Docoh
Loading...

SRCE 1st Source

Filed: 20 Feb 20, 4:06pm

     
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
(Mark One)
          ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019
OR
            TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                                to                                
Commission file number 0-6233
corplogoa12.jpg
1st Source Corporation
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Indiana 35-1068133
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization) (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
100 North Michigan Street  
South Bend,IN 46601
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (574) 235-2000
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class Trading Symbol(s) Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock — without par value SRCE The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o No x
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o No x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes x No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 Large accelerated filerx Accelerated filer 
       
 Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company 
       
    Emerging growth company 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes No x
The aggregate market value of the voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of June 30, 2019 was $921,284,157
The number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of stock as of February 14, 2020: Common Stock, without par value — 25,525,562 shares
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the 2020 Proxy Statement for the 2020 annual meeting of shareholders to be held April 23, 2020, are incorporated by reference into Part III.
     




TABLE OF CONTENTS
  
   
   
  
   
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
   
  
   
   
  
   
Certifications 

2


Part I
Item 1. Business.
1ST SOURCE CORPORATION
1st Source Corporation, an Indiana corporation incorporated in 1971, is a bank holding company headquartered in South Bend, Indiana that provides, through its subsidiaries (collectively referred to as “1st Source”, “we”, and “our”), a broad array of financial products and services. 1st Source Bank (“Bank”), its banking subsidiary, offers commercial and consumer banking services, trust and wealth advisory services, and insurance to individual and business clients through most of our 80 banking center locations in 17 counties in Indiana and Michigan and Sarasota County in Florida. 1st Source Bank’s Specialty Finance Group, with 15 locations nationwide, offers specialized financing services for construction equipment, new and used private and cargo aircraft, and various vehicle types (cars, trucks, vans) for fleet purposes. While our lending portfolio is concentrated in certain equipment types, we serve a diverse client base. We are not dependent upon any single industry or client. At December 31, 2019, we had consolidated total assets of $6.62 billion, total loans and leases of $5.09 billion, total deposits of $5.36 billion, and total shareholders’ equity of $828.28 million.
Our principal executive office is located at 100 North Michigan Street, South Bend, Indiana 46601 and our telephone number is (574) 235-2000. Access to our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments to those reports is available, free of charge, at www.1stsource.com soon after the material is electronically filed with or furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The SEC maintains an Internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC at www.sec.gov.
1ST SOURCE BANK
1st Source Bank is a wholly owned subsidiary of 1st Source Corporation that offers a broad range of consumer and commercial banking services through its lending operations, retail branches, and fee based businesses.
Commercial, Agricultural, and Real Estate Loans — 1st Source Bank provides commercial, small business, agricultural, and real estate loans to primarily privately owned business clients mainly located within our regional market area. Loans are made for a wide variety of general corporate purposes, including financing for industrial and commercial properties, financing for equipment, inventories and accounts receivable, renewable energy financing, and acquisition financing. Other services include commercial leasing, treasury management services and retirement planning services.
Consumer Services — 1st Source Bank provides a full range of consumer banking products and services through our banking centers and at 1stsource.com. In a number of our markets, 1st Source also offers insurance products through 1st Source Insurance offices. The traditional banking services include checking and savings accounts, certificates of deposits and Individual Retirement Accounts. 1st Source offers a full line of on-line and mobile banking products which includes person-to-person payments, outside account aggregation, money management budgeting solution and bill payment. As an added convenience, a strategically located Automated Teller Machine network serves our customers and supports the debit and credit card programs of the bank. Consumers also have the ability to obtain consumer loans, real estate loans and lines of credit in any of our banking centers or on-line. Finally, 1st Source offers a variety of financial planning, financial literacy and other consultative services to our customers.
Trust and Wealth Advisory Services — 1st Source Bank provides a wide range of trust, investment, agency, and custodial services for individual, corporate, and not-for-profit clients. These services include the administration of estates and personal trusts, as well as the management of investment accounts for individuals, employee benefit plans, and charitable foundations.
Specialty Finance Group Services — 1st Source Bank, through its Specialty Finance Group, provides a broad range of comprehensive equipment loan and lease products addressing the financing needs of a broad array of companies. This group can be broken down into four areas: construction equipment; new and used aircraft; auto and light trucks; and medium and heavy duty trucks.
Construction equipment financing includes financing of equipment (i.e., asphalt and concrete plants, bulldozers, excavators, cranes and loaders, etc.) to the construction industry. Construction equipment finance receivables generally range from $50,000 to $25 million with fixed or variable interest rates and terms of one to ten years.
Aircraft financing consists of financings for new and used general aviation aircraft (including helicopters) for private and corporate aircraft users, aircraft distributors and dealers, air charter operators, air cargo carriers, and other aircraft operators. For many years, on a limited and selective basis, 1st Source Bank has provided international aircraft financing, primarily in Mexico and Brazil. Aircraft finance receivables generally range from $500,000 to $15 million with fixed or variable interest rates and terms of one to ten years.
The auto and light truck division (including specialty vehicles such as motor coaches, shuttle buses, step vans, work trucks and funeral cars) consists of fleet financings to automobile and light truck rental companies, commercial leasing companies, and single unit to fleet financing for users of specialty vehicles. The auto and light truck finance receivables generally range from $50,000 to $25 million with fixed or variable interest rates and terms of one to eight years.

3


The medium and heavy duty truck division provides fleet financing for highway tractors, medium duty trucks (including environmental vehicles) and trailers to the commercial trucking industry. Medium and heavy duty truck finance receivables generally range from $50,000 to $20 million with fixed or variable interest rates and terms of three to seven years.
The group also generates equipment rental income through the leasing of construction equipment, various types of trucks, vans, automobiles, motor coaches, shuttle buses and other equipment through operating leases to clients.
In addition to loan and lease financings during 2019, the group had average total deposit account balances of approximately $196 million.
SPECIALTY FINANCE GROUP SUBSIDIARIES
The Specialty Finance Group also consists of separate wholly owned subsidiaries of 1st Source Bank which include: Michigan Transportation Finance Corporation, 1st Source Specialty Finance, Inc., SFG Aircraft, Inc., 1st Source Intermediate Holding, LLC, SFG Commercial Aircraft Leasing, Inc., and SFG Equipment Leasing Corporation I.
1ST SOURCE INSURANCE, INC.
1st Source Insurance, Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of 1st Source Bank that provides insurance products and services to individuals and businesses covering corporate and personal property, casualty insurance, and individual and group health and life insurance. 1st Source Insurance, Inc. has ten offices.
1ST SOURCE CORPORATION INVESTMENT ADVISORS, INC.
1st Source Corporation Investment Advisors, Inc. (Investment Advisors) is a wholly owned subsidiary of 1st Source Bank that provides investment advisory services for trust and investment clients of 1st Source Bank. Investment Advisors is registered as an investment advisor with the SEC under the Investment Advisors Act of 1940. Investment Advisors serves strictly in an advisory capacity and as such, does not hold any client securities.
CONSOLIDATED VARIABLE INTEREST SUBSIDIARIES
1st Source Bank is the managing general partner in the following subsidiaries that have interests in tax-advantaged investments with third parties: 1st Source Solar 2, LLC, 1st Source Solar 3, LLC, 1st Source Solar 4, LLC, 1st Source Solar 5, LLC and 1st Source Solar 6, LLC.
OTHER CONSOLIDATED SUBSIDIARIES
We have other subsidiaries that are not significant to the consolidated entity.
1ST SOURCE MASTER TRUST
Our unconsolidated subsidiary includes 1st Source Master Trust. This subsidiary was created for the purpose of issuing $57.00 million of trust preferred securities and lending the proceeds to 1st Source. We guarantee, on a limited basis, payments of distributions on the trust preferred securities and payments on redemption of the trust preferred securities.
COMPETITION
The activities in which we and the Bank engage are highly competitive. Our businesses and the geographic markets we serve require us to compete with other banks, some of which are affiliated with large bank holding companies headquartered outside of our principal market. We generally compete on the basis of client service and responsiveness to client needs, available loan and deposit products, the rates of interest charged on loans and leases, the rates of interest paid for funds, other credit and service charges, the quality of services rendered, the convenience of banking facilities, and in the case of loans and leases to large commercial borrowers, relative lending limits.
In addition to competing with other banks within our primary service areas, the Bank also competes with other financial service companies, such as credit unions, industrial loan associations, securities firms, insurance companies, small loan companies, finance companies, mortgage companies, real estate investment trusts, certain governmental agencies, credit organizations, and other enterprises.
Additional competition for depositors’ funds comes from United States Government securities, private issuers of debt obligations, and suppliers of other investment alternatives for depositors. Many of our non-bank competitors are not subject to the same extensive Federal and State regulations that govern bank holding companies and banks. Such non-bank competitors may, as a result, have certain advantages over us in providing some services.
We compete against these financial institutions by being convenient to do business with, and by taking the time to listen and understand our clients’ needs. We deliver personalized, one-on-one banking through knowledgeable local members of the community always keeping the clients’ best interest in mind while offering a full array of products and highly personalized services. We rely on our history and our reputation in northern Indiana dating back to 1863.

4


EMPLOYEES
At December 31, 2019, we had approximately 1,175 employees on a full-time equivalent basis. We provide a wide range of employee benefits and consider employee relations to be good.
ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
1st Source endeavors to be a good steward of the environment. We have an approach that protects and conserves our natural resources through methods such as:
Developing business practices that protect and conserve natural resources — We use responsible, reputable, and monitored e-recyclers for our electronic assets. All computers, including desktops, laptops, and monitors, are properly recycled.
We are conscious of our paper usage, recognizing that we depend on printed materials for important day-to-day office work, client communications, and acquiring new clients. Increasingly, consumers demand more environmentally sustainable options and prefer online statements and correspondence rather that printed materials. The majority of the paper used in our facilities is recycled through our secure shred program and in 2019 we recycled 186,000 pounds of paper. In recent years, we have also transitioned away from the traditional proxy model and have utilized the notice and access or “e-proxy” model for supplying shareholder materials for our Annual Meeting. This has resulted in a reduction in the amount of paper consumed by us each year during this process.
Additionally, we are utilizing various sustainable practices in some of our facilities such as LED lights, daylight harvesting sensors, programmable thermostats, 95% or higher efficiency furnace systems, drip irrigation, 90% recycled mats, and sustainable landscaping and irrigation systems. In an effort to reduce our carbon footprint, we have utilized solar panels in two of our banking centers for supplemental sustainable power. These banking centers have supplemented approximately 20% of their total electrical usage with renewable solar power.
Embracing opportunities for new products, services and partnerships — In 2019, we continued our focus on renewable energy sources through lending and investment partnerships with renewable energy providers. We recognize the opportunities and complexities associated with energy financing and understand the value of innovative technology that leverages the wind and sun, which are sustainable from an environmental and financial perspective. To date, we have invested $53 million and provided debt financing in 22 solar projects across 11 states with current loan and lease outstandings of $164 million. The 22 solar projects have a current operating capacity of 196,274 MWh per year, which is equivalent to avoiding 138,774 metric tons of carbon greenhouse emissions or 152.9 million pounds of coal burned. We will continue to finance and invest in sustainable opportunities, and we will explore new opportunities to develop products and solutions that support our clients and advance sustainability.
Adopting new technologies — We encourage our clients to take advantage of our online and mobile banking tools. Our ATM devices allow clients to make deposits without the need for an envelope. This reduces the use of paper, which again reduces emissions throughout our supply chain.
To help reduce emissions associated with travel, we have tools that help clients choose the banking center and ATMs closest to them. In addition, mobile deposit features are available to our clients, enabling them to deposit checks into their accounts using their mobile devices.
Many of these approaches can create long-term value for our clients and shareholders through increased revenues, reduced costs and improved convenience.
REGULATION AND SUPERVISION
General — 1st Source and the Bank are extensively regulated under Federal and State law. To the extent that the following information describes statutory or regulatory provisions, it is qualified in its entirety by reference to the particular statutory and regulatory provisions. Any change in applicable laws or regulations may have a material effect on our business and our prospective business. Our operations may be affected by legislative changes and by the policies of various regulatory authorities. We are unable to predict the nature or the extent of the effects on our business and earnings that fiscal or monetary policies, economic controls, or new Federal or State legislation may have in the future.
We are a registered bank holding company under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended (BHCA), and, as such, we are subject to regulation, supervision, and examination by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Federal Reserve). We are required to file annual reports with the Federal Reserve and to provide the Federal Reserve such additional information as it may require.
The Bank, as an Indiana state bank and member of the Federal Reserve System, is supervised by the Indiana Department of Financial Institutions (DFI) and the Federal Reserve. As such, 1st Source Bank is regularly examined by and subject to regulations promulgated by the DFI and the Federal Reserve. Because the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) provides deposit insurance to the Bank, we are also subject to supervision and regulation by the FDIC (even though the FDIC is not our primary Federal regulator).

5


Bank Holding Company Act — Under the BHCA our activities are limited to business so closely related to banking, managing, or controlling banks as to be a proper incident thereto. We are also subject to capital requirements applied on a consolidated basis in a form substantially similar to those required of the Bank. The BHCA also requires a bank holding company to obtain approval from the Federal Reserve before (i) acquiring, or holding more than 5% voting interest in any bank or bank holding company, (ii) acquiring all or substantially all of the assets of another bank or bank holding company, or (iii) merging or consolidating with another bank holding company.
The BHCA also restricts non-bank activities to those which, by statute or by Federal Reserve regulation or order, have been identified as activities closely related to the business of banking or of managing or controlling banks. As discussed below, the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA), which was enacted in 1999, established a distinct type of bank holding company known as a “financial holding company” that has powers that are not otherwise available to bank holding companies.
Capital Standards — The Federal bank regulatory agencies use capital adequacy guidelines in their examination and regulation of bank holding companies and banks. If capital falls below the minimum levels established by these guidelines, a bank holding company or bank must submit an acceptable plan for achieving compliance with the capital guidelines and, until its capital sufficiently improves, will be subject to denial of applications and appropriate supervisory enforcement actions. The various regulatory capital requirements that we are subject to are disclosed in Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data — Note 20 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
In July 2013, the Federal Reserve and other federal banking agencies approved final rules implementing the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision’s capital guidelines for all U.S. banks and for bank holding companies with greater than $500 million in assets. Under these final rules, minimum requirements will increase for both the quantity and quality of capital held by 1st Source and the Bank. The rules include a new common equity Tier 1 capital ratio of 4.5%, a minimum Tier 1 capital ratio of 6.0%, a total capital ratio of 8.0%, and a minimum leverage ratio of 4.0%. The final rules also require a common equity Tier 1 capital conservation buffer of 2.5% of risk-weighted assets which is in addition to the other minimum risk-based capital standards in the rule. Institutions that do not maintain the required capital buffer will become subject to progressively more stringent limitations on the percentage of earnings that can be paid out in dividends or used for stock repurchases and on the payment of discretionary bonuses to senior executive management. The capital buffer requirement, which was phased in over a three-year period beginning in 2016 and is now fully phased in, effectively raised the minimum required common equity Tier 1 capital ratio to 7.0%, the Tier 1 capital ratio to 8.5%, and the total capital ratio to 10.5%.
The final rules also increase the required capital for certain categories of assets, including higher-risk construction real estate loans and certain exposures related to securitizations. The final rules do not, however, adopt the changes in the proposed rule to the risk weights assigned to certain mortgage loan assets. The final rules instead adopt the risk weights for residential mortgages under the existing general risk-based capital rules, which assign a risk weight of either 50% (for most first-lien exposures) or 100% for other residential mortgage exposures. Similarly, the final rules do not adopt the proposed rule’s elimination of Tier 1 treatment of trust preferred securities for banking organizations with less than $15 billion in assets as of December 31, 2010. Instead, the final rules permit these banking organizations to retain non-qualifying Tier 1 capital trust preferred securities issued prior to May 19, 2010, subject generally to a limit of 25% of Tier 1 capital.
These new minimum capital ratios became effective for us on January 1, 2015 and became fully phased in on January 1, 2019. As of December 31, 2019, we were in compliance with all applicable regulatory capital requirements.
In September 2019, the FRB and other federal banking agencies adopted a final rule, effective January 1, 2020, creating a community bank leverage ratio (“CBLR”) for institutions with total consolidated assets of less than $10 billion and that meet other qualifying criteria. The CBLR provides for a simple measure of capital adequacy for qualifying institutions. Qualifying institutions that elect to use the CBLR framework and that maintain a leverage ratio of greater than 9% will be considered to have satisfied the generally applicable risk-based and leverage capital requirements in the regulatory agencies’ capital rules and to have met the well-capitalized ratio requirements. Management is still reviewing the CBLR framework and has not yet determined whether 1st Source and the Bank will elect to use the CBLR framework.
Prompt Corrective Action Regulations — The FDIC’s prompt corrective action regulations establish five capital levels for financial institutions (“well capitalized,” “adequately capitalized,” “undercapitalized,” “significantly undercapitalized,” and “critically undercapitalized”), and impose mandatory regulatory scrutiny and limitations on institutions that are less than adequately capitalized. At December 31, 2019, the Bank was categorized as “well capitalized,” meaning that our total risk-based capital ratio exceeded 10.00%, our Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio exceeded 8.00%, our common equity Tier-1 risk-based capital ratio exceeded 6.50%, our leverage ratio exceeded 5.00%, and we are not subject to a regulatory order, agreement, or directive to meet and maintain a specific capital level for any capital measure.

6


FDIC Deposit Insurance Assessments ��The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act), which was signed into law on July 21, 2010, changed how the FDIC calculates deposit insurance premiums payable by insured depository institutions. The Dodd-Frank Act directs the FDIC to calculate the deposit insurance assessments payable by each insured depository institution based generally upon the institution’s average total consolidated assets minus its average tangible equity during the assessment period. Previously, an institution’s assessments were based on the amount of its insured deposits. The minimum deposit insurance fund rate will increase from 1.15% to 1.35% by September 30, 2020, and the cost of the increase will be borne by depository institutions with assets of $10 billion or more. The Dodd-Frank Act also provides the FDIC with discretion to determine whether to pay rebates to insured depository institutions when its deposit insurance reserves exceed certain thresholds.
Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and The NASDAQ Stock Market (NASDAQ) — We are under the jurisdiction of the SEC and certain state securities commissions for matters relating to the offering and sale of our securities and our investment advisory services. We are subject to the disclosure and regulatory requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as administered by the SEC. We are listed on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the trading symbol “SRCE,” and we are subject to the rules of NASDAQ for listed companies.
Interstate Branching — The Dodd-Frank Act expanded the authority of a state or national bank to open offices in other states. A state or national bank may now open a de novo branch in a state where the bank does not already operate a branch if the law of the state where the branch is to be located would permit a state bank chartered by that state to open the branch. This provision removed restrictions under prior law that restricted a state or national bank from expanding into another state unless the laws of the bank’s home state and the laws of the other state both permitted out-of-state banks to open de novo branches.
Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of 1999 — The GLBA removed barriers to affiliations among banks, insurance companies, the securities industry, and other financial service providers, and provides greater flexibility to these organizations in structuring such affiliations. The GLBA also expanded the types of financial activities a bank may conduct through a financial subsidiary and established a distinct type of bank holding company, known as a financial holding company, which may engage in an expanded list of activities that are “financial in nature.” These activities include securities and insurance brokerage, securities underwriting, insurance underwriting, and merchant banking. A bank holding company may become a financial holding company only if all of its subsidiary financial institutions are well-capitalized and well-managed and have at least a satisfactory Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) rating. While we meet these standards, we do not currently intend to file notice with the Federal Reserve to become a financial holding company or to engage in expanded financial activities through a financial subsidiary of the Bank. The GLBA also includes privacy protections for nonpublic personal information held by financial institutions regarding their customers, and establishes a system of functional regulation that makes the Federal Reserve the “umbrella supervisor” for holding companies, and other federal and state agencies the supervisor of the holding company’s subsidiaries.
Financial Privacy — In accordance with the GLBA, Federal banking regulators adopted rules that limit the ability of banks and other financial institutions to disclose non-public information about customers to nonaffiliated third parties. These limitations require disclosure of privacy policies to consumers and, in some circumstances, allow consumers to prevent disclosure of certain personal information to a nonaffiliated third party. The privacy provisions of the GLBA affect how consumer information is transmitted through diversified financial companies and conveyed to outside vendors. We are also subject to various state laws that generally require us to notify any customer whose personal financial information may have been released to an unauthorized person as the result of a breach of our data security policies and procedures.
USA Patriot Act of 2001 — The USA Patriot Act of 2001 (USA Patriot Act) substantially broadened the scope of anti-money laundering laws and regulations by imposing significant new compliance and due diligence obligations on financial institutions. The regulations adopted by the Treasury under the USA Patriot Act require financial institutions to maintain appropriate controls to combat money laundering activities, perform due diligence of private banking and correspondent accounts, establish standards for verifying customer identity, and provide records related to suspected anti-money laundering activities upon request from federal authorities. A financial institution’s failure to comply with these regulations could result in fines or sanctions, including restrictions on conducting acquisitions or establishing new branches, and could also have other serious legal and reputational consequences for the institution. We have established policies, procedures and systems designed to comply with these regulations.
Community Reinvestment Act — The Community Reinvestment Act of 1977 requires that, in connection with examinations of financial institutions within their jurisdiction, the Federal banking regulators must evaluate the record of the financial institutions in meeting the credit needs of their local communities, including low and moderate income neighborhoods, consistent with the safe and sound operation of those banks. Federal banking regulators are required to consider a financial institution’s performance in these areas as they review applications filed by the institution to engage in mergers or acquisitions or to open a branch or facility.

7


Regulations Governing Extensions of Credit — The Bank is subject to certain restrictions imposed by the Federal Reserve Act on extensions of credit to 1st Source or our subsidiaries, or investments in our securities and on the use of our securities as collateral for loans to any borrowers. These regulations and restrictions may limit our ability to obtain funds from the Bank for our cash needs, including funds for acquisitions and for payment of dividends, interest and operating expenses. Further, the BHCA, certain regulations of the Federal Reserve, state laws and many other Federal laws govern the extensions of credit and generally prohibit a bank from extending credit, engaging in a lease or sale of property, or furnishing services to a customer on the condition that the customer obtain additional services from the bank’s holding company or from one of its subsidiaries.
The Bank is also subject to certain restrictions imposed by the Federal Reserve Act on extensions of credit to executive officers, directors, principal shareholders, or any related interest of such persons. Extensions of credit (i) must be made on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, and subject to credit underwriting procedures that are at least as stringent as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with non affiliates, and (ii) must not involve more than the normal risk of repayment or present other unfavorable features. The Bank is also subject to certain lending limits and restrictions on overdrafts to such persons.
Reserve Requirements — The Federal Reserve requires all depository institutions to maintain reserves against their transaction account deposits. For 2020, the Bank must maintain reserves of 3.00% against net transaction accounts greater than $16.90 million and up to $127.50 million (subject to adjustment by the Federal Reserve) and reserves of 10.00% must be maintained against that portion of net transaction accounts in excess of $127.50 million. These amounts are indexed to inflation and adjusted annually by the Federal Reserve.
Dividends — The ability of the Bank to pay dividends is limited by state and Federal laws and regulations that require the Bank to obtain the prior approval of the DFI and the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago before paying a dividend that, together with other dividends it has paid during a calendar year, would exceed the sum of its net income for the year to date combined with its retained net income for the previous two years. The amount of dividends the Bank may pay may also be limited by certain covenant agreements and by the principles of prudent bank management. See Part II, Item 5, Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities for further discussion of dividend limitations.
Monetary Policy and Economic Control — The commercial banking business in which we engage is affected not only by general economic conditions, but also by the monetary policies of the Federal Reserve. Changes in the discount rate on member bank borrowing, availability of borrowing at the “discount window,” open market operations, the imposition of changes in reserve requirements against member banks’ deposits and assets of foreign branches, and the imposition of, and changes in, reserve requirements against certain borrowings by banks and their affiliates are some of the instruments of monetary policy available to the Federal Reserve. These monetary policies are used in varying combinations to influence overall growth and distributions of bank loans, investments, and deposits, and such use may affect interest rates charged on loans and leases or paid on deposits. The monetary policies of the Federal Reserve have had a significant effect on the operating results of commercial banks and are expected to do so in the future. The monetary policies of the Federal Reserve are influenced by various factors, including economic growth, inflation, unemployment, short-term and long-term changes in the international trade balance, and in the fiscal policies of the U.S. Government. Future monetary policies and the effect of such policies on our future business and earnings, and the effect on the future business and earnings of the Bank cannot be predicted.
Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 — The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOA) includes provisions intended to enhance corporate responsibility and protect investors by improving the accuracy and reliability of corporate disclosures pursuant to the securities laws, and which increase penalties for accounting and auditing improprieties at public traded companies. The SOA generally applies to all companies that file or are required to file periodic reports with the SEC under the Exchange Act.
Among other things, the SOA creates the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board as an independent body subject to SEC supervision with responsibility for setting auditing, quality control, and ethical standards for auditors of public companies. The SOA also requires public companies to make faster and more-extensive financial disclosures, requires the chief executive officer and the chief financial officer of public companies to provide signed certifications as to the accuracy and completeness of financial information filed with the SEC, and provides enhanced criminal and civil penalties for violations of the Federal securities laws.
The SOA also addresses functions and responsibilities of audit committees of public companies. The statute, by mandating certain stock exchange listing rules, makes the audit committee directly responsible for the appointment, compensation, and oversight of the work of the company’s outside auditor, and requires the auditor to report directly to the audit committee. The SOA authorizes each audit committee to engage independent counsel and other advisors, and requires a public company to provide the appropriate funding, as determined by its audit committee, to pay the company’s auditors and any advisors that its audit committee retains. The SOA also requires public companies to prepare an internal control report and assessment by management, along with an attestation to this report prepared by the company’s independent registered public accounting firm, in their annual reports to stockholders.

8


Consumer Financial Protection Laws — The Bank is subject to a number of federal and state consumer financial protection laws and regulations that extensively govern its transactions with consumers. These laws include the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the Truth in Lending Act, the Truth in Savings Act, the Electronic Funds Transfer Act, the Expedited Funds Availability Act, the Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, the Fair Housing Act, the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, and the Service Members Civil Relief Act. 1st Source Bank must also comply with applicable state usury laws and other laws prohibiting unfair and deceptive acts and practices. These laws, among other things, require disclosures of the cost of credit and the terms of deposit accounts, prohibit discrimination in credit transactions, regulate the use of credit report information, restrict the Bank’s ability to raise interest rates and subject the Bank to substantial regulatory oversight. Violations of these laws may expose us to liability from potential lawsuits brought by affected customers. Federal bank regulators, state attorneys general and state and local consumer protection agencies may also seek to enforce these consumer financial protection laws, in which case we may be subject to regulatory sanctions, civil money penalties, and customer rescission rights. Failure to comply with these laws may also cause the Federal Reserve or DFI to deny approval of any applications we may file to engage in merger and acquisition transactions with other financial institutions.
Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act — The Dodd-Frank Act, which was signed into law in 2010, significantly changed the regulation of financial institutions and the financial services industry. The Dodd-Frank Act includes provisions affecting large and small financial institutions alike, including several provisions that profoundly affected the regulation of community banks, thrifts, and small bank and thrift holding companies. Among other things, these provisions relaxed rules on interstate branching, allow financial institutions to pay interest on business checking accounts, and impose heightened capital requirements on bank and thrift holding companies. The Dodd-Frank Act also includes several corporate governance provisions that apply to all public companies, not just financial institutions. These include provisions mandating certain disclosures regarding executive compensation and provisions addressing proxy access by shareholders.
The Dodd-Frank Act also establishes the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) as an independent entity within the Federal Reserve and transferred to the CFPB primary responsibility for administering substantially all of the consumer compliance protection laws formerly administered by other federal agencies. The Dodd-Frank Act also authorizes the CFPB to promulgate consumer protection regulations that will apply to all entities, including banks, that offer consumer financial services or products. It also includes a series of provisions covering mortgage loan origination standards affecting, among other things, originator compensation, minimum repayment standards, and pre-payment penalties.
The Dodd-Frank Act contains numerous other provisions affecting financial institutions of all types, including some that may affect our business in substantial and unpredictable ways. We have incurred higher operating costs in complying with the Dodd -Frank Act, and we expect that these higher costs will continue for the foreseeable future. Our management continues to monitor the ongoing implementation of the Dodd-Frank Act and as new regulations are issued, will assess their effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
The Volcker Rule — The Dodd-Frank Act prohibits banks and their affiliates from engaging in proprietary trading and from investing and sponsoring hedge funds and private equity funds. The provision of the statute imposing these restrictions is commonly called the “Volcker Rule.” The regulations implementing the Volcker Rule exempt the Bank, as a bank with less than $10 billion in total consolidated assets that does not engage in any covered activities other than trading in certain government, agency, state or municipal obligations, from any significant compliance obligations under the Volcker Rule.
Liquidity Requirements — Historically, the regulation and monitoring of bank and bank holding company liquidity has been addressed as a supervisory matter, without required formulaic measures. The Basel III final framework requires banks and bank holding companies to measure their liquidity against specific liquidity tests that, although similar in some respects to liquidity measures historically applied by banks and regulators for management and supervisory purposes, going forward would be required by regulation. One test, referred to as the liquidity coverage ratio, or LCR, is designed to ensure that the banking entity maintains an adequate level of unencumbered high-quality liquid assets equal to the entity’s expected net cash outflow for a 30-day time horizon (or, if greater, 25% of its expected total cash outflow) under an acute liquidity stress scenario. The other test, referred to as the net stable funding ratio, or NSFR, is designed to promote more medium and long-term funding of the assets and activities of banking entities over a one-year time horizon. These requirements are expected to incentivize banking entities to increase their holdings of U.S. Treasury securities and other sovereign debt as a component of assets and increase the use of long-term debt as a funding source.
In September 2015, the federal bank regulators approved final rules implementing the LCR for advanced approaches banking organizations (i.e,. banking organizations with $250 billion or more in total consolidated assets or $10 billion or more in total on-balance sheet foreign exposure) and a modified version of the LCR for bank holding companies with at least $50 billion in total consolidated assets that are not advanced approach banking organizations, neither of which would apply to 1st Source or the Bank. The federal bank regulators have not yet proposed rules to implement the NSFR, but the Federal Reserve has stated its intent to adopt a version of this measure as well.

9


2018 Regulatory Reform — In May 2018, the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act (Regulatory Relief Act), was enacted to modify or remove certain financial reform rules and regulations, including some of those implemented under the Dodd-Frank Act. While the Regulatory Relief Act maintains most of the regulatory structure established by the Dodd-Frank Act, it amends certain aspects of the regulatory framework for small depository institutions with assets of less than $10 billion and for large banks with assets of more than $50 billion. Many of these changes could result in meaningful regulatory changes for the Bank and 1st Source.
The Regulatory Relief Act, among other things, expands the definition of qualified mortgages a financial institution may hold and simplifies the regulatory capital rules for financial institutions and their holding companies with total consolidated assets of less than $10 billion by instructing the federal banking regulators to establish a single “community bank leverage ratio” of between 8% and 10%. Any qualifying depository institution or its holding company that exceeds this community bank leverage ratio will be considered to have met generally applicable leverage and risk-based capital requirements. Further, any qualifying depository institution that exceeds the new ratio will be considered to be “well capitalized” for purposes of the prompt corrective action rules. In addition, the Regulatory Relief Act includes regulatory relief for community banks regarding regulatory examination cycles, call reports, the proprietary trading prohibitions in the Volcker Rule, mortgage disclosures, and risk weights for certain high-risk commercial real estate loans.
It is difficult at this time to predict when or how any new standards under the Regulatory Relief Act will ultimately be applied to the Bank or 1st Source or what specific impact the Regulatory Relief Act and the yet-to-be-written implementing rules and regulations will have on the Bank or 1st Source.
Pending Legislation — Because of concerns relating to competitiveness and the safety and soundness of the banking industry, Congress often considers a number of wide-ranging proposals for altering the structure, regulation, and competitive relationships of the nation’s financial institutions. We cannot predict whether or in what form any proposals will be adopted or the extent to which our business may be affected.
Item 1A. Risk Factors.
An investment in our common stock is subject to risks inherent to our business. The material risks and uncertainties that we believe affect us are described below. See “Forward Looking Statements” under Item 7 of this report for a discussion of other important factors that can affect our business.
Credit Risks
We are subject to credit risks relating to our loan and lease portfolios — We have certain lending policies and procedures in place that are designed to optimize loan and lease income within an acceptable level of risk. Our management reviews and approves these policies and procedures on a regular basis. A reporting system supplements the review process by providing our management with frequent reports related to loan and lease production, loan quality, concentrations of credit, loan and lease delinquencies, and nonperforming and potential problem loans and leases. Diversification in the loan and lease portfolios is a means of managing risk associated with fluctuations in economic conditions.
We maintain an independent loan review department that reviews and validates the credit risk program on a periodic basis. Results of these reviews are presented to our management. The loan and lease review process complements and reinforces the risk identification and assessment decisions made by lenders and credit personnel, as well as our policies and procedures.
Commercial and commercial real estate loans generally involve higher credit risks than residential real estate and consumer loans. Because payments on loans secured by commercial real estate or equipment are often dependent upon the successful operation and management of the underlying assets, repayment of such loans may be influenced to a great extent by conditions in the market or the economy. We seek to minimize these risks through our underwriting standards. We obtain financial information and perform credit risk analysis on our customers. Credit criteria may include, but are not limited to, assessments of income, cash flows, collateral, and net worth; asset ownership; bank and trade credit references; credit bureau reports; and operational history.
Commercial real estate or equipment loans are underwritten after evaluating and understanding the borrower’s ability to operate profitably and generate positive cash flows. Our management examines current and projected cash flows of the borrower to determine the ability of the borrower to repay their obligations as agreed. Underwriting standards are designed to promote relationship banking rather than transactional banking. Most commercial and industrial loans are secured by the assets being financed or other business assets; however, some loans may be made on an unsecured basis. Our credit policy sets different maximum exposure limits both by business sector and our current and historical relationship and previous experience with each customer.

10


We offer both fixed-rate and adjustable-rate consumer mortgage loans secured by properties, substantially all of which are located in our primary market area. Adjustable-rate mortgage loans help reduce our exposure to changes in interest rates; however, during periods of rising interest rates, the risk of default on adjustable-rate mortgage loans may increase as a result of repricing and the increased payments required from the borrower. Additionally, some residential mortgages are sold into the secondary market and serviced by our principal banking subsidiary, 1st Source Bank.
Consumer loans are primarily all other non-real estate loans to individuals in our regional market area. Consumer loans can entail risk, particularly in the case of loans that are unsecured or secured by rapidly depreciating assets. In these cases, any repossessed collateral may not provide an adequate source of repayment of the outstanding loan balance. The remaining deficiency often does not warrant further substantial collection efforts against the borrower beyond obtaining a deficiency judgment. In addition, consumer loan collections are dependent on the borrower’s continuing financial stability, and thus are more likely to be adversely affected by job loss, divorce, illness, or personal bankruptcy.
The 1st Source Specialty Finance Group loan and lease portfolio consists of commercial loans and leases secured by construction and transportation equipment, including aircraft, autos, trucks, and vans. Finance receivables for this Group generally provide for monthly payments and may include prepayment penalty provisions.
Our construction and transportation related businesses could be adversely affected by slowdowns in the economy. Clients who rely on the use of assets financed through the Specialty Finance Group to produce income could be negatively affected, and we could experience substantial loan and lease losses. By the nature of the businesses these clients operate in, we could be adversely affected by rapid increases or decreases in fuel costs, terrorist and other potential attacks, and other destabilizing events. These factors could contribute to the deterioration of the quality of our loan and lease portfolio, as they could have a negative impact on the travel and transportation sensitive businesses for which our specialty finance businesses provide financing.
Our aircraft portfolio has foreign exposure, particularly in Mexico and Brazil. We establish exposure limits for each country through a centralized oversight process, and in consideration of relevant economic, political, social and legal risks. We monitor exposures closely and adjust our country limits in response to changing conditions. Currency fluctuations could have a negative impact on our client’s cost of paying dollar denominated debts and, as a result, we could experience higher delinquency in this portfolio. Also, since some of the relationships in this portfolio are large, a slowdown in these markets could have a significant adverse impact on our performance.
In addition, our leasing and equipment financing activity is subject to the risk of cyclical downturns, industry concentration and clumping, and other adverse economic developments affecting these industries and markets. This area of lending, with transportation in particular, is dependent upon general economic conditions and the strength of the travel, construction, and transportation industries.
Our reserve for loan and lease losses may prove to be insufficient to absorb probable losses in our loan and lease portfolio — In the financial services industry, there is always a risk that certain borrowers may not repay borrowings. The determination of the appropriate level of the reserve for loan and lease losses inherently involves a high degree of subjectivity and requires us to make significant estimates of current credit risks and future trends, all of which may undergo material changes. Our reserve for loan and lease losses may not be sufficient to cover the loan and lease losses that we may actually incur. If we experience defaults by borrowers in any of our businesses, our earnings could be negatively affected. Changes in local economic conditions could adversely affect credit quality, particularly in our local business loan and lease portfolio. Changes in national or international economic conditions could also adversely affect the quality of our loan and lease portfolio and negate, to some extent, the benefits of national or international diversification through our Specialty Finance Group’s portfolio. In addition, bank regulatory agencies periodically review our reserve for loan and lease losses and may require an increase in the provision for loan and lease losses or the recognition of further loan or lease charge-offs based upon their judgments, which may be different from ours.
The soundness of other financial institutions could adversely affect us — Financial services institutions are interrelated as a result of trading, clearing, counterparty, or other relationships. We have exposure to many different industries and counterparties, and we routinely execute transactions with counterparties in the financial services industry, including commercial banks, brokers and dealers, investment banks, and other institutional clients. Many of these transactions expose us to credit risk in the event of a default by our counterparty or client. In addition, our credit risk may be exacerbated when the collateral held by us cannot be realized or is liquidated at prices not sufficient to recover the full amount of the credit or derivative exposure due us. Any such losses could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

11


Market Risks
Fluctuations in interest rates could reduce our profitability and affect the value of our assets — Like other financial institutions, we are subject to interest rate risk. Our primary source of income is net interest income, which is the difference between interest earned on loans and leases and investments, and interest paid on deposits and borrowings. We expect that we will periodically experience imbalances in the interest rate sensitivities of our assets and liabilities and the relationships of various interest rates to each other. Over any defined period of time, our interest-earning assets may be more sensitive to changes in market interest rates than our interest-bearing liabilities, or vice-versa. In addition, the individual market interest rates underlying our loan and lease and deposit products may not change to the same degree over a given time period. If market interest rates should move contrary to our position, earnings may be negatively affected. In addition, loan and lease volume and quality and deposit volume and mix can be affected by market interest rates as can the businesses of our clients. Changes in levels of market interest rates could have a material adverse effect on our net interest spread, asset quality, origination volume, and overall profitability. Additionally, changes in levels of market interest rates could cause our debt securities available-for-sale to move into unrealized loss positions which is a negative component of total shareholders’ equity.
Market interest rates are beyond our control, and they fluctuate in response to general economic conditions and the policies of various governmental and regulatory agencies, in particular, the Federal Reserve Board. Changes in monetary policy, including changes in interest rates, may negatively affect our ability to originate loans and leases, the value of our assets and our ability to realize gains from the sale of our assets, all of which ultimately could affect our earnings.
Adverse changes in economic conditions could impair our financial condition and results of operations — We are impacted by general business and economic conditions in the United States and abroad. These conditions include short-term and long-term interest rates, inflation, money supply, political issues, legislative and regulatory changes, fluctuations in both debt and equity capital markets, broad trends in industry and finance, unemployment, infectious disease epidemics or outbreaks and the strength of the U.S. economy and the local economies in which we operate, all of which are beyond our control. A deterioration in economic conditions could result in an increase in loan delinquencies and non-performing assets, decreases in loan collateral values and a decrease in demand for our products and services.
Changes in economic conditions may negatively impact the fees generated by our trust and wealth advisory business — Trust and wealth advisory fees are largely based on the size of client relationships and the market value of assets held under management. Changes in general economic conditions and in the financial and securities markets may negatively impact the value of our clients’ wealth management accounts and the market value of assets held under management. Market declines, reductions in the value of our clients’ accounts, and the loss of wealth management clients may negatively impact the fees generated by our trust and wealth management business and could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We may be adversely impacted by the transition away from LIBOR as a reference interest rate — The London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) is a short-term interest rate used as a pricing reference for loans, derivatives and other financial instruments. In July 2017, the United Kingdom Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates the process for establishing LIBOR, announced that it intends to stop persuading or compelling banks to submit rates for the calculation of LIBOR after 2021. This announcement indicates that the continuation of LIBOR on the current basis cannot and will not be guaranteed after 2021. The exact impact this will have on financial markets and their individual participants is not currently known. Various substitute benchmarks are being considered in the marketplace but at this time it is not feasible to predict which of these will emerge as acceptable substitutes after 2021.
We have a significant number of loans and other financial instruments with attributes that are either directly or indirectly influenced by LIBOR. The transitional impact away from LIBOR may adversely affect revenues, expenses and the value of those financial instruments. Such transition may also result in litigation with counterparties impacted by the transition as well as increased regulatory scrutiny and other adverse consequences. Any replacement benchmark ultimately adopted as a substitute for LIBOR may behave differently than LIBOR in a manner detrimental to our financial performance. We are actively monitoring market developments and implementing a transition plan. Although we are currently unable to assess what the ultimate impact of the transition from LIBOR will be, failure to adequately manage the transition could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

12


Liquidity Risks
We could experience an unexpected inability to obtain needed liquidity — Liquidity measures the ability to meet current and future cash flow needs as they become due. The liquidity of a financial institution reflects its ability to meet loan requests, to accommodate possible outflows in deposits, and to take advantage of interest rate market opportunities and is essential to a financial institution’s business. The ability of a financial institution to meet its current financial obligations is a function of its balance sheet structure, its ability to liquidate assets, and its access to alternative sources of funds. We seek to ensure our funding needs are met by maintaining a level of liquidity through asset and liability management. If we become unable to obtain funds when needed, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. Additionally, under Indiana law governing the collateralization of public fund deposits, the Indiana Board for Depositories determines which financial institutions are required to pledge collateral based on the strength of their financial ratings. We have been informed that no collateral is required for our public fund deposits. However, the Board of Depositories could alter this requirement in the future, which could adversely affect our liquidity depending on the amount of collateral we may be required to pledge.
We rely on dividends from our subsidiaries — We receive substantially all of our revenue from dividends from our subsidiaries, including, primarily, the Bank. These dividends are the principal source of funds we use to pay dividends on our common stock and interest and principal on our debt. Various federal and state laws and regulations limit the amount of dividends our subsidiaries may pay to us. In the event our subsidiaries are unable to pay dividends to us, we may not be able to service debt, pay other obligations, or pay dividends on our common stock. Our inability to receive dividends from our subsidiaries could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Operational Risks
Our risk management framework could be ineffective and could have a material adverse effect on our ability to mitigate risks and/or losses — We have established a risk management framework to identify and manage our risk exposure. This framework is comprised of various processes, systems and strategies, and is designed to manage the types of risk to which we are subject, including, credit, market, liquidity, operational, legal/compliance, and reputational risks. Our framework also includes financial, analytical and forecasting modeling methodologies which involve significant management assumptions and judgment that may not be accurate, particularly in times of market stress or other unforeseen circumstances. Additionally, our Board of Directors has adopted a risk appetite statement in consultation with management which sets forth certain thresholds and limits to govern our overall risk profile. There can be no assurance that our risk management framework will be effective under all circumstances or that it will adequately identify, manage or limit any risk of loss to us. Any such failure in our risk management framework could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
We are dependent upon the services of our management team — Our future success and profitability is substantially dependent upon our management and the banking acumen of our senior executives. We believe that our future results will also depend in part upon our ability to attract and retain highly skilled and qualified management. We are especially dependent on a limited number of key management personnel, many of whom do not have employment agreements with us. The loss of the chief executive officer and other senior management and key personnel could have a material adverse impact on our operations because other officers may not have the experience and expertise to readily replace these individuals. Many of these senior officers have primary contact with our clients and are important in maintaining personalized relationships with our client base. The unexpected loss of services of one or more of these key employees could have a material adverse effect on our operations and possibly result in reduced revenues if we were unable to find suitable replacements promptly. Competition for senior personnel is intense, and we may not be successful in attracting and retaining such personnel. Changes in key personnel and their responsibilities may be disruptive to our businesses and could have a material adverse effect on our businesses, financial condition, and results of operations.
Technology security breaches — Information security risks have increased due to the sophistication and activities of organized crime, hackers, terrorists and other external parties and the use of online, telephone, and mobile banking channels by clients. Any compromise of our security could deter our clients from using our banking services. We rely on security systems to provide the protection and authentication necessary to effect secure transmission of data against damage by theft, fire, power loss, telecommunications failure or similar catastrophic event, as well as from security breaches, denial of service attacks, viruses, worms, and other disruptive problems caused by hackers. Computer break-ins, phishing and other disruptions of customer or vendor systems could also jeopardize the security of information stored in and transmitted through our computer systems and network infrastructure. We maintain a cyber insurance policy that is designed to cover a majority of loss resulting from cyber security breaches.
We also confront the risk of being compromised by emails sent by perpetrators posing as company executives or vendors in order to dupe company personnel into sending large sums of money to accounts controlled by the perpetrators. We require all our employees to complete annual information security awareness training to increase their awareness of these risks and to engage them in our mitigation efforts. If these precautions are not sufficient to protect our systems from data breaches or compromises, our reputation and business could be adversely affected.

13


We depend on the services of a variety of third-party vendors to meet data processing and communication needs and we have contracted with third parties to run their proprietary software on our behalf. While we perform reviews of security controls instituted by the vendor in accordance with industry standards and institute our own internal security controls, we rely on continued maintenance of the controls by the outside party to safeguard our customer data.
Additionally, we issue debit cards which are susceptible to compromise at the point of sale via the physical terminal through which transactions are processed and by other means of hacking. The security and integrity of these transactions are dependent upon the retailers’ vigilance and willingness to invest in technology and upgrades. Issuing debit cards to our clients exposes us to potential losses which, in the event of a data breach at one or more major retailers may adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
We continually encounter technological change — The financial services industry is constantly undergoing rapid technological change with frequent introductions of new technology-driven products and services. The effective use of technology increases efficiency and enables financial institutions to better service clients and reduce costs. Our future success depends, in part, upon our ability to address the needs of our clients by using technology to provide products and services that will satisfy client demands, as well as create additional efficiencies within our operations. Many of our large competitors have substantially greater resources to invest in technological improvements. We may not be able to effectively implement new technology-driven products and services quickly or be successful in marketing these products and services to our clients. Failure to successfully keep pace with technological change affecting the financial services industry could have a material adverse impact on our business and, in turn, our financial condition and results of operations.
Our accounting estimates rely on analytical and forecasting models — The processes we use to estimate our probable loan losses and to measure the fair value of financial instruments, as well as the processes used to estimate the effects of changing interest rates and other market measures on our financial condition and results of operations, depend upon the use of analytical and forecasting models. These models reflect assumptions that may not be accurate, particularly in times of market stress or other unforeseen circumstances. Even if these assumptions are adequate, the models may prove to be inadequate or inaccurate because of other flaws in their design or their implementation. Any such failure in our analytical or forecasting models could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Changes in accounting standards could impact reported earnings — Current accounting and tax rules, standards, policies and interpretations influence the methods by which financial institutions conduct business, implement strategic initiatives and tax compliance, and govern financial reporting and disclosures. These laws, regulations, rules, standards, policies and interpretations are constantly evolving and may change significantly over time. Events that may not have directly impacted us, such as bankruptcy of major U.S. companies, have resulted in legislators, regulators, and authoritative bodies, such as the Financial Accounting Standards Board, the Securities and Exchange Commission, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board and various taxing authorities, responding by adopting and/or proposing substantive revision to laws, regulations, rules, standards, policies and interpretations. New accounting pronouncements and varying interpretations of accounting pronouncements have occurred and may occur in the future. A change in accounting standards may adversely affect our reported financial condition and results of operations.
Legal/Compliance Risks
We are subject to extensive government regulation and supervision — Our operations are subject to extensive federal and state regulation and supervision. Banking regulations are primarily intended to protect depositors’ funds, federal deposit insurance funds and the banking system as a whole, not security holders. These regulations affect our lending practices, capital structure, investment practices, dividend policy and growth, among other things. Congress and federal regulatory agencies continually review banking laws, regulations and policies for possible change. Changes to statutes, regulations or regulatory policies, including changes in interpretation or implementation of statutes, regulation or policies, could affect us in substantial and unpredictable ways. Such changes could subject us to additional costs and limit the types of financial services and products we may offer. Failure to comply with laws, regulations or policies could result in sanctions by regulatory agencies, civil money penalties and/or reputation damage, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. While we have policies and procedures designed to prevent any such violations, there can be no assurance that such violations will not occur.
Our investments and/or financings in certain tax-advantaged projects may not generate returns as anticipated and may have an adverse impact on our financial results — We invest and/or finance certain tax-advantaged projects promoting affordable housing, community redevelopment and renewable energy sources. Our investments in these projects are designed to generate a return primarily through the realization of federal and state income tax credits, and other tax benefits, over specified time periods. We are subject to the risk that previously recorded tax credits, which remain subject to recapture by taxing authorities based on compliance features required to be met at the project level, will fail to meet certain government compliance requirements and will not be able to be fully realized. The possible inability to realize these tax credits and other tax benefits can have a negative impact on our financial results. The risk of not being able to realize the tax credits and other tax benefits depends on many factors outside of our control, including changes in the applicable tax code and the ability of the projects to be completed and properly managed.

14


Substantial ownership concentration — Our directors, executive officers and 1st Source Bank, as trustee, collectively hold a significant ownership concentration of our common shares. Due to this significant level of ownership among our affiliates, our directors, executive officers, and 1st Source Bank, as trustee, may be able to influence the outcome of director elections or impact significant transactions, such as mergers or acquisitions, or any other matter that might otherwise be favored by other shareholders.
The fact that certain significant shareholders have additional shares registered for sale may depress market prices of our common stock — We have filed a registration statement with the SEC covering the potential sale by 1st Source Bank as trustee of certain trusts established for the benefit of the extended families of two of the children of Ernestine Raclin. Such holders may choose to sell their remaining registered shares at any time. Some market participants may assume that such remaining shares will become available to the market and choose to defer purchasing our shares on the market. This may, in turn have an effect of depressing the market price for our common stock. In addition, the future sale of substantial amounts of common stock by the holders of such registered shares may also depress the market price of our common stock.
Reputational Risks
Competition from other financial services providers could adversely impact our results of operations — The banking and financial services business is highly competitive. We face competition in making loans and leases, attracting deposits and providing insurance, investment, trust and wealth advisory, and other financial services. Increased competition in the banking and financial services businesses may reduce our market share, impair our growth or cause the prices we charge for our services to decline. Our results of operations may be adversely impacted in future periods depending upon the level and nature of competition we encounter in our various market areas.
Managing reputational risk is important to attracting and maintaining customers, investors, and employees — Threats to our reputation can come from many sources, including adverse sentiment about financial institutions generally, unethical practices, employee misconduct, failure to deliver minimum standards of service or quality, compliance deficiencies, and questionable or fraudulent activities of our customers. We have policies and procedures in place that seek to protect our reputation and promote ethical conduct. Nonetheless, negative publicity may arise regarding our business, employees, or customers, with or without merit, and could result in the loss of customers, investors, or employees, costly litigation, a decline in revenues, and increased government regulation.
 Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.
None
Item 2. Properties.
Our headquarters building is located in downtown South Bend, Indiana. The building is part of a larger complex, including a 300-room hotel and a 500-car parking garage. In September 2019, we extended the lease on this property through September 2027. As of December 31, 2019, 1st Source leases approximately 71% of the office space in this complex.
At December 31, 2019, we owned or leased property and/or buildings where 1st Source Bank’s 80 banking centers were located. Our facilities are located in Allen, Elkhart, Fulton, Huntington, Kosciusko, LaPorte, Marshall, Porter, Pulaski, St. Joseph, Starke, Tippecanoe, Wells, and Whitley Counties in the State of Indiana, Berrien, Cass, and Kalamazoo Counties in the State of Michigan, and Sarasota County in the state of Florida. Additionally, we utilize an operations center for business operations. The Bank leases additional property and/or buildings to and from third parties under lease agreements negotiated at arms-length.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
1st Source and our subsidiaries are involved in various other legal proceedings incidental to the conduct of our businesses. Our management does not expect that the outcome of any such proceedings will have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position or results of operations.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.
None
Part II

15


Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.
Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “SRCE.” As of February 14, 2020, there were 1,544 holders of record of 1st Source common stock.
Comparison of Five Year Cumulative Total Return*
Among 1st Source, Morningstar Market Weighted NASDAQ Index** and Peer Group Index***
totalreturnperformance2019.jpg
 
* Assumes $100 invested on December 31, 2014, in 1st Source Corporation common stock, NASDAQ market index, and peer group index.
** The Morningstar Weighted NASDAQ Index Return is calculated using all companies which trade as NASD Capital Markets, NASD Global Markets or NASD Global Select. It includes both domestic and foreign companies. The index is weighted by the then current shares outstanding and assumes dividends reinvested. The return is calculated on a monthly basis.
*** The peer group is a market-capitalization-weighted stock index of 34 banking companies in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin. The following companies included in this peer group in last year’s annual report have not been included this year, all due to being acquired during 2019: Chemical Financial Corporation, MB Financial Corporation and MBT Financial Corporation.
NOTE: Total return assumes reinvestment of dividends.

16


The following table shows our share repurchase activity during the three months ended December 31, 2019.
Period 
Total Number of
Shares Purchased
 
Average Price
Paid Per Share
 
Total Number of
Shares Purchased as
Part of Publicly Announced
Plans or Programs*
 
Maximum Number (or Approximate
Dollar Value) of Shares that
may yet be Purchased Under
the Plans or Programs
October 01 - 31, 2019 
 $
 
 859,374
November 01 - 30, 2019 
 
 
 859,374
December 01 - 31, 2019 
 
 
 859,374
 
*1st Source maintains a stock repurchase plan that was authorized by the Board of Directors on July 24, 2014. Under the terms of the plan, 1st Source may repurchase up to 2,000,000 shares of its common stock from time to time to mitigate the potential dilutive effects of stock-based incentive plans and other potential uses of common stock for corporate purposes. Since the inception of the plan, 1st Source has repurchased a total of 1,140,626 shares.
Federal laws and regulations contain restrictions on the ability of 1st Source and the Bank to pay dividends. For information regarding restrictions on dividends, see Part I, Item 1, Business - Regulation and Supervision - Dividends and Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data - Note 20 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
Item 6. Selected Financial Data.
The following table shows selected financial data and should be read in conjunction with our Consolidated Financial Statements and the accompanying notes presented elsewhere herein.
(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts) 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015
Interest income $282,877
 $257,316
 $212,385
 $191,760
 $184,684
Interest expense 59,011
 43,410
 26,754
 22,101
 18,163
Net interest income 223,866
 213,906
 185,631
 169,659
 166,521
Provision for loan and lease losses 15,833
 19,462
 8,980
 5,833
 2,160
Net interest income after provision for loan and lease losses 208,033
 194,444
 176,651
 163,826
 164,361
Noninterest income 101,130
 97,050
 98,706
 88,945
 83,316
Noninterest expense 189,009
 186,467
 173,997
 163,645
 159,114
Income before income taxes 120,154
 105,027
 101,360
 89,126
 88,563
Income taxes 28,139
 22,613
 33,309
 31,340
 31,077
Net income 92,015
 82,414
 68,051
 57,786
 57,486
Net income available to common shareholders $91,960
 $82,414
 $68,051
 $57,786
 $57,486
           
Assets at year-end $6,622,776
 $6,293,745
 $5,887,284
 $5,486,268
 $5,187,916
Long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities at year-end 71,639
 71,123
 70,060
 74,308
 57,379
Shareholders’ equity at year-end 828,277
 762,082
 718,537
 672,650
 644,053
Basic net income per common share 3.57
 3.16
 2.60
 2.22
 2.17
Diluted net income per common share 3.57
 3.16
 2.60
 2.22
 2.17
Cash dividends per common share 1.100
 0.960
 0.760
 0.720
 0.671
Dividend payout ratio 30.81% 30.48% 29.23% 32.45% 30.85%
Return on average assets 1.41% 1.34% 1.21% 1.08% 1.15%
Return on average common shareholders’ equity 11.50% 11.09% 9.69% 8.71% 9.05%
Average common shareholders’ equity to average assets 12.25% 12.08% 12.46% 12.38% 12.72%
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
The purpose of this analysis is to provide the reader with information relevant to understanding and assessing our results of operations for each of the past three years and financial condition for each of the past two years. In order to fully appreciate this analysis you are encouraged to review the consolidated financial statements and statistical data presented in this document.
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This report, including Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, contains forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements include statements with respect to our beliefs, plans, objectives, goals, expectations, anticipations, assumptions, estimates, intentions, and future performance, and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, which may be beyond our control, and which may cause actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements.

17


All statements other than statements of historical fact are statements that could be forward-looking statements. Words such as “believe,” “contemplate,” “seek,” “estimate,” “plan,” “project,” “anticipate,” “possible,” “assume,” “expect,” “intend,” “targeted,” “continue,” “remain,” “will,” “should,” “indicate,” “would,” “may” and other similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements but are not the exclusive means of identifying such statements. Forward-looking statements provide current expectations or forecasts of future events and are not guarantees of future performance, nor should they be relied upon as representing management’s views as of any subsequent date.
All written or oral forward-looking statements that are made by or attributable to us are expressly qualified in their entirety by this cautionary notice. We have no obligation, and do not undertake, to update, revise, or correct any of the forward-looking statements after the date of this report, or after the respective dates on which such statements otherwise are made. We have expressed our expectations, beliefs, and projections in good faith and we believe they have a reasonable basis. However, we make no assurances that our expectations, beliefs, or projections will be achieved or accomplished. The results or outcomes indicated by our forward-looking statements may not be realized due to a variety of factors, including, without limitation, the following:
Local, regional, national, and international economic conditions and the impact they may have on us and our clients and our assessment of that impact.
Changes in the level of nonperforming assets and charge-offs.
Changes in estimates of future cash reserve requirements based upon the periodic review thereof under relevant regulatory and accounting requirements.
The effects of and changes in trade and monetary and fiscal policies and laws, including the interest rate policies of the Federal Reserve Board.
Inflation, interest rate, securities market, and monetary fluctuations.
Political instability.
Acts of war or terrorism.
Substantial changes in the cost of fuel.
The timely development and acceptance of new products and services and perceived overall value of these products and services by others.
Changes in consumer spending, borrowings, and savings habits.
Changes in the financial performance and/or condition of our borrowers.
Technological changes.
Acquisitions and integration of acquired businesses.
The ability to increase market share and control expenses.
The ability to expand effectively into new markets that we target.
Changes in the competitive environment among bank holding companies.
The effect of changes in laws and regulations (including laws and regulations concerning taxes, banking, securities, and insurance) with which we and our subsidiaries must comply.
The effect of changes in accounting policies and practices and auditing requirements, as may be adopted by the regulatory agencies, as well as the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, and other accounting standard setters.
Changes in our organization, compensation, and benefit plans.
The costs and effects of legal and regulatory developments including the resolution of legal proceedings or regulatory or other governmental inquires and the results of regulatory examinations or reviews.
Greater than expected costs or difficulties related to the integration of new products and lines of business.
Our success at managing the risks described in Item 1A. Risk Factors.

18


APPLICATION OF CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES
Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and follow general practices within the industries in which we operate. Application of these principles requires management to make estimates or judgments that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. These estimates or judgments reflect management’s view of the most appropriate manner in which to record and report our overall financial performance. Because these estimates or judgments are based on current circumstances, they may change over time or prove to be inaccurate based on actual experience. As such, changes in these estimates, judgments, and/or assumptions may have a significant impact on our financial statements. All accounting policies are important, and all policies described in Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data – Note 1 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Note 1), should be reviewed for a greater understanding of how our financial performance is recorded and reported.
We have identified the following two policies as being critical because they require management to make particularly difficult, subjective, and/or complex estimates or judgments about matters that are inherently uncertain and because of the likelihood that materially different amounts would be reported under different conditions or using different assumptions. These policies relate to the determination of the reserve for loan and lease losses and fair value measurements. Management believes it has used the best information available to make the estimations or judgments necessary to value the related assets and liabilities. Actual performance that differs from estimates or judgments and future changes in the key variables could change future valuations and impact net income. Management has reviewed the application of these policies with the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors. Following is a discussion of the areas we view as our most critical accounting policies.
Reserve for Loan and Lease Losses — The reserve for loan and lease losses represents management’s estimate of probable losses inherent in the loan and lease portfolio and the establishment of a reserve that is sufficient to absorb those losses. In determining an appropriate reserve, management makes numerous judgments, assumptions, and estimates based on continuous review of the loan and lease portfolio, estimates of client performance, collateral values, and disposition, as well as historical loss rates and expected cash flows. In assessing these factors, management benefits from a lengthy organizational history and experience with credit decisions and related outcomes. Nonetheless, if management’s underlying assumptions prove to be inaccurate, the reserve for loan and lease losses would have to be adjusted. Our accounting policy related to the reserve is disclosed in Note 1 under the heading “Reserve for Loan and Lease Losses.”
Fair Value Measurements — We use fair value measurements to record certain financial instruments and to determine fair value disclosures. Available-for-sale securities, trading account securities, mortgage loans held for sale, and interest rate swap agreements are financial instruments recorded at fair value on a recurring basis. Additionally, from time to time, we may be required to record at fair value other financial assets on a nonrecurring basis. These nonrecurring fair value adjustments typically involve write-downs of, or specific reserves against, individual assets. GAAP establishes a three-level hierarchy for disclosure of assets and liabilities recorded at fair value. The classification of assets and liabilities within the hierarchy is based on whether the inputs to the valuation methodology used in the measurement are observable or unobservable. Observable inputs reflect market-driven or market-based information obtained from independent sources, while unobservable inputs reflect our estimates about market data.
The degree of management judgment involved in determining the fair value of a financial instrument is dependent upon the availability of quoted market prices or observable market data. For financial instruments that trade actively and have quoted market prices or observable market data, there is minimal subjectivity involved in measuring fair value. When observable market prices and data are not fully available, management judgment is necessary to estimate fair value. In addition, changes in the market conditions may reduce the availability of quoted prices or observable data. For example, reduced liquidity in the capital markets or changes in secondary market activities could result in observable market inputs becoming unavailable. Therefore, when market data is not available, we use valuation techniques that require more management judgment to estimate the appropriate fair value measurement. Fair value is discussed further in Note 1 under the heading “Fair Value Measurements” and in Note 21, “Fair Value Measurements.”
EARNINGS SUMMARY
Net income available to common shareholders in 2019 was $91.96 million, up from $82.41 million in 2018 and up from $68.05 million in 2017. Diluted net income per common share was $3.57 in 2019, $3.16 in 2018, and $2.60 in 2017. Return on average total assets was 1.41% in 2019 compared to 1.34% in 2018, and 1.21% in 2017. Return on average common shareholders’ equity was 11.50% in 2019 versus 11.09% in 2018, and 9.69% in 2017.
Net income in 2019, as compared to 2018, was positively impacted by a $9.96 million or 4.66% increase in net interest income, a $4.08 million or 4.20% increase in noninterest income, and a $3.63 million or 18.65% decrease in provision for loan and lease losses which was offset by a $5.53 million or 24.44% increase in income tax expense and a $2.54 million or 1.36% increase in noninterest expense. Net income in 2018 was positively impacted by a $28.28 million or 15.23% increase in net interest income and a $10.70 million or 32.11% decrease in income tax expense, which was offset by a $10.48 million or 116.73% increase in provision for loan and lease losses and a $12.47 million or 7.17% increase in noninterest expense over 2017.

19


Dividends paid on common stock in 2019 amounted to $1.10 per share, compared to $0.96 per share in 2018, and $0.76 per share in 2017. The level of earnings reinvested and dividend payouts are determined by the Board of Directors based on management’s assessment of future growth opportunities and the level of capital necessary to support them.
Net Interest Income — Our primary source of earnings is net interest income, the difference between income on earning assets and the cost of funds supporting those assets. Significant categories of earning assets are loans and securities while deposits and borrowings represent the major portion of interest-bearing liabilities. For purposes of the following discussion, comparison of net interest income is done on a tax-equivalent basis, which provides a common basis for comparing yields on earning assets exempt from federal income taxes to those which are fully taxable.
Net interest margin (the ratio of net interest income to average earning assets) is significantly affected by movements in interest rates and changes in the mix of earning assets and the liabilities that fund those assets. Net interest margin on a fully taxable- equivalent basis was 3.68% in 2019, compared to 3.73% in 2018 and 3.57% in 2017. Net interest income was $223.87 million for 2019, compared to $213.91 million for 2018 and $185.63 million for 2017. Tax-equivalent net interest income totaled $224.55 million for 2019, up $9.84 million from the $214.71 million reported in 2018. Tax-equivalent net interest income for 2018 was up $27.28 million from the $187.43 reported for 2017.
During 2019, average earning assets increased $342.91 million or 5.95% while average interest-bearing liabilities increased $152.29 million or 3.55% over the comparable period in 2018. The yield on average earning assets increased 17 basis points to 4.65% for 2019 from 4.48% for 2018 primarily due to higher rates on loans and leases. Total cost of average interest-bearing liabilities increased 32 basis points to 1.33% during 2019 from 1.01% in 2018 as a result of the rising interest rate environment during 2018 and competitive pressure on deposit rates. The result to the fully taxable-equivalent net interest margin was a decrease of five basis points.
The largest contributor to the increase in the yield on average earning assets in 2019 was the 23 basis point improvement in the loan and lease portfolio yield primarily due to market conditions as a result of 2018 Federal interest rate increases. Average net loans and leases increased $244.91 million or 5.15% in 2019 from 2018 while the yield increased to 5.16%.
During 2019, the tax-equivalent yield on investment securities available-for-sale decreased five basis points to 2.23% while the average balance grew $62.85 million. Average mortgages held for sale increased $7.41 million during 2019 while the yield decreased 63 basis points. Average other investments, which include federal funds sold, time deposits with other banks, Federal Reserve Bank excess balances, Federal Reserve Bank and Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) stock and commercial paper increased $27.75 million during 2019 while the yield decreased 53 basis points. The decrease in yield for mortgages held for sale and other investments was primarily a result of higher outstanding balances at lower rates.
Average interest-bearing deposits increased $211.10 million or 5.42% during 2019 while the effective rate paid on those deposits increased 34 basis points. The increase in the average cost of interest-bearing deposits was primarily the result of higher rates, competitive pressure on rates and a slight shift in the deposit mix. Average noninterest-bearing demand deposits increased $101.98 million or 9.53% during 2019.
Average short-term borrowings decreased $59.13 million during 2019 while the effective rate paid decreased 13 basis points. The decrease in short-term borrowings was primarily the result of decreased borrowings with the Federal Home Loan Bank. Average long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities balances increased $0.32 million during 2019 as the effective rate increased 81 basis points primarily due to higher rates on mandatorily redeemable securities.

20


The following table provides an analysis of net interest income and illustrates interest income earned and interest expense charged for each major component of interest earning assets and the interest bearing liabilities. Yields/rates are computed on a tax-equivalent basis, using a 21% rate (35% for periods prior to 2018). Nonaccrual loans and leases are included in the average loan and lease balance outstanding.
  2019 2018 2017
(Dollars in thousands) Average Balance Interest Income/Expense Yield/Rate Average Balance Interest Income/Expense Yield/Rate Average Balance Interest Income/Expense Yield/Rate
ASSETS  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Investment securities available-for-sale:  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Taxable $945,396
 $20,946
 2.22% $861,733
 $19,356
 2.25% $734,291
 $13,853
 1.89%
Tax-exempt(1)
 69,263
 1,662
 2.40% 90,079
 2,293
 2.55% 120,588
 3,587
 2.97%
Mortgages held for sale 15,601
 610
 3.91% 8,190
 372
 4.54% 10,754
 429
 3.99%
Loans and leases, net of unearned discount(1)
 5,000,161
 258,113
 5.16% 4,755,256
 234,450
 4.93% 4,333,375
 194,918
 4.50%
Other investments 74,252
 2,232
 3.01% 46,503
 1,648
 3.54% 52,086
 1,393
 2.67%
Total earning assets(1)
 6,104,673
 283,563
 4.65% 5,761,761
 258,119
 4.48% 5,251,094
 214,180
 4.08%
Cash and due from banks 67,726
  
  
 64,853
  
  
 62,137
  
  
Reserve for loan and lease losses (105,340)  
  
 (99,258)  
  
 (92,187)  
  
Other assets 461,215
  
  
 424,083
  
  
 417,278
  
  
Total assets $6,528,274
  
  
 $6,151,439
  
  
 $5,638,322
  
  
                   
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Interest-bearing deposits $4,105,097
 $50,495
 1.23% $3,893,999
 $34,631
 0.89% $3,510,197
 $19,202
 0.55%
Short-term borrowings 205,911
 1,934
 0.94% 265,041
 2,838
 1.07% 245,235
 1,115
 0.45%
Subordinated notes 58,764
 3,677
 6.26% 58,764
 3,625
 6.17% 58,764
 4,002
 6.81%
Long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities 71,133
 2,905
 4.08% 70,813
 2,316
 3.27% 74,973
 2,435
 3.25%
Total interest-bearing liabilities 4,440,905
 59,011
 1.33% 4,288,617
 43,410
 1.01% 3,889,169
 26,754
 0.69%
Noninterest-bearing deposits 1,171,639
  
  
 1,069,664
  
  
 983,050
  
  
Other liabilities 106,945
  
  
 49,791
  
  
 63,684
  
  
Shareholders’ equity 799,736
  
  
 743,173
  
  
 702,419
  
  
Noncontrolling interests 9,049
     194
     
    
Total liabilities and equity $6,528,274
  
  
 $6,151,439
  
  
 $5,638,322
  
  
Less: Fully tax-equivalent adjustments   (686)     (803)     (1,795)  
Net interest income/margin (GAAP-derived)(1)
  
 $223,866
 3.67%  
 $213,906
 3.71%  
 $185,631
 3.54%
Fully tax-equivalent adjustments   686
     803
     1,795
  
Net interest income/margin - FTE(1)
  
 $224,552
 3.68%  
 $214,709
 3.73%  
 $187,426
 3.57%
(1) See “Reconciliation of Non-GAAP Financial Measures” for more information on this performance measure/ratio.

21


Reconciliation of Non-GAAP Financial Measures — Our accounting and reporting policies conform to GAAP in the United States and prevailing practices in the banking industry. However, certain non-GAAP performance measures are used by management to evaluate and measure the Company’s performance. These include taxable-equivalent net interest income (including its individual components) and net interest margin (including its individual components). Management believes that these measures provide users of the Company’s financial information a more meaningful view of the performance of the interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities.
Management reviews yields on certain asset categories and the net interest margin of the Company and its banking subsidiaries on a fully taxable-equivalent (“FTE”) basis. In this non-GAAP presentation, net interest income is adjusted to reflect tax-exempt interest income on an equivalent before-tax basis. This measure ensures comparability of net interest income arising from both taxable and tax-exempt sources. The following table shows the reconciliation of non-GAAP financial measures for the most recent three years ended December 31.
(Dollars in thousands)201920182017
Calculation of Net Interest Margin   
(A)Interest income (GAAP)$282,877
$257,316
$212,385
 Fully tax-equivalent adjustments:   
(B)- Loans and leases375
367
621
(C)- Tax-exempt investment securities311
436
1,174
(D)Interest income - FTE (A+B+C)283,563
258,119
214,180
(E)Interest expense (GAAP)59,011
43,410
26,754
(F)Net interest income (GAAP) (A-E)223,866
213,906
185,631
(G)Net interest income - FTE (D-E)224,552
214,709
187,426
(H)Total earning assets$6,104,673
$5,761,761
$5,251,094
 Net interest margin (GAAP-derived) (F/H)3.67%3.71%3.54%
 Net interest margin - FTE (G/H)3.68%3.73%3.57%

22


The change in interest due to both rate and volume has been allocated to volume and rate changes in proportion to the relationship of the absolute dollar amounts of the change in each. The following table shows changes in tax-equivalent interest earned and interest paid, resulting from changes in volume and changes in rates.
  Increase (Decrease) due to  
(Dollars in thousands) Volume Rate Net
2019 compared to 2018  
  
  
Interest earned on:  
  
  
Investment securities available-for-sale:  
  
  
Taxable $1,857
 $(267) $1,590
Tax-exempt (506) (125) (631)
Mortgages held for sale 296
 (58) 238
Loans and leases, net of unearned discount 12,371
 11,292
 23,663
Other investments 864
 (280) 584
Total earning assets $14,882
 $10,562
 $25,444
Interest paid on:  
  
  
Interest-bearing deposits $1,967
 $13,897
 $15,864
Short-term borrowings (583) (321) (904)
Subordinated notes 
 52
 52
Long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities 11
 578
 589
Total interest-bearing liabilities $1,395
 $14,206
 $15,601
Net interest income - FTE $13,487
 $(3,644) $9,843
       
2018 compared to 2017  
  
  
Interest earned on:  
  
  
Investment securities available-for-sale:  
  
  
Taxable $2,623
 $2,880
 $5,503
Tax-exempt (824) (470) (1,294)
Mortgages held for sale (111) 54
 (57)
Loans and leases, net of unearned discount 19,894
 19,638
 39,532
Other investments (161) 416
 255
Total earning assets $21,421
 $22,518
 $43,939
Interest paid on:  
  
  
Interest-bearing deposits $2,295
 $13,134
 $15,429
Short-term borrowings 97
 1,626
 1,723
Subordinated notes 
 (377) (377)
Long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities (136) 17
 (119)
Total interest-bearing liabilities $2,256
 $14,400
 $16,656
Net interest income - FTE $19,165
 $8,118
 $27,283

23



Noninterest Income — Noninterest income increased $4.08 million or 4.20% in 2019 from 2018 following a $1.66 million or 1.68% decrease in 2018 over 2017. The following table shows noninterest income for the most recent three years ended December 31.
(Dollars in thousands) 2019 2018 2017
Noninterest income:  
  
  
Trust and wealth advisory $20,692
 $21,071
 $20,980
Service charges on deposit accounts 11,010
 10,454
 10,589
Debit card 14,209
 13,369
 11,809
Mortgage banking 4,698
 3,844
 4,796
Insurance commissions 6,761
 6,502
 5,889
Equipment rental 30,741
 31,793
 30,381
(Losses) gains on investment securities available-for-sale 
 (345) 4,340
Other 13,019
 10,362
 9,922
Total noninterest income $101,130
 $97,050
 $98,706
Trust and wealth advisory fees (which include investment management fees, estate administration fees, mutual fund fees, annuity fees, and fiduciary fees) decreased $0.38 million or 1.80% in 2019 from 2018 compared to a slight increase in 2018 over 2017. Trust and wealth advisory fees are largely based on the number and size of client relationships and the market value of assets under management. The market value of trust assets under management at December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $4.48 billion and $3.94 billion, respectively. Stock market recoveries during the fourth quarter of 2019 helped improve the market value of trust assets under management at December 31, 2019, however the decrease in trust and wealth advisory fees during 2019 was due to a lower average market value of trust assets under management during 2019 compared to 2018. At December 31, 2019, these trust assets were comprised of $3.02 billion of personal and agency trusts and estate administration assets, $926.61 million of employee benefit plan assets, $426.91 million of individual retirement accounts, and $105.35 million of custody assets.
Service charges on deposit accounts increased by $0.56 million or 5.32% in 2019 from 2018 compared to a decrease of $0.14 million or 1.27% in 2018 from 2017. The increase in service charges on deposit accounts in 2019 was primarily due to a higher volume of nonsufficient fund transactions. The decrease in service charges on deposit accounts in 2018 primarily reflects a one-time adjustment to business account fees.
Debit card income improved $0.84 million or 6.28% in 2019 from 2018 compared to an increase of $1.56 million or 13.21% in 2018 from 2017. The increase in 2019 and 2018 was mainly the result of an increased volume of debit card transactions.
Mortgage banking income increased $0.85 million or 22.22% in 2019 over 2018, compared to a $0.95 million or 19.85% decrease in 2018 from 2017. We had no MSR impairment in 2019, 2018 or 2017. During 2019, 2018 and 2017, we determined that no permanent write-down was necessary for previously recorded impairment on MSRs. During 2019, mortgage banking income increased primarily due to improved gains on a higher volume of loans sold as a result of more loans originated for the secondary market. During 2018, mortgage banking income decreased due to reduced gains on loan sales and a lower volume of loans originated for the secondary market.
Insurance commissions grew $0.26 million or 3.98% in 2019 compared to 2018 and improved $0.61 million or 10.41% in 2018 compared to 2017. The increase in insurance commissions during 2019 and 2018 was mainly due to an increase in the book of business and higher contingent commissions received resulting from increased sales and lower client claims.
Equipment rental income generated from operating leases decreased by $1.05 million or 3.31% during 2019 from 2018 compared to an increase of $1.41 million or 4.65% during 2018 from 2017. The average equipment rental portfolio decreased 3.48% in 2019 over 2018 as a result of reduced leasing volume primarily in the construction and medium and heavy duty truck portfolios offset by a slight increase in the specialty vehicle portfolio and increased 1.41% in 2018 over 2017 as the result of growth in specialty vehicles and solar financing during 2018. In 2019, the decrease in rental income was offset by a similar decrease in depreciation on equipment owned under operating leases. In 2018, the increase in equipment rental income was offset by a similar increase in depreciation on equipment owned under operating leases.
There were no sales of investment securities available-for-sale for the year ended 2019. Sales of investment securities available-for-sale resulted in net losses of $0.35 million for the year ended 2018 and gains of $4.34 million for the year ended 2017. During 2018, losses on the sale of investment securities available-for-sale were primarily the result of repositioning the investment portfolio during the first quarter in response to tax reform.

24


Other income increased $2.66 million or 25.64% in 2019 from 2018 compared to an increase of $0.44 million or 4.43% in 2018 from 2017. The improvement in 2019 was mainly a result of nonrecurring rental income on a repossessed asset of $0.96 million, higher claim proceeds from bank owned life insurance, and an increase in customer swap fees. The increase was also helped by personal property tax reimbursements on leased equipment from lessees of $0.73 million that were reported gross as required by the new leasing standard effective January 1, 2019. These personal property tax reimbursements were offset by a similar increase in other expense resulting from the payment of personal property taxes to the taxing jurisdictions. The improvement in 2018 was mainly a result of increased net partnership investment gains, higher loan servicing fees, a rise in brokerage fees and commissions, and higher claim proceeds from bank owned life insurance offset by lower customer swap fees and reduced fees on standby letters of credit.
Noninterest Expense — Noninterest expense increased $2.54 million or 1.36% in 2019 over 2018 following a $12.47 million or 7.17% increase in 2018 from 2017. The following table shows noninterest expense for the most recent three years ended December 31.
(Dollars in thousands)  2019 2018 2017
Noninterest expense:  
  
  
Salaries and employee benefits $97,098
 $93,857
 $86,912
Net occupancy 10,528
 10,041
 10,624
Furniture and equipment 24,815
 23,433
 20,769
Depreciation — leased equipment 25,128
 26,248
 25,215
Professional fees 6,952
 7,680
 6,810
Supplies and communications 6,454
 6,320
 5,355
FDIC and other insurance 1,795
 2,923
 2,537
Business development and marketing 6,303
 6,112
 7,477
Loan and lease collection and repossession 3,402
 3,375
 2,724
Other 6,534
 6,478
 5,574
Total noninterest expense $189,009
 $186,467
 $173,997
Total salaries and employee benefits increased $3.24 million or 3.45% in 2019 from 2018, following a $6.95 million or 7.99% increase in 2018 from 2017.
Employee salaries increased $1.00 million or 1.29% in 2019 from 2018 compared to an increase of $6.30 million or 8.91% in 2018 from 2017. The increase in 2019 was mainly a result of higher base salaries due to normal merit increases and a slight increase in full-time equivalent employees offset by a decrease in incentive compensation due to fewer vestings of share-based compensation arrangements. The increase in 2018 was mainly a result of higher base salaries and incentive compensation. Higher base salary expense was primarily due to normal merit increases and a slight increase in full-time equivalent employees.
Employee benefits increased $2.25 million or 13.38% in 2019 from 2018, compared to a $0.65 million or 3.98% increase in 2018 from 2017. During 2019, group insurance costs increased as a result of overall higher health insurance claims experience, administrative expenses and stop loss premiums and higher company contributions to employee retirement accounts. In 2018, group insurance costs increased as a result of overall higher health insurance claims experience.
Occupancy expense increased $0.49 million or 4.85% in 2019 from 2018, compared to a decrease of $0.58 million or 5.49% in 2018 from 2017. The higher expense in 2019 was primarily the result of the Company leasing office space in its former headquarters building which sold during the first quarter of 2019 offset by reduced snow removal costs and lower utility expenses compared to 2018. The lower expense in 2018 was primarily attributed to a true-up of operating rent expense on a lease.
Furniture and equipment expense, including depreciation, grew by $1.38 million or 5.90% in 2019 from 2018 compared to an increase of $2.66 million or 12.83% in 2018 from 2017. The higher expense in 2019 was primarily due to increased software maintenance costs. The higher expense in 2018 was primarily due to increased software maintenance costs and higher computer processing charges.
Depreciation on equipment owned under operating leases decreased $1.12 million or 4.27% in 2019 from 2018, following a $1.03 million or 4.10% increase in 2018 from 2017. In 2019 and 2018, depreciation on equipment owned under operating leases correlated with the change in equipment rental income.
Professional fees declined $0.73 million or 9.48% in 2019 from 2018, compared to a $0.87 million or 12.78% increase in 2018 from 2017. The lower expense in 2019 was primarily due to reduced utilization of consulting services as 2018 projects were completed. The higher expense in 2018 compared to 2017 was primarily due to increased utilization of consulting services related to a customer relationship management project, information technology projects as well as a regulatory compliance project.

25


Supplies and communications expense increased $0.13 million or 2.12% in 2019 from 2018, and increased $0.97 million or 18.02% in 2018 from 2017. During 2019, higher printing costs were offset by lower telephone service expenses. The increase in 2018 resulted primarily from higher data communication line charges as bandwidth was improved and a one-time reduction in postage costs in 2017.
FDIC and other insurance expense decreased $1.13 million or 38.59% in 2019 from 2018 and increased $0.39 million or 15.21% in 2018 from 2017. The decrease in 2019 was mainly due to $0.88 million in FDIC insurance premium credits received. The increase in 2018 was mainly due to higher assessments for FDIC premiums in conjunction with overall asset growth and a rise in other insurance costs.
Business development and marketing expenses grew $0.19 million or 3.13% in 2019 from 2018 and decreased $1.37 million or 18.26% in 2018 from 2017. The higher expense in 2019 was mainly the result of additional marketing promotions. The lower expense in 2018 was mainly the result of reduced charitable contributions offset by additional business development efforts.
Loan and lease collection and repossession expenses increased $0.03 million or 0.80% in 2019 from 2018 compared to an increase of $0.65 million or 23.90% in 2018 from 2017. Loan and lease collection and repossession expense was higher in 2019 primarily due to increased valuation adjustments on repossessed assets and fewer gains on the sale of repossessed assets offset by less legal fees on collection and repossession activity. The increase in 2018 was mainly due to increased valuation adjustments on repossessed assets offset by higher gains on the sale of repossessed assets.
Other expenses were higher by $0.06 million or 0.86% in 2019 as compared to 2018 and increased $0.90 million or 16.22% in 2018 as compared to 2017. The increase in 2019 was primarily the result of higher credit report and appraisal fees on greater loan volume, an increase in the interest rate swap valuation provision and higher professional membership dues and subscriptions offset by a $1.31 million gain on the sale of a fixed asset. Additionally, other expense during 2019 included personal property taxes on leased equipment of $0.73 million that are reported gross as required by the new leasing standard effective January 1, 2019. These personal property taxes on leased equipment were offset by a similar increase in other income from the reimbursement of personal property taxes by lessees. The increase in 2018 was mainly the result of one-time trust losses and reduced gains on the sale of leased equipment offset by a decrease in the provision for unfunded loan commitments and lower intangible asset amortization as items fully amortize and impairment writedowns on branches in 2017 not present in 2018.
Income Taxes — 1st Source recognized income tax expense in 2019 of $28.14 million, compared to $22.61 million in 2018, and $33.31 million in 2017. The effective tax rate in 2019 was 23.42% compared to 21.53% in 2018, and 32.86% in 2017. The change in effective tax rate from 2017 was due primarily to the decrease in the federal tax rate from 35% in 2017 to 21% in 2018. Additionally, the 2018 provision for income taxes included a $0.80 million benefit from a state tax settlement and a $0.88 million benefit from finalization of the provisional amounts recorded at December 31, 2017 related to the impact of the federal tax rate change. The impact of those items resulted in an effective rate decrease from 23.13% to 21.53% during 2018.
For a detailed analysis of 1st Source’s income taxes see Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data — Note 17 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
FINANCIAL CONDITION
Loan and Lease Portfolio — The following table shows 1st Source’s loan and lease distribution at the end of each of the last five years as of December 31.
(Dollars in thousands)  2019 2018 2017 2016 2015
Commercial and agricultural $1,132,791
 $1,073,205
 $929,997
 $812,264
 $744,749
Auto and light truck 588,807
 559,987
 496,816
 411,764
 425,236
Medium and heavy duty truck 294,824
 283,544
 296,935
 294,790
 278,254
Aircraft 784,040
 803,111
 844,657
 802,414
 778,012
Construction equipment 705,451
 645,239
 563,437
 495,925
 455,565
Commercial real estate 908,177
 809,886
 741,568
 719,170
 700,268
Residential real estate and home equity 532,003
 523,855
 526,122
 521,931
 490,468
Consumer 139,434
 136,637
 128,146
 129,813
 122,140
Total loans and leases $5,085,527
 $4,835,464
 $4,527,678
 $4,188,071
 $3,994,692
At December 31, 2019, 10.5% of total loans and leases were concentrated with non-owner occupied commercial real estate.
Loans and leases, net of unearned discount, at December 31, 2019, were $5.09 billion and were 76.79% of total assets, compared to $4.84 billion and 76.83% of total assets at December 31, 2018. Average loans and leases, net of unearned discount, increased $244.91 million or 5.15% and increased $421.88 million or 9.74% in 2019 and 2018, respectively.

26


Commercial and agricultural lending, excluding those loans secured by real estate, increased $59.59 million or 5.55% in 2019 over 2018. Commercial and agricultural lending outstandings were $1.13 billion and $1.07 billion at December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. During 2019, we experienced somewhat lower growth in this sector driven, in part, by our decision to exit our participation in several syndicated credit facilities due to interest rate spreads being lower than our targets. These reductions were offset by increases within our solar loan and lease portfolio, which grew by $67.60 million or 70.42% to $163.60 million as that business line has continued to have positive momentum.
Auto and light truck loans increased $28.82 million or 5.15% in 2019 over 2018. At December 31, 2019, auto and light truck loans had outstandings of $588.81 million and $559.99 million at December 31, 2018. This increase was primarily attributable to growth in the commercial lessor, auto rental and the step van segments offset by decreases in the bus financing portfolio due to prudent underwriting considerations.
Medium and heavy duty truck loans and leases increased $11.28 million or 3.98% in 2019. Medium and heavy duty truck financing at December 31, 2019 and 2018 had outstandings of $294.82 million and $283.54 million, respectively. The increase at December 31, 2019 from December 31, 2018 can be mainly attributed to customers continued replacement of aging equipment and increased organic growth with existing client relationships.
Aircraft financing at year-end 2019 decreased $19.07 million or 2.37% from year-end 2018. Aircraft financing at December 31, 2019 and 2018 had outstandings of $784.04 million and $803.11 million, respectively. The reduction during 2019 was due to lower foreign outstandings of $40.20 million offset by increased domestic outstandings of $21.13 million. In 2019, originations were affected by economic and political uncertainties coupled with increased competition for fewer deals. While we experienced growth domestically, our foreign outstandings decreased due largely to significantly lower in-country lending rates that were competitive against our pricing. Also, several of our watch accounts were voluntarily liquidated by borrowers which added to the reduction in foreign outstandings. Our foreign loan and lease outstandings, all denominated in U.S. dollars were $184.24 million and $224.44 million as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Loan and lease outstandings to borrowers in Brazil and Mexico were $58.29 million and $111.91 million as of December 31, 2019, respectively, compared to $83.90 million and $127.16 million as of December 31, 2018, respectively. Outstanding balances to other borrowers in other countries were insignificant.
Construction equipment financing increased $60.21 million or 9.33% in 2019 compared to 2018. Construction equipment financing at December 31, 2019 had outstandings of $705.45 million, compared to outstandings of $645.24 million at December 31, 2018. The growth in this category was primarily due to new client relationships and continued replacement of aged equipment.
Commercial loans secured by real estate, of which approximately 55% is owner occupied, increased $98.29 million or 12.14% in 2019 over 2018. Commercial loans secured by real estate outstanding at December 31, 2019 were $908.18 million and $809.89 million at December 31, 2018. The increase in 2019 was driven by general improvements in the business economy within our markets related to our owner occupied financing. Our non-owner occupied real estate portfolio also experienced growth due to funding several projects to existing clients that had been in our pipeline.
Residential real estate and home equity loans were $532.00 million at December 31, 2019 and $523.86 million at December 31, 2018. Residential real estate and home equity loans increased $8.15 million in 2019 from 2018. Residential mortgage and home equity outstandings were higher in 2019 due to a favorable rate environment during the year as well as internal staffing increases which allowed us to capture a greater market share within our footprint. Additionally, a stronger economy with low unemployment resulted in improved customer confidence. Median home values rose during 2019 which led to slightly larger average loan amounts. Refinance activity also improved and new construction loans increased by 5% over 2018.
Consumer loans increased $2.80 million or 2.05% in 2019 over 2018. Consumer loans outstanding at December 31, 2019, were $139.43 million and $136.64 million at December 31, 2018. The increase during 2019 was primarily due to higher demand for auto and personal loans as a result of the stabilized economy with low unemployment, reduced interest rates and increased consumer confidence.
The following table shows the maturities of loans and leases in the categories of commercial and agricultural, auto and light truck, medium and heavy duty truck, aircraft and construction equipment outstanding as of December 31, 2019.
(Dollars in thousands) 0-1 Year 1-5 Years Over 5 Years Total
Commercial and agricultural $519,459
 $491,359
 $121,973
 $1,132,791
Auto and light truck 218,900
 361,295
 8,612
 588,807
Medium and heavy duty truck 99,054
 187,127
 8,643
 294,824
Aircraft 198,796
 525,132
 60,112
 784,040
Construction equipment 227,773
 457,769
 19,909
 705,451
Total $1,263,982
 $2,022,682
 $219,249
 $3,505,913

27


The following table shows amounts due after one year are also classified according to the sensitivity to changes in interest rates.
Rate Sensitivity (Dollars in thousands)
 Fixed Rate Variable Rate Total
1 – 5 Years $1,456,088
 $566,594
 $2,022,682
Over 5 Years 54,572
 164,677
 219,249
Total $1,510,660
 $731,271
 $2,241,931
During 2019, approximately 56% of the Bank’s residential mortgage originations were sold into the secondary market. Mortgage loans held for sale were $20.28 million at December 31, 2019 and were $11.29 million at December 31, 2018.
1st Source Bank sells residential mortgage loans to Fannie Mae as well as FHA-insured and VA-guaranteed loans in Ginnie Mae mortgage-backed securities. Additionally, we have sold loans on a service released basis to various other financial institutions in the past. The agreements under which we sell these mortgage loans contain various representations and warranties regarding the acceptability of loans for purchase. On occasion, we may be asked to indemnify the loan purchaser for credit losses on loans that were later deemed ineligible for purchase or we may be asked to repurchase a loan. Both circumstances are collectively referred to as “repurchases.” Within the industry, repurchase demands have decreased during recent years. We believe the loans we have underwritten and sold to these entities have met or exceeded applicable transaction parameters. Our exposure risk for repurchases started to reduce in 2016 as a result of the enhancements made by FNMA in 2013 to the selling representations and warranties framework as warranties on loans sold prior to implementation of such changes lapse.
Our liability for repurchases, included in Accrued Expenses and Other Liabilities on the Statements of Financial Condition, was $0.29 million as of December 31, 2019 and 2018. Our expense (recovery) for repurchase losses, included in Loan and Lease Collection and Repossession expense on the Statements of Income, was $0.01 million in 2019 compared to $(0.10) million in 2018 and $(0.03) million in 2017. The mortgage repurchase liability represents our best estimate of the loss that we may incur. The estimate is based on specific loan repurchase requests and a historical loss ratio with respect to origination dollar volume. Because the level of mortgage loan repurchase losses is dependent on economic factors, investor demand strategies and other external conditions that may change over the life of the underlying loans, the level of liability for mortgage loan repurchase losses is difficult to estimate and requires considerable management judgment.
CREDIT EXPERIENCE
Reserve for Loan and Lease Losses — Our reserve for loan and lease losses is provided for by direct charges to operations. Losses on loans and leases are charged against the reserve and likewise, recoveries during the period for prior losses are credited to the reserve. Our management evaluates the reserve quarterly, reviewing all loans and leases over a fixed-dollar amount ($100,000) where the internal credit quality grade is at or below a predetermined classification, actual and anticipated loss experience, current economic events in specific industries, and other pertinent factors including general economic conditions. Determination of the reserve is inherently subjective as it requires significant estimates, including the amounts and timing of expected future cash flows or fair value of collateral on collateral-dependent impaired loans and leases, estimated losses on pools of homogeneous loans and leases based on historical loss experience, and consideration of environmental factors, principally economic risk and concentration risk, all of which may be susceptible to significant and unforeseen changes. We review the status of the loan and lease portfolio to identify borrowers that might develop financial problems in order to aid borrowers in the handling of their accounts and to mitigate losses. See Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data — Note 1 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on management’s evaluation of the reserve for loan and lease losses.
The reserve for loan and lease loss methodology has been consistently applied for several years, with enhancements instituted periodically. Reserve ratios are reviewed quarterly and revised periodically to reflect recent loss history and to incorporate current risks and trends which may not be recognized in historical data. As we update our historical charge-off analysis, we review the look-back periods for each business loan portfolio.

28


During 2019, the medium-term portion of the look-back period was eleven years given that 2009 through 2019 losses were considerably impacted by the severe recession. Although the recession began in December 2007, its financial consequences were not recognized in the loan portfolios until 2009. We gave the greatest weight to this recent eleven-year period in our calculation. Furthermore, we perform a thorough analysis of charge-offs, non-performing asset levels, special attention outstandings and delinquency in order to review portfolio trends and other factors, including specific industry risks and economic conditions, which may have an impact on the reserves and reserve ratios applied to various portfolios. We adjust the calculated historical based ratio as a result of our analysis of environmental factors, principally economic risk, collateral risk and concentration risk. Key economic factors affecting our portfolios are growth in gross domestic product, unemployment rates, housing market trends, commodity prices, inflation and global economic and political issues. The economy has been strong and is forecast to remain robust as we begin 2020, but there is considerable downside risk. The political stalemates in the U.S. Congress, impeachment concerns and intensified strife in the Middle East, cause increased uncertainty. Collateral values are significant to our underwriting in our specialty finance portfolios and volatility or declining values pose a threat. Concentration risk is impacted primarily by geographic concentration in Northern Indiana and Southwestern Michigan in our business banking and commercial real estate portfolios and by collateral concentration in our specialty finance portfolios.
The world economy has slowed and challenges persist. Current concerns include ongoing tariff wars, heightened concerns in the Middle East, corruption scandals and political uncertainty in Latin American countries, the improving economic conditions in Brazil tempered by pressure from broader regional instability, stagnation in Mexico with prospects for modest improvement in 2020, the continued slowdown in China, the geopolitical tensions with Russia, and the persistent threats of terrorist attacks. We include a factor in our loss ratios for global risk, as we are increasingly aware of the threat that global concerns may affect our customers. While we are unable to determine with any precision the impact of global economic and political issues on 1st Source Bank’s loan portfolios, we feel the risks are real and significant. We believe there is a risk of negative consequences for our borrowers that would affect their ability to repay their financial obligations. Therefore, we continue to include a factor for global risk in our analysis for 2019.
There are several industries represented in the commercial and agricultural portfolio. The outlook for the business banking portfolio is guardedly optimistic, generally a continuation of 2019 trends. Consumer and small business confidence remains strong and unemployment is slightly lower than the national average in many of the markets we serve. Our recent foray into solar financing looks promising in terms of performance of existing projects financed, loan growth opportunities and overall credit quality. An area of concern remains with our agricultural portfolio, which has exposure of approximately $157 million. Farm incomes declined sharply from 2015 through 2019 and no improvement is anticipated in 2020, as commodity prices, particularly corn and soybeans, remain low. Our customers have had favorable growing conditions which have resulted in strong crop yields. We will continue to have a few borrowers who will be unable to repay their lines of credit in full, resulting in carry-over debt. For the commercial and agricultural portfolio as a whole, we have experienced strong credit quality trends with low delinquencies and minimal charge-offs. We have reviewed the calculated loss ratios and assessed the environmental factors and concentration issues affecting these portfolios and we made a slight upward adjustment to the ratio primarily due to the slowing manufacturing sector. We believe the adjustment to our reserve ratio is appropriate and the ratio is adequate.
The core businesses in our auto and light truck portfolio performed well in 2019. The losses in the portfolio were principally attributable to specialty vehicles which is a relatively new venture and where we had aggressive growth. We sustained small losses on a handful of accounts, the vast majority of which were identified as special mention accounts in 2018. We reviewed our processes, assessed our underwriting and have implemented improvements. We also reviewed the reserve ratio for this segment of the portfolio, increasing it for the pass loans as we continue to have greater movement from pass to special mention for our specialty vehicle credits and decreasing it for the special attention pool as the size of the individual losses is declining as a result of our enhanced monitoring of collateral types and condition. The auto rental portion of the portfolio continues to be threatened by ongoing consolidation in the rental car industry which remains a threat to portfolio growth. On the other hand, collateral values have been relatively stable throughout the latter half of 2019 and are significantly stronger than this time a year ago. We believe the reserve ratio for the auto and light truck portfolio remains appropriate.
We experienced ongoing stability in the medium and heavy duty truck portfolio. We recognized sizable losses during 2009 and the first half of 2010; however, since then we have had only two charge-offs, one small account in 2018 and a mid-sized credit in 2019. Our credit quality is strongest when industry conditions are favorable. Reasonably stable gas prices, low unemployment, and growth in GDP and the construction sector, which leads to higher demand for trucking bode well for the industry as does the strong growth in online sales which drive freight volumes. Industry concerns include a persistent driver shortage which is exacerbated in today’s tight labor market. Furthermore, truck chassis sales are expected to experience a cyclical decline in 2020 resulting in greater competition for new loan transactions, potentially placing additional pressure on interest rates in this portfolio. Nevertheless, the underlying industry fundamentals are expected to remain relatively stable and the industry is poised to have a good year again in 2020. We believe our reserve ratio for this portfolio remains appropriate without adjustment.

29


Another area of concern continues to be our aircraft portfolio, which was among the sectors affected most by the sluggish economy. In this portfolio we have collateral concentration and $184 million of foreign exposure, primarily in Mexico and Brazil. Mexico’s economic growth is expected to increase moderately but continues to be threatened by drug trafficking and related violence, the solution to which may entail additional public expenditures, further increasing already high and growing government debt. Brazil’s economic recovery has continued to progress; however, improved interest rates in Brazil have made domestic borrowing more attractive for some of our customers. The U.S. economic growth has bolstered the business aviation industry, with stabilized to somewhat improving private jet markets. New business jet markets experienced growth in 2019 and the short to medium term outlook is favorable. We reassessed our ratios, which were established based on the high and volatile loss histories, and believe they remain appropriate particularly given the downside economic risks.
Our construction equipment portfolio is characterized by increasing outstanding loan balances and continued strong credit quality in 2019; however we did experience an uptick in our special attention credits during the most recent three quarters. The construction industry, which was hard hit during the recession, is benefiting from an improving economy, buoyed by growth in private residential and non-residential construction. Nonetheless, certain sectors are experiencing stress and we continue to monitor for credit weaknesses. Historically, 1st Source has experienced less volatility in this portfolio than the industry as losses have been mitigated by appropriate underwriting and a global market for used construction equipment. A solid U.S. market and potential continued infrastructure spending could have a positive impact for the used equipment markets. The industry’s greatest challenge is hiring and retaining qualified workers. The underlying risk has not changed significantly for this portfolio; our reserve factors are similar to last year.
Similar to the commercial portfolio, our commercial real estate loans are concentrated in our local market with local customers, with approximately fifty-five percent of the Bank’s exposure being owner occupied facilities where we are the primary relationship bank for our customers. Nevertheless, we were not immune to the dramatic declines in real estate values following the great recession, similar to other U.S. markets and we experienced losses in these categories from 2009 through 2011. From 2012 through 2019, we have experienced small recoveries in the portfolio with exception of 2018 when we realized a small loss. We reviewed our reserve factors and believe the ratio remains appropriate and adequate this year-end.
The reserve for loan and lease losses at December 31, 2019, totaled $111.25 million and was 2.19% of loans and leases, compared to $100.47 million or 2.08% of loans and leases at December 31, 2018 and $94.88 million or 2.10% of loans and leases at December 31, 2017. It is our opinion that the reserve for loan and lease losses was appropriate to absorb probable losses inherent in the loan and lease portfolio as of December 31, 2019.
Charge-offs for loan and lease losses were $7.59 million for 2019, compared to $17.11 million for 2018 and $6.53 million for 2017. We had one large loss in the aircraft portfolio in 2019 contributing to charge-offs. The provision for loan and lease losses was $15.83 million for 2019, compared to $19.46 million for 2018 and $8.98 million for 2017 to accommodate net charge-offs and loan and lease growth.

30


The following table summarizes our loan and lease loss experience for each of the last five years ended December 31.
(Dollars in thousands) 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015
Amounts of loans and leases outstanding at end of period $5,085,527
 $4,835,464
 $4,527,678
 $4,188,071
 $3,994,692
Average amount of net loans and leases outstanding during period $5,000,161
 $4,755,256
 $4,333,375
 $4,113,508
 $3,837,149
Balance of reserve for loan and lease losses at beginning of period $100,469
 $94,883
 $88,543
 $88,112
 $85,068
Charge-offs:  
  
  
  
  
Commercial and agricultural 1,040
 229
 2,415
 547
 3,489
Auto and light truck 991
 3,308
 774
 4
 24
Medium and heavy duty truck 1,132
 23
 
 
 
Aircraft 3,066
 12,222
 1,872
 6,123
 244
Construction equipment 238
 288
 164
 128
 
Commercial real estate 5
 70
 344
 32
 
Residential real estate and home equity 53
 63
 124
 219
 295
Consumer 1,066
 909
 836
 888
 658
Total charge-offs 7,591
 17,112
 6,529
 7,941
 4,710
Recoveries:  
  
  
  
  
Commercial and agricultural 664
 222
 984
 509
 851
Auto and light truck 97
 68
 1,153
 253
 380
Medium and heavy duty truck 32
 
 
 10
 28
Aircraft 1,143
 2,499
 227
 528
 802
Construction equipment 160
 100
 298
 461
 434
Commercial real estate 75
 53
 851
 469
 2,807
Residential real estate and home equity 85
 23
 109
 31
 34
Consumer 287
 271
 267
 278
 258
Total recoveries 2,543
 3,236
 3,889
 2,539
 5,594
Net charge-offs (recoveries) 5,048
 13,876
 2,640
 5,402
 (884)
Provision for loan and lease losses 15,833
 19,462
 8,980
 5,833
 2,160
Balance at end of period $111,254
 $100,469
 $94,883
 $88,543
 $88,112
Ratio of net charge-offs (recoveries) to average net loans and leases outstanding 0.10% 0.29% 0.06% 0.13% (0.02)%
Ratio of reserve for loan and lease losses to net loans and leases outstanding end of period 2.19% 2.08% 2.10% 2.11% 2.21 %
Coverage ratio of reserve for loan and lease losses to nonperforming loans and leases 1,101.74% 355.96% 477.66% 435.68% 686.23 %
The following table shows net charge-offs (recoveries) as a percentage of average loans and leases by portfolio type:
  2019 2018 2017 2016 2015
Commercial and agricultural 0.03 % % 0.16 %  % 0.36 %
Auto and light truck 0.15
 0.60
 (0.08) (0.06) (0.08)
Medium and heavy duty truck 0.38
 0.01
 
 
 (0.01)
Aircraft 0.24
 1.15
 0.21
 0.69
 (0.07)
Construction equipment 0.01
 0.03
 (0.03) (0.07) (0.10)
Commercial real estate (0.01) 
 (0.07) (0.06) (0.44)
Residential real estate and home equity (0.01) 0.01
 
 0.04
 0.05
Consumer 0.57
 0.48
 0.44
 0.49
 0.33
Total net charge-offs (recoveries) to average portfolio loans and leases 0.10 % 0.29% 0.06 % 0.13 % (0.02)%

31


The reserve for loan and lease losses has been allocated according to the amount deemed necessary to provide for the estimated probable losses that have been incurred within the categories of loans and leases set forth in the table below. The following table shows the amount of such components of the reserve at December 31 and the ratio of such loan and lease categories to total outstanding loan and lease balances.
  2019 2018 2017 2016 2015
(Dollars in thousands) Reserve Amount Percentage of Loans and Leases in Each Category to Total Loans and Leases Reserve Amount Percentage of Loans and Leases in Each Category to Total Loans and Leases Reserve Amount Percentage of Loans and Leases in Each Category to Total Loans and Leases Reserve Amount Percentage of Loans and Leases in Each Category to Total Loans and Leases Reserve Amount Percentage of Loans and Leases in Each Category to Total Loans and Leases
Commercial and agricultural $23,671
 22.27% $17,063
 22.20% $16,228
 20.54% $14,668
 19.40% $15,456
 18.64%
Auto and light truck 14,400
 11.58
 14,689
 11.58
 10,103
 10.97
 8,064
 9.83
 9,269
 10.64
Medium and heavy duty truck 4,612
 5.80
 4,303
 5.86
 4,844
 6.56
 4,740
 7.04
 4,699
 6.97
Aircraft 31,058
 15.42
 33,047
 16.61
 34,619
 18.66
 34,352
 19.16
 32,373
 19.48
Construction equipment 14,120
 13.87
 10,922
 13.34
 9,343
 12.44
 8,207
 11.84
 7,592
 11.40
Commercial real estate 18,350
 17.86
 15,705
 16.75
 14,792
 16.38
 13,677
 17.17
 13,762
 17.53
Residential real estate and home equity 3,609
 10.46
 3,425
 10.83
 3,666
 11.62
 3,550
 12.46
 3,662
 12.28
Consumer 1,434
 2.74
 1,315
 2.83
 1,288
 2.83
 1,285
 3.10
 1,299
 3.06
Total $111,254
 100.00% $100,469
 100.00% $94,883
 100.00% $88,543
 100.00% $88,112
 100.00%
Nonperforming Assets — Nonperforming assets include loans past due over 90 days, nonaccrual loans and leases, other real estate, repossessions and other nonperforming assets we own. Our policy is to discontinue the accrual of interest on loans and leases where principal or interest is past due and remains unpaid for 90 days or more, or when an individual analysis of a borrower’s credit worthiness indicates a credit should be placed on nonperforming status, except for residential real estate and home equity loans, which are placed on nonaccrual at the time the loan is placed in foreclosure and consumer loans that are both well secured and in the process of collection.
Nonperforming assets amounted to $19.24 million at December 31, 2019, compared to $35.32 million at December 31, 2018, and $31.30 million at December 31, 2017. During 2019, interest income on nonaccrual loans and leases would have increased by approximately $0.69 million compared to $2.18 million in 2018 if these loans and leases had earned interest at their full contractual rate.
Nonperforming assets at December 31, 2019 decreased from December 31, 2018, mainly due to decreases in nonaccrual loans and leases. Repossessions consisted mainly of aircraft largely represented by one airplane and one helicopter with a combined carrying value of $6.71 million at December 31, 2019. Other real estate increased due to foreclosures outpacing sales of existing properties.

32


Nonperforming assets at December 31 (Dollars in thousands)
 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015
Loans past due over 90 days $309
 $366
 $459
 $416
 $122
Nonaccrual loans and leases:  
  
  
  
  
Commercial and agricultural 969
 2,653
 2,603
 3,981
 4,283
Auto and light truck 1,250
 11,374
 8,041
 166
 46
Medium and heavy duty truck 1,074
 106
 371
 
 
Aircraft 875
 7,561
 1,957
 6,110
 4,388
Construction equipment 1,351
 2,326
 991
 1,248
 539
Commercial real estate 1,652
 1,984
 3,418
 5,555
 1,392
Residential real estate and home equity 2,189
 1,714
 1,890
 2,641
 1,961
Consumer 429
 141
 134
 206
 109
Total nonaccrual loans and leases 9,789
 27,859
 19,405
 19,907
 12,718
Total nonperforming loans and leases 10,098
 28,225
 19,864
 20,323
 12,840
Other real estate 522
 299
 1,312
 704
 736
Repossessions:  
  
  
  
  
Commercial and agricultural 
 
 
 
 
Auto and light truck 1,865
 440
 165
 32
 10
Medium and heavy duty truck 
 15
 
 
 
Aircraft 6,707
 6,209
 9,335
 9,335
 6,916
Construction equipment 35
 
 582
 
 
Consumer 16
 2
 32
 6
 1
Total repossessions 8,623
 6,666
 10,114
 9,373
 6,927
Operating leases 
 126
 9
 34
 121
Total nonperforming assets $19,243
 $35,316
 $31,299
 $30,434
 $20,624
Nonperforming loans and leases to loans and leases, net of unearned discount 0.20% 0.58% 0.44% 0.49% 0.32%
Nonperforming assets to loans and leases and operating leases, net of unearned discount 0.37% 0.71% 0.67% 0.70% 0.50%
Potential Problem Loans — Potential problem loans consist of loans that are performing but for which management has concerns about the ability of a borrower to continue to comply with repayment terms because of the borrower’s potential operating or financial difficulties. Management monitors these loans closely and reviews their performance on a regular basis. As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, we had $17.74 million and $4.24 million, respectively, in loans of this type which are not included in either of the non-accrual or 90 days past due loan categories. At December 31, 2019, potential problem loans consisted of three credit relationships from various portfolios without any commonalities with regard to industry or collateral. Weakness in these companies’ operating performance and payment patterns have caused us to heighten attention given to these credits.
INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO
The amortized cost of securities at year-end 2019 increased 2.95% from 2018, following a 10.43% increase from year-end 2017 to year-end 2018. The amortized cost of securities at December 31, 2019 was $1.03 billion or 15.61% of total assets, compared to $1.00 billion or 15.96% of total assets at December 31, 2018.
The following table shows the amortized cost of securities available-for-sale as of December 31.
(Dollars in thousands)  2019 2018 2017
U.S. Treasury and Federal agencies securities $524,896
 $537,913
 $471,508
U.S. States and political subdivisions securities 83,566
 95,346
 116,260
Mortgage-backed securities — Federal agencies 372,458
 324,390
 289,327
Corporate debt securities 52,151
 45,843
 31,573
Foreign government and other securities 700
 700
 700
Total investment securities available-for-sale $1,033,771
 $1,004,192
 $909,368

33


Yields on tax-exempt obligations are calculated on a fully tax-equivalent basis assuming a 21% tax rate. The following table shows the maturities of securities available-for-sale at December 31, 2019, at the amortized costs and weighted average yields of such securities.
(Dollars in thousands)  Amount Yield
U.S. Treasury and Federal agencies securities  
  
Under 1 year $121,828
 2.06%
1 – 5 years 381,966
 1.94
5 – 10 years 21,102
 1.67
Over 10 years 
 
Total U.S. Treasury and Federal agencies securities 524,896
 1.96
U.S. States and political subdivisions securities  
  
Under 1 year 19,488
 2.22
1 – 5 years 53,291
 2.43
5 – 10 years 10,107
 2.27
Over 10 years 680
 2.76
Total U.S. States and political subdivisions securities 83,566
 2.36
Corporate debt securities  
  
Under 1 year 5,990
 2.62
1 – 5 years 46,161
 2.56
5 – 10 years 
 
Over 10 years 
 
Total Corporate debt securities 52,151
 2.57
Foreign government and other securities  
  
Under 1 year 
 
1 – 5 years 700
 2.66
5 – 10 years 
 
Over 10 years 
 
Total Foreign government and other securities 700
 2.66
Mortgage-backed securities — Federal agencies 372,458
 2.48
Total investment securities available-for-sale $1,033,771
 2.21%
At December 31, 2019, the residential mortgage-backed securities we held consisted of GNMA, FNMA and FHLMC pass-through certificates (Government Sponsored Enterprise, GSEs). The type of loans underlying the securities were all conforming loans at the time of issuance. The underlying GSEs backing these mortgage-backed securities are rated Aaa or AA+ from the rating agencies. At December 31, 2019, the vintage (years originated) of the underlying loans comprising our securities are: 28% in the year 2019; 39% in the years 2017 and 2018; 12% in the years 2015 and 2016; 6% in the years 2013 and 2014; and 15% in years 2012 and prior.
DEPOSITS
The following table shows the average daily amounts of deposits and rates paid on such deposits.
  2019 2018 2017
(Dollars in thousands)  Amount Rate Amount Rate Amount Rate
Noninterest bearing demand $1,171,639
 % $1,069,664
 % $983,050
 %
Interest bearing demand 1,635,209
 0.82
 1,610,022
 0.62
 1,517,859
 0.31
Savings 825,292
 0.20
 839,652
 0.14
 828,993
 0.09
Time 1,644,596
 2.16
 1,444,325
 1.63
 1,163,345
 1.18
Total deposits $5,276,736
   $4,963,663
   $4,493,247
  
See Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data — Note 10 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on deposits.

34


SHORT-TERM BORROWINGS
The following table shows the distribution of our short-term borrowings and the weighted average interest rates thereon at the end of each of the last three years. Also provided are the maximum amount of borrowings and the average amount of borrowings, as well as weighted average interest rates for the last three years.
(Dollars in thousands) Federal Funds Purchased and Securities Repurchase Agreements Commercial Paper Federal Home Loan Bank Advances 
Other
Short-Term Borrowings
 Total Borrowings
2019  
  
    
  
Balance at December 31, 2019 $120,459
 $3,993
 $20,000
 $1,441
 $145,893
Maximum amount outstanding at any month-end 187,848
 4,820
 168,000
 1,762
 362,430
Average amount outstanding 143,625
 4,547
 56,326
 1,413
 205,911
Weighted average interest rate during the year 0.33% 0.28% 2.56% % 0.94%
Weighted average interest rate for outstanding amounts at December 31, 2019 0.23% 0.29% 1.61% % 0.42%
2018  
  
    
  
Balance at December 31, 2018 $113,627
 $4,325
 $80,000
 $1,392
 $199,344
Maximum amount outstanding at any month-end 148,002
 5,590
 225,000
 2,740
 381,332
Average amount outstanding 135,670
 4,805
 122,592
 1,974
 265,041
Weighted average interest rate during the year 0.30% 0.29% 1.97% % 1.07%
Weighted average interest rate for outstanding amounts at December 31, 2018 0.47% 0.29% 2.57% % 1.30%
2017  
  
    
  
Balance at December 31, 2017 $205,834
 $6,115
 $
 $2,646
 $214,595
Maximum amount outstanding at any month-end 205,834
 6,542
 160,000
 2,402
 374,778
Average amount outstanding 166,114
 6,327
 70,293
 2,501
 245,235
Weighted average interest rate during the year 0.21% 0.27% 1.06% % 0.45%
Weighted average interest rate for outstanding amounts at December 31, 2017 0.59% 0.27% % % 0.57%
LIQUIDITY
Core Deposits — Our major source of investable funds is provided by stable core deposits consisting of all interest bearing and noninterest bearing deposits, excluding brokered certificates of deposit, listing services certificates of deposit and certain certificates of deposit over $250,000 based on established FDIC insured deposits. In 2019, average core deposits equaled 71.48% of average total assets, compared to 72.53% in 2018 and 73.71% in 2017. The effective rate of core deposits in 2019 was 0.77%, compared to 0.56% in 2018 and 0.35% in 2017.
Average noninterest bearing core deposits increased 9.53% in 2019 compared to an increase of 8.81% in 2018. These represented 25.11% of total core deposits in 2019, compared to 23.97% in 2018, and 23.65% in 2017.
Purchased Funds — We use purchased funds to supplement core deposits, which include certain certificates of deposit over $250,000, brokered certificates of deposit, listing services certificates of deposit, over-night borrowings, securities sold under agreements to repurchase, commercial paper, and other short-term borrowings. Purchased funds are raised from customers seeking short-term investments and are used to manage the Bank’s interest rate sensitivity. During 2019, our reliance on purchased funds increased to 12.51% of average total assets from 12.47% in 2018.
Shareholders’ Equity — Average shareholders’ equity equated to 12.25% of average total assets in 2019, compared to 12.08% in 2018. Shareholders’ equity was 12.51% of total assets at year-end 2019, compared to 12.11% at year-end 2018. We include unrealized gains (losses) on available-for-sale securities, net of income taxes, in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) which is a component of shareholders’ equity. While regulatory capital adequacy ratios exclude unrealized gains (losses), it does impact our equity as reported in the audited financial statements. The unrealized gains (losses) on available-for-sale securities, net of income taxes, were $5.17 million and $(10.68) million at December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.
Other Liquidity — Under Indiana law governing the collateralization of public fund deposits, the Indiana Board of Depositories determines which financial institutions are required to pledge collateral based on the strength of their financial ratings. We have been informed that no collateral is required for our public fund deposits. However, the Board of Depositories could alter this requirement in the future and adversely impact our liquidity. Our potential liquidity exposure if we must pledge collateral is approximately $783 million.

35


Liquidity Risk Management — The Bank’s liquidity is monitored and closely managed by the Asset/Liability Management Committee (ALCO), whose members are comprised of the Bank’s senior management. Asset and liability management includes the management of interest rate sensitivity and the maintenance of an adequate liquidity position. The purpose of interest rate sensitivity management is to stabilize net interest income during periods of changing interest rates.
Liquidity management is the process by which the Bank ensures that adequate liquid funds are available to meet financial commitments on a timely basis. Financial institutions must maintain liquidity to meet day-to-day requirements of depositors and borrowers, take advantage of market opportunities and provide a cushion against unforeseen needs.
Liquidity of the Bank is derived primarily from core deposits, principal payments received on loans, the sale and maturity of investment securities, net cash provided by operating activities, and access to other funding sources. The most stable source of liability-funded liquidity is deposit growth and retention of the core deposit base. The principal source of asset-funded liquidity is available-for-sale investment securities, cash and due from banks, overnight investments, securities purchased under agreements to resell, and loans and interest bearing deposits with other banks maturing within one year. Additionally, liquidity is provided by repurchase agreements, and the ability to borrow from the Federal Reserve Bank (FRB) and the Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB).
The Bank’s liquidity strategy is guided by internal policies and the Interagency Policy Statement on Funding and Liquidity Risk Management. Internal guidelines consist of:
(i)
Available Liquidity (sum of short term borrowing capacity) greater than $500 million; 
(ii)Liquidity Ratio (total of net cash, short term investments and unpledged marketable assets divided by the sum of net deposits and short term liabilities) greater than 15%;
(iii)
Dependency Ratio (net potentially volatile liabilities minus short term investments divided by total earning assets minus short term investments) less than 15%; and 
(iv)Loans to Deposits Ratio less than 100%
At December 31, 2019, we were in compliance with the foregoing internal policies and regulatory guidelines.
The Bank also maintains a contingency funding plan that assesses the liquidity needs under various scenarios of market conditions, asset growth and credit rating downgrades. The plan includes liquidity stress testing which measures various sources and uses of funds under the different scenarios. The contingency plan provides for ongoing monitoring of unused borrowing capacity and available sources of contingent liquidity to prepare for unexpected liquidity needs and to cover unanticipated events that could affect liquidity.
We have borrowing sources available to supplement deposits and meet our funding needs. 1st Source Bank has established relationships with several banks to provide short term borrowings in the form of federal funds purchased. At December 31, 2019, we borrowed zero in the federal funds market. We could borrow $265.00 million in additional funds for a short time from these banks on a collective basis. As of December 31, 2019, we had $65.82 million outstanding in FHLB advances and could borrow an additional $520.13 million contingent on the FHLB activity-based stock ownership requirement. We also had no outstandings with the FRB and could borrow $551.99 million as of December 31, 2019.
Interest Rate Risk Management — ALCO monitors and manages the relationship of earning assets to interest bearing liabilities and the responsiveness of asset yields, interest expense, and interest margins to changes in market interest rates. In the normal course of business, we face ongoing interest rate risks and uncertainties. We may utilize interest rate swaps to partially manage the primary market exposures associated with the interest rate risk related to underlying assets, liabilities, and anticipated transactions.
A hypothetical change in net interest income was modeled by calculating an immediate 200 basis point (2.00%) and 100 basis point (1.00%) increase and a 100 basis point (1.00%) decrease in interest rates across all maturities. The following table shows the aggregate hypothetical impact to pre-tax net interest income.
  Percentage Change in Net Interest Income
  December 31, 2019 December 31, 2018
Basis Point Interest Rate Change 12 Months 24 Months 12 Months 24 Months
Up 200 1.88% 5.57% 3.12% 6.92%
Up 100 0.95% 2.89% 1.58% 3.49%
Down 100 (4.06)% (7.64)% (4.33)% (6.78)%

36


The earnings simulation model excludes the earnings dynamics related to how fee income and noninterest expense may be affected by changes in interest rates. Actual results may differ materially from those projected. The use of this methodology to quantify the market risk of the balance sheet should not be construed as an endorsement of its accuracy or the accuracy of the related assumptions.
At December 31, 2019 and 2018, the impact of these hypothetical fluctuations in interest rates on our derivative holdings was not significant, and, as such, separate disclosure is not presented. We manage the interest rate risk related to mortgage loan commitments by entering into contracts for future delivery of loans with outside parties. See Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data — Note 18 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS AND CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS
In the ordinary course of operations, we enter into certain contractual obligations. Such obligations include the funding of operations through debt issuances as well as leases for premises and equipment. The following table summarizes our significant fixed, determinable, and estimated contractual obligations, by payment date, at December 31, 2019, except for obligations associated with short-term borrowing arrangements. Payments for borrowings do not include interest. Further discussion of the nature of each obligation is included in the referenced note to the consolidated financial statements.
The following table shows contractual obligation payments by period.
(Dollars in thousands)  Note 0 – 1 Year 1 – 3 Years 3 – 5 Years Over 5 Years Indeterminate maturity Total
Deposits without stated maturity  $3,708,828
 $
 $
 $
 $
 $3,708,828
Certificates of deposit 10 1,256,577
 332,333
 57,495
 2,093
 
 1,648,498
Long-term debt 11 2,759
 7,756
 12,993
 30,159
 17,972
 71,639
Subordinated notes 12 
 
 
 58,764
 
 58,764
Operating leases 18 3,477
 7,514
 5,205
 11,508
 
 27,704
Purchase obligations  34,768
 10,531
 1,368
 
 
 46,667
Total contractual obligations   $5,006,409
 $358,134
 $77,061
 $102,524
 $17,972
 $5,562,100
We routinely enter into contracts for services. These contracts may require payment for services to be provided in the future and may also contain penalty clauses for early termination of the contract. We have made a diligent effort to estimate such payments and penalties, where applicable. Additionally, where necessary, we have made reasonable estimates as to certain purchase obligations as of December 31, 2019. Our management has used the best information available to make the estimates necessary to value the related purchase obligations. Our management is not aware of any additional commitments or contingent liabilities which may have a material adverse impact on our liquidity or capital resources at year-end 2019.
We also enter into derivative contracts under which we are required to either receive cash from, or pay cash to, counterparties depending on changes in interest rates. Derivative contracts are carried at fair value on the consolidated balance sheet with the fair value representing the net present value of expected future cash receipts or payments based on market interest rates as of the balance sheet date. The fair value of the contracts changes daily as market interest rates change. Because the derivative assets and liabilities recorded on the balance sheet at December 31, 2019 do not necessarily represent the amounts that may ultimately be paid under these contracts, these assets and liabilities are not included in the table of contractual obligations presented above.
Assets under management and assets under custody are held in fiduciary or custodial capacity for our clients. In accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, these assets are not included on our balance sheet.
We are also party to financial instruments with off-balance sheet risk in the normal course of business to meet the financing needs of our clients. These financial instruments include commitments to extend credit and standby letters of credit. Further discussion of these commitments is included in Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data — Note 18 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

37


QUARTERLY RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
The following table sets forth unaudited consolidated selected quarterly statement of operations data for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018.
Three Months Ended (Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
 March 31 June 30 September 30 December 31
2019  
  
  
  
Interest income $69,021
 $71,637
 $72,676
 $69,543
Interest expense 14,073
 15,210
 15,481
 14,247
Net interest income 54,948
 56,427
 57,195
 55,296
Provision for loan and lease losses 4,918
 4,247
 3,717
 2,951
Gains on investment securities available-for-sale 
 
 
 
Income before income taxes 28,950
 30,491
 32,137
 28,576
Net income 22,196
 23,417
 24,448
 21,954
Net income available to common shareholders 22,196
 23,385
 24,438
 21,941
Diluted net income per common share 0.86
 0.91
 0.95
 0.86
2018  
  
  
  
Interest income $59,238
 $63,865
 $65,696
 $68,517
Interest expense 8,706
 10,696
 11,334
 12,674
Net interest income 50,532
 53,169
 54,362
 55,843
Provision for loan and lease losses 3,786
 4,817
 6,157
 4,702
(Losses) gains on investment securities available-for-sale (345) 
 
 
Income before income taxes 24,996
 27,498
 24,923
 27,610
Net income 19,116
 21,964
 19,888
 21,446
Net income available to common shareholders 19,116
 21,964
 19,888
 21,446
Diluted net income per common share 0.73
 0.84
 0.76
 0.82
Net income available to common shareholders was $21.94 million for the fourth quarter of 2019, compared to the $21.45 million of net income available to common shareholders reported for the fourth quarter of 2018. Diluted net income per common share for the fourth quarter of 2019 amounted to $0.86, compared to $0.82 per common share reported in the fourth quarter of 2018.
Net interest margin was 3.51% for the fourth quarter of 2019 and 3.77% for the fourth quarter of 2018. Net interest income was $55.30 million for the fourth quarter of 2019 down 0.98% from 2018’s fourth quarter. Net interest margin on a fully taxable-equivalent basis was 3.52% for the fourth quarter of 2019 and 3.78% for the fourth quarter of 2018. Tax-equivalent net interest income was $55.46 million for the fourth quarter of 2019, down 1.03% from 2018’s fourth quarter.
Our provision for loan and lease losses was $2.95 million in the fourth quarter of 2019 compared to $4.70 million in the fourth quarter of 2018. Net charge-offs were $0.64 million for the fourth quarter 2019, compared to net charge-offs of $2.53 million a year ago.
Noninterest income for the fourth quarter of 2019 was $25.58 million, compared to $24.16 million for the fourth quarter of 2018. Noninterest expense for the fourth quarter of 2019 was $49.35 million and was $47.69 million in the fourth quarter 2018.
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.
For information regarding Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk, see Part II, Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, Interest Rate Risk Management.

38


Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Shareholders, Board of Directors and Audit Committee
1st Source Corporation
South Bend, Indiana

Opinion on the Financial Statements
We have audited the accompanying consolidated statements of financial condition of 1st Source Corporation (Company) as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, shareholders’ equity and cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2019 and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “financial statements”). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2019, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”), the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2019, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) and our report dated February 20, 2020, expressed an unqualified opinion of the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.
Basis for Opinion
These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits.
We are a public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures include examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
Critical Audit Matters
The critical audit matters communicated below are matters arising from the current-period audit of the financial statements that were communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relate to accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective or complex judgments. The communication of critical audit matters does not alter in any way our opinion on the financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit matters below, providing separate opinions on the critical audit matters or on the accounts or disclosures to which they relate.
Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses
As described in Note 5 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company’s consolidated allowance for loan and lease losses (ALLL) was $111.25 million at December 31, 2019. The Company also describes in Note 1 of the consolidated financial statements the “Reserve for Loan and Lease Losses” accounting policy around this estimate. The ALLL is an estimate of losses inherent in the loan and lease portfolio. The determination of the reserve requires significant judgment reflecting the Company’s best estimate of probable loan and lease losses. The estimate consists of several key elements, which include: specific reserves for impaired loans, formula reserves for each business lending division portfolio including percentage allocations for special attention loans and leases not deemed impaired, and reserves for pooled homogenous loans and leases. The Company’s evaluation is based upon a continuing review of these portfolios, estimates of customer performance, collateral values and dispositions, and assessments of economic and geopolitical events, all of which are subject to judgment and will change.
The primary reason for our determination that the allowance for loan losses is a critical audit matter is that auditing the estimated allowance for loan losses involved significant judgment and complex review. There is a high degree of subjectivity in evaluating management’s estimate, such as evaluating management's assessment of economic conditions and other environmental factors, evaluating the adequacy of specific allowances associated with impaired loans and assessing the appropriateness of loan grades.
Our audit procedures related to the estimated allowance for loan losses included:
Testing the design and operating effectiveness of internal controls, including those related to technology, over the ALLL including data completeness and accuracy, classifications of loans by loan segment, historical loss data, the calculation of a loss rate, the establishment of qualitative adjustments, grading and risk classification of loans and establishment of specific reserves on impaired loans and management’s review controls over the ALLL balance as a whole including attending internal Company Credit Policy Committee meetings and Audit Committee discussions and analysis;
Testing clerical/computational accuracy of the formulas within the calculation spreadsheet;
Testing of completeness and accuracy of the information/reports utilized in the ALLL, including reports used in management review controls over the ALLL;
Computing an independent calculation of an acceptable range and comparing it to the Company’s estimate;
Evaluating the qualitative adjustment to the historical loss rates, including assessing the basis for the adjustments and the reasonableness of the significant assumptions; and
Testing of the loan review function and the accuracy of loan grades determined. Specifically, utilizing internal specialists to assist us in evaluating the appropriateness of loan grades and to assess the reasonableness of specific impairments on loans.
Evaluating the overall reasonableness of qualitative factors and the appropriateness of their direction and magnitude and the Company’s support for the direction and magnitude compared to previous years.

/s/ BKD, LLP 
  
We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2015 
  
Fort Wayne, Indiana 
February 20, 2020 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Shareholders, Board of Directors and Audit Committee
1st Source Corporation
South Bend, Indiana

Opinion on the Internal Control over Financial Reporting
We have audited 1st Source Corporation’s (“Company”) internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2019, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework: (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).
In our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2019, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework: (2013) issued by COSO.
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States)(“PCAOB”), the consolidated financial statements of the Company and our report dated February 20, 2020, expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.
Basis for Opinion
The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.
We are a public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects.
Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audit also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
Definitions and Limitations of Internal Control over Financial Reporting
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
/s/ BKD, LLP 
  
  
Fort Wayne, Indiana 
February 20, 2020 

39


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
December 31 (Dollars in thousands)
 2019 2018
ASSETS  
  
Cash and due from banks $67,215
 $94,907
Federal funds sold and interest bearing deposits with other banks 16,150
 4,172
Investment securities available-for-sale 1,040,583
 990,129
Other investments 28,414
 28,404
Mortgages held for sale 20,277
 11,290
Loans and leases, net of unearned discount:  
  
Commercial and agricultural 1,132,791
 1,073,205
Auto and light truck 588,807
 559,987
Medium and heavy duty truck 294,824
 283,544
Aircraft 784,040
 803,111
Construction equipment 705,451
 645,239
Commercial real estate 908,177
 809,886
Residential real estate and home equity 532,003
 523,855
Consumer 139,434
 136,637
Total loans and leases 5,085,527
 4,835,464
   Reserve for loan and lease losses (111,254) (100,469)
Net loans and leases 4,974,273
 4,734,995
Equipment owned under operating leases, net 111,684
 134,440
Net premises and equipment 52,219
 52,139
Goodwill and intangible assets 83,971
 83,998
Accrued income and other assets 227,990
 159,271
Total assets $6,622,776
 $6,293,745
     
LIABILITIES  
  
Deposits:  
  
Noninterest-bearing demand $1,216,834
 $1,217,120
Interest-bearing deposits:    
Interest-bearing demand 1,677,200
 1,614,959
Savings 814,794
 822,477
Time 1,648,498
 1,467,766
Total interest-bearing deposits 4,140,492
 3,905,202
Total deposits 5,357,326
 5,122,322
Short-term borrowings:  
  
Federal funds purchased and securities sold under agreements to repurchase 120,459
 113,627
Other short-term borrowings 25,434
 85,717
Total short-term borrowings 145,893
 199,344
Long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities 71,639
 71,123
Subordinated notes 58,764
 58,764
Accrued expenses and other liabilities 140,518
 78,602
Total liabilities 5,774,140
 5,530,155
     
SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY  
  
Preferred stock; no par value
Authorized 10,000,000 shares; none issued or outstanding
 
 
Common stock; no par value
Authorized 40,000,000 shares; issued 28,205,674 shares at December 31,2019 and 2018
 436,538
 436,538
Retained earnings 463,269
 398,980
Cost of common stock in treasury (2,696,200 shares at December 31, 2019 and 2,421,946 shares at December 31, 2018 (76,702) (62,760)
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) 5,172
 (10,676)
Total shareholders’ equity 828,277
 762,082
Noncontrolling interests 20,359
 1,508
Total equity 848,636
 763,590
Total liabilities and equity $6,622,776
 $6,293,745

The accompanying notes are a part of the consolidated financial statements.

40


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
Year Ended December 31 (Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
 2019 2018 2017
Interest income:  
  
  
Loans and leases $258,348
 $234,455
 $194,726
Investment securities, taxable 20,946
 19,356
 13,853
Investment securities, tax-exempt 1,351
 1,857
 2,413
Other 2,232
 1,648
 1,393
Total interest income 282,877
 257,316
 212,385
Interest expense:  
  
  
Deposits 50,495
 34,631
 19,202
Short-term borrowings 1,934
 2,838
 1,115
Subordinated notes 3,677
 3,625
 4,002
Long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities 2,905
 2,316
 2,435
Total interest expense 59,011
 43,410
 26,754
Net interest income 223,866
 213,906
 185,631
Provision for loan and lease losses 15,833
 19,462
 8,980
Net interest income after provision for loan and lease losses 208,033
 194,444
 176,651
Noninterest income:  
  
  
Trust and wealth advisory 20,692
 21,071
 20,980
Service charges on deposit accounts 11,010
 10,454
 10,589
Debit card 14,209
 13,369
 11,809
Mortgage banking 4,698
 3,844
 4,796
Insurance commissions 6,761
 6,502
 5,889
Equipment rental 30,741
 31,793
 30,381
(Losses) gains on investment securities available-for-sale 
 (345) 4,340
Other 13,019
 10,362
 9,922
Total noninterest income 101,130
 97,050
 98,706
Noninterest expense:  
  
  
Salaries and employee benefits 97,098
 93,857
 86,912
Net occupancy 10,528
 10,041
 10,624
Furniture and equipment 24,815
 23,433
 20,769
Depreciation — leased equipment 25,128
 26,248
 25,215
Professional fees 6,952
 7,680
 6,810
Supplies and communication 6,454
 6,320
 5,355
FDIC and other insurance 1,795
 2,923
 2,537
Business development and marketing 6,303
 6,112
 7,477
Loan and lease collection and repossession 3,402
 3,375
 2,724
Other 6,534
 6,478
 5,574
Total noninterest expense 189,009
 186,467
 173,997
Income before income taxes 120,154
 105,027
 101,360
Income tax expense 28,139
 22,613
 33,309
Net income 92,015
 82,414
 68,051
Net (income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interests (55) 
 
Net income available to common shareholders $91,960
 $82,414
 $68,051
Basic net income per common share $3.57
 $3.16
 $2.60
Diluted net income per common share $3.57
 $3.16
 $2.60

The accompanying notes are a part of the consolidated financial statements.

41


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
Year Ended December 31 (Dollars in thousands)
 2019 2018 2017
Net income $92,015
 $82,414
 $68,051
Other comprehensive income (loss):  
  
  
Unrealized appreciation (depreciation) of investment securities available-for-sale 20,875
 (9,073) (3,147)
Reclassification adjustment for realized losses (gains) included in net income 
 345
 (4,340)
Income tax effect (5,027) 2,102
 2,811
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax 15,848
 (6,626) (4,676)
Comprehensive income 107,863
 75,788
 63,375
Comprehensive (income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interests (55) 
 
Comprehensive income available to common shareholders $107,808
 $75,788
 $63,375
The accompanying notes are a part of the consolidated financial statements.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
  1st Source Corporation Shareholders    
(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts) Preferred Stock Common Stock Retained Earnings Cost of Common Stock in Treasury Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss), Net Total Shareholders’ Equity Noncontrolling Interests Total Equity
Balance at January 1, 2017 $
 $436,538
 $290,824
 $(56,056) $1,344
 $672,650
 $
 $672,650
Cumulative-effect adjustment 
 
 (65) 
 
 (65) 
 (65)
Balance at January 1, 2017, adjusted 
 436,538
 290,759
 (56,056) 1,344
 672,585
 
 672,585
Net income 
 
 68,051
 
 
 68,051
 
 68,051
Other comprehensive loss 
 
 
 
 (4,676) (4,676) 
 (4,676)
Issuance of 61,899 common shares under
stock based compensation awards
 
 
 908
 1,469
 
 2,377
 
 2,377
Cost of 900 shares of common stock
acquired for treasury
 
 
 
 (41) 
 (41) 
 (41)
Common stock dividend ($0.76 per share) 
 
 (19,759) 
 
 (19,759) 
 (19,759)
Balance at December 31, 2017 $
 $436,538
 $339,959
 $(54,628) $(3,332) $718,537
 $
 $718,537
Cumulative-effect adjustment 
 
 718
 
 (718) 
 
 
Balance at January 1, 2018, adjusted 
 436,538
 340,677
 (54,628) (4,050) 718,537
 
 718,537
Net income 
 
 82,414
 
 
 82,414
 
 82,414
Other comprehensive loss 
 
 
 
 (6,626) (6,626) 
 (6,626)
Issuance of 47,977 common shares under
stock based compensation awards
 
 
 841
 1,139
 
 1,980
 
 1,980
Cost of 201,013 shares of common stock
acquired for treasury
 
 
 
 (9,271) 
 (9,271) 
 (9,271)
Common stock dividend ($0.96 per share) 
 
 (24,952) 
 
 (24,952) 
 (24,952)
Contributions from noncontrolling interests 
 
 
 
 
 
 1,508
 1,508
Balance at December 31, 2018 $
 $436,538
 $398,980
 $(62,760) $(10,676) $762,082
 $1,508
 $763,590
Cumulative-effect adjustment 
 
 (301) 
 
 (301) 
 (301)
Balance at January 1, 2019, adjusted 
 436,538
 398,679
 (62,760) (10,676) 761,781
 1,508
 763,289
Net income 
 
 91,960
 
 
 91,960
 55
 92,015
Other comprehensive income 
 
 
 
 15,848
 15,848
 
 15,848
Issuance of 51,533 common shares under
stock based compensation awards
 
 
 862
 1,143
 
 2,005
 
 2,005
Cost of 325,787 shares of common stock
acquired for treasury
 
 
 
 (15,085) 
 (15,085) 
 (15,085)
Common stock dividend ($1.10 per share) 
 
 (28,232) 
 
 (28,232) 
 (28,232)
Contributions from noncontrolling interests 
 
 
 
 
 
 18,934
 18,934
Distributions to noncontrolling interests 
 
 
 
 
 
 (138) (138)
Balance at December 31, 2019 $
 $436,538
 $463,269
 $(76,702) $5,172
 $828,277
 $20,359
 $848,636

The accompanying notes are a part of the consolidated financial statements.

42


CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
Year Ended December 31 (Dollars in thousands)
 2019 2018 2017
Operating activities:  
  
  
Net income $92,015
 $82,414
 $68,051
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:  
  
  
Provision for loan and lease losses 15,833
 19,462
 8,980
Depreciation of premises and equipment 5,786
 5,620
 5,658
Depreciation of equipment owned and leased to others 25,128
 26,248
 25,215
Stock-based compensation 2,765
 3,553
 2,963
Amortization of investment securities premiums and accretion of discounts, net 4,014
 3,477
 5,449
Amortization of mortgage servicing rights 1,312
 956
 1,092
Amortization of right of use assets 3,046
 
 
Deferred income taxes (5,730) (550) 2,767
Losses (gains) on investment securities available-for-sale 
 345
 (4,340)
Originations of loans held for sale, net of principal collected (145,097) (78,450) (101,104)
Proceeds from the sales of loans held for sale 139,050
 82,127
 106,811
Net gains on sale of loans held for sale (2,940) (1,844) (2,981)
Net gains on sale of other real estate and repossessions (487) (561) (251)
Net gain on sale of premises and equipment (1,251) (128) (300)
Change in interest receivable (245) (1,747) (2,119)
Change in interest payable 4,968
 2,997
 1,222
Change in other assets 11,213
 (7,048) 551
Change in other liabilities 13,492
 21,884
 19,364
Other 1,734
 940
 2,670
Net change in operating activities 164,606
 159,695
 139,698
Investing activities:  
  
  
Proceeds from sales of investment securities available-for-sale 
 11,392
 228,715
Proceeds from maturities and paydowns of investment securities available-for-sale 317,295
 145,167
 177,466
Purchases of investment securities available-for-sale (351,189) (255,205) (469,385)
Net change in partnership investments (33,840) (13,669) (24,489)
Net change in other investments (10) (2,451) (3,495)
Loans sold or participated to others 53,369
 22,835
 32,004
Proceeds from principal payments on direct finance leases 69,188
 50,457
 75,268
Net change in loans and leases (392,475) (405,961) (457,654)
Net change in equipment owned under operating leases (2,495) (21,107) (46,003)
Purchases of premises and equipment (8,033) (3,058) (5,444)
Proceeds from disposal of premises and equipment 3,418
 216
 2,180
Proceeds from sales of other real estate and repossessions 10,855
 13,433
 6,194
Net change in investing activities (333,917) (457,951) (484,643)
Financing activities:  
  
  
Net change in demand deposits and savings accounts 54,272
 171,799
 205,649
Net change in time deposits 180,732
 197,793
 213,321
Net change in short-term borrowings (53,451) (15,251) (77,348)
Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt 
 
 19,999
Payments on long-term debt (2,695) (1,735) (26,628)
Stock issued under stock purchase plans 49
 145
 153
Acquisition of treasury stock (15,085) (9,271) (41)
Net change in noncontrolling interests 18,796
 1,508
 
Cash dividends paid on common stock (29,021) (25,686) (20,431)
Net change in financing activities 153,597
 319,302
 314,674
Net change in cash and cash equivalents (15,714) 21,046
 (30,271)
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year 99,079
 78,033
 108,304
Cash and cash equivalents, end of year $83,365
 $99,079
 $78,033
Supplemental Information:  
  
  
Non-cash transactions:  
  
  
Loans transferred to other real estate and repossessions $14,807
 $11,007
 $8,135
Common stock matching contribution to Employee Stock Ownership and Profit Sharing Plan 300
 583
 1,426
Right of use assets obtained in exchange for lease obligation 17,064
 
 
Cash paid for:  
  
  
Interest $54,043
 $40,413
 $25,531
Income taxes 5,585
 8,272
 10,567
The accompanying notes are a part of the consolidated financial statements.

43


NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Note 1 — Accounting Policies
1st Source Corporation is a bank holding company headquartered in South Bend, Indiana that provides, through its subsidiaries (collectively referred to as “1st Source” or “the Company”), a broad array of financial products and services. 1st Source Bank (“Bank”), its banking subsidiary, offers commercial and consumer banking services, trust and wealth advisory services, and insurance to individual and business clients in Indiana, Michigan and Florida. The following is a summary of significant accounting policies followed in the preparation of the consolidated financial statements.
Basis of Presentation — The financial statements consolidate 1st Source, its subsidiaries (principally the Bank) and any variable interest entities (“VIEs”) for which the Company has concluded it has significant involvement in and the ability to direct the activities that impact the entity’s economic performance. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated. For purposes of the parent company only financial information presented in Note 22, investments in subsidiaries are carried at equity in the underlying net assets.
Use of Estimates in the Preparation of Financial Statements — Financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) require the Company to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of income and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.
Business Combinations — Business combinations are accounted for under the purchase method of accounting. Under the purchase method, assets and liabilities of the business acquired are recorded at their estimated fair values as of the date of acquisition with any excess of the cost of the acquisition over the fair value of the net tangible and intangible assets acquired recorded as goodwill. Results of operations of the acquired business are included in the income statement from the date of acquisition.
Cash Flows — For purposes of the consolidated and parent company only statements of cash flows, the Company considers cash and due from banks, federal funds sold and interest bearing deposits with other banks with original maturities of three months or less as cash and cash equivalents.
Securities — Securities that the Company has the ability and positive intent to hold to maturity are classified as investment securities held-to-maturity. Held-to-maturity investment securities, when present, are carried at amortized cost. As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, the Company held 0 securities classified as held-to-maturity. Securities that may be sold in response to, or in anticipation of, changes in interest rates and resulting prepayment risk, or for other factors, are classified as available-for-sale and are carried at fair value. Unrealized gains and losses on debt securities are reported, net of applicable taxes, as a separate component of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in shareholders’ equity. Unrealized gains and losses on equity securities are reflected, net of applicable taxes, in earnings.
The initial indication of potential other-than-temporary impairment (OTTI) for debt securities is a decline in fair value below amortized cost. Quarterly, any impaired securities are analyzed on a qualitative and quantitative basis in determining OTTI. Declines in the fair value of available-for-sale debt securities below their cost that are deemed to be other-than-temporary are reflected in earnings as realized losses to the extent the impairment is related to credit losses. The amount of impairment related to other factors is recognized in other comprehensive income. In estimating OTTI impairment losses, the Company considers among other things, (i) the length of time and the extent to which fair value has been less than cost, (ii) the financial condition and near-term prospects of the issuer, and (iii) whether it is more likely than not that the Company will not have to sell any such securities before an anticipated recovery of cost.
Debt and equity securities that are purchased and held principally for the purpose of selling them in the near term are classified as trading account securities and are carried at fair value with unrealized gains and losses reported in earnings. Realized gains and losses on the sales of all securities are reported in earnings and computed using the specific identification cost basis.
Other investments consist of shares of Federal Home Loan Bank of Indianapolis (FHLBI) and Federal Reserve Bank stock. As restricted member stocks, these investments are carried at cost. Both cash and stock dividends received on the stocks are reported as income. Quarterly, the Company reviews its investment in FHLBI for impairment. Factors considered in determining impairment are: history of dividend payments; determination of cause for any net loss; adequacy of capital; and review of the most recent financial statements. As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, it was determined that the Company’s investment in FHLBI stock is appropriately valued at cost, which equates to par value. In addition, other investments include interest bearing deposits with other banks with original maturities of greater than three months. These investments are in denominations, including accrued interest, that are fully insured by the FDIC.
Loans and Leases — Loans are stated at the principal amount outstanding, net of unamortized deferred loan origination fees and costs and net of unearned income. Interest income is accrued as earned based on unpaid principal balances. Origination fees and direct loan and lease origination costs are deferred, and the net amount amortized to interest income over the estimated life of the related loan or lease. Loan commitment fees are deferred and amortized into other income over the commitment period.

44


Direct financing leases are carried at the aggregate of lease payments plus estimated residual value of the leased property, net of unamortized deferred lease origination fees and costs and unearned income. As part of the leasing standard that became effective January 1, 2019, only those costs incurred as a direct result of closing a lease transaction are capitalized. Interest income on direct financing leases is recognized over the term of the lease to achieve a constant periodic rate of return on the outstanding investment. All existing deferrals will continue to be amortized over the estimated life of the lease while all new incremental direct costs are expensed immediately.
The accrual of interest on loans and leases is discontinued when a loan or lease becomes contractually delinquent for 90 days, or when an individual analysis of a borrower’s credit worthiness indicates a credit should be placed on nonperforming status, except for residential mortgage loans and consumer loans that are well secured and in the process of collection. Residential mortgage loans are placed on nonaccrual at the time the loan is placed in foreclosure. When interest accruals are discontinued, interest credited to income in the current year is reversed and interest accrued in the prior year is charged to the reserve for loan and lease losses. However, in some cases, the Company may elect to continue the accrual of interest when the net realizable value of collateral is sufficient to cover the principal and accrued interest. When a loan or lease is classified as nonaccrual and the future collectability of the recorded loan or lease balance is doubtful, collections on interest and principal are applied as a reduction to principal outstanding. Loans are returned to accrual status when all principal and interest amounts contractually due are brought current and future payments are reasonably assured, which is typically evidenced by a sustained repayment performance of at least six months.
A loan or lease is considered impaired, based on current information and events, if it is probable that the Company will be unable to collect the scheduled payments of principal or interest when due according to the contractual terms of the loan or lease agreement. Interest on impaired loans and leases, which are not classified as nonaccrual, is recognized on the accrual basis. The Company evaluates loans and leases exceeding $100,000 where the internal credit quality grade is at or below a predetermined classification for impairment and establishes a specific reserve as a component of the reserve for loan and lease losses when it is probable all amounts due will not be collected pursuant to the contractual terms of the loan or lease and the recorded investment in the loan or lease exceeds its fair value.
Loans and leases that have been modified and economic concessions have been granted to borrowers who have experienced financial difficulties are considered a troubled debt restructuring (TDR) and, by definition, are deemed an impaired loan. These concessions typically result from the Company’s loss mitigation activities and may include reductions in the interest rate, payment extensions, forgiveness of principal, forbearance or other actions. Certain TDRs are classified as nonperforming at the time of restructuring and typically are returned to performing status after considering the borrower’s sustained repayment performance for a reasonable period of at least six months.
When the Company modifies loans and leases in a TDR, it evaluates any possible impairment similar to other impaired loans based on the present value of expected future cash flows, discounted at the contractual interest rate of the original loan or lease agreement, or uses the current fair value of the collateral, less selling costs for collateral dependent loans. If the Company determines that the value of the modified loan is less than the recorded investment in the loan (net of previous charge-offs, deferred loan fees or costs and unamortized premium or discount), impairment is recognized through a reserve for loan and lease losses estimate or a charge-off to the reserve for loan and lease losses. In periods subsequent to modification, the Company evaluates all TDRs, including those that have payment defaults, for possible impairment and recognizes impairment through the reserve for loan and lease losses.
The Company sells mortgage loans to the Government National Mortgage Association (GNMA) in the normal course of business and retains the servicing rights. The GNMA programs under which the loans are sold allow the Company to repurchase individual delinquent loans that meet certain criteria from the securitized loan pool. At its option, and without GNMA’s prior authorization, the Company may repurchase a delinquent loan for an amount equal to 100% of the remaining principal balance on the loan. Once the Company has the unconditional ability to repurchase a delinquent loan, the Company is deemed to have regained effective control over the loan and the Company is required to recognize the loan on its balance sheet and record an offsetting liability, regardless of its intent to repurchase the loan. At December 31, 2019 and 2018, residential real estate portfolio loans included $1.44 million and $1.39 million, respectively, of loans available for repurchase under the GNMA optional repurchase programs with the offsetting liability recorded within other short-term borrowings.
Mortgage Banking Activities — Loans held for sale are composed of performing one-to-four family residential mortgage loans originated for resale. Mortgage loans originated with the intent to sell are carried at fair value.
The Company recognizes the rights to service mortgage loans for others as separate assets, whether the servicing rights are acquired through a separate purchase or through the sale of originated loans with servicing rights retained. The Company allocates a portion of the total proceeds of a mortgage loan to servicing rights based on the relative fair value. These assets are amortized as reductions of mortgage servicing fee income over the estimated servicing period in proportion to the estimated servicing income to be received. Gains and losses on the sale of MSRs are recognized in Noninterest Income on the Statements of Income in the period in which such rights are sold.

45


MSRs are evaluated for impairment at each reporting date. For purposes of impairment measurement, MSRs are stratified based on the predominant risk characteristics of the underlying servicing, principally by loan type. If temporary impairment exists within a tranche, a valuation allowance is established through a charge to income equal to the amount by which the carrying value exceeds the fair value. If it is later determined all or a portion of the temporary impairment no longer exists for a particular tranche, the valuation allowance is reduced through a recovery of income.
MSRs are also reviewed for other-than-temporary impairment. Other-than-temporary impairment exists when recoverability of a recorded valuation allowance is determined to be remote considering historical and projected interest rates, prepayments, and loan pay-off activity. When this situation occurs, the unrecoverable portion of the valuation allowance is applied as a direct write-down to the carrying value of the MSRs. Unlike a valuation allowance, a direct write-down permanently reduces the carrying value of the MSRs and the valuation allowance, precluding subsequent recoveries.
As part of mortgage banking operations, the Company enters into commitments to originate loans whereby the interest rate on these loans is determined prior to funding (“rate lock commitments”). Similar to loans held for sale, the fair value of rate lock commitments is subject to change primarily due to changes in interest rates. Under the Company’s risk management policy, these fair values are hedged primarily by selling forward contracts on agency securities or obtaining corresponding best-efforts forward sales commitments with an investor to sell the loans at an agreed-upon price at the time the interest rate locks are issued to the customers. The rate lock commitments on mortgage loans intended to be sold and the related hedging instruments are recorded at fair value with changes in fair value recorded in current earnings.
Reserve for Loan and Lease Losses — The reserve for loan and lease losses is maintained at a level believed to be appropriate by the Company to absorb probable losses inherent in the loan and lease portfolio. The determination of the reserve requires significant judgment reflecting the Company’s best estimate of probable loan and lease losses related to specifically identified impaired loans and leases as well as probable losses in the remainder of the various loan and lease portfolios. For purposes of determining the reserve, the Company has segmented loans and leases into classes based on the associated risk within these segments. The Company has determined that 8 classes exist within the loan and lease portfolio. The methodology for assessing the appropriateness of the reserve consists of several key elements, which include: specific reserves for impaired loans, formula reserves for each business lending division portfolio including percentage allocations for special attention loans and leases not deemed impaired, and reserves for pooled homogenous loans and leases. The Company’s evaluation is based upon a continuing review of these portfolios, estimates of customer performance, collateral values and dispositions, and assessments of economic and geopolitical events, all of which are subject to judgment and will change.
Specific reserves are established for certain business and specialty finance credits based on a regular analysis of special attention loans and leases. This analysis is performed by the Credit Policy Committee (CPC), the Loan Review Department, Credit Administration, and the Loan Workout Departments. The specific reserves are based on an analysis of underlying collateral values, cash flow considerations and, if applicable, guarantor capacity. Sources for determining collateral values include appraisals, evaluations, auction values and industry guides. Generally, for loans secured by commercial real estate and dependent on cash flows from the underlying collateral to service the debt, a new appraisal is obtained at the time the credit is deemed to be impaired. For non-income producing commercial real estate, an appraisal or evaluation is ordered depending on an analysis of the underlying factors, including an assessment of the overall credit worthiness of the borrower, the value of non-real estate collateral supporting the transaction and the date of the most recent existing appraisal or evaluation. An evaluation may be performed in lieu of obtaining a new appraisal for less complex transactions secured by local market properties. Values based on evaluations are discounted more heavily than those determined by appraisals when calculating loan impairment. Appraisals, evaluations and industry guides are used to determine aircraft values. Appraisals, industry guides and auction values are used to determine construction equipment, truck and auto values.
The formula reserves determined for each business lending division portfolio are calculated quarterly by applying loss factors to outstanding loans and leases based upon a review of historical loss experience and qualitative factors, which include but are not limited to, economic trends, current market risk assessment by industry, recent loss experience in particular segments of the portfolios, movement in equipment values collateralizing specialized industry portfolios, concentrations of credit, delinquencies, trends in volume, experience and depth of relationship managers and division management, and the effects of changes in lending policies and practices, including changes in quality of the loan and lease origination, servicing and risk management processes. Special attention loans and leases without specific reserves receive a higher percentage allocation ratio than credits not considered special attention.
Pooled loans and leases are smaller credits and are homogenous in nature, such as consumer credits and residential mortgages. Pooled loan and lease loss reserves are based on historical net charge-offs, adjusted for delinquencies, the effects of lending practices and programs and current economic conditions, and current trends in the geographic markets which the Company serves.

46


A comprehensive analysis of the reserve is performed on a quarterly basis by reviewing all loans and leases over a fixed dollar amount ($100,000) where the internal credit quality grade is at or below a predetermined classification. Although the Company determines the amount of each element of the reserve separately and relies on this process as an important credit management tool, the entire reserve is available for the entire loan and lease portfolio. The actual amount of losses incurred can vary significantly from the estimated amounts both positively and negatively. The Company’s methodology includes several factors intended to minimize the difference between estimated and actual losses. These factors allow the Company to adjust its estimate of losses based on the most recent information available.
Impaired loans are reviewed quarterly to assess the probability of being able to collect the portion considered impaired. When a review and analysis of the underlying credit and collateral indicates ultimate collection is improbable, the deficiency is charged-off and deducted from the reserve. Loans and leases, which are deemed uncollectible or have a low likelihood of collection, are charged-off and deducted from the reserve, while recoveries of amounts previously charged-off are credited to the reserve. A (recovery of) provision for loan and lease losses is credited or charged to operations based on the Company’s periodic evaluation of the factors previously mentioned, as well as other pertinent factors.
Equipment Owned Under Operating Leases — As a lessor, the Company finances various types of construction equipment, medium and heavy duty trucks, automobiles and other equipment under leases classified as operating leases. The equipment underlying the operating leases is reported at cost, net of accumulated depreciation, on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition. These operating lease arrangements require the lessee to make a fixed monthly rental payment over a specified lease term generally ranging from three years to seven years. Revenue consists of the contractual lease payments and is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term and reported in Noninterest Income on the Consolidated Statements of Income. Leased assets are depreciated on a straight-line method over the lease term to the estimate of the equipment’s fair market value at lease termination, also referred to as “residual” value. The depreciation of these operating lease assets is reported in Noninterest Expense on the Consolidated Statements of Income. For automobile leases, fair value is based upon published industry market guides. For other equipment leases, fair value may be based upon observable market prices, third-party valuations, or prices received on sales of similar assets at the end of the lease term. These residual values are reviewed annually to ensure the recorded amount does not exceed the fair market value at the lease termination. At the end of the lease, the operating lease asset is either purchased by the lessee or returned to the Company. The Company is responsible for the payment of personal property taxes which is reported in Other Expense on the Consolidated Statements of Income. The lessee is responsible for reimbursing the Company for personal property taxes which is reported in Other Income on the Consolidated Statements of Income. The Company excludes sales taxes and other similar taxes from being reported as lease revenue with an associated expense.
Lease Commitments — The Company leases certain banking center locations, office space, land and billboards. In determining whether a contract contains a lease, the Company examines the contract to ensure an asset was specifically identified and that the Company has control of use over the asset. To determine whether a lease is classified as operating or finance, the Company performs an economic life test on all building leases with greater than a twenty years term. Further, the Company performs a fair value test to identify any leases that have a present value of future lease payments over the lease term that is greater than 90% of the fair value of the building. The Company only capitalizes leases with an initial lease liability of $2,000 or greater.
At lease inception, the Company determines the lease term by adding together the minimum lease term and all optional renewal periods that it is reasonably certain to renew. The Company determines this on each lease by considering all relevant contract-based, asset-based, market-based, and entity-based economic factors. Generally, the exercise of lease renewal options is at the Company’s sole discretion. The lease term is used to determine whether a lease is operating or finance and is used to calculate straight-line rent expense. Additionally, the depreciable life of leasehold improvements is limited by the expected lease term.
Operating lease rentals are expensed on a straight-line basis over the life of the lease beginning on the date the Company takes possession of the property. Rent expense and variable lease costs are included in Net Occupancy Expense on the Consolidated Statements of Income. Included in variable lease costs are leases with rent escalations based on recent financial indices, such as the Consumer Price Index, where the Company estimates future rent increases and records the actual difference to variable costs. Certain leases require the Company to pay common area maintenance, real estate taxes, insurance and other operating expenses associated with the leases premises. These expenses are classified in Net Occupancy Expense on the Consolidated Statements of Income, consistent with similar costs for owned locations. There are no residual value guarantees, restrictions or covenants imposed by leases.
The Company accounts for lease and nonlease components together as a single lease component by class of underlying asset. Operating lease obligations with an initial term longer than 12 months are recorded with a right of use asset and a lease liability on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition.
The discount rate used in determining the lease liability and related right of use asset is based upon what would be obtained by the Company for similar loans as an incremental rate as of the date of origination or renewal.

47


Other Real Estate — Other real estate acquired through partial or total satisfaction of nonperforming loans is included in Other Assets on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition and recorded at fair value less anticipated selling costs based upon the property’s appraised value at the date of transfer, with any difference between the fair value of the property less cost to sell, and the carrying value of the loan charged to the reserve for loan and lease losses or other income, if a positive adjustment. Subsequent fair value write-downs or write-ups, to the extent of previous write-downs, property maintenance costs, and gains or losses recognized upon the sale of other real estate are recognized in Noninterest Expense on the Consolidated Statements of Income. Gains or losses resulting from the sale of other real estate are recognized on the date of sale. As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, other real estate had carrying values of $0.52 million and $0.30 million, respectively, and is included in Other Assets on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition.
Repossessed Assets — Repossessed assets may include fixtures and equipment, inventory and receivables, aircraft, construction equipment, and vehicles acquired from business banking and specialty finance activities. Repossessed assets are included in Other Assets on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition at fair value of the equipment or vehicle less estimated selling costs. At the time of repossession, the recorded amount of the loan or lease is written down to the fair value of the equipment or vehicle by a charge to the reserve for loan and lease losses or other income, if a positive adjustment. Subsequent fair value write-downs or write-ups, to the extent of previous write-downs, equipment maintenance costs, and gains or losses recognized upon the sale of repossessions are recognized in Noninterest Expense on the Consolidated Statements of Income. Gains or losses resulting from the sale of repossessed assets are recognized on the date of sale. Repossessed assets totaled $8.62 million and $6.66 million, as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively, and are included in Other Assets on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition.
Premises and Equipment — Premises and equipment are stated at cost, less accumulated depreciation and amortization. The provision for depreciation is computed by the straight-line method, primarily with useful lives ranging from three years to 31.5 years. Maintenance and repairs are charged to expense as incurred, while improvements, which extend the useful life, are capitalized and depreciated over the estimated remaining life.
Goodwill and Intangibles — Goodwill represents the excess of the cost of businesses acquired over the fair value of the net assets acquired. Other intangible assets represent purchased assets that also lack physical substance but can be distinguished from goodwill because of contractual or other legal rights or because the asset is capable of being sold or exchanged either on its own or in combination with a related contract, asset, or liability. Goodwill is reviewed for impairment at least annually or on an interim basis if an event occurs or circumstances change that would more likely than not reduce the carrying amount. Goodwill is allocated into 2 reporting units. Fair value for each reporting unit is estimated using stock price multiples or earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) multiples. Intangible assets that have finite lives are amortized over their estimated useful lives and are subject to impairment testing. All of the Company’s other intangible assets have finite lives and are amortized on a straight-line basis over varying periods not exceeding twenty-five years. The Company performed the required annual impairment test of goodwill during the fourth quarter of 2019 and determined that 0 impairment exists.
Partnership Investments — The partnerships in which the Company has investments account for their investments at fair value. As a result, the Company’s investments in these partnerships reflect the underlying fair value of the partnerships’ investments. The Company accounts for its investments in partnerships for which it owns 3 percent or more of the partnership on the equity method. The Company accounts for its investments in partnerships of which it owns less than three percent at fair value less impairment. The Company has elected to use the practical expedient to estimate fair value of an investment in an investment company using the net asset value of its partnership interest. The Company uses the hypothetical liquidation book value (HLBV) method for equity investments when the liquidation rights and priorities as defined by an equity investment agreement differ from what is reflected by the underlying percentage ownership interests. The HLBV method is commonly applied to equity investments in the renewable energy industry, where cash percentages vary at different points in time and are not directly linked to an investor’s ownership percentage. A calculation is prepared at each balance sheet date to determine the amount that the Company would receive if an equity investment entity were to liquidate all of its assets (as valued in accordance with GAAP) and distribute that cash to the investors based on the contractually defined liquidation priorities. The difference between the calculated liquidation distribution amounts at the beginning and the end of the reporting period, after adjusting for capital contributions and distributions, is 1st Source’s share of the earnings or losses from the equity investment for the period. Investments in partnerships are included in Other Assets on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition. The balances as of December 31, 2019 and 2018 were $61.08 million and $23.46 million, respectively.
Short-Term Borrowings — Short-term borrowings consist of Federal funds purchased, securities sold under agreements to repurchase, commercial paper, Federal Home Loan Bank notes, and borrowings from non-affiliated banks. Federal funds purchased, securities sold under agreements to repurchase, and other short-term borrowings mature within one day to 365 days of the transaction date. Commercial paper matures within seven days to 270 days. Other short-term borrowings on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition include the Company’s liability related to mortgage loans available for repurchase under GNMA optional repurchase programs.

48


Securities purchased under agreements to resell and securities sold under agreements to repurchase are treated as collateralized financing transactions and are recorded at the amounts at which the securities were acquired or sold plus accrued interest. The fair value of collateral either received from or provided to a third-party is continually monitored and additional collateral obtained or requested to be returned to the Company as deemed appropriate.
Revenue Recognition — The Company recognizes revenues as they are earned based on contractual terms, as transactions occur, or as services are provided and collectability is reasonably assured. The Company’s principal source of revenue is interest income from loans and leases and investment securities. The Company also earns noninterest income from various banking and financial services offered primarily through 1st Source Bank and its subsidiaries.
Interest Income — The largest source of revenue for the Company is interest income which is primarily recognized on an accrual basis according to nondiscretionary formulas in written contracts, such as loan and lease agreements or investment securities contracts.
Noninterest Income — The Company earns noninterest income through a variety of financial and transaction services provided to corporate and consumer clients such as trust and wealth advisory, deposit account, debit card, mortgage banking, insurance, and equipment rental services. Revenue is recorded for noninterest income based on the contractual terms for the service or transaction performed. In certain circumstances, noninterest income is reported net of associated expenses.
Trust and Wealth Advisory Fees — Trust and wealth advisory fees are recognized on the accrual basis.
Income Taxes — 1st Source and its subsidiaries file a consolidated Federal income tax return. The provision for incomes taxes is based upon income in the consolidated financial statements, rather than amounts reported on the income tax return. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized as income or expense in the period that includes the enactment date. A valuation allowance, if needed, reduces deferred tax assets to the expected amount most likely to be realized. Realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of a sufficient level of future taxable income and recoverable taxes paid in prior years. Although realization is not assured, the Company believes it is more likely than not that all of the deferred tax assets will be realized.
The Company uses the deferral method of accounting on investments that generate investment tax credits. Under this method, the investment tax credits are recognized as a reduction to the related asset. The expense on certain qualified affordable housing investments is included in Tax Expense on the Consolidated Statements of Income.
Positions taken in the tax returns may be subject to challenge by the taxing authorities upon examination. Uncertain tax positions are initially recognized in the financial statements when it is more likely than not the position will be sustained upon examination by the tax authorities. Such tax positions are both initially and subsequently measured as the largest amount of tax benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized upon settlement with the tax authority, assuming full knowledge of the position and all relevant facts. The Company provides for interest and, in some cases, penalties on tax positions that may be challenged by the taxing authorities. Interest expense is recognized beginning in the first period that such interest would begin accruing. Penalties are recognized in the period that the Company claims the position in the tax return. Interest and penalties on income tax uncertainties are classified within Income Tax Expense on the Consolidated Statements of Income.
Net Income Per Common Share — Basic earnings per common share is computed by dividing net income available to common shareholders by the weighted-average number of shares of common stock outstanding. Diluted earnings per common share is computed by dividing net income available to common shareholders by the weighted-average number of shares of common stock outstanding, plus the dilutive effect of outstanding stock options, stock warrants and nonvested stock-based compensation awards.
Stock-Based Employee Compensation — The Company recognizes stock-based compensation as compensation cost on the Consolidated Statements of Income based on their fair values on the measurement date, which, for its purposes, is the date of grant. The Company recognizes forfeitures as they occur.
Segment Information — 1st Source has one principal business segment, commercial banking. While our chief decision makers monitor the revenue streams of various products and services, the identifiable segments’ operations are managed and financial performance is evaluated on a company-wide basis. Accordingly, all of the Company’s financial service operations are considered to be aggregated in 1 reportable operating segment.

49


Derivative Financial Instruments — The Company occasionally enters into derivative financial instruments as part of its interest rate risk management strategies. These derivative financial instruments consist primarily of interest rate swaps. All derivative instruments are recorded on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition, as either an asset or liability, at their fair value. The accounting for the gain or loss resulting from the change in fair value depends on the intended use of the derivative. For a derivative used to hedge changes in fair value of a recognized asset or liability, or an unrecognized firm commitment, the gain or loss on the derivative will be recognized in earnings together with the offsetting loss or gain on the hedged item. This results in an earnings impact only to the extent that the hedge is ineffective in achieving offsetting changes in fair value. If it is determined that the derivative instrument is not highly effective as a hedge, hedge accounting is discontinued and the adjustment to fair value of the derivative instrument is recorded in earnings. For a derivative used to hedge changes in cash flows associated with forecasted transactions, the gain or loss on the effective portion of the derivative will be deferred, and reported as accumulated other comprehensive income, a component of shareholders’ equity, until such time the hedged transaction affects earnings. For derivative instruments not accounted for as hedges, changes in fair value are recognized in noninterest income/expense on the Consolidated Statements of Income. Deferred gains and losses from derivatives that are terminated and were in a cash flow hedge are amortized over the shorter of the original remaining term of the derivative or the remaining life of the underlying asset or liability.
Fair Value Measurements — The Company records certain assets and liabilities at fair value. Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Securities available for sale, mortgage loans held for sale, and derivative instruments are carried at fair value on a recurring basis. Fair value measurements are also utilized to determine the initial value of certain assets and liabilities, to perform impairment assessments, and for disclosure purposes. The Company uses quoted market prices and observable inputs to the maximum extent possible when measuring fair value. In the absence of quoted market prices, various valuation techniques are utilized to measure fair value. When possible, observable market data for identical or similar financial instruments are used in the valuation. When market data is not available, fair value is determined using valuation models that incorporate management’s estimates of the assumptions a market participant would use in pricing the asset or liability.
Fair value measurements are classified within one of three levels based on the observability of the inputs used to determine fair value, as follows:
Level 1 — The valuation is based on quoted prices in active markets for identical instruments.
Level 2 — The valuation is based on observable inputs such as quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active, and model-based valuation techniques for which all significant assumptions are observable in the market.
Level 3 — The valuation is based on unobservable inputs that are supported by minimal or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the instrument. Level 3 valuations are typically performed using pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies, or similar techniques that incorporate management’s own estimates of assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the instrument, or valuations that require significant management judgment or estimation.
Reclassifications — Certain amounts in the prior periods consolidated financial statements have been reclassified to conform with the current year presentation. These reclassifications had no effect on total assets, shareholders’ equity or net income as previously reported.
Note 2 — Recent Accounting Pronouncements
Partnership Investments and Derivatives: In January 2020, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2020-01 “Investments-Equity Securities (Topic 321), Investments-Equity Method and Joint Ventures (Topic 323), and Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815) - Clarifying the Interactions between Topic 321, Topic 323, and Topic 815.” These amendments, among other things, clarify that a company should consider observable transactions that require a company to either apply or discontinue the equity method of accounting under Topic 323, Investments-Equity Method and Joint Ventures, for the purposes of applying the measurement alternative in accordance with Topic 321 immediately before applying or upon discontinuing the equity method. The amendments also clarify that, when determining the accounting for certain forward contracts and purchased options a company should not consider, whether upon settlement or exercise, if the underlying securities would be accounted for under the equity method or fair value option. The guidance is effective for public business entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2020. Early application is permitted, including early adoption in an interim period. An entity should apply ASU 2020-01 prospectively at the beginning of the interim period that includes the adoption date. The Company is assessing ASU 2020-01 and its impact on its accounting and disclosures.

50


Income Taxes: In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12 “Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes.” These amendments remove specific exceptions to the general principles in Topic 740 in GAAP. It eliminates the need for an organization to analyze whether the following apply in a given period: exception to the incremental approach for intraperiod tax allocation; exceptions to accounting for basis differences where there are ownership changes in foreign investments; and exception in interim period income tax accounting for year-to-date losses that exceed anticipated losses. It also improves financial statement preparers’ application of income tax-related guidance and simplifies GAAP for: franchise taxes that are partially based on income; transactions with a government that result in a step up in the tax basis of goodwill; separate financial statements of legal entities that are not subject to tax; and enacts changes in tax laws in interim periods. The guidance is effective for public business entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2020. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is assessing ASU 2019-12 and its impact on its accounting and disclosure.
Leases: In March 2019, the FASB issued ASU No. 2019-01 “Leases (Topic 842): Codification Improvements.” These amendments align the guidance for fair value of the underlying asset by lessors that are not manufacturers or dealers in Topic 842 with that of existing guidance. The ASU also requires lessors within the scope of Topic 842, Financial Services-Depository Lending, to present all “principal payments received under leases” within investing activities on the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows. Finally, the ASU exempts both lessees and lessors from having to provide certain interim disclosures in the fiscal year in which a company adopts the new leases standard. The guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early application is permitted. An entity should apply the amendments as of the date that it first applied Topic 842, using the same transition methodology in accordance with paragraph 842-10-65-1(c). The Company adopted Topic 842 on January 1, 2019 and applied the amendments in ASU 2019-01 as of the same date and it did not have a material impact on its accounting and disclosures.
Intangibles - Internal-Use Software: In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-15 “Intangibles - Goodwill and Other - Internal-Use Software (Subtopic 350-40): Customer’s Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That Is a Service Contract.” These amendments align the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred in a hosting arrangement that is a service contact with the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred to develop or obtain internal-use software (and hosting arrangements that include an internal-use software license). The accounting for the service element of a hosting arrangement that is a service contract is not affected by these amendments. The guidance is effective for public business entities for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted. The Company adopted ASU 2018-15 on January 1, 2020 and it did not have a material impact on its accounting and disclosures.
Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement: In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-13 “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework - Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement.” These amendments modify the disclosure requirements in Topic 820 as follows:
Removals: the amount of and reasons for transfers between Level 1 and Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy; the policy for timing of transfers between levels; and the valuation processes for Level 3 fair value measurements.
Modifications: for investments in certain entities that calculate net asset value, an entity is required to disclose the timing of liquidation of an investee’s assets and the date when restrictions from redemption might lapse only if the investee has communicated the timing to the entity or announced the timing publicly; and the amendments clarify that the measurement uncertainty disclosure is to communicate information about the uncertainty in measurement as of the reporting date.
Additions: the changes in unrealized gains and losses for the period included in other comprehensive income for recurring Level 3 fair value measurements held at the end of the reporting period; and the range and weighted average of significant unobservable inputs used to develop Level 3 fair value measurements.
The guidance is effective for all entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2019. The amendments on changes in unrealized gains and losses, the range and weighted average of significant unobservable inputs used to develop Level 3 fair value measurements, and the narrative description of measurement uncertainty should all be applied prospectively for only the most recent interim or annual period presented in the initial year of adoption. All other amendments should be applied retrospectively to all periods presented upon their effective date. Early adoption is permitted. An entity is permitted to early adopt any removed or modified disclosures upon issuance of ASU No. 2018-13 and delay adoption of the additional disclosures until their effective date. The Company adopted ASU 2018-13 on January 1, 2020 and it did not have a material impact on its accounting and disclosures.

51


Premium Amortization: In March 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-08 “Receivables - Nonrefundable Fees and Other Costs (Subtopic 310-20), Premium Amortization on Purchased Callable Debt Securities.” These amendments shorten the amortization period for certain callable debt securities held at a premium. Specifically, the amendments require the premium to be amortized to the earliest call date. The amendments do not require an accounting change for securities held at a discount; the discount continues to be amortized to maturity. The guidance is effective for public business entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2018. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. If an entity early adopts in an interim period, any adjustments should be reflected as of the beginning of the fiscal year that includes that interim period. The amendments should be applied on a modified retrospective basis, with a cumulative-effect adjustment directly to retained earnings as of the beginning of the period of adoption. The Company adopted ASU 2017-08 on January 1, 2019 and recognized a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings of $0.30 million.
Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment: In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-04 “Intangibles - Goodwill and Other (Topic 350) - Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment.” These amendments eliminate Step 2 from the goodwill impairment test. The amendments also eliminate the requirements for any reporting unit with a zero or negative carrying amount to perform a qualitative assessment and, if it fails that qualitative test, to perform Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test. An entity still has the option to perform the qualitative assessment for a reporting unit to determine if the quantitative impairment test is necessary. The guidance is effective for annual or any interim goodwill impairment tests in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019. Early adoption is permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. ASU 2017-04 should be adopted on a prospective basis. The Company adopted ASU 2017-04 on January 1, 2020 and it did not have a material impact on its accounting and disclosures.
Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments: In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-13, “Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326) - Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments (CECL).” The provisions of ASU 2016-13 were issued to provide financial statement users with more decision-useful information about the expected credit losses on financial instruments that are not accounted for at fair value through net income, including loans held for investment, held-to-maturity debt securities, trade and other receivables, net investment in leases and other commitments to extend credit held by a reporting entity at each reporting date. ASU 2016-13 requires that financial assets measured at amortized cost be presented at the net amount expected to be collected, through an allowance for credit losses that is deducted from the amortized cost basis. The amendments in ASU 2016-13 eliminate the probable incurred loss recognition in current GAAP and reflect an entity’s current estimate of all expected credit losses. The measurement of expected credit losses is based upon historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts that affect the collectibility of the financial assets.
Credit losses relating to available-for-sale debt securities will be recorded through an allowance for credit losses rather than as a direct write-down to the security.
The FASB issued additional ASUs containing clarifying guidance, transition relief provisions and minor updates to the original ASU. These include ASU 2018-19 (issued November 2018), ASU 2019-04 (issued April 2019), ASU 2019-05 (issued May 2019), ASU 2019-10 (issued November 2019) and ASU 2019-11 (issued November 2019). ASU 2016-13 and subsequent ASUs are effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2019. This amendment is required to be adopted using a modified retrospective approach with a cumulative-effect adjustment to beginning retained earnings, as of the beginning of the first reporting period in which the guidance is effective.
As previously disclosed, the Company formed a cross-functional team to work through its implementation plan. The Company’s cross-functional team is substantially complete with the assessment and documentation of processes, internal controls, data and model validation testing, parallel testing, qualitative factors and forecast periods as well as model development. The Company implemented a third-party software solution to assist in the application of the new standard including portfolio segmentation according to shared risk characteristics and modeling methodologies. The Company has not finalized the results of its CECL estimate as of year-end since it is in the final stages of completing the formal review and approval process. The Company estimates the adoption of ASU 2016-13 on January 1, 2020 will result in a one-time cumulative effect adjustment through retained earnings in a decrease of up to $1 million or an increase of up to $3 million on its allowance for credit losses.
The Company does not expect to record an allowance on January 1, 2020 with respect to its available-for-sale debt securities as the majority of these securities are government agency-backed securities for which the risk of loss is minimal. The adoption of ASU 2016-13 is not expected to have a significant impact on the Company’s regulatory capital ratios.

52


Note 3 — Investment Securities Available-For-Sale
The following table shows investment securities available-for-sale.
(Dollars in thousands) Amortized Cost Gross Unrealized Gains Gross Unrealized Losses Fair Value
December 31, 2019  
  
  
  
U.S. Treasury and Federal agencies securities $524,896
 $2,538
 $(470) $526,964
U.S. States and political subdivisions securities 83,566
 1,048
 (109) 84,505
Mortgage-backed securities - Federal agencies 372,458
 3,948
 (1,017) 375,389
Corporate debt securities 52,151
 890
 (16) 53,025
Foreign government and other securities 700
 
 
 700
Total investment securities available-for-sale $1,033,771
 $8,424
 $(1,612) $1,040,583
December 31, 2018  
  
  
  
U.S. Treasury and Federal agencies securities $537,913
 $196
 $(6,886) $531,223
U.S. States and political subdivisions securities 95,346
 172
 (936) 94,582
Mortgage-backed securities - Federal agencies 324,390
 718
 (6,875) 318,233
Corporate debt securities 45,843
 
 (451) 45,392
Foreign government and other securities 700
 
 (1) 699
Total investment securities available-for-sale $1,004,192
 $1,086
 $(15,149) $990,129

At December 31, 2019, the residential mortgage-backed securities held by the Company consisted primarily of GNMA, FNMA and FHLMC pass-through certificates which are guaranteed by those respective agencies of the United States government (Government Sponsored Enterprise, GSEs).
The Company did not hold any marketable equity securities at December 31, 2019 and 2018.
The following table shows the contractual maturities of investments in debt securities available-for-sale at December 31, 2019. Expected maturities will differ from contractual maturities, because borrowers may have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without call or prepayment penalties.
(Dollars in thousands) Amortized Cost Fair Value
Due in one year or less $147,306
 $147,629
Due after one year through five years 482,118
 485,745
Due after five years through ten years 31,209
 31,173
Due after ten years 680
 647
Mortgage-backed securities 372,458
 375,389
Total debt securities available-for-sale $1,033,771
 $1,040,583


53


The following table summarizes gross unrealized losses and fair value by investment category and age. At December 31, 2019, the Company’s available-for-sale securities portfolio consisted of 629 securities, 152 of which were in an unrealized loss position.
  Less than 12 Months 12 months or Longer Total
(Dollars in thousands)  Fair Value Unrealized Losses Fair Value Unrealized Losses Fair Value Unrealized Losses
December 31, 2019  
  
  
  
  
  
U.S. Treasury and Federal agencies securities $87,352
 $(171) $69,053
 $(299) $156,405
 $(470)
U.S. States and political subdivisions securities 9,283
 (107) 1,042
 (2) 10,325
 (109)
Mortgage-backed securities - Federal agencies 81,951
 (383) 51,165
 (634) 133,116
 (1,017)
Corporate debt securities 
 
 8,091
 (16) 8,091
 (16)
Foreign government and other securities 
 
 
 
 
 
Total temporarily impaired available-for-sale securities $178,586
 $(661) $129,351
 $(951) $307,937
 $(1,612)
December 31, 2018  
  
  
  
  
  
U.S. Treasury and Federal agencies securities $55,491
 $(177) $424,269
 $(6,709) $479,760
 $(6,886)
U.S. States and political subdivisions securities 21,059
 (61) 45,365
 (875) 66,424
 (936)
Mortgage-backed securities - Federal agencies 65,554
 (511) 198,221
 (6,364) 263,775
 (6,875)
Corporate debt securities 21,496
 (143) 23,896
 (308) 45,392
 (451)
Foreign government and other securities 699
 (1) 
 
 699
 (1)
Total temporarily impaired available-for-sale securities $164,299
 $(893) $691,751
 $(14,256) $856,050
 $(15,149)

At December 31, 2019, the Company does not have the intent to sell any of the available-for-sale securities in the table above and believes that it is more likely than not that it will not have to sell any such securities before an anticipated recovery of cost. The unrealized losses on debt securities are due to market volatility. The fair value is expected to recover on all debt securities as they approach their maturity date or repricing date or if market yields for such investments decline. The Company does not believe any of the securities are impaired due to reasons of credit quality.
The following table shows the gross realized gains and losses from the securities available-for-sale portfolio, including marketable equity securities.
(Dollars in thousands) 2019 2018 2017
Gross realized gains $
 $2
 $7,425
Gross realized losses 
 (347) (2,895)
OTTI losses 
 
 (190)
Net realized (losses) gains $
 $(345) $4,340

At December 31, 2019 and 2018, investment securities with carrying values of $281.38 million and $242.31 million, respectively, were pledged as collateral for security repurchase agreements and for other purposes.
Note 4 — Loan and Lease Financings
Total loans and leases outstanding were recorded net of unearned income and deferred loan fees and costs at December 31, 2019 and 2018, and totaled $5.09 billion and $4.84 billion, respectively. At December 31, 2019 and 2018, net deferred loan and lease costs were $5.06 million and $4.54 million, respectively.
In the ordinary course of business, the Company has extended loans to certain directors, executive officers, and principal shareholders of equity securities of 1st Source and to their affiliates. In the opinion of management, these loans are made on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with persons not related to the Company and did not involve more than the normal risk of collectability, or present other unfavorable features. The loans are consistent with sound banking practices and within applicable regulatory and lending limitations. The aggregate dollar amounts of these loans were $17.08 million and $11.38 million at December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. During 2019, $6.69 million of new loans and other additions were made and repayments and other reductions totaled $0.99 million.
The Company evaluates loans and leases for credit quality at least annually but more frequently if certain circumstances occur (such as material new information which becomes available and indicates a potential change in credit risk). The Company uses 2 methods to assess credit risk: loan or lease credit quality grades and credit risk classifications. The purpose of the loan or lease credit quality grade is to document the degree of risk associated with individual credits as well as inform management of the degree of risk in the portfolio taken as a whole. Credit risk classifications are used to categorize loans by degree of risk and to designate individual or committee approval authorities for higher risk credits at the time of origination. Credit risk classifications include categories for: Acceptable, Marginal, Special Attention, Special Risk, Restricted by Policy, Regulated and Prohibited by Law.

54


All loans and leases, except residential real estate and home equity loans and consumer loans, are assigned credit quality grades on a scale from 1 to 12 with grade 1 representing superior credit quality. The criteria used to assign grades to extensions of credit that exhibit potential problems or well-defined weaknesses are primarily based upon the degree of risk and the likelihood of orderly repayment, and their effect on our safety and soundness. Loans or leases graded 7 or weaker are considered “special attention” credits and, as such, relationships in excess of $100,000 are reviewed quarterly as part of management’s evaluation of the appropriateness of the reserve for loan and lease losses. Grade 7 credits are defined as “watch” and contain greater than average credit risk and are monitored to limit our exposure to increased risk; grade 8 credits are “special mention” and, following regulatory guidelines, are defined as having potential weaknesses that deserve management’s close attention. Credits that exhibit well-defined weaknesses and a distinct possibility of loss are considered ‘‘classified’’ and are graded 9 through 12 corresponding to the regulatory definitions of “substandard” (grades 9 and 10) and the more severe ‘‘doubtful’’ (grade 11) and ‘‘loss’’ (grade 12).
The following table shows the credit quality grades of the recorded investment in loans and leases, segregated by class.
  Credit Quality Grades
(Dollars in thousands)  1-6 7-12 Total
December 31, 2019  
  
  
Commercial and agricultural $1,080,933
 $51,858
 $1,132,791
Auto and light truck 569,234
 19,573
 588,807
Medium and heavy duty truck 293,736
 1,088
 294,824
Aircraft 764,564
 19,476
 784,040
Construction equipment 668,076
 37,375
 705,451
Commercial real estate 888,154
 20,023
 908,177
Total $4,264,697
 $149,393
 $4,414,090
December 31, 2018  
  
  
Commercial and agricultural $1,043,019
 $30,186
 $1,073,205
Auto and light truck 528,174
 31,813
 559,987
Medium and heavy duty truck 281,834
 1,710
 283,544
Aircraft 768,442
 34,669
 803,111
Construction equipment 625,579
 19,660
 645,239
Commercial real estate 787,376
 22,510
 809,886
Total $4,034,424
 $140,548
 $4,174,972

For residential real estate and home equity and consumer loans, credit quality is based on the aging status of the loan and by payment activity. The following table shows the recorded investment in residential real estate and home equity and consumer loans by performing or nonperforming status. Nonperforming loans are those loans which are on nonaccrual status or are 90 days or more past due.
(Dollars in thousands)  Performing Nonperforming Total
December 31, 2019  
  
  
Residential real estate and home equity $529,557
 $2,446
 $532,003
Consumer 138,951
 483
 139,434
Total $668,508
 $2,929
 $671,437
December 31, 2018  
  
  
Residential real estate and home equity $521,846
 $2,009
 $523,855
Consumer 136,423
 214
 136,637
Total $658,269
 $2,223
 $660,492


55


The following table shows the recorded investment of loans and leases, segregated by class, with delinquency aging and nonaccrual status.
(Dollars in thousands)  Current 30-59 Days Past Due 60-89 Days Past Due 90 Days or More Past Due and Accruing Total Accruing Loans Nonaccrual Total Financing Receivables
December 31, 2019  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Commercial and agricultural $1,131,704
 $118
 $
 $
 $1,131,822
 $969
 $1,132,791
Auto and light truck 586,212
 1,268
 77
 
 587,557
 1,250
 588,807
Medium and heavy duty truck 293,736
 14
 
 
 293,750
 1,074
 294,824
Aircraft 772,846
 7,026
 3,293
 
 783,165
 875
 784,040
Construction equipment 702,671
 819
 609
 
 704,099
 1,352
 705,451
Commercial real estate 906,468
 58
 
 
 906,526
 1,651
 908,177
Residential real estate and home equity 528,844
 561
 152
 257
 529,814
 2,189
 532,003
Consumer 138,132
 632
 187
 54
 139,005
 429
 139,434
Total $5,060,613
 $10,496
 $4,318
 $311
 $5,075,738
 $9,789
 $5,085,527
December 31, 2018  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Commercial and agricultural $1,070,530
 $22
 $
 $
 $1,070,552
 $2,653
 $1,073,205
Auto and light truck 544,022
 3,154
 1,437
 
 548,613
 11,374
 559,987
Medium and heavy duty truck 283,284
 154
 
 
 283,438
 106
 283,544
Aircraft 790,233
 4,149
 1,168
 
 795,550
 7,561
 803,111
Construction equipment 641,270
 1,643
 
 
 642,913
 2,326
 645,239
Commercial real estate 807,793
 109
 
 
 807,902
 1,984
 809,886
Residential real estate and home equity 520,124
 1,267
 455
 295
 522,141
 1,714
 523,855
Consumer 135,591
 682
 150
 73
 136,496
 141
 136,637
Total $4,792,847
 $11,180
 $3,210
 $368
 $4,807,605
 $27,859
 $4,835,464

Interest income for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018, and 2017, would have increased by approximately $0.69 million, $2.18 million, and $1.14 million, respectively, if the nonaccrual loans and leases had earned interest at their full contract rate.

56


The following table shows impaired loans and leases, segregated by class, and the corresponding reserve for impaired loan and lease losses.
(Dollars in thousands)  Recorded Investment Unpaid Principal Balance Related Reserve
December 31, 2019  
  
  
With no related reserve recorded:  
  
  
Commercial and agricultural $218
 $218
 $
Auto and light truck 853
 853
 
Medium and heavy duty truck 1,074
 1,074
 
Aircraft 875
 875
 
Construction equipment 615
 615
 
Commercial real estate 1,487
 1,487
 
Residential real estate and home equity 
 
 
Consumer 
 
 
Total with no related reserve recorded 5,122
 5,122
 
With a reserve recorded:  
  
  
Commercial and agricultural 10,366
 10,366
 3,003
Auto and light truck 278
 278
 30
Medium and heavy duty truck 
 
 
Aircraft 
 
 
Construction equipment 736
 736
 75
Commercial real estate 
 
 
Residential real estate and home equity 337
 339
 117
Consumer 
 
 
Total with a reserve recorded 11,717
 11,719
 3,225
Total impaired loans $16,839
 $16,841
 $3,225
December 31, 2018  
  
  
With no related reserve recorded:  
  
  
Commercial and agricultural $2,471
 $2,471
 $
Auto and light truck 7,504
 7,504
 
Medium and heavy duty truck 106
 106
 
Aircraft 556
 556
 
Construction equipment 905
 905
 
Commercial real estate 1,131
 1,131
 
Residential real estate and home equity 
 
 
Consumer 
 
 
Total with no related reserve recorded 12,673
 12,673
 
With a reserve recorded:  
  
  
Commercial and agricultural 
 
 
Auto and light truck 3,840
 3,840
 372
Medium and heavy duty truck 
 
 
Aircraft 7,004
 7,004
 1,255
Construction equipment 1,340
 1,340
 279
Commercial real estate 759
 759
 51
Residential real estate and home equity 344
 346
 126
Consumer 
 
 
Total with a reserve recorded 13,287
 13,289
 2,083
Total impaired loans $25,960
 $25,962
 $2,083


57


The following table shows average recorded investment and interest income recognized on impaired loans and leases, segregated by class, for years ending December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017.
  2019 2018 2017
(Dollars in thousands)  
Average
Recorded
Investment
 
Interest
Income
 
Average
Recorded
Investment
 
Interest
Income
 
Average
Recorded
Investment
 
Interest
Income
Commercial and agricultural $5,983
 $242
 $2,812
 $
 $4,526
 $1
Auto and light truck 2,721
 
 9,352
 
 766
 
Medium and heavy duty truck 244
 
 247
 
 658
 
Aircraft 2,409
 8
 9,987
 20
 4,873
 5
Construction equipment 1,664
 
 1,663
 
 1,011
 
Commercial real estate 1,715
 
 2,303
 
 3,220
 2
Residential real estate and home equity 340
 19
 347
 15
 355
 15
Consumer loans 
 
 
 
 
 
Total $15,076
 $269
 $26,711
 $35
 $15,409
 $23

The following table shows the number of loans and leases classified as troubled debt restructuring (TDR) during 2019, 2018 and 2017, segregated by class, as well as the recorded investment as of December 31. The classification between nonperforming and performing is shown at the time of modification. Modification programs focused on extending maturity dates or modifying payment patterns with most TDRs experiencing a combination of concessions. The modifications did not result in the contractual forgiveness of principal or interest. There was 1 modification during 2019, 0 modifications during 2018, and 1 modification during 2017 that resulted in an interest rate reduction below market rate. Consequently, the financial impact of the modifications was immaterial.
  2019 2018 2017
(Dollars in thousands) Number of Modifications Recorded Investment Number of Modifications Recorded Investment Number of Modifications Recorded Investment
Performing TDRs:  
  
  
  
    
Commercial and agricultural 1
 $9,901
 
 $
 
 $
Auto and light truck 
 
 
 
 
 
Medium and heavy duty truck 
 
 
 
 
 
Aircraft 
 
 
 
 
 
Construction equipment 
 
 
 
 
 
Commercial real estate 
 
 
 
 
 
Residential real estate and home equity 
 
 
 
 
 
Consumer 
 
 
 
 
 
Total performing TDR modifications 1
 9,901
 
 
 
 
Nonperforming TDRs:  
  
  
  
    
Commercial and agricultural 1
 465
 
 
 1
 
Auto and light truck 
 
 1
 285
 
 
Medium and heavy duty truck 
 
 
 
 
 
Aircraft 
 
 
 
 
 
Construction equipment 
 
 
 
 
 
Commercial real estate 
 
 
 
 
 
Residential real estate and home equity 
 
 
 
 
 
Consumer 
 
 
 
 
 
Total nonperforming TDR modifications 1
 465
 1
 285
 1
 
Total TDR modifications 2
 $10,366
 1
 $285
 1
 $

There was 1 nonperforming auto and light truck TDR with a recorded investment of $0.00 million which had a payment default within the twelve months following modification for the year ended December 31, 2019, 0 TDRs which had a payment default within the twelve months following modification during the year ended December 31, 2018 and 1 nonperforming construction equipment TDR with a recorded investment of $0.41 million which had a payment default within the twelve months following modification for the year ended December 31, 2017.
The classification between nonperforming and performing is shown at the time of modification. Default occurs when a loan or lease is 90 days or more past due under the modified terms or transferred to nonaccrual.

58


The following table shows the recorded investment of loans and leases classified as troubled debt restructurings as of December 31.
Year Ended December 31 (Dollars in thousands)
 2019 2018
Performing TDRs $10,238
 $344
Nonperforming TDRs 486
 316
Total TDRs $10,724
 $660

Note 5 — Reserve for Loan and Lease Losses
The following table shows the changes in the reserve for loan and lease losses, segregated by class, for each of the three years ended December 31.
(Dollars in thousands)  Commercial and agricultural Auto and light truck Medium and heavy duty truck Aircraft Construction equipment Commercial real estate Residential real estate and home equity Consumer Total
2019  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Balance, beginning of year $17,063
 $14,689
 $4,303
 $33,047
 $10,922
 $15,705
 $3,425
 $1,315
 $100,469
Charge-offs 1,040
 991
 1,132
 3,066
 238
 5
 53
 1,066
 7,591
Recoveries 664
 97
 32
 1,143
 160
 75
 85
 287
 2,543
Net charge-offs 376
 894
 1,100
 1,923
 78
 (70) (32) 779
 5,048
Provision (recovery of provision) 6,984
 605
 1,409
 (66) 3,276
 2,575
 152
 898
 15,833
Balance, end of year $23,671
 $14,400
 $4,612
 $31,058
 $14,120
 $18,350
 $3,609
 $1,434
 $111,254
                   
2018  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Balance, beginning of year $16,228
 $10,103
 $4,844
 $34,619
 $9,343
 $14,792
 $3,666
 $1,288
 $94,883
Charge-offs 229
 3,308
 23
 12,222
 288
 70
 63
 909
 17,112
Recoveries 222
 68
 
 2,499
 100
 53
 23
 271
 3,236
Net charge-offs (recoveries) 7
 3,240
 23
 9,723
 188
 17
 40
 638
 13,876
Provision (recovery of provision) 842
 7,826
 (518) 8,151
 1,767
 930
 (201) 665
 19,462
Balance, end of year $17,063
 $14,689
 $4,303
 $33,047
 $10,922
 $15,705
 $3,425
 $1,315
 $100,469
                   
2017  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Balance, beginning of year $14,668
 $8,064
 $4,740
 $34,352
 $8,207
 $13,677
 $3,550
 $1,285
 $88,543
Charge-offs 2,415
 774
 
 1,872
 164
 344
 124
 836
 6,529
Recoveries 984
 1,153
 
 227
 298
 851
 109
 267
 3,889
Net charge-offs (recoveries) 1,431
 (379) 
 1,645
 (134) (507) 15
 569
 2,640
Provision (recovery of provision) 2,991
 1,660
 104
 1,912
 1,002
 608
 131
 572
 8,980
Balance, end of year $16,228
 $10,103
 $4,844
 $34,619
 $9,343
 $14,792
 $3,666
 $1,288
 $94,883

The following table shows the reserve for loan and lease losses and recorded investment in loans and leases, segregated by class, separated by individually and collectively evaluated for impairment as of December 31, 2019 and 2018.
(Dollars in thousands)  Commercial and agricultural Auto and light truck Medium and heavy duty truck Aircraft Construction equipment Commercial real estate Residential real estate and home equity Consumer Total
December 31, 2019  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Reserve for loan and lease losses    
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Ending balance, individually evaluated for impairment $3,003
 $30
 $
 $
 $75
 $
 $117
 $
 $3,225
Ending balance, collectively evaluated for impairment 20,668
 14,370
 4,612
 31,058
 14,045
 18,350
 3,492
 1,434
 108,029
Total reserve for loan and lease losses $23,671
 $14,400
 $4,612
 $31,058
 $14,120
 $18,350
 $3,609
 $1,434
 $111,254
Recorded investment in loans  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Ending balance, individually evaluated for impairment $10,584
 $1,131
 $1,074
 $875
 $1,351
 $1,487
 $337
 $
 $16,839
Ending balance, collectively evaluated for impairment 1,122,207
 587,676
 293,750
 783,165
 704,100
 906,690
 531,666
 139,434
 5,068,688
Total recorded investment in loans $1,132,791
 $588,807
 $294,824
 $784,040
 $705,451
 $908,177
 $532,003
 $139,434
 $5,085,527
                   
December 31, 2018  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Reserve for loan and lease losses    
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Ending balance, individually evaluated for impairment $
 $372
 $
 $1,255
 $279
 $51
 $126
 $
 $2,083
Ending balance, collectively evaluated for impairment 17,063
 14,317
 4,303
 31,792
 10,643
 15,654
 3,299
 1,315
 98,386
Total reserve for loan and lease losses $17,063
 $14,689
 $4,303
 $33,047
 $10,922
 $15,705
 $3,425
 $1,315
 $100,469
Recorded investment in loans  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Ending balance, individually evaluated for impairment $2,471
 $11,344
 $106
 $7,560
 $2,245
 $1,890
 $344
 $
 $25,960
Ending balance, collectively evaluated for impairment 1,070,734
 548,643
 283,438
 795,551
 642,994
 807,996
 523,511
 136,637
 4,809,504
Total recorded investment in loans $1,073,205
 $559,987
 $283,544
 $803,111
 $645,239
 $809,886
 $523,855
 $136,637
 $4,835,464

Note 6 — Lease Investments
As a lessor, the Company’s loan and lease portfolio includes direct finance leases, which are included in commercial and agricultural, auto and light truck, medium and heavy duty truck, aircraft, and construction equipment on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition. The Company also finances various types of construction equipment, medium and heavy duty trucks, automobiles and other equipment under leases classified as operating leases, which are included in Equipment Owned Under Operating Leases, net, on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition.
The following table shows the components of the investment in direct finance and operating leases as of December 31.
(Dollars in thousands) 2019 2018
Direct finance leases:  
  
Minimum lease payments $190,879
 $257,398
Estimated unguaranteed residual values 41
 41
Less: Unearned income (30,568) (46,709)
Net investment in direct finance leases $160,352
 $210,730
     
Operating leases:    
Gross investment in operating leases $176,485
 $199,954
Accumulated depreciation (64,801) (65,514)
Net investment in operating leases $111,684
 $134,440


59


The following table shows future minimum lease payments due from clients on direct finance and operating leases at December 31, 2019.
(Dollars in thousands) 
Direct
Finance Leases
 Operating Leases
2020 $42,940
 $33,015
2021 34,966
 20,036
2022 33,577
 12,800
2023 29,027
 7,208
2024 16,001
 2,968
Thereafter 34,368
 934
Total $190,879
 $76,961

To mitigate the risk of loss, the Company seeks to diversify both the type of equipment leased and the industries in which the lessees participate. In addition, a portion of our leases are terminal rental adjustment clause or “TRAC” leases where the lessee effectively guarantees the full residual value through a rental adjustment at the end of term or those where partial value is guaranteed (“split-TRAC”), which has a limited residual risk. Under a split-TRAC structure, the limited residual risk would be satisfied first by the net sale proceeds of the leased asset. The lessee’s at-risk portion, or top risk, is satisfied last and is subject to repayment as additional rent, if the TRAC amount is not satisfied by the net sale proceeds. The carrying amount of residual assets covered by residual value guarantees was $69.09 million and $87.61 million at December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively.
The following table shows interest income recognized from direct finance lease payments and operating lease equipment rental income and related depreciation expense.
(Dollars in thousands)2019 2018 2017
Direct finance leases:     
Interest income on lease receivable$10,985
 $13,052
 $11,482
      
Operating leases:     
Income related to lease payments$30,741
 $31,793
 $30,381
Depreciation expense25,128
 26,248
 25,215

Income related to reimbursements from lessees for personal property tax on operating leased equipment for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $0.73 million. Expense related to personal property tax payments on operating leased equipment for the year ended December 31, 2019 was $0.73 million.
Note 7 — Premises and Equipment
The following table shows premises and equipment as of December 31.
(Dollars in thousands)  2019 2018
Land $15,222
 $15,223
Buildings and improvements 59,508
 59,691
Furniture and equipment 41,831
 40,789
Total premises and equipment 116,561
 115,703
Accumulated depreciation and amortization (64,342) (63,564)
Net premises and equipment $52,219
 $52,139

Depreciation and amortization of properties and equipment totaled $5.79 million in 2019, $5.62 million in 2018, and $5.66 million in 2017.
During 2019, 2018 and 2017, the Company recorded long-lived asset impairment charges totaling 0, $100,000 and $410,000, respectively. The impairment charges were recorded as a result of appraisals on buildings and were recognized in Other Expense on the Consolidated Statements of Income.
Note 8 — Mortgage Servicing Rights
The unpaid principal balance of residential mortgage loans serviced for third parties was $740.91 million at December 31, 2019, compared to $734.30 million at December 31, 2018, and $752.99 million at December 31, 2017.

60


Amortization expense on MSRs is expected to total $0.76 million, $0.64 million, $0.53 million, $0.43 million, and $0.36 million in 2020, 2021, 2022, 2023 and 2024, respectively. Projected amortization excludes the impact of future asset additions or disposals.
The following table shows changes in the carrying value of MSRs and the associated valuation allowance.
(Dollars in thousands) 2019 2018
Mortgage servicing rights:  
  
Balance at beginning of year $4,283
 $4,349
Additions 1,229
 890
Amortization (1,312) (956)
Sales 
 
Carrying value before valuation allowance at end of year 4,200
 4,283
Valuation allowance:  
  
Balance at beginning of year 
 
Impairment recoveries 
 
Balance at end of year $
 $
Net carrying value of mortgage servicing rights at end of year $4,200
 $4,283
Fair value of mortgage servicing rights at end of year $5,986
 $7,238

At December 31, 2019, the fair value of MSRs exceeded the carrying value reported on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition by $1.79 million. This difference represents increases in the fair value of certain MSRs that could not be recorded above cost basis.
Funds held in trust at 1st Source for the payment of principal, interest, taxes and insurance premiums applicable to mortgage loans being serviced for others, were approximately $16.77 million and $10.28 million at December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. Mortgage loan contractual servicing fees, including late fees and ancillary income, were $2.64 million, $2.61 million, and $2.70 million for 2019, 2018, and 2017, respectively. Mortgage loan contractual servicing fees are included in Mortgage Banking Income on the Consolidated Statements of Income.
Note 9 — Intangible Assets and Goodwill
At December 31, 2019, intangible assets consisted of goodwill of $83.87 million and other intangible assets of $0.10 million, which was net of accumulated amortization of $0.10 million. At December 31, 2018, intangible assets consisted of goodwill of $83.87 million and other intangible assets of $0.13 million, which was net of accumulated amortization of $0.07 million. Intangible asset amortization was $0.03 million, $0.08 million, and $0.36 million for 2019, 2018, and 2017, respectively. Amortization on other intangible assets is expected to total $0.02 million, $0.02 million, $0.02 million, $0.02 million, and $0.02 million in 2020, 2021, 2022, 2023, and 2024, respectively.
The following table shows a summary of other intangible assets as of December 31.
(Dollars in thousands) 2019 2018
Other intangibles:  
  
Gross carrying amount $204
 $204
Less: accumulated amortization (100) (71)
Net carrying amount $104
 $133

Note 10 — Deposits
The aggregate amount of certificates of deposit of $250,000 or more and other time deposits of $250,000 or more outstanding at December 31, 2019 and 2018 was $749.44 million and $666.89 million, respectively.
The following table shows the amount of certificates of deposit of $250,000 or more and other time deposits of $250,000 or more outstanding at December 31, 2019, by time remaining until maturity.
(Dollars in thousands)   
Under 3 months $199,375
4 – 6 months 170,902
7 – 12 months 156,874
Over 12 months 222,284
Total $749,435


61


The following table shows scheduled maturities of time deposits, including both private and public funds, at December 31, 2019.
(Dollars in thousands)  
2020 $1,256,577
2021 227,115
2022 105,218
2023 49,999
2024 7,496
Thereafter 2,093
Total $1,648,498

Note 11 — Borrowed Funds and Mandatorily Redeemable Securities
The following table shows the details of long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities as of December 31, 2019 and 2018.
(Dollars in thousands)  2019 2018
Federal Home Loan Bank borrowings (1.04% – 5.04%) $45,819
 $46,444
Mandatorily redeemable securities 17,972
 16,542
Other long-term debt 7,848
 8,137
Total long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities $71,639
 $71,123

Annual maturities of long-term debt outstanding at December 31, 2019, for the next five years and thereafter beginning in 2020, are as follows (in thousands): $2,759; $3,047; $4,709; $1,928; $11,065; and $48,131.
At December 31, 2019, the Federal Home Loan Bank borrowings represented a source of funding for community economic development activities, agricultural loans and general funding for the bank and consisted of 17 fixed rate notes with maturities ranging from 2021 to 2027. These notes were collateralized by $57.25 million of certain real estate loans.
Mandatorily redeemable securities as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, of $17.97 million and $16.54 million, respectively reflected the “book value” shares under the 1st Source Executive Incentive Plan. See Note 16 - Stock Based Compensation (Stock Award Plans) for additional information. Dividends paid on these shares and changes in book value per share are recorded as other interest expense. Total interest expense recorded for 2019, 2018, and 2017 was $2.22 million, $1.61 million, and $1.68 million, respectively.
The following table shows the details of short-term borrowings as of December 31, 2019 and 2018.
  2019 2018
(Dollars in thousands)  Amount Weighted Average Rate Amount Weighted Average Rate
Federal funds purchased $
 % $10,000
 2.70%
Security repurchase agreements 120,459
 0.23
 103,627
 0.25
Commercial paper 3,993
 0.29
 4,325
 0.29
Federal Home Loan Bank advances 20,000
 1.61
 80,000
 2.57
Other short-term borrowings 1,441
 
 1,392
 
Total short-term borrowings $145,893
 0.42% $199,344
 1.30%

Note 12 — Variable Interest Entities
A variable interest entity (VIE) is a partnership, limited liability company, trust or other legal entity that meets any one of the following criteria:
The entity does not have sufficient equity to conduct its activities without additional subordinated financial support from another party.
The entity’s investors lack the power to direct the activities that most significantly affect the entity’s economic performance.
The entity’s at-risk holders do not have the obligation to absorb the losses or the right to receive residual returns.
The voting rights of some investors are not proportional to their economic interests in the entity, and substantially all of the entity’s activities involve, or are conducted on behalf of, investors with disproportionately few voting rights.

62


The Company is involved in various entities that are considered to be VIEs. The Company’s investments in VIEs are primarily related to investments promoting affordable housing, community development and renewable energy sources. Some of these tax-advantaged investments support the Company’s regulatory compliance with the Community Reinvestment Act. The Company’s investments in these entities generate a return primarily through the realization of federal and state income tax credits, and other tax benefits, such as tax deductions from operating losses of the investments, over specified time periods. These tax credits are recognized as a reduction of tax expense or, for investments qualifying as investment tax credits, as a reduction to the related investment asset. The Company recognized federal and state income tax credits related to its affordable housing and community development tax-advantaged investments in tax expense of $1.55 million, $1.29 million and $1.15 million for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively. The Company also recognized $15.86 million, $10.45 million and $18.16 million of investment tax credits for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.
The Company is not required to consolidate VIEs in which it has concluded it does not have a controlling financial interest, and thus is not the primary beneficiary. In such cases, the Company does not have both the power to direct the entities’ most significant activities and the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive benefits that could potentially be significant to the VIEs. As a limited partner in these operating partnerships, we are allocated credits and deductions associated with the underlying properties. The Company has determined that it is not the primary beneficiary of these investments because the general partners have the power to direct activities that most significantly influence the economic performance of their respective partnerships.
The Company’s investments in these unconsolidated VIEs are carried in Other Assets on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition. The Company’s unfunded capital and other commitments related to these unconsolidated VIEs are generally carried in Other Liabilities on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition. The Company’s maximum exposure to loss from these unconsolidated VIEs include the investment recorded on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition, net of unfunded capital commitments, and previously recorded tax credits which remain subject to recapture by taxing authorities based on compliance features required to be met at the project level. While the Company believes potential losses from these investments are remote, the maximum exposure was determined by assuming a scenario where the community-based business, housing projects and renewable energy projects completely fail and do not meet certain taxing authority compliance requirements resulting in recapture of the related tax credits.
The following table provides a summary of investments in affordable housing, community development and renewable energy VIEs that the Company has not consolidated as of December 31, 2019 and 2018.
(Dollars in thousands)20192018
Investment carrying amount$19,843
$15,083
Unfunded capital and other commitments17,420
6,449
Maximum exposure to loss37,904
40,705
The Company is required to consolidate VIEs in which it has concluded it has significant involvement in and the ability to direct the activities that impact the entity’s economic performance. The Company is the managing general partner of entities to which it shares interest in tax-advantaged investments with a third party. At December 31, 2019 and 2018, approximately $41.24 million and $8.38 million, respectively, of the Company’s assets and $18.68 million and $6.70 million, respectively, of its liabilities included on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition were related to tax-advantaged investment VIEs which the Company has consolidated. The assets of the consolidated VIE are reported in Other Assets, the liabilities are reported in Other Liabilities and the non-controlling interest is reported in Equity on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition. The assets of a particular VIE are the primary source of funds to settle its obligations. The creditors of the VIE do not have recourse to the general credit of the Company. The Company’s exposure to the consolidated VIE is generally limited to the carrying value of its variable interest plus any related tax credits previously recognized.
Additionally, the Company sponsors 1 trust, 1st Source Master Trust (Capital Trust) of which 100% of the common equity is owned by the Company. The Capital Trust was formed in 2007 for the purpose of issuing corporation-obligated mandatorily redeemable capital securities (the capital securities) to third-party investors and investing the proceeds from the sale of the capital securities solely in junior subordinated debenture securities of the Company (the subordinated notes). The subordinated notes held by the Capital Trust are the sole assets of the Capital Trust. The Capital Trust qualifies as a variable interest entity for which the Company is not the primary beneficiary and therefore reported in the financial statements as an unconsolidated subsidiary. The junior subordinated debentures are reflected as subordinated notes on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition with the corresponding interest distributions reflected as Interest Expense on the Consolidated Statements of Income. The common shares issued by the Capital Trust are included in Other Assets on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition.

63


Distributions on the capital securities issued by the Capital Trust are payable quarterly at a rate per annum equal to the interest rate being earned by the Capital Trust on the subordinated notes held by the Capital Trust. The capital securities are subject to mandatory redemption, in whole or in part, upon repayment of the subordinated notes. The Company has entered into agreements which, taken collectively, fully and unconditionally guarantee the capital securities subject to the terms of each of the guarantees. The capital securities held by the Capital Trust qualify as Tier 1 capital under Federal Reserve Board guidelines.
The following table shows subordinated notes at December 31, 2019.
(Dollars in thousands) Amount of Subordinated Notes Interest Rate Maturity Date
June 2007 issuance (1) $41,238
 7.22% 6/15/2037
August 2007 issuance (2) 17,526
 3.37% 9/15/2037
Total $58,764
  
  
 
(1) Fixed rate through life of debt.
(2) 3-Month LIBOR +1.48% through remaining life of debt.
Note 13 — Earnings Per Share
Earnings per common share is computed using the two-class method. Basic earnings per common share is computed by dividing net income by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the applicable period, excluding outstanding participating securities. Participating securities include non-vested restricted stock awards. Non-vested restricted stock awards are considered participating securities to the extent the holders of these securities receive non-forfeitable dividends at the same rate as holders of common stock. Diluted earnings per common share is computed using the weighted-average number of shares determined for the basic earnings per common share computation plus the dilutive effect of stock compensation using the treasury stock method.
Stock options, where the exercise price was greater than the average market price of the common shares, were excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per common share because the result would have been antidilutive. NaN stock options were considered antidilutive as of December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017.
The following table presents a reconciliation of the number of shares used in the calculation of basic and diluted earnings per common share for the three years ending December 31.
(Dollars in thousands - except per share amounts) 2019 2018 2017
Distributed earnings allocated to common stock $28,188
 $24,894
 $19,701
Undistributed earnings allocated to common stock��63,254
 56,975
 47,830
Net earnings allocated to common stock 91,442
 81,869
 67,531
Net earnings allocated to participating securities 518
 545
 520
Net income allocated to common stock and participating securities $91,960
 $82,414
 $68,051
       
Weighted average shares outstanding for basic earnings per common share 25,600,138
 25,937,599
 25,925,820
Dilutive effect of stock compensation 
 
 
Weighted average shares outstanding for diluted earnings per common share 25,600,138
 25,937,599
 25,925,820
       
Basic earnings per common share $3.57
 $3.16
 $2.60
Diluted earnings per common share $3.57
 $3.16
 $2.60
       

Note 14 — Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income
The following table presents reclassifications out of accumulated other comprehensive income related to unrealized gains and losses on available-for-sale securities for the two years ending December 31.
(Dollars in thousands) 2019 2018 Affected Line Item in the Statements of Income
Realized (losses) gains included in net income $
 $(345) (Losses) gains on investment securities available-for-sale
  
 (345) Income before income taxes
Tax effect 
 83
 Income tax expense
Net of tax $
 $(262) Net income


64


Note 15 — Employee Benefit Plans
The 1st Source Corporation Employee Stock Ownership and Profit Sharing Plan (as amended, the “Plan”) includes an employee stock ownership component, which is designed to invest in and hold 1st Source common stock, and a 401(k) plan component, which holds all Plan assets not invested in 1st Source common stock. The Plan encourages diversification of investments with opportunities to change investment elections and contribution levels.
Employees are eligible to participate in the Plan the first of the month following 90 days of employment. The Company matches dollar for dollar on the first 4% of deferred compensation, plus 50 cents on the dollar of the next 2% deferrals. The Company will also contribute to the Plan an amount designated as a fixed 2% employer contribution. The amount of fixed contribution is equal to two percent of the participant’s eligible compensation. Additionally, each year the Company may, in its sole discretion, make a discretionary profit sharing contribution. As of December 31, 2019 and 2018, there were 852,128 and 1,007,611 shares, respectively, of 1st Source Corporation common stock held in relation to employee benefit plans.
The Company contributions are allocated among the participants on the basis of compensation. Each participant’s account is credited with cash and/or shares of 1st Source common stock based on that participant’s compensation earned during the year. After completing 5 years of service in which they worked at least 1,000 hours per year, a participant will be completely vested in the Company’s contribution. An employee is always 100% vested in their deferral. Plan participants are entitled to receive distributions from their Plan accounts in-service and upon termination of service, retirement, or death.
Contribution expense for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018, and 2017, amounted to $5.48 million, $4.87 million, and $4.88 million, respectively.
In addition to the 1st Source Corporation Employee Stock Ownership and Profit Sharing Plan, the Company provides a limited health care and life insurance benefit for some of its retired employees. Effective March 31, 2009, the Company amended the plan so that no new retirees would be covered by the plan. The amendment will have no effect on the coverage for retirees covered at the time of the amendment. Prior to amendment, all full-time employees became eligible for these retiree benefits upon reaching age 55 with 20 years of credited service. The retiree medical plan pays a stated percentage of eligible medical expenses reduced by any deductibles and payments made by government programs and other group coverage. The lifetime maximum benefit payable under the medical plan is $15,000 and for life insurance is $3,000.
The Company’s net periodic post retirement benefit (recovery) cost recognized in Salaries and Employee Benefits on the Consolidated Statements of Income for the years ended December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017, amounted to 0, $(0.01) million, and $(0.01) million, respectively. The accrued post retirement benefit cost was not material at December 31, 2019, 2018, and 2017.
Note 16 — Stock Based Compensation
As of December 31, 2019, the Company had 4 active stock-based employee compensation plans. These plans include 3 executive stock award plans, the Executive Incentive Plan (EIP), the Restricted Stock Award Plan (RSAP), the Strategic Deployment Incentive Plan (SDP); and the Employee Stock Purchase Plan (ESPP). The 2011 Stock Option Plan was approved by the shareholders on April 21, 2011 but the Company had not made any grants through December 31, 2019. These stock-based employee compensation plans were established to help retain and motivate key employees. All of the plans have been approved by the shareholders of 1st Source Corporation. The Executive Compensation and Human Resources Committee (the “Committee”) of the 1st Source Corporation Board of Directors has sole authority to select the employees, establish the awards to be issued, and approve the terms and conditions of each award under the stock-based compensation plans.
Stock-based compensation to employees is recognized as compensation cost on the Consolidated Statements of Income based on their fair values on the measurement date, which, for 1st Source, is the date of grant. Stock-based compensation expense is recognized ratably over the requisite service period for all awards. The total fair value of share awards vested was $3.35 million during 2019, $3.53 million in 2018, and $2.37 million in 2017.

65


The following table shows the combined summary of activity regarding active stock option and stock award plans.
   Non-Vested Stock Awards Outstanding
 Shares Available for Grant Number of Shares Weighted-Average Grant-Date Fair Value
Balance, January 1, 2017714,005
 276,615
 $23.94
Shares authorized - 2017 EIP59,064
 
 
Granted(98,625) 98,625
 33.54
Stock awards vested
 (76,858) 22.71
Forfeited2,000
 (2,456) 29.93
Balance, December 31, 2017676,444
 295,926
 27.41
Shares authorized - 2018 EIP70,461
 
 
Granted(74,981) 74,981
 29.11
Stock awards vested
 (106,513) 25.79
Forfeited3,135
 (10,575) 27.51
Balance, December 31, 2018675,059
 253,819
 28.59
Shares authorized - 2019 EIP62,538
 
 
Granted(74,336) 74,336
 31.44
Stock awards vested
 (100,299) 28.35
Forfeited1,241
 (8,865) 30.28
Balance, December 31, 2019664,502
 218,991
 $29.60

Stock Option Plans — Incentive stock option plans include the 2011 Stock Option Plan (the “2011 Plan”).
Each award from the plan is evidenced by an award agreement that specifies the option price, the duration of the option, the number of shares to which the option pertains, and such other provisions as the Committee determines. The option price is equal to the fair market value of a share of 1st Source Corporation’s common stock on the date of grant. Options granted expire at such time as the Committee determines at the date of grant and in no event does the exercise period exceed a maximum of ten years. Upon merger, consolidation, or other corporate consolidation in which 1st Source Corporation is not the surviving corporation, as defined in the plans, all outstanding options immediately vest.
There were 0 stock options exercised during 2019, 2018 or 2017. All shares issued in connection with stock option exercises and non-vested stock awards are issued from available treasury stock.
No stock-based compensation expense related to stock options was recognized in 2019, 2018 or 2017.
The fair value of each option on the date of grant is estimated using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. Expected volatility is based on the historical volatility estimated over a period equal to the expected life of the options. In estimating the fair value of stock options under the Black-Scholes valuation model, separate groups of employees that have similar historical exercise behavior are considered separately. The expected life of the options granted is derived based on past experience and represents the period of time that options granted are expected to be outstanding.
Stock Award Plans — Incentive stock award plans include the EIP, the SDP and the RSAP. The EIP is administered by the Committee. Awards under the EIP and SDP include “book value” shares and “market value” shares of common stock. These shares are awarded annually based on weighted performance criteria and generally vest over a period of five years. The EIP book value shares may only be sold to 1st Source and such sale is mandatory in the event of death, retirement, disability, or termination of employment. The RSAP is designed for key employees. Awards under the RSAP are made to employees recommended by the Chief Executive Officer and approved by the Committee. Shares granted under the RSAP vest over a period of up to ten years and vesting is based upon meeting certain various criteria, including continued employment with 1st Source.
Stock-based compensation expense relating to the EIP, SDP and RSAP totaled $2.76 million in 2019, $3.55 million in 2018, and $2.96 million in 2017. The total income tax benefit recognized in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Income related to stock-based compensation was $0.65 million in 2019, $0.86 million in 2018, and $1.11 million in 2017. Unrecognized stock-based compensation expense related to non-vested stock awards (EIP/SDP/RSAP) was $4.91 million at December 31, 2019. At such date, the weighted-average period over which this unrecognized expense was expected to be recognized was 2.88 years.
The fair value of non-vested stock awards for the purposes of recognizing stock-based compensation expense is market price of the stock on the measurement date, which, for the Company’s purposes is the date of the award.

66


Employee Stock Purchase Plan — The Company offers an ESPP for substantially all employees with at least two years of service on the effective date of an offering under the plan. Eligible employees may elect to purchase any dollar amount of stock, so long as such amount does not exceed 25% of their base rate of pay and the aggregate stock accrual rate for all offerings does not exceed $25,000 in any calendar year. The purchase price for shares offered is the lower of the closing market bid price for the offering date or the average market bid price for the five business days preceding the offering date. The purchase price and premium/(discount) to the actual market closing price on the offering date for the 2019, 2018, and 2017 offerings were $43.81 (0.14%), $53.84 (-0.09%), and $46.18 (-1.32%), respectively. Payment for the stock is made through payroll deductions over the offering period, and employees may discontinue the deductions at any time and exercise the option or take the funds out of the program. The most recent offering began June 3, 2019 and runs through June 3, 2021, with $139,290 in stock value to be purchased at $43.81 per share.
Note 17 — Income Taxes
The following table shows the composition of income tax expense.
Year Ended December 31 (Dollars in thousands) 
 2019 2018 2017
Current:  
  
  
Federal $28,130
 $20,167
 $26,012
State 5,739
 2,996
 4,530
Total current 33,869
 23,163
 30,542
Deferred:  
  
  
Federal (5,135) (875) 5,869
State (595) 1,200
 (488)
Deferred tax liability remeasurement 
 (875) (2,614)
Total deferred (5,730) (550) 2,767
Total provision $28,139
 $22,613
 $33,309

The following table shows the reasons for the difference between income tax expense and the amount computed by applying the statutory federal income tax rate (21% for 2019 and 2018 and 35% for 2017) to income before income taxes.
  2019 2018 2017
Year Ended December 31 (Dollars in thousands)
 Amount Percent of Pretax Income Amount Percent of Pretax Income Amount Percent of Pretax Income
Statutory federal income tax $25,232
 21.0 % $22,056
 21.0 % $35,476
 35.0 %
(Decrease) increase in income taxes resulting from:  
  
  
  
  
  
Tax-exempt interest income (552) (0.5) (650) (0.6) (1,197) (1.2)
State taxes, net of federal income tax benefit 4,064
 3.4
 3,315
 3.2
 2,627
 2.6
Deferred tax liability remeasurement 
 
 (875) (0.8) (2,614) (2.6)
Other (605) (0.5) (1,233) (1.3) (983) (0.9)
Total $28,139
 23.4 % $22,613
 21.5 % $33,309
 32.9 %

The tax expense related to (losses) gains on investment securities available-for-sale for the years 2019, 2018, and 2017 was approximately $0, $(83,000), and $1,629,000, respectively.

67


The following table shows the composition of deferred tax assets and liabilities as of December 31, 2019 and 2018.
(Dollars in thousands)  2019 2018
Deferred tax assets:  
  
Reserve for loan and lease losses $28,792
 $25,386
Operating lease liability 5,899
 
Accruals for employee benefits 2,842
 2,974
Net unrealized losses on securities available-for-sale 
 3,386
Other 222
 127
Total deferred tax assets 37,755
 31,873
Deferred tax liabilities:  
  
Differing depreciable bases in premises and leased equipment 18,614
 21,184
Right of use assets - leases 5,899
 
Differing bases in assets related to acquisitions 4,092
 4,021
Tax advantaged partnerships 4,383
 4,354
Net unrealized gains on securities available-for-sale 1,640
 
Mortgage servicing 394
 586
Capitalized loan costs 1,207
 1,110
Prepaid expenses 297
 273
Other 544
 364
Total deferred tax liabilities 37,070
 31,892
Net deferred tax asset (liability) $685
 $(19)

NaN valuation allowance for deferred tax assets was recorded at December 31, 2019 and 2018 as the Company believes it is more likely than not that all of the deferred tax assets will be realized.
The following table shows a reconciliation of the beginning and ending amounts of unrecognized tax benefits.
(Dollars in thousands) 2019 2018 2017
Balance, beginning of year $
 $1,112
 $762
Additions based on tax positions related to the current year 
 
 350
Additions for tax positions of prior years 
 
 
Reductions for tax positions of prior years 
 
 
Reductions due to lapse in statute of limitations 
 
 
Settlements 
 (1,112) 
Balance, end of year $
 $
 $1,112

The total amount of unrecognized tax benefits that would affect the effective tax rate if recognized was 0 at December 31, 2019 and 2018 and $0.72 million at December 31, 2017. Interest and penalties are recognized through the income tax provision. For the years 2019, 2018 and 2017, the Company recognized approximately $0.00 million, $(0.09) million and $0.05 million in interest, net of tax effect, and penalties, respectively. There were 0 accrued interest and penalties at December 31, 2019 and 2018 and $0.09 million at December 31, 2017.
Tax years that remain open and subject to audit include the federal 2016-2019 years and the Indiana 2016-2019 years. Additionally, in 2018 the Company reached a state tax settlement for the 2015-2017 years and as a result, recorded a reduction of unrecognized tax benefits in the amount of $1.11 million. The Company does not anticipate a significant change in the amount of uncertain tax positions within the next 12 months.
The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act was enacted on December 22, 2017. The Act reduced the U.S. federal corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%. At December 31, 2017, the Company had not fully completed its accounting for the tax effects of enactment of the Act and recorded a provisional benefit of $2.61 million which is included as a component of Income Tax Expense on the Consolidated Statements of Income related to the remeasurement of its deferred tax balance. During the third quarter of 2018, the Company completed its accounting for the provisional amounts recognized at December 31, 2017 and recorded an additional $0.88 million benefit as provided by the SEC’s Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 118, Income Tax Accounting Implications of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.

68


Note 18 — Contingent Liabilities, Commitments, and Financial Instruments with Off-Balance-Sheet Risk
Contingent Liabilities —1st Source and its subsidiaries are defendants in various legal proceedings arising in the normal course of business. In the opinion of management, based upon present information including the advice of legal counsel, the ultimate resolution of these proceedings will not have a material effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position or results of operations.
1st Source Bank sells residential mortgage loans to Fannie Mae as well as FHA-insured, USDA-insured and VA-guaranteed loans in Ginnie Mae mortgage-backed securities. Additionally, the Bank has sold loans on a service released basis to various other financial institutions in the past. The agreements under which the Bank sells these mortgage loans contain various representations and warranties regarding the acceptability of loans for purchase. On occasion, the Bank may be required to indemnify the loan purchaser for credit losses on loans that were later deemed ineligible for purchase or may be required to repurchase a loan. Both circumstances are collectively referred to as “repurchases.”
The Company’s liability for repurchases, included in Accrued Expenses and Other Liabilities on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition, was $0.29 million and $0.29 million as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The mortgage repurchase liability represents the Company’s best estimate of the loss that it may incur. The estimate is based on specific loan repurchase requests and a historical loss ratio with respect to origination dollar volume. Because the level of mortgage loan repurchase losses are dependent on economic factors, investor demand strategies and other external conditions that may change over the life of the underlying loans, the level of liability for mortgage loan repurchase losses is difficult to estimate and requires considerable management judgment.
Lease Commitments — The Company and its subsidiaries are obligated under operating leases for certain office premises and equipment.
The following table shows operating lease right of use assets and operating lease liabilities as of December 31, 2019.
(Dollars in thousands)Statement of Financial Condition classification2019
Operating lease right of use assetsAccrued income and other assets$24,147
Operating lease liabilitiesAccrued expenses and other liabilities$24,319

During 2019, the Company amended the lease agreement for its corporate office building by extending the lease term which resulted in an increase to its operating lease right of use assets of $14.65 million and an increase to its operating lease liabilities of $14.64 million.
The following table shows the components of operating leases expense for the year ended December 31, 2019.
(Dollars in thousands)Statement of Income classification2019
Operating lease costNet occupancy expense$3,506
Short-term lease costNet occupancy expense41
Variable lease costNet occupancy expense
Total operating lease cost $3,547

Gross rental expense for the years ended 2018 and 2017 was $3.73 million and $4.18 million, respectively.
The following table shows future minimum rental commitments for all noncancellable operating leases with an initial term longer than 12 months for the next five years and thereafter.
(Dollars in thousands)  
2020 $3,477
2021 3,800
2022 3,714
2023 2,653
2024 2,552
Thereafter 11,508
Total lease payments 27,704
Less: imputed interest (3,385)
Present value of operating lease liabilities $24,319


69


The following table shows the weighted average remaining operating lease term, the weighted average discount rate and supplemental Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows information for operating leases at December 31, 2019.
(Dollars in thousands)2019
Weighted average remaining lease term10.88 years
Weighted average discount rate2.83%
Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities: 
Operating cash flows from operating leases$950

During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company recognized a net gain on the sale of an office building in the amount of $1.31 million. The Company commenced an operating lease with the buyer of the building to lease a portion of it for office space resulting in a new right of use asset and operating lease liability.
There are 0 new significant leases that have not yet commenced as of December 31, 2019.
Financial Instruments with Off-Balance-Sheet Risk — To meet the financing needs of our clients, 1st Source and its subsidiaries are parties to financial instruments with off-balance-sheet risk in the normal course of business. These off-balance-sheet financial instruments include commitments to originate and sell loans and standby letters of credit. The instruments involve, to varying degrees, elements of credit and interest rate risk in excess of the amount recognized in the consolidated statements of financial condition.
Financial instruments, whose contract amounts represent credit risk as of December 31, were as follows:
(Dollars in thousands) 2019 2018
Amounts of commitments:    
Loan commitments to extend credit $1,095,054
 $1,095,053
Standby letters of credit $27,549
 $31,133
Commercial and similar letters of credit $2,332
 $2,500

The Company’s exposure to credit loss in the event of nonperformance by the other party to the financial instruments for loan commitments and standby letters of credit is represented by the dollar amount of those instruments. The Company uses the same credit policies and collateral requirements in making commitments and conditional obligations as it does for on-balance-sheet instruments.
Loan commitments generally have fixed expiration dates or other termination clauses and may require payment of a fee. Since many of the commitments are expected to expire without being drawn upon, the total commitment amounts do not necessarily represent future cash requirements. The Company grants mortgage loan commitments to borrowers subject to normal loan underwriting standards. The interest rate risk associated with these loan commitments is managed by entering into contracts for future deliveries of loans.
Standby letters of credit are conditional commitments issued to guarantee the performance of a client to a third party. The credit risk involved in and collateral obtained when issuing standby letters of credit are essentially the same as those involved in extending loan commitments to clients. Standby letters of credit generally have terms ranging from two months to one year.
Commercial letters of credit are issued specifically to facilitate commerce and typically result in the commitment being drawn on when the underlying transaction is consummated between the customer and the third party. Commercial letters of credit generally have terms ranging from two months to six months.
Note 19 — Derivative Financial Instruments
Commitments to originate residential mortgage loans held for sale and forward commitments to sell residential mortgage loans are considered derivative instruments. See Note 18 for further information.

70


The Company has certain interest rate derivative positions that are not designated as hedging instruments. Derivative assets and liabilities are recorded at fair value on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition and do not take into account the effects of master netting agreements. Master netting agreements allow the Company to settle all derivative contracts held with a single counterparty on a net basis, and to offset net derivative positions with related collateral, where applicable. These derivative positions relate to transactions in which the Company enters into an interest rate swap with a client while at the same time entering into an offsetting interest rate swap with another financial institution. In connection with each transaction, the Company agrees to pay interest to the client on a notional amount at a variable interest rate and receive interest from the client on the same notional amount at a fixed interest rate. At the same time, the Company agrees to pay another financial institution the same fixed interest rate on the same notional amount and receive the same variable interest rate on the same notional amount. The transaction allows the client to effectively convert a variable rate loan to a fixed rate. Because the terms of the swaps with the customers and the other financial institution offset each other, with the only difference being counterparty credit risk, changes in the fair value of the underlying derivative contracts are not materially different and do not significantly impact the Company’s results of operations.
The following table shows the amounts of non-hedging derivative financial instruments at December 31, 2019 and 2018.
    Asset derivatives Liability derivatives
(Dollars in thousands) Notional or contractual amount Statement of Financial Condition classification Fair value Statement of Financial Condition classification Fair value
Interest rate swap contracts $1,074,809
 Other assets $21,975
 Other liabilities $22,352
Loan commitments 9,950
 Mortgages held for sale 185
 N/A 
Forward contracts - mortgage loan 23,632
 N/A 
 Mortgages held for sale 38
Total - December 31, 2019 $1,108,391
   $22,160
   $22,390
           
Interest rate swap contracts $855,848
 Other assets $7,124
 Other liabilities $7,250
Loan commitments 5,871
 Mortgages held for sale 112
 N/A 
Forward contracts - mortgage loan 14,087
 N/A 
 Mortgages held for sale 135
Total - December 31, 2018 $875,806
   $7,236
   $7,385

The following table shows the amounts included on the Consolidated Statements of Income for non-hedging derivative financial instruments at December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017.
    Gain (loss)
(Dollars in thousands) Statement of Income classification 2019 2018 2017
Interest rate swap contracts Other expense $(252) $(30) $26
Interest rate swap contracts Other income 1,356
 1,028
 1,585
Loan commitments Mortgage banking 73
 46
 23
Forward contracts - mortgage loan Mortgage banking 97
 (125) (232)
Total   $1,274
 $919
 $1,402

The following table shows the offsetting of financial assets and derivative assets at December 31, 2019 and 2018.
        Gross Amounts Not Offset in the Statement of Financial Condition  
(Dollars in thousands) Gross Amounts of Recognized Assets Gross Amounts Offset in the Statement of Financial Condition Net Amounts of Assets Presented in the Statement of Financial Condition Financial Instruments Cash Collateral Received Net Amount
December 31, 2019            
Interest rate swaps $22,279
 $304
 $21,975
 $
 $
 $21,975
             
December 31, 2018            
Interest rate swaps $7,128
 $4
 $7,124
 $177
 $610
 $6,337


71


The following table shows the offsetting of financial liabilities and derivative liabilities at December 31, 2019 and 2018.
        Gross Amounts Not Offset in the Statement of Financial Condition  
(Dollars in thousands) Gross Amounts of Recognized Liabilities Gross Amounts Offset in the Statement of Financial Condition Net Amounts of Liabilities Presented in the Statement of Financial Condition Financial Instruments Cash Collateral Pledged Net Amount
December 31, 2019            
Interest rate swaps $22,656
 $304
 $22,352
 $23,482
 $
 $(1,130)
Repurchase agreements 120,459
 
 120,459
 120,459
 
 
Total $143,115
 $304
 $142,811
 $143,941
 $
 $(1,130)
             
December 31, 2018            
Interest rate swaps $7,254
 $4
 $7,250
 $1,700
 $
 $5,550
Repurchase agreements 103,627
 
 103,627
 103,627
 
 
Total $110,881
 $4
 $110,877
 $105,327
 $
 $5,550

If a default in performance of any obligation of a repurchase or derivative agreement occurs, each party will set-off property held, or loan indebtedness owing, in respect of transactions against obligations owing in respect of any other transactions. At December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, repurchase agreements had a remaining contractual maturity of $119.45 million and $102.34 million in overnight and $1.01 million and $1.29 million in up to 30 days, respectively and were collateralized by U.S. Treasury and Federal agencies securities.
Note 20 — Regulatory Matters
The Company is subject to various regulatory capital requirements administered by the Federal banking agencies. Failure to meet minimum capital requirements can result in certain mandatory and possible additional discretionary actions by regulators that, if undertaken, could have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements. Under capital adequacy guidelines and the regulatory framework for prompt corrective action, the Company must meet specific capital guidelines that involve quantitative measures of assets, liabilities, and certain off-balance-sheet items as calculated under regulatory accounting practices. Capital amounts and classification are subject to qualitative judgments by the regulators about components, risk weightings, and other factors.
Quantitative measures established by regulation to ensure capital adequacy require the Company to maintain minimum amounts and ratios of total capital, Tier 1 capital, and common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets and of Tier 1 capital to average assets. The Company believes that it meets all capital adequacy requirements to which it is subject.
The most recent notification from the Federal bank regulators categorized 1st Source Bank, the largest of its subsidiaries, as “well capitalized” under the regulatory framework for prompt corrective action. To be categorized as “well capitalized” the Bank must maintain minimum total risk-based, Tier 1 risk-based, common equity Tier 1 risk-based, and Tier 1 leverage ratios as set forth in the table below. There are no conditions or events since that notification that the Company believes will have changed the institution’s category.

72


As discussed in Note 12, the capital securities held by the Capital Trusts qualify as Tier 1 capital under Federal Reserve Board guidelines. The following table shows the actual and required capital amounts and ratios for 1st Source Corporation and 1st Source Bank as of December 31, 2019 and 2018.
  Actual Minimum Capital Adequacy 
Minimum Capital Adequacy with Capital Buffer(1)
 To Be Well Capitalized Under Prompt Corrective Action Provisions
(Dollars in thousands)  Amount Ratio Amount Ratio Amount Ratio Amount Ratio
2019  
  
  
  
      
  
Total Capital (to Risk-Weighted Assets):  
  
  
  
      
  
1st Source Corporation $882,453
 14.90% $473,782
 8.00% $621,839
 10.50% $592,227
 10.00%
1st Source Bank 804,131
 13.57
 474,189
 8.00
 622,373
 10.50
 592,736
 10.00
Tier 1 Capital (to Risk-Weighted Assets):  
  
  
  
      
  
1st Source Corporation 807,926
 13.64
 355,336
 6.00
 503,393
 8.50
 473,782
 8.00
1st Source Bank 729,541
 12.31
 355,642
 6.00
 503,826
 8.50
 474,189
 8.00
Common Equity Tier 1 Capital (to Risk-Weighted Assets):                
1st Source Corporation 743,467
 12.55
 266,502
 4.50
 414,559
 7.00
 384,948
 6.50
1st Source Bank 722,082
 12.18
 266,731
 4.50
 414,915
 7.00
 385,279
 6.50
Tier 1 Capital (to Average Assets):  
  
  
  
      
  
1st Source Corporation 807,926
 12.19
 265,122
 4.00
 N/A
 N/A
 331,402
 5.00
1st Source Bank 729,541
 11.03
 264,500
 4.00
 N/A
 N/A
 330,625
 5.00
2018  
  
  
  
      
  
Total Capital (to Risk-Weighted Assets):  
  
  
  
      
  
1st Source Corporation $821,975
 14.68% $447,909
 8.00% $552,888
 9.875% $559,887
 10.00%
1st Source Bank 744,326
 13.29
 448,152
 8.00
 553,188
 9.875
 560,190
 10.00
Tier 1 Capital (to Risk-Weighted Assets):  
  
  
  
      
  
1st Source Corporation 751,575
 13.42
 335,932
 6.00
 440,911
 7.875
 447,909
 8.00
1st Source Bank 673,888
 12.03
 336,114
 6.00
 441,150
 7.875
 448,152
 8.00
Common Equity Tier 1 Capital (to Risk-Weighted Assets):                
1st Source Corporation 693,067
 12.38
 251,949
 4.50
 356,928
 6.375
 363,926
 6.50
1st Source Bank 672,380
 12.00
 252,086
 4.50
 357,121
 6.375
 364,124
 6.50
Tier 1 Capital (to Average Assets):  
  
  
  
      
  
1st Source Corporation 751,575
 12.06
 249,185
 4.00
 N/A
 N/A
 311,481
 5.00
1st Source Bank 673,888
 10.82
 249,052
 4.00
 N/A
 N/A
 311,315
 5.00

 
(1) The capital conservation buffer requirement was fully phased in as of December 31, 2019.
The Bank was not required to maintain noninterest bearing cash balances with the Federal Reserve Bank as of December 31, 2019 and 2018.
Dividends that may be paid by a subsidiary bank to the parent company are subject to certain legal and regulatory limitations and also may be affected by capital needs, as well as other factors.
Due to the Company’s mortgage activities, 1st Source Bank is required to maintain minimum net worth capital requirements established by various governmental agencies. 1st Source Bank’s net worth requirements are governed by the Department of Housing and Urban Development and GNMA. As of December 31, 2019, 1st Source Bank met its minimum net worth capital requirements.

73


Note 21 — Fair Value Measurements
The Company determines the fair values of its financial instruments based on the fair value hierarchy, which requires an entity to maximize the use of quoted prices and observable inputs and to minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The Company elected fair value accounting for mortgages held for sale and for its best-efforts forward sales commitments. The Company economically hedges its mortgages held for sale by either selling corresponding forward contracts on agency securities (free-standing derivatives) or obtaining best-efforts forward sales commitments with an investor to sell the loans at an agreed-upon price at the time the interest rate locks are issued to the customers. The Company believes the election for mortgages held for sale will reduce certain timing differences and better match changes in the value of these assets with changes in the value of the derivatives or best-efforts forward sales commitments. At December 31, 2019 and 2018, all mortgages held for sale are carried at fair value.
The following table shows the differences between fair value carrying amount of mortgages held for sale measured at fair value and the aggregate unpaid principal amount the Company is contractually entitled to receive at maturity on December 31, 2019 and 2018.
(Dollars in thousands)  Fair value carrying amount Aggregate unpaid principal Excess of fair value carrying amount over (under) unpaid principal 
December 31, 2019  
  
  
 
Mortgages held for sale reported at fair value:  
  
  
 
Total Loans $20,277
 $19,890
 $387
(1)
December 31, 2018  
  
  
 
Mortgages held for sale reported at fair value:  
  
  
 
Total Loans $11,290
 $11,076
 $214
(1)
 
(1) The excess of fair value carrying amount over (under) unpaid principal is included in mortgage banking income and includes changes in fair value at and subsequent to funding and gains and losses on the related loan commitment prior to funding.
Financial Instruments on Recurring Basis:
The following is a description of the valuation methodologies used for financial instruments measured at fair value on a recurring basis:
Investment securities available-for-sale are valued primarily by a third-party pricing agent. Prices supplied by the independent pricing agent, as well as their pricing methodologies and assumptions, are reviewed by the Company for reasonableness and to ensure such prices are aligned with market levels. In general, the Company’s investment securities do not possess a complex structure that could introduce greater valuation risk. The portfolio mainly consists of traditional investments including U.S. Treasury and Federal agencies securities, federal agency mortgage pass-through securities, and general obligation and revenue municipal bonds. Pricing for such instruments is fairly generic and is easily obtained. On a quarterly basis, prices supplied by the pricing agent are validated by comparison to prices obtained from other third party sources for a material portion of the portfolio.
The valuation policy and procedures for Level 3 fair value measurements of available-for-sale debt securities are decided through collaboration between management of the Corporate Accounting and Funds Management departments. The changes in fair value measurement for Level 3 securities are analyzed on a periodic basis under a collaborative framework with the aforementioned departments. The methodology and variables used for input are derived from the combination of observable and unobservable inputs. The unobservable inputs are determined through internal assumptions that may vary from period to period due to external factors, such as market movement and credit rating adjustments.
Both the market and income valuation approaches are implemented using the following types of inputs:
U.S. treasuries are priced using the market approach and utilizing live data feeds from active market exchanges for identical securities.
Government-sponsored agency debt securities and corporate bonds are primarily priced using available market information through processes such as benchmark curves, market valuations of like securities, sector groupings and matrix pricing.
Other government-sponsored agency securities, mortgage-backed securities and some of the actively traded REMICs and CMOs, are primarily priced using available market information including benchmark yields, prepayment speeds, spreads and volatility of similar securities.

74


Inactively traded government-sponsored agency securities are primarily priced using consensus pricing and dealer quotes.
State and political subdivisions are largely grouped by characteristics, i.e., geographical data and source of revenue in trade dissemination systems. Since some securities are not traded daily and due to other grouping limitations, active market quotes are often obtained using benchmarking for like securities. Local direct placement municipal securities, with very little market activity, are priced using an appropriate market yield curve which incorporates a credit spread assumption.
Mortgages held for sale and the related loan commitments and forward contracts (hedges) are valued using a market value approach and utilizing an appropriate current market yield and a loan commitment closing rate based on historical analysis.
Interest rate swap positions, both assets and liabilities, are valued by a third-party pricing agent using an income approach and utilizing models that use as their basis readily observable market parameters. This valuation process considers various factors including interest rate yield curves, time value and volatility factors. Validation of third-party agent valuations is accomplished by comparing those values to the Company’s swap counterparty valuations. Management believes an adjustment is required to “mid-market” valuations for derivatives tied to its performing loan portfolio to recognize the imprecision and related exposure inherent in the process of estimating expected credit losses as well as velocity of deterioration evident with systemic risks embedded in these portfolios. Any change in the mid-market derivative valuation adjustment will be recognized immediately through the Consolidated Statements of Income.
The following table shows the balance of assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis.
(Dollars in thousands) Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Total
December 31, 2019        
Assets:  
  
  
  
Investment securities available-for-sale:  
  
  
  
U.S. Treasury and Federal agencies securities $80,393
 $446,571
 $
 $526,964
U.S. States and political subdivisions securities 
 82,213
 2,292
 84,505
Mortgage-backed securities - Federal agencies 
 375,389
 
 375,389
Corporate debt securities 
 53,025
 
 53,025
Foreign government and other securities 
 700
 
 700
Total debt securities available-for-sale 80,393
 957,898
 2,292
 1,040,583
Mortgages held for sale 
 20,277
 
 20,277
Accrued income and other assets (interest rate swap agreements) 
 21,975
 
 21,975
Total $80,393
 $1,000,150
 $2,292
 $1,082,835
         
Liabilities:  
  
  
  
Accrued expenses and other liabilities (interest rate swap agreements) $
 $22,352
 $
 $22,352
Total $
 $22,352
 $
 $22,352
         
December 31, 2018        
Assets:  
  
  
  
Investment securities available-for-sale:  
  
  
  
U.S. Treasury and Federal agencies securities $33,746
 $497,477
 $
 $531,223
U.S. States and political subdivisions securities 
 93,557
 1,025
 94,582
Mortgage-backed securities - Federal agencies 
 318,233
 
 318,233
Corporate debt securities 
 45,392
 
 45,392
Foreign government and other securities 
 699
 
 699
Total debt securities available-for-sale 33,746
 955,358
 1,025
 990,129
Mortgages held for sale 
 11,290
 
 11,290
Accrued income and other assets (interest rate swap agreements) 
 7,124
 
 7,124
Total $33,746
 $973,772
 $1,025
 $1,008,543
         
Liabilities:  
  
  
  
Accrued expenses and other liabilities (interest rate swap agreements) $
 $7,250
 $
 $7,250
Total $
 $7,250
 $
 $7,250


75


The following table shows the changes in Level 3 assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis.
(Dollars in thousands) U.S. States and political subdivisions securities Foreign government and other securities Investment securities available-for-sale
Beginning balance January 1, 2019 $1,025
 $
 $1,025
Total gains or losses (realized/unrealized):  
    
Included in earnings 
 
 
Included in other comprehensive income (35) 
 (35)
Purchases 5,600
 
 5,600
Issuances 
 
 
Sales 
 
 
Settlements 
 
 
Maturities (4,298) 
 (4,298)
Transfers into Level 3 
 
 
Transfers out of Level 3 
 
 
Ending balance December 31, 2019 $2,292
 $
 $2,292
       
Beginning balance January 1, 2018 $2,155
 $710
 $2,865
Total gains or losses (realized/unrealized):  
    
Included in earnings 
 
 
Included in other comprehensive income 6
 (11) (5)
Purchases 
 200
 200
Issuances 
 
 
Sales 
 
 
Settlements 
 
 
Maturities (1,136) (200) (1,336)
Transfers into Level 3 
 
 
Transfers out of Level 3 
 (699) (699)
Ending balance December 31, 2018 $1,025
 $
 $1,025

There were 0 gains or losses for the period included in earnings attributable to the change in unrealized gains or losses relating to assets and liabilities still held at December 31, 2019 or 2018. No transfers between levels occurred during 2019. A foreign government debt security was transferred from Level 3 to Level 2 during 2018 due to the Company’s periodic review of valuation methodologies and inputs. The Company determined that the observable inputs used in determining fair value warranted a transfer to Level 2 as the unobservable inputs were deemed to be insignificant to the overall fair value measurement.
The following table shows the valuation methodology and unobservable inputs for Level 3 assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis.
(Dollars in thousands) Fair value Valuation Methodology Unobservable Inputs Range of Inputs
December 31, 2019        
Debt securities available-for-sale  
      
Direct placement municipal securities $2,292
 Discounted cash flows Credit spread assumption 0.12% - 2.85%
         
December 31, 2018        
Debt securities available-for-sale        
Direct placement municipal securities $1,025
 Discounted cash flows Credit spread assumption 0.17% - 3.02%

The sensitivity to changes in the unobservable inputs and their impact on the fair value measurement can be significant. The significant unobservable input for direct placement municipal securities are the credit spread assumptions used to determine the fair value measure. An increase (decrease) in the estimated spread assumption of the market will decrease (increase) the fair value measure of the securities.
Financial Instruments on Non-recurring Basis:
The Company may be required, from time to time, to measure certain other financial assets at fair value on a non-recurring basis in accordance with GAAP. These adjustments to fair value usually result from application of lower of cost or market accounting or impairment charges of individual assets.

76


The Credit Policy Committee (CPC), a management committee, is responsible for overseeing the valuation processes and procedures for Level 3 measurements of impaired loans, other real estate and repossessions. The CPC reviews these assets on a quarterly basis to determine the accuracy of the observable inputs, generally third-party appraisals, auction values, values derived from trade publications and data submitted by the borrower, and the appropriateness of the unobservable inputs, generally discounts due to current market conditions and collection issues. The CPC establishes discounts based on asset type and valuation source; deviations from the standard are documented. The discounts are reviewed periodically, annually at a minimum, to determine they remain appropriate. Consideration is given to current trends in market values for the asset categories and gain and losses on sales of similar assets. The Loan and Funds Management Committee of the Board of Directors is responsible for overseeing the CPC.
Discounts vary depending on the nature of the assets and the source of value. Aircraft are generally valued using quarterly trade publications adjusted for engine time, condition, maintenance programs, discounted by 10%. Likewise, autos are valued using current auction values, discounted by 10%; medium and heavy duty trucks are valued using trade publications and auction values, discounted by 15%. Construction equipment is generally valued using trade publications and auction values, discounted by 20%. Real estate is valued based on appraisals or evaluations, discounted by 20% at a minimum with higher discounts for property in poor condition or property with characteristics which may make it more difficult to market. Commercial loans subject to borrowing base certificates are generally discounted by 20% for receivables and 40% - 75% for inventory with higher discounts when monthly borrowing base certificates are not required or received.
Impaired loans and related write-downs are based on the fair value of the underlying collateral if repayment is expected solely from the collateral. Collateral values are reviewed quarterly and estimated using customized discounting criteria, appraisals and dealer and trade magazine quotes which are used in a market valuation approach. In accordance with fair value measurements, only impaired loans for which a reserve for loan loss has been established based on the fair value of collateral require classification in the fair value hierarchy. As a result, only a portion of the Company’s impaired loans are classified in the fair value hierarchy.
The Company has established MSRs valuation policies and procedures based on industry standards and to ensure valuation methodologies are consistent and verifiable. MSRs and related adjustments to fair value result from application of lower of cost or fair value accounting. For purposes of impairment, MSRs are stratified based on the predominant risk characteristics of the underlying servicing, principally by loan type. The fair value of each tranche of the servicing portfolio is estimated by calculating the present value of estimated future net servicing cash flows, taking into consideration actual and expected mortgage loan prepayment rates, discount rates, servicing costs, and other economic factors. Prepayment rates and discount rates are derived through a third-party pricing agent. Changes in the most significant inputs, including prepayment rates and discount rates, are compared to the changes in the fair value measurements and appropriate resolution is made. A fair value analysis is also obtained from an independent third-party agent and compared to the internal valuation for reasonableness. MSRs do not trade in an active, open market with readily observable prices and though sales of MSRs do occur, precise terms and conditions typically are not readily available and the characteristics of the Company’s servicing portfolio may differ from those of any servicing portfolios that do trade.
Other real estate is based on the fair value of the underlying collateral less expected selling costs. Collateral values are estimated primarily using appraisals and reflect a market value approach. Fair values are reviewed quarterly and new appraisals are obtained annually. Repossessions are similarly valued.
For assets measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis the following represents impairment charges (recoveries) recognized on these assets during the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively: impaired loans - $4.29 million and $12.46 million; MSRs - $0.00 million and $0.00 million; repossessions - $2.25 million and $1.92 million, and other real estate - $0.00 million and $0.00 million.

77


The following table shows the carrying value of assets measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis.
(Dollars in thousands) Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Total
December 31, 2019  
  
  
  
Impaired loans - collateral based $
 $
 $8,492
 $8,492
Accrued income and other assets (mortgage servicing rights) 
 
 4,200
 4,200
Accrued income and other assets (repossessions) 
 
 8,623
 8,623
Accrued income and other assets (other real estate) 
 
 522
 522
Total $
 $
 $21,837
 $21,837
         
December 31, 2018  
  
  
  
Impaired loans - collateral based $
 $
 $7,306
 $7,306
Accrued income and other assets (mortgage servicing rights) 
 
 4,283
 4,283
Accrued income and other assets (repossessions) 
 
 6,666
 6,666
Accrued income and other assets (other real estate) 
 
 299
 299
Total $
 $
 $18,554
 $18,554

The following table shows the valuation methodology and unobservable inputs for Level 3 assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis.
(Dollars in thousands) Carrying Value Fair value Valuation Methodology Unobservable Inputs Range of Inputs
December 31, 2019          
Impaired loans $8,492
 $8,492
 Collateral based measurements including appraisals, trade publications, and auction values Discount for lack of marketability and current conditions 0% - 90%
           
Mortgage servicing rights 4,200
 5,986
 Discounted cash flows Constant prepayment rate (CPR) 10.2% - 28.1%
   
  
   Discount rate 9.3% - 12.1%
           
Repossessions 8,623
 9,211
 Appraisals, trade publications and auction values Discount for lack of marketability 3% - 25%
           
Other real estate 522
 564
 Appraisals Discount for lack of marketability 0% - 11%
           
December 31, 2018          
Impaired loans $7,306
 $7,306
 Collateral based measurements including appraisals, trade publications, and auction values Discount for lack of marketability and current conditions 20% - 35%
           
Mortgage servicing rights 4,283
 7,238
 Discounted cash flows Constant prepayment rate (CPR) 7.2% - 24.8%
   
  
   Discount rate 10.3% - 13.1%
           
Repossessions 6,666
 6,991
 Appraisals, trade publications and auction values Discount for lack of marketability 4% - 6%
           
Other real estate 299
 305
 Appraisals Discount for lack of marketability 0% - 10%

GAAP requires disclosure of the fair value of financial assets and financial liabilities, including those financial assets and financial liabilities that are not measured and reported at fair value on a recurring or non-recurring basis.

78


The following table shows the fair values of the Company’s financial instruments.
(Dollars in thousands) Carrying or Contract Value Fair Value Level 1 Level 2 Level 3
December 31, 2019  
  
  
  
  
Assets:  
  
  
  
  
Cash and due from banks $67,215
 $67,215
 $67,215
 $
 $
Federal funds sold and interest bearing deposits with other banks 16,150
 16,150
 16,150
 
 
Investment securities, available-for-sale 1,040,583
 1,040,583
 80,393
 957,898
 2,292
Other investments 28,414
 28,414
 28,414
 
 
Mortgages held for sale 20,277
 20,277
 
 20,277
 
Loans and leases, net of reserve for loan and lease losses 4,974,273
 4,992,684
 
 
 4,992,684
Mortgage servicing rights 4,200
 5,986
 
 
 5,986
Accrued interest receivable 19,125
 19,125
 
 19,125
 
Interest rate swaps 21,975
 21,975
 
 21,975
 
Liabilities:  
  
  
  
  
Deposits $5,357,326
 $5,362,633
 $3,708,828
 $1,653,805
 $
Short-term borrowings 145,893
 145,893
 120,891
 25,002
 
Long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities 71,639
 71,084
 
 71,084
 
Subordinated notes 58,764
 61,469
 
 61,469
 
Accrued interest payable 13,918
 13,918
 
 13,918
 
Interest rate swaps 22,352
 22,352
 
 22,352
 
Off-balance-sheet instruments * 
 281
 
 281
 
           
December 31, 2018  
  
  
  
  
Assets:  
  
  
  
  
Cash and due from banks $94,907
 $94,907
 $94,907
 $
 $
Federal funds sold and interest bearing deposits with other banks 4,172
 4,172
 4,172
 
 
Investment securities, available-for-sale 990,129
 990,129
 33,746
 955,358
 1,025
Other investments 28,404
 28,404
 28,404
 
 
Mortgages held for sale 11,290
 11,290
 
 11,290
 
Loans and leases, net of reserve for loan and lease losses 4,734,995
 4,689,267
 
 
 4,689,267
Mortgage servicing rights 4,283
 7,238
 
 
 7,238
Accrued interest receivable 18,880
 18,880
 
 18,880
 
Interest rate swaps 7,124
 7,124
 
 7,124
 
Liabilities:  
  
  
  
  
Deposits $5,122,322
 $5,111,711
 $3,654,556
 $1,457,155
 $
Short-term borrowings 199,344
 199,344
 113,734
 85,610
 
Long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities 71,123
 68,751
 
 68,751
 
Subordinated notes 58,764
 45,874
 
 45,874
 
Accrued interest payable 8,950
 8,950
 
 8,950
 
Interest rate swaps 7,250
 7,250
 
 7,250
 
Off-balance-sheet instruments * 
 259
 
 259
 

 
* Represents estimated cash outflows required to currently settle the obligations at current market rates.

79


These estimates do not reflect any premium or discount that could result from offering for sale at one time the Company’s entire holdings of a particular financial instrument. These estimates are subjective in nature and require considerable judgment to interpret market data. Accordingly, the estimates presented herein are not necessarily indicative of the amounts the Company could realize in a current market exchange, nor are they intended to represent the fair value of the Company as a whole. The use of different market assumptions and/or estimation methodologies may have a material effect on the estimated fair value amounts. The fair value estimates presented herein are based on pertinent information available to management as of the respective balance sheet date. Although the Company is not aware of any factors that would significantly affect the estimated fair value amounts, such amounts have not been comprehensively revalued since the presentation dates, and therefore, estimates of fair value after the balance sheet date may differ significantly from the amounts presented herein.
Other significant assets, such as premises and equipment, other assets, and liabilities not defined as financial instruments, are not included in the above disclosures. Also, the fair value estimates for deposits do not include the benefit that results from the low-cost funding provided by the deposit liabilities compared to the cost of borrowing funds in the market.
Note 22 — 1st Source Corporation (Parent Company Only) Financial Information
STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION
December 31 (Dollars in thousands)
 2019 2018
ASSETS  
  
Cash and cash equivalents $107,285
 $106,647
Short-term investments with bank subsidiary 500
 500
Investments in:  
  
Bank subsidiaries 806,192
 740,697
Non-bank subsidiaries 1
 1
Right of use assets 17,106
 
Other assets 4,442
 4,191
Total assets $935,526
 $852,036
     
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY  
  
Commercial paper $3,993
 $4,325
Long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities 25,819
 24,676
Subordinated notes 58,764
 58,764
Operating lease liability 17,329
 
Other liabilities 1,344
 2,189
Total liabilities 107,249
 89,954
Total shareholders’ equity 828,277
 762,082
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity $935,526
 $852,036


80


STATEMENTS OF INCOME AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
Year Ended December 31 (Dollars in thousands)
 2019 2018 2017
Income:  
  
  
Dividends from bank subsidiary $46,735
 $45,080
 $38,317
Dividends from non-bank subsidiary 
 
 958
Rental income from subsidiaries 2,505
 2,613
 2,354
Other 366
 367
 422
Investment securities and other investment gains (losses) 109
 (180) 6,431
Total income 49,715
 47,880
 48,482
Expenses:  
  
  
Interest on subordinated notes 3,677
 3,625
 4,002
Interest on long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities 2,228
 1,624
 1,685
Interest on commercial paper and other short-term borrowings 13
 14
 17
Occupancy 1,861
 1,774
 2,070
Other 586
 642
 1,733
Total expenses 8,365
 7,679
 9,507
Income before income tax benefit and equity in undistributed income of subsidiaries 41,350
 40,201
 38,975
Income tax benefit 987
 1,009
 204
Income before equity in undistributed income of subsidiaries 42,337
 41,210
 39,179
Equity in undistributed income of subsidiaries:  
  
  
Bank subsidiaries 49,678
 41,204
 28,872
Non-bank subsidiaries 
 
 
Net income $92,015
 $82,414
 $68,051
Comprehensive income $107,863
 $75,788
 $63,375


81


STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
Year Ended December 31 (Dollars in thousands) 
 2019 2018 2017
Operating activities:  
  
  
Net income $92,015
 $82,414
 $68,051
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:  
  
  
Equity (undistributed) distributed in excess of income of subsidiaries (49,678) (41,204) (28,872)
Depreciation of premises and equipment 2
 2
 2
Amortization of right of use assets 1,350
 
 
Stock-based compensation 78
 71
 48
Realized/unrealized investment securities and other investment (gains) losses (109) 180
 (6,431)
Other 533
 45
 4,122
Net change in operating activities 44,191
 41,508
 36,920
Investing activities:  
  
  
Proceeds from sales and maturities of investment securities 
 
 6,327
Net change in partnership investments (260) (980) (62)
Capital contribution to subsidiary (325) 
 
Return of capital from subsidiaries 
 
 854
Net change in investing activities (585) (980) 7,119
Financing activities:  
  
  
Net change in commercial paper (332) (1,790) 354
Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities 1,611
 1,867
 1,248
Payments on long-term debt and mandatorily redeemable securities (2,068) (1,064) (667)
Stock issued under stock purchase plans 49
 145
 153
Net proceeds from issuance of treasury stock 1,878
 1,763
 2,176
Acquisition of treasury stock (15,085) (9,271) (41)
Cash dividends paid on common stock (29,021) (25,686) (20,431)
Net change in financing activities (42,968) (34,036) (17,208)
Net change in cash and cash equivalents 638
 6,492
 26,831
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year 106,647
 100,155
 73,324
Cash and cash equivalents, end of year $107,285
 $106,647
 $100,155



82


Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.
None
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures.
1st Source carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934) pursuant to Exchange Act Rule 13a-14. Based upon that evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that, at December 31, 2019, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective in ensuring that information required to be disclosed by 1st Source in reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms and are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in those reports is accumulated and communicated to management as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.
In addition, there were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(f)) during the fourth fiscal quarter of 2019 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal controls over financial reporting.
MANAGEMENT REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING
Management of 1st Source Corporation (“1st Source”) is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. 1st Source’s internal control over financial reporting includes policies and procedures pertaining to 1st Source’s ability to record, process, and report reliable information. Actions are taken to correct any deficiencies as they are identified through internal and external audits, regular examinations by bank regulatory agencies, 1st Source’s formal risk management process, and other means. 1st Source’s internal control system is designed to provide reasonable assurance to 1st Source’s management and Board of Directors regarding the preparation and fair presentation of 1st Source’s published financial statements.
All internal control systems, no matter how well designed, have inherent limitations. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation. Further, because of changes in conditions, the effectiveness of internal control may vary over time.
1st Source’s management assessed the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2019. In making this assessment, management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control — Integrated Framework (2013 framework). Based on management’s assessment, 1st Source believes that, as of December 31, 2019, 1st Source’s internal control over financial reporting is effective based on those criteria.
BKD LLP, independent registered public accounting firm, has issued an attestation report on management’s assessment of 1st Source’s internal control over financial reporting. This report appears on page 39.
By/s/ CHRISTOPHER J. MURPHY III 
 Christopher J. Murphy III, Chief Executive Officer 
   
   
By/s/ ANDREA G. SHORT 
 Andrea G. Short, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer 
South Bend, Indiana
Item 9B. Other Information.
None

83


Part III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance.
The information under the caption “Proposal Number 1: Election of Directors,” “Board Committees and Other Corporate Governance Matters,” and “Delinquent Section 16(a) Reports” of the 2020 Proxy Statement is incorporated herein by reference.
Item 11. Executive Compensation.
The information under the caption “Compensation Discussion & Analysis” of the 2020 Proxy Statement is incorporated herein by reference.
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.
The information under the caption “Voting Securities and Principal Holders Thereof” and “Proposal Number 1: Election of Directors” of the 2020 Proxy Statement is incorporated herein by reference.
The following table shows Equity Compensation Plan Information as of December 31, 2019.
  (A) Number of Securities to be Issued upon Exercise of Outstanding Options, Warrants and Rights Weighted-average Exercise Price of Outstanding Options, Warrants and Rights Number of Securities Remaining Available for Future Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans [excluding securities reflected in column (A)] 
Equity compensation plans approved by shareholders  
  
  
 
2011 Stock Option Plan 
 $
 250,000
 
1997 Employee Stock Purchase Plan 6,436
 49.28
 119,531
 
1982 Executive Incentive Plan 
 
 97,104
(1)(2)
1982 Restricted Stock Award Plan 
 
 218,753
(1)
Strategic Deployment Incentive Plan 
 
 98,645
(1)(2)
Total plans approved by shareholders 6,436
 $49.28
 784,033
 
Equity compensation plans not approved by shareholders       
Director Retainer Stock Plan 
 
 35,437
 
Total equity compensation plans 6,436
 $49.28
 819,470
 
 
(1)Amount is to be awarded by grants administered by the Executive Compensation and Human Resources Committee of the 1st Source Corporation Board of Directors.
(2)Amount includes market value stock only. Book value shares used for annual awards may only be sold to 1st Source.
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence.
The information under the caption “Proposal Number 1: Election of Directors”, “Board Committees and Other Corporate Governance Matters, “ and “Transactions with Related Persons” of the 2020 Proxy Statement is incorporated herein by reference.
Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services.
The information under the caption “Relationship with Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm” of the 2020 Proxy Statement is incorporated herein by reference.

84


Part IV
Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules.
(a) Financial Statements and Schedules:
The following Financial Statements and Supplementary Data are filed as part of this annual report:
Financial statement schedules required by Article 9 of Regulation S-X are not required under the related instructions, or are inapplicable and, therefore, have been omitted.
(b) Exhibits (numbered in accordance with Item 601 of Regulation S-K):
3(a) 
   
3(b) 
   
3(c) 
   
4(a) Form of Common Stock Certificates of Registrant, filed as exhibit to Registration Statement 2-40481 and incorporated herein by reference.
   
4(b) 1st Source agrees to furnish to the Commission, upon request, a copy of each instrument defining the rights of holders of Senior and Subordinated debt of 1st Source.
   
10(a)(1) 
Employment Agreement of Christopher J. Murphy III, dated January 1, 2008, filed as exhibit to Form 8-K, dated March 17, 2008, amended February 6, 2014, filed as exhibit to Form 8-K, dated March 12, 2014, and incorporated herein by reference.
   
10(a)(2) 
Employment Agreement of Andrea G. Short dated January 1, 2013, filed as exhibit to Form 10-K, dated December 31, 2012, amended February 6, 2014, filed as exhibit to Form 8-K, dated March 12, 2014, and incorporated herein by reference.
   
10(a)(3) 
Employment Agreement of John B. Griffith, dated January 1, 2008, filed as exhibit to Form 8-K, dated March 17, 2008, amended February 6, 2014, filed as exhibit to Form 8-K, dated March 12, 2014, and incorporated herein by reference.
   
10(a)(4) 
   
10(a)(5) 
   
10(b) 
   
10(c) 
   
10(d)</