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OSG Overseas Shipholding

Filed: 7 May 21, 4:05pm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2021

 

OR

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from _____ to _____

 

Commission File Number: 001-06479

 

OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware 13-2637623
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization) (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

302 Knights Run Avenue, Tampa, Florida 33602
(Address of principal executive office) (Zip Code)

 

(813) 209-0600

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class Trading Symbol(s) Name of each exchange on which registered
Class A Common Stock (par value $0.01 per share) OSG New York Stock Exchange NYSE

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒ No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S–T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes ☒ No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company”, and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer ☐Accelerated filer ☒Non-accelerated filer ☐Smaller reporting company
    
   Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐ No

 

APPLICABLE ONLY TO ISSUERS INVOLVED IN BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDINGS DURING THE PRECEDING FIVE YEARS:

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed all documents and reports required to be filed by Sections 12, 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 subsequent to the distribution of securities under a plan confirmed by a court. YES ☒ NO ☐

 

APPLICABLE ONLY TO CORPORATE ISSUERS

 

The number of shares outstanding of the issuer’s Class A common stock as of May 5, 2021: Class A common stock, par value $0.01 – 86,863,651 shares. Excluded from these amounts are penny warrants, which were outstanding as of May 5, 2021 for the purchase of 3,654,795 shares of Class A common stock without consideration of any withholding pursuant to the cashless exercise procedures.

 

 

 

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

  

Page
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Part I—FINANCIAL INFORMATION 
   
Item 1.Financial Statements 
   
 Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2021 (Unaudited) and December 31, 20203
   
 Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations (Unaudited) for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 20204
   
 Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive (Loss)/Income (Unaudited) for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 20205
   
 Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (Unaudited) for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 20206
   
 Condensed Consolidated Statements of Changes in Equity (Unaudited) for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 20207
   
 Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)8
   
Item 2.Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations16
   
Item 3.Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk22
   
Item 4.Controls and Procedures23
   
Part II—OTHER INFORMATION 
   
Item 1ARisk Factors24
   
Item 2Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds25
  
Item 3Defaults upon Senior Securities25
   
Item 4Mine Safety Disclosure26
  
Item 5Other Information26
   
Item 6.Exhibits26
   
Signatures27

 

   2

 

 

OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS

 

  March 31, 2021  December 31, 2020 
  (unaudited)    
ASSETS        
Current Assets:        
Cash and cash equivalents $45,093  $69,697 
Restricted cash  37   49 
Voyage receivables, including unbilled of $4,999 and $6,740, net of reserve for doubtful accounts  10,872   13,123 
Income tax receivable  388   387 
Other receivables  3,817   1,817 
Inventories, prepaid expenses and other current assets  5,067   3,603 
Total Current Assets  65,274   88,676 
Vessels and other property, less accumulated depreciation  787,241   832,174 
Asset held for sale  31,850    
Deferred drydock expenditures, net  45,810   43,134 
Total Vessels, Other Property and Deferred Drydock  864,901   875,308 
Restricted cash - non current  59   73 
Intangible assets, less accumulated amortization  26,067   27,217 
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net  197,073   215,817 
Other assets  26,058   24,646 
Total Assets $1,179,432  $1,231,737 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY        
Current Liabilities:        
Accounts payable, accrued expenses and other current liabilities $48,449  $48,089 
Current portion of operating lease liabilities  90,612   90,613 
Current portion of finance lease liabilities  4,001   4,000 
Current installments of long-term debt  38,718   38,922 
Total Current Liabilities  181,780   181,624 
Reserve for uncertain tax positions  183   189 
Noncurrent operating lease liabilities  128,055   147,154 
Noncurrent finance lease liabilities  20,793   21,360 
Long-term debt  380,165   390,198 
Deferred income taxes, net  74,821   80,992 
Other liabilities  29,618   30,409 
Total Liabilities  815,415   851,926 
Equity:        
Common stock - Class A ($0.01 par value; 166,666,666 shares authorized; 86,863,651 and 86,365,422 shares issued and outstanding)  869   864 
Paid-in additional capital  592,732   592,564 
Accumulated deficit  (229,203)  (213,335)
Stockholder’s Equity Subtotal  364,398   380,093 
Accumulated other comprehensive loss  (381)  (282)
Total Equity  364,017   379,811 
Total Liabilities and Equity $1,179,432  $1,231,737 

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

   3

 

 

OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS, EXCEPT PER SHARE AMOUNTS

(UNAUDITED)

 

  2021  2020 
  

Three Months Ended

March 31,

 
  2021  2020 
Shipping Revenues:        
         
Time and bareboat charter revenues $63,788  $78,150 
Voyage charter revenues  17,485   22,709 
Total Shipping revenues  81,273   100,859 
         
Operating Expenses:        
Voyage expenses  15,760   3,786 
Vessel expenses  31,807   35,769 
Charter hire expenses  22,318   22,460 
Depreciation and amortization  15,319   14,019 
General and administrative  6,365   6,173 
Loss on disposal of vessels and other property, including impairments, net  5,493   296 
Total operating expenses  97,062   82,503 
(Loss)/income from vessel operations  (15,789)  18,356 
Gain on termination of pre-existing arrangement     19,172 
Operating (loss)/income  (15,789)  37,528 
Other income, net  122   31 
(Loss)/income before interest expense and income taxes  (15,667)  37,559 
Interest expense  (6,370)  (6,074)
(Loss)/income before income taxes  (22,037)  31,485 
Income tax benefit/(expense)  6,169   (6,360)
Net (loss)/income $(15,868) $25,125 
         
Weighted Average Number of Common Shares Outstanding:        
Basic - Class A  90,111,701   89,422,311 
Diluted - Class A  90,111,701   90,388,988 
Per Share Amounts:        
Basic and diluted net (loss)/income - Class A $(0.18) $0.28 

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

   4

 

 

OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE (LOSS)/INCOME

DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS

(UNAUDITED)

 

  2021  2020 
  

Three Months Ended

March 31,

 
  2021  2020 
Net (loss)/income $(15,868) $25,125 
Other comprehensive (loss)/income, net of tax:        
Defined benefit pension and other postretirement benefit plans:        
Net change in unrecognized prior service costs  (180)  (18)
Net change in unrecognized actuarial losses  81  76 
Other comprehensive (loss)/income  (99)  58 
Comprehensive (loss)/income $(15,967) $25,183 

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

   5

 

 

OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS

(UNAUDITED)

 

  2021  2020 
  

Three Months Ended

March 31,

 
  2021  2020 
Cash Flows from Operating Activities:        
Net (loss)/income $(15,868) $25,125 
Items included in net income not affecting cash flows:        
Depreciation and amortization  15,319   14,019 
Gain on termination of pre-existing arrangement     (19,172)
Loss on disposal of vessels and other property, including impairments, net  5,493   296 
Amortization of debt discount and other deferred financing costs  557   533 
Compensation relating to restricted stock awards and stock option grants  575   438 
Deferred income tax (benefit)/expense  (6,178)  2,135 
Interest on finance lease liabilities  460   506 
Non-cash operating lease expense  22,717   22,811 
Distributed earnings of affiliated companies     3,562 
Payments for drydocking  (8,179)  (3,327)
Operating lease liabilities  (22,860)  (22,969)
Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net  (1,217)  2,162 
Net cash (used in)/provided by operating activities  (9,181)  26,119 
Cash Flows from Investing Activities:        
Acquisition, net of cash acquired     (16,973)
Expenditures for vessels and vessel improvements  (3,227)  (20,871)
Expenditures for other property     (232)
Net cash used in investing activities  (3,227)  (38,076)
Cash Flows from Financing Activities:        
Payments on debt  (9,616)  (7,865)
Tax withholding on share-based awards  (402)  (197)
Payments on principal portion of finance lease liabilities  (1,026)  (1,037)
Extinguishment of debt  (301)   
Deferred financing costs paid for debt amendments  (877)   
Issuance of debt, net of issuance and deferred financing costs     80,886 
Net cash (used in)/provided by financing activities  (12,222)  71,787 
Net (decrease)/increase in cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash  (24,630)  59,830 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at beginning of period  69,819   41,677 
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash at end of period $45,189  $101,507 

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

   6

 

 

OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY

DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS

(UNAUDITED)

 

  Common Stock (1)  Paid-in Additional Capital (2)  Accumulated Deficit  Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss (3)  Total 
Balance at December 31, 2019 $857  $590,436  $(243,339) $(6,409) $341,545 
Net income        25,125      25,125 
Other comprehensive income           58   58 
Forfeitures, cancellations, issuance and vesting of restricted stock awards, net  1   (200)        (199)
Compensation related to Class A options granted and restricted stock awards     438         438 
Balance at March 31, 2020 $858  $590,674  $(218,214) $(6,351) $366,967 
                     
Balance at December 31, 2020 $864  $592,564  $(213,335) $(282) $379,811 
Net loss        (15,868)     (15,868)
Other comprehensive loss           (99)  (99)
Forfeitures, cancellations, issuance and vesting of restricted stock awards, net  5   (407)        (402)
Compensation related to Class A options granted and restricted stock awards     575         575 
Balance at March 31, 2021 $869  $592,732  $(229,203) $(381) $364,017 

 

 (1)Par value $0.01 per share; 166,666,666 Class A shares authorized; 86,863,651 and 85,845,920 Class A shares outstanding as of March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.
 (2)Includes 19,235,764 and 19,238,262 outstanding Class A warrants as of March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.
 (3)Amounts are net of tax.

 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

 

   7

 

 

OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS, EXCEPT PER SHARE AMOUNTS

 

Note 1 — Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Overseas Shipholding Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation (the “Parent Company”), and its wholly-owned subsidiaries (collectively, the “Company” or “OSG”, “we”, “us” or “our”), including Alaska Tanker Company (“ATC”) as of its March 12, 2020 acquisition date. The Company owns and operates a fleet of oceangoing vessels engaged primarily in the transportation of crude oil and refined petroleum products in the U.S. Flag trade.

 

These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. They do not include all of the information and notes required by generally accepted accounting principles in the United States. In the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring accruals) considered necessary for a fair statement of the results have been included. Operating results for the three months ended March 31, 2021 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2021 or for any other interim period.

 

The condensed consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2020 has been derived from the audited financial statements at that date but does not include all of the information and notes required by generally accepted accounting principles in the United States for complete financial statements. For further information, refer to the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020 (“Form 10-K”).

 

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of a novel coronavirus (“COVID-19”) as a pandemic, which continues to affect the United States and the world. COVID-19 and its direct and indirect consequences have caused significant volatility in U.S. and international markets, and there is significant uncertainty around the breadth and duration of business disruptions related to COVID-19, as well as its impact on the U.S. and international economies. The COVID-19 pandemic is a dynamic and continuously evolving phenomenon and the ultimate severity of the outbreak, and its effect on the Company’s business in the future, is uncertain.

 

Note 2 — Recently Adopted and Issued Accounting Standards

 

Recently Adopted Accounting Standards

 

In October 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-10, Codification Improvements, which contains amendments to improve the codification by ensuring that all guidance that requires or provides an option for an entity to provide information in the notes to financial statements is codified in the disclosure section so that disclosure is not missed. The standard also clarifies various guidance so that an entity can apply the guidance more consistently. The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020 and for interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company adopted this standard on January 1, 2021. The adoption of this standard did not have an impact to the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes, which removes certain exceptions for investments, intraperiod allocations and interim calculations, and adds guidance to reduce complexity in accounting for income taxes. The new guidance is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020 and for interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company adopted this standard on January 1, 2021. The adoption of this standard did not have a material impact to the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

   8

 

 

OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS, EXCEPT PER SHARE AMOUNTS

 

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments, which adds a new Topic 326 and removes the thresholds that companies apply to measure credit losses on financial instruments measured at amortized cost, such as loans, receivables, and held-to maturity debt securities. Under current U.S. GAAP, entities generally recognize credit losses when it is probable that a loss has been incurred. The revised guidance will remove all recognition thresholds and will require entities to recognize an allowance for credit losses for the difference between the amortized cost basis of a financial instrument and the amount of amortized cost that the entity expects to collect over the instrument’s contractual life. Subsequently, the FASB issued ASU 2018-19, Codification Improvements to Topic 326, to clarify that receivables arising from operating leases are within the scope of lease accounting standards.

 

In November 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-10, Financial Instruments – Credit Losses (Topic 326), Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815) and Leases (Topic 842): Effective Dates, which allows a two-bucket approach for determining the effective dates of these accounting standards. Under this approach, the buckets would be defined as follows:

 

Bucket 1— All public business entities (“PBEs”) that are SEC filers (as defined in U.S. GAAP), excluding smaller reporting companies (“SRCs”) (as defined by the SEC). The credit losses standard became effective January 1, 2020.

 

Bucket 2— All other entities, including SRCs, other PBEs that are not SEC filers, private companies, not-for-profit organizations, and employee benefit plans. The credit losses standard is to become effective January 1, 2023.

 

At June 30, 2019, the evaluation date for purposes of determining the applicability of the credit losses standard, the Company met the SEC definition of a smaller reporting company. Accordingly, the Company plans to adopt the credit losses standard on January 1, 2023. Management is currently reviewing the impact of the adoption of this accounting standard on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

Note 3 - Revenue Recognition

 

Disaggregated Revenue

 

The Company has disaggregated revenue from contracts with customers into categories that depict how the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows are affected by economic factors. Consequently, the disaggregation below is based on contract type. Since the terms within these contract types are generally standard in nature, the Company does not believe that further disaggregation would result in increased insight into the economic factors impacting revenue and cash flows.

 

   9

 

 

OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS, EXCEPT PER SHARE AMOUNTS

 

The following table shows the Company’s shipping revenues disaggregated by nature of the charter arrangement for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020:

 Schedule of Disaggregation of Revenue

  

Three Months Ended

March 31,

 
  2021  2020 
Time and bareboat charter revenues $63,788  $78,150 
Voyage charter revenues(1)  7,037   11,468 
Contracts of affreightment revenues  10,448   11,241 
Total shipping revenues $81,273  $100,859 

 

(1)Voyage charter revenues include revenue related to short-term time charter contracts was $2,864 and $11,319 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

  

Voyage Receivables

 

As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, contract balances from contracts with customers consisted of voyage receivables of $8,458 and $9,351, respectively, net of reserve for doubtful accounts for voyage charters and lightering contracts.

 

Contracts of Affreightment

 

At March 31, 2021, the Company did not have deferred revenue related to the Company's contracts of affreightment (“COAs”).

 

Costs to Fulfill a Contract

 

At March 31, 2021, the costs related to voyages that were not yet completed were not material.

 

Transaction Price Allocated to the Remaining Performance Obligations

 

As of March 31, 2021, the Company expects to recognize revenue of approximately $16,519 for the remainder of 2021 under COAs. This estimated amount relates to the fixed consideration of contractual minimums within the contracts based on the Company’s estimate of future services.

 

   10

 

 

OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS, EXCEPT PER SHARE AMOUNTS

 

Note 4 — Earnings per Common Share

 

Basic earnings per common share is computed by dividing earnings, after the deduction of dividends and undistributed earnings allocated to participating securities, by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. As management deems the exercise price for the Class A warrants of $0.01 per share to be nominal, warrant proceeds are ignored and the shares issuable upon Class A warrant exercise are included in the calculation of basic weighted average common shares outstanding for all periods.

 

The computation of diluted earnings per share assumes the issuance of common stock for all potentially dilutive stock options and restricted stock units. Participating securities are defined by ASC 260, Earnings Per Share, as unvested share-based payment awards that contain non-forfeitable rights to dividends or dividend equivalents and are included in the computation of earnings per share pursuant to the two-class method.

 

Class A

 

As of March 31, 2021, there were 3,414,189 shares of Class A common stock issuable under outstanding restricted stock units and 1,478,756 shares of Class A common stock issuable under outstanding options, both of which are considered to be potentially dilutive securities. As of March 31, 2020, there were 2,681,891 shares of Class A common stock issuable under outstanding restricted stock units and 1,478,756 shares of Class A common stock issuable under outstanding options, both of which are considered to be potentially dilutive securities.

 

The components of the calculation of basic earnings per share and diluted earnings per share are as follows:

 Schedule of Earnings Per Share

  

Three Months Ended

March 31,

 
  2021  2020 
Net (loss)/income $(15,868) $25,125 
         
Weighted average common shares outstanding:        
Class A common stock - basic  90,111,701   89,422,311 
Class A common stock - diluted  90,111,701   90,388,988 

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2020, there were dilutive equity awards outstanding covering 966,677 shares. Awards of 371,893 shares (which are related to stock options) for the three months ended March 31, 2020 were not included in the computation of diluted earnings per share because inclusion of these awards would be anti-dilutive.

 

   11

 

 

OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS, EXCEPT PER SHARE AMOUNTS

 

Note 5 — Fair Value Measurements and Fair Value Disclosures

 

The following methods and assumptions are used to estimate the fair value of each class of financial instrument:

 

Cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash— The carrying amounts reported in the condensed consolidated balance sheet for interest-bearing deposits approximate fair value. Investments in trading securities consist of equity securities and were measured using quoted market prices at the reporting date.

 

Debt— The fair values of the Company’s publicly traded and non-public debt are estimated based on quoted market prices. ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, relating to fair value measurements defines fair value and establishes a framework for measuring fair value. The ASC 820 fair value hierarchy distinguishes between market participant assumptions developed based on market data obtained from sources independent of the reporting entity and the reporting entity’s own assumptions about market participant assumptions developed based on the best information available in the circumstances. ASC 820 defines fair value as the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. In addition, the fair value of assets and liabilities should include consideration of non-performance risk, which for the liabilities described below includes the Company’s own credit risk.

 

The levels of the fair value hierarchy established by ASC 820 are as follows:

 

Level 1 - Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities

 

Level 2 - Quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets or inputs that are observable

 

Level 3 - Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities

 

Financial Instruments that are not Measured at Fair Value on a Recurring Basis

 

The estimated fair values of the Company’s financial instruments that are not measured at fair value on a recurring basis, categorized based upon the fair value hierarchy, are as follows:

 Schedule of Hierarchy Categorized on Fair Value

  Carrying  Fair Value 
  Value  Level 1  Level 2 
March 31, 2021:            
Assets            
Cash and cash equivalents (1) $45,189  $45,189  $ 
Total $45,189  $45,189  $ 
Liabilities            
Term loan, due 2023, net $245,994  $  $250,988 
Term loan, due 2024, net  22,603      22,868 
Alaska tankers term loan, due 2025, net  49,242      47,688 
OSG 204 LLC term loan, due 2025, net  30,647      30,562 
Term loan, due 2026, net  47,924      50,346 
OSG 205 LLC and OSG Courageous II LLC term loan, due 2027, net  22,083      20,555 
Unsecured senior notes, net  390      407 
Total $418,883  $  $423,414 

 

   12

 

 

OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS, EXCEPT PER SHARE AMOUNTS

 

  Carrying  Fair Value 
  Value  Level 1  Level 2 
December 31, 2020:            
Assets            
Cash and cash equivalents (1) $69,819  $69,819  $ 
Total $69,819  $69,819  $ 
Liabilities            
Term loan, due 2023, net $252,057  $   257,228 
Term loan, due 2024, net  22,972      23,535 
Alaska tankers term loan, due 2025, net  50,360      49,357 
OSG 204 LLC term loan, due 2025, net  31,283      31,562 
Term loan, due 2026, net  23,171      21,921 
OSG 205 LLC and OSG Courageous II LLC term loan, due 2027, net  48,586      52,199 
Unsecured senior notes, net  691      715 
Total $429,120  $  $436,517 

 

(1)Includes current and non-current restricted cash aggregating $96 and $122 at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. Restricted cash as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 was related to the Company’s Unsecured Senior Notes.

 

Nonfinancial Instruments that are Measured at Fair Value on a Nonrecurring Basis

 

Vessel and Intangible Assets Impairments

 

During the first quarter of 2021, the Company considered whether events or changes in circumstances had occurred since December 31, 2020 that could indicate the carrying amounts of the vessels in the Company’s fleet and the carrying value of the Company’s intangible assets may not be recoverable as of March 31, 2021.

 

The Company concluded that no such events or changes in circumstances had occurred for its intangible assets at March 31, 2021.

 

During the first quarter of 2021 the Company received a firm offer for the sale of the Overseas Gulf Coast, which is classified as asset held for sale on the condensed consolidated balance sheets at March 31, 2021. Based on the negotiated sale terms, the Company recorded a loss of $5,446, which is included in loss on disposal of vessels and other property, including impairments, net on the condensed consolidated statements of operations, on the planned disposition of this tanker. In April 2021, the Company entered into a contract to sell the vessel for $31,850, net of broker commissions. The sale is anticipated to be final prior to the end of the second quarter of 2021.

 

Note 6 — Taxes

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company recorded an income tax benefit/(provision) of $6,169 and $(6,360), respectively, which represented effective tax rates of 28% and 20%, respectively. The increase in the effective tax rate for the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to the three months ended March 31, 2020 was primarily due to the tonnage tax exclusion. The effective tax rate for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was more than the statutory rate due to the tonnage tax exclusion and state benefit. The effective tax rate for the three months ended March 31, 2020 was less than the statutory rate due to a discrete tax benefit in the quarter relating to state benefit resulting from the Alaska Tanker Company acquisition and deductible expenses related to Code Section 162(m).

 

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NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS, EXCEPT PER SHARE AMOUNTS

 

Note 7 — Capital Stock and Stock Compensation

 

Share and Warrant Repurchases

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2021, in connection with the vesting of restricted stock units (“RSUs”), the Company withheld 185,459 shares of Class A common stock at an average price of $2.18 per share (based on the market prices on the dates of vesting) from certain members of management to cover withholding taxes.

 

Warrant Conversions

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company did not issue any shares of Class A common stock as a result of the exercise of Class A warrants.

 

Stock Compensation

 

The Company accounts for stock compensation expense in accordance with the fair value-based method required by ASC 718, Compensation – Stock Compensation. This method requires share-based payment transactions to be measured based on the fair value of the equity instruments issued.

 

Management CompensationRestricted Stock Units and Stock Options

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2021, the Company granted 554,962 RSUs to its employees, including senior officers. The grant date fair value of these awards was $2.36 per RSU. Each RSU represents a contingent right to receive one share of Class A common stock upon vesting. Each award of RSUs will vest in equal installments on each of the first three anniversaries of the grant date.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2021, the Company awarded 363,238 performance-based RSUs to its senior officers. Each performance-based RSU represents a contingent right to receive RSUs based upon continuous employment through the end of a three-year performance period and will vest as follows: (i) one-half of the target RSUs will vest and become nonforfeitable subject to OSG’s return on invested capital (“ROIC”) performance in the three-year ROIC performance period relative to a target rate (the “ROIC Target”) set forth in the award agreements (which define ROIC as net operating profit after taxes divided by the net of total debt plus shareholders equity less cash); and (ii) one–half of the target RSUs will be subject to OSG’s three–year total shareholder return (“TSR Target”) performance relative to that of a performance index over a three–year TSR performance period. The index consists of companies that comprise a combination of the oil and gas storage and transportation and marine GICS sub-industries indexes during the performance period. Vesting is subject in each case to certification by the Human Resources and Compensation Committee of the Parent Company’s Board of Directors as to achievement of the performance measures and targets.

 

The ROIC Target RSU awards and the TSR Target RSU awards are subject to an increase of up to a maximum of 181,619 target RSUs combined (544,857 RSUs in total) or decrease, depending on performance against the applicable measure and targets. The ROIC performance goal is a performance condition which, as of March 31, 2021, management believed was probable of being achieved. Accordingly, for financial reporting purposes, compensation costs have been recognized for these awards. The grant date fair value of the TSR based performance awards, which have a market condition, was determined to be $2.36 per RSU.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2021, the Company awarded 590,251 performance-based RSUs to its senior officers. The grant date fair value of these awards was $2.36 per RSU. Each performance-based RSU represents a contingent right to receive RSUs based on performance criteria tied to specific operational and financial goals that must be achieved over an 18-month performance period. Vesting is subject to certification by the Compensation Committee as to achievement of the performance measures.

 

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NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)

DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS, EXCEPT PER SHARE AMOUNTS

 

Note 8 — Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss

 

The components of accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of related taxes, in the condensed consolidated balance sheets follow:

 Schedule of Components of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss

As of March 31, 2021  December 31, 2020 
Items not yet recognized as a component of net periodic benefit cost (pension and other postretirement benefit plans) $(381) $(282)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss $(381) $(282)

 

The following tables present the changes in the balances of each component of accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of related taxes, during the three and three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020:

  Schedule of Changes in Balances of Component of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss

  

Items not yet

recognized as a component of net periodic benefit

cost (pension and

other

postretirement plans)

 
    
Balance as of December 31, 2020 $(282)
Current period change, excluding amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income   
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income  (99)
Total change in accumulated other comprehensive income  (99)
Balance as of March 31, 2021 $(381)
     
Balance as of December 31, 2019 $(6,409)
Current period change, excluding amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income   
Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income  58 
Total change in accumulated other comprehensive income  58 
Balance as of March 31, 2020 $(6,351)

 

The Company includes the service cost component for net periodic benefit cost/(income) in vessel expenses and general and administrative expenses and other components in other (expense)/income, net on the condensed consolidated statements of operations.

 

Note 9 — Leases

 

Charters-out

 

The Company is the lessor under its time charter contracts. Total time charter revenue for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 was equal to lease income from lease payments of $63,417 and $78,853, respectively, plus straight-line adjustments of $371 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and less straight-line adjustments of $703 for the three months ended March 31, 2020.

 

Note 10 — Debt

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a significant reduction in demand for oil and refined petroleum products worldwide which has had a direct impact on the Company’s business. In an effort to conserve costs, several of the vessels in the Company’s fleet were placed in layup in late 2020 and 2021. In recognition that certain of the financial covenants that were in place in each of the Company’s vessel financing facilities did not appropriately reflect the impact of the pandemic on the Company's business, in March 2021, the Company obtained waivers and amendments of certain financial covenants in each of its vessel financing facilities, with respect to fourth quarter 2020 and later periods’ compliance requirements. In accordance with the loan amendments, the Company agreed to sell one of its vessels, the Overseas Gulf Coast.

 

Note 11 — Commitments and Contingencies

 

The Company is a party, as plaintiff or defendant, to various suits in the ordinary course of business for monetary relief arising principally from personal injuries (including without limitation exposure to asbestos and other toxic materials), wrongful death, collision or other casualty and to claims arising under charter parties. A substantial majority of such personal injury, wrongful death, collision or other casualty claims against the Company are covered by insurance (subject to deductibles not material in amount). Each of the claims involves an amount which, in the opinion of management, are not expected to be material to the Company’s financial position, results of operations and cash flows.

 

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OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements include, among others, statements about our beliefs, plans, objectives, goals, expectations, estimates and intentions that are subject to significant risks and uncertainties and are subject to change based on various factors, many of which are beyond our control. The words “may,” “could,” “should,” “would,” “believe,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “plan,” “target,” “goal,” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements.

 

All forward-looking statements, by their nature, are subject to risks and uncertainties. Our actual future results may differ materially from those set forth in our forward-looking statements. Please see the section titled “Forward-Looking Statements” and Item 1A. Risk Factors of our 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K. Other factors besides those listed in our quarterly reports or in our Annual Report also could adversely affect our results, and you should not consider any such list of factors to be a complete set of all potential risks or uncertainties. The following highlights some of these risk factors:

 

 public health threats, particularly the COVID-19 pandemic, which may impact the Company in many ways, including those noted below, as well as by increasing operating costs to protect the health and safety of the Company’s crew members and others in the industry;
 volatility in supply and demand in the crude oil market worldwide, which could also affect the nature and severity of certain factors listed below;
 the Company’s ability to renew its time charters when they expire or to enter into new time charters, or to replace its operating leases on favorable terms;
 the loss of or reduction in business with a large customer, should it be impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic or otherwise;
 changing economic, political and governmental conditions in the United States or abroad and conditions in the oil and natural gas industry, including in reaction to the COVID-19 pandemic;
 the Company’s ability to generate sufficient cash to service its indebtedness and to comply with debt covenants, allowing it to maintain capital availability;
 the effect of the Company’s indebtedness on its ability to finance operations, pursue desirable business operations and successfully run its business in the future;
 changes in demand in certain specialized markets in which the Company currently trades;
 changes in credit risk with respect to the Company’s counterparties on contracts or the failure of contract counterparties to meet their obligations;
 the Company’s compliance with complex laws and regulations, including those seeking to reduce the spread of the COVID-19 virus, and environmental laws and regulations, including those relating to the emission of greenhouse gases and ballast water treatment;
 the highly cyclical nature of OSG’s industry;
 significant fluctuations in the market value of our vessels;
 the Company’s compliance with 46 U.S.C. sections 50501 and 55101 (commonly known as the “Jones Act”) and heightened exposure to Jones Act market fluctuations, as well as stockholder citizenship requirements imposed on us by the Jones Act which result in restrictions on foreign ownership of the Company’s common stock;
 competition within the Company’s industry and OSG’s ability to compete effectively for charters;
 the refusal of certain customers to use vessels of a certain age;
 increasing operating costs, unexpected drydock costs or increasing capital expenses as the Company’s vessels age, including increases due to limited shipbuilder warranties of the consolidation of suppliers;

 

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OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

 work stoppages or other labor disruptions by the unionized employees of OSG or other companies in related industries or the impact of any potential liabilities resulting from withdrawal from participation in multiemployer plans;
 limitations on U.S. coastwise trade, the waiver, modification or repeal of the Jones Act limitations or changes in international trade agreements;
 the inability to clear oil majors’ risk assessment processes;
 the Company’s ability to use its net operating loss carryforwards;
 significant fluctuations in the market price of the Company’s securities; and
 provisions of Delaware law and the Company’s governing documents that could influence its ability to effect a change of control.

 

The Company assumes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, except as may be required by law. Forward-looking statements in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and written and oral forward-looking statements attributable to the Company or its representatives after the date of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statement contained in this paragraph and in other reports hereafter filed by the Company with the SEC.

 

Business Overview

 

OSG is a publicly traded tanker company providing energy transportation services for crude oil and petroleum products in the U.S. Flag markets. OSG is a major operator of tankers and ATBs in the Jones Act industry. OSG’s active vessel fleet, of which 22 are U.S. Flag vessels, consists of three crude oil tankers doing business in Alaska, two conventional ATBs, two lightering ATBs, three shuttle tankers, ten MR tankers, and two non-Jones Act MR tankers that participate in the U.S. Maritime Security Program. The Company also owns and operates two Marshall Islands flagged MR tankers which trade internationally. OSG is committed to setting high standards of excellence for its quality, safety and environmental programs. OSG is recognized as one of the world’s most customer-focused marine transportation companies and is headquartered in Tampa, FL. Our revenues are derived predominantly from time charter agreements for specific periods of time at fixed daily amounts. We also charter-out vessels for specific voyages where we typically earn freight revenue at spot market rates.

 

The following is a discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020. You should consider the foregoing when reviewing the condensed consolidated financial statements, including the notes thereto, and this discussion and analysis. This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q includes industry data and forecasts that we have prepared based in part on information obtained from industry publications and surveys. Third-party industry publications, surveys and forecasts generally state that the information contained therein has been obtained from sources believed to be reliable. In addition, certain statements regarding our market position in this report are based on information derived from internal market studies and research reports. Unless we state otherwise, statements about the Company’s relative competitive position in this report are based on management’s beliefs, internal studies and management’s knowledge of industry trends.

 

All dollar amounts are in thousands, except daily dollar amounts and per share amounts.

 

Operations and Oil Tanker Markets

 

The ongoing coronavirus pandemic has severely impacted global and national economies. Lockdown orders, business closures and travel restrictions among many other events have reduced the demand for many products, including petroleum. This has led to a significant reduction in refinery operations and end user demand for transportation fuels. The reduced demand has created extreme business uncertainty for our customers and the result has been a reluctance to enter into longer term transportation commitments. We believe that, as our customers’ visibility and confidence in the future returns, there will be a resumption of more typical customer behavior and time charter activity will rebound.

 

Heightened uncertainty has resulted in the non-renewal of charters for vessels whose time charters ended in late 2020 and early in 2021. In response to this we have placed seven vessels in lay-up. Laying up vessels in times of limited near-term employment opportunities allows us to reduce the costs associated with vessels that are without charter. The historic Texas freeze during the just completed quarter also impacted lay-up decisions as more than 50% of PADD 3 refining capacity was shut in for a good portion of the just completed quarter. The refinery shutdowns have by now largely been resolved. Further, we anticipate that, as vaccines become more widely distributed and there is a lifting of the COVID-19 restrictions, mobility and related US consumption of transportation fuels will, more likely than not, normalize. A normalization of fuel demand patterns consistent with historic levels of consumption is expected to stimulate more marine transportation demand, which in turn should lead to a reactivation of vessels from lay-up to meet any such increase in demand. The pace and trajectory of demand recovery continues to be influenced by many factors, including progress in resolving the pandemic outside of the US, and near-term uncertainty will continue to define a wide spectrum of possible vessel reactivation outcomes as we move through the late spring and summer.

 

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OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

Our revenues are highly sensitive to patterns of supply and demand for vessels of the size and design configurations owned and operated by us and the trades in which those vessels operate. Rates for the transportation of crude oil and refined petroleum products are determined by market forces such as the supply and demand for oil, the distance that cargoes must be transported, and the number of vessels expected to be available at the time cargoes need to be transported. In the Jones Act trades within which the substantial majority of our vessels operate, demand factors for transportation are affected almost exclusively by supply and distribution decisions of oil producers, refiners and distributors based in the United States. Further, the demand for U.S. domestic oil shipments is significantly affected by the state of the U.S. and global economies, the level of imports into the U.S. from OPEC and other foreign producers, oil production in the United States, and the relative price differentials of U.S. produced crude oil and refined petroleum products as compared with comparable products sourced from or destined for foreign markets, including the cost of transportation on international flag vessels to or from those markets. The number of vessels is affected by newbuilding deliveries and by the removal of existing vessels from service, principally through storage, deletions, or conversions. Our revenues are also affected by the mix of charters between spot (voyage charter which includes short-term time charter) and long-term (time or bareboat charter).

 

Beginning in the 2020 first quarter, COVID-19 has resulted in disruptions in demand and an oversupply of crude oil and refined products. Many analysts predict that gasoline and diesel demand will recover in 2021. Jet fuel demand is anticipated to remain well below 2019 levels through at least the end of 2021. These predictions reflect estimates on the prevalence of COVID-19 and the recovery of the U.S. economy. Energy markets are, however, global in nature and the pace and extent of COVID and its continuing presence in markets outside of the U.S. is also an important factor in understanding the timing and extent of recovery of supply and consumption patterns within the U.S. While COVID-19 has presented our industry and markets with significant challenges, we believe that we have thus far managed its impact on our business operations well, with all of our Jones Act and internationally trading vessels able to load, transit and discharge cargo without material interruption.

 

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have implemented procedures to protect the health and safety of our employees, crew and contractors. These procedures and protocols are those mandated or recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. Coast Guard, local ports and shipyards, and country- and state-specific requirements. They include such actions as providing personal protective equipment, minimizing crew changes, managing the locations where crew members board and depart from our vessels, requiring crew members to disclose symptoms and the health of those they have been in contact with, mandatory quarantine periods imposed prior to joining any vessel, sanitization of the vessels, mandating face coverings, social distancing and temperature checks, and requiring testing in certain instances. COVID-19 has also impacted planned shipyard maintenance and vetting activities, resulting in delays, rescheduling and extensions. These additional procedures and delays have resulted in increased costs, which at this point in time, have not been material but are expected to continue and may increase.

 

Having our vessels committed on time charters is a fundamental objective of our chartering strategy. The majority of available vessel operating days are covered with medium-term charters or contracts of affreightment. However, medium-term charters may not always be remunerative, nor prove achievable under certain market conditions. As a result, some of our vessels may operate in the spot market, which is more volatile and less predictable. In some cases, where neither time charter nor consistent spot market business is available, lay up and removal of vessels from an actively available status is deemed necessary. Because shipping revenues and voyage expenses are significantly affected by the mix between voyage charters and time charters, we manage our vessels based on TCE revenues and rates, which are non-GAAP measures.

 

COVID-19 induced demand destruction that started in March 2020 has resulted in minimal spot market activity since then. The few voyages that were available were typically performed by ATBs and not by product tankers.

 

Our vessels, excluding vessels in lay-up, were employed for 92% of available days during the first quarter of 2021, with 93 of a total 1,223 available days (available days excludes 43 days vessels were offhire due to drydock requirements) seeing vessels idle without employment.

 

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OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

Industry-wide, there were no firm Jones Act vessel orders as of March 31, 2021.

 

Delaware Bay lightering volumes averaged 66,000 b/d in the first quarter of 2021 compared with 80,000 b/d in the first quarter of 2020. Refinery demand for crude oil has been significantly reduced since the third quarter of 2020 due to COVID-19, reducing the need for lightering services. We have contract minimums with our refinery customers that compensate us for barrels not lightered below those minimum amounts.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

The Company’s consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, which require the Company to make estimates in the application of its accounting policies based on the best assumptions, judgments and opinions of management. For a description of all of the Company’s material accounting policies, see Note 2, “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies,” to the Company’s consolidated financial statements included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for 2020.

 

Results of Vessel Operations

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2021, shipping revenues decreased by $19,586, or 19.4%, compared to the same period in 2020. The decrease was primarily a result of a 624-day increase in lay-up days due to seven vessels in lay-up, a decision taken in light of the lack of demand due to the economic impact of COVID-19. The decrease in shipping revenues was partially offset by the addition to our fleet of three crude oil tankers, Alaskan Explorer, Alaskan Legend and Alaskan Navigator, which were purchased on March 12, 2020.

 

Reconciliation of TCE revenues, a non-GAAP measure, to shipping revenues as reported in the consolidated statements of operations follows:

 

  

Three Months Ended

March 31,

 
  2021  2020 
Time charter equivalent revenues $65,513  $97,073 
Add: Voyage expenses  15,760   3,786 
Shipping revenues $81,273  $100,859 

 

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OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

The following table provides a breakdown of TCE rates achieved for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 between spot and fixed earnings and the related revenue days.

 

  2021  2020 
Three Months Ended March 31, Spot Earnings  Fixed Earnings  Spot Earnings  Fixed Earnings 
Jones Act Handysize Product Carriers:                
Average rate $24,467  $65,165  $61,951  $60,260 
Revenue days  148   477   92   1,052 
Non-Jones Act Handysize Product Carriers:                
Average rate $14,958  $7,044  $27,727  $16,788 
Revenue days  180   177   154   182 
ATBs:                
Average rate $  $32,339  $28,332  $24,015 
Revenue days     180   93   89 
Lightering:                
Average rate $92,524  $  $78,258  $61,012 
Revenue days  73      91   87 
Alaska (a):                
Average rate $  $58,743  $  $59,015 
Revenue days     238      58 

 

(a)Excludes one Alaska vessel currently in layup.

 

During the first quarter of 2021, TCE revenues decreased by $31,560, or 32.5%, to $65,513 from $97,073 in the first quarter of 2020. The decrease was primarily a result of a 624-day increase in lay-up days due to seven vessels in lay-up, a decision taken in light of the lack of demand due to the economic impact of COVID-19. The decrease in TCE revenues was partially offset by the addition to our fleet of three crude oil tankers, Alaskan Explorer, Alaskan Legend and Alaskan Navigator, which were purchased on March 12, 2020.

 

Voyage expenses increased by $11,974, or 316.3%, in the first quarter of 2021 to $15,760 compared to $3,786 in the first quarter of 2020, primarily related to expenses for oil pollution mitigation services for the Alaskan tankers in the first quarter of 2021 compared to none during the first quarter of 2020 as we acquired the vessels on March 12, 2020. These expenses are passed through to the charterer each month. Additionally, voyage expenses increased due to fuel and port expenses related to one Government of Israel voyage during the first quarter of 2021 compared to no Government of Israel voyages during the first quarter of 2020.

 

Vessel expenses decreased by $3,962, or 11.1%, in the first quarter of 2021 to $31,807 compared to $35,769 in the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to a decrease in crewing costs. The decrease in crewing costs was due to the decision to place seven vessels in layup as a result of the lack of demand due to COVID-19 economic impact.

 

Depreciation and amortization increased by $1,300, or 9.3%, to $15,319 in the first quarter of 2021 compared to $14,019 in the first quarter of 2020. The increase primarily resulted from an increase in depreciation expense due to the addition of three crude oil tankers, Alaskan Explorer, Alaskan Legend and Alaskan Navigator, to our fleet in March 2020 and the addition of our newbuild barges, OSG 204 and OSG 205, which entered service during the second and fourth quarters of 2020, respectively.

 

Our two U.S. Flag Product Carriers participate in the MSP, which is designed to ensure that militarily useful U.S. Flag vessels are available to the U.S. Department of Defense in the event of war or national emergency. We receive an annual subsidy, subject in each case to annual congressional appropriations, which is intended to offset the increased cost incurred by such vessels from operating under the U.S. Flag. For 2021, we expect to receive up to $5,200 for each vessel. During 2020, the stipend we received was $5,058 on one vessel and $4,607 on one vessel. We do not receive a subsidy for any days for which either of the two vessels operate under a time charter to a U.S. government agency.

 

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General and Administrative Expenses

 

During the first quarter of 2021, general and administrative expenses increased by $192, or 3.1%, to $6,365 from $6,173 in the first quarter of 2020. The increase was primarily driven by an increase in compensation and benefit costs due to our acquisition of ATC on March 12, 2020 and the resulting increase in headcount.

 

Loss on Disposal of Vessels and Other Property, Including Impairments, Net

 

Loss on disposal of vessels and other property, including impairments, net was $5,493 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to $296 for the three months ended March 31, 2020. The increase was a result of a firm offer we received to sell the Overseas Gulf Coast. Based on the negotiated sale terms, we recorded a loss of $5,446 on the planned disposition of this tanker. We expect the sale to be completed prior to the end of the second quarter of 2021.

 

Gain on Termination of Pre-Existing Arrangement

 

Gain on termination of pre-existing arrangement was $0 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to $19,172 during the three months ended March 31, 2020. The decrease was due to our acquisition of ATC on March 12, 2020. Our pre-existing ATC arrangements with a minimum term through December 2023 were terminated at the time of acquisition and a non-cash gain equal to the value of the remaining arrangement of $19,172 was recognized.

 

Interest Expense

 

Interest expense was $6,370 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared with $6,074 for the three months ended March 31, 2020. The increase in interest expense was primarily associated with the additional debt outstanding at March 31, 2021 compared to at March 31, 2020.

 

Income Taxes

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, we recorded an income tax benefit/(provision) of $6,169 and $(6,360), respectively, which represented effective tax rates of 28% and 20%, respectively. The increase in the effective tax rate for the three months ended March 31, 2021 compared to the three months ended March 31, 2020 was substantially due to the tonnage tax exclusion. The effective tax rate for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was more than the statutory rate due to the tonnage tax exclusion and state benefit. The effective tax rate for the three months ended March 31, 2020 was less than the statutory rate due to a discrete tax benefit in the quarter relating to state benefit resulting from the Alaska Tanker Company acquisition and deductible expenses related to Code Section 162(m).

 

Liquidity and Sources of Capital

 

Our business is capital intensive. Our ability to successfully implement our strategy is dependent on the continued availability of capital on attractive terms. In addition, our ability to successfully operate our business to meet near-term and long-term debt repayment obligations is dependent on maintaining sufficient liquidity.

 

Liquidity

 

Working capital at March 31, 2021 was approximately $(117,000) compared with approximately $(93,000) at December 31, 2020. Excluding the current portion of operating and finance lease liabilities, working capital was approximately $(22,000) at March 31, 2021 compared to $1,700 at December 31, 2020. The decrease in working capital was primarily due to a decrease in cash and cash equivalents from use in operations including for payments on debt and expenditures for vessel improvements.

 

As of March 31, 2021, we had total liquidity on a consolidated basis comprised of $45,093 of cash and cash equivalents. We manage our cash in accordance with our intercompany cash management system, subject to the requirements of our debt facilities. Our cash and cash equivalents, as well as our restricted cash balances, generally exceed Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation insurance limits. We place our cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash in what we believe to be credit-worthy financial institutions. In addition, certain of our money market accounts invest in U.S. Treasury securities or other obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government or its agencies. Restricted cash as of March 31, 2021 was related to requirements under the Unsecured Senior Notes.

 

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OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

As of March 31, 2021, we had total debt outstanding (net of deferred financing costs) of $418,883 and a total debt to total capitalization of 53.5%, compared to $429,120 and 53.0%, respectively, at December 31, 2020.

 

Sources, Uses and Management of Capital

 

We generate significant cash flows through our complementary mix of time charters, voyage charters and contracts of affreightment. Net cash used in operating activities during the three months ended March 31, 2021 was $9,181. In addition to operating cash flows, our other current potential sources of funds are proceeds from additional issuances of equity securities, additional borrowings and proceeds from the opportunistic sales of our vessels. In the past, we have also obtained funds from the issuance of long-term debt securities.

 

We use capital to fund working capital requirements, maintain the quality of our vessels, comply with U.S. and international shipping standards and environmental laws and regulations and repay or repurchase our outstanding loan facilities. We may also use cash generated by operations to finance capital expenditures to modernize and grow our fleet.

 

We are presently assessing the impact of the expected discontinuation of LIBOR, expected by year-end 2021.

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a significant reduction in demand for oil and refined petroleum products worldwide which has had a direct impact on our business. In an effort to conserve costs, seven of the vessels in our fleet were placed in layup in late 2020 and 2021. In recognition that certain of the financial covenants that were in place in each of the Company’s vessel financing facilities did not appropriately reflect the impact of the pandemic on the Company’s business, in March 2021, we obtained waivers and amendments of certain financial covenants in each of our vessel financing facilities, with respect to fourth quarter 2020 and later periods’ compliance requirements. In accordance with the loan amendments, the Company agreed to sell one of its vessels, the Overseas Gulf Coast.

 

During the first quarter of 2021 the Company received a firm offer for the sale of the Overseas Gulf Coast, which is classified as asset held for sale on the condensed consolidated balance sheets at March 31, 2021. Based on the negotiated sale terms, the Company recorded a loss of $5,446, which is included in loss on disposal of vessels and other property, including impairments, net on the condensed consolidated statements of operations, on the planned disposition of this tanker. In April 2021, the Company entered into a contract to sell the vessel for $31,850, net of broker commissions. The sale is expected to be final prior to the end of the second quarter of 2021.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

The Company did not have, during the periods presented, and does not currently have, any off-balance sheet arrangements.

 

Item 3: Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

Not applicable due to the Company’s status as a smaller reporting company.

 

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OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

Item 4: Controls and Procedures

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

As of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, an evaluation was performed under the supervision and with the participation of the Company’s management, including the Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”) and Chief Financial Officer (“CFO”), of the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act. Based on that evaluation, the Company’s management, including the CEO and CFO, concluded that the Company’s current disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of March 31, 2021 to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports the Company files or submits under the Exchange Act is (i) recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms and (ii) accumulated and communicated to the Company’s management, including the CEO and CFO, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended March 31, 2021 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

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OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

PART II – OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

In addition to the other information set forth in this Quarterly Report, you should carefully consider the factors discussed in Part I, Item 1A. “Risk Factors” in our 2020 Form 10-K, and as may be updated in our subsequent quarterly reports. The risks described in our 2020 Form 10-K are not the only risks facing us. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial also may materially adversely affect our business, financial condition or operating results. There have been no material changes in our risk factors from those disclosed in our 2020 Form 10-K.

 

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OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2021, in connection with the vesting of restricted stock awards, the Company withheld the following number of shares of Class A common stock from certain members of management to cover withholding taxes.

 

Period Total Number Shares of Class A Withheld  Average Price Paid per Share of Class A 
January 1, 2021 through January 31, 2021    $ 
February 1, 2021 through February 28, 2021  74,270  $2.19 
March 1, 2021 through March 31, 2021  111,189  $2.17 
   185,459  $2.18 

 

Item 3. Defaults upon senior securities

 

None.

 

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OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not applicable.

 

Item 5. Other information

 

None.

 

Item 6. Exhibits

 

31.1 Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and 15d-14(a), as amended.
   
31.2 Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and 15d-14(a), as amended.
   
32 Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
   
10.1 Form of Overseas Shipholding Group, Inc. 2019 Incentive Compensation Plan For Management Performance-Based Restricted Stock Unit Grant Agreement Form PB-2021 Special Grant.
   
101.INS Inline XBRL Instance Document.
   
101.SCH Inline XBRL Taxonomy Schema.
   
101.CAL Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase.
   
101.DEF Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase.
   
101.LAB Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase.
   
101.PRE Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase.

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

 OVERSEAS SHIPHOLDING GROUP, INC.
                (Registrant)
  
Date: May 7, 2021/s/ Samuel H. Norton
 Samuel H. Norton
 Chief Executive Officer
  
Date: May 7, 2021/s/ Richard Trueblood
 Richard Trueblood
 Chief Financial Officer
 (Mr. Trueblood is the Principal Financial Officer and has been duly authorized to sign on behalf of the Registrant)

 

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