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SMPR Standard Metals Processing

Filed: 30 Apr 21, 4:44pm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, DC 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

☑  QUARTERLY REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2021

 

OR

 

☐ TRANSITION REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from _______ to _______

 

Commission file number 000-14319

 

STANDARD METALS PROCESSING, INC.

(Exact Name of Small Business Issuer as Specified in its Charter)

 

Nevada 84-0991764
(State or Other Jurisdiction of (I.R.S. Employer
Incorporation or Organization) Identification Number)

 

611 Walnut Street, Gadsden, Alabama 35901 

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(888) 960-7347

(Issuer’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

 

N/A 

(Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, If Changed Since Last Report)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class Trading Symbol Name of each exchange on which
registered
Common Stock $0.001 par value SMPR OTC

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant: (1) filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the issuer was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☐  No ☑

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such fi les).). Yes ☑  No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer ☐Accelerated filer ☐
Non-accelerated filer ☐Smaller reporting company ☑
 Emerging growth company ☐

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act: ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐  No ☑

 

As of April 30, 2021, there were 133,630,343 (pre-reverse split) shares of common stock outstanding (2,672,807 shares post-reverse split) which is the Registrant’s only class of voting stock. 

 

 

 

 

 

  

STANDARD METALS PROCESSING, INC. 

FORM 10-Q

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2021

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

  Page
   
PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION 
   
ITEM 1Financial Statements (unaudited)1
   
 Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 20201
   
 Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2021 and 20202
   
 Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2021 and  20203
   
 Condensed Statement of Changes in Shareholders’ Deficit for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2021 and the Year Ended December 31, 20204
   
 Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements5
   
ITEM 2.Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations12
   
ITEM 3.Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk17
   
ITEM 4.Controls and Procedures18
   
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION 
   
ITEM 1.Legal Proceedings19
   
ITEM 1A.Risk Factors19
   
ITEM 2.Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds19
   
ITEM 3.Defaults Upon Senior Securities19
   
ITEM 4.Mine Safety Disclosures19
   
ITEM 5.Other Information19
   
ITEM 6.Exhibits19
   
SIGNATURES20

 

i

 

 

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Form 10-Q contains certain statements which are forward-looking in nature and are based on the current beliefs of our management as well as assumptions made by and information currently available to management, general trends in our operations or financial results, plans, expectations, estimates and beliefs. In addition, when used in this Form 10-Q, the words “may,” “could,” “should,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “plan,” “predict” and similar expressions and their variants, as they relate to us or our management, may identify forward-looking statements. These statements reflect our judgment as of the date of this Form 10-Q with respect to future events, the outcome of which is subject to risks. We have attempted to identify, in context, certain of the factors that we believe may cause actual future experience and results to differ materially from our current expectations, which may have a significant impact on our business, operating results, financial condition or your investment in our common stock, as described in Part II, Item 1A entitled “Risk Factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020, as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) on January 26, 2021.

 

Readers are cautioned that these forward-looking statements are inherently uncertain. Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results or outcomes may vary materially from those described herein.

 

We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. However, your attention is directed to any further disclosures made on related subjects in our subsequent periodic reports filed with the SEC on Forms 10-K, 10-Q and 8-K.

 

ii

 

 

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

 

STANDARD METALS PROCESSING, INC. 

CONDENSED Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

  March 31,
2021
  December 31,
2020
 
  (unaudited)    
Assets      
Current assets:        
Cash $1,626  $1,199 
Prepaid expenses  35,447   35,447 
         
Total current assets  37,073   36,646 
         
Mining and mineral rights  3,883,524   3,883,524 
         
Total Assets $3,920,597  $3,920,170 
         
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Deficit        
Current liabilities:        
Senior secured promissory note payable, related party $2,229,187  $2,229,187 
Promissory notes payable - related party  477,500   477,500 
Convertible notes payable, including $584,608 and $219,597 from related parties at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively  684,608   319,597 
Accrual for settlement of lawsuits  3,400,170   3,357,622 
Accounts payable  1,354,122   1,400,631 
Accrued interest - Related party $1,629,587 and $1,565,405 at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020  2,542,988   2,422,063 
Total current liabilities  10,688,575   10,206,600 
         
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 6)        
         
Preferred stock, 50,000,000 shares authorized:        
Series A, $.001 par value, 10,000,000 shares issued and outstanding at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020  10,000,000   10,000,000 
         
Shareholders’ deficit:        
Common stock, $0.001 par value, 500,000,000 shares authorized: 2,672,807 issued and outstanding at March 31, 2021 and
December 31, 2020
  2,673   2,673 
Additional paid-in capital  88,061,299   88,061,299 
Accumulated deficit  (104,831,950)  (104,350,402)
Total shareholders’ deficit  (16,767,978)  (16,286,430)
         
Total Liabilities and Shareholders’ deficit $3,920,597  $3,920,170 

 

The accompanying footnotes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

1

 

 

STANDARD METALS PROCESSING, INC.

CONDENSED Consolidated STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS 

(Unaudited)

 

  Three months ended 
  March 31,
2021
  

March 31,

2020

 
       
Revenues $  $ 
         
Operating expenses:        
General and administrative  342,697   52,220 
         
Total operating expenses  342,697   52,220 
Loss from operations  (342,697)  (52,220)
         
Other income (expense):        
Other income  2,099   2,099 
Derecognition of debt  22,523   --- 
Interest expense  (163,473)  (194,330)
         
Total other expense  (138,851)  (192,231)
Loss before income tax provision  (481,548)  (244,451)
         
Income tax provision      
Net loss $(481,548) $(244,251)
   ��     
Basic net loss per common share $(0.18) $(0.09)
         
Basic weighted average common shares outstanding  2,672,807   2,580,149 

 

The accompanying footnotes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

2

 

 

STANDARD METALS PROCESSING, INC.

CONDENSED Consolidated STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS 

(Unaudited)

 

  For the Three months
ended
 
  March 31,
2021
  March 31,
2020
 
Cash flows from operating activities:      
Net loss $(481,548) $(244,451)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to cash flows provided by (used in) operating activities:        
Gain on derecognition of certain accounts payable  22,523   --- 
Expenses paid directly by related party  365,011   50,780 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities -        
Accounts payable  (69,032)  --- 
Accrued expenses  120,925   151,310 
Accrual for settlement of lawsuits  42,548   43,020 
         
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities  427   659 
Cash flows from investing activities:      
Cash flows from financing activities:        
Proceeds from convertible debentures  ---   --- 
         
Net cash provided by financing activities  ---   --- 
         
(Decrease) Increase in cash  427   659 
Cash, beginning of period  1,199   1,945 
Cash, end of period $1,626  $2,604 
         
Supplemental cash flow disclosures        
Advances from related party to pay expenses on Company’s behalf $365,011  $--- 

 

The accompanying footnotes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

3

 

 

STANDARD METALS PROCESSING, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2021 AND

THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020 

 

  Common Stock     Accumulated    
  Shares  Amount  APIC  Deficit  Total 
Balance, December 31, 2019  128,997,423  $128,997  $87,712,695  $(103,862,127) $(16,020,435)
Reverse split restatement adjustment  (126,417,274)  (126,417)  126,417   ---   --- 
Restated balance, December 31, 2019  2,580,149   2,580   87,839,112   (103,862,127)  (16,020,435)
                     
Shares issued on exercise of options  55,000   55   63,195   -   63,250 
                     
Shares issued on exercise of warrants  37,658   38   43,270       43,308 
                     
Loss on modification of options and warrants  +---   ---   115,722   ---   115,722 
                     
Net loss  ---   ---   ---   (488,275)  (488,275)
                     
Balance at December 31, 2020  2,672,807   2,673   88,061,299   (104,350,402)  (16,286,430)
                     
Net loss  ---   ---   ---   (481,548)  (481,548)
                     
Balance at March 31, 2021  2,672,807  $2,673  $88,061,299  $(104,831,950) $(16,767,978)

 

The accompanying footnotes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

4

 

 

STANDARD METALS PROCESSING, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2021

(unaudited)

 

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF BUSINESS

 

Standard Metals Processing, Inc. (“we,” “us,” “our,” “Standard Metals” or the “Company”) is an exploration stage company, incorporated in Nevada having offices in Gadsden, Alabama and through its subsidiary, a property in Tonopah, Nevada. The business plan is to purchase and install the equipment necessary to complete a facility on the Tonopah property to serve as a permitted custom processing toll milling facility (which includes an analytical lab, pyrometallurgical plant, and hydrometallurgical recovery plant).

 

The Company plans to perform permitted custom processing toll milling which is a process whereby mined material is crushed and ground into fine particles to ease the extraction of any precious minerals contained therein, such as minerals in the gold, silver, and platinum metal groups. Custom milling and refining can include many different processes that are designed specifically for each ore load and to maximize the extraction of precious metals from carbon or concentrates. These toll processing services also distill, dry, mix, or mill chemicals and bulk materials on a contractual basis and provide a chemical production outsourcing option for industrial companies, which lack the expertise, capacity, or regulatory permits for in-house production.

 

We are required to obtain several permits before we can begin construction of a small-scale mineral processing facility to conduct permitted processing toll milling activities and construction of the required additional buildings and well relocation necessary for us to commence operations.

 

Going Concern 

 

The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, assuming we will continue as a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. For the three months ended March 31, 2021, the Company had a net loss of $481,548. At March 31, 2021, the Company had an accumulated deficit of $104,831,950 and a working capital deficit of $10,651,502. Additionally, all of the Company’s assets are under lien pursuant to a First Deed of Trust and UCC filings; and 100% of the common stock of the Company’s subsidiary Aurielle Enterprises, Inc. (“AE”), and that of its wholly owned subsidiaries Tonopah Custom Processing, Inc., (“TCP”) and Tonopah Resources, Inc. (“TR”) has been pledged in favor of Granite Peak Resources, LLC (“GPR”), a related party, whose secured Note is in default. These circumstances raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The Company’s ability to continue as a going concern is dependent on their ability to raise the required additional capital or debt financing to meet short and long-term operating requirements. During the three months ended March 31, 2021, a related party advanced $365,012 from the convertible note line of credit GPR also established for the Company in 2020 (See Note 4).

 

Management believes that private placements of equity capital and/or additional debt financing will be needed to fund our long-term operating requirements. The Company may also encounter business endeavors that require significant cash commitments or unanticipated problems or expenses that could result in a requirement for additional cash. If the Company raises additional funds through the issuance of equity or convertible debt securities, the percentage ownership of our current shareholders would likely be reduced, and such securities might have rights, preferences, or privileges senior to our common stock. Additional financing may not be available upon acceptable terms, or at all. If adequate funds are not available or are not available on acceptable terms, the Company may not be able to take advantage of prospective business endeavors or opportunities, which could significantly and materially restrict our operations. We are continuing to pursue external financing alternatives to improve our working capital position, however, if the Company is unable to obtain the necessary capital, the Company may have to cease operations.

 

5

 

 

NOTE 2 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Standard Metals Processing, Inc., and its wholly owned subsidiary Aurielle Enterprises Inc. (f/k/a Tonopah Milling and Metals Group, Inc.) (“AE”) and its wholly owned subsidiaries Tonopah Custom Processing, Inc., (“TCP”) and Tonopah Resources, Inc. (“TR”) All significant intercompany transactions, accounts and balances have been eliminated in consolidation.  

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“US GAAP”), for interim financial information pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). Accordingly, they do not include all the information and footnotes required by US GAAP for complete financial statements. The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in our Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020 filed January 26, 2021. In the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring adjustments unless otherwise indicated) considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. Operating results for the three months ended March 31, 2021 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year as a whole.

 

Reclassification of Prior Year Presentation

 

Certain prior period balance sheet amounts of accounts payable and accrued expenses have been reclassified for consistency with the current year balance sheet presentation. These reclassifications had no effect on previously reported consolidated financial condition, results of operations, cash flows, and shareholders’ deficit.   

 

Mineral Properties

 

Mineral property acquisition costs are recorded at cost and are deferred until the viability of the property is determined. No properties have produced operating revenues at this time. Exploration, mineral property evaluation, option payments, related acquisition costs for mineral properties acquired under an option agreement, general overhead, administrative and holding costs to maintain a property on a care and maintenance basis are expensed in the period they are incurred. When reserves are determined for a property and a bankable feasibility study is completed, subsequent exploration and development costs on the property would be capitalized. If a project were to be put into production, capitalized costs would be amortized on the unit of production basis.

 

Management reviews the net carrying value of each mineral property as changes may materialize with a property or at a minimum, on an annual basis. Where information and conditions suggest impairment, estimated future net cash flows from each property are calculated using estimated future prices, proven and probable reserves and value beyond proven and probable reserves, and operating, capital and reclamation costs on an undiscounted basis. If it is determined that the future cash flows are less than the carrying value, a write-down to the estimated fair value is made with a charge to loss for the period. Where estimates of future net cash flows are not available and where other conditions suggest impairment, management assesses if the carrying value can be recovered.

 

Management’s estimates of gold prices, recoverable reserves, probable outcomes, operating capital, and reclamation costs are subject to risks and uncertainties that may affect the recoverability of mineral property costs.  

 

The Company does not own any mining claims. It owns tailings located on the Tonopah property and the rights to some tailings located in Manhattan, Nevada. The Company has not disturbed or processed any of this material, but recently authorized GPR to examine the economic feasibility of processing the tailings to reclaim their residual content of valuable metals in exchange for the exclusive right to process the tailings should their economic assessment prove positive. The terms of such processing to be mutually agreed upon between GPR and the Company in the future based on the results of the assessment.  In addition, the Company and Sustainable Metal Solutions, LLC (“SMS”), an affiliate of GPR, agreed to form a joint venture into which the Company will contribute the solar energy rights attributable to its 1,086 acres in exchange for SMS’s agreement to develop, manage and underwrite the venture.

 

6

 

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets and Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company will periodically evaluate the carrying value of long-lived assets to be held and used, including but not limited to, mineral properties, mine tailings, mine dumps, capital assets and intangible assets, when events and circumstances warrant such a review and at least annually. The carrying value of a long-lived asset is considered impaired when the anticipated undiscounted cash flow from such asset is separately identifiable and is less than its carrying value. In that event, a loss is recognized based on the amount by which the carrying value exceeds the fair value of the long-lived asset. Fair value is determined primarily using the anticipated cash flows discounted at a rate commensurate with the risk involved. Losses on long-lived assets to be disposed of are determined in a similar manner, except that fair values are reduced for the cost to dispose.

 

Use of Estimates

 

Preparing financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the amount of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Revenue Recognition and Deferred Revenue

 

As of March 31, 2021, the Company has not recognized any revenues from custom permitted processing toll milling. If we achieve revenue generation, the Company plans to report such revenues consistent with ASC Topic 606.

 

Income Taxes

 

Income taxes are accounted for based upon an asset and liability approach. Accordingly, deferred tax assets and liabilities arise from the difference between the tax basis of an asset or liability and its reported amount in the financial statements. Deferred tax amounts are determined using the tax rates expected to be in effect when the taxes will actually be paid or refunds received, as provided under currently enacted tax law. Valuation allowances are established when necessary to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized. Income tax expense or benefit is the tax payable or refundable, respectively, for the period plus or minus the change in deferred tax assets and liabilities during the period.

 

Accounting guidance requires the recognition of a financial statement benefit of a tax position only after determining that the relevant tax authority would more likely than not sustain the position following an audit. For tax positions meeting the more-likely-than-not threshold, the amount recognized in the financial statements is the largest benefit that has a greater than fifty percent likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement with the relevant tax authority. The Company believes its income tax filing positions and deductions will be sustained upon examination and accordingly, no reserves, or related accruals for interest and penalties have been recorded at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020. The Company recognizes interest and penalties due on unrecognized tax benefits as well as interest receivable from favorable tax settlements within income tax expense.

 

On December 22, 2017, the President of the United States signed and enacted into law H.R. 1 (the “Tax Reform Law”). The Tax Reform Law, effective for tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2018, except for certain provisions, resulted in significant changes to existing United States tax law, including various provisions that are expected to impact the Company. The Tax Reform Law reduces the federal corporate tax rate from 34% to 21% effective January 1, 2018. Management believes the provisions of the Tax Reform Law will have a favorable impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements should it attain a level of profitable operations.

 

Recent Accounting Standards

 

In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12, Income Taxes-Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes ("ASU 2019-12"). Among other items, the amendments in ASU 2019-12 simplify the accounting treatment of tax law changes and year-to-date losses in interim periods. An entity generally recognizes the effects of a change in tax law in the period of enactment, however, there is an exception for tax laws with delayed effective dates. Under current guidance, an entity may not adjust its annual effective tax rate for a tax law change until the period in which the law is effective. This exception was removed under ASU 2019-12, thereby providing that all effects of a tax law change are recognized in the period of enactment, including adjustment of the estimated annual effective tax rate. Regarding year-to-date losses in interim periods, an entity is required to estimate its annual effective tax rate for the full fiscal year at the end of each interim period and use that rate to calculate its income taxes on a year-to-date basis. However, current guidance provides an exception that when a loss in an interim period exceeds the anticipated loss for the year, the income tax benefit is limited to the amount that would be recognized if the year-to-date loss were the anticipated loss for the full year. ASU 2019-12 removes this exception and provides that, in this situation, an entity would compute its income tax benefit at each interim period based on its estimated annual effective tax rate. ASU 2019-l2 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, including interim periods within those annual periods Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the effect that this update will have on its consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

 

7

 

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments (“ASU 2016-13”) and also issued subsequent amendments to the initial guidance: ASU 2018-19, ASU 2019-04, and ASU 2019-05 (collectively, "Topic 326"). Topic 326 requires measurement and recognition of expected credit losses for financial assets held. The Company will be required to adopt this ASU for financial years beginning after December 15, 2022, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The adoption of topic 326 is not expected to have a material effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and financial statement disclosures.

 

During the period ended March 31, 2021 and through the date of this filing, there were several new accounting pronouncements issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board. Each of these pronouncements, as applicable, has been or will be adopted by the Company. Management does not believe the adoption of any of these accounting pronouncements has had or will have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

NOTE 3 – MINING AND MINERAL RIGHTS

 

The Company is preparing the Tonopah property site for the construction of a permitted custom processing toll milling facility including grading the land, installing fencing, and working with contractors for our planned 21,875 square foot building and servicing and drilling various wells for our future operations.

 

The Company has continued to assess the realizability of its mining and mineral rights. Based on an assessment the Company conducted in January 2021, the Company believes the carrying value of the rights recorded on its books is not impaired. However, the Company determined that its land, mineral rights, and water rights are inseparable and depend on each other in value creation. Accordingly, during the year ended December 31, 2018, the Company combined the carrying value of the assets to present more clearly their intended use together.

 

NOTE 4 – CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE

 

On March 16, 2020 the Company executed a Line of Credit (“LOC”) with Granite Peak Resources, LLC (“GPR”), a related party, evidenced by a convertible promissory note. The LOC is for up to $2,500,000, matures over three years and may be increased by up to another $1,000,000 and extended an additional two years at GPR’s sole option. The LOC is for funding operating expenses critical to the Company’s basic operations and redirection and all requests for funds may be approved or disapproved in GPR’s sole discretion. The LOC bears interest at 10% per annum, is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock at a per share price of $2.00, and is secured by the real and personal property of the Company and its subsidiaries, and the subsidiaries’ stock GPR already has under lien (See Note 7). During the three months ended March 31, 2021 and year ended December 31, 2020, GPR advanced $365,011 and $206,022, respectively, pursuant to the LOC in direct payments on the Company’s behalf, to fund certain operating expenses and reduce certain accounts payable. At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 the balance due GPR under the LOC is $584,608 and $219,597 principal and $26,171 and $16,073 accrued interest, respectively.

 

Advances by GPR to pay directly certain operating expenses and reduce certain accounts payable on the Company’s behalf have been included in the convertible promissory issued by the Company in connection with the LOC and classified accordingly in the accompanying consolidated condensed financial statements.

 

Including the foregoing advances under the LOC, there was $684,608 of principal and $130,310 of accrued interest outstanding on convertible debentures at March 31, 2021. With exception of the $584,608 of principal advanced under the LOI to date, a pre-existing convertible note is in default.

   

8

 

 

NOTE 5 – SHAREHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

  

Common Stock - Option Grants

  

The Company recorded no compensation expense for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020. As of March 31, 2021, there was $0 in unrecognized compensation expense.

 

The Company did not grant any options during the three months ended March 31, 2021, and 40,000 options expired; none were cancelled. There are no unvested options as of March 31, 2021.

 

The following tables summarize information about stock options outstanding and exercisable:  

 

  Options Outstanding and Exercisable at March 31, 2021 
Range of Exercise Prices Number 
Exercisable
  Weighted 
Remaining 
Contractual 
Life
  Weighted 
Average 
Exercise 
Price
  Aggregate 
Intrinsic
Value (1)
 
$20.00 to $30.00  ---   ---  $---  $--- 
$30.50 to $50.00  ---   ---  $---  $--- 
$50.50 to $75.00  ---   ---  $---  $--- 
$75.50 to $112.50  25,000   .25 years  $83.50  $--- 
$20.00 to $112.50  25,000   .25years  $83.5000  $--- 

  

(1)The aggregate intrinsic value in the table represents the difference between the closing stock price on March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, and the exercise price, multiplied by the number of in-the-money options that would have been received by the option holders had all option holders exercised their options on March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

 

Common Stock Purchase Warrants

 

For warrants granted to non-employees in exchange for services, the Company recorded the fair value of the equity instrument using the Black-Scholes pricing model unless the value of the services is more reliably measurable.

 

The Company did not grant any warrants during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and no warrants were exercised, none expired, and none were cancelled. At March 31, 2021 there were 5,000 warrants outstanding, with exercise prices of $61.50, a weighted exercise price of $61.50 and a weighted remaining contractual life of 0.9 years.

 

The aggregate intrinsic value of the 5,000 outstanding and exercisable warrants at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 was $0. The intrinsic value is the difference between the closing stock price on March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, and the exercise price, multiplied by the number of in-the-money warrants had all warrant holders exercised their warrants on March 31, 2021 or December 31, 2020.

 

9

 

 

The following table summarizes information about the Company’s stock purchase warrants outstanding at March 31, 2021. 

 

  Number  Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
  Range
of
Exercise
Price
  Weighted
Remaining
Contractual
Life (1)
 
Outstanding at December 31, 2019  97,313  $42.00   $ 10.00 - 61.50   .5 years 
Granted               
Cancelled or expired  54,655   38.00         
Exercised  37,658   44.50         
Outstanding and exercisable at December 31, 2020  5,000   61.50   61.50-61.50   1.2 years 
                 
Granted  ---   ---   ---     
Cancelled or expired  ---   ---   ---     
Outstanding and exercisable at March 31, 2021  5,000  $61.50   $ 61.50 - 61.50   0.9 years 

 

(1)The aggregate intrinsic value of the 5,000 outstanding and exercisable warrants at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively, was $0. The intrinsic value is the difference between the closing stock price on March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, and the exercise price, multiplied by the number of in-the-money warrants had all warrant holders exercised their warrants on March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020.

 

NOTE 6 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

Legal Matters

 

Stephen E. Flechner v. Standard Metals Processing, Inc.

 

On April 29, 2014, Stephen E. Flechner filed suit in the United States District Court for the District of Colorado against Standard Metals Processing, Inc. alleging that the Company had refused to allow him to exercise stock options granted to him pursuant to a Stock Option Agreement, dated April 1, 2010, and a second Stock Option Agreement, dated January 21, 2011. On June 12, 2014, the Company filed an Answer and a Motion to Dismiss or, Alternatively, to Stay or Transfer the action to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama, Middle Division. On January 16, 2015, the Company filed a Motion for Summary Judgment. On January 23, 2015, the Court issued an Order granting in part and denying in part the Company’s Motion to Dismiss or, Alternatively, to Stay or Transfer the action to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama, Middle Division. The Court in its Order stayed further proceedings in Colorado pending the issuance of orders by the Alabama court. Thereafter, on January 26, 2015, the Court issued an Order vacating the February 20, 2015 Trial Preparation Conference and the March 9, 2015 Bench Trial. On March 23, 2015, the Court issued an Order denying the Company’s Motion for Summary Judgment. On March 30, 2015, Flechner filed a Motion to Lift the Stay. On March 31, 2015, the Court issued an Order granting Flechner’s Motion to Lift the Stay. On April 6, 2015, the Court issued an Order scheduling a Bench Trial for July 29, 2015. On April 9, 2015, Flechner filed a Motion for Reconsideration of the Court’s March 23, 2015 Order Denying Flechner’s Motion to Enforce the Confidential Settlement Agreement to Settle Certain Issues. On May 1, 2015, the Court issued an Order Granting Flechner’s Motion to Enforce the Confidential Settlement Agreement to Settle Certain Issues. On August 12, 2015 the U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado issued a judgment in favor of Stephen E. Flechner for $2,157,000. An amended final judgment was ordered in adjudication of the Complaint by the U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado (the “Court”) on August 28, 2015 in favor of Flechner in the amount of $2,157,000, plus interest through the date of judgment of $235,246, plus interest of $472.76/day from August 28, 2015 until paid in full. The Company, in good faith anticipation of a settlement did not appeal the judgment and therefore, the Company’s notice of appeal was dismissed on November 17, 2015. This judgment is now non-appealable. The Company has recognized the daily interest due from the date of the August 28, 2015 judgment through March 31, 2021, totaling $1,007,924, resulting in a total amount of $3,400,170 being included in the Accrual for settlement of lawsuits relating to this matter in the accompanying March 31, 2021 condensed consolidated balance sheet.

 

10

 

 

NOTE 7 – related party TRANSACTIONS

 

During March 2019, the Company was informed that a change of control of the Company had occurred. Granite Peak Resources, LLC, through its members, including Pure Path Capital Management LLC (“GPR”) acquired 1,389,289 shares of common stock (including 90,000 warrants to purchase common stock). The members transferred their shares of common stock of the Company in exchange for a pro-rata ownership interest in GPR and are listed in the Schedule 13D filed by GPR on March 29, 2019. Since March 2019, through March 31, 2021, GPR and its members, through several unsolicited transactions purchased another 43,206 shares of common stock. GPR has not communicated to the Company any plans to change any of the current officers or directors or governing documents. GPR has expressed the purpose of its acquisition is to assist the Company in resolving its current obligations and claims, as a critical step in determining its future business plans.

 

GPR also acquired the senior secured creditor position previously held by Pure Path Capital Group LLC (the “Secured Note”), which includes a $2,500,000 first deed of trust on the Tonopah property and an outstanding promissory note with a principal balance of $2,229,187 as of both March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, and related accrued interest of $1,373,968 and $1,329,303 respectively. The Secured Note is securitized by all the Company’s tangible or intangible assets, already or hereinafter acquired, including but not limited to machinery, inventory, accounts receivable, cash, computers, hardware, land and mineral rights, etc., and all of the outstanding shares of the Company’s subsidiary AE and its subsidiaries TCP and TR which are held in Pledge by GPR’s Nevada counsel. The outstanding principal balance on the Secured Note of $2,229,187 together with related accrued interest of $1,373,968 at March 31, 2021 is in default.

 

As further detailed in Note 4, in March 2020, the Company executed a Line of Credit (“LOC”) with GPR, a related party, evidenced by a 10% convertible promissory note. The LOC is for up to $2,500,000, matures over three years and may be increased by up to another $1.000.000 and extended an additional two years, respectively at GPR’s sole option. As the LOC, like the Secured Note, is secured by all the Company’s assets including a pledge of 100% of its subsidiaries’ stock. As such, the LOC’s outstanding balance and accrued interest increase the amount of secured debt owned by GPR. During the three months ended March 31, 2021, GPR advanced $365,011 pursuant to the LOC in direct payments on the Company’s behalf, to pay for certain operating expenses and reduce certain accounts payable. At March 31, 2021, the balance due GPR under the LOC is $584,608 principal and $26,171 accrued interest.

 

Although the LOC is for funding operating expenses critical to the Company’s basic operations, redirection and the resolution of certain creditors’ claims under GPR’s sole discretion, neither GPR nor the Company can give any assurances that such creditors or claimants may be amicably resolved. As of the date of this filing, GPR is the beneficial owner of 53.6% (58.3% including the common share equivalent of GPR conversion rights) of the Company’s common stock and the holder of $4,213,934 of the Company’s secured debt and related interest, $3,603,155 of which is in default at March 31, 2021.

 

On February 11, 2015, the Company issued an unsecured promissory note (the “Note”) to Tina Gregerson Family Properties, LLC, an entity controlled by a former director of the Company. The Note for up to $750,000 was provided in tranches. Maturity of each tranche is one year from the date of receipt. Interest accrues at 8% per annum on each tranche. Under the terms of the Note, the Company received $477,500. At March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, accrued interest on the Note is $229,448 and $220,029, respectively. This Note is also in default.

 

NOTE 8 – EARNINGS (LOSS) PER SHARE

 

Basic net loss per common share is computed by dividing net loss applicable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the periods presented. Diluted net loss per common share is determined using the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the periods presented, adjusted for the dilutive effect of common stock equivalents, consisting of shares that might be issued upon exercise of options, warrants and conversion of convertible debt. In periods where losses are reported, the weighted average number of common shares outstanding excludes common stock equivalents, because their inclusion would be anti-dilutive.

  

At March 31, 2021 the weighted average shares from stock options of 25,000, warrants of 5,000 and Convertible Promissory note equivalent shares of 312,404, and at December 31, 2020 the weighted average shares from stock options of 65,000, warrants of 5,000 and Convertible Promissory note equivalent shares of 124,849 were excluded from the diluted weighted average common share calculation, respectively, due to the antidilutive effect such shares would have on net loss per common share.

 

NOTE 9 - SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

 

On April 6, 2021, holders of a majority of the Company’s Common Stock consented to the following actions: a) reelection of the Company’s board members until the next Annual Meeting or until their successors are duly elected and qualified, b) authorized a 1 for 50 reverse stock split of the Company’s outstanding Common Stock, with all fractional shares rounded to the nearest whole share, as of April 12, 2021 (the “Record Date”), and c) ratified and reappointed Turner Stone & Company, LLP as the Company’s independent registered accountants. These actions were taken without notice, meetings or votes in accordance with the Nevada Revised Statutes (“NRS”), Sections 78.315 and 78.320. A complete Information Statement has been mailed to all shareholders as of the Record Date.

 

The outstanding shares and per share amounts in the accompanying consolidated condensed financial statements have been restated to give effect to the afore mentioned reverse split.

  

11

 

 

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

The following management discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations should be read in connection with the accompanying unaudited condensed financial statements and related notes thereto included elsewhere in this report and the audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in the Company’s Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020, as filed with the SEC on January 23, 2021.

 

Cautionary Notice Regarding Forward Looking Statements

 

Readers are cautioned that the following discussion contains certain forward-looking statements and should be read in conjunction with the “Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” appearing at the beginning of this Quarterly Report.

 

The information contained in this Item 2 contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Actual results may materially differ from those projected in the forward-looking statements as a result of certain risks and uncertainties set forth in this report. Although management believes that the assumptions made and expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, there is no assurance that the underlying assumptions will, in fact, prove to be correct or that actual results will not be different from expectations expressed in this report.

 

As used in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and unless otherwise indicated, the terms “Company,” “we,” “us,” and “our” refer to Standard Metals Processing, Inc. and our wholly owned subsidiary, Aurielle Enterprises Inc. (“AE”), and AE’s wholly owned subsidiaries Tonopah Custom Processing, Inc. (“TCP”) and Tonopah Resources, Inc. (“TR”). Unless otherwise specified, all dollar amounts are expressed in United States dollars.  

 

Corporate History

 

We were incorporated in the State of Colorado on July 10, 1985 and re-domiciled in Nevada in March 2013. In 2011, we closed a series of transactions, whereby we acquired certain assets of Shea Mining & Milling, LLC, which assets include land, buildings, a dormant milling facility, abandoned milling equipment, water permits, mine tailings, mine dumps and the assignment of a note payable, a lease and a contract agreement with permits. We completed the Shea Exchange Agreement in order to offer toll milling services of precious minerals. Toll milling is a process whereby mined material is crushed and ground into fine particles to ease the extraction of any precious minerals contained therein, such as gold, silver, and platinum group metals. Custom milling and refining can include many different processes to extract precious metals from carbon or concentrates. These toll-processing services also distill, dry, mix, or mill chemicals and bulk materials on a contractual basis and provide a chemical production outsourcing option for industrial companies which lack the expertise, capacity, or regulatory permits for in-house production.

  

12

 

 

Overview of the Company

 

We have an office in Gadsden, Alabama and, through a subsidiary, a property in Tonopah, Nevada. Our business plan is to purchase equipment and build a facility on the Tonopah property to serve as a permitted custom processing toll milling facility which includes an analytical lab, pyrometallurgical plant, and hydrometallurgical recovery plant. We are required to obtain several permits before we can begin construction of a small-scale mineral processing facility and the required additional buildings to conduct permitted processing toll milling activities and commence operations.

 

Water Pollution Control Permit with Nevada Department of Environmental Protection

 

Through the Company’s wholly owned subsidiary, TCP, a Water Pollution Control Permit (“WPCP”) Application was filed with the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection (“NDEP”) Bureau of Mines and Mining Reclamation (“BMMR”) for the approval of the permits necessary for a small-scale mineral processing facility planned for the Tonopah property. The plant will perform laboratory testing, pilot testing, and custom processing of precious metal ores and concentrates from mining industry clients. Processing of ore materials will employ standard mineral processing techniques including gravity concentration, froth flotation and chemical leaching and carbon stripping.

 

The WPCP must be approved prior to commencing the planned construction of our processing plant in Tonopah, Nevada.  

 

In connection with our WPCP application, NDEP suggested that we take the following actions: (i) retain a Nevada Certified Environmental Manager (“CEM”), (ii) perform Meteoric Profile II water testing on ground water directly below the mill as well as surrounding wells located off site, and (iii) determine baseline values of water using the Meteoric Profile II results. NDEP regulations require that the Company delay any new construction planned for “metal extraction” until after the permits are in place.

 

Advanced Surveying & Professional Services, a Professional Land Surveyor (“PLS”), completed surveys and testing of the Tonopah property required for the application of our required permits. After completion of the survey, it was determined the property is 1,186 acres. The scope of work the PLS completed includes: (i) setting a total of 19 permanent monuments at angle points along lines, (ii) setting eight permanent monuments locating US Hwy 95, (iii) recording a professional map indicating longitude and latitude for all corners, and (iv) providing a digital map accessible in Auto Cad software.

 

Site Preparation

 

We have completed the initial grading of specific designated areas on the 40 undisturbed acres of land including clearing all vegetation, removing of all scrap metal, and the excavation of the building pad for preparation of our planned new 21,875 square foot processing plant and have completed the removal of all the extra and unnecessary materials and old equipment that has accumulated on the land. We have also refurbished a trailer that will act as our construction office.

 

Business Plan

 

The Company is reexamining its next steps for developing a processing facility. In an effort to move the Company’s business plan forward, the Company may evaluate opportunities to acquire, license, or joint venture with other parties involved in toll milling, processing, or mining related activities, which may include GPR and its affiliated entities including, but not limited to, Sustainable Metal Solutions, LLC (“SMS”), Remedy Environmental LLC, and Black Bear Natural Resources, LTD.

 

The Company owns tailings located on the Tonopah property and the rights to some tailings located in Manhattan, Nevada. The Company has not disturbed or processed any of this material, but recently authorized GPR to examine the economic feasibility of processing the tailings to reclaim their residual content of valuable metals in exchange for the exclusive right to process the tailings should their economic assessment prove positive. The terms of such processing to be mutually agreed upon between GPR and the Company in the future based on the results of the assessment.  In addition, the Company and Sustainable Metal Solutions, LLC (“SMS”), an affiliate of GPR, agreed to form a joint venture into which the Company will contribute the solar energy rights attributable to its 1,086 acres in exchange for SMS’s agreement to develop, manage and underwrite the venture.

 

13

 

 

Products and Services

 

We plan to establish ourselves as a custom processing and permitted toll milling service provider. Our business plan is to build a facility on our Tonopah property, which includes an analytical lab, pyrometallurgical, and hydrometallurgical recovery plant.

 

The Company’s intention is to become a full service permitted custom toll milling and processing company that facilitates the extraction of precious and strategic minerals from mined material. The Company is in the process of obtaining the permits needed for construction and operation of our permitted custom processing toll milling facility with state-of-the-art equipment capable of processing gold, silver, and platinum metal groups. Many junior miners do not have the capital or the ability to permit a processing facility, yet they have a large supply of mined material that requires milling be performed. It is often cost prohibitive or impractical for these mine operators to send their materials to processing mills owned by the large mining companies, or to other customers sorely needing milling and processing services.

 

While Nevada has a historic role as a mining center with good proximate geology and ample mined product, very little custom processing toll milling capacity remains in the state. During the last several decades, other processing facilities have been shuttered due to high costs of regulations and the vertical integration of milling within large mining companies leaving junior miners with few options for local milling services. As a result, we are in a unique position among processing facilities because we are capable of true permitted custom processing. We have the only ball mill located within a custom toll milling facility within 300 miles allowing us to serve miners in the western United States, Canada, Mexico, and Central America.

 

Many junior miners are undercapitalized, have limited access to capital markets and have a large supply of mined material that requires milling be performed. Many large mining companies reserve their milling capacity for their inventory, which does not make providing third party services worthwhile. This provides the Company with an opportunity to provide these potential customers with dearly needed milling and processing services. Some of our mining customers will be able to take their tailings (the material left over after the desired minerals have been extracted) from the material they deposited with the Company and put it back in the exact same mines those tailings initially came from. Thereby eliminating the need for the Company to store or dispose of their voluminous remains.

 

Results of Operation

 

Comparison of Three Months Ended March 31, 2021 to Three Months Ended March 31, 2020

 

Revenues

 

We had no revenues from any operations for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020. Furthermore, we do not anticipate any significant future revenue until we have sufficiently funded construction and begin operations.

 

General and Administrative Expenses

 

General and administrative expenses were $342,697 for the three months ended March 31, 2021, as compared to $52,220 for the same period in 2020. The increase for the three months ended March 31, 2021, was principally a result of increased engineering and development expenses associated with evaluating future uses of the Company’s property. In the three months ended March 31, 2020, the $52,220 total related principally to continuance of nominal accounting, legal, and office expenses consistent with modest funding. We anticipate that that operating expenses will increase for fiscal 2021 as we continue to assess the Company’s future.

 

Other Income and Expenses

 

We receive monthly lease payments of from American Tower Corporation for a cellular tower located on our Tonopah land. As such Other Income for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was $2,099 compared to $2,099 for the respective period in 2020. Additionally, gain on derecognition of debt for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was $22,523, as compared to none in the three months ended March 31, 2020.

 

Interest expense for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was $163,473, compared to $194,330 for the same period in 2020. The decrease of $30,857 in the current period was primarily due to our reassessment of the interest rates likely to apply to amounts due certain unsecured creditors.

 

14

 

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Liquidity is a measure of an entity’s ability to secure enough cash to meet its contractual and operating needs as they arise. We have funded our operations and satisfied our capital requirements through increases in convertible debt pursuant to our LOC during the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020. We do not anticipate generating sufficient net positive cash flows from our operations to fund the next twelve months. We had a working capital deficit of $10,651,502 at March 31, 2021. Cash was $1,626 at March 31, 2021, as compared to cash of $1,199 at December 31, 2020.

 

Our cash reserves will not be sufficient to meet our operational needs and thus, we need to raise additional capital to pay for our operational expenses and provide for capital expenditures. Our basic operational expenses are currently estimated at approximately $25,000 per month. Above the basic operational expenses, we estimate that we need approximately $10,000,000 to begin limited toll milling operations. If we are not able to raise additional working capital, we may have to cease operations altogether.

 

Recent Financings  

 

 On March 16, 2020 the Company executed a Line of Credit (“LOC”) with GPR, a related party, evidenced by a convertible promissory note. The LOC is for up to $2,500,000, matures over three years, bears interest at 10% per annum, is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock at a per share price of $2.00, and is secured by the real and personal property of the Company and its subsidiaries and pledged securities GPR already has under lien. The LOC is for funding operating expenses critical to the Company’s basic operations and redirection and all requests for funds may be approved or disapproved in GPR’s sole discretion.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2021, GPR advanced $365,012 to pay directly on the Company’s behalf, certain administrative costs as well as engineering and development expenses to assess the future uses of the Company’s real property. During the three months ended March 31, 2020. GPR advanced $50,780 which it used to pay directly certain of the Company’s providers of administrative expenses. The advances were made by GPR, a related party, pursuant to the terms of our LOC.

 

Going Concern

 

The condensed consolidated financial statements contained in this quarterly report on Form 10-Q have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. The Company has accumulated losses from inception through the period ended March 31, 2021 of $104,831,950, and a working capital deficit of $10,651,502, as well as negative cash flows from operating activities. Presently, the Company does not have sufficient cash resources to meet its debt obligations in the twelve months following the date of this filing. In addition, virtually all of the Company’s assets are encumbered or pledged under senior secured debt that is in default. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management is in the process of evaluating various financing alternatives to finance its capital requirements, as well as for general and administrative expenses. These alternatives include raising funds through public or private equity markets and either through institutional or retail investors. Although there is no assurance that the Company will be successful with its fund-raising initiatives, management believes that the Company will be able to secure the necessary financing providing it is successful in resolving its liabilities and other claims with its unsecured creditors and GPR’s assistance.

 

The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that may be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern. The Company’s continuation as a going concern is dependent on its ability to obtain additional financing as may be required and ultimately to attain profitability. If the Company raises additional funds through the issuance of equity, the percentage ownership of current shareholders would likely be reduced, and such securities might have rights, preferences or privileges senior to the rights, preferences, and privileges of the Company’s common stock. Additional financing may not be available upon acceptable terms, or at all. If adequate funds are not available or are not available on acceptable terms, the Company may not be able to take advantage of prospective business endeavors or opportunities, which would significantly and materially restrict its future. If the Company is unable to resolve the claims of its unsecured creditors, the Company may have to cease operations.

 

15

 

 

Working Capital Deficiency

 

  March 31,
2021
  December 31,
2020
 
Current assets $37,073  $36,646 
Current liabilities  10,688,575   10,206,601 
Working capital deficiency $(10,651,502) $(10,169,954)

 

The balance and components of current assets are consistent between periods. The increase in current liabilities is primarily due to accrual of interest on settlement of lawsuits, creditor claims, and notes due related parties.

 

Cash Flows

 

  

Three Months Ended

March 31,

 
  2021  2020 
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities $427  $659 
Net cash provided by financing activities  ---   --- 
Increase (Decrease) in cash $427  $659 

 

Operating Activities

 

Net cash provided by operating activities was $427 and $659 for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. Cash was provided by operating activities during both periods primarily due to payments advanced under the LOC for operating expenses offset by net increases in accrued liabilities.

 

Financing Activities

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2021, net cash provided by financing activities was $-0-. For the three months ended March 31, 2020, net cash provided by financing activities was also $0.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2021, we did not engage in any off-balance sheet arrangements as defined in item 303(a)(4) of the SEC’s Regulation S-K.

 

Effects of Inflation

 

We do not believe that inflation has had a material impact on our business, revenues or operating results during the periods presented.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Our significant accounting policies are more fully described in the notes to our financial statements included herein for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and in the notes to our audited consolidated financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020. We believe that the accounting policies below are critical for one to fully understand and evaluate our financial condition and results of operations.

 

16

 

 

Impairment of Long-lived Assets

 

We review our property and mining and mineral rights subject to amortization and other long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset class may not be recoverable. Indicators of potential impairment include: an adverse change in legal factors or in the business climate that could affect the value of the asset; an adverse change in the extent or manner in which the asset is used or is expected to be used, or in its physical condition; and current or forecasted operating or cash flow losses that demonstrate continuing losses associated with the use of the asset. If indicators of impairment are present, the asset is tested for recoverability by comparing the carrying value of the asset to the related estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. If the expected cash flows are less than the carrying value of the asset, then the asset is considered to be impaired and its carrying value is written down to fair value, based on the related estimated discounted cash flows. During the prior year, however, we decided to combine the carrying value of our mining and mineral assets as they are inseparable and depend upon each other in value creation. See Note 3. There were no impairment charges in the three months ended March 31, 2021.

 

Recent Accounting Standards

 

In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12, Income Taxes-Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes ("ASU 2019-12"). Among other items, the amendments in ASU 2019-12 simplify the accounting treatment of tax law changes and year-to-date losses in interim periods. An entity generally recognizes the effects of a change in tax law in the period of enactment, however, there is an exception for tax laws with delayed effective dates. Under current guidance, an entity may not adjust its annual effective tax rate for a tax law change until the period in which the law is effective. This exception was removed under ASU 2019-12, thereby providing that all effects of a tax law change are recognized in the period of enactment, including adjustment of the estimated annual effective tax rate. Regarding year-to-date losses in interim periods, an entity is required to estimate its annual effective tax rate for the full fiscal year at the end of each interim period and use that rate to calculate its income taxes on a year-to-date basis. However, current guidance provides an exception that when a loss in an interim period exceeds the anticipated loss for the year, the income tax benefit is limited to the amount that would be recognized if the year-to-date loss were the anticipated loss for the full year. ASU 2019-12 removes this exception and provides that, in this situation, an entity would compute its income tax benefit at each interim period based on its estimated annual effective tax rate. ASU 2019-l2 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, including interim periods within those annual periods Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the effect that this update will have on its consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments (“ASU 2016-13”) and also issued subsequent amendments to the initial guidance: ASU 2018-19, ASU 2019-04, and ASU 2019-05 (collectively, "Topic 326"). Topic 326 requires measurement and recognition of expected credit losses for financial assets held. The Company will be required to adopt this ASU for financial years beginning after December 15, 2022, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The adoption of topic 326 is not expected to have a material effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and financial statement disclosures.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2021 and through the date of this filing, there were several new accounting pronouncements issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board. Each of these pronouncements, as applicable, has been or will be adopted by the Company. Management does not believe the adoption of any of these accounting pronouncements has had or will have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements. 

   

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

Not Applicable.

 

17

 

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

We carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer (who is our Principal Executive Officer) and our Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer (who is our Principal Financial Officer and Principal Accounting Officer), of the effectiveness of the design of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined by Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) or 15d-15(e)) as of March 31, 2021 pursuant to Exchange Act Rule 13a-15. Based upon that evaluation, our Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of March 31, 2021 in ensuring that information required to be disclosed by us in reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. This conclusion is based on findings that constituted material weaknesses. A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of control deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the Company’s interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

 

In performing the above-referenced assessment, management identified the following deficiencies in the design or operation of our internal controls and procedures, which management considers to be material weaknesses:

 

(i) Lack of Formal Policies and Procedures. We utilize a third party independent contractor for the preparation of our financial statements. Although the financial statements and footnotes are reviewed by our management, we do not have a formal policy to review significant accounting transactions and the accounting treatment of such transactions. The third party independent contractor is not involved in the day to day operations of the Company and may not be provided information from management on a timely basis to allow for adequate reporting/consideration of certain transactions.

 

(ii) Audit Committee and Financial Expert. We do not have a formal audit committee with a financial expert, and thus we lack the board oversight role within the financial reporting process.

 

(iii) Insufficient Resources. We have insufficient quantity of dedicated resources and experienced personnel involved in reviewing and designing internal controls. As a result, a material misstatement of the interim and annual financial statements could occur and not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

 

(iv) Entity Level Risk Assessment. We did not perform an entity level risk assessment to evaluate the implication of relevant risks on financial reporting, including the impact of potential fraud related risks and the risks related to non-routine transactions, if any, on internal control over financial reporting. Lack of an entity-level risk assessment constituted an internal control design deficiency which resulted in more than a remote likelihood that a material error would not have been prevented or detected and constituted a material weakness.

 

Our management feels the weaknesses identified above have not had any material effect on our financial results. However, we are currently reviewing our disclosure controls and procedures related to these material weaknesses, and expect to implement changes in the near term, as resources permit, to address these material weaknesses. Our management will continue to monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of our internal controls and procedures and our internal controls over financial reporting on an ongoing basis and is committed to taking further action and implementing additional enhancements or improvements, as necessary and as funds permit.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. All internal control systems, no matter how well designed, have inherent limitations. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the three months ended March 31, 2021 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting. 

  

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PART II – OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

 

Stephen E. Flechner v. Standard Metals Processing, Inc.

 

On April 29, 2014, Stephen E. Flechner filed suit in the United States District Court for the District of Colorado against Standard Metals Processing, Inc. alleging that the Company had refused to allow him to exercise stock options granted to him pursuant to a Stock Option Agreement, dated April 1, 2010, and a second Stock Option Agreement, dated January 21, 2011. On June 12, 2014, the Company filed an Answer and a Motion to Dismiss or, Alternatively, to Stay or Transfer the action to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama, Middle Division. On January 16, 2015, the Company filed a Motion for Summary Judgment. On January 23, 2015, the Court issued an Order granting in part and denying in part the Company’s Motion to Dismiss or, Alternatively, to Stay or Transfer the action to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama, Middle Division. The Court in its Order stayed further proceedings in Colorado pending the issuance of orders by the Alabama court. Thereafter, on January 26, 2015, the Court issued an Order vacating the February 20, 2015 Trial Preparation Conference and the March 9, 2015 Bench Trial. On March 23, 2015, the Court issued an Order denying the Company’s Motion for Summary Judgment. On March 30, 2015, Flechner filed a Motion to Lift the Stay. On March 31, 2015, the Court issued an Order granting Flechner’s Motion to Lift the Stay. On April 6, 2015, the Court issued an Order scheduling a Bench Trial for July 29, 2015. On April 9, 2015, Flechner filed a Motion for Reconsideration of the Court’s March 23, 2015 Order Denying Flechner’s Motion to Enforce the Confidential Settlement Agreement to Settle Certain Issues. On May 1, 2015, the Court issued an Order Granting Flechner’s Motion to Enforce the Confidential Settlement Agreement to Settle Certain Issues. On August 12, 2015 the U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado issued a judgment in favor of Stephen E. Flechner for $2,157,000. An amended final judgment was ordered in adjudication of the Complaint by the U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado (the “Court”) on August 28, 2015 in favor of Flechner in the amount of $2,157,000, plus interest through the date of judgment of $235,246, plus interest of $472.76/day from August 28, 2015 until paid in full. The Company, in good faith anticipation of a settlement did not appeal the judgment and therefore, the Company’s notice of appeal was dismissed on November 17, 2015. This judgment is now non-appealable. The Company has recognized the daily interest due from the date of the August 28, 2015 judgment through March 31, 2021, totaling $1,007,924, resulting in a total amount of $3,400,170 being included in the Accrual for settlement of lawsuits relating to this matter in the accompanying March 31, 2021 condensed consolidated balance sheet.

  

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

As a smaller reporting company, we are not required to provide the information required by this Item. We note, however, that an investment in our common stock involves a number of very significant risks. Investors should carefully consider the risk factors included in the “Risk Factors” section of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for our fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 as filed with SEC on January 26, 2021, in addition to other information contained in such Annual Report and in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, in evaluating the Company and our business before purchasing shares of our common stock. The Company’s business, operating results and financial condition could be adversely affected due to any of those risks.

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use Of Proceeds

 

None.

 

Item 3. Defaults upon Senior Securities

 

None.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

Not Applicable.

 

Item 5. Other Information

 

None.

 

Item 6. Exhibits

 

Exhibit

Number

 Description
(31) Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certifications
31.1* Section 302 Certification under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of the Principal Executive Officer
31.2* Section 302 Certification under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of the Principal Financial Officer and Principal Accounting Officer
(32) Section 1350 Certifications
32.1* Section 906 Certification under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of the Chief Executive Officer
32.2* Section 906 Certification under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 of the Principal Accounting Officer
(101)* Interactive Data Files
101.INS XBRL Instance Document
101.SCH XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
101.CAL XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
101.DEF XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
101.LAB XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
101.PRE XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document

 

*Filed herewith.

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

 STANDARD METALS PROCESSING, INC.
   
 By:/s/ J. Bryan Read
  J. Bryan Read
  Chief Executive Officer
  (Principal Executive Officer)
   
  Date: April 30, 2021
   
 By:/s/ Sharon Ullman
  Sharon Ullman
  Chief Financial Officer
  

(Principal Financial Officer and

Principal Accounting Officer)

  
  Date: April 30, 2021

 

 

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