amortization decreased $3.4 million, or 4%, primarily due to the 2020 temporary suspension of active mining operations at Palmarejo and Silvertip and longer assumed mine life based on year-end 2020 mineral reserve growth at Palmarejo, partially offset by higher ounces sold.
Expenses
General and administrative expenses increased $5.5 million, or 22%, primarily due to higher employee incentive compensation, travel and outside service costs.
Exploration expense increased $6.4 million, or 21%, as the Company maintained its commitment to a higher-level of exploration investment following the completion of the largest and most successful drilling campaign in Coeur’s history during 2020. The Company completed 556,800 feet (169,725 meters) of expansion drilling and 346,500 feet (105,625 meters) of infill drilling in the nine months of 2021 compared to 477,454 feet (145,528 meters) of expansion drilling and 122,686 feet (37,395 meters) of infill drilling in the nine months of 2020.
Pre-development, reclamation, and other expenses decreased $3.3 million, or 8%, stemming from lower costs incurred in connection with the Company’s COVID-19 health and safety protocols and one-time costs at Silvertip including a $2.1 million write down of obsolete supply inventory in 2020, partially offset by full-year ongoing carrying costs at Silvertip and a gain resulting from the modification of a right of use lease at Silvertip in 2020.
The following table summarizes pre-development, reclamation, and other expenses:
Nine months ended September 30,Increase (Decrease)Percentage Change
In thousands20212020
COVID-19$5,937 $10,418 $(4,481)(43)%
Silvertip ongoing carrying costs18,957 11,704 7,253 62 %
Silvertip temporary suspension costs— 10,107 (10,107)(100)%
Gain on modification of right of use lease— (4,051)4,051 (100)%
Asset retirement accretion8,898 8,724 174 %
Other3,164 3,359 (195)(6)%
Pre-development, reclamation and other expense$36,956 $40,261 $(3,305)(8)%
Other Income and Expenses
During the first quarter of 2021, the Company incurred a $9.2 million loss in connection with the tender and redemption of the 2024 Senior Notes concurrent with the completed offering of the 2029 Senior Notes.
Fair value adjustments, net, increased to a gain of $7.0 million compared to a gain of $3.5 million as a result of a gain of $9.3 million related to a fair value adjustment to the Exchange Agreement embedded derivative liability, partially offset by reduction in value of the Company’s equity investments. The estimated fair values of the Company’s equity investments in Victoria and Integra were $131.2 million and $8.5 million, respectively, at September 30, 2021. For additional details on the
36


Exchange Agreement embedded derivative see Note 12 -- Fair Value Measurements and Note 13 -- Derivative Financial Instruments.
Interest expense (net of capitalized interest of $7.0 million) decreased to $13.2 million from $16.0 million due to higher capitalized interest associated with the POA 11 project at Rochester, and lower interest paid under the RCF, partially offset by higher interest paid under the 2029 Senior Notes compared to the 2024 Senior Notes and higher interest paid under finance lease obligations.
Other, net increased to a loss of $22.4 million compared to $4.3 million due to a write-down of a VAT receivable of $26.0 million due to uncertain collectability, partially offset by an increase in gains on the sale of assets in 2021 and a one-time fee of $3.8 million related to the novation of certain of the Company’s gold zero cost collars incurred in 2020. For additional details on the VAT receivable write-down see Note 17 -- Commitments and Contingencies.
Income and Mining Taxes
During the first nine months of 2021, income and mining tax expense of approximately $34.5 million resulted in an effective tax rate of 247.3% for 2021. This compares to income tax expense of $12.0 million or effective tax rate of 46.6% for 2020. The comparability of the Company’s income and mining tax (expense) benefit and effective tax rate for the reported periods was impacted by multiple factors, primarily: (i) variations in our income before income taxes; (ii) geographic distribution of that income; (iii) foreign exchange rates; (iv) the impact of uncertain tax positions; (v) mining taxes; (vi) percentage depletion and (vii) the non-recognition of tax assets. Therefore, the effective tax rate will fluctuate, sometimes significantly, period to period.
The following table summarizes the components of the Company’s income (loss) before tax and income and mining tax (expense) benefit:
Nine months ended September 30,
 20212020
In thousandsIncome (loss) before taxTax (expense) benefitIncome (loss) before taxTax (expense) benefit
United States$(9,131)$(4,775)$26,132 $(5,913)
Canada(39,643)— (54,544)232 
Mexico59,603 (29,751)54,483 (6,366)
Other jurisdictions3,135 — (306)29 
$13,964 $(34,526)$25,765 $(12,018)
A valuation allowance is provided for deferred tax assets for which it is more likely than not that the related tax benefits will not be realized. The Company analyzes its deferred tax assets and, if it is determined that the Company will not realize all or a portion of its deferred tax assets, it will record or increase a valuation allowance. Conversely, if it is determined that the Company will ultimately be more likely than not able to realize all or a portion of the related benefits for which a valuation allowance has been provided, all or a portion of the related valuation allowance will be reduced. There are a number of factors that impact the Company’s ability to realize its deferred tax assets. For additional information, please see “Item 1A - Risk Factors” in the 2020 10-K.
Net Income (Loss)
Net loss was $20.6 million, or $0.08 per diluted share, compared to net income of $13.7 million, or $0.06 per share. The decrease in net income was driven by higher operating costs, a VAT write-down of $26.0 million, higher exploration expense, a $9.2 million loss on debt extinguishment, 9 months of ongoing carrying costs at Silvertip, reduction in value related to the Company’s equity investments and higher income and mining taxes. This was partially offset by a 1% and 33% increase in average realized gold and silver prices, respectively, higher sales of gold and silver (1% and 9%, respectively), and lower operating costs at Silvertip. Adjusted net income was $10.5 million, or $0.04 per diluted share, compared to $39.9 million, or $0.17 per share (see “Non-GAAP Financial Performance Measures”).


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Results of Operations
Palmarejo
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
2021202020212020
Tons milled517,363 492,474 1,519,126 1,241,677 
Average gold grade (oz/t)0.050 0.070 0.060 0.070 
Average silver grade (oz/t)3.86 4.37 3.95 4.52 
Average recovery rate – Au93.7 %91.3 %93.9 %90.3 %
Average recovery rate – Ag85.5 %82.8 %82.9 %80.0 %
Gold ounces produced24,254 29,296 80,454 76,097 
Silver ounces produced1,707,518 1,783,524 4,977,337 4,485,549 
Gold ounces sold24,897 27,252 81,100 75,463 
Silver ounces sold1,714,617 1,765,371 4,991,932 4,534,802 
Costs applicable to sales per gold ounce(1)
$705 $603 $666 $637 
Costs applicable to sales per silver ounce(1)
$12.52 $10.09 $12.20 $9.03 
(1)See Non-GAAP Financial Performance Measures.
Three Months Ended September 30, 2021 compared to Three Months Ended September 30, 2020
Gold and silver production decreased 17% and 4%, respectively, as a result of lower gold and silver grades, partially offset by higher mill throughout and recoveries. Metal sales were $74.6 million, or 36% of Coeur’s metal sales, compared with $81.8 million, or 36% of Coeur’s metal sales. Revenue for the three months ended September 30, 2021 decreased by $7.1 million or 9%, of which $4.4 million was the result of a lower volume of gold and silver sales and $2.7 million was due to lower average realized gold and silver prices. Costs applicable to sales per gold and silver ounce increased 17% and 24%, respectively, due to the mix of gold and silver sales, lower production, and higher maintenance and consumable costs, partially offset by the favorable impact of foreign currency hedges. Amortization decreased to $8.7 million due to lower ounces sold and longer assumed mine life based on year-end 2020 mineral reserve growth. Capital expenditures increased to $8.5 million from $5.0 million due to higher underground development and infill drilling activities.
Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021 compared to Nine Months Ended September 30, 2020
Gold and silver production increased 6% and 11%, respectively, as a result of the government-mandated COVID-19-related temporary suspension of active mining operations at Palmarejo in 2020 and higher mill throughput and recoveries, partially offset by lower gold and silver grades. Metal sales were $240.0 million, or 38% of Coeur’s metal sales, compared with $194.1 million, or 35% of Coeur’s metal sales. Revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 increased by $46.0 million or 24%, of which $26.5 million was the result of higher average realized gold and silver prices, and $19.5 million was due to a higher volume of gold and silver sales. Costs applicable to sales per gold and silver ounce increased 5% and 35%, respectively, due to the mix of gold and silver sales, lower gold and silver grades, and higher maintenance and consumable costs, partially offset by the favorable impact from foreign currency hedges. Amortization decreased to $26.1 million due to a longer anticipated mine life based on year-end 2020 reserve growth, partially offset by higher ounces sold. Capital expenditures increased to $28.3 million from $16.6 million attributable to higher underground development at the La Nacion deposit and the impact of the 2020 temporary suspension on underground development and infill drilling activities.
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Rochester
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
2021202020212020
Tons placed3,427,078 4,523,767 9,863,772 11,695,676 
Average gold grade (oz/t)0.002 0.0020.002 0.002
Average silver grade (oz/t)0.43 0.490.42 0.52
Gold ounces produced6,051 6,462 20,187 17,557 
Silver ounces produced738,554 739,886 2,400,539 2,155,577 
Gold ounces sold5,559 6,834 20,311 17,585 
Silver ounces sold758,214 785,887 2,441,429 2,141,803 
Costs applicable to sales per gold ounce(1)
$1,994 $1,118 $1,707 $1,299 
Costs applicable to sales per silver ounce(1)
$27.15 $14.58 $24.19 $14.73 
(1)See Non-GAAP Financial Performance Measures.
Three Months Ended September 30, 2021 compared to Three Months Ended September 30, 2020
Gold production decreased 6%, while silver production remained comparable, despite the placement of over-liner material on the new Stage VI leach pad, which impacted the Company’s ability to stack and leach material on the Stage IV leach pad. Metal sales were $28.3 million, or 14% of Coeur’s metal sales, compared with $32.1 million, or 14% of Coeur’s metal sales. Revenue for the three months ended September 30, 2021 decreased by $3.8 million or 12%, of which $2.9 million was the result of a lower volume of gold and silver sales and $0.9 million was due to lower average realized gold and silver prices. Costs applicable to sales per gold and silver ounce increased 78% and 86%, respectively, resulting from higher maintenance and consumable costs, and a LCM adjustment of $5.3 million. Amortization increased to $4.7 million due to higher equipment depreciation from recently placed-in service assets. Capital expenditures increased to $40.1 million from $9.8 million due to the commencement of construction activities related to POA 11 in August 2020.
Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021 compared to Nine Months Ended September 30, 2020
Gold and silver production increased 15% and 11%, respectively, due to the timing of recoveries associated with the restocking of leach pad inventory after the commissioning of the high-pressure grinding roll in 2019, which adversely impacted 2020 gold and silver production. Metal sales were $99.2 million, or 16% of Coeur’s metal sales, compared with $72.2 million, or 13% of Coeur’s metal sales. Revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 increased by $27.0 million or 37%, of which $14.4 million was the result of higher average realized gold and silver prices and $12.6 million was the result of a higher volume of gold and silver sales. Costs applicable to sales per gold and silver ounce increased 31% and 64%, respectively, due to the mix of gold and silver sales, and higher maintenance and consumable costs. Additionally, there was a LCM adjustment of $5.3 million and a non-cash inventory charge of $8.6 million related to a change in the Company’s recovery rate assumption on the Stage IV leach pad. Amortization increased to $14.8 million due to higher ounces sold and higher equipment depreciation from recently placed-in service assets. Capital expenditures increased to $112.5 million from $20.6 million due to the commencement of construction activities related to POA 11 in August 2020.
Overall progress under the current scope, POA 11 was approximately 42% complete at the end of the third quarter. As part of ongoing efforts to optimize and de-risk the project, the Company has identified a potential opportunity to enhance future operating flexibility by incorporating pre-screens into the flowsheet for the newly constructed crushing circuit. While the Company completes detailed engineering related to this opportunity, Coeur intends to install pre-screens on the existing crusher system during the first half of 2022. If the Company determines that pre-screens are a value-accretive scope change to the project, Coeur currently estimates that commissioning and ramp-up of the new crushing circuit could be extended by three to six months.
Historic rain amounts were experienced at Rochester in late October 2021. The Company is currently assessing any impacts to operations and the POA 11 project.
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Kensington
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
2021202020212020
Tons milled160,596 163,276 499,265 496,095 
Average gold grade (oz/t)0.19 0.18 0.19 0.20 
Average recovery rate93.0 %93.7 %92.9 %93.0 %
Gold ounces produced28,621 26,797 87,624 91,877 
Gold ounces sold29,902 27,815 88,293 92,963 
Costs applicable to sales per gold ounce(1)
$1,156 $1,134 $1,078 $994 
(1)See Non-GAAP Financial Performance Measures.
Three Months Ended September 30, 2021 compared to Three Months Ended September 30, 2020
Gold production increased 7% as a result of higher grade, partially offset by lower mill throughput. Metal sales were $51.9 million, or 25% of Coeur’s metal sales, compared to $52.4 million, or 23% of Coeur’s metal sales. Revenue for the three months ended September 30, 2021 decreased by $0.5 million or 1%, of which $4.1 million resulted from lower average realized gold prices, partially offset by an increase of $3.6 million due to a higher volume of gold sales. Costs applicable to sales per gold ounce increased slightly due to higher diesel and employee-related costs, partially offset by higher production. Amortization increased to $12.8 million due to higher ounces sold. Capital expenditures increased to $6.3 million from $5.3 million due to higher infill drilling and underground development.
Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021 compared to Nine Months Ended September 30, 2020
Gold production decreased 5% as a result of lower grade, partially offset by higher mill throughput. Metal sales were $155.2 million, or 25% of Coeur’s metal sales, compared to $159.2 million, or 29% of Coeur’s metal sales. Revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 decreased by $4.0 million or 3%, of which $8.2 million resulted from lower volume of gold sales, partially offset by an increase of $4.2 million due to higher average realized gold prices. Costs applicable to sales per gold ounce increased 8% due to lower production and higher diesel, employee-related and maintenance costs. Amortization increased to $38.9 million primarily due to higher Jualin production, partially offset by lower ounces sold. Capital expenditures increased to $19.5 million from $14.1 million due to higher infill drilling and underground development.

Wharf
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
2021202020212020
Tons placed1,489,169 1,315,542 3,628,693 3,663,228 
Average gold grade (oz/t)0.025 0.0250.028 0.028
Gold ounces produced28,157 33,440 71,318 73,770 
Silver ounces produced16,323 41,939 75,055 81,764 
Gold ounces sold29,446 33,382 71,713 72,840 
Silver ounces sold18,172 40,521 76,048 77,996 
Costs applicable to sales per gold ounce(1)
$973 $805 $966 $914 
(1)See Non-GAAP Financial Performance Measures.
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Three Months Ended September 30, 2021 compared to Three Months Ended September 30, 2020
Gold production decreased 16% driven by the timing of recoveries. Metal sales were $53.1 million, or 26% of Coeur’s metal sales, compared to $63.5 million, or 28% of Coeur’s metal sales. Revenue for the three months ended September 30, 2021 decreased by $10.4 million or 16%, of which $7.6 million was due to a lower volume of gold and silver sales and $2.8 million resulted from lower average realized gold and silver prices. Costs applicable to sales per gold ounce increased 21% due to higher employee-related and diesel costs. Amortization decreased to $3.2 million due to lower ounces sold. Capital expenditures were $1.0 million.
Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021 compared to Nine Months Ended September 30, 2020
Gold production decreased 3% driven by the timing of recoveries. Metal sales were $130.6 million, or 21% of Coeur’s metal sales, compared to $129.8 million, or 23% of Coeur’s metal sales. Revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 increased by $0.8 million or 1%, of which $2.8 million resulted from higher average realized gold and silver prices, partially offset by a decrease of $2.0 million due to a lower volume of gold and silver sales. Costs applicable to sales per gold ounce increased 6% due to higher equipment rental, diesel and employee-related costs, partially offset by a $3.3 million inventory write-down related to lower expected recoveries from leach pads 4 and 5 in 2020. Amortization decreased to $8.6 million due to lower ounces sold. Capital expenditures were $3.9 million.
Silvertip
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
2021202020212020
Silver ounces produced— — — 139,287 
Zinc pounds produced— — — 2,459,756 
Lead pounds produced— — — 2,176,847 
Silver ounces sold— — — 158,984 
Zinc pounds sold— — — 3,203,446 
Lead pounds sold— — — 2,453,485 
Costs applicable to sales per silver ounce(2)
$— $— $— 
NM(1)
Costs applicable to sales per zinc pound(2)
$— $— $— 
NM(1)
Costs applicable to sales per lead ounce(2)
$— $— $— 
NM(1)
(1)Due to the temporary suspension of mining and processing activities these amounts are not meaningful.
(2)See Non-GAAP Financial Performance Measures.
Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021 compared to Nine Months Ended September 30, 2020
Silvertip temporarily suspended mining and processing activities, unrelated to COVID-19, in February 2020. Operational results in the table above reflect performance prior to the temporary suspension. Ongoing carrying and temporary suspension costs are included in Pre-development, reclamation, and other.
The Company continues to generate positive results from ongoing exploration and confirmatory metallurgical test work. Given these drilling results, the enhanced understanding of the Silvertip deposit and the potential to significantly expand mineralized material with continued drilling, Coeur is now assessing the opportunity to significantly enhance the economics of a potential expansion and restart by re-evaluating the overall scope, including higher throughput, staging options, delivery timeline and commercial approach to the project.
Coeur anticipates this ongoing review, current macroeconomic conditions impacting capital estimates and continued exploration investment will result in the Company sequencing a potential Silvertip expansion and restart following the completion of the POA 11 expansion at Rochester. Coeur believes the benefits of this sequencing includes (i) allowing for an acute focus on successful completion of the Rochester expansion, and (ii) maximizing balance sheet flexibility.
In June 2021, Silvertip repurchased from Silvertip Resources Investment Cayman Ltd. a net smelter returns royalty of 1.429% on the first 1,434,000 metric tonnes of mineralized material mined, and 1.00% thereafter for $7.0 million.

Liquidity and Capital Resources
At September 30, 2021, the Company had $86.8 million of cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash and $245.0 million available under its RCF. Cash and cash equivalents decreased $7.8 million in the nine months ended September 30,
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2021, due to higher capital expenditures related to POA 11 at Rochester and the potential expansion project at Silvertip coupled with higher general and administrative and exploration costs, and the tender and redemption of the 2024 Senior Notes for $238.3 million, including premiums. This was partially offset by a 1% and 33% increase in average realized gold and silver prices, respectively, higher gold and silver ounces sold (1% and 9%, respectively), $20.0 million drawn from the RCF, and the net proceeds of $367.5 million from the issuance of the 2029 Senior Notes.
Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Company has completed various scenario planning analyses to consider potential impacts of COVID-19 on its business, including volatility in commodity prices, temporary disruptions and/or curtailments of operating activities (voluntary or involuntary). To provide additional flexibility to respond to potential downside scenarios, the Company has been able to periodically draw and make repayments under its RCF subsequent to the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. At September 30, 2021, the Company had $20.0 million drawn and $35.0 million in outstanding letters of credit under the RCF, which was amended in March 2021 to allow the Company to obtain one or more increases of the RCF in an aggregate amount of up to $100.0 million and extend the maturity to March 2025. Additionally, Coeur established a $100.0 million ATM Program in April 2020 as a means to proactively increase its financial flexibility in response to increased volatility and uncertainty associated with COVID-19. At the date of this filing, the Company has yet to issue any shares of its common stock under the ATM Program and intends to maintain the program during the POA 11 construction.
Cash Provided by Operating Activities
Net cash provided by operating activities for the three months ended September 30, 2021 was $21.8 million, compared to $79.5 million for the three months ended September 30, 2020. Net cash provided by operating activities for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 was $75.5 million, compared to $81.4 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2020. Adjusted EBITDA for the three months ended September 30, 2021 was $48.8 million, compared to $90.8 million for the three months ended September 30, 2020. Adjusted EBITDA for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 was $167.4 million, compared to $179.4 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2020 (see “Non-GAAP Financial Performance Measures”). Net cash provided by operating activities was impacted by the following key factors for the applicable periods:
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
In thousands2021202020212020
Cash flow before changes in operating assets and liabilities$34,804 $57,378 $107,826 $103,933 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
Receivables(944)(1,497)1,016 (3,846)
Prepaid expenses and other(80)(1,921)593 (1,186)
Inventories(3,820)(3,066)(18,047)(33,047)
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities(8,114)28,570 (15,842)15,566 
Cash provided by operating activities$21,846 $79,464 $75,546 $81,420 
Net cash provided by operating activities decreased $57.6 million for the three months ended September 30, 2021 compared to the three months ended September 30, 2020, primarily due to a 6% decrease in average realized gold prices, and lower gold and silver ounces sold (6% and 4%, respectively), higher mining and income tax at Palmarejo, and the timing of interest payments. Revenue for the three months ended September 30, 2021 decreased by $21.8 million, of which $11.5 million was the result of the lower volume of gold and silver sales and $10.3 million was due to lower average realized gold prices.
Net cash provided by operating activities decreased $5.9 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, primarily due to higher exploration costs, and higher mining and income tax at Palmarejo, partially offset by a 1% and 33% increase in average realized gold and silver prices, respectively, and higher gold and silver ounces sold (1% and 9%, respectively), and a reduction in operating costs at Silvertip due to the temporary suspension in 2020. Revenue for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 increased by $67.8 million, of which $48.3 million was the result of higher average realized gold and silver prices and $19.5 million was due to the higher volume of gold and silver sales.
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Cash Provided by (Used in) Investing Activities
Net cash used in investing activities in the three months ended September 30, 2021 was $72.3 million compared to $24.8 million in the three months ended September 30, 2020. Cash used in investing activities increased primarily due to construction activities related to POA 11 at Rochester and the potential expansion at Silvertip. The Company incurred capital expenditures of $71.3 million in the three months ended September 30, 2021 compared with $23.0 million in the three months ended September 30, 2020. Capital expenditures in the three months ended September 30, 2021 were primarily related to POA 11 construction activities at Rochester, potential expansion expenditures at Silvertip and underground development at Palmarejo and Kensington. Capital expenditures in the three months ended September 30, 2020 were primarily related to the commencement of POA 11 construction activities at Rochester and underground development at Palmarejo and Kensington.
Net cash used in investing activities in the nine months ended September 30, 2021 was $204.4 million compared to $39.6 million in the nine months ended September 30, 2020. Cash used in investing activities increased primarily due to construction activities related to POA 11 at Rochester and the potential expansion at Silvertip in the current period and the impact of the net proceeds of $19.4 million from the sale of Metalla Common Shares in the comparable period of 2020. The Company incurred capital expenditures of $208.9 million in the nine months ended September 30, 2021 compared with $61.9 million in the nine months ended September 30, 2020. Capital expenditures in the nine months ended September 30, 2021 were primarily related to POA 11 construction activities at Rochester, potential expansion expenditures at Silvertip and underground development at Palmarejo and Kensington. Capital expenditures in the nine months ended September 30, 2020 were primarily related to POA 11 at Rochester, which commenced construction activities during the third quarter, and underground development at Palmarejo and Kensington.
The Company has started to experience inflationary pressures, specifically with respect to building materials and fuel as well as overall tightness in the construction market related to capital projects, most notably the POA 11 project at Rochester and to operating costs company-wide.
Cash Provided by (Used in) Financing Activities
Net cash provided by financing activities in the three months ended September 30, 2021 was $12.0 million compared to net cash used in financing activities of $48.4 million in the three months ended September 30, 2020. During the three months ended September 30, 2021, the Company drew $20.0 million from the RCF. During the three months ended September 30, 2020, the Company repaid $40.0 million under the RCF.
Net cash provided by financing activities in the nine months ended September 30, 2021 was $121.8 million compared to net cash used in financing activities of $20.6 million in the nine months ended September 30, 2020. During the nine months ended September 30, 2021, the Company received net proceeds of $367.5 million from the issuance of the 2029 Senior Notes, and drew $20.0 million from the RCF, partially offset by the tender and redemption of the 2024 Senior Notes for $238.3 million, including premiums. During the nine months ended September 30, 2020, the Company drew $20.0 million, net, from the RCF, and paid cash contingent consideration of $18.8 million associated with the Silvertip acquisition.
The Company secured a finance lease package for nearly $60 million during the quarter, a portion of which has been funded as of September 30, 2021. The package is earmarked for planned equipment purchases for the POA 11 project in 2021 and 2022, and has an interest rate of 5.20%.

Critical Accounting Policies and Accounting Developments
Please see Note 2 -- Summary of Significant Accounting Policies contained in the 2020 10-K and in Note 2 - Summary of Significant Accounting Policies contained in this Report for the Company’s critical accounting policies and estimates.

Other Liquidity Matters
We believe that our liquidity and capital resources in the U.S. are adequate to fund our U.S. operations and corporate activities. The Company has asserted indefinite reinvestment of earnings from its Mexican operations as determined by management’s judgment about and intentions concerning the future operations of the Company. The Company does not believe that the amounts reinvested will have a material impact on liquidity.

In order to reduce indebtedness, future cash interest payments and/or amounts due at maturity or upon redemption and for general working capital purposes, from time-to-time we may (1) issue equity securities for cash in public or private offerings or (2) repurchase certain of our debt securities for cash or in exchange for other securities, which may include secured or unsecured notes or equity, in each case in open market or privately negotiated transactions. We evaluate any such transactions in light of prevailing market conditions, liquidity requirements, contractual restrictions, and other factors. The
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amounts involved may be significant and any debt repurchase transactions may occur at a substantial discount to the debt securities’ face amount.

Non-GAAP Financial Performance Measures
Non-GAAP financial measures are intended to provide additional information only and do not have any standard meaning prescribed by generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). Unless otherwise noted, we present the Non-GAAP financial measures in the tables below. These measures should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for performance measures prepared in accordance with GAAP.
Adjusted Net Income (Loss)
Management uses Adjusted net income (loss) to evaluate the Company’s operating performance, and to plan and forecast its operations. The Company believes the use of Adjusted net income (loss) reflects the underlying operating performance of our core mining business and allows investors and analysts to compare results of the Company to similar results of other mining companies. Management’s determination of the components of Adjusted net income (loss) are evaluated periodically and is based, in part, on a review of non-GAAP financial measures used by mining industry analysts. The tax effect of adjustments are based on statutory tax rates and the Company’s tax attributes, including the impact through the Company’s valuation allowance. The combined effective rate of tax adjustments may not be consistent with the statutory tax rates or the Company’s effective tax rate due to jurisdictional tax attributes and related valuation allowance impacts which may minimize the tax effect of certain adjustments and may not apply to gains and losses equally. Adjusted net income (loss) is reconciled to Net income (loss) in the following table:
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
In thousands except per share amounts2021202020212020
Net income (loss)$(54,768)$26,856 $(20,562)$13,747 
Fair value adjustments, net26,440 (2,243)(7,000)(3,491)
Foreign exchange loss (gain)388 1,233 1,849 (4,761)
(Gain) loss on sale of assets and securities92 2,476 (4,582)2,093 
VAT write-off25,982 — 25,982 — 
Loss on debt extinguishment— — 9,172 — 
Silvertip inventory write-down271 1,232 271 13,717 
Wharf inventory write-down— — — 3,323 
Silvertip temporary suspension costs— 838 — 6,073 
Silvertip lease modification— — — (4,051)
Silvertip gain on contingent consideration— — — (955)
Novation— 3,819 — 3,819 
COVID-19 costs617 4,037 5,937 10,418 
Tax effect of adjustments(1)
(1,630)— (574)— 
Adjusted net income (loss)$(2,608)$38,248 $10,493 $39,932 
Adjusted net income (loss) per share - Basic$(0.01)$0.16 $0.04 $0.17 
Adjusted net income (loss) per share - Diluted$(0.01)$0.16 $0.04 $0.17 
(1) For the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, tax effect of adjustments of $1.6 million (-3%) and $0.6 million (-2%) are primarily related to the fair value adjustments on the Company’s equity investments.

EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA
Management uses EBITDA to evaluate the Company’s operating performance, to plan and forecast its operations, and assess leverage levels and liquidity measures. The Company believes the use of EBITDA reflects the underlying operating performance of our core mining business and allows investors and analysts to compare results of the Company to similar results of other mining companies. Adjusted EBITDA is a measure used in indenture governing the 2029 Senior Notes and the RCF to determine our ability to make certain payments and incur additional indebtedness. EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA do not represent, and should not be considered an alternative to, Net income (Loss) or Cash Flow from Operations as determined under GAAP. Other companies may calculate Adjusted EBITDA differently and those calculations may not be comparable to our presentation. Adjusted EBITDA is reconciled to Net income (loss) in the following table:
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Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
In thousands except per share amounts2021202020212020
Net income (loss)$(54,768)$26,856 $(20,562)$13,747 
Interest expense, net of capitalized interest3,237 5,096 13,240 15,989 
Income tax provision (benefit)6,400 13,113 34,526 12,018 
Amortization30,962 32,216 92,872 96,254 
EBITDA(14,169)77,281 120,076 138,008 
Fair value adjustments, net26,440 (2,243)(7,000)(3,491)
Foreign exchange (gain) loss1,028 599 2,299 665 
Asset retirement obligation accretion3,027 2,968 8,898 8,724 
Inventory adjustments and write-downs5,519 (230)6,358 1,038 
(Gain) loss on sale of assets and securities92 2,476 (4,582)2,093 
VAT write-off25,982 — 25,982 — 
Loss on debt extinguishment— — 9,172 — 
Silvertip inventory write-down271 1,232 271 13,717 
Silvertip temporary suspension costs— 838 — 6,073 
Silvertip lease modification— — — (4,051)
Silvertip gain on contingent consideration— — — (955)
COVID-19 costs617 4,037 5,937 10,418 
Wharf inventory write-down— — — 3,323 
Adjusted EBITDA$48,807 $90,777 $167,411 $179,381 

Free Cash Flow
Management uses Free Cash Flow as a non-GAAP measure to analyze cash flows generated from operations. Free Cash Flow is Cash Provided By (used in) Operating Activities less Capital expenditures as presented on the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows. The Company believes Free Cash Flow is also useful as one of the bases for comparing the Company’s performance with its competitors. Although Free Cash Flow and similar measures are frequently used as measures of cash flows generated from operations by other companies, the Company’s calculation of Free Cash Flow is not necessarily comparable to such other similarly titled captions of other companies.
The following table sets forth a reconciliation of Free Cash Flow, a non-GAAP financial measure, to Cash Provided By (used in) Operating Activities, which the Company believes to be the GAAP financial measure most directly comparable to Free Cash Flow.
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
(Dollars in thousands)2021202020212020
Cash flow from operations$21,846 $79,464 $75,546 $81,420 
Capital expenditures71,266 22,996 208,913 61,886 
Free cash flow$(49,420)$56,468 $(133,367)19,534 

Operating Cash Flow Before Changes in Working Capital
Management uses Operating Cash Flow Before Changes in Working Capital as a non-GAAP measure to analyze cash flows generated from operations. Operating Cash Flow Before Changes in Working Capital is Cash Provided By (used in) Operating Activities excluding the change in Receivables, Prepaid expenses and other, Inventories and Accounts payable and accrued liabilities as presented on the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows. The Company believes Operating Cash Flow Before Changes in Working Capital is also useful as one of the bases for comparing the Company’s performance with its competitors. Although Operating Cash Flow Before Changes in Working Capital and similar measures are frequently used as measures of cash flows generated from operations by other companies, the Company’s calculation of Operating Cash Flow Before Changes in Working Capital is not necessarily comparable to such other similarly titled captions of other companies.
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The following table sets forth a reconciliation of Operating Cash Flow Before Changes in Working Capital, a non-GAAP financial measure, to Cash Provided By (used in) Operating Activities, which the Company believes to be the GAAP financial measure most directly comparable to Operating Cash Flow Before Changes in Working Capital.
Three Months Ended September 30,Nine Months Ended September 30,
(Dollars in thousands)2021202020212020
Cash provided by (used in) operating activities$21,846 $79,464 $75,546 $81,420 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
Receivables944 1,536 (1,016)2,349 
Prepaid expenses and other80 (1,081)(593)(735)
Inventories3,820 8,056 18,047 29,981 
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities8,114 (2,047)15,842 13,004 
Operating cash flow before changes in working capital$34,804 $85,928 $107,826 $126,019 

Costs Applicable to Sales
Management uses CAS to evaluate the Company’s current operating performance and life of mine performance from discovery through reclamation. We believe these measures assist analysts, investors and other stakeholders in understanding the costs associated with producing gold, silver, zinc and lead, assessing our operating performance and ability to generate free cash flow from operations and sustaining production. These measures may not be indicative of operating profit or cash flow from operations as determined under GAAP. Management believes that allocating CAS to gold, silver, zinc and lead based on gold, silver, zinc and lead metal sales relative to total metal sales best allows management, analysts, investors and other stakeholders to evaluate the operating performance of the Company. Other companies may calculate CAS differently as a result of reflecting the benefit from selling non-silver metals as a by-product credit, converting to silver equivalent ounces, and differences in underlying accounting principles and accounting frameworks such as in International Financial Reporting Standards.

Three Months Ended September 30, 2021
In thousands (except metal sales, per ounce and per pound amounts)PalmarejoRochesterKensingtonWharfSilvertipTotal
Costs applicable to sales, including amortization (U.S. GAAP)$47,763 $36,340 $47,362 $32,237 $1,258 $164,960 
Amortization(8,747)(4,671)(12,786)(3,158)(1,258)(30,620)
Costs applicable to sales$39,016 $31,669 $34,576 $29,079 $— $134,340 
Metal Sales
Gold ounces24,897 5,559 29,902 29,446 89,804 
Silver ounces1,714,617 758,214 18,172 — 2,491,003 
Zinc pounds— — 
Lead pounds— — 
Costs applicable to sales
Gold ($/oz)$705 $1,994 $1,156 $973 
Silver ($/oz)$12.52 $27.15 $— 
Zinc ($/lb)$— 
Lead ($/lb)$— 
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Three Months Ended September 30, 2020
In thousands (except metal sales, per ounce and per pound amounts)PalmarejoRochesterKensingtonWharfSilvertipTotal
Costs applicable to sales, including amortization (U.S. GAAP)$46,163 $22,382 $43,053 $31,887 $1,185 $144,670 
Amortization(11,912)(3,278)(11,523)(4,000)(1,185)(31,898)
Costs applicable to sales$34,251 $19,104 $31,530 $27,887 $— $112,772 
Metal Sales
Gold ounces27,252 6,834 27,815 33,382 95,283 
Silver ounces1,765,371 785,887 40,521 — 2,591,779 
Zinc pounds— — 
Lead pounds— — 
Costs applicable to sales
Gold ($/oz)$603 $1,118 $1,134 $805 
Silver ($/oz)$10.09 $14.58 $— 
Zinc ($/lb)$— 
Lead ($/lb)$— 

Nine Months Ended September 30, 2021
In thousands (except metal sales, per ounce and per pound amounts)PalmarejoRochesterKensingtonWharfSilvertipTotal
Costs applicable to sales, including amortization (U.S. GAAP)$140,999 $108,487 $134,114 $79,881 $3,529 $467,010 
Amortization(26,077)(14,754)(38,941)(8,627)(3,529)(91,928)
Costs applicable to sales$114,922 $93,733 $95,173 $71,254 $— $375,082 
Metal Sales
Gold ounces81,100 20,311 88,293 71,713 261,417 
Silver ounces4,991,932 2,441,429 76,048 — 7,509,409 
Zinc pounds— — 
Lead pounds— — 
Costs applicable to sales
Gold ($/oz)$666 $1,707 $1,078 $966 
Silver ($/oz)$12.20 $24.19 $— 
Zinc ($/lb)$— 
Lead ($/lb)$— 

Nine Months Ended September 30, 2020
In thousands (except metal sales, per ounce and per pound amounts)PalmarejoRochesterKensingtonWharfSilvertipTotal
Costs applicable to sales, including amortization (U.S. GAAP)$121,407 $63,590 $128,717 $77,807 $25,418 $416,939 
Amortization(32,357)(9,194)(36,298)(9,625)(7,761)(95,235)
Costs applicable to sales$89,050 $54,396 $92,419 $68,182 $17,657 $321,704 
Metal Sales
Gold ounces75,463 17,585 92,963 72,840 258,851 
Silver ounces4,534,802 2,141,803 77,996 158,984 6,913,585 
Zinc pounds3,203,446 3,203,446 
Lead pounds2,453,485 2,453,485 
Costs applicable to sales
Gold ($/oz)$637 $1,299 $994 $914 
Silver ($/oz)$9.03 $14.73 
NM(1)
Zinc ($/lb)
NM(1)
Lead ($/lb)
NM(1)
(1) Due to the temporary suspension of mining and processing activities these amounts are not meaningful.

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Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Statements
    This report contains numerous forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) relating to the Company’s gold, silver, zinc and lead mining business, including statements regarding operations at the Company’s mines, exploration and development efforts, strategies, expectations regarding the Rochester POA 11 expansion project, the Silvertip mine's potential expansion and restart, supply and labor disruption, inflation, expectations regarding the sale of the La Preciosa project, COVID-19 planning, response and mitigation efforts, hedging strategies, realization of deferred tax assets, expectations about the recovery of VAT in Mexico, timing of completion of obligations under the Amended Sales Contract at Kensington, liquidity management, financing plans, risk management strategies, capital allocation and anticipated production, costs, and expenses. Such forward-looking statements are identified by the use of words such as “believes,” “intends,” “expects,” “hopes,” “may,” “should,” “plan,” “projected,” “contemplates,” “anticipates” or similar words. Actual results could differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. The factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements include (i) the risk factors set forth in Part II, Item 1A of this report and in “Risk Factors” section of the 2020 10-K, and the risks set forth in this MD&A and Item 3 of this report, (ii) the risks and hazards inherent in the mining business (including risks inherent in developing large-scale mining projects, environmental hazards, industrial accidents, weather or geologically related conditions), (iii) changes in the market prices of gold, silver, zinc and lead and a sustained lower price or higher treatment and refining charge environment, (iv) the uncertainties inherent in the Company’s production, exploratory and developmental activities, including risks relating to permitting and regulatory delays (including the impact of government shutdowns), ground conditions and grade variability, (v) any future labor disputes or work stoppages (involving the Company and its subsidiaries or third parties), (vi) the uncertainties inherent in the estimation of mineral reserves and mineralized material, (vii) changes that could result from the Company’s future acquisition of new mining properties or businesses, (viii) the loss of access to any third-party smelter to whom the Company markets its production, (ix) the potential effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, including impacts to workforce, equipment and materials availability, inflationary pressures, continued access to financing sources, government orders that may require temporary suspension of operations at one or more of our sites and effects on our suppliers or the refiners and smelters to whom the Company markets its production, (x) the effects of environmental and other governmental regulations, (xi) the risks inherent in the ownership or operation of or investment in mining properties or businesses in foreign countries, and (xii) the Company’s ability to raise additional financing necessary to conduct its business, make payments or refinance its debt. Readers are cautioned not to put undue reliance on forward-looking statements. The Company disclaims any intent or obligation to update publicly these forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.
Item 3.        Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
The Company is exposed to various market risks as a part of its operations and engages in risk management strategies to mitigate these risks. The Company continually evaluates the potential benefits of engaging in these strategies based on current market conditions. The Company does not actively engage in the practice of trading derivative instruments for profit. Additional information about the Company’s derivative financial instruments may be found in Note 13 -- Derivative Financial Instruments in the notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements. This discussion of the Company’s market risk assessments contains “forward looking statements”. For additional information regarding forward-looking statements and risks and uncertainties that could impact the Company, please refer to Item 2 of this Report - Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Statements. Actual results and actions could differ materially from those discussed below.
Gold, Silver, Zinc and Lead Prices
Gold, silver, zinc and lead prices may fluctuate widely due to numerous factors, such as U.S. dollar strength or weakness, demand, investor sentiment, inflation or deflation, and global mine production. The Company’s profitability and cash flow may be significantly impacted by changes in the market price of gold, silver, zinc and lead.
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Gold, Silver, Zinc and Lead Hedging
To mitigate the risks associated with gold, silver, zinc and lead price fluctuations, the Company may enter into option contracts to hedge future production. The Company had outstanding Asian put and call option contracts in net-zero-cost collar contracts on 171,675 ounces of gold at September 30, 2021 that settle monthly through December 2022. The Company is targeting to hedge up to 50% of expected gold production through 2021 and 2022 and may in the future layer on additional hedges as circumstances warrant. The weighted average strike prices on the put and call contracts are $1,623 and $2,002 per ounce of gold, respectively. The contracts are generally net cash settled and, if the price of gold at the time of the expiration is between the put and call prices, would expire at no cost to the Company. These Asian put and call option contracts expose us to (i) credit risk in the form of non-performance by counterparties for contracts in which the contract price exceeds the spot price of a commodity, (ii) price risk to the extent that the spot price exceeds the contract price for quantities of our production covered under contract positions; and (iii) liquidity risk to the extent counterparties exercise rights to cash collateral for out-of-money hedges under applicable instruments. To reduce counter-party credit exposure, the Company enters into contracts with institutions management deems credit-worthy and limits credit exposure to each institution. The Company does not anticipate non-performance by any of its counterparties. For additional information, please see the section titled “Risk Factors” in the 2020 10-K and part II, Item 1A of this report.
At September 30, 2021, the fair value of the put and call zero cost collars contracts was an asset of $1.6 million. For the nine months ended September 30, 2021 the Company recognized a loss of $0.9 million related to expired options in Revenue and the remaining outstanding options were included in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss). A 10% increase in the price of gold at September 30, 2021 would result in a realized loss of $2.5 million and 10% decrease would result in a realized gain of $9.3 million. As of September 30, 2021, the closing price of gold was $1,743 per ounce. As of October 25, 2021, the closing price of gold was $1,805 per ounce.
Provisional Gold, Silver, Zinc and Lead Sales
The Company enters into sales contracts with third-party smelters and refiners which, in some cases, provide for a provisional payment based upon preliminary assays and quoted metal prices. The provisionally priced sales contracts contain an embedded derivative that is required to be separated from the host contract. Depending on the difference between the price at the time of sale and the final settlement price, embedded derivatives are recorded as either a derivative asset or liability. The embedded derivatives do not qualify for hedge accounting and, as a result, are marked to the market gold, silver, zinc and lead price at the end of each period from the provisional sale date to the date of final settlement. The mark-to-market gains and losses are recorded in earnings. At September 30, 2021, the Company had outstanding provisionally priced sales of 15,966 ounces of gold at an average price of $1,786. Changes in gold prices resulted in provisional pricing mark-to-market loss of $0.6 million during the nine months ended September 30, 2021. A 10% change in realized gold prices would cause revenue to vary by $2.9 million.
Foreign Currency
The Company operates, or has mineral interests, in several foreign countries including Canada, Mexico, and New Zealand, which exposes it to foreign currency exchange rate risks. Foreign currency exchange rates are influenced by world market factors beyond the Company’s control such as supply and demand for U.S. and foreign currencies and related monetary and fiscal policies. Fluctuations in local currency exchange rates in relation to the U.S. dollar may significantly impact profitability and cash flow.
Foreign Exchange Hedging
To manage foreign currency risk, the Company may enter into foreign currency forward exchange contracts. At September 30, 2021, the Company entered into foreign currency forward contracts to manage this risk and designated these instruments as cash flow hedges of forecasted foreign denominated transactions. The Company had outstanding foreign currency forward exchange contracts to receive $0.4 billion Mexican Pesos at September 30, 2021 with an average exchange rate of 25.43 that settle monthly through December 2021. At September 30, 2021, the fair value of the foreign currency forward exchange contracts was a net asset of $3.3 million. For the nine months ended September 30, 2021 the Company has recognized a gain of $10.5 million related to expired options in Cost Applicable to Sales and Pre-development, Reclamation and Other, respectively, and an unrealized gain of $3.3 million related to outstanding options in AOCI. A 10% increase or decrease in the exchange rates at September 30, 2021 would result in a realized gain of $1.8 million or $4.2 million, respectively.
Interest Rates
Interest Rate Hedging
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We may use financial instruments to manage exposures to changes in interest rates on loans, which exposes us to credit risk and market risk. Credit risk is the failure of the counterparty to perform under the terms of the derivative contract. When the fair value of a derivative contract is positive, the counterparty owes us, which creates credit risk for us. When the fair value of a derivative contract is negative, we owe the counterparty and, therefore, it does not pose credit risk. We seek to minimize the credit risk in derivative instruments by entering into transactions with what we believe are high-quality counterparties. Market risk is the adverse effect on the value of a financial instrument that results from a change in interest rates. The Company had no outstanding interest rate swaps at September 30, 2021.
Investment Risk
Equity Price Risk
We are exposed to changes in the fair value of our investments in equity securities. For the nine months ended September 30, 2021, the Company recognized unrealized losses of $3.7 million in Fair value adjustments, net due to decreases in the stock price of those equity securities. At September 30, 2021, the fair value of the equity securities was $139.7 million. A 10% change in realized equity prices would result in an unrealized gain or loss of $14.0 million.

Item 4.    Controls and Procedures
(a)Disclosure Controls and Procedures
As of the end of the period covered by this quarterly report, the Company carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of the Company’s management, including its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures (as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and management necessarily applied its judgment in assessing the costs and benefits of such controls and procedures, which by their nature, can provide only reasonable assurance regarding management’s control objectives. The design of any system of controls is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events. Based upon the foregoing, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective and operating to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed by it in the reports it files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and to provide reasonable assurance that such information is accumulated and communicated to the Company’s management, including its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.
(b)Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
Based on an evaluation by the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, such officers concluded that there was no change in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting during the three months ended September 30, 2021 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.
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PART II

Item 1.         Legal Proceedings
See Note 17 -- Commitments and Contingencies in the notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements included herein.

Item 1A.     Risk Factors
Item 1A -- Risk Factors of the 2020 10-K sets forth information relating to important risks and uncertainties that could materially adversely affect the Company’s business, financial condition or operating results. Those risk factors have been supplemented and updated in the Form 10-Q filed for the quarterly periods ended March 31, 2021 (the “First Quarter 10-Q”) and June 30, 2021 (the “Second Quarter 10-Q”). Except as supplemented in the First Quarter 10-Q and the Second Quarter 10-Q, the risk factors set forth in the 2020 10-K remain current. Additional risks and uncertainties that the Company does not presently know or that it currently deems immaterial also may impair our business operations.

Item 4.         Mine Safety Disclosures

Information pertaining to mine safety matters is reported in accordance with Section 1503(a) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in Exhibit 95.1 attached to this Form 10-Q.

Item 5.     Other Information
In accordance with Rule 10b5-1 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and the Company’s insider trading policy, Casey M. Nault, the Company's Senior Vice President, General Counsel & Secretary entered into a selling plan on August 9, 2021. Under the selling plan, between September 2021 and September 2022, Mr. Nault will sell a total of 100,000 shares of the Company’s common stock so long as the market price of the common stock is higher than the minimum threshold prices specified in the plan.
Rule 10b5-1 permits an insider to implement a written prearranged trading plan entered into at a time when the insider is not aware of any material nonpublic information about the Company and allows the insider to trade on a one-time or regularly scheduled basis regardless of any material nonpublic information about the Company thereafter received by the insider.

Item 6.        Exhibits
10.1
31.1
31.2
32.1
32.2
95.1
101.INSXBRL Instance Document*
101.SCHXBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema*
101.CALXBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase*
101.DEFXBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase*
101.LABXBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase*
101.PREXBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase*
104Cover Page Interactive Data File (formatted as Inline XBRL and included in Exhibit 101).
*    The following financial information from Coeur Mining, Inc.'s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2021, formatted in XBRL (Extensible Business Reporting Language): Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets, Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss), Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows and Consolidated Statement of Changes in Stockholders' Equity.
** Management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement.

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SIGNATURES
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.
COEUR MINING, INC.
(Registrant)
DatedOctober 27, 2021/s/ Mitchell J. Krebs
MITCHELL J. KREBS
President and Chief Executive Officer (Principal Executive Officer)
DatedOctober 27, 2021/s/ Thomas S. Whelan
THOMAS S. WHELAN
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (Principal Financial Officer)
DatedOctober 27, 2021/s/ Ken Watkinson
KEN WATKINSON
Vice President, Corporate Controller and Chief Accounting Officer (Principal Accounting Officer)

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