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USB U.S. Bancorp.

Filed: 4 May 21, 4:56pm
Table of Contents

 
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
 
Form
10-Q
 
 
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2021
OR
 
 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from (not applicable)
Commission file number
1-6880
U.S. BANCORP
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Delaware
 
41-0255900
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
800 Nicollet Mall
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402
(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)
651-466-3000
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
(not applicable)
(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
Title of each class
 
Trading
symbols
 
Name of each exchange
on which registered
Common Stock, $.01 par value per share
 USB New York Stock Exchange
Depositary Shares (each representing 1/100th interest in a share of Series A
Non-Cumulative
Perpetual Preferred Stock, par value $1.00)
 USB PrA New York Stock Exchange
Depositary Shares (each representing 1/1,000th interest in a share of Series B
Non-Cumulative
Perpetual Preferred Stock, par value $1.00)
 USB PrH New York Stock Exchange
Depositary Shares (each representing 1/1,000th interest in a share of Series F
Non-Cumulative
Perpetual Preferred Stock, par value $1.00)
 USB PrM New York Stock Exchange
Depositary Shares (each representing 1/1,000th interest in a share of Series K
Non-Cumulative
Perpetual Preferred Stock, par value $1.00)
 USB PrP New York Stock Exchange
Depositary Shares (each representing 1/1,000th interest in a share of Series L
Non-Cumulative
Perpetual Preferred Stock, par value $1.00)
 USB PrQ New York Stock Exchange
Depositary Shares (each representing 1/1,000th interest in a share of Series M
Non-Cumulative
Perpetual Preferred Stock, par value $1.00)
 USB PrR New York Stock Exchange
0.850% Medium-Term Notes, Series X (Senior), due June 7, 2024
 USB/24B New York Stock Exchange
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months, and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
YES ☑    NO ☐
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of
Regulation S-T
during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).
YES ☑    NO ☐
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a
non-accelerated
filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in
Rule 12b-2
of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer ☑  Accelerated filer ☐
Non-accelerated
filer ☐
  
Smaller reporting company ☐
Emerging growth company ☐
If an emerging growth company, indicate by checkmark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule
12b-2
of the Exchange Act).
YES ☐    NO ☑
Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.
 
Class  Outstanding as of April 30, 2021
Common Stock, $0.01 Par Value  1,489,677,942 shares
 
 
 

Table of Contents and
Form 10-Q
Cross Reference Index
 
Part I — Financial Information
    
     3 
     3 
     3 
     6 
     30 
     32 
     32 
     7 
     7 
     8 
     21 
     21 
     21 
     21 
     23 
     24 
     25 
     27 
     33 
Part II — Other Information
    
     71 
     71 
     71 
     71 
     72 
     73 
“Safe Harbor” Statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.
This quarterly report on
Form 10-Q
contains forward-looking statements about U.S. Bancorp. Statements that are not historical or current facts, including statements about beliefs and expectations, are forward-looking statements and are based on the information available to, and assumptions and estimates made by, management as of the date hereof. These forward-looking statements cover, among other things, anticipated future revenue and expenses and the future plans and prospects of U.S. Bancorp. Forward-looking statements involve inherent risks and uncertainties, and important factors could cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated. The
COVID-19
pandemic is adversely affecting U.S. Bancorp, its customers, counterparties, employees, and third-party service providers, and the ultimate extent of the impacts on its business, financial position, results of operations, liquidity, and prospects is uncertain. Continued deterioration in general business and economic conditions or turbulence in domestic or global financial markets could adversely affect U.S. Bancorp’s revenues and the values of its assets and liabilities, reduce the availability of funding to certain financial institutions, lead to a tightening of credit, and increase stock price volatility. In addition, changes to statutes, regulations, or regulatory policies or practices could affect U.S. Bancorp in substantial and unpredictable ways. U.S. Bancorp’s results could also be adversely affected by changes in interest rates; further increases in unemployment rates; deterioration in the credit quality of its loan portfolios or in the value of the collateral securing those loans; deterioration in the value of its investment securities; legal and regulatory developments; litigation; increased competition from both banks and
non-banks;
civil unrest; changes in customer behavior and preferences; breaches in data security, including as a result of work-from-home arrangements; failures to safeguard personal information; effects of mergers and acquisitions and related integration; effects of critical accounting policies and judgments; and management’s ability to effectively manage credit risk, market risk, operational risk, compliance risk, strategic risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk and reputation risk.
For discussion of these and other risks that may cause actual results to differ from expectations, refer to U.S. Bancorp’s Annual Report on Form
10-K
for the year ended December 31, 2020, on file with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the sections entitled “Corporate Risk Profile” and “Risk Factors” contained in Exhibit 13, and all subsequent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission under Sections 13(a), 13(c), 14 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. In addition, factors other than these risks also could adversely affect U.S. Bancorp’s results, and the reader should not consider these risks to be a complete set of all potential risks or uncertainties. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date hereof, and U.S. Bancorp undertakes no obligation to update them in light of new information or future events.
 
U.S. Bancorp 
1

 Table 1
 
   Selected Financial Data
 
  
Three Months Ended
March 31
 
(Dollars and Shares in Millions, Except Per Share Data) 2021  2020  Percent
Change
 
Condensed Income Statement
   
Net interest income
 $3,063  $3,223   (5.0)% 
Taxable-equivalent adjustment (a)
  26   24   8.3 
Net interest income (taxable-equivalent basis) (b)
  3,089   3,247   (4.9
Noninterest income
  2,381   2,525   (5.7
Total net revenue
  5,470   5,772   (5.2
Noninterest expense
  3,379   3,316   1.9 
Provision for credit losses
  (827  993   * 
Income before taxes
  2,918   1,463   99.5 
Income taxes and taxable-equivalent adjustment
  633   284   * 
Net income
  2,285   1,179   93.8 
Net (income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interests
  (5  (8  37.5 
Net income attributable to U.S. Bancorp
 $2,280  $1,171   94.7 
Net income applicable to U.S. Bancorp common shareholders
 $2,175  $1,088   99.9 
Per Common Share
   
Earnings per share
 $1.45  $.72   *
Diluted earnings per share
  1.45   .72   * 
Dividends declared per share
  .42   .42    
Book value per share (c)
  30.53   30.24   1.0 
Market value per share
  55.31   34.45   60.6 
Average common shares outstanding
  1,502   1,518   (1.1
Average diluted common shares outstanding
  1,503   1,519   (1.1
Financial Ratios
   
Return on average assets
  1.69  .95 
Return on average common equity
  19.0   9.7  
Net interest margin (taxable-equivalent basis) (a)
  2.50   2.91  
Efficiency ratio (b)
  62.1   58.0  
Net charge-offs as a percent of average loans outstanding
  .31   .53  
Average Balances
   
Loans
 $293,989  $297,657   (1.2)% 
Loans held for sale
  10,032   4,748   * 
Investment securities (d)
  145,520   120,843   20.4 
Earning assets
  497,711   447,722   11.2 
Assets
  548,734   494,807   10.9 
Noninterest-bearing deposits
  118,352   74,142   59.6 
Deposits
  426,364   362,804   17.5 
Short-term borrowings
  13,107   20,253   (35.3
Long-term debt
  39,463   43,846   (10.0
Total U.S. Bancorp shareholders’ equity
  52,729   51,146   3.1 
      March 31,
2021
  December 31,
2020
    
Period End Balances
   
Loans
 $294,427  $297,707   (1.1)% 
Investment securities
  156,003   136,840   14.0 
Assets
  553,375   553,905   (.1
Deposits
  433,761   429,770   .9 
Long-term debt
  37,419   41,297   (9.4
Total U.S. Bancorp shareholders’ equity
  51,678   53,095   (2.7
Asset Quality
   
Nonperforming assets
 $1,202  $1,298   (7.4)% 
Allowance for credit losses
  6,960   8,010   (13.1
Allowance for credit losses as a percentage of
period-end
loans
  2.36  2.69 
Capital Ratios
   
Common equity tier 1 capital
  9.9  9.7 
Tier 1 capital
  11.5   11.3  
Total risk-based capital
  13.5   13.4  
Leverage
  8.4   8.3  
Total leverage exposure
  7.4   7.3  
Tangible common equity to tangible assets (b)
  6.6   6.9  
Tangible common equity to risk-weighted assets (b)
  9.1   9.5  
Common equity tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets, reflecting the full implementation of the current expected credit losses methodology (b)
  9.5   9.3     
 
*
Not meaningful
(a)
Based on a federal income tax rate of 21 percent for those assets and liabilities whose income or expense is not included for federal income tax purposes.
(b)
See
Non-GAAP
Financial Measures beginning on page 30.
(c)
Calculated as U.S. Bancorp common shareholders’ equity divided by common shares outstanding at end of the period.
(d)
Excludes unrealized gains and losses on
available-for-sale
investment securities and any premiums or discounts recorded related to the transfer of investment securities at fair value from
available-for-sale
to
held-to-maturity.
 
2
 U.S. Bancorp

Management’s Discussion and Analysis
 
OVERVIEW
Earnings Summary
U.S. Bancorp and its subsidiaries (the “Company”) reported net income attributable to U.S. Bancorp of $2.3 billion for the first quarter of 2021, or $1.45 per diluted common share, compared with $1.2 billion, or $0.72 per diluted common share, for the first quarter of 2020. Return on average assets and return on average common equity were 1.69 percent and 19.0 percent, respectively, for the first quarter of 2021, compared with 0.95 percent and 9.7 percent, respectively, for the first quarter of 2020.
Total net revenue for the first quarter of 2021 was $302 million (5.2 percent) lower than the first quarter of 2020, reflecting a 5.0 percent decrease in net interest income (4.9 percent on a taxable-equivalent basis) and a 5.7 percent decrease in noninterest income. The decrease in net interest income from the first quarter of 2020 was primarily due to the impact of lower interest rates compared with the prior year and higher premium amortization in the investment portfolio related to mortgage refinance activities, partially offset by changes in deposit and funding mix as well as higher loan fees related to the Small Business Administration (“SBA”) Paycheck Protection Program. The noninterest income decrease was driven by lower mortgage banking revenue, deposit service charges, securities gains and other noninterest income, partially offset by improvement in trust and investment management fees and commercial products revenue.
Noninterest expense in the first quarter of 2021 was $63 million (1.9 percent) higher than the first quarter of 2020, reflecting increases in personnel expense, primarily related to performance-based incentive compensation, as well as technology and communications expense, partially offset by lower net occupancy and equipment expense, marketing and business development expense, and other noninterest expense.
The provision for credit losses for the first quarter of 2021 was a benefit of $827 million, which was $1.8 billion lower than the first quarter of 2020, reflecting a decrease in the allowance for credit losses during the first quarter of 2021 primarily due to improving economic conditions. Net charge-offs in the first quarter of 2021 were $223 million, compared with $393 million in the first quarter of 2020. Refer to “Corporate Risk Profile” for further information on the provision for credit losses, net charge-offs, nonperforming assets and other factors considered by the Company in assessing the credit quality of the loan portfolio and establishing the allowance for credit losses.
STATEMENT OF INCOME ANALYSIS
Net Interest Income
 Net interest income, on a taxable-equivalent basis, was $3.1 billion in the first quarter of 2021, representing a decrease of $158 million (4.9 percent) compared with the first quarter of 2020. The decrease was primarily due to the impact of lower interest rates compared with the prior year and higher premium amortization related to securities prepayments, partially offset by changes in deposit and funding mix as well as higher loan fees. Average earning assets were $50.0 billion (11.2 percent) higher than the first quarter of 2020, reflecting increases of $24.7 billion (20.4 percent) in investment securities and $23.7 billion (96.8 percent) in other earning assets, including cash balances being maintained for liquidity given the current economic environment, while average loans decreased $3.7 billion (1.2 percent) due to continued paydowns by corporate customers that accessed the capital markets. The net interest margin, on a taxable-equivalent basis, in the first quarter of 2021 was 2.50 percent, compared with 2.91 percent in the first quarter of 2020. The decrease in net interest margin from the first quarter of 2020 was primarily due to the impact of a lower yield curve on earning assets, higher premium amortization within the investment portfolio and decisions to maintain higher levels of liquidity, partially offset by the net benefit of deposit repricing and funding composition and higher loan fees. Refer to the “Consolidated Daily Average Balance Sheet and Related Yields and Rates” table for further information on net interest income.
 
U.S. Bancorp 
3

 Table 2
 
   Noninterest Income
 
       
Three Months Ended
March 31
 
(Dollars in Millions)      2021   2020   Percent
Change
 
Credit and debit card revenue
 
  $336   $304    10.5
Corporate payment products revenue
 
   126    145    (13.1
Merchant processing services
 
   318    337    (5.6
Trust and investment management fees
 
   444    427    4.0 
Deposit service charges
 
   161    209    (23.0
Treasury management fees
 
   147    143    2.8 
Commercial products revenue
 
   280    246    13.8 
Mortgage banking revenue
 
   299    395    (24.3
Investment products fees
 
   55    49    12.2 
Securities gains (losses), net
 
   25    50    (50.0
Other
    190    220    (13.6
Total noninterest income
 
  $2,381   $2,525    (5.7)% 
 
Average total loans in the first quarter of 2021 were $3.7 billion (1.2 percent) lower than the first quarter of 2020. The decrease was primarily due to lower commercial loans (3.7 percent) driven by continued paydowns by corporate customers that accessed the capital markets, lower credit card loans (11.3 percent) driven by higher customer payment rates, lower commercial real estate loans (3.2 percent) reflecting customer paydowns and a decrease in new loan origination activity, and lower total other retail loans (0.2 percent). The decrease in total other retail loans reflected the net impact of lower home equity and second mortgages (18.7 percent) as more customers chose to refinance their existing first lien residential mortgage balances during the prior year due to the low interest rate environment, partially offset by higher other retail loans (9.5 percent) driven by growth in installment loans due to the impact of
COVID-19
on recreational vehicle sales. The decrease in average total loans was further offset by growth in residential mortgages (6.1 percent) driven by loan repurchases from the Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA”).
Average investment securities in the first quarter of 2021 were $24.7 billion (20.4 percent) higher than the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to purchases of mortgage-backed, U.S. Treasury and state and political securities, net of prepayments and maturities.
Average total deposits for the first quarter of 2021 were $63.6 billion (17.5 percent) higher than the first quarter of 2020, including approximately $10 billion related to the acquisition of deposit balances from State Farm Bank in the fourth quarter of 2020. Average noninterest-bearing deposits were $44.2 billion (59.6 percent) higher than the prior year, reflecting increases across all business lines. Average total savings deposits were $33.7 billion (13.6 percent) higher than the prior year, driven by increases in Consumer and Business Banking, and Wealth Management and Investment Services balances, partially offset by a decrease in Corporate and Commercial Banking balances. The growth in average noninterest-bearing and total savings deposits was primarily a result of the actions by the federal government to increase liquidity in the financial system, customers maintaining balance sheet liquidity by utilizing existing credit facilities and government stimulus programs. Average time deposits for the first quarter of 2021 were $14.4 billion (34.8 percent) lower than the first quarter of 2020, primarily driven by decreases in those deposits managed as an alternative to other funding sources, based largely on relative pricing and liquidity characteristics.
Provision for Credit Losses
 The provision for credit losses for the first quarter of 2021 was a benefit of $827 million, representing a decrease of $1.8 billion from the first quarter of 2020. The decrease reflected factors affecting economic conditions during the first quarter of 2021, including the enactment of additional benefits from government stimulus programs, vaccine availability in the United States and reduced levels of new
COVID-19
cases. Net charge-offs decreased $170 million (43.3 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to lower commercial, credit card and other retail loan net charge-offs. Refer to “Corporate Risk Profile” for further information on the provision for credit losses, net charge-offs, nonperforming assets and other factors considered by the Company in assessing the credit quality of the loan portfolio and establishing the allowance for credit losses.
 
4
 U.S. Bancorp

 Table 3
 
   Noninterest Expense
 
   
Three Months Ended
March 31
 
(Dollars in Millions)  2021  2020  Percent
Change
 
Compensation
  $1,803  $1,620   11.3
Employee benefits
   384   352   9.1 
Net occupancy and equipment
   263   276   (4.7
Professional services
   98   99   (1.0
Marketing and business development
   48   74   (35.1
Technology and communications
   359   289   24.2 
Postage, printing and supplies
   69   72   (4.2
Other intangibles
   38   42   (9.5
Other
   317   492   (35.6
Total noninterest expense
  $3,379  $3,316   1.9
Efficiency ratio (a)
   62.1  58.0    
 
(a)
See Non-GAAP Financial Measures beginning on page 30.
 
Noninterest Income
 Noninterest income was $2.4 billion in the first quarter of 2021, representing a decrease of $144 million (5.7 percent), compared with the first quarter of 2020. The decrease from a year ago reflected lower mortgage banking revenue, deposit service charges, securities gains and other noninterest income, partially offset by higher commercial products revenue and trust and investment management fees. Mortgage banking revenue decreased $96 million (24.3 percent) due to declines in mortgage servicing rights (“MSRs”) valuations, net of hedging activities, driven by the impact of prepayments on the servicing portfolio, partially offset by higher production volume and related gain on sale margins compared with the prior year. Deposit service charges decreased $48 million (23.0 percent) primarily due to lower consumer spending activities and higher consumer deposit levels related to government stimulus. Other noninterest income decreased $30 million (13.6 percent) primarily due to lower gains on sales of certain businesses and
tax-advantaged
investment syndication revenue in the first quarter of 2021, partially offset by higher retail leasing end of term residual gains. Commercial products revenue increased $34 million (13.8 percent) primarily due to better market conditions and higher
non-yield
loan fees on unused commitments, while trust and investment management fees increased $17 million (4.0 percent) driven by business growth and favorable market conditions. During the past year, payment services revenue has been adversely affected by the impact of the
COVID-19
pandemic on consumer spending, particularly related to travel and entertainment activities. However, consumer spending continues to strengthen across most sectors driven by government stimulus, local jurisdictions reducing restrictions and consumer behaviors normalizing. As a result, payment services revenue was essentially flat compared with the first quarter of 2020. The components of payment services revenue included higher credit and debit card revenue of $32 million (10.5 percent) driven by higher net interchange revenue related to sales volumes and higher prepaid fees as a result of government stimulus programs. This increase in payment services revenue was more than offset by lower corporate payment products revenue of $19 million (13.1 percent) primarily due to lower business spending related to travel and entertainment as well as lower merchant processing services revenue of $19 million (5.6 percent) driven by lower sales volume and merchant fees.
Noninterest Expense
 Noninterest expense was $3.4 billion in the first quarter of 2021, representing an increase of $63 million (1.9 percent) over the first quarter of 2020. The increase from the prior year reflected higher compensation expense, employee benefits expense, and technology and communications expense, partially offset by lower marketing and business development expense, net occupancy and equipment expense, and other noninterest expense. Compensation expense increased $183 million (11.3 percent) due to merit increases, higher revenue-related compensation driven by business production within mortgage banking, and higher performance-based incentives and stock-based compensation. Employee benefits expense increased $32 million (9.1 percent) primarily due to higher payroll taxes and related benefits, as well as higher medical claims expense compared with the first quarter of 2020. Technology and communications expense increased $70 million (24.2 percent) primarily due to higher call center volume related to prepaid cards and capital expenditures supporting business technology investments. Other noninterest expense decreased $175 million (35.6 percent) primarily due to higher
COVID-19
related accruals in the first quarter of 2020 including recognizing liabilities related to future delivery exposures related to merchant and airline processing. Marketing and business development expense decreased $26 million (35.1 percent) due to a reduction in travel as a result of
COVID-19,
while net occupancy and equipment expense decreased $13 million (4.7 percent) primarily due to branch closures.
 
U.S. Bancorp 
5

Income Tax Expense
 The provision for income taxes was $607 million (an effective rate of 21.0 percent) for the first quarter of 2021, compared with $260 million (an effective rate of 18.1 percent) for the first quarter of 2020. The increase in the tax rate is due to the marginal impact of providing taxes on higher pretax earnings in the first quarter of 2021. For further information on income taxes, refer to Note 11 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
BALANCE SHEET ANALYSIS
Loans
 The Company’s loan portfolio was $294.4 billion at March 31, 2021, compared with $297.7 billion at December 31, 2020, a decrease of $3.3 billion (1.1 percent). The decrease was driven by lower residential mortgages, credit card loans and commercial real estate loans, partially offset by higher commercial loans and other retail loans.
Residential mortgages held in the loan portfolio decreased $2.5 billion (3.3 percent) at March 31, 2021, compared with December 31, 2020, due to customers paying down balances in the first quarter of 2021. Residential mortgages originated and placed in the Company’s loan portfolio include well-secured jumbo mortgages and branch-originated first lien home equity loans to borrowers with high credit quality.
Credit card loans decreased $1.5 billion (6.6 percent) at March 31, 2021, compared with December 31, 2020, reflecting higher customer payment rates.
Commercial real estate loans decreased $879 million (2.2 percent) at March 31, 2021, compared with December 31, 2020, the result of customers paying down balances and a decrease in new loan origination activity.
Commercial loans increased $1.3 billion (1.3 percent) at March 31, 2021, compared with December 31, 2020, reflecting the impact of loans made under the SBA Paycheck Protection Program during the first quarter of 2021, partially offset by paydowns by corporate customers that accessed the capital markets.
Other retail loans increased $317 million (0.6 percent) at March 31, 2021, compared with December 31, 2020, due to increases in auto loans and installment loans, partially offset by decreases in home equity loans, retail leasing balances and revolving credit balances.
The Company generally retains portfolio loans through maturity; however, the Company’s intent may change over time based upon various factors such as ongoing asset/liability management activities, assessment of product profitability, credit risk, liquidity needs, and capital implications. If the Company’s intent or ability to hold an existing portfolio loan changes, it is transferred to loans held for sale.
Loans Held for Sale
 Loans held for sale, consisting primarily of residential mortgages to be sold in the secondary market, were $9.0 billion at March 31, 2021, compared with $8.8 billion at December 31, 2020. Almost all of the residential mortgage loans the Company originates or purchases for sale follow guidelines that allow the loans to be sold into existing, highly liquid secondary markets; in particular in government agency transactions and to government-sponsored enterprises (“GSEs”).
Investment Securities
 Available-for-sale
investment securities totaled $156.0 billion at March 31, 2021, compared with $136.8 billion at December 31, 2020. The $19.2 billion (14.0 percent) increase was primarily due to $22.6 billion of net investment purchases, partially offset by a $3.4 billion unfavorable change in net unrealized gains (losses) on
available-for-sale
 
 Table 4
 
   Available-for-Sale Investment Securities
 
  March 31, 2021   December 31, 2020 
(Dollars in Millions) Amortized
Cost
   Fair Value  Weighted-
Average
Maturity in
Years
   Weighted-
Average
Yield (d)
   Amortized
Cost
   Fair Value  Weighted-
Average
Maturity in
Years
   Weighted-
Average
Yield (d)
 
U.S. Treasury and agencies
 $24,401   $24,317   4.4    1.31  $21,954   $22,391   3.8    1.37
Mortgage-backed securities (a)
  122,883    122,262   6.1    1.44    103,282    105,374   3.0    1.47 
Asset-backed securities (a)
  197    202   5.9    1.09    200    205   6.2    1.47 
Obligations of state and political subdivisions (b) (c)
  8,687    9,215   6.7    3.89    8,166    8,861   6.3    3.99 
Other
  7    7   .1    2.07    9    9   .1    1.81 
Total investment securities
 $156,175   $156,003   5.9    1.55  $133,611   $136,840   3.4    1.61
 
(a)
Information related to asset and mortgage-backed securities included above is presented based upon weighted-average maturities that take into account anticipated future prepayments.
(b)
Information related to obligations of state and political subdivisions is presented based upon yield to first optional call date if the security is purchased at a premium, and yield to maturity if the security is purchased at par or a discount.
(c)
Maturity calculations for obligations of state and political subdivisions are based on the first optional call date for securities with a fair value above par and the contractual maturity date for securities with a fair value equal to or below par.
(d)
Yields on investment securities are computed based on amortized cost balances. Weighted-average yields for obligations of state and political subdivisions are presented on a fully-taxable equivalent basis based on a federal income tax rate of 21 percent.
 
6
 U.S. Bancorp

investment securities. The Company had no outstanding investment securities classified as
held-to-maturity
at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020.
The Company’s
available-for-sale
investment securities are carried at fair value with changes in fair value reflected in other comprehensive income (loss) unless a portion of a security’s unrealized loss is related to credit and an allowance for credit losses is necessary. At March 31, 2021, the Company’s net unrealized losses on
available-for-sale
investment securities were $172 million, compared with $3.2 billion of net unrealized gains at December 31, 2020. The unfavorable change in net unrealized gains (losses) was primarily due to decreases in the fair value of mortgage-backed, U.S. Treasury, and state and political securities as a result of changes in interest rates. Gross unrealized losses on
available-for-sale
investment securities totaled $2.3 billion at March 31, 2021, compared with $53 million at December 31, 2020. At March 31, 2021, the Company had no plans to sell securities with unrealized losses, and believes it is more likely than not that it would not be required to sell such securities before recovery of their amortized cost.
Refer to Notes 3 and 14 in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further information on investment securities.
Deposits
 Total deposits were $433.8 billion at March 31, 2021, compared with $429.8 billion at December 31, 2020. The $4.0 billion (0.9 percent) increase in total deposits reflected increases in noninterest-bearing and total savings deposits, partially offset by a decrease in time deposits. Noninterest-bearing deposits increased $8.7 billion (7.3 percent) at March 31, 2021, compared with December 31, 2020, primarily due to higher Corporate and Commercial Banking, Consumer and Business Banking, and Wealth Management and Investment Services balances. Interest checking balances increased $7.9 billion (8.3 percent), driven by higher Consumer and Business Banking, Wealth Management and Investment Services, and Corporate and Commercial Banking balances. Savings account balances increased $4.4 billion (7.7 percent), primarily due to higher Consumer and Business Banking balances. Money market deposit balances decreased $10.0 billion (7.8 percent) at March 31, 2021, compared with December 31, 2020, primarily due to lower Wealth Management and Investment Services, and Corporate and Commercial Banking balances. Time deposits decreased $7.0 billion (22.8 percent) at March 31, 2021, compared with December 31, 2020, driven by a decrease in those deposits managed as an alternative to other funding sources, based largely on relative pricing and liquidity characteristics.
Borrowings
 The Company utilizes both short-term and long-term borrowings as part of its asset/liability management and funding strategies. Short-term borrowings, which include federal funds purchased, commercial paper, repurchase agreements, borrowings secured by high-grade assets and other short-term borrowings, were $12.1 billion at March 31, 2021, compared with $11.8 billion at December 31, 2020. The $332 million (2.8 percent) increase in short-term borrowings was primarily due to higher repurchase agreement and other short-term borrowings balances. Long-term debt was $37.4 billion at March 31, 2021, compared with $41.3 billion at December 31, 2020. The $3.9 billion (9.4 percent) decrease was primarily due to $3.7 billion of bank note repayments and maturities. Refer to the “Liquidity Risk Management” section for discussion of liquidity management of the Company.
CORPORATE RISK PROFILE
Overview
Managing risks is an essential part of successfully operating a financial services company. The Company’s Board of Directors has approved a risk management framework which establishes governance and risk management requirements for all risk-taking activities. This framework includes Company and business line risk appetite statements which set boundaries for the types and amount of risk that may be undertaken in pursuing business objectives and initiatives. The Board of Directors, primarily through its Risk Management Committee, oversees performance relative to the risk management framework, risk appetite statements, and other policy requirements.
The Executive Risk Committee (“ERC”), which is chaired by the Chief Risk Officer and includes the Chief Executive Officer and other members of the executive management team, oversees execution against the risk management framework and risk appetite statements. The ERC focuses on current and emerging risks, including strategic and reputation risks, by directing timely and comprehensive actions. Senior operating committees have also been established, each responsible for overseeing a specified category of risk.
The Company’s most prominent risk exposures are credit, interest rate, market, liquidity, operational, compliance, strategic, and reputation. Leveraging the Company’s risk management framework, the specific impacts of
COVID-19
and related risks are identified for each of the most prominent exposures. With respect to direct impacts from
COVID-19,
oversight and governance is managed through a centralized command center with frequent reporting to the Managing
 
U.S. Bancorp 
7

Committee and ERC. The Board of Directors also oversees the Company’s responsiveness to the
COVID-19
pandemic. Credit risk is the risk of loss associated with a change in the credit profile or the failure of a borrower or counterparty to meet its contractual obligations. Interest rate risk is the potential reduction of net interest income or market valuations as a result of changes in interest rates. Market risk arises from fluctuations in interest rates, foreign exchange rates, and security prices that may result in changes in the values of financial instruments, such as trading and
available-for-sale
securities, mortgage loans held for sale (“MLHFS”), MSRs and derivatives that are accounted for on a fair value basis. Liquidity risk is the possible inability to fund obligations or new business at a reasonable cost and in a timely manner. Operational risk is the risk to current or projected financial condition and resilience arising from inadequate or failed internal processes or systems, people (including human errors or misconduct), or adverse external events, including the risk of loss resulting from breaches in data security. Operational risk can also include the risk of loss due to failures by third parties with which the Company does business. Compliance risk is the risk that the Company may suffer legal or regulatory sanctions, financial losses, and reputational damage if it fails to adhere to compliance requirements and the Company’s compliance policies. Strategic risk is the risk to current or projected financial condition arising from adverse business decisions, poor implementation of business decisions, or lack of responsiveness to changes in the banking industry and operating environment. Reputation risk is the risk to current or anticipated earnings, capital, or franchise or enterprise value arising from negative public opinion. This risk may impair the Company’s competitiveness by affecting its ability to establish new relationships or services, or continue serving existing relationships. In addition to the risks identified above, other risk factors exist that may impact the Company. Refer to “Risk Factors” in the Company’s Annual Report on Form
10-K
for the year ended December 31, 2020, for a detailed discussion of these factors.
The Company’s Board and management-level governance committees are supported by a “three lines of defense” model for establishing effective checks and balances. The first line of defense, the business lines, manages risks in conformity with established limits and policy requirements. In turn, business line leaders and their risk officers establish programs to ensure conformity with these limits and policy requirements. The second line of defense, which includes the Chief Risk Officer’s organization as well as policy and oversight activities of corporate support functions, translates risk appetite and strategy into actionable risk limits and policies. The second line of defense monitors first line of defense conformity with limits and policies, and provides reporting and escalation of emerging risks and other concerns to senior management and the Risk Management Committee of the Board of Directors. The third line of defense, internal audit, is responsible for providing the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors and senior management with independent assessment and assurance regarding the effectiveness of the Company’s governance, risk management and control processes.
Management regularly provides reports to the Risk Management Committee of the Board of Directors. The Risk Management Committee discusses with management the Company’s risk management performance, and provides a summary of key risks to the entire Board of Directors, covering the status of existing matters, areas of potential future concern and specific information on certain types of loss events. The Risk Management Committee considers quarterly reports by management assessing the Company’s performance relative to the risk appetite statements and the associated risk limits, including:
 
Macroeconomic environment and other qualitative considerations, such as regulatory and compliance changes, litigation developments, and technology and cybersecurity;
 
Credit measures, including adversely rated and nonperforming loans, leveraged transactions, credit concentrations and lending limits;
 
Interest rate and market risk, including market value and net income simulation, and trading-related Value at Risk (“VaR”);
 
Liquidity risk, including funding projections under various stressed scenarios;
 
Operational and compliance risk, including losses stemming from events such as fraud, processing errors, control breaches, breaches in data security or adverse business decisions, as well as reporting on technology performance, and various legal and regulatory compliance measures;
 
Capital ratios and projections, including regulatory measures and stressed scenarios; and
 
Strategic and reputation risk considerations, impacts and responses.
Credit Risk Management
 The Company’s strategy for credit risk management includes well-defined, centralized credit policies, uniform underwriting criteria, and ongoing risk monitoring and review processes for all commercial and consumer credit exposures. In evaluating its credit risk, the Company considers changes, if any, in underwriting activities, the loan portfolio composition
 
8
 U.S. Bancorp

(including product mix and geographic, industry or customer-specific concentrations), collateral values, trends in loan performance and macroeconomic factors, such as changes in unemployment rates, gross domestic product levels and consumer bankruptcy filings, as well as the potential impact on customers and the domestic economy resulting from the
COVID-19
pandemic. The Risk Management Committee oversees the Company’s credit risk management process.
In addition, credit quality ratings as defined by the Company, are an important part of the Company’s overall credit risk management and evaluation of its allowance for credit losses. Loans with a pass rating represent those loans not classified on the Company’s rating scale for problem credits, as minimal credit risk has been identified. Loans with a special mention or classified rating, including consumer lending and small business loans that are 90 days or more past due and still accruing, nonaccrual loans, those loans considered troubled debt restructurings (“TDRs”), and loans in a junior lien position that are current but are behind a first lien position on nonaccrual, encompass all loans held by the Company that it considers to have a potential or well-defined weakness that may put full collection of contractual cash flows at risk. The Company’s internal credit quality ratings for consumer loans are primarily based on delinquency and nonperforming status, except for a limited population of larger loans within those portfolios that are individually evaluated. For this limited population, the determination of the internal credit quality rating may also consider collateral value and customer cash flows. Refer to Note 4 in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion of the Company’s loan portfolios including internal credit quality ratings. In addition, refer to “Management’s Discussion and Analysis — Credit Risk Management” in the Company’s Annual Report on
Form 10-K
for the year ended December 31, 2020, for a more detailed discussion on credit risk management processes.
The Company manages its credit risk, in part, through diversification of its loan portfolio which is achieved through limit setting by product type criteria, such as industry, and identification of credit concentrations. As part of its normal business activities, the Company offers a broad array of lending products. The Company categorizes its loan portfolio into two segments, which is the level at which it develops and documents a systematic methodology to determine the allowance for credit losses. The Company’s two loan portfolio segments are commercial lending and consumer lending.
The commercial lending segment includes loans and leases made to small business, middle market, large corporate, commercial real estate, financial institution,
non-profit
and public sector customers. Key risk characteristics relevant to commercial lending segment loans include the industry and geography of the borrower’s business, purpose of the loan, repayment source, borrower’s debt capacity and financial flexibility, loan covenants, and nature of pledged collateral, if any, as well as macroeconomic factors such as unemployment rates, gross domestic product levels, corporate bond spreads and long-term interest rates, all of which have been impacted by the
COVID-19
pandemic. These risk characteristics, among others, are considered in determining estimates about the likelihood of default by the borrowers and the severity of loss in the event of default. The Company considers these risk characteristics in assigning internal risk ratings to, or forecasting losses on, these loans, which are the significant factors in determining the allowance for credit losses for loans in the commercial lending segment.
The consumer lending segment represents loans and leases made to consumer customers, including residential mortgages, credit card loans, and other retail loans such as revolving consumer lines, auto loans and leases, home equity loans and lines, and student loans, a
run-off
portfolio. Home equity or second mortgage loans are junior lien
closed-end
accounts fully disbursed at origination. These loans typically are fixed rate loans, secured by residential real estate, with a
10-
or
15-year
fixed payment amortization schedule. Home equity lines are revolving accounts giving the borrower the ability to draw and repay balances repeatedly, up to a maximum commitment, and are secured by residential real estate. These include accounts in either a first or junior lien position. Typical terms on home equity lines in the portfolio are variable rates benchmarked to the prime rate, with a
10-
or
15-year
draw period during which a minimum payment is equivalent to the monthly interest, followed by a
20-
or
10-year
amortization period, respectively. At March 31, 2021, substantially all of the Company’s home equity lines were in the draw period. Approximately $1.2 billion, or 12 percent, of the outstanding home equity line balances at March 31, 2021, will enter the amortization period within the next 36 months. Key risk characteristics relevant to consumer lending segment loans primarily relate to the borrowers’ capacity and willingness to repay and include unemployment rates, consumer bankruptcy filings and other macroeconomic factors, customer payment history and credit scores, and in some cases, updated
loan-to-value
(“LTV”) information reflecting current
 
U.S. Bancorp 
9

market conditions on real estate-based loans. These and other risk characteristics, including elevated risk resulting from the
COVID-19
pandemic, are reflected in forecasts of delinquency levels, bankruptcies and losses which are the primary factors in determining the allowance for credit losses for the consumer lending segment.
The Company further disaggregates its loan portfolio segments into various classes based on their underlying risk characteristics. The two classes within the commercial lending segment are commercial loans and commercial real estate loans. The three classes within the consumer lending segment are residential mortgages, credit card loans and other retail loans.
The Company’s consumer lending segment utilizes several distinct business processes and channels to originate consumer credit, including traditional branch lending, mobile and
on-line
banking, indirect lending, alliance partnerships, correspondent banks and loan brokers. Each distinct underwriting and origination activity manages unique credit risk characteristics and prices its loan production commensurate with the differing risk profiles.
Residential mortgage originations are generally limited to prime borrowers and are performed through the Company’s branches, loan production offices, mobile and
on-line
services and a wholesale network of originators. The Company may retain residential mortgage loans it originates on its balance sheet or sell the loans into the secondary market while retaining the servicing rights and customer relationships. Utilizing the secondary markets enables the Company to effectively reduce its credit and other asset/liability risks. For residential mortgages that are retained in the Company’s portfolio and for home equity and second mortgages, credit risk is also diversified by geography and managed by adherence to LTV and borrower credit criteria during the underwriting process.
The Company estimates updated LTV information on its outstanding residential mortgages quarterly, based on a method that combines automated valuation model updates and relevant home price indices. LTV is the ratio of the loan’s outstanding principal balance to the current estimate of property value. For home equity and second mortgages, combined
loan-to-value
(“CLTV”) is the combination of the first mortgage original principal balance and the second lien outstanding principal balance, relative to the current estimate of property value. Certain loans do not have an LTV or CLTV, primarily due to lack of availability of relevant automated valuation model and/or home price indices values, or lack of necessary valuation data on acquired loans.
The following tables provide summary information of residential mortgages and home equity and second mortgages by LTV at March 31, 2021:
 
Residential Mortgages
(Dollars in Millions)
 Interest
Only
  Amortizing  Total  Percent
of Total
 
Loan-to-Value
    
Less than or equal to 80%
 $3,138  $55,505  $58,643   79.7
Over 80% through 90%
  7   3,146   3,153   4.3 
Over 90% through 100%
     291   291   .4 
Over 100%
     91   91   .1 
No LTV available
     10   10    
Loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools (a)
     11,436   11,436   15.5 
Total (b)
 $3,145  $70,479  $73,624   100.0
 
(a)
Represents loans purchased from Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA”) mortgage pools whose payments are primarily insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs.
(b)
At March 31, 2021, approximately $494 million of residential mortgage balances were considered
sub-prime.
 
Home Equity and Second Mortgages
(Dollars in Millions)
 Lines  Loans  Total  Percent
of Total
 
Loan-to-Value
    
Less than or equal to 80%
 $9,796  $654  $10,450   89.5
Over 80% through 90%
  625   317   942   8.1 
Over 90% through 100%
  98   36   134   1.1 
Over 100%
  67   6   73   .6 
No LTV/CLTV available
  76   4   80   .7 
Total (a)
 $10,662  $1,017  $11,679   100.0
 
(a)
At March 31, 2020, approximately $46 million of home equity and second mortgage balances were considered
sub-prime.    
Home equity and second mortgages were $11.7 billion at March 31, 2021, compared with $12.5 billion at December 31, 2020, and included $3.3 billion of home equity lines in a first lien position and $8.4 billion of home equity and second mortgage loans and lines in a junior lien position. Loans and lines in a junior lien position at March 31, 2021, included approximately $3.2 billion of loans and lines for which the Company also serviced the related first lien loan, and approximately $5.2 billion where the Company did not service the related first lien loan. The Company was able to determine the status of the related first liens using information the Company has as the servicer of the first lien or information reported on customer credit bureau files. The Company also evaluates other indicators of credit risk for these junior lien loans and lines including delinquency, estimated average CLTV ratios and updated weighted-average credit scores in making its assessment of credit risk, related loss estimates and determining the allowance for credit losses.
 
10
 U.S. Bancorp

The following table provides a summary of delinquency statistics and other credit quality indicators for the Company’s junior lien positions at March 31, 2021:
 
  Junior Liens Behind    
(Dollars in Millions) Company Owned
or Serviced First
Lien
  Third Party
First Lien
  Total 
Total
 $3,145  $5,225  $8,370 
Percent 30—89 days past due
  .31  .34  .33
Percent 90 days or more past due
  .07  .06  .07
Weighted-average CLTV
  64  62  62
Weighted-average credit score
  780   778   779 
See the “Analysis and Determination of the Allowance for Credit Losses” section for additional information on how the Company determines the allowance for credit losses for loans in a junior lien position.
Loan Delinquencies
Trends in delinquency ratios are an indicator, among other considerations, of credit risk within the Company’s loan portfolios. The Company measures delinquencies, both including and excluding nonperforming loans, to enable comparability with other companies. Accruing loans 90 days or more past due totaled $476 million at March 31, 2021, compared with $477 million at December 31, 2020. These balances exclude loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools whose repayments are primarily insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. Accruing loans 90 days or more past due are not included in nonperforming assets and continue to accrue interest because they are adequately secured by collateral, are in the process of collection and are reasonably expected to result in repayment or restoration to current status, or are managed in homogeneous portfolios with specified
charge-off
timeframes adhering to regulatory guidelines. The ratio of accruing loans 90 days or more past due to total loans was 0.16 percent at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020.
 
 Table 5
    Delinquent Loan Ratios as a Percent of Ending Loan Balances
 
90 days or more past due
excluding
nonperforming loans
      March 31,
2021
  December 31,
2020
 
Commercial
    
Commercial
    .06  .06
Lease financing
           
Total commercial
    .06   .05 
Commercial Real Estate
    
Commercial mortgages
        
Construction and development
       .03   .02 
Total commercial real estate
    .01   .01 
Residential Mortgages (a)
    .19   .18 
Credit Card
    .95   .88 
Other Retail
    
Retail leasing
    .01   .05 
Home equity and second mortgages
    .36   .36 
Other
       .07   .10 
Total other retail
       .12   .15 
Total loans
       .16  .16
90 days or more past due
including
nonperforming loans
      March 31,
2021
  December 31,
2020
 
Commercial
    .39  .42
Commercial real estate
    .94   1.15 
Residential mortgages (a)
    .54   .50 
Credit card
    .95   .88 
Other retail
       .42   .42 
Total loans
       .54  .57
 
(a)
Delinquent loan ratios exclude $1.7 billion at March 31, 2021, and $1.8 billion at December 31, 2020, of loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools whose repayments are primarily insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. Including these loans, the ratio of residential mortgages 90 days or more past due including all nonperforming loans was 2.81 percent at March 31, 2021, and 2.87 percent at December 31, 2020.
 
U.S. Bancorp 
11

The following table provides summary delinquency information for residential mortgages, credit card and other retail loans included in the consumer lending segment:
 
  
Amount
        
As a Percent of Ending
Loan Balances
 
(Dollars in Millions) March 31,
2021
   December 31,
2020
        March 31,
2021
  December 31,
2020
 
Residential Mortgages (a)
         
30-89
days
 $204   $244       .28  .32
90 days or more
  143    137       .19   .18 
Nonperforming
  253    245         .34   .32 
Total
 $600   $626       .81  .82
Credit Card
         
30-89
days
 $188   $231       .90  1.04
90 days or more
  198    197       .95   .88 
Nonperforming
                   
Total
 $386   $428       1.85  1.92
Other Retail
         
Retail Leasing
         
30-89
days
 $  27   $  35       .34  .43
90 days or more
  1    4       .01   .05 
Nonperforming
  14    13         .18   .16 
Total
 $  42   $  52       .53  .64
Home Equity and Second Mortgages
         
30-89
days
 $  44   $  68       .37  .54
90 days or more
  42    45       .36   .36 
Nonperforming
  127    107         1.09   .86 
Total
 $213   $220       1.82  1.76
Other (b)
         
30-89
days
 $150   $215       .40  .60
90 days or more
  27    37       .07   .10 
Nonperforming
  31    34         .08   .09 
Total
 $208   $286         .55  .79
 
(a)
Excludes $1.5 billion of loans
30-89
days past due and $1.7 billion of loans 90 days or more past due at March 31, 2021, purchased from GNMA mortgage pools that continue to accrue interest, compared with $1.4 billion and $1.8 billion at December 31, 2020, respectively.
(b)
Includes revolving credit, installment, automobile and student loans.
 
Restructured Loans
In certain circumstances, the Company may modify the terms of a loan to maximize the collection of amounts due when a borrower is experiencing financial difficulties or is expected to experience difficulties in the near-term. In most cases the modification is either a concessionary reduction in interest rate, extension of the maturity date or reduction in the principal balance that would otherwise not be considered.
Troubled Debt Restructurings
Concessionary modifications are classified as TDRs unless the modification results in only an insignificant delay in the payments to be received. TDRs accrue interest if the borrower complies with the revised terms and conditions and has demonstrated repayment performance at a level commensurate with the modified terms over several payment cycles, which is generally six months or greater. At March 31, 2021, performing TDRs were $3.5 billion, compared with $3.6 billion at December 31, 2020.
The Company continues to work with customers to modify loans for borrowers who are experiencing financial difficulties. Many of the Company’s TDRs are determined on a
case-by-case
basis in connection with ongoing loan collection processes. The modifications vary within each of the Company’s loan classes. Commercial lending segment TDRs generally include extensions of the maturity date and may be accompanied by an increase or decrease to the interest rate. The Company may also work with the borrower to make other changes to the loan to mitigate losses, such as obtaining additional collateral and/or guarantees to support the loan.
The Company has also implemented certain residential mortgage loan restructuring programs that may result in TDRs. The Company modifies residential mortgage loans under Federal Housing Administration, United States Department of Veterans Affairs, and its own internal programs. Under these programs, the Company offers qualifying homeowners the opportunity to permanently modify their loan and achieve more affordable monthly payments by providing loan concessions. These concessions may include adjustments to interest rates, conversion of adjustable rates to fixed rates, extensions of maturity dates or deferrals of payments, capitalization of accrued interest and/or outstanding advances, or in limited situations, partial forgiveness of loan principal. In most instances, participation in residential mortgage loan restructuring programs requires the customer to complete a short-term trial period. A permanent loan modification is contingent on the customer successfully completing the trial period
 
12
 U.S. Bancorp

arrangement, and the loan documents are not modified until that time. The Company reports loans in a trial period arrangement as TDRs and continues to report them as TDRs after the trial period.
Credit card and other retail loan TDRs are generally part of distinct restructuring programs providing customers modification solutions over a specified time period, generally up to 60 months.
In accordance with regulatory guidance, the Company considers secured consumer loans that have had debt discharged through bankruptcy where the borrower has not reaffirmed the debt to be TDRs. If the loan amount exceeds the collateral value, the loan is charged down to collateral value and the remaining amount is reported as nonperforming.
Loan modifications or concessions granted to customers resulting directly from the effects of the
COVID-19
pandemic, who were otherwise in current payment status, are not considered to be TDRs.
 
The following table provides a summary of TDRs by loan class, including the delinquency status for TDRs that continue to accrue interest and TDRs included in nonperforming assets:
 
      As a Percent of Performing TDRs       
At March 31, 2021
(Dollars in Millions)
 Performing
TDRs
   
30-89 Days

Past Due
  90 Days or More
Past Due
  Nonperforming
TDRs
  Total
TDRs
 
Commercial
 $183    5.1  2.6 $212(a)  $395 
Commercial real estate
  139    1.8      156(b)   295 
Residential mortgages
  1,449    6.0   4.2   140   1,589(d) 
Credit card
  235    8.4   4.2      235 
Other retail
  198    10.1   5.4   46(c)   244(e) 
TDRs, excluding loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools
  2,204    6.3   3.9   554   2,758 
Loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools (g)
  1,322             1,322(f) 
Total
 $3,526    3.9  2.4 $554  $4,080 
 
(a)
Primarily represents loans less than six months from the modification date that have not met the performance period required to return to accrual status (generally six months) and small business credit cards with a modified rate equal to 0 percent.
(b)
Primarily represents loans less than six months from the modification date that have not met the performance period required to return to accrual status (generally six months).
(c)
Primarily represents loans with a modified rate equal to 0 percent.
(d)
Includes $264 million of residential mortgage loans to borrowers that have had debt discharged through bankruptcy and $57 million in trial period arrangements or previously placed in trial period arrangements but not successfully completed.
(e)
Includes $80 million of other retail loans to borrowers that have had debt discharged through bankruptcy and $17 million in trial period arrangements or previously placed in trial period arrangements but not successfully completed.
(f)
Includes $169 million of Federal Housing Administration and United States Department of Veterans Affairs residential mortgage loans to borrowers that have had debt discharged through bankruptcy and $269 million in trial period arrangements or previously placed in trial period arrangements but not successfully completed.
(g)
Approximately 14.9 percent and 39.0 percent of the total TDR loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools are
30-89
days past due and 90 days or more past due, respectively, but are not classified as delinquent as their repayments are insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs.
 
U.S. Bancorp 
13

Short-term and Other Loan Modifications
The Company makes short-term and other modifications that it does not consider to be TDRs, in limited circumstances, to assist borrowers experiencing temporary hardships. Short-term consumer lending modification programs include payment reductions, deferrals of up to three past due payments, and the ability to return to current status if the borrower makes required payments. The Company may also make short-term modifications to commercial lending loans, with the most common modification being an extension of the maturity date of three months or less. Such extensions generally are used when the maturity date is imminent and the borrower is experiencing some level of financial stress, but the Company believes the borrower will pay all contractual amounts owed.
COVID-19
Payment Relief
The Company has offered payment relief, including forbearance, payment deferrals and other customer accommodations, to assist borrowers that have experienced financial hardship resulting from the effects of the
COVID-19
pandemic. The majority of these borrowers were not delinquent on payments at the time they received the payment relief. From March 2020 through March 31, 2021, the Company had approved approximately 385,000 loan modifications for these borrowers, representing approximately $27.0 billion. The loans modified consisted primarily of payment forbearance or deferrals of 90 days or less. A portion of the borrowers who received account modifications are no longer participating in these payment relief programs, as the programs are generally short-term; and at March 31, 2021, approximately 57,000 accounts, representing approximately $7.3 billion, were currently in an active payment relief program. The recognition of delinquent or nonaccrual loans and loan net charge-offs may be delayed for those customers enrolled in these payment relief programs who would have otherwise moved into past due or nonaccrual status, as these customer accounts do not continue to age during the period the payment delay is provided.
 
The following table summarizes borrowers enrolled in payment relief programs as a result of the
COVID-19
pandemic at March 31, 2021, as a percentage of the Company’s loans and loan balances:
 
    Percentage of Loan Accounts
in Payment Relief Programs
   Percentage of Loan Balances
in Payment Relief Programs
   Program Details
Commercial
   .07   .03  Primarily 3 month payment deferral up to a maximum of 6 months; interest continues to accrue with various payment options; may include short-term covenant waivers
Commercial real estate
   .30    .62   Primarily 3 month payment deferral up to a maximum of 6 months; interest continues to accrue with various payment options; may include short-term covenant waivers
Residential mortgages (a)
   2.28    2.99   Primarily 6 month payment forbearance, which may be extended up to 18 months; interest continues to accrue; cumulative payments suspended during forbearance period are either
paid-off
immediately or under a short-term repayment plan, or addressed through a permanent loan modification that either requires repayment at maturity or through restructured payments over time
Credit cards
   .10    .22   Primarily payment reduction up to 6 months; payment relief of up to 3 months; interest continues to accrue
Other retail
   .35    .65   Home equity loan programs are similar to residential mortgage programs; programs for other loan portfolios are primarily 2 month payment deferral up to a maximum of 4 months; interest continues to accrue
Total loans (a)
   .18   .91   
 
Note:
Payment relief generally includes payment deferrals, forbearances, extensions and
re-ages,
and excludes loans made under the Small Business Administration’s (“SBA”) Paycheck Protection Program, as amounts due under that program are expected to be fully forgiven by the SBA.
 
(a)
Excludes loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools, whose repayments are primarily insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. At March 31, 2021, 40.08 percent of the total number of accounts and 42.15 percent of the total loan balances of loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools were to borrowers enrolled in payment relief programs as a result of the
COVID-19
pandemic. Including these loans, 11.15 percent of the total number of accounts and 9.07 percent of the total balances of residential mortgages were to borrowers enrolled in payment relief programs as a result of the
COVID-19
pandemic. Including these loans, .43 percent of the total number of accounts and 2.55 percent of the total balances of all loans were to borrowers enrolled in payment relief programs as a result of the
COVID-19
pandemic.
 
14
 U.S. Bancorp

Nonperforming Assets
The level of nonperforming assets represents another indicator of the potential for future credit losses. Nonperforming assets include nonaccrual loans, restructured loans not performing in accordance with modified terms and not accruing interest, restructured loans that have not met the performance period required to return to accrual status, other real estate owned (“OREO”) and other nonperforming assets owned by the Company. Interest payments collected from assets on nonaccrual status are generally applied against the principal balance and not recorded as income. However, interest income may be recognized for interest payments if the remaining carrying amount of the loan is believed to be collectible.
At March 31, 2021, total nonperforming assets were $1.2 billion, compared to $1.3 billion at December 31, 2020. The $96 million (7.4 percent) decrease in nonperforming assets was driven by decreases in nonperforming commercial real estate and commercial
loans, partially offset by an increase in nonperforming other retail loans. The ratio of total nonperforming assets to total loans and other real estate was 0.41 percent at March 31, 2021, compared with 0.44 percent at December 31, 2020. The Company expects credit quality to return to more normalized levels throughout the remainder of 2021 as the economy rebounds and consumer spending resumes. However, some manageable levels of elevated nonperforming assets in certain industries and loan categories yet to recover from pandemic related impacts are expected.
OREO was $19 million at March 31, 2021, compared with $24 million at December 31, 2020, and was related to foreclosed properties that previously secured loan balances. These balances exclude foreclosed GNMA loans whose repayments are primarily insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs.
 
The following table provides an analysis of OREO, as a percent of their related loan balances, including geographical location detail for residential (residential mortgage, home equity and second mortgage) and commercial (commercial and commercial real estate) loan balances:
 
  Amount       As a Percent of Ending
Loan Balances
 
(Dollars in Millions) March 31,
2021
  December 31,
2020
       March 31,
2021
  December 31,
2020
 
Residential
       
California
             $3              $2      .01  .01
New York
  2   2      .16   .17 
Oregon
  2   2      .07   .07 
Illinois
  1   2      .02   .04 
Florida
  1   1      .03   .03 
All other states
  9   14        .02   .03 
Total residential
  18   23      .02   .03 
Commercial
       
Iowa
  1   1      .05   .04 
All other states
                 
Total commercial
  1   1            
Total
             $19              $24        .01  .01
 
U.S. Bancorp 
15

 
Table 6
 
   Nonperforming Assets (a)
 
(Dollars in Millions) March 31,
2021
  December 31,
2020
 
Commercial
  
Commercial
         $298          $321 
Lease financing
  49   54 
Total commercial
  347   375 
Commercial Real Estate
  
Commercial mortgages
  266   411 
Construction and development
  90   39 
Total commercial real estate
  356   450 
Residential Mortgages (b)
  253   245 
Credit Card
      
Other Retail
  
Retail leasing
  14   13 
Home equity and second mortgages
  127   107 
Other
  31   34 
Total other retail
  172   154 
Total nonperforming loans
  1,128   1,224 
Other Real Estate (c)
  19   24 
Other Assets
  55   50 
Total nonperforming assets
         $1,202          $1,298 
Accruing loans 90 days or more past due (b)
         $476          $477 
Nonperforming loans to total loans
  .38  .41
Nonperforming assets to total loans plus other real estate (c)
  .41  .44
Changes in Nonperforming Assets
 
(Dollars in Millions)  Commercial and
Commercial
Real Estate
  Residential
Mortgages,
Credit Card and
Other Retail
  Total 
Balance December 31, 2020
            $854              $444      $1,298 
Additions to nonperforming assets
    
New nonaccrual loans and foreclosed properties
   178   79   257 
Advances on loans
   3      3 
Total additions
   181   79   260 
Reductions in nonperforming assets
    
Paydowns, payoffs
   (80  (21  (101
Net sales
   (148  (6  (154
Return to performing status
   (24  (19  (43
Charge-offs (d)
   (52  (6  (58
Total reductions
   (304  (52  (356
Net additions to (reductions in) nonperforming assets
   (123  27   (96
Balance March 31, 2021
            $731              $471      $1,202 
 
(a)
Throughout this document, nonperforming assets and related ratios do not include accruing loans 90 days or more past due.
(b)
Excludes $1.7 billion at March 31, 2021, and $1.8 billion at December 31, 2020, of loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools that are 90 days or more past due that continue to accrue interest, as their repayments are primarily insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs.
(c)
Foreclosed GNMA loans of $29 million at March 31, 2021, and $33 million at December 31, 2020, continue to accrue interest and are recorded as other assets and excluded from nonperforming assets because they are insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs.
(d)
Charge-offs exclude actions for certain card products and loan sales that were not classified as nonperforming at the time the
charge-off
occurred.
 
16
 U.S. Bancorp

 
Table 7
 
   Net Charge-offs as a Percent of Average Loans Outstanding
 
   Three Months Ended
March 31
 
    2021  2020 
Commercial
   
Commercial
   .22  .28
Lease financing
   .30   .36 
Total commercial
   .22   .28 
Commercial Real Estate
   
Commercial mortgages
   (.17  (.01
Construction and development
   .19   (.04
Total commercial real estate
   (.07  (.02
Residential Mortgages
   (.03  .01 
Credit Card
   2.76   3.95 
Other Retail
   
Retail leasing
   .05   .90 
Home equity and second mortgages
   (.07  .03 
Other
   .40   .79 
Total other retail
   .25   .61 
Total loans
   .31  .53
 
Analysis of Loan Net Charge-Offs
 Total loan net charge-offs were $223 million for the first quarter of 2021, compared with $393 million for the first quarter of 2020. The ratio of total loan net charge-offs to average loans outstanding on an annualized basis for the first quarter of 2021 was 0.31 percent, compared with 0.53 percent for the first quarter of 2020. The decrease in net charge-offs for the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, was primarily due to lower credit card, commercial and other retail loan net charge-offs.
Analysis and Determination of the Allowance for Credit Losses
 The allowance for credit losses is established for current expected credit losses on the Company’s loan and lease portfolio, including unfunded credit commitments. The allowance considers expected losses for the remaining lives of the applicable assets, inclusive of expected recoveries. The allowance for credit losses is increased through provisions charged to earnings and reduced by net charge-offs. Management evaluates the appropriateness of the allowance for credit losses on a quarterly basis. Multiple economic scenarios are considered over a three-year reasonable and supportable forecast period, which includes increasing consideration of historical loss experience over years two and three. These economic scenarios are constructed with interrelated projections of multiple economic variables, and loss estimates are produced that consider the historical correlation of those economic variables with credit losses. After the forecast period, the Company fully reverts to long-term historical loss experience, adjusted for prepayments and characteristics of the current loan and lease portfolio, to estimate losses over the remaining life of the portfolio. The economic scenarios are updated at least quarterly and are designed to provide a range of reasonable estimates, which are both better and worse than current expectations. Scenarios are weighted based on the Company’s expectation of economic conditions for the foreseeable future and reflect significant judgment and consider uncertainties that exist. Final loss estimates also consider factors affecting credit losses not reflected in the scenarios, due to the unique aspects of current conditions and expectations. These factors may include, but are not limited to, loan servicing practices, regulatory guidance, and/or fiscal and monetary policy actions. Because business processes and credit risks associated with unfunded credit commitments are essentially the same as for loans, the Company utilizes similar processes to estimate its liability for unfunded credit commitments, which is included in other liabilities in the Consolidated Balance Sheet. Both the allowance for loan losses and the liability for unfunded credit commitments are included in the Company’s analysis of credit losses and reported reserve ratios.
The allowance recorded for credit losses utilizes forward-looking expected loss models to consider a variety of factors affecting lifetime credit losses. These factors include, but are not limited to, macroeconomic variables such as unemployment rates, real estate prices, gross domestic product levels, corporate bonds spreads and long-term interest rate forecasts, as well as loan and borrower characteristics, such as internal risk ratings on commercial loans and consumer credit scores, delinquency status, collateral type and available valuation information, consideration of
end-of-term
losses on lease residuals, and the remaining term of the loan, adjusted for expected prepayments. For each loan portfolio, model estimates are adjusted as necessary to consider any relevant changes in portfolio composition, lending policies, underwriting standards, risk management practices, economic conditions or other factors that may affect the accuracy of the model. Expected credit loss estimates also include consideration of expected cash recoveries on loans previously
charged-off
or expected recoveries on collateral-dependent loans where recovery is expected through sale of the collateral. Where loans do not exhibit similar risk characteristics, an individual analysis is performed to consider expected credit losses.
The allowance recorded for individually evaluated loans greater than $5 million in the commercial lending segment is based on an analysis utilizing expected cash
 
U.S. Bancorp 
17

flows discounted using the original effective interest rate, the observable market price of the loan, or the fair value of the collateral, less selling costs, for collateral-dependent loans as appropriate. For commercial TDRs individually evaluated for impairment, attributes of the borrower are the primary factors in determining the allowance for credit losses. However, historical loss experience is also incorporated into the allowance methodology applied to this category of loans. Commercial lending segment TDR loans may be collectively evaluated for impairment where observed performance history, including defaults, is a primary driver of the loss allocation.
The allowance recorded for TDR loans in the consumer lending segment is determined on a homogenous pool basis utilizing expected cash flows discounted using the original effective interest rate of the pool. The expected cash flows on TDR loans consider subsequent payment defaults since modification, the borrower’s ability to pay under the restructured terms, and the timing and amount of payments. The allowance for collateral-dependent loans in the consumer lending segment is determined based on the current fair value of the collateral less costs to sell.
When evaluating the appropriateness of the allowance for credit losses for any loans and lines in a junior lien position, the Company considers the delinquency and modification status of the first lien. At March 31, 2021, the Company serviced the first lien on 38 percent of the home equity loans and lines in a junior lien position. The Company also considers the status of first lien mortgage accounts reported on customer credit bureau files when the first lien is not serviced by the Company. Regardless of whether the Company services the first lien, an assessment is made of economic conditions, problem loans, recent loss experience and other factors in determining the allowance for credit losses. Based on the available information, the Company estimated $243 million or 2.1 percent of its total home equity portfolio at March 31, 2021, represented
non-delinquent
junior liens where the first lien was delinquent or modified, excluding loans in COVID-related forbearance programs.
The Company considers historical loss experience on the loans and lines in a junior lien position to establish loss estimates for junior lien loans and lines the Company services that are current, but the first lien is delinquent or modified. The historical long-term average loss experience related to junior liens has been relatively limited (less than 1 percent of the total portfolio annually), and estimates are adjusted to consider current collateral support and portfolio risk characteristics. These include updated credit scores and collateral estimates obtained on the Company’s home equity portfolio each quarter. In its evaluation of the allowance for credit losses, the Company also considers the increased risk of loss associated with home equity lines that are contractually scheduled to convert from a revolving status to a fully amortizing payment.
Beginning January 1, 2020, when a loan portfolio is purchased, the acquired loans are divided into those considered purchased with more than insignificant credit deterioration (“PCD”) and those not considered purchased with more than insignificant credit deterioration. An allowance is established for each population and considers product mix, risk characteristics of the portfolio, bankruptcy experience, delinquency status and refreshed LTV ratios when possible. The allowance established for purchased loans not considered PCD is recognized through provision expense upon acquisition, whereas the allowance established for loans considered PCD at acquisition is offset by an increase in the basis of the acquired loans. Any subsequent increases and decreases in the allowance related to purchased loans, regardless of PCD status, are recognized through provision expense, with charge-offs charged to the allowance. The Company did not have a material amount of PCD loans included in its loan portfolio at March 31, 2021.
The Company’s methodology for determining the appropriate allowance for credit losses also considers the imprecision inherent in the methodologies used and allocated to the various loan portfolios. As a result, amounts determined under the methodologies described above are adjusted by management to consider the potential impact of other qualitative factors not captured in quantitative model adjustments which include, but are not limited to, the following: model imprecision, imprecision in economic scenario assumptions, and emerging risks related to either changes in the economic environment that are affecting specific portfolios, or changes in portfolio concentrations over time that may affect model performance. The consideration of these items results in adjustments to allowance amounts included in the Company’s allowance for credit losses for each loan portfolio.
Although the Company determined the amount of each element of the allowance separately and considers this process to be an important credit management tool, the entire allowance for credit losses is available for the entire loan portfolio. The actual amount of losses can vary significantly from the estimated amounts.
At March 31, 2021, the allowance for credit losses was $7.0 billion (2.36 percent of
period-end
loans), compared with an allowance of $8.0 billion (2.69 percent of
period-end
loans) at December 31, 2020. The ratio of the allowance for credit losses to nonperforming loans was 617 percent at March 31, 2021, compared with 654 percent at December 31, 2020. The ratio of the allowance for credit losses to annualized loan net charge-offs was 770 percent at March 31, 2021, compared with 448 percent of full year 2020 net charge-offs at December 31, 2020.
 
18
 U.S. Bancorp

The decrease in the allowance for credit losses of $1.1 billion (13.1 percent) at March 31, 2021, compared with December 31, 2020, reflected factors affecting economic conditions during the first quarter of 2021, including the enactment of additional benefits from government stimulus programs, vaccine availability in the United States and reduced levels of new
COVID-19
cases. In addition to these factors, expected loss estimates consider various factors including customer specific information impacting changes in risk ratings, projected delinquencies and the impact of industry-wide loan modification efforts designed to limit long-term effects of the
COVID-19
pandemic, among other factors. Currently, consumer credit trends continue to perform better than expected, although select commercial portfolios most impacted by COVID-19 continue to be monitored for structural shifts associated with the pandemic.
Changes in economic conditions during the first quarter of 2021 included improvements in projected gross domestic product and unemployment levels for 2021, which reflected the additional government stimulus and availability of vaccines. These factors are evaluated through a combination of quantitative calculations using economic scenarios and qualitative assessments that consider the high degree of uncertainty related to the unprecedented levels of both economic stress and the stimulus response.
The following table summarizes the baseline forecast for key economic variables the Company used in its estimate of the allowance for credit losses at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020:
 
   March 31,
2021
  December 31,
2020
 
United States unemployment rate for the three months ending (a)
  
March 31, 2021
  6.3  6.9
June 30, 2021
  6.0   7.1 
December 31, 2021
  5.0   6.8 
United States real gross domestic product for the three months ending (b)
  
March 31, 2021
  (1.3)%   (2.1)% 
June 30, 2021
  .2   (1.1
December 31, 2021
  3.7   1.5 
 
(a)
Reflects quarterly average of forecasted reported United States unemployment rate.
(b)
Reflects cumulative change from December 31, 2019.
Baseline economic forecasts are used in combination with alternative scenarios and historical loss experience as is considered reasonable and supportable to inform the Company’s allowance for credit losses. Changes in the allowance for credit losses are based on a variety of factors, including loan balance changes, portfolio credit quality and mix changes, and changes in general economic conditions and expectations (including for unemployment and gross domestic product), among other factors. Based on economic conditions at March 31, 2021, it was difficult to estimate the length and severity of the economic downturn that may result from
COVID-19
and the impact of other factors that may influence the level of eventual losses and corresponding requirements for the allowance for credit losses, including the impact of economic stimulus programs and customer accommodation activity. While reserves consider the uncertainty in these estimates, the unpredictability of the
COVID-19
pandemic could result in the recognition of credit losses in the Company’s loan portfolios and increases in the allowance for credit losses. Scenarios worse than the Company’s expected outcome at March 31, 2021 include risks that government stimulus in response to the
COVID-19
pandemic is less effective than expected, or that a longer or more severe health crisis prolongs the downturn in economic activity, potentially reducing the number of businesses that are ultimately able to resume operations after the crisis has passed. Other factors considered include the potential of rising interest rates and unsupported increases in the values of certain assets.
The allowance for credit losses related to commercial lending segment loans decreased $503 million during the first quarter of 2021, as improvements in general economic conditions and portfolio credit quality offset the impact of
COVID-19
on certain industry sectors, including the retail and restaurants, energy, media and entertainment, lodging and airline industries that have been severely impacted by virus containment measures.
The following table summarizes the Company’s commercial lending segment credit exposure to customers within the industry sectors most impacted by
COVID-19,
as a percentage of total loans and legal commitments outstanding at March 31, 2021:
 
   Loans  Outstanding
Commitments
 
Retail
  3.6  5.0
Energy (includes Oil and gas)
  .9   2.2 
Media and entertainment
  1.9   2.2 
Lodging
  1.2   .9 
Airline
  .3   .5 
The allowance for credit losses related to consumer lending segment loans decreased $547 million during the first quarter of 2021, due to improving economic risks, including those due to decreased unemployment, along with continued strong underlying credit quality that supports expectations of long-term repayment.
 
U.S. Bancorp 
19

 
Table 8
 
   Summary of Allowance for Credit Losses
 
  Three Months Ended
March 31
 
(Dollars in Millions) 2021  2020 
Balance at beginning of period
 $8,010  $4,491 
Change in accounting principle (a)
     1,499 
Charge-Offs
  
Commercial
  
Commercial
  80   81 
Lease financing
  6   7 
Total commercial
  86   88 
Commercial real estate
  
Commercial mortgages
  5    
Construction and development
  5    
Total commercial real estate
  10    
Residential mortgages
  5   8 
Credit card
  190   274 
Other retail
  
Retail leasing
  11   25 
Home equity and second mortgages
  4   5 
Other
  68   91 
Total other retail
  83   121 
Total charge-offs
  374   491 
Recoveries
  
Commercial
  
Commercial
  28   12 
Lease financing
  2   2 
Total commercial
  30   14 
Commercial real estate
  
Commercial mortgages
  17   1 
Construction and development
     1 
Total commercial real estate
  17   2 
Residential mortgages
  10   7 
Credit card
  46   40 
Other retail
  
Retail leasing
  10   6 
Home equity and second mortgages
  6   4 
Other
  32   25 
Total other retail
  48   35 
Total recoveries
  151   98 
Net Charge-Offs
  
Commercial
  
Commercial
  52   69 
Lease financing
  4   5 
Total commercial
  56   74 
Commercial real estate
  
Commercial mortgages
  (12  (1
Construction and development
  5   (1
Total commercial real estate
  (7  (2
Residential mortgages
  (5  1 
Credit card
  144   234 
Other retail
  
Retail leasing
  1   19 
Home equity and second mortgages
  (2  1 
Other
  36   66 
Total other retail
  35   86 
Total net charge-offs
  223   393 
Provision for credit losses
  (827  993 
Balance at end of period
 $6,960  $6,590 
Components
  
Allowance for loan losses
 $6,343  $6,216 
Liability for unfunded credit commitments
  617   374 
Total allowance for credit losses
 $6,960  $6,590 
Allowance for Credit Losses as a Percentage of
  
Period-end
loans
  2.36  2.07
Nonperforming loans
  617   809 
Nonperforming and accruing loans 90 days or more past due
  434   473 
Nonperforming assets
  579   697 
Annualized net charge-offs
  770   417 
 
(a)
Effective January 1, 2020, the Company adopted accounting guidance which changed impairment recognition of financial instruments to a model that is based on expected losses rather than incurred losses.
 
20
 U.S. Bancorp

Residual Value Risk Management
 The Company manages its risk to changes in the residual value of leased vehicles, office and business equipment, and other assets through disciplined residual valuation setting at the inception of a lease, diversification of its leased assets, regular residual asset valuation reviews and monitoring of residual value gains or losses upon the disposition of assets. As of March 31, 2021, no significant change in the amount of residual values or concentration of the portfolios had occurred since December 31, 2020. Refer to “Management’s Discussion and Analysis — Residual Value Risk Management” in the Company’s Annual Report on
Form 10-K
for the year ended December 31, 2020, for further discussion on residual value risk management.
Operational Risk Management
 The Company operates in many different businesses in diverse markets and relies on the ability of its employees and systems to process a high number of transactions. Operational risk is inherent in all business activities, and the management of this risk is important to the achievement of the Company’s objectives. Business lines have direct and primary responsibility and accountability for identifying, controlling, and monitoring operational risks embedded in their business activities, including those additional or increased risks created by the economic and financial disruptions, and the Company’s alternative working arrangements resulting from the
COVID-19
pandemic. The Company maintains a system of controls with the objective of providing proper transaction authorization and execution, proper system operations, proper oversight of third parties with whom it does business, safeguarding of assets from misuse or theft, and ensuring the reliability and security of financial and other data. Refer to “Management’s Discussion and Analysis — Operational Risk Management” in the Company’s Annual Report on
Form 10-K
for the year ended December 31, 2020, for further discussion on operational risk management.
Compliance Risk Management
 The Company may suffer legal or regulatory sanctions, material financial loss, or damage to its reputation through failure to comply with laws, regulations, rules, standards of good practice, and codes of conduct, including those related to compliance with Bank Secrecy Act/anti-money laundering requirements, sanctions compliance requirements as administered by the Office of Foreign Assets Control, consumer protection and other requirements. The Company has controls and processes in place for the assessment, identification, monitoring, management and reporting of compliance risks and issues including those created or increased by the economic and financial disruptions caused by the
COVID-19
pandemic. Refer to “Management’s Discussion and Analysis — Compliance Risk Management” in the Company’s Annual Report on
Form 10-K
for the year ended December 31, 2020, for further discussion on compliance risk management.
Interest Rate Risk Management
In the banking industry, changes in interest rates are a significant risk that can impact earnings and the safety and soundness of an entity. The Company manages its exposure to changes in interest rates through asset and liability management activities within guidelines established by its Asset Liability Management Committee (“ALCO”) and approved by the Board of Directors. The ALCO has the responsibility for approving and ensuring compliance with the ALCO management policies, including interest rate risk exposure. One way the Company measures and analyzes its interest rate risk is through net interest income simulation analysis.
Simulation analysis incorporates substantially all of the Company’s assets and liabilities and
off-balance
sheet instruments, together with forecasted changes in the balance sheet and assumptions that reflect the current interest rate environment. Through this simulation, management estimates the impact on net interest income of various interest rate changes that differ in the direction, amount and speed of change over time, as well as the shape of the yield curve. This simulation includes assumptions about how the balance sheet is likely to be affected by changes in loan and deposit growth. Assumptions are made to project interest rates for new loans and deposits based on historical analysis, management’s outlook and
re-pricing
strategies. These assumptions are reviewed and validated on a periodic basis with sensitivity analysis being provided for key variables of the simulation. The results are reviewed monthly by the ALCO and are used to guide asset/liability management strategies.
The Company manages its interest rate risk position by holding assets with desired interest rate risk characteristics on its balance sheet, implementing certain pricing strategies for loans and deposits and selecting derivatives and various funding and investment portfolio strategies.
Table 9 summarizes the projected impact to net interest income over the next 12 months of various potential interest rate changes. The sensitivity of the projected impact to net interest income over the next 12 months is dependent on balance sheet growth, product mix, deposit behavior, pricing and funding decisions. While the Company utilizes models and assumptions based on historical information and expected behaviors, actual outcomes could vary significantly.
 
U.S. Bancorp 
21

 
Table 9
 
   Sensitivity of Net Interest Income
 
  March 31, 2021       December 31, 2020 
   Down 50 bps
Immediate
  Up 50 bps
Immediate
  Down 200 bps
Gradual
   Up 200 bps
Gradual
       Down 50 bps
Immediate
  Up 50 bps
Immediate
  Down 200 bps
Gradual
   Up 200 bps
Gradual
 
Net interest income
  (3.02)%   2.57  *    3.23       (4.48)%   4.58  *    6.57
*
Given the level of interest rates, downward rate scenario is not computed.
 
Use of Derivatives to Manage Interest Rate and Other Risks
 To manage the sensitivity of earnings and capital to interest rate, prepayment, credit, price and foreign currency fluctuations (asset and liability management positions), the Company enters into derivative transactions. The Company uses derivatives for asset and liability management purposes primarily in the following ways:
 
To convert fixed-rate debt and available-for-sale investment securities from fixed-rate payments to floating-rate payments;
 
To convert floating-rate debt from floating-rate payments to fixed-rate payments;
 
To mitigate changes in value of the Company’s unfunded mortgage loan commitments, funded MLHFS and MSRs;
 
To mitigate remeasurement volatility of foreign currency denominated balances; and
 
To mitigate the volatility of the Company’s net investment in foreign operations driven by fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates.
In addition, the Company enters into interest rate and foreign exchange derivative contracts to support the business requirements of its customers (customer-related positions). The Company minimizes the market and liquidity risks of customer-related positions by either entering into similar offsetting positions with broker-dealers, or on a portfolio basis by entering into other derivative or
non-derivative
financial instruments that partially or fully offset the exposure from these customer-related positions. The Company may enter into derivative contracts that are either exchange-traded, centrally cleared through clearinghouses or
over-the-counter.
The Company does not utilize derivatives for speculative purposes.
The Company does not designate all of the derivatives that it enters into for risk management purposes as accounting hedges because of the inefficiency of applying the accounting requirements and may instead elect fair value accounting for the related hedged items. In particular, the Company enters into interest rate swaps, swaptions, forward commitments to buy
to-be-announced
securities (“TBAs”), U.S. Treasury and Eurodollar futures and options on U.S. Treasury futures to mitigate fluctuations in the value of its MSRs, but does not designate those derivatives as accounting hedges.
Additionally, the Company uses forward commitments to sell TBAs and other commitments to sell residential mortgage loans at specified prices to economically hedge the interest rate risk in its residential mortgage loan production activities. At March 31, 2021, the Company had $13.7 billion of forward commitments to sell, hedging $7.7 billion of MLHFS and $8.7 billion of unfunded mortgage loan commitments. The forward commitments to sell and the unfunded mortgage loan commitments on loans intended to be sold are considered derivatives under the accounting guidance related to accounting for derivative instruments and hedging activities. The Company has elected the fair value option for the MLHFS.
Derivatives are subject to credit risk associated with counterparties to the contracts. Credit risk associated with derivatives is measured by the Company based on the probability of counterparty default, including consideration of the
COVID-19
pandemic. The Company manages the credit risk of its derivative positions by diversifying its positions among various counterparties, by entering into master netting arrangements, and, where possible, by requiring collateral arrangements. The Company may also transfer counterparty credit risk related to interest rate swaps to third parties through the use of risk participation agreements. In addition, certain interest rate swaps, interest rate forwards and credit contracts are required to be centrally cleared through clearinghouses to further mitigate counterparty credit risk.
For additional information on derivatives and hedging activities, refer to Notes 12 and 13 in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
LIBOR Transition
 In July 2017, the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority announced that it would no longer require banks to submit rates for the London InterBank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) after 2021. In 2020, the Intercontinental Exchange Benchmark Administration, which is the administrator of LIBOR, proposed to cease the publication of all
non-United
States Dollar LIBOR rates and one week and two month United States Dollar LIBOR rates on December 31, 2021, but extend the publication of the remainder of United States Dollar LIBOR rates until June 30, 2023. The Company holds financial instruments that will be impacted by the discontinuance of LIBOR, including certain loans,
 
22
 U.S. Bancorp

investment securities, derivatives, borrowings and other financial instruments that use LIBOR as the benchmark rate. The Company also provides various services to customers in its capacity as trustee, which involve financial instruments that will be similarly impacted by the discontinuance of LIBOR. The Company anticipates these financial instruments will require transition to a new reference rate. This transition will occur over time as many of these arrangements do not have an alternative rate referenced in their contracts or a clear path for the parties to agree upon an alternative reference rate. In order to facilitate the transition process, the Company has instituted a LIBOR Transition Office and commenced an enterprise-wide project to identify, assess and monitor risks associated with the expected discontinuance or unavailability of LIBOR, actively engage with industry working groups and regulators, achieve operational readiness and engage impacted customers. Starting in 2020, the Company began modifying its systems, models, procedures and internal infrastructure to be prepared to accept alternative reference rates. The Company also adopted industry best practice guidelines for fallback language for new transactions, converted its cleared interest rate swaps discounting to Secured Overnight Financing Rate discounting, and distributed communications to certain impacted parties, both inside and outside the Company, on the transition. Refer to “Risk Factors” in the Company’s Annual Report on Form
10-K
for the year ended December 31, 2020, for further discussion on potential risks that could adversely affect the Company’s financial results as a result of the LIBOR transition.
 
Market Risk Management
 In addition to interest rate risk, the Company is exposed to other forms of market risk, principally related to trading activities which support customers’ strategies to manage their own foreign currency, interest rate risk and funding activities. For purposes of its internal capital adequacy assessment process, the Company considers risk arising from its trading activities, as well as the remeasurement volatility of foreign currency denominated balances included on its Consolidated Balance Sheet (collectively, “Covered Positions”), employing methodologies consistent with the requirements of regulatory rules for market risk. The Company’s Market Risk Committee (“MRC”), within the framework of the ALCO, oversees market risk management. The MRC monitors and reviews the Company’s Covered Positions and establishes policies for market risk management, including exposure limits for each portfolio. The Company uses a VaR approach to measure general market risk. Theoretically, VaR represents the statistical risk of loss the Company has to adverse market movements over a
one-day
time horizon. The Company uses the Historical Simulation method to calculate VaR for its Covered Positions measured at the ninety-ninth percentile using a
one-year
look-back period for distributions derived from past market data. The market factors used in the calculations include those pertinent to market risks inherent in the underlying trading portfolios, principally those that affect the Company’s corporate bond trading business, foreign currency transaction business, client derivatives business, loan trading business and municipal securities business, as well as those inherent in the Company’s foreign denominated balances and the derivatives used to mitigate the related measurement volatility. On average, the Company expects the
one-day
VaR to be exceeded by actual losses two to three times per year related to these positions. The Company monitors the accuracy of internal VaR models and modeling processes by back-testing model performance, regularly updating the historical data used by the VaR models and regular model validations to assess the accuracy of the models’ input, processing, and reporting components. All models are required to be independently reviewed and approved prior to being placed in use. If the Company were to experience market losses in excess of the estimated VaR more often than expected, the VaR models and associated assumptions would be analyzed and adjusted.
The average, high, low and
period-end
one-day
VaR amounts for the Company’s Covered Positions were as follows:
 
Three Months Ended March 31
(Dollars in Millions)
 2021   2020 
Average
 $3   $2 
High
  4    3 
Low
  1    1 
Period-end
  2    3 
The Company did not experience any actual losses for its combined Covered Positions that exceeded VaR during the three months ended March 31, 2021. Given the market volatility in the first quarter of 2020 resulting from effects of the
COVID-19
pandemic, the Company experienced actual losses for its combined Covered Positions that exceeded VaR five times during the three months ended March 31, 2020. The Company stress tests its market risk measurements to provide management with perspectives on market events that may not be captured by its VaR models, including worst case historical market movement combinations that have not necessarily occurred on the same date.
The Company calculates Stressed VaR using the same underlying methodology and model as VaR, except that a historical continuous
one-year
look-back period is utilized that reflects a period of significant financial stress
 
U.S. Bancorp 
23

appropriate to the Company’s Covered Positions. The period selected by the Company includes the significant market volatility of the last four months of 2008.
The average, high, low and
period-end
one-day
Stressed VaR amounts for the Company’s Covered Positions were as follows:
 
Three Months Ended March 31
(Dollars in Millions)
 2021   2020 
Average
 $7   $6 
High
  9    7 
Low
  5    4 
Period-end
  9    7 
 
Valuations of positions in client derivatives and foreign currency activities are based on discounted cash flow or other valuation techniques using market-based assumptions. These valuations are compared to third party quotes or other market prices to determine if there are significant variances. Significant variances are approved by senior management in the Company’s corporate functions. Valuation of positions in the corporate bond trading, loan trading and municipal securities businesses are based on trader marks. These trader marks are evaluated against third-party prices, with significant variances approved by senior management in the Company’s corporate functions.
The Company also measures the market risk of its hedging activities related to residential MLHFS and MSRs using the Historical Simulation method. The VaRs are measured at the ninety-ninth percentile and employ factors pertinent to the market risks inherent in the valuation of the assets and hedges. A
one-year
look-back period is used to obtain past market data for the models.
The average, high and low VaR amounts for the residential MLHFS and related hedges and the MSRs and related hedges were as follows:
 
Three Months Ended March 31
(Dollars in Millions)
 2021   2020 
Residential Mortgage Loans Held For Sale and Related Hedges
   
Average
 $12   $5 
High
  19    12 
Low
  7    2 
Mortgage Servicing Rights and Related Hedges
   
Average
 $5   $13 
High
  11    34 
Low
  2    6 
Liquidity Risk Management
 The Company’s liquidity risk management process is designed to identify, measure, and manage the Company’s funding and liquidity risk to meet its daily funding needs and to address expected and unexpected changes in its funding requirements. The Company engages in various activities to manage its liquidity risk. These activities include diversifying its funding sources, stress testing, and holding readily-marketable assets which can be used as a source of liquidity if needed. In addition, the Company’s profitable operations, sound credit quality and strong capital position have enabled it to develop a large and reliable base of core deposit funding within its market areas and in domestic and global capital markets.
The Company’s Board of Directors approves the Company’s liquidity policy. The Risk Management Committee of the Company’s Board of Directors oversees the Company’s liquidity risk management process and approves a contingency funding plan. The ALCO reviews the Company’s liquidity policy and limits, and regularly assesses the Company’s ability to meet funding requirements arising from adverse company-specific or market events.
The Company regularly projects its funding needs under various stress scenarios and maintains a contingency funding plan consistent with the Company’s access to diversified sources of contingent funding. The Company maintains a substantial level of total available liquidity in the form of
on-balance
sheet and
off-balance
sheet funding sources. These liquidity sources include cash at the Federal Reserve Bank and certain European central banks, unencumbered liquid assets, and capacity to borrow from the FHLB and at Federal Reserve Bank’s Discount Window. At March 31, 2021, the fair value of unencumbered investment securities totaled $116.8 billion, compared with $125.9 billion at December 31, 2020. Refer to Note 3 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements and “Balance Sheet Analysis” for further information on investment securities maturities and trends. Asset liquidity is further enhanced by the Company’s practice of pledging loans to access secured borrowing facilities through the FHLB and Federal Reserve Bank. At March 31, 2021, the Company could have borrowed a total of an additional $94.5 billion from the FHLB and Federal Reserve Bank based on collateral available for additional borrowings.
The Company’s diversified deposit base provides a sizeable source of relatively stable and
low-cost
funding, while reducing the Company’s reliance on the wholesale markets. Total deposits were $433.8 billion at March 31, 2021, compared with $429.8 billion at December 31, 2020. Refer to “Balance Sheet Analysis” for further information on the Company’s deposits.
Additional funding is provided by long-term debt and short-term borrowings. Long-term debt was $37.4 billion at March 31, 2021, and is an important funding source because of its multi-year borrowing structure. Short-term borrowings were $12.1 billion at March 31, 2021, and supplement the Company’s other funding sources. Refer to “Balance Sheet Analysis” for further information on the Company’s long-term debt and short-term borrowings.
 
24
 U.S. Bancorp

In addition to assessing liquidity risk on a consolidated basis, the Company monitors the parent company’s liquidity. The Company establishes limits for the minimal number of months into the future where the parent company can meet existing and forecasted obligations with cash and securities held that can be readily monetized. The Company measures and manages this limit in both normal and adverse conditions. The Company maintains sufficient funding to meet expected capital and debt service obligations for 24 months without the support of dividends from subsidiaries and assuming access to the wholesale markets is maintained. The Company maintains sufficient liquidity to meet its capital and debt service obligations for 12 months under adverse conditions without the support of dividends from subsidiaries or access to the wholesale markets. The parent company is currently well in excess of required liquidity minimums.
At March 31, 2021, parent company long-term debt outstanding was $20.8 billion, compared with $20.9 billion at December 31, 2020. As of March 31, 2021, there was $1.5 billion of parent company debt scheduled to mature in the remainder of 2021.
The Company is subject to a regulatory Liquidity Coverage Ratio (“LCR”) requirement which requires banks to maintain an adequate level of unencumbered high quality liquid assets to meet estimated liquidity needs over a
30-day
stressed period. At March 31, 2021, the Company was compliant with this requirement.
Refer to “Management’s Discussion and Analysis — Liquidity Risk Management” in the Company’s Annual Report on
Form 10-K
for the year ended December 31, 2020, for further discussion on liquidity risk management.
European Exposures
The Company provides merchant processing and corporate trust services in Europe either directly or through banking affiliations in Europe. Revenue generated from sources in Europe represented approximately 2 percent of the Company’s total net revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2021. Operating cash for these businesses is deposited on a short-term basis typically with certain European central banks. For deposits placed at other European banks, exposure is mitigated by the Company placing deposits at multiple banks and managing the amounts on deposit at any bank based on institution-specific deposit limits. At March 31, 2021, the Company had an aggregate amount on deposit with European banks of approximately $12.3 billion, predominately with the Central Bank of Ireland and Bank of England.
In addition, the Company provides financing to domestic multinational corporations that generate revenue from customers in European countries, transacts with various European banks as counterparties to certain derivative-related activities, and through a subsidiary, manages money market funds that hold certain investments in European sovereign debt. Any further deterioration in economic conditions in Europe, including the potential negative impact of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union (“Brexit”), is not expected to have a significant effect on the Company related to these activities. The Company is focused on providing continuity of services, with minimal disruption resulting from Brexit, to customers with activities in European countries. The Company has made certain structural changes to its legal entities and operations in the United Kingdom and European Union, where needed, and migrated certain business activities to the appropriate jurisdictions to continue to provide such services and generate revenue.
Off-Balance
Sheet Arrangements
 Off-balance
sheet arrangements include any contractual arrangements to which an unconsolidated entity is a party, under which the Company has an obligation to provide credit or liquidity enhancements or market risk support. In the ordinary course of business, the Company enters into an array of commitments to extend credit, letters of credit and various forms of guarantees that may be considered
off-balance
sheet arrangements. Refer to Note 15 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further information on these arrangements. The Company does not utilize private label asset securitizations as a source of funding.
Off-balance
sheet arrangements also include any obligation related to a variable interest held in an unconsolidated entity that provides financing, liquidity, credit enhancement or market risk support. Refer to Note 5 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further information related to the Company’s interests in variable interest entities.
Capital Management
 The Company is committed to managing capital to maintain strong protection for depositors and creditors and for maximum shareholder benefit. The Company also manages its capital to exceed regulatory capital requirements for banking organizations. The regulatory capital requirements effective for the Company follow Basel III, with the Company being subject to calculating its capital adequacy as a percentage of risk-weighted assets under the standardized approach. Beginning in 2020, the Company elected to adopt a rule issued in 2020 by its regulators which permits banking organizations who adopt accounting guidance related to the impairment of financial instruments based on the current expected credit losses (“CECL”) methodology during 2020, the
 
U.S. Bancorp 
25

 
Table 10
    Regulatory Capital Ratios
 
(Dollars in Millions)  March 31,
2021
  December 31,
2020
 
Basel III standardized approach:
   
Common equity tier 1 capital
  $39,103  $38,045 
Tier 1 capital
   45,517   44,474 
Total risk-based capital
   53,625   52,602 
Risk-weighted assets
   396,351   393,648 
Common equity tier 1 capital as a percent of risk-weighted assets
   9.9  9.7
Tier 1 capital as a percent of risk-weighted assets
   11.5   11.3 
Total risk-based capital as a percent of risk-weighted assets
   13.5   13.4 
Tier 1 capital as a percent of adjusted quarterly average assets (leverage ratio)
   8.4   8.3 
Tier 1 capital as a percent of total
on-
and
off-balance
sheet leverage exposure (total leverage exposure ratio)
   7.4   7.3 
 
option to defer the impact of the effect of that guidance at adoption plus 25 percent of its quarterly credit reserve increases over the next two years on its regulatory capital requirements, followed by a three-year transition period to phase in the cumulative deferred impact. Table 10 provides a summary of statutory regulatory capital ratios in effect for the Company at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. All regulatory ratios exceeded regulatory “well-capitalized” requirements.
The Company believes certain other capital ratios are useful in evaluating its capital adequacy. The Company’s tangible common equity, as a percent of tangible assets and as a percent of risk-weighted assets determined in accordance with transitional regulatory capital requirements related to the CECL methodology under the standardized approach, was 6.6 percent and 9.1 percent, respectively, at March 31, 2021, compared with 6.9 percent and 9.5 percent, respectively, at December 31, 2020. In addition, the Company’s common equity tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets ratio, reflecting the full implementation of the CECL methodology was 9.5 percent at March 31, 2021, compared with 9.3 percent at December 31, 2020. Refer to
“Non-GAAP
Financial Measures” beginning on page 30 for further information on these other capital ratios.
Total U.S. Bancorp shareholders’ equity was $51.7 billion at March 31, 2021, compared with $53.1 billion at December 31, 2020. The decrease was primarily the result of changes in unrealized gains and losses on
available-for-sale
investment securities included in other comprehensive income (loss), dividends and common share repurchases, partially offset by corporate earnings.
Beginning in March of 2020 and continuing through the remainder of 2020, the Company suspended all common stock repurchases except for those done exclusively in connection with its stock-based compensation programs. This action was initially taken to maintain strong capital levels given the impact and uncertainties of
COVID-19
on the economy and global markets. Due to continued economic uncertainty, the Federal Reserve Board implemented measures beginning in the fourth quarter of 2020 and extending through 2021, restricting capital distributions of all large bank holding companies, including the Company. These restrictions limit the aggregate amount of common stock dividends and share repurchases to an amount that does not exceed the average net income of the four preceding calendar quarters. Based on the results of the December 2020 Federal Reserve Board Stress Test, the Company announced on December 22, 2020 that its Board of Directors had approved an authorization to repurchase up to $3.0 billion of its common stock beginning January 1, 2021.
The following table provides a detailed analysis of all shares purchased by the Company or any affiliated purchaser during the first quarter of 2021:
 
Period Total Number
of Shares
Purchased
  Average
Price Paid
Per Share
  Total Number of
Shares Purchased
as Part of Publicly
Announced
Program (a)
  Approximate Dollar
Value of Shares
that May Yet Be
Purchased Under
the Program
(In Millions)
 
January
  5,559,648(b)  $44.91   5,194,648  $2,767 
February
  5,343,085   49.37   5,343,085   2,503 
March
  2,838,065   54.13   2,838,065   2,350 
Total
  13,740,798(b)  $48.55   13,375,798  $2,350 
 
(a)
All shares were purchased under the $3.0 billion common stock repurchase authorization program announced December 22, 2020.
(b)
Includes 365,000 shares of common stock purchased, at an average price per share of $45.52, in open-market transactions by U.S. Bank National Association, the Company’s banking subsidiary, in its capacity as trustee of the U.S. Bank 401(k) Savings Plan, which is the Company’s employee retirement savings plan.
The Company will continue to monitor the economic environment and will adjust its capital distributions as circumstances warrant. Additional capital distributions are subject to the approval of the Company’s Board of Directors, and will be consistent with regulatory requirements.
Refer to “Management’s Discussion and Analysis — Capital Management” in the Company’s Annual Report on
Form 10-K
for the year ended December 31, 2020, for further discussion on capital management.
 
26
 U.S. Bancorp

LINE OF BUSINESS FINANCIAL REVIEW
The Company’s major lines of business are Corporate and Commercial Banking, Consumer and Business Banking, Wealth Management and Investment Services, Payment Services, and Treasury and Corporate Support. These operating segments are components of the Company about which financial information is prepared and is evaluated regularly by management in deciding how to allocate resources and assess performance.
Basis for Financial Presentation
 Business line results are derived from the Company’s business unit profitability reporting systems by specifically attributing managed balance sheet assets, deposits and other liabilities and their related income or expense. Refer to Note 16 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further information on the business lines’ basis for financial presentation.
Designations, assignments and allocations change from time to time as management systems are enhanced, methods of evaluating performance or product lines change or business segments are realigned to better respond to the Company’s diverse customer base. During 2021, certain organization and methodology changes were made and, accordingly, 2020 results were restated and presented on a comparable basis.
Corporate and Commercial Banking
Corporate and Commercial Banking offers lending, equipment finance and small-ticket leasing, depository services, treasury management, capital markets services, international trade services and other financial services to middle market, large corporate, commercial real estate, financial institution,
non-profit
and public sector clients. Corporate and Commercial Banking contributed $419 million of the Company’s net income in the first quarter of 2021, or an increase of $278 million compared with the first quarter of 2020.
Net revenue decreased $130 million (12.3 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020. Net interest income, on a taxable-equivalent basis, decreased $118 million (15.1 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020. The decrease was primarily due to the impact of declining interest rates on the margin benefit from deposits and lower loan balances, partially offset by favorable deposit mix with higher noninterest-bearing deposit balances and higher loan fees. Noninterest income decreased $12 million (4.4 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, primarily driven by lower capital markets activities, including trading revenue, and lower commercial leasing fees, partially offset by higher
non-yield
loan fees on unused commitments.
Noninterest expense decreased $37 million (8.4 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to lower net shared services expense and production incentives as well as lower marketing and business development expense driven by a reduction in travel as a result of
COVID-19.
The provision for credit losses decreased $464 million in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to a favorable change in the reserve allocation driven by improving credit risk ratings.
Consumer and Business Banking
 Consumer and Business Banking delivers products and services through banking offices, telephone servicing and sales,
on-line
services, direct mail, ATM processing and mobile devices. It encompasses community banking, metropolitan banking and indirect lending, as well as mortgage banking. Consumer and Business Banking contributed $671 million of the Company’s net income in the first quarter of 2021, or an increase of $52 million (8.4 percent), compared with the first quarter of 2020.
Net revenue decreased $46 million (2.0 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020. Net interest income, on a taxable-equivalent basis, increased $94 million (6.1 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, reflecting continued strong growth in deposit balances and loan growth, driven by mortgage and indirect lending as well as by loans made under the SBA’s Paycheck Protection Program and GNMA buybacks. The increase in net interest income also reflected higher loan fees and favorable loan spreads, partially offset by the impact of declining interest rates on deposit spreads. Noninterest income decreased $140 million (18.5 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to lower mortgage banking revenue reflecting a reduction in the fair value of MSRs, net of hedging activities, partially offset by higher production volume and related gain on sale margins compared with the prior year as well as lower deposit service charges.
Noninterest expense increased $51 million (3.8 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to an increase in net shared services expense due to investments in digital capabilities and higher variable compensation related to mortgage banking origination activities. The provision for credit losses decreased $167 million in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, due to a favorable change in the reserve allocation primarily reflecting lower delinquency rates in consumer portfolios and a reduction in end of period outstanding loan balances in the first quarter of 2021 compared with loan growth in the first quarter of 2020.
 
U.S. Bancorp 
27

 Table 11
    Line of Business Financial Performance
 
  
Corporate and
Commercial Banking
       
Consumer and
Business Banking
    
Three Month Ended March 31
(Dollars in Millions)
 2021  2020   Percent
Change
       2021  2020   Percent
Change
    
Condensed Income Statement
             
Net interest income (taxable-equivalent basis)
 $666  $784    (15.1)%     $1,625  $1,531    6.1  
Noninterest income
  259   271    (4.4     617   757    (18.5  
Total net revenue
  925   1,055    (12.3     2,242   2,288    (2.0  
Noninterest expense
  406   443    (8.4     1,388   1,336    3.9   
Other intangibles
               3   4    (25.0  
Total noninterest expense
  406   443    (8.4     1,391   1,340    3.8   
Income (loss) before provision and income taxes
  519   612    (15.2     851   948    (10.2  
Provision for credit losses
  (40  424    *      (44  123    *   
Income (loss) before income taxes
  559   188    *      895   825    8.5   
Income taxes and taxable-equivalent adjustment
  140   47    *      224   206    8.7   
Net income (loss)
  419   141    *      671   619    8.4   
Net (income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interests
                         
Net income (loss) attributable to U.S. Bancorp
 $419  $141    *     $671  $619    8.4   
Average Balance Sheet
             
Commercial
 $74,055  $82,167    (9.9)%     $13,378  $8,860    51.0  
Commercial real estate
  20,808   21,190    (1.8     15,151   16,305    (7.1  
Residential mortgages
  2   3    (33.3     70,085   66,634    5.2   
Credit card
                         
Other retail
  7   8    (12.5     54,563   54,919    (.6  
Total loans
  94,872   103,368    (8.2     153,177   146,718    4.4   
Goodwill
  1,647   1,647          3,475   3,574    (2.8  
Other intangible assets
  5   7    (28.6     2,491   2,411    3.3   
Assets
  107,022   115,308    (7.2     175,541   161,886    8.4   
Noninterest-bearing deposits
  51,020   29,370    73.7      39,186   27,866    40.6   
Interest checking
  13,024   14,064    (7.4     69,785   53,017    31.6   
Savings products
  46,112   48,207    (4.3     80,220   64,189    25.0   
Time deposits
  8,614   18,386    (53.1     16,871   16,512    2.2   
Total deposits
  118,770   110,027    7.9      206,062   161,584    27.5   
Total U.S. Bancorp shareholders’ equity
  13,074   14,182    (7.8       13,453   13,422    .2   
 
*
Not meaningful
 
Wealth Management and Investment Services
 Wealth Management and Investment Services provides private banking, financial advisory services, investment management, retail brokerage services, insurance, trust, custody and fund servicing through four businesses: Wealth Management, Global Corporate Trust & Custody, U.S. Bancorp Asset Management and Fund Services. Wealth Management and Investment Services contributed $171 million of the Company’s net income in the first quarter of 2021, or a decrease of $35 million (17.0 percent) compared with the first quarter of 2020.
Net revenue decreased $54 million (7.2 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020. Net interest income, on a taxable-equivalent basis, decreased $80 million (28.2 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to the declining margin benefit from deposits given lower interest rates, partially offset by higher noninterest-bearing deposit balances and favorable deposit mix. Noninterest income increased $26 million (5.6 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to the impact of core business growth on trust and investment management fees and favorable market conditions, partially offset by higher fee waivers related to money market funds.
Noninterest expense increased $9 million (2.0 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, reflecting increased other noninterest expense and higher salary expense due to merit increases in the first quarter of 2021. The provision for credit losses decreased $16 million (69.6 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, reflecting a favorable change in the reserve allocation primarily driven by stable credit quality relative to credit quality deterioration in the first quarter of 2020.
Payment Services
 Payment Services includes consumer and business credit cards, stored-value cards, debit cards, corporate, government and purchasing card services, consumer lines of credit and merchant processing. Payment Services contributed $479 million of the Company’s net income in the first quarter of 2021, or an increase of $176 million (58.1 percent) compared with the first quarter of 2020.
Net revenue decreased $42 million (2.9 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter
 
28
 U.S. Bancorp

 
    
 
    
Wealth Management and
Investment Services
   
Payment
Services
   
Treasury and
Corporate Support
   
Consolidated
Company
 
    2021  2020   Percent
Change
   2021  2020   Percent
Change
   2021  2020  Percent
Change
   2021  2020  Percent
Change
 
                    
 $204  $284    (28.2)%   $628  $661    (5.0)%   $(34)  $(13  *  $3,089  $3,247   (4.9)% 
     492   466    5.6    785   794    (1.1   228   237   (3.8   2,381   2,525   (5.7
  696   750    (7.2   1,413   1,455    (2.9   194   224   (13.4   5,470   5,772   (5.2
  459   449    2.2    782   754    3.7    306   292   4.8    3,341   3,274   2.0 
     2   3    (33.3   33   35    (5.7             38   42   (9.5
     461   452    2.0    815   789    3.3    306   292   4.8    3,379   3,316   1.9 
  235   298    (21.1   598   666    (10.2   (112  (68  (64.7   2,091   2,456   (14.9
     7   23    (69.6   (41  262    *    (709  161   *    (827  993   * 
  228   275    (17.1   639   404    58.2    597   (229  *    2,918   1,463   99.5 
     57   69    (17.4   160   101    58.4    52   (139  *    633   284   * 
  171   206    (17.0   479   303    58.1    545   (90  *    2,285   1,179   93.8 
                           (5  (8  37.5    (5  (8  37.5 
    $171  $206    (17.0  $479  $303    58.1   $540  $(98  *   $2,280  $1,171   94.7 
                    
 $4,838  $4,189    15.5  $8,266  $9,543    (13.4)%   $1,554  $1,228   26.5  $102,091  $105,987   (3.7)% 
  514   536    (4.1              2,313   2,047   13.0    38,786   40,078   (3.2
  5,114   4,255    20.2                         75,201   70,892   6.1 
             21,144   23,836    (11.3             21,144   23,836   (11.3
     1,977   1,628    21.4    220   309    (28.8             56,767   56,864   (.2
  12,443   10,608    17.3    29,630   33,688    (12.0   3,867   3,275   18.1    293,989   297,657   (1.2
  1,619   1,617    .1    3,173   2,856    11.1              9,914   9,694   2.3 
  42   44    (4.5   544   557    (2.3             3,082   3,019   2.1 
  15,662   13,950    12.3    35,095   38,285    (8.3   215,414   165,378   30.3    548,734   494,807   10.9 
  20,277   13,232    53.2    5,264   1,471    *    2,605   2,203   18.2    118,352   74,142   59.6 
  13,829   10,027    37.9               747   251   *    97,385   77,359   25.9 
  56,398   56,646    (.4   132   112    17.9    811   840   (3.5   183,673   169,994   8.0 
     1,402   2,169    (35.4      2    *    67   4,240   (98.4   26,954   41,309   (34.8
  91,906   82,074    12.0    5,396   1,585    *    4,230   7,534   (43.9   426,364   362,804   17.5 
     2,634   2,571    2.5    7,480   7,619    (1.8   16,088   13,352   20.5    52,729   51,146   3.1 
 
of 2020. Net interest income, on a taxable-equivalent basis, decreased $33 million (5.0 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to lower loan balances as a result of higher credit card payment rates, and lower loan fees, mostly offset by higher deposit balances as a result of state unemployment programs utilizing prepaid debit cards. Noninterest income decreased $9 million (1.1 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, mainly due to the impact of
COVID-19
on consumer spending, particularly related to travel and entertainment activities. However, consumer spending continues to strengthen across most sectors driven by government stimulus, local jurisdictions reducing restrictions and consumer behaviors normalizing, resulting in payment services revenue being essentially flat compared with the prior year. Payment services revenue included higher credit and debit card revenue driven by higher net interchange revenue related to sales volumes and higher prepaid fees as a result of government stimulus programs, offset by lower corporate payment products revenue primarily due to lower business spending related to travel and entertainment and lower merchant processing services revenue driven by lower sales volume and merchant fees.
Noninterest expense increased $26 million (3.3 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, reflecting incremental costs related to the prepaid card business. The provision for credit losses decreased $303 million in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to a favorable change in the reserve allocation due to lower delinquency rates in the first quarter of 2021.
Treasury and Corporate Support
 Treasury and Corporate Support includes the Company’s investment portfolios, funding, capital management, interest rate risk management, income taxes not allocated to the business lines, including most investments in
tax-advantaged
projects, and the residual aggregate of those expenses associated with corporate activities that are managed on a consolidated basis. Treasury and Corporate Support recorded net income of $540 million in the first quarter of 2021, compared with a net loss of $98 million in the first quarter of 2020.
Net revenue decreased $30 million (13.4 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020. Net interest income, on a taxable-equivalent basis, decreased $21 million in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to higher premium amortization and lower reinvestment
 
U.S. Bancorp 
29

yields within the investment portfolio compared with the prior year. Noninterest income decreased $9 million (3.8 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to lower other noninterest income driven by lower gains on sales of businesses and
tax-advantaged
investment syndication revenue, mostly offset by the impact of favorable market conditions.
Noninterest expense increased $14 million (4.8 percent) in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to higher compensation expense as a result of merit increases, and higher performance-based incentives and stock-based compensation as well as related payroll taxes and benefits. These increases were mostly offset by lower
COVID-19
related accruals compared with the first quarter of 2020, including recognizing liabilities related to future delivery exposures for merchant and airline processing, and lower net shared services expense. The provision for credit losses decreased $870 million in the first quarter of 2021, compared with the first quarter of 2020, reflecting the residual impact of changes in the allowance for credit losses being impacted by improving economic conditions.
Income taxes are assessed to each line of business at a managerial tax rate of 25.0 percent with the residual tax expense or benefit to arrive at the consolidated effective tax rate included in Treasury and Corporate Support.
NON-GAAP
FINANCIAL MEASURES
In addition to capital ratios defined by banking regulators, the Company considers various other measures when evaluating capital utilization and adequacy, including:
 
Tangible common equity to tangible assets,
 
Tangible common equity to risk-weighted assets, and
 
Common equity tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets, reflecting the full implementation of the CECL methodology.
These capital measures are viewed by management as useful additional methods of evaluating the Company’s utilization of its capital held and the level of capital available to withstand unexpected negative market or economic conditions. Additionally, presentation of these measures allows investors, analysts and banking regulators to assess the Company’s capital position relative to other financial services companies. These capital measures are not defined in generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”), or are not currently effective or defined in banking regulations. In addition, certain of these measures differ from currently effective capital ratios defined by banking regulations principally in that the currently effective ratios, which are subject to certain transitional provisions, temporarily exclude the impact of the 2020 adoption of accounting guidance related to impairment of financial instruments based on the CECL methodology. As a result, these capital measures disclosed by the Company may be considered
non-GAAP
financial measures. Management believes this information helps investors assess trends in the Company’s capital adequacy.
The Company also discloses net interest income and related ratios and analysis on a taxable-equivalent basis, which may also be considered
non-GAAP
financial measures. The Company believes this presentation to be the preferred industry measurement of net interest income as it provides a relevant comparison of net interest income arising from taxable and
tax-exempt
sources. In addition, certain performance measures, including the efficiency ratio and net interest margin utilize net interest income on a taxable-equivalent basis.
There may be limits in the usefulness of these measures to investors. As a result, the Company encourages readers to consider the consolidated financial statements and other financial information contained in this report in their entirety, and not to rely on any single financial measure.
 
30
 U.S. Bancorp

The following table shows the Company’s calculation of these
non-GAAP
financial measures:
 
(Dollars in Millions) March 31,
2021
  December 31,
2020
 
Total equity
     $52,308  $53,725 
Preferred stock
  (5,968  (5,983
Noncontrolling interests
  (630  (630
Goodwill (net of deferred tax liability) (1)
  (8,992  (9,014
Intangible assets, other than mortgage servicing rights
  (675  (654
Tangible common equity (a)
  36,043   37,444 
Common equity tier 1 capital, determined in accordance with transitional regulatory capital requirements related to the CECL methodology implementation
  39,103   38,045 
Adjustments (2)
  (1,732  (1,733
Common equity tier 1 capital, reflecting the full implementation of the CECL methodology (b)
  37,371   36,312 
Total assets
  553,375   553,905 
Goodwill (net of deferred tax liability) (1)
  (8,992  (9,014
Intangible assets, other than mortgage servicing rights
  (675  (654
Tangible assets (c)
  543,708   544,237 
Risk-weighted assets, determined in accordance with prescribed regulatory capital requirements effective for the Company (d)
  396,351   393,648 
Adjustments (3)
  (1,440  (1,471
Risk-weighted assets, reflecting the full implementation of the CECL methodology (e)
  394,911   392,177 
Ratios
  
Tangible common equity to tangible assets (a)/(c)
  6.6  6.9
Tangible common equity to risk-weighted assets (a)/(d)
  9.1   9.5 
Common equity tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets, reflecting the full implementation of the CECL methodology (b)/(e)
  9.5   9.3 
 
   Three Months Ended
March 31
 
   2021  2020 
Net interest income
  $3,063  $3,223 
Taxable-equivalent adjustment (4)
   26   24 
Net interest income, on a taxable-equivalent basis
   3,089   3,247 
Net interest income, on a taxable-equivalent basis (as calculated above)
   3,089   3,247 
Noninterest income
   2,381   2,525 
Less: Securities gains (losses), net
   25   50 
Total net revenue, excluding net securities gains (losses) (f)
   5,445   5,722 
Noninterest expense (g)
   3,379   3,316 
Efficiency ratio (g)/(f)
   62.1  58.0
 
(1)
Includes goodwill related to certain investments in unconsolidated financial institutions per prescribed regulatory requirements.
(2)
Includes the estimated increase in the allowance for credit losses related to the adoption of the CECL methodology net of deferred taxes.
(3)
Includes the impact of the estimated increase in the allowance for credit losses related to the adoption of the CECL methodology.
(4)
Based on a federal income tax rate of 21 percent for those assets and liabilities whose income or expense is not included for federal income tax purposes.
 
 
U.S. Bancorp 
31

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES
The accounting and reporting policies of the Company comply with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States and conform to general practices within the banking industry. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions. The Company’s financial position and results of operations can be affected by these estimates and assumptions, which are integral to understanding the Company’s financial statements. Critical accounting policies are those policies management believes are the most important to the portrayal of the Company’s financial condition and results, and require management to make estimates that are difficult, subjective or complex. Most accounting policies are not considered by management to be critical accounting policies. Management has discussed the development and the selection of critical accounting policies with the Company’s Audit Committee. Those policies considered to be critical accounting policies relate to the allowance for credit losses, fair value estimates, MSRs, and income taxes. These accounting policies are discussed in detail in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis — Critical Accounting Policies” and the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the Company’s Annual Report on
Form 10-K
for the year ended December 31, 2020.
CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
Under the supervision and with the participation of the Company’s management, including its principal executive officer and principal financial officer, the Company has evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of its disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in
Rules 13a-15(e)
and
15d-15(e)
under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”)). Based upon this evaluation, the principal executive officer and principal financial officer have concluded that, as of the end of the period covered by this report, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective.
During the most recently completed fiscal quarter, there was no change made in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules
13a-15(f)
and
15d-15(f)
under the Exchange Act) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.
 
32
 U.S. Bancorp

U.S. Bancorp
Consolidated Balance Sheet
 
(Dollars in Millions) March 31,
2021
  December 31,
2020
  (Unaudited)   
   
Assets
     
Cash and due from banks
 $  43,501  $  62,580
Available-for-sale
investment securities ($596 and $402 pledged as collateral, respectively) (a)
 156,003  136,840
Loans held for sale (including $8,869 and $8,524 of mortgage loans carried at fair value, respectively)
 8,991  8,761
Loans
     
Commercial
 104,158  102,871
Commercial real estate
 38,432  39,311
Residential mortgages
 73,624  76,155
Credit card
 20,872  22,346
Other retail
 57,341  57,024
Total loans
 294,427  297,707
Less allowance for loan losses
 (6,343)  (7,314)
Net loans
 288,084  290,393
Premises and equipment
 3,388  3,468
Goodwill
 9,905  9,918
Other intangible assets
 3,462  2,864
Other assets (including $1,313 and $1,255 of trading securities at fair value pledged as collateral, respectively) (a)
 40,041  39,081
Total assets
 $553,375  $553,905
   
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity
     
Deposits
     
Noninterest-bearing
 $126,754  $118,089
Interest-bearing (b)
 307,007  311,681
Total deposits
 433,761  429,770
Short-term borrowings
 12,098  11,766
Long-term debt
 37,419  41,297
Other liabilities
 17,789  17,347
Total liabilities
 501,067  500,180
Shareholders’ equity
     
Preferred stock
 5,968  5,983
Common stock, par value $0.01 a share—authorized: 4,000,000,000 shares; issued: 3/31/21 and 12/31/20—2,125,725,742 shares
 21  21
Capital surplus
 8,487  8,511
Retained earnings
 65,740  64,188
Less cost of common stock in treasury: 3/31/21—628,716,254 shares; 12/31/20—618,618,084 shares
 (26,443)  (25,930)
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
 (2,095)  322
Total U.S. Bancorp shareholders’ equity
 51,678  53,095
Noncontrolling interests
 630  630
Total equity
 52,308  53,725
Total liabilities and equity
 $553,375  $553,905
 
(a)
Includes only collateral pledged by the Company where counterparties have the right to sell or pledge the collateral.
(b)
Includes
 time deposits greater than $250,000 balances of $3.1 billion and $4.4 billion at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
U.S. Bancorp 
 33

U.S. Bancorp
Consolidated Statement of Income
 
(Dollars and Shares in Millions, Except Per Share Data)
(Unaudited)
 Three Months Ended
March 31
 
 2021  2020 
Interest Income
        
Loans
  $2,724   $3,311 
Loans held for sale
  67   44 
Investment securities
  517   692 
Other interest income
  33   69 
Total interest income
  3,341   4,116 
Interest Expense
        
Deposits
  85   525 
Short-term borrowings
  16   71 
Long-term debt
  177   297 
Total interest expense
  278   893 
Net interest income
  3,063   3,223 
Provision for credit losses
  (827  993 
Net interest income after provision for credit losses
  3,890   2,230 
Noninterest Income
        
Credit and debit card revenue
  336   304 
Corporate payment products revenue
  126   145 
Merchant processing services
  318   337 
Trust and investment management fees
  444   427 
Deposit service charges
  161   209 
Treasury management fees
  147   143 
Commercial products revenue
  280   246 
Mortgage banking revenue
  299   395 
Investment products fees
  55   49 
Securities gains (losses), net
  25   50 
Other
  190   220 
Total noninterest income
  2,381   2,525 
Noninterest Expense
        
Compensation
  1,803   1,620 
Employee benefits
  384   352 
Net occupancy and equipment
  263   276 
Professional services
  98   99 
Marketing and business development
  48   74 
Technology and communications
  359   289 
Postage, printing and supplies
  69   72 
Other intangibles
  38   42 
Other
  317   492 
Total noninterest expense
  3,379   3,316 
Income before income taxes
  2,892   1,439 
Applicable income taxes
  607   260 
Net income
  2,285   1,179 
Net (income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interests
  (5  (8
Net income attributable to U.S. Bancorp
  $2,280   $1,171 
Net income applicable to U.S. Bancorp common shareholders
  $2,175   $1,088 
Earnings per common share
  $  1.45   $    .72 
Diluted earnings per common share
  $  1.45   $    .72 
Average common shares outstanding
  1,502   1,518 
Average diluted common shares outstanding
  1,503   1,519 
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
34 U.S. Bancorp

U.S. Bancorp
Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income
 
(Dollars in Millions)
(Unaudited)
 Three Months Ended
March 31
 
 2021  2020 
Net income
 $2,285   $1,179 
Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
        
Changes in unrealized gains and losses on investment securities
available-for-sale
  (3,378  2,787 
Changes in unrealized gains and losses on derivative hedges
  99   (257
Foreign currency translation
  25   (13
Reclassification to earnings of realized gains and losses
  18   (6
Income taxes related to other comprehensive income (loss)
  819   (635
Total other comprehensive income (loss)
  (2,417  1,876 
Comprehensive income (loss)
  (132  3,055 
Comprehensive (income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interests
  (5  (8
   
Comprehensive income (loss) attributable to U.S. Bancorp
 $(137  $3,047 
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
U.S. Bancorp 35

U.S. Bancorp
Consolidated Statement of Shareholders’ Equity
 
  U.S. Bancorp Shareholders       
(Dollars and Shares in Millions, Except Per
Share Data) (Unaudited)
 Common Shares
Outstanding
  Preferred
Stock
  Common
Stock
  Capital
Surplus
  Retained
Earnings
  Treasury
Stock
  Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
  Total
U.S. Bancorp
Shareholders’
Equity
  Noncontrolling
Interests
  Total
Equity
 
Balance December 31, 2019
  1,534  $5,984  $21  $8,475  $63,186  $(24,440 $(1,373 $51,853  $630  $52,483 
Change in accounting principle (a)
                  (1,099          (1,099      (1,099
Net income (loss)
                  1,171           1,171   8   1,179 
Other comprehensive income (loss)
                          1,876   1,876       1,876 
Preferred stock dividends (b)
                  (78          (78      (78
Common stock dividends ($.42 per share)
                  (636          (636      (636
Issuance of common and treasury stock
  3           (108      117       9       9 
Purchase of treasury stock
  (31                  (1,649      (1,649      (1,649
Distributions to noncontrolling interests
                                 (8  (8
Stock option and restricted stock grants
              85               85       85 
           
Balance March 31, 2020
  1,506  $5,984  $21  $8,452  $62,544  $(25,972 $503  $51,532  $630  $52,162 
Balance December 31, 2020
  1,507  $5,983  $21  $8,511  $64,188  $(25,930 $322  $53,095  $630  $53,725 
Net income (loss)
                  2,280           2,280   5   2,285 
Other comprehensive income (loss)
                          (2,417  (2,417      (2,417
Preferred stock dividends (c)
                  (90          (90      (90
Common stock dividends ($.42 per share)
                  (633          (633      (633
Issuance of preferred stock
      730                       730       730 
Call of preferred stock
      (745          (5          (750      (750
Issuance of common and treasury stock
  3           (119      137       18       18 
Purchase of treasury stock
  (13                  (650      (650      (650
Distributions to noncontrolling interests
                                 (5  (5
Stock option and restricted stock grants
              95               95       95 
           
Balance March 31, 2021
  1,497  $5,968  $21  $8,487  $65,740  $(26,443 $(2,095 $51,678  $630  $52,308 
 
(a)
Effective January 1, 2020, the Company adopted accounting guidance which changed impairment recognition of financial instruments to a model that is based on expected losses rather than incurred losses. Upon adoption, the Company increased its allowance for credit losses and reduced retained earnings net of deferred taxes through a cumulative-effect adjustment.
(b)
Reflects dividends declared per share on the Company’s Series A, Series B, Series F, Series H, Series J and Series K
Non-Cumulative
Perpetual Preferred Stock of $884.722, $221.18, $406.25, $321.88, $662.50 and $343.75, respectively.
(c)
Reflects dividends declared per share on the Company’s Series A, Series B, Series F, Series I, Series J, Series K, Series L and Series M
Non-Cumulative
Perpetual Preferred Stock of $875.00, $218.75, $406.25, $232.953, $662.50, $343.75, $234.375, and $202.778 respectively.
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
36 U.S. Bancorp

U.S. Bancorp
Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows
 
(Dollars in Millions)
(Unaudited)
 Three Months Ended
March 31
 
 2021  2020 
Operating Activities
        
Net income attributable to U.S. Bancorp
 $2,280  $1,171 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities
        
Provision for credit losses
  (827  993 
Depreciation and amortization of premises and equipment
  84   87 
Amortization of intangibles
  38   42 
(Gain) loss on sale of loans held for sale
  (213  (303
(Gain) loss on sale of securities and other assets
  (66  (120
Loans originated for sale, net of repayments
  (20,928  (10,882
Proceeds from sales of loans held for sale
  20,397   12,032 
Other, net
  172   (666
Net cash provided by operating activities
  937   2,354 
Investing Activities
        
Proceeds from sales of
available-for-sale
investment securities
  1,062   9,916 
Proceeds from maturities of
available-for-sale
investment securities
  12,550   5,649 
Purchases of
available-for-sale
investment securities
  (36,182  (14,937
Net decrease (increase) in loans outstanding
  3,562   (22,272
Proceeds from sales of loans
  1,062   575 
Purchases of loans
  (1,600  (893
Net (increase) decrease in securities purchased under agreements to resell
  (26  788 
Other, net
  106   (1,085
Net cash used in investing activities
  (19,466  (22,259
Financing Activities
        
Net increase in deposits
  3,991   32,938 
Net increase in short-term borrowings
  332   2,621 
Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt
  69   11,271 
Principal payments or redemption of long-term debt
  (3,830  (156
Proceeds from issuance of preferred stock
  730    
Proceeds from issuance of common stock
  17   9 
Repurchase of preferred stock
  (500   
Repurchase of common stock
  (646  (1,660
Cash dividends paid on preferred stock
  (76  (71
Cash dividends paid on common stock
  (637  (647
Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities
  (550  44,305 
Change in cash and due from banks
  (19,079  24,400 
Cash and due from banks at beginning of period
  62,580   22,405 
Cash and due from banks at end of period
 $43,501  $46,805 
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
U.S. Bancorp 37

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
 
 Note 1    Basis of Presentation
The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the instructions to Form
10-Q
and, therefore, do not include all information and notes necessary for a complete presentation of financial position, results of operations and cash flow activity required in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. In the opinion of management of U.S. Bancorp (the “Company”), all adjustments (consisting only of normal recurring adjustments) necessary for a fair statement of results for the interim periods have been made. These financial statements and notes should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes included in the Company’s Annual Report on
Form 10-K
for the year ended December 31, 2020. Certain amounts in prior periods have been reclassified to conform to the
 
current presentation.
 
 Note 2
    Accounting Changes
Reference Interest Rate Transition
 
In March 2020, the FASB issued accounting guidance, providing temporary optional expedients and exceptions to the guidance in United States generally accepted accounting principles on contract modifications and hedge accounting, to ease the financial reporting burdens related to the expected market transition from the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) and other interbank offered rates to alternative reference rates. Under the guidance, a company can elect not to apply certain modification accounting requirements to contracts affected by reference rate transition, if certain criteria are met. A company that makes this election would not be required to remeasure the contracts at the modification date or reassess a previous accounting determination. This guidance also permits a company to elect various optional expedients that would allow it to continue applying hedge accounting for hedging relationships affected by reference rate transition, if certain criteria are met. The guidance is effective upon issuance and generally can be applied through December 31, 2022. The Company is in the process of evaluating and applying, as applicable, the optional expedients and exceptions in accounting for eligible contract modifications, eligible existing hedging relationships and new hedging relationships available through December 31, 2022. The adoption of this guidance has not had, and is expected to continue to not have, a material impact on the Company’s financial statements.
 
Note 3
    Investment Securities
The Company’s
available-for-sale
investment securities are carried at fair value with unrealized net gains or losses reported within accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) in shareholders’ equity. The Company had no outstanding investment securities classified as
held-to-maturity
at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020.     
The amortized cost, gross unrealized holding gains and losses, and fair value of
available-for-sale
investment securities were as follows:
 
  March 31, 2021   December 31, 2020 
(Dollars in Millions) Amortized
Cost
   Unrealized
Gains
   Unrealized
Losses
  
Fair
Value
   Amortized
Cost
   Unrealized
Gains
   Unrealized
Losses
  Fair Value 
U.S. Treasury and agencies
 $24,401   $288   $(372) $24,317    $21,954   $462   $(25 $22,391 
Mortgage-backed securities
                                     
Residential agency
  116,629    1,230    (1,683  116,176    98,031    1,950    (13  99,968 
Commercial agency
  6,254    53    (221  6,086    5,251    170    (15  5,406 
Asset-backed securities
  197    5       202    200    5       205 
Obligations of state and political subdivisions
  8,687    546    (18  9,215    8,166    695       8,861 
Other
  7           7    9           9 
Total
available-for-sale
 $156,175   $ 2,122   $(2,294 $156,003   $133,611   $ 3,282   $(53 $136,840 
Investment securities with a fair value of $39.3 billion at March 31, 2021, and $11.0 billion at December 31, 2020, were pledged to secure public, private and trust deposits, repurchase agreements and for other purposes required by contractual obligation or law. Included in these amounts were securities where the Company and certain counterparties have agreements granting the counterparties the right to sell or pledge the securities. Investment securities securing these types of arrangements had a fair value of $596 million at March 31, 2021, and $402 million at December 31, 2020.
 
38 U.S. Bancorp

The following table provides information about the amount of interest income from taxable and
non-taxable
investment securities:
 
  Three Months Ended
March 31
 
(Dollars in Millions)     2021       2020 
Taxable
 $ 455   $ 640 
Non-taxable
  62    52 
Total interest income from investment securities
 $517   $692 
The following table provides information about the amount of gross gains and losses realized through the sales of
available-for-sale
investment securities:
 
  Three Months Ended
March 31
 
(Dollars in Millions)     2021       2020 
Realized gains
 $ 25   $ 73 
Realized losses
      (23
Net realized gains
 $25   $50 
Income tax on net realized gains
 $6   $13 
The Company conducts a regular assessment of its available-for-sale investment securities with unrealized losses to determine whether all or some portion of a security’s unrealized loss is related to credit and an allowance for credit losses is necessary. If the Company intends to sell or it is more likely than not the Company will be required to sell an investment security, the amortized cost of the security is written down to fair value. When evaluating credit losses, the Company considers various factors such as the nature of the investment security, the credit ratings or financial condition of the issuer, the extent of the unrealized loss, expected cash flows of underlying collateral, the existence of any government or agency guarantees, and market conditions. The Company measures the allowance for credit losses using market information where available and discounting the cash flows at the original effective rate of the investment security. The allowance for credit losses is adjusted each period through earnings and can be subsequently recovered. The allowance for credit losses on the Company’s available-for-sale investment securities was immaterial at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020.
At March 31, 2021, certain investment securities had a fair value below amortized cost. The following table shows the gross unrealized losses and fair value of the Company’s
available-for-sale
investment securities with unrealized losses, aggregated by investment category and length of time the individual investment securities have been in continuous unrealized loss positions, at March 31, 2021:
 
  Less Than 12 Months   12 Months or Greater   Total 
(Dollars in Millions) 
Fair
Value
   Unrealized
Losses
   Fair
Value
   Unrealized
Losses
   
Fair
Value
   Unrealized
Losses
 
U.S. Treasury and agencies
 $9,519   $(372  $           $ –   $9,519   $(372
Residential agency mortgage-backed securities
  59,916    (1,678   150    (5   60,066    (1,683
Commercial agency mortgage-backed securities
  4,130    (221   6        4,136    (221
Asset-backed securities
          2        2     
Obligations of state and political subdivisions
  1,037    (18           1,037    (18
Total investment securities
 $74,602   $(2,289  $158           $(5)  $74,760   $(2,294
These unrealized losses primarily relate to changes in interest rates and market spreads subsequent to purchase of the investment securities. U.S. Treasury and agencies securities and agency mortgage-backed securities are issued, guaranteed or otherwise supported by the United States government. The Company’s obligations of state and political subdivisions are generally high grade. Accordingly, the Company does not consider these unrealized losses to be credit-related and an allowance for credit losses is not necessary. In general, the issuers of the investment securities are contractually prohibited from prepayment at less than par, and the Company did not pay significant purchase premiums for these investment securities. At March 31, 2021, the Company had no plans to sell investment securities with unrealized losses, and believes it is more likely than not it would not be required to sell such investment securities before recovery of their amortized cost.
During the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company did not purchase any
available-for-sale
investment securities that had more-than-insignificant credit deterioration.
 
U.S. Bancorp 39

The following table provides information about the amortized cost, fair value and yield by maturity date of the
available-for-sale
investment securities outstanding at March 31, 2021:
 
(Dollars in Millions) Amortized
Cost
   Fair Value   Weighted-
Average
Maturity in
Years
   Weighted-
Average
Yield (e)
 
U.S. Treasury and Agencies
                   
Maturing in one year or less
 $4,264   $4,292    .4    1.54
Maturing after one year through five years
  11,534    11,694    2.6    1.15 
Maturing after five years through ten years
  7,364    7,150    8.1    1.33 
Maturing after ten years
  1,239    1,181    13.0    1.78 
Total
 $24,401   $24,317    4.4    1.31
Mortgage-Backed Securities (a)
                   
Maturing in one year or less
 $110   $112    .6    2.07
Maturing after one year through five years
  47,936    49,021    3.6    1.40 
Maturing after five years through ten years
  74,785    73,077    7.8    1.46 
Maturing after ten years
  52    52    11.9    1.13 
Total
 $122,883   $122,262    6.1    1.44
Asset-Backed Securities (a)
                   
Maturing in one year or less
 $   $    .9    2.69
Maturing after one year through five years
  3    4    2.9    1.74 
Maturing after five years through ten years
  194    197    6.0    1.08 
Maturing after ten years
      1    13.6    2.41 
Total
 $197   $202    5.9    1.09
Obligations of State and Political Subdivisions (b) (c)
                   
Maturing in one year or less
 $178   $182    .7    4.21
Maturing after one year through five years
  1,451    1,539    3.5    4.39 
Maturing after five years through ten years
  6,624    7,066    6.9    3.86 
Maturing after ten years
  434    428    17.4    2.57 
Total
 $8,687   $9,215    6.7    3.89
Other
                   
Maturing in one year or less
 $7   $7    .1    2.07
Maturing after one year through five years
               
Maturing after five years through ten years
               
Maturing after ten years
               
Total
 $7   $7    .1    2.07
Total investment securities (d)
 $156,175   $156,003    5.9    1.55
 
(a)
Information related to asset and mortgage-backed securities included above is presented based upon weighted-average maturities that take into account anticipated future prepayments.
(b)
Information related to obligations of state and political subdivisions is presented based upon yield to first optional call date if the security is purchased at a premium, and yield to maturity if the security is purchased at par or a discount.
(c)
Maturity calculations for obligations of state and political subdivisions are based on the first optional call date for securities with a fair value above par and the contractual maturity date for securities with a fair value equal to or below par.
(d)
The weighted-average maturity of total
available-for-sale
investment securities was 3.4 years at December 31, 2020, with a corresponding weighted-average yield of 1.61 percent.
(e)
Weighted-average yields for obligations of state and political subdivisions are presented on a fully-taxable equivalent basis based on a federal income tax rate of 21 percent. Yields on investment securities are computed based on amortized cost balances.
 
40 U.S. Bancorp

 Note 4
 
   Loans and Allowance for Credit Losses
The composition of the loan portfolio, disaggregated by class and underlying specific portfolio type, was as follows:
 
  March 31, 2021       December 31, 2020 
(Dollars in Millions) Amount   Percent
of Total
       Amount   Percent
of Total
 
Commercial
                       
Commercial
 $98,847    33.6      $97,315    32.7
Lease financing
  5,311    1.8        5,556    1.9 
Total commercial
  104,158    35.4        102,871    34.6 
Commercial Real Estate
                       
Commercial mortgages
  27,649    9.4        28,472    9.6 
Construction and development
  10,783    3.6        10,839    3.6 
Total commercial real estate
  38,432    13.0        39,311    13.2 
Residential Mortgages
                       
Residential mortgages
  64,238    21.8        66,525    22.4 
Home equity loans, first liens
  9,386    3.2        9,630    3.2 
Total residential mortgages
  73,624    25.0        76,155    25.6 
Credit Card
  20,872    7.1        22,346    7.5 
Other Retail
                       
Retail leasing
  7,880    2.7        8,150    2.7 
Home equity and second mortgages
  11,679    4.0        12,472    4.2 
Revolving credit
  2,536    .9        2,688    .9 
Installment
  14,562    4.9        13,823    4.6 
Automobile
  20,527    7.0        19,722    6.6 
Student
  157            169    .1 
Total other retail
  57,341    19.5        57,024    19.1 
Total loans
 $294,427    100.0      $297,707    100.0
The Company had loans of $94.4 billion at March 31, 2021, and $96.1 billion at December 31, 2020, pledged at the Federal Home Loan Bank, and loans of $65.4 billion at March 31, 2021, and $67.8 billion at December 31, 2020, pledged at the Federal Reserve Bank.
Originated loans are reported at the principal amount outstanding, net of unearned interest and deferred fees and costs, and any partial charge-offs recorded. Net unearned interest and deferred fees and costs amounted to $849 million at March 31, 2021 and $763 million at December 31, 2020. All purchased loans are recorded at fair value at the date of purchase. Beginning January 1, 2020, the Company evaluates purchased loans for more-than-insignificant deterioration at the date of purchase in accordance with applicable authoritative accounting guidance. Purchased loans that have experienced more-than-insignificant deterioration from origination are considered purchased credit deteriorated loans. All other purchased loans are considered
non-purchased
credit deteriorated loans.
Allowance for Credit Losses
Beginning January 1, 2020, the allowance for credit losses is established for current expected credit losses on the Company’s loan and lease portfolio, including unfunded credit commitments. The allowance considers expected losses for the remaining lives of the applicable assets, inclusive of expected recoveries. The allowance for credit losses is increased through provisions charged to earnings and reduced by net charge-offs. Management evaluates the appropriateness of the allowance for credit losses on a quarterly basis. Multiple economic scenarios are considered over a three-year reasonable and supportable forecast period, which includes increasing consideration of historical loss experience over years two and three. These economic scenarios are constructed with interrelated projections of multiple economic variables, and loss estimates are produced that consider the historical correlation of those economic variables with credit losses. After the forecast period, the Company fully reverts to long-term historical loss experience, adjusted for prepayments and characteristics of the current loan and lease portfolio, to estimate losses over the remaining life of the portfolio. The economic scenarios are updated at least quarterly and are designed to provide a range of reasonable estimates, both better and worse than current expectations. Scenarios are weighted based on the Company’s expectation of economic conditions for the foreseeable future and reflect significant judgment and consider uncertainties that exist. Final loss estimates also consider factors affecting credit losses not reflected in the scenarios, due to the unique aspects of current conditions and expectations. These factors may include, but are not limited to, loan servicing practices, regulatory guidance, and/or fiscal and monetary policy actions.
The allowance recorded for credit losses utilizes forward-looking expected loss models to consider a variety of factors affecting lifetime credit losses. These factors include, but are not limited to, macroeconomic variables such as unemployment rate, real estate prices, gross domestic product levels, corporate bonds spreads and long-term interest rate forecasts, as well as loan and borrower characteristics, such as internal risk ratings on commercial loans and
 
U.S. Bancorp 41

consumer credit scores, delinquency status, collateral type and available valuation information, consideration of
end-of-term
losses on lease residuals, and the remaining term of the loan, adjusted for expected prepayments. For each loan portfolio, model estimates are adjusted as necessary to consider any relevant changes in portfolio composition, lending policies, underwriting standards, risk management practices, economic conditions or other factors that would affect the accuracy of the model. Expected credit loss estimates also include consideration of expected cash recoveries on loans previously
charged-off
or expected recoveries on collateral dependent loans where recovery is expected through sale of the collateral. Where loans do not exhibit similar risk characteristics, an individual analysis is performed to consider expected credit losses. The allowance recorded for individually evaluated loans greater than $5 million in the commercial lending segment is based on an analysis utilizing expected cash flows discounted using the original effective interest rate, the observable market price of the loan, or the fair value of the collateral, less selling costs, for collateral-dependent loans as appropriate.
The allowance recorded for Troubled Debt Restructuring (“TDR”) loans in the consumer lending segment is determined on a homogenous pool basis utilizing expected cash flows discounted using the original effective interest rate of the pool. TDRs generally do not include loan modifications granted to customers resulting directly from the economic effects of the
COVID-19
pandemic, who were otherwise in current payment status. The expected cash flows on TDR loans consider subsequent payment defaults since modification, the borrower’s ability to pay under the restructured terms, and the timing and amount of payments. The allowance for collateral-dependent loans in the consumer lending segment is determined based on the fair value of the collateral less costs to sell. With respect to the commercial lending segment, TDRs may be collectively evaluated for impairment where observed performance history, including defaults, is a primary driver of the loss allocation. For commercial TDRs individually evaluated for impairment, attributes of the borrower are the primary factors in determining the allowance for credit losses. However, historical loss experience is also incorporated into the allowance methodology applied to this category of loans.
Beginning January 1, 2020, when a loan portfolio is purchased, the acquired loans are divided into those considered purchased with more than insignificant credit deterioration (“PCD”) and those not considered purchased with more than insignificant credit deterioration. An allowance is established for each population and considers product mix, risk characteristics of the portfolio, bankruptcy experience, delinquency status and refreshed LTV ratios when possible. The allowance established for purchased loans not considered PCD is recognized through provision expense upon acquisition, whereas the allowance established for loans considered PCD at acquisition is offset by an increase in the basis of the acquired loans. Any subsequent increases and decreases in the allowance related to purchased loans, regardless of PCD status, are recognized through provision expense, with charge-offs charged to the allowance. The Company did not have a material amount of PCD loans included in its loan portfolio at March 31, 2021.
The Company’s methodology for determining the appropriate allowance for credit losses also considers the imprecision inherent in the methodologies used and allocated to the various loan portfolios. As a result, amounts determined under the methodologies described above, are adjusted by management to consider the potential impact of other qualitative factors not captured in the quantitative model adjustments which include, but are not limited to the following: model imprecision, imprecision in economic scenario assumptions, and emerging risks related to either changes in the environment that are affecting specific portfolios, or changes in portfolio concentrations over time that may affect model performance. The consideration of these items results in adjustments to allowance amounts included in the Company’s allowance for credit losses for each loan portfolio.
The Company also assesses the credit risk associated with
off-balance
sheet loan commitments, letters of credit, investment securities and derivatives. Credit risk associated with derivatives is reflected in the fair values recorded for those positions. The liability for
off-balance
sheet credit exposure related to loan commitments and other credit guarantees is included in other liabilities. Because business processes and credit risks associated with unfunded credit commitments are essentially the same as for loans, the Company utilizes similar processes to estimate its liability for unfunded credit commitments.
Prior to January 1, 2020, the allowance for credit losses was established based on an incurred loss model. The allowance recorded for loans in the commercial lending segment was based on the migration analysis of commercial loans and actual loss experience. The allowance recorded for loans in the consumer lending segment was determined on a homogenous pool basis and primarily included consideration of delinquency status and historical losses. In addition to the amounts determined under the methodologies described above, management also considered the potential impact of qualitative factors.
 
42 U.S. Bancorp

Activity in the allowance for credit losses by portfolio class was as follows:
 
(Dollars in Millions) Commercial  Commercial
Real Estate
  Residential
Mortgages
  Credit
Card
  Other
Retail
  Total
Loans
 
Balance at December 31, 2020
 $2,423  $1,544  $573  $2,355  $1,115  $8,010 
Add
                        
Provision for credit losses
  (435  (19  (39  (259  (75  (827
Deduct
                        
Loans
charged-off
  86   10   5   190   83   374 
Less recoveries of loans
charged-off
  (30  (17  (10  (46  (48  (151
Net loan charge-offs (recoveries
)
  56   (7  (5  144   35   223 
Balance at March 31, 2021
 $1,932  $1,532  $539  $1,952  $1,005  $6,960 
Balance at December 31, 2019
 $1,484  $799  $433  $1,128  $647  $4,491 
Add
                        
Change in accounting principle (a)
  378   (122  (30  872   401   1,499 
Provision for credit losses
  452   162   10   246   123   993 
Deduct
                        
Loans
charged-off
  88      8   274   121   491 
Less recoveries of loans
charged-off
  (14  (2  (7  (40  (35  (98
Net loan charge-offs (recoveries
)
  74   (2  1   234   86   393 
Balance at March 31, 2020
 $2,240  $841  $412  $2,012  $1,085  $6,590 
 
(a)
Effective January 1, 2020, the Company adopted accounting guidance which changed impairment recognition of financial instruments to a model that is based on expected losses rather than incurred losses.
The decrease in the allowance for credit losses from December 31, 2020 to March 31, 2021 reflected factors affecting economic conditions during the first quarter of 2021, including the enactment of additional benefits from government stimulus programs, vaccine availability in the United States and reduced levels of new
COVID-19
cases.
Credit Quality
The credit quality of the Company’s loan portfolios is assessed as a function of net credit losses, levels of nonperforming assets and delinquencies, and credit quality ratings as defined by the Company.
For all loan portfolio classes, loans are considered past due based on the number of days delinquent except for monthly amortizing loans which are classified delinquent based upon the number of contractually required payments not made (for example, two missed payments is considered 30 days delinquent). When a loan is placed on nonaccrual status, unpaid accrued interest is reversed, reducing interest income in the current period.
Commercial lending segment loans are generally placed on nonaccrual status when the collection of principal and interest has become 90 days past due or is otherwise considered doubtful. Commercial lending segment loans are generally fully or partially charged down to the fair value of the collateral securing the loan, less costs to sell, when the loan is placed on nonaccrual.
Consumer lending segment loans are generally
charged-off
at a specific number of days or payments past due. Residential mortgages and other retail loans secured by
1-4
family properties are generally charged down to the fair value of the collateral securing the loan, less costs to sell, at 180 days past due. Residential mortgage loans and lines in a first lien position are placed on nonaccrual status in instances where a partial
charge-off
occurs unless the loan is well secured and in the process of collection. Residential mortgage loans and lines in a junior lien position secured by
1-4
family properties are placed on nonaccrual status at 120 days past due or when they are behind a first lien that has become 180 days or greater past due or placed on nonaccrual status. Any secured consumer lending segment loan whose borrower has had debt discharged through bankruptcy, for which the loan amount exceeds the fair value of the collateral, is charged down to the fair value of the related collateral and the remaining balance is placed on nonaccrual status. Credit card loans continue to accrue interest until the account is
charged-off.
Credit cards are
charged-off
at 180 days past due. Other retail loans not secured by
1-4
family properties are
charged-off
at 120 days past due; and revolving consumer lines are
charged-off
at 180 days past due. Similar to credit cards, other retail loans are generally not placed on nonaccrual status because of the relative short period of time to
charge-off.
Certain retail customers having financial difficulties may have the terms of their credit card and other loan agreements modified to require only principal payments and, as such, are reported as nonaccrual.
For all loan classes, interest payments received on nonaccrual loans are generally recorded as a reduction to a loan’s carrying amount while a loan is on nonaccrual and are recognized as interest income upon payoff of the loan. However, interest income may be recognized for interest payments if the remaining carrying amount of the loan is believed to be collectible. In certain circumstances, loans in any class may be restored to accrual status, such as when a
 
U.S. Bancorp 
43

loan has demonstrated sustained repayment performance or no amounts are past due and prospects for future
payment
are no longer in doubt; or when the loan becomes well secured and is in the process of collection. Loans where there has been a partial
charge-off
may be returned to accrual status if all principal and interest (including amounts previously
charged-off)
is expected to be collected and the loan is current.
The following table provides a summary of loans by portfolio class, including the delinquency status of those that continue to accrue interest, and those that are nonperforming:
  Accruing         
(Dollars in Millions) Current   
30-89 Days

Past Due
   90 Days or
More Past Due
   Nonperforming (b)   Total 
March 31, 2021
                        
Commercial
 $103,557   $193   $61   $347   $104,158 
Commercial real estate
  37,953    119    4    356    38,432 
Residential mortgages (a)
  73,024    204    143    253    73,624 
Credit card
  20,486    188    198        20,872 
Other retail
  56,878    221    70    172    57,341 
Total loans
 $291,898   $925   $476   $1,128   $294,427 
December 31, 2020
                        
Commercial
 $102,127   $314   $55   $375   $102,871 
Commercial real estate
  38,676    183    2    450    39,311 
Residential mortgages (a)
  75,529    244    137    245    76,155 
Credit card
  21,918    231    197        22,346 
Other retail
  56,466    318    86    154    57,024 
Total loans
 $294,716   $1,290   $477   $1,224   $297,707 
 
(a)
At March 31, 2021, $1.5 billion of loans 30–89 days past due and $1.7 billion of loans 90 days or more past due purchased from Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA”) mortgage pools whose repayments are insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, were classified as current, compared with $1.4 billion and $1.8 billion at December 31, 2020, respectively.    
(b)
Substantially all nonperforming loans at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, had an associated allowance for credit losses. The Company recognized interest income on nonperforming loans of $3 million and $5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.    
At March 31, 2021, the amount of foreclosed residential real estate held by the Company, and included in OREO, was $18 million, compared with $23 million at December 31, 2020. These amounts excluded $29 million and $33 million at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively, of foreclosed residential real estate related to mortgage loans whose payments are primarily insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. In addition, the amount of residential mortgage loans secured by residential real estate in the process of foreclosure at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, was $936 million and $1.0 billion, respectively, of which $756 million and $812 million, respectively, related to loans purchased from Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA”) mortgage pools whose repayments are insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs.
The Company classifies its loan portfolio classes using internal credit quality ratings on a quarterly basis. These ratings include pass, special mention and classified, and are an important part of the Company’s overall credit risk management process and evaluation of the allowance for credit losses. Loans with a pass rating represent those loans not classified on the Company’s rating scale for problem credits, as minimal credit risk has been identified. Special mention loans are those loans that have a potential weakness deserving management’s close attention. Classified loans are those loans where a well-defined weakness has been identified that may put full collection of contractual cash flows at risk. It is possible that others, given the same information, may reach different reasonable conclusions regarding the credit quality rating classification of specific loans.​​​​​​​
 
44 U.S. Bancorp

The following table provides a summary of loans by portfolio class and the Company’s internal credit quality rating:
  March 31, 2021        December 31, 2020 
     Criticized             Criticized    
(Dollars in Millions) Pass  
Special
Mention
  Classified (a)  Total
Criticized
  Total        Pass  Special
Mention
  Classified (a)  Total
Criticized
  Total 
Commercial
                                              
Originated in 2021
 $12,604  $313  $218  $531  $13,135        $  $  $  $  $ 
Originated in 2020
  28,890   1,003   1,302   2,305   31,195         34,557   1,335   1,753   3,088   37,645 
Originated in 2019
  15,710   351   223   574   16,284         17,867   269   349   618   18,485 
Originated in 2018
  10,909   372   151   523   11,432         12,349   351   176   527   12,876 
Originated in 2017
  4,658   81   181   262   4,920         5,257   117   270   387   5,644 
Originated prior to 2017
  4,133   168   73   241   4,374         4,954   128   115   243   5,197 
Revolving
  22,377   206   235   441   22,818         22,445   299   280   579   23,024 
Total commercial
  99,281   2,494   2,383   4,877   104,158         97,429   2,499   2,943   5,442   102,871 
            
Commercial real estate
                                              
Originated in 2021
  2,368   39   408   447   2,815                      
Originated in 2020
  8,889   336   901   1,237   10,126         9,446   461   1,137   1,598   11,044 
Originated in 2019
  8,788   450   947   1,397   10,185         9,514   454   1,005   1,459   10,973 
Originated in 2018
  5,296   373   499   872   6,168         6,053   411   639   1,050   7,103 
Originated in 2017
  2,375   141   350   491   2,866         2,650   198   340   538   3,188 
Originated prior to 2017
  4,272   151   161   312   4,584         4,762   240   309   549   5,311 
Revolving
  1,457   5   226   231   1,688         1,445   9   238   247   1,692 
Total commercial real estate
  33,445   1,495   3,492   4,987   38,432         33,870   1,773   3,668   5,441   39,311 
            
Residential mortgages (b)
                                              
Originated in 2021
  4,208            4,208                      
Originated in 2020
  22,053      5   5   22,058         23,262   1   3   4   23,266 
Originated in 2019
  12,084   1   23   24   12,108         13,969   1   17   18   13,987 
Originated in 2018
  4,989   1   25   26   5,015         5,670   1   22   23   5,693 
Originated in 2017
  6,091   1   22   23   6,114         6,918   1   24   25   6,943 
Originated prior to 2017
  23,782   3   335   338   24,120         25,921   2   342   344   26,265 
Revolving
  1            1         1            1 
Total residential mortgages
  73,208   6   410   416   73,624         75,741   6   408   414   76,155 
            
Credit card (c)
  20,674      198   198   20,872         22,149      197   197   22,346 
            
Other retail
                                              
Originated in 2021
  5,690      1   1   5,691                      
Originated in 2020
  15,954      6   6   15,960         17,589      7   7   17,596 
Originated in 2019
  10,351      16   16   10,367         11,605      23   23   11,628 
Originated in 2018
  5,822      20   20   5,842         6,814      27   27   6,841 
Originated in 2017
  3,106      14   14   3,120         3,879      22   22   3,901 
Originated prior to 2017
  3,134      18   18   3,152         3,731      29   29   3,760 
Revolving
  12,536      135   135   12,671         12,647      110   110   12,757 
Revolving converted to term
  495      43   43   538         503      38   38   541 
Total other retail
  57,088      253   253   57,341         56,768      256   256   57,024 
Total loans
 $283,696  $3,995  $6,736  $10,731  $294,427        $285,957  $4,278  $7,472  $11,750  $297,707 
Total outstanding commitments
 $629,280  $8,140  $9,239  $17,379  $646,659        $627,606  $8,772  $9,374  $18,146  $645,752 
 
Note:
Year of origination is based on the origination date of a loan or the date when the maturity date, pricing or commitment amount is amended.
(a)
Classified rating on consumer loans primarily based on delinquency status.
(b)
At March 31, 2021, $1.7 billion of GNMA loans 90 days or more past due and $1.3 billion of restructured GNMA loans whose repayments are insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs were classified with a pass rating, compared with $1.8 billion and $1.4 billion at December 31, 2020, respectively.
(c)
All credit card loans are considered revolving loans.
Troubled Debt Restructurings
In certain circumstances, the Company may modify the terms of a loan to maximize the collection of amounts due when a borrower is experiencing financial difficulties or is expected to experience difficulties in the near-term. Concessionary modifications are classified as TDRs unless the modification results in only an insignificant delay in payments to be received. The Company recognizes interest on TDRs if the borrower complies with the revised terms and conditions as agreed upon with the Company and has demonstrated repayment performance at a level commensurate with the modified terms over several payment cycles, which is generally six months or greater. To the extent a previous restructuring was insignificant, the Company considers the cumulative effect of past restructurings related to the receivable when determining whether a current restructuring is a TDR.
 
U.S. Bancorp 45

The following table provides a summary of loans modified as TDRs for the periods presented by portfolio class:
  2021        2020 
Three Months Ended March 31
(Dollars in Millions)
 Number
of Loans
   
Pre-Modification

Outstanding
Loan Balance
   
Post-Modification

Outstanding
Loan Balance
        Number
of Loans
   
Pre-Modification

Outstanding
Loan Balance
   
Post-Modification

Outstanding
Loan Balance
 
Commercial
  704   $75   $60         999   $99   $ 101 
Commercial real estate
  56    86    71         27    21    21 
Residential mortgages
  336    104    104         90    10    10 
Credit card
  5,786    33    34         8,415    46    47 
Other retail
  1,325    37    32         655    15    14 
Total loans, excluding loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools
  8,207    335    301         10,186    191    193 
Loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools
  559    87    89         1,904    266    260 
Total loans
  8,766   $422   $390         12,090   $457   $453 
Residential mortgages, home equity and second mortgages, and loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools in the table above include trial period arrangements offered to customers during the periods presented. The post-modification balances for these loans reflect the current outstanding balance until a permanent modification is made. In addition, the post-modification balances typically include capitalization of unpaid accrued interest and/or fees under the various modification programs. At March 31, 2021, 89 residential mortgages, 33 home equity and second mortgage loans and 304 loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools with outstanding balances of $28 million, $2 million and $52 million, respectively, were in a trial period and have estimated post-modification balances of $28 million, $2 million and $53 million, respectively, assuming permanent modification occurs at the end of the trial period.
The Company has implemented certain restructuring programs that may result in TDRs. However, many of the Company’s TDRs are also determined on a
case-by-case
basis in connection with ongoing loan collection processes.
For the commercial lending segment, modifications generally result in the Company working with borrowers on a
case-by-case
basis. Commercial and commercial real estate modifications generally include extensions of the maturity date and may be accompanied by an increase or decrease to the interest rate, which may not be deemed a market interest rate. In addition, the Company may work with the borrower in identifying other changes that mitigate loss to the Company, which may include additional collateral or guarantees to support the loan. To a lesser extent, the Company may waive contractual principal. The Company classifies all of the above concessions as TDRs to the extent the Company determines that the borrower is experiencing financial difficulty.
Modifications for the consumer lending segment are generally part of programs the Company has initiated. The Company modifies residential mortgage loans under Federal Housing Administration, United States Department of Veterans Affairs, or its own internal programs. Under these programs, the Company offers qualifying homeowners the opportunity to permanently modify their loan and achieve more affordable monthly payments by providing loan concessions. These concessions may include adjustments to interest rates, conversion of adjustable rates to fixed rates, extension of maturity dates or deferrals of payments, capitalization of accrued interest and/or outstanding advances, or in limited situations, partial forgiveness of loan principal. In most instances, participation in residential mortgage loan restructuring programs requires the customer to complete a short-term trial period. A permanent loan modification is contingent on the customer successfully completing the trial period arrangement, and the loan documents are not modified until that time. The Company reports loans in a trial period arrangement as TDRs and continues to report them as TDRs after the trial period.
Credit card and other retail loan TDRs are generally part of distinct restructuring programs providing customers experiencing financial difficulty with modifications whereby balances may be amortized up to 60 months, and generally include waiver of fees and reduced interest rates.
In addition, the Company considers secured loans to consumer borrowers that have debt discharged through bankruptcy where the borrower has not reaffirmed the debt to be TDRs.
Loan modifications or concessions granted to borrowers resulting directly from the effects of the
COVID-19
pandemic, who were otherwise in current payment status, are generally not considered to be TDRs. As of March 31, 2021, approximately $7.3 billion of loan modifications included on the Company’s consolidated balance sheet related to borrowers impacted by the
COVID-19
pandemic, consisting primarily of payment deferrals.
 
46 U.S. Bancorp

The following table provides a summary of TDR loans that defaulted (fully or partially
charged-off
or became 90 days or more past due) for the periods presented, that were modified as TDRs within 12 months previous to default:
  2021        2020 
Three Months Ended March 31
(Dollars in Millions)
 Number
of Loans
   Amount
Defaulted
        Number
of Loans
   Amount
Defaulted
 
Commercial
  285   $16         287   $20 
Commercial real estate
  7    5         16    10 
Residential mortgages
  15    2         13    1 
Credit card
  1,764    9         2,070    10 
Other retail
  280    5         108    1 
Total loans, excluding loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools
  2,351    37         2,494    42 
Loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools
  30    4         304    41 
Total loans
  2,381   $41         2,798   $83 
In addition to the defaults in the table above, the Company had a total of 19 residential mortgage loans, home equity and second mortgage loans and loans purchased from GNMA mortgage pools for the three months ended March 31, 2021, where borrowers did not successfully complete the trial period arrangement and, therefore, are no longer eligible for a permanent modification under the applicable modification program. These loans had aggregate outstanding balances of $4 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021.
As of March 31, 2021, the Company had $134 million of commitments to lend additional funds to borrowers whose terms of their outstanding owed balances have been modified in TDRs.
 
 Note 5
    Accounting for Transfers and Servicing of Financial Assets and Variable Interest Entities
The Company transfers financial assets in the normal course of business. The majority of the Company’s financial asset transfers are residential mortgage loan sales primarily to government-sponsored enterprises (“GSEs”), transfers of
tax-advantaged
investments, commercial loan sales through participation agreements, and other individual or portfolio loan and securities sales. In accordance with the accounting guidance for asset transfers, the Company considers any ongoing involvement with transferred assets in determining whether the assets can be derecognized from the balance sheet. Guarantees provided to certain third parties in connection with the transfer of assets are further discussed in Note 15.
For loans sold under participation agreements, the Company also considers whether the terms of the loan participation agreement meet the accounting definition of a participating interest. With the exception of servicing and certain performance-based guarantees, the Company’s continuing involvement with financial assets sold is minimal and generally limited to market customary representation and warranty clauses. Any gain or loss on sale depends on the previous carrying amount of the transferred financial assets, the consideration received, and any liabilities incurred in exchange for the transferred assets. Upon transfer, any servicing assets and other interests that continue to be held by the Company are initially recognized at fair value. For further information on mortgage servicing rights (“MSRs”), refer to Note 6. On a limited basis, the Company may acquire and package high-grade corporate bonds for select corporate customers, in which the Company generally has no continuing involvement with these transactions. Additionally, the Company is an authorized GNMA issuer and issues GNMA securities on a regular basis. The Company has no other asset securitizations or similar asset-backed financing arrangements that are
off-balance
sheet.
The Company also provides financial support primarily through the use of waivers of trust and investment management fees associated with various unconsolidated registered money market funds it manages. The Company provided $47 million and $8 million of support to the funds during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.
The Company is involved in various entities that are considered to be variable interest entities (“VIEs”). The Company’s investments in VIEs are primarily related to investments promoting affordable housing, community development and renewable energy sources. Some of these
tax-advantaged
investments support the Company’s regulatory compliance with the Community Reinvestment Act. The Company’s investments in these entities generate a return primarily through the realization of federal and state income tax credits, and other tax benefits, such as tax deductions from operating losses of the investments, over specified time periods. These tax credits are recognized as a reduction of tax expense or, for investments qualifying as investment tax credits, as a reduction to the related investment asset. The Company recognized federal and state income tax credits related to its affordable housing and other
tax-advantaged
investments in tax expense of $133 million and $150 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The Company also recognized $37 million and $99 million of investment tax
 
U.S. Bancorp 47

credits for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The Company recognized $126 million and $142 million of expenses related to all of these investments for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, of which $92 million and $101 million, respectively, were included in tax expense and the remaining amounts were included in noninterest expense.
The Company is not required to consolidate VIEs in which it has concluded it does not have a controlling financial interest, and thus is not the primary beneficiary. In such cases, the Company does not have both the power to direct the entities’ most significant activities and the obligation to absorb losses or the right to receive benefits that could potentially be significant to the VIEs.
The Company’s investments in these unconsolidated VIEs are carried in other assets on the Consolidated Balance Sheet. The Company’s unfunded capital and other commitments related to these unconsolidated VIEs are generally carried in other liabilities on the Consolidated Balance Sheet. The Company’s maximum exposure to loss from these unconsolidated VIEs include the investment recorded on the Company’s Consolidated Balance Sheet, net of unfunded capital commitments, and previously recorded tax credits which remain subject to recapture by taxing authorities based on compliance features required to be met at the project level. While the Company believes potential losses from these investments are remote, the maximum exposure was determined by assuming a scenario where the community-based business and housing projects completely fail and do not meet certain government compliance requirements resulting in recapture of the related tax credits.
The following table provides a summary of investments in community development and
tax-advantaged
VIEs that the Company has not consolidated:
 
(Dollars in Millions) March 31,
2021
   December 31,
2020
 
Investment carrying amount
 $5,161   $5,378 
Unfunded capital and other commitments
  2,236    2,334 
Maximum exposure to loss
  10,903    11,219 
The Company also has noncontrolling financial investments in private investment funds and partnerships considered to be VIEs, which are not consolidated. The Company’s recorded investment in these entities, carried in other assets on the Consolidated Balance Sheet, was approximately $35 million at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. The maximum exposure to loss related to these VIEs was $58 million at March 31, 2021 and $57 million at December 31, 2020, representing the Company’s investment balance and its unfunded commitments to invest additional amounts.
The Company’s individual net investments in unconsolidated VIEs, which exclude any unfunded capital commitments, ranged from less than $1 million to $78 million at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020.
The Company is required to consolidate VIEs in which it has concluded it has a controlling financial interest. The Company sponsors entities to which it transfers its interests in
tax-advantaged
investments to third parties. At March 31, 2021, approximately $4.8 billion of the Company’s assets and $3.6 billion of its liabilities included on the Consolidated Balance Sheet were related to community development and
tax-advantaged
investment VIEs which the Company has consolidated, primarily related to these transfers. These amounts compared to $4.9 billion and $3.7 billion, respectively, at December 31, 2020. The majority of the assets of these consolidated VIEs are reported in other assets, and the liabilities are reported in long-term debt and other liabilities. The assets of a particular VIE are the primary source of funds to settle its obligations. The creditors of the VIEs do not have recourse to the general credit of the Company. The Company’s exposure to the consolidated VIEs is generally limited to the carrying value of its variable interests plus any related tax credits previously recognized or transferred to others with a guarantee.
In addition, the Company sponsors a municipal bond securities tender option bond program. The Company controls the activities of the program’s entities, is entitled to the residual returns and provides liquidity and remarketing arrangements to the program. As a result, the Company has consolidated the program’s entities. At March 31, 2021, $1.7 billion of
available-for-sale
investment securities and $1.2 billion of short-term borrowings on the Consolidated Balance Sheet were related to the tender option bond program, compared with $2.4 billion of
available-for-sale
investment securities and $1.5 billion of short-term borrowings at December 31, 2020.
 
48 U.S. Bancorp

 Note 6
    Mortgage Servicing Rights
The Company capitalizes MSRs as separate assets when loans are sold and servicing is retained. MSRs may also be purchased from others. The Company carries MSRs at fair value, with changes in the fair value recorded in earnings during the period in which they occur. The Company serviced $211.6 billion of residential mortgage loans for others at March 31, 2021, and $211.8 billion at December 31, 2020, including subserviced mortgages with no corresponding MSR asset. Included in mortgage banking revenue are the MSR fair value changes arising from market rate and model assumption changes, net of the value change in derivatives used to economically hedge MSRs. These changes resulted in a net loss of $120 million and a net gain of $25 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Loan servicing and ancillary fees, not including valuation changes, included in mortgage banking revenue were $175 million and $186 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.
Changes in fair value of capitalized MSRs are summarized as follows:
 
  Three Months Ended
March 31
 
(Dollars in Millions) 2021  2020 
Balance at beginning of period
 $2,210  $2,546 
Rights purchased
  16   5 
Rights capitalized
  319   201 
Rights sold (a)
     1 
Changes in fair value of MSRs
        
Due to fluctuations in market interest rates (b)
  486   (743
Due to revised assumptions or models (c)
  (102  17 
Other changes in fair value (d)
  (142  (140
Balance at end of period
 $2,787  $1,887 
 
(a)
MSRs sold include those having a negative fair value, resulting from the loans being severely delinquent.
(b)
Includes changes in MSR value associated with changes in market interest rates, including estimated prepayment rates and anticipated earnings on escrow deposits.
(c)
Includes changes in MSR value not caused by changes in market interest rates, such as changes in assumed cost to service, ancillary income and option adjusted spread, as well as the impact of any model changes.
(d)
Primarily the change in MSR value from passage of time and cash flows realized (decay), but also includes the impact of changes to expected cash flows not associated with changes in market interest rates, such as the impact of delinquencies.
The estimated sensitivity to changes in interest rates of the fair value of the MSR portfolio and the r
e
lated derivative instruments was as follows:
 
  March 31, 2021       December 31, 2020 
(Dollars in Millions) Down
100 bps
  Down
50 bps
  Down
25 bps
  Up
25 bps
  Up
50 bps
  Up
100 bps
       Down
100 bps
  Down
50 bps
  Down
25 bps
  Up
25 bps
  Up
50 bps
  Up
100 bps
 
MSR portfolio
 $(563 $(293 $(149 $143  $272  $483       $(442 $(271 $(150 $169  $343  $671 
Derivative instrument hedges
  611   299   146   (136  (266  (513       523   281   145   (149  (304  (625
Net sensitivity
 $48  $6  $(3 $7  $6  $(30      $81  $10  $(5 $20  $39  $46 
The fair value of MSRs and their sensitivity to changes in interest rates is influenced by the mix of the servicing portfolio and characteristics of each segment of the portfolio. The Company’s servicing portfolio consists of the distinct portfolios of government-insured mortgages, conventional mortgages and Housing Finance Agency (“HFA”) mortgages. The servicing portfolios are predominantly comprised of fixed-rate agency loans with limited adjustable-rate or jumbo mortgage loans. The HFA servicing portfolio is comprised of loans originated under state and local housing authority program guidelines which assist purchases by first-time or
low-
to moderate-income homebuyers through a favorable rate subsidy, down payment and/or closing cost assistance on government- and conventional-insured mortgages.
 
U.S. Bancorp 49

A summary of the Company’s MSRs and related characteristics by portfolio was as follows:
 
  March 31, 2021      December 31, 2020 
(Dollars in Millions) HFA  Government  Conventional (d)  Total      HFA  Government  Conventional (d)  Total 
Servicing portfolio (a)
 $39,757  $23,734  $145,171  $208,662      $40,396  $25,474  $143,085  $208,955 
Fair value
 $499  $312  $1,976  $2,787      $406  $261  $1,543  $2,210 
Value (bps) (b)
  126   131   136   134       101   102   108   106 
Weighted-average servicing fees (bps)
  35   40   30   32       35   40   30   32 
Multiple (value/servicing fees)
  3.56   3.31   4.47   4.12       2.87   2.56   3.55   3.26 
Weighted-average note rate
  4.33  3.88  3.64  3.80      4.43  3.91  3.78  3.92
Weighted-average age (in years)
  3.8   5.9   3.8   4.0       3.8   5.6   4.2   4.3 
Weighted-average expected prepayment (constant prepayment rate)
  11.2  13.3  9.5  10.3      14.1  18.0  13.8  14.4
Weighted-average expected life (in years)
  6.8   5.6   6.9   6.7       5.6   4.3   5.5   5.4 
Weighted-average option adjusted spread (c)
  7.7  7.3  6.3  6.7      7.7  7.3  6.2  6.6
(a)
Represents principal balance of mortgages having corresponding MSR asset.
(b)
Calculated as fair value divided by the servicing portfolio.
(c)
Option adjusted spread is the incremental spread added to the risk-free rate to reflect optionality and other risk inherent in the MSRs.
(d)
Represents loans sold primarily to GSEs.
 
 Note 7
    Preferred Stock
At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Company had authority to issue 50 million shares of preferred stock. The number of shares issued and outstanding and the carrying amount of each outstanding series of the Company’s preferred stock were as follows:
 
  March 31, 2021        December 31, 2020 
(Dollars in Millions) Shares
Issued and
Outstanding
   Liquidation
Preference
   Discount   Carrying
Amount
        Shares
Issued and
Outstanding
   Liquidation
Preference
   Discount   Carrying
Amount
 
Series A
  12,510   $1,251   $145   $1,106         12,510   $1,251   $145   $1,106 
Series B
  40,000    1,000        1,000         40,000    1,000        1,000 
Series F
  44,000    1,100    12    1,088         44,000    1,100    12    1,088 
Series I
  —      —      —      —           30,000    750    5    745 
Series J
  40,000    1,000    7    993         40,000    1,000    7    993 
Series K
  23,000    575    10    565         23,000    575    10    565 
Series L
  20,000    500    14    486         20,000    500    14    486 
Series M
  30,000    750    20    730         —      —      —      —   
Total preferred stock (a)
  209,510   $6,176   $208   $5,968         209,510   $6,176   $193   $5,983 
 
(a)
The par value of all shares issued and outstanding at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, was $1.00 per share.
During the first quarter of 2021, the Company issued depositary shares representing an ownership interest in 30,000 shares of Series M
Non-Cumulative
Perpetual Preferred Stock with a liquidation preference of $25,000 per share (the “Series M Preferred Stock”). The Series M Preferred Stock has no stated maturity and will not be subject to any sinking fund or other obligation of the Company. Dividends, if declared, will accrue and be payable quarterly, in arrears, at a rate per annum equal to 4.00 percent. The Series M Preferred Stock is redeemable at the Company’s option, in whole or in part, on or after April 15, 2026. The Series M Preferred Stock is redeemable at the Company’s option, in whole, but not in part, prior to April 15, 2026 within 90 days following an official administrative or judicial decision, amendment to, or change in the laws or regulations that would not allow the Company to treat the full liquidation value of the Series M Preferred Stock as Tier 1 capital for purposes of the capital adequacy guidelines of the Federal Reserve Board.
During the first quarter of 2021, the Company provided notice of its intent to redeem all outstanding shares of the Series I
Non-Cumulative
Perpetual Preferred Stock (the “Series I Preferred Stock”) during the second quarter of 2021. The Company removed the outstanding liquidation preference amount of the Series I Preferred Stock from shareholders’ equity and included it in other liabilities on the Consolidated Balance Sheet as of March 31, 2021, because upon the notification date it became mandatorily redeemable. The liquidation preference amount equals the redemption price for all outstanding shares of the Series I Preferred Stock. The Company included a $5 million loss in the computation of earnings per diluted common share for the first quarter of 2021, which represents the stock issuance costs recorded in preferred stock upon the issuance of the Series I Preferred Stock that were reclassified to retained earnings on the notification date. On April 15, 2021, the Company redeemed all outstanding shares of the Series I Preferred Stock.
 
50 U.S. Bancorp

 Note 8
 
   Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Shareholders’ equity is affected by transactions and valuations of asset and liability positions that r
e
quire adjustments to accumulated other comprehensive income (loss). The reconciliation of the transactions affecting accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) included in shareholders’ equity for the three months ended March 31, is as follows:
 
(Dollars in Millions) Unrealized Gains
(Losses) on
Investment
Securities
Available-For-

Sale
  
Unrealized Gains
(Losses) on
Derivative Hedges
  Unrealized Gains
(Losses) on
Retirement Plans
  Foreign
Currency
Translation
  Total 
2021
                    
Balance at beginning of period
 $2,417  $(189 $(1,842 $(64 $322 
Changes in unrealized gains and losses
  (3,378  99   0      (3,279
Foreign currency translation adjustment (a)
           25   25 
Reclassification to earnings of realized gains and losses
  (25  4   39      18 
Applicable income taxes
  861   (26  (10  (6  819 
Balance at end of period
 $(125 $(112 $(1,813 $(45 $(2,095
2020
                    
Balance at beginning of period
 $379  $(51 $(1,636 $(65 $(1,373
Changes in unrealized gains and losses
  2,787   (257        2,530 
Foreign currency translation adjustment (a)
           (13  (13
Reclassification to earnings of realized gains and losses
  (50  13   31      (6
Applicable income taxes
  (692  62   (8  3   (635
Balance at end of period
 $2,424  $(233 $(1,613 $(75 $503 
 
(a)
Represents the impact of changes in foreign currency exchange rates on the Company’s investment in foreign operations and related hedges.
Additional detail about the impact to net income for items reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) and into earnings for the three months ended March 31, is as follows:
 
  Impact to Net Income  Affected Line Item in the
Consolidated Statement of Income
(Dollars in Millions) 2021       2020 
Unrealized gains (losses) on investment securities
available-for-sale
            
Realized gains (losses) on sale of investment securities
 $25       $50  Securities gains (losses), net
   (6       (13 Applicable income taxes
   19        37  
Net-of-tax
Unrealized gains (losses) on derivative hedges
               
Realized gains (losses) on derivative hedges
  (4       (13 Interest expense
   1        3  Applicable income taxes
   (3       (10 
Net-of-tax
Unrealized gains (losses) on retirement plans
               
Actuarial gains (losses) and prior service cost (credit) amortization
  (39       (31 Other noninterest expense
   10        8  Applicable income taxes
   (29       (23 
Net-of-tax
     
Total impact to net income
 $(13      $4   
 
 Note 9
 
   Earnings Per Share
The components of earnings per share were:
 
  
Three Months
 
Ended 
March 31
 
(Dollars and Shares in Millions, Except Per Share Data)     2021             2020 
Net income attributable to U.S. Bancorp
 $2,280��      $1,171 
Preferred dividends
  (90       (78
Impact of preferred stock call (a)
  (5        
Earnings allocated to participating stock awards
  (10       (5
Net income applicable to U.S. Bancorp common shareholders
 $2,175       $1,088 
Average common shares outstanding
  1,502        1,518 
Net effect of the exercise and assumed purchase of stock awards
  1        1 
Average diluted common shares outstanding
  1,503        1,519 
Earnings per common share
 $1.45       $.72 
Diluted earnings per common share
 $1.45       $.72 
 
(a)
Represents stock issuance costs originally recorded in preferred stock upon issuance of the Company’s Series I Preferred Stock that were reclassified to retained earnings on the date the Company announced its intent to redeem the outstanding shares.
 
U.S. Bancorp 51

Options outstanding at March 31, 2021 and 2020, to purchase 1 million common shares, were not included in the computation of diluted earnings per share for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, because they were antidilutive.
 
 Note 10
 
   Employee Benefits
The components of net periodic benefit cost for the Company’s retirement p
l
ans were:
 
  Three Months Ended March 31 
  Pension Plans   Postretirement
Welfare Plan
 
(Dollars in Millions) 2021  2020   2021  2020 
Service cost
 $66  $59   $  $ 
Interest cost
  55   58       1 
Expected return on plan assets
  (112  (101      (1
Prior service cost (credit) amortization
         (1  (1
Actuarial loss (gain) amortization
  42   34    (2  (2
Net periodic benefit cost (a)
 $51  $50   $(3 $(3
 
(a)
Service cost is included in employee benefits expense on the Consolidated Statement of Income. All other components are included in other noninterest expense on the Consolidated Statement of Income.
 
Note 11
 
   Income Taxes
The components of income tax expense were:
 
   
  Three Months Ended  
March 31
 
(Dollars in Millions)  2021   2020 
Federal
          
Current
  $353   $315 
Deferred
   130    (106
Federal income tax
   483    209 
State
          
Current
   94    70 
Deferred
   30    (19
   
State income tax
   124    51 
Total income tax provision
  $607   $260 
A reconciliation of expected income tax expense at the federal statutory rate of 21 percent to the Company’s applicable income tax expense follows:
 
   
  Three Months Ended  
March 31
 
(Dollars in Millions)  2021  2020 
Tax at statutory rate
  $607  $302 
State income tax, at statutory rates, net of federal tax benefit
   114   59 
Tax effect of
         
Tax credits and benefits, net of related expenses
   (93  (102
Tax-exempt
income
   (28  (29
Other items
   7   30 
Applicable income taxes
  $607  $260 
The Company’s income tax returns are subject to review and examination by federal, state, local and foreign government authorities. On an ongoing basis, numerous federal, state, local and foreign examinations are in progress and cover multiple tax years. As of March 31, 2021, federal tax examinations for all years ending through December 31, 2014 are completed and resolved. The Company’s tax returns for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 are under examination by the Internal Revenue Service. The years open to examination by foreign, state and local government authorities vary by jurisdiction.
The Company’s net deferred tax asset was $1.3 billion at March 31, 2021 and $597 million at December 31, 2020.
 
52 U.S. Bancorp

 Note 12
 
   Derivative Instruments
In the ordinary course of business, the Company enters into derivative transactions to manage various risks and to accommodate the business requirements of its customers. The Company recognizes all derivatives on the Consolidated Balance Sheet at fair value in other assets or in other liabilities. On the date the Company enters into a derivative contract, the derivative is designated as either a fair value hedge, cash flow hedge, net investment hedge, or a designation is not made as it is a customer-related transaction, an economic hedge for asset/liability risk management purposes or another stand-alone derivative created through the Company’s operations (“free-standing derivative”). When a derivative is designated as a fair value, cash flow or net investment hedge, the Company performs an assessment, at inception and, at a minimum, quarterly thereafter, to determine the effectiveness of the derivative in offsetting changes in the value or cash flows of the hedged item(s).
Fair Value Hedges
These derivatives are interest rate swaps the Company uses to hedge the change in fair value related to interest rate changes of its underlying
available-for-sale
investment securities and fixed-rate debt. Changes in the fair value of derivatives designated as fair value hedges, and changes in the fair value of the hedged items, are recorded in earnings.
Cash Flow Hedges
These derivatives are interest rate swaps the Company uses to hedge the forecasted cash flows from its underlying variable-rate debt. Changes in the fair value of derivatives designated as cash flow hedges are recorded in other comprehensive income (loss) until the cash flows of the hedged items are realized. If a derivative designated as a cash flow hedge is terminated or ceases to be highly effective, the gain or loss in other comprehensive income (loss) is amortized to earnings over the period the forecasted hedged transactions impact earnings. If a hedged forecasted transaction is no longer probable, hedge accounting is ceased and any gain or loss included in other comprehensive income (loss) is reported in earnings immediately, unless the forecasted transaction is at least reasonably possible of occurring, whereby the amounts remain within other comprehensive income (loss). At March 31, 2021, the Company had $112 million
(net-of-tax)
of realized and unrealized losses on derivatives classified as cash flow hedges recorded in other comprehensive income (loss), compared with $189 million
(net-of-tax)
of realized and unrealized losses at December 31, 2020. The estimated amount to be reclassified from other comprehensive income (loss) into earnings during the remainder of 2021 and the next 12 months are losses of $31 million
(net-of-tax)
and $39 million
(net-of-tax),
respectively. All cash flow hedges were highly effective for the three months ended March 31, 2021.
Net Investment Hedges
 The Company uses forward commitments to sell specified amounts of certain foreign currencies, and
non-derivative
debt instruments, to hedge the volatility of its net investment in foreign operations driven by fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. The carrying amount of
non-derivative
debt instruments designated as net investment hedges was $1.4 billion at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020.
Other Derivative Positions
 The Company enters into free-standing derivatives to mitigate interest rate risk and for other risk management purposes. These derivatives include forward commitments to sell
to-be-announced
securities (“TBAs”) and other commitments to sell residential mortgage loans, which are used to economically hedge the interest rate risk related to mortgage loans held for sale (“MLHFS”) and unfunded mortgage loan commitments. The Company also enters into interest rate swaps, swaptions, forward commitments to buy TBAs, U.S. Treasury and Eurodollar futures and options on U.S. Treasury futures to economically hedge the change in the fair value of the Company’s MSRs. The Company also enters into foreign currency forwards to economically hedge remeasurement gains and losses the Company recognizes on foreign currency denominated assets and liabilities. In addition, the Company acts as a seller and buyer of interest rate derivatives and foreign exchange contracts for its customers. The Company mitigates the market and liquidity risk associated with these customer derivatives by entering into similar offsetting positions with broker-dealers, or on a portfolio basis by entering into other derivative or
non-derivative
financial instruments that partially or fully offset the exposure to earnings from these customer-related positions. The Company’s customer derivatives and related hedges are monitored and reviewed by the Company’s Market Risk Committee, which establishes policies for market risk management, including exposure limits for each portfolio. The Company also has derivative contracts that are created through its operations, including certain unfunded mortgage loan commitments and swap agreements related to the sale of a portion of its Class B common and preferred shares of Visa Inc. Refer to Note 14 for further information on these swap agreements.
 
U.S. Bancorp 53

The following table summarizes the asset and liability management derivative positions of the Company:
 
  Asset Derivatives        Liability Derivatives 
(Dollars in Millions) 
Notional
Value
   
Fair
Value
   
Weighted-
Average
Remaining
Maturity
In Years
        
Notional
Value
   
Fair
Value
   
Weighted-
Average
Remaining
Maturity
In Years
 
March 31, 2021
                                  
Fair value hedges
                                  
Interest rate contracts
                                  
Receive fixed/pay floating swaps
 $6,600   $    1.96        $   $     
Cash flow hedges
                                  
Interest rate contracts
                                  
Pay fixed/receive floating swaps
                   3,250        4.34 
Net investment hedges
                                  
Foreign exchange forward contracts
  781    10    .05                  
Other economic hedges
                                  
Interest rate contracts
                                  
Futures and forwards
                                  
Buy
  6,044    31    .06         11,179    107    .10 
Sell
  30,218    349    .19         9,364    66    .04 
Options
                                  
Purchased
  18,370    290    3.68                  
Written
  4,373    109    .12         6,740    300    2.33 
Receive fixed/pay floating swaps
  4,333        4.72         6,373        10.03 
Pay fixed/receive floating swaps
  3,379        4.20         4,389        4.85 
Foreign exchange forward contracts
  270    1    .06         344    2    .04 
Equity contracts
  117        .33         74    2    .19 
Other (a)
  311    5    .03         2,096    172    1.92 
Total
 $74,796   $795             $43,809   $649      
December 31, 2020
                                  
Fair value hedges
                                  
Interest rate contracts
                                  
Receive fixed/pay floating swaps
 $8,400   $    1.76        $   $     
Pay fixed/receive floating swaps
                   100        9.63 
Cash flow hedges
                                  
Interest rate contracts
                                  
Pay fixed/receive floating swaps
                   3,250        4.59 
Net investment hedges
                                  
Foreign exchange forward contracts
  479        .06         336    3    .06 
Other economic hedges
                                  
Interest rate contracts
                                  
Futures and forwards
                                  
Buy
  16,431    73    .50         1,925    5    .07 
Sell
  10,440    48    .04         28,976    157    .07 
Options
                                  
Purchased
  11,610    121    4.11                  
Written
  5,073    202    .13         7,770    198    2.53 
Receive fixed/pay floating swaps
  11,064        7.31         907        23.43 
Pay fixed/receive floating swaps
  78        13.68         8,538        5.67 
Foreign exchange forward contracts
  292    1    .04         341    2    .05 
Equity contracts
  127    3    .39         45        .46 
Other (a)
  47    1    .11         1,832    183    2.44 
Total
 $64,041   $449             $54,020   $548      
 
(a)
Includes derivative liability swap agreements related to the sale of a portion of the Company’s Class B common and preferred shares of Visa Inc. The Visa swap agreements had a total notional value, fair value and weighted-average remaining maturity of $1.8 billion, $167 million and 2.25 years at March 31, 2021, respectively, compared to $1.8 billion, $182 million and 2.50 years at December 31, 2020, respectively. In addition, includes short-term underwriting purchase and sale commitments with total asset and liability notional values of $311 million at March 31, 2021, and $47 million at December 31, 2020.
 
54 U.S. Bancorp

The following table summarizes the customer-related derivative positions of the Company:
 
  Asset Derivatives        Liability Derivatives 
(Dollars in Millions) Notional
Value
   Fair
Value
   Weighted-
Average
Remaining
Maturity In
Years
        Notional
Value
   Fair
Value
   Weighted-
Average
Remaining
Maturity In
Years
 
March 31, 2021
                                  
Interest rate contracts
                                  
Receive fixed/pay floating swaps
 $121,392   $2,416    4.42        $40,305   $494    7.50 
Pay fixed/receive floating swaps
  39,173    115    7.22         115,251    801    4.32 
Other (a)
  9,128    2    3.74         6,901    2    4.73 
Options
                                  
Purchased
  80,134    204    1.32         1,465    31    2.71 
Written
  1,391    31    2.77         75,365    195    1.25 
Futures
                                  
Buy
  921        .95         1,628        1.14 
Sell
  1,468        1.10         1,310        .45 
Foreign exchange rate contracts
                                  
Forwards, spots and swaps
  41,612    1,307    1.09         41,887    1,284    1.25 
Options
                                  
Purchased
  650    23    .98                  
Written
                   650    20    .98 
Credit contracts
  2,906    1    2.68         7,495    10    4.45 
Total
 $298,775   $4,099             $292,257   $2,837      
December 31, 2020
                                  
Interest rate contracts
                                  
Receive fixed/pay floating swaps
 $144,859   $3,782    4.93        $12,027   $99    8.72 
Pay fixed/receive floating swaps
  15,048    2    8.43         134,963    1,239    4.71 
Other (a)
  9,921    6    3.75         6,387    3    4.22 
Options
                                  
Purchased
  72,655    111    1.40         1,454    46    2.96 
Written
  1,736    46    2.76         68,205    81    1.25 
Futures
                                  
Buy
  1,851        1.22         924        .05 
Sell
                   4,090        .72 
Foreign exchange rate contracts
                                  
Forwards, spots and swaps
  44,845    1,590    .96         45,992    1,565    1.13 
Options
                                  
Purchased
  519    14    .90                  
Written
                   519    14    .90 
Credit contracts
  2,876    1    2.75         7,479    7    3.81 
Total
 $294,310   $5,552             $282,040   $3,054      
 
(a)
Primarily represents floating rate interest rate swaps that pay based on differentials between specified interest rate indexes.     
The table below shows the effective portion of the gains (losses) recognized in other comprehensive income (loss) and the gains (losses) reclassified from other comprehensive income (loss) into earnings
(net-of-tax)
for the three months ended March 31:
 
  
Gains (Losses)
Recognized in
Other
  Comprehensive  
Income
(Loss)
  Gains (Losses)
Reclassified from
Other
Comprehensive
Income
  (Loss) into Earnings  
 
(Dollars in Millions) 2021   2020  2021  2020 
Asset and Liability Management Positions
                  
Cash flow hedges
                  
Interest rate contracts
 $74   $(192 $ (3 $(10
Net investment hedges
                  
Foreign exchange forward contracts
  7    16        
Non-derivative
debt instruments
  48    25        
 
Note:
The Company does not exclude components from effectiveness testing for cash flow and net investment hedges.    
 
U.S. Bancorp 55

The table below shows the effect of fair value and cash flow hedge accounting on the Consolidated Statement of I
n
come for the three months ended March 31:
 
  Interest Income        Interest Expense 
(Dollars in Millions) 2021  2020        2021  2020 
Total amount of income and expense line items presented in the Consolidated Statement of Income in which the effects of fair value or cash flow hedges are recorded
 $3,341  $4,116        $278  $893 
      
Asset and Liability Management Positions
                      
Fair value hedges
                      
Interest rate contract derivatives
  (1           55   (1,035
Hedged items
  1            (55  1,028 
Cash flow hedges
                      
Interest rate contract derivatives
              4   13 
 
Note:
The Company does not exclude components from effectiveness testing for fair value and cash flow hedges. The Company reclassified losses of $15 million into earnings during the three months ended March 31, 2021, as a result of the discontinuance of cash flow hedges. The Company did 0t reclassify gains or losses into earnings as a result of the discontinuance of cash flow hedges during the three months ended March 31, 2020.
The table below shows cumulative hedging adjustments and the carrying amount of assets and liabilities designated in fair value hedges:    
 
  Carrying Amount of the Hedged Assets
and Liabilities
        Cumulative Hedging Adjustment (a) 
(Dollars in Millions) March 31, 2021   December 31, 2020        March 31, 2021  December 31, 2020 
Line Item in the Consolidated Balance Sheet
         
Available-for-sale
investment securities
 $   $99        $(4 $(1
Long-term debt
  6,713    8,567         800   903 
 
(a)
The cumulative hedging adjustment related to the discontinued hedging relationships on available-for-sale investment securities and long-term debt was
$(4) million and $678
 
million, respectively, at March 31, 2021. The cumulative hedging adjustment related to discontinued hedging relationships on long-term debt was $726 million at December 31, 2020. 
The table below shows the gains (losses) recognized in earnings for other economic hedges and the customer-related positions for the three months ended March 31:
 
(Dollars in Millions)  Location of Gains (Losses)
Recognized in Earnings
   2021  2020 
Asset and Liability Management Positions
              
Other economic hedges
              
Interest rate contracts
              
Futures and forwards
   Mortgage banking revenue/
other noninterest income

 
  $430  $(75
Purchased and written options
   Mortgage banking revenue    12   280 
Swaps
   Mortgage banking revenue    (390  729 
Foreign exchange forward contracts
   Other noninterest income    (3  17 
Equity contracts
   Compensation expense    4   (4
Other
   Other noninterest income       (1
Customer-Related Positions
              
Interest rate contracts
              
Swaps
   Commercial products revenue    27   (22
Purchased and written options
   Commercial products revenue    (7  17 
Futures
   Commercial products revenue       (18
Foreign exchange rate contracts
              
Forwards, spots and swaps
   Commercial products revenue    19   17 
Purchased and written options
   Commercial products revenue        
Credit contracts
   Commercial products revenue    2   18 
Derivatives are subject to credit risk associated with counterparties to the derivative contracts. The Company measures that credit risk using a credit valuation adjustment and includes it within the fair value of the derivative. The Company manages counterparty credit risk through diversification of its derivative positions among various counterparties, by entering into derivative positions that are centrally cleared through clearinghouses, by entering into master netting arrangements and, where possible, by requiring collateral arrangements. A master netting arrangement allows two counterparties, who have multiple derivative contracts with each other, the ability to net settle amounts under all contracts, including any related collateral, through a single payment and in a single currency. Collateral arrangements generally require the counterparty to deliver collateral (typically cash or U.S. Treasury and agency securities) equal to the Company’s net derivative receivable, subject to minimum transfer and credit rating requirements.
 
56 U.S. Bancorp

The Company’s collateral arrangements are predominately bilateral and, therefore, contain provisions that require collateralization of the Company’s net liability derivative positions. Required collateral coverage is based on net liability thresholds and may be contingent upon the Company’s credit rating from two of the nationally recognized statistical rating organizations. If the Company’s credit rating were to fall below credit ratings thresholds established in the collateral arrangements, the counterparties to the derivatives could request immediate additional collateral coverage up to and including full collateral coverage for derivatives in a net liability position. The aggregate fair value of all derivatives under collateral arrangements that were in a net liability position at March 31, 2021, was $1.0 billion. At March 31, 2021, the Company had $783 million of cash posted as collateral against this net liability position.
 
 
Note 13
 Netting Arrangements for Certain Financial Instruments and Securities Financing Activities
    
The Company’s derivative portfolio consists of bilateral
over-the-counter
trades, certain interest rate derivatives and credit contracts required to be centrally cleared through clearinghouses per current regulations, and exchange-traded positions which may include U.S. Treasury and Eurodollar futures or options on U.S. Treasury futures. Of the Company’s $709.6 billion total notional amount of derivative positions at March 31, 2021, $375.4 billion related to bilateral
over-the-counter
trades, $319.4 billion related to those centrally cleared through clearinghouses and $14.8 billion related to those that were exchange-traded. The Company’s derivative contracts typically include offsetting rights (referred to as netting arrangements), and depending on expected volume, credit risk, and counterparty preference, collateral maintenance may be required. For all derivatives under collateral support arrangements, fair value is determined daily and, depending on the collateral maintenance requirements, the Company and a counterparty may receive or deliver collateral, based upon the net fair value of all derivative positions between the Company and the counterparty. Collateral is typically cash, but securities may be allowed under collateral arrangements with certain counterparties. Receivables and payables related to cash collateral are included in other assets and other liabilities on the Consolidated Balance Sheet, along with the related derivative asset and liability fair values. Any securities pledged to counterparties as collateral remain on the Consolidated Balance Sheet. Securities received from counterparties as collateral are not recognized on the Consolidated Balance Sheet, unless the counterparty defaults. In general, securities used as collateral can be sold, repledged or otherwise used by the party in possession. No restrictions exist on the use of cash collateral by either party. Refer to Note 12 for further discussion of the Company’s derivatives, including collateral arrangements.
As part of the Company’s treasury and broker-dealer operations, the Company executes transactions that are treated as securities sold under agreements to repurchase or securities purchased under agreements to resell, both of which are accounted for as collateralized financings. Securities sold under agreements to repurchase include repurchase agreements and securities loaned transactions. Securities purchased under agreements to resell include reverse repurchase agreements and securities borrowed transactions. For securities sold under agreements to repurchase, the Company records a liability for the cash received, which is included in short-term borrowings on the Consolidated Balance Sheet. For securities purchased under agreements to resell, the Company records a receivable for the cash paid, which is included in other assets on the Consolidated Balance Sheet.
Securities transferred to counterparties under repurchase agreements and securities loaned transactions continue to be recognized on the Consolidated Balance Sheet, are measured at fair value, and are included in investment securities or other assets. Securities received from counterparties under reverse repurchase agreements and securities borrowed transactions are not recognized on the Consolidated Balance Sheet unless the counterparty defaults. The securities transferred under repurchase and reverse repurchase transactions typically are U.S. Treasury and agency securities, residential agency mortgage-backed securities or corporate debt securities. The securities loaned or borrowed typically are corporate debt securities traded by the Company’s broker-dealer subsidiary. In general, the securities transferred can be sold, repledged or otherwise used by the party in possession. No restrictions exist on the use of cash collateral by either party. Repurchase/reverse repurchase and securities loaned/borrowed transactions expose the Company to counterparty risk. The Company manages this risk by performing assessments, independent of business line managers, and establishing concentration limits on each counterparty. Additionally, these transactions include collateral arrangements that require the fair values of the underlying securities to be determined daily, resulting in cash being obtained or refunded to counterparties to maintain specified collateral levels.
 
U.S. Bancorp 57

The following table summarizes the maturities by category of collateral pledged for repurchase agreements and securities loaned transactions:
 
(Dollars in Millions) Overnight and
Continuous
   Less Than
30 Days
   
30-89

Days
   Greater Than
90 Days
   Total 
      
March 31, 2021
                        
Repurchase agreements
                        
U.S. Treasury and agencies
 
$
272
   
$
   
$
   
$
   
$
272
 
Residential agency mortgage-backed securities
  
588
    
    
    
    
588
 
Corporate debt securities
  
814
    
    
    
    
814
 
Total repurchase agreements
  
1,674
    
    
    
    
1,674
 
Securities loaned
                        
Corporate debt securities
  
230
    
    
    
    
230
 
Total securities loaned
  
230
    
    
    
    
230
 
Gross amount of recognized liabilities
 
$
1,904
   
$
   
$
   
$
   
$
1,904
 
December 31, 2020
                        
Repurchase agreements
                        
U.S. Treasury and agencies
 
$
472
   
$
   
$
   
$
   
$
472
 
Residential agency mortgage-backed securities
  
398
    
    
    
    
398
 
Corporate debt securities
  
560
    
    
    
    
560
 
Total repurchase agreements
  
1,430
    
    
    
    
1,430
 
Securities loaned
                        
Corporate debt securities
  
218
    
    
    
    
218
 
Total securities loaned
  
218
    
    
    
    
218
 
Gross amount of recognized liabilities
 
$
1,648
   
$
   
$
   
$
   
$
1,648
 
The Company executes its derivative, repurchase/reverse repurchase and securities loaned/borrowed transactions under the respective industry standard agreements. These agreements include master netting arrangements that allow for multiple contracts executed with the same counterparty to be viewed as a single arrangement. This allows for net settlement of a single amount on a daily basis. In the event of default, the master netting arrangement provides for
close-out
netting, which allows all of these positions with the defaulting counterparty to be terminated and net settled with a single payment amount.
The Company has elected to offset the assets and liabilities under netting arrangements for the balance sheet presentation of the majority of its derivative counterparties. The netting occurs at the counterparty level, and includes all assets and liabilities related to the derivative contracts, including those associated with cash collateral received or delivered. The Company has not elected to offset the assets and liabilities under netting arrangements for the balance sheet presentation of repurchase/reverse repurchase and securities loaned/borrowed transactions.
The following tables provide information on the Company’s netting adjustments, and items not offset on the Consolidated Balance Sheet but available for offset in the event of default:
 
(Dollars in Millions)
 
Gross
Recognized
Assets
   
Gross Amounts
Offset on the
Consolidated
Balance Sheet (a)
  
Net Amounts
Presented on the
Consolidated
Balance Sheet
   Gross Amounts Not Offset on the
Consolidated Balance Sheet
  Net Amount 
  Financial
Instruments (b)
  Collateral
Received (c)
 
March 31, 2021
                          
Derivative assets (d)
 
$
4,776
   
$
(1,938
 
$
2,838
   
$
(159
 
$
(147
 
$
2,532
 
Reverse repurchase agreements
  
403
    
   
403
    
(207
  
(196
  
 
Securities borrowed
  
1,915
    
   
1,915
    
   
(1,862
  
53
 
Total
 
$
7,094
   
$
(1,938
 
$
5,156
   
$
(366
 
$
(2,205
 
$
2,585
 
December 31, 2020
                          
Derivative assets (d)
 
$
5,744
   
$
(1,874
 
$
3,870
   
$
(109
 
$
(287
 
$
3,474
 
Reverse repurchase agreements
  
377
    
   
377
    
(262
  
(115
  
 
Securities borrowed
  
1,716
    
   
1,716
    
   
(1,670
  
46
 
Total
 
$
7,837
   
$
(1,874
 
$
5,963
   
$
(371
 
$
(2,072
 
$
3,520
 
 
(a)
Includes $637 million and $898 million of cash collateral related payables that were netted against derivative assets at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.
(b)
For derivative assets this includes any derivative liability fair values that could be offset in the event of counterparty default; for reverse repurchase agreements this includes any repurchase agreement payables that could be offset in the event of counterparty default; for securities borrowed this includes any securities loaned payables that could be offset in the event of counterparty default.
(c)
Includes the fair value of securities received by the Company from the counterparty. These securities are not included on the Consolidated Balance Sheet unless the counterparty defaults.
(d)
Excludes $118 million and $257 million at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively, of derivative assets not subject to netting arrangements.
 
58 U.S. Bancorp

(Dollars in Millions) 
Gross
Recognized
Liabilities
   
Gross Amounts
Offset on the
Consolidated
Balance Sheet (a)
  
Net Amounts
Presented on the
Consolidated
Balance Sheet
   Gross Amounts Not Offset on the
Consolidated Balance Sheet
  Net Amount 
  Financial
Instruments (b)
  Collateral
Pledged (c)
 
March 31, 2021
                          
Derivative liabilities (d)
 
$
3,280
   
$
(2,084
 
$
1,196
   
$
(159
 
$
  
$
1,037
 
Repurchase agreements
  
1,674
    
   
1,674
    
(207
  
(1,465
  
2
 
Securities loaned
  
230
    
   
230
    
   
(227
  
3
 
Total
 
$
5,184
   
$
(2,084
 
$
3,100
   
$
(366
 
$
(1,692
 
$
1,042
 
December 31, 2020
                          
Derivative liabilities (d)
 
$
3,419
   
$
(2,312
 
$
1,107
   
$
(109
 
$
  
$
998
 
Repurchase agreements
  
1,430
    
   
1,430
    
(262
  
(1,168
  
 
Securities loaned
  
218
    
   
218
    
   
(215
  
3
 
Total
 
$
5,067
   
$
(2,312
 
$
2,755
   
$
(371
 
$
(1,383
 
$
1,001
 
 
(a)
Includes $783 million and $1.3 billion of cash collateral related receivables that were netted against derivative liabilities at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.
(b)
For derivative liabilities this includes any derivative asset fair values that could be offset in the event of counterparty default; for repurchase agreements this includes any reverse repurchase agreement receivables that could be offset in the event of counterparty default; for securities loaned this includes any securities borrowed receivables that could be offset in the event of counterparty default.     
(c)
Includes the fair value of securities pledged by the Company to the counterparty. These securities are included on the Consolidated Balance Sheet unless the Company defaults.    
(d)
Excludes $206 million and $183 million at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively, of derivative liabilities not subject to netting arrangements.
 
 Note 14
    Fair Values of Assets and Liabilities
The Company uses fair value measurements for the initial recording of certain assets and liabilities, periodic remeasurement of certain assets and liabilities, and disclosures. Derivatives, trading and
available-for-sale
investment securities, MSRs and substantially all MLHFS are recorded at fair value on a recurring basis. Additionally, from time to time, the Company may be required to record at fair value other assets on a nonrecurring basis, such as loans held for sale, loans held for investment and certain other assets. These nonrecurring fair value adjustments typically involve application of
lower-of-cost-or-fair
value accounting or impairment write-downs of individual assets.
Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. A fair value measurement reflects all of the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability, including assumptions about the risk inherent in a particular valuation technique, the effect of a restriction on the sale or use of an asset and the risk of nonperformance.
The Company groups its assets and liabilities measured at fair value into a three-level hierarchy for valuation techniques used to measure financial assets and financial liabilities at fair value. This hierarchy is based on whether the valuation inputs are observable or unobservable. These levels are:
  
Level 1 — Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 1 includes U.S. Treasury securities, as well as exchange-traded instruments.
  
Level 2 — Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities. Level 2 includes debt securities that are traded less frequently than exchange-traded instruments and which are typically valued using third party pricing services; derivative contracts and other assets and liabilities, including securities, whose value is determined using a pricing model with inputs that are observable in the market or can be derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data; and MLHFS whose values are determined using quoted prices for similar assets or pricing models with inputs that are observable in the market or can be corroborated by observable market data.
  
Level 3 — Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities. Level 3 assets and liabilities include financial instruments whose values are determined using pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies, or similar techniques, as well as instruments for which the determination of fair value requires significant management judgment or estimation. This category includes MSRs and certain derivative contracts.
Valuation Methodologies
The valuation methodologies used by the Company to measure financial assets and liabilities at fair value are described below. In addition, the following section includes an indication of the level of the fair value hierarchy in which the
 
U.S. Bancorp 59

assets or liabilities are classified. Where appropriate, the descriptions include information about the valuation models and key inputs to those models. During the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, there were no significant changes to the valuation techniques used by the Company to measure fair value.
Available-For-Sale
Investment Securities
 When quoted market prices for identical securities are available in an active market, these prices are used to determine fair value and these securities are classified within Level 1 of the fair value hierarchy. Level 1 investment securities include U.S. Treasury and exchange-traded securities.
For other securities, quoted market prices may not be readily available for the specific securities. When possible, the Company determines fair value based on market observable information, including quoted market prices for similar securities, inactive transaction prices, and broker quotes. These securities are classified within Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy. Level 2 valuations are generally provided by a third party pricing service. Level 2 investment securities are predominantly agency mortgage-backed securities, certain other asset-backed securities, obligations of state and political subdivisions and agency debt securities.
Mortgage Loans Held For Sale
 MLHFS measured at fair value, for which an active secondary market and readily available market prices exist, are initially valued at the transaction price and are subsequently valued by comparison to instruments with similar collateral and risk profiles. MLHFS are classified within Level 2. Included in mortgage banking revenue was a net
loss
of $215 
million and a net gain of 
$93 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, from the changes to fair value of these MLHFS under fair value option accounting guidance. Changes in fair value due to instrument specific credit risk were immaterial. Interest income for MLHFS is measured based on contractual interest rates and reported as interest income on the Consolidated Statement of Income. Electing to measure MLHFS at fair value reduces certain timing differences and better matches changes in fair value of these assets with changes in the value of the derivative instruments used to economically hedge them without the burden of complying with the requirements for hedge accounting.
Mortgage Servicing Rights
 MSRs are valued using a discounted cash flow methodology, and are classified within Level 3. The Company determines fair value of the MSRs by projecting future cash flows for different interest rate scenarios using prepayment rates and other assumptions, and discounts these cash flows using a risk adjusted rate based on option adjusted spread levels. There is minimal observable market activity for MSRs on comparable portfolios and, therefore, the determination of fair value requires significant management judgment. Refer to Note 6 for further information on MSR valuation assumptions.
Derivatives
The majority of derivatives held by the Company are executed
over-the-counter
or centrally cleared through clearinghouses and are valued using market standard cash flow valuation techniques. The models incorporate inputs, depending on the type of derivative, including interest rate curves, foreign exchange rates and volatility. All derivative values incorporate an assessment of the risk of counterparty nonperformance, measured based on the Company’s evaluation of credit risk including external assessments of credit risk. The Company monitors and manages its nonperformance risk by considering its ability to net derivative positions under master netting arrangements, as well as collateral received or provided under collateral arrangements. Accordingly, the Company has elected to measure the fair value of derivatives, at a counterparty level, on a net basis. The majority of the derivatives are classified within Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy, as the significant inputs to the models, including nonperformance risk, are observable. However, certain derivative transactions are with counterparties where risk of nonperformance cannot be observed in the market and,