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OI O-I Glass

Filed: 30 Apr 21, 4:32pm

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(Mark one)

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended

March 31, 2021

or

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from to

Commission file number 1-9576

Graphic

O-I GLASS, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware

22-2781933

(State or other jurisdiction of

(IRS Employer

incorporation or organization)

Identification No.)

One Michael Owens Way, Perrysburg, Ohio

43551

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (567) 336-5000

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class

Trading symbol

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $.01 par value

OI

New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes No The number of shares of common stock, par value $.01, of O-I Glass, Inc. outstanding as of March 31, 2021 was 157,912,101.

Part I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1. Financial Statements.

The Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements of O-I Glass, Inc. (the “Company”) presented herein are unaudited but, in the opinion of management, reflect all adjustments necessary to present fairly such information for the periods and at the dates indicated. All adjustments are of a normal recurring nature. Because the following unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Article 10 of Regulation S-X, they do not contain all information and footnotes normally contained in annual consolidated financial statements; accordingly, they should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and notes thereto appearing in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.

The term “Company,” as used herein and unless otherwise stated or indicated by context, refers to Owens-Illinois, Inc. (“O-I”) prior to the Corporate Modernization (as defined in Note 10) and to O-I Glass, Inc. (“O-I Glass”) after the Corporate Modernization.

1

O-I GLASS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

(Dollars in millions, except per share amounts)
(Unaudited)

Three months ended

March 31,

2021

    

2020

    

 

Net sales

$

1,500

$

1,561

Cost of goods sold

 

(1,256)

 

(1,293)

Gross profit

244

268

Selling and administrative expense

(102)

(116)

Research, development and engineering expense

(18)

(16)

Interest expense, net

(51)

(53)

Equity earnings

18

15

Other expense, net

(156)

(17)

Earnings (loss) before income taxes

 

(65)

 

81

Provision for income taxes

(26)

(26)

Net earnings (loss)

 

(91)

 

55

Net earnings attributable to non-controlling interests

(6)

(5)

Net earnings (loss) attributable to the Company

$

(97)

$

50

Basic earnings per share:

Net earnings (loss) attributable to the Company

$

(0.62)

$

0.32

Weighted average shares outstanding (thousands)

157,571

156,081

Diluted earnings per share:

Net earnings (loss) attributable to the Company

$

(0.62)

$

0.32

Weighted average diluted shares outstanding (thousands)

157,571

157,684

See accompanying notes.

2

O-I GLASS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

(Dollars in millions)

(Unaudited)

Three months ended

March 31,

    

2021

    

2020

    

 

Net earnings (loss)

$

(91)

$

55

Other comprehensive income (loss):

Foreign currency translation adjustments

(85)

(573)

Pension and other postretirement benefit adjustments, net of tax

20

31

Change in fair value of derivative instruments, net of tax

13

6

Other comprehensive loss

(52)

(536)

Total comprehensive income (loss)

(143)

(481)

Comprehensive (income) loss attributable to non-controlling interests

(2)

4

Comprehensive income (loss) attributable to the Company

$

(145)

$

(477)

See accompanying notes.

3

O-I GLASS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(Dollars in millions)

(Unaudited)

March 31,

December 31,

March 31,

2021

2020

2020

Assets

Current assets:

Cash and cash equivalents

$

742

$

563

$

891

Trade receivables, net of allowance of $32 million, $33 million, and $30 million at March 31, 2021, December 31, 2020 and March 31, 2020

 

714

 

623

 

767

Inventories

 

827

 

841

 

1,047

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

203

 

270

 

257

Total current assets

 

2,486

 

2,297

 

2,962

Property, plant and equipment, net

2,791

2,907

2,987

Goodwill

1,880

1,951

1,773

Intangibles, net

310

325

312

Other assets

1,358

1,402

1,470

Total assets

$

8,825

$

8,882

$

9,504

Liabilities and Share owners’ equity

Current liabilities:

Accounts payable

$

998

$

1,126

$

1,025

Short-term loans and long-term debt due within one year

180

197

283

Other liabilities

524

575

516

Total current liabilities

 

1,702

 

1,898

 

1,824

Long-term debt

5,168

4,945

6,115

Paddock support agreement liability

625

471

471

Other long-term liabilities

1,068

1,167

1,018

Share owners' equity

262

401

76

Total liabilities and share owners’ equity

$

8,825

$

8,882

$

9,504

See accompanying notes.

4

O-I GLASS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED CASH FLOWS

(Dollars in millions)

(Unaudited)

Three months ended March 31,

    

2021

    

2020

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

Net earnings (loss)

$

(91)

$

55

Non-cash charges

Depreciation and amortization

 

115

126

Pension expense

 

8

9

Charge related to Paddock support agreement liability

 

154

Cash payments

Pension contributions

 

(18)

(13)

Cash paid for restructuring activities

 

(3)

(8)

Change in components of working capital

 

(229)

(461)

Other, net (a)

8

(23)

Cash utilized in operating activities

 

(56)

 

(315)

Cash flows from investing activities:

Cash payments for property, plant and equipment

 

(93)

(120)

Cash proceeds on disposal of other businesses and misc. assets

4

Cash proceeds on sale of ANZ businesses, net of transaction costs

58

Deconsolidation of Paddock

(47)

Other

2

Cash utilized in investing activities

 

(31)

 

(165)

Cash flows from financing activities:

Changes in borrowings, net

290

859

Issuance of common stock and other

(2)

(2)

Dividends paid

(8)

Cash provided by financing activities

 

288

 

849

Effect of exchange rate fluctuations on cash

 

(22)

(29)

Increase in cash

 

179

 

340

Cash at beginning of period

 

563

551

Cash at end of period

$

742

$

891

(a)Other, net includes other non-cash charges plus other changes in non-current assets and liabilities.

See accompanying notes.

5

O-I GLASS, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Tabular data dollars in millions, except per share amounts

1. Segment Information

Historically, the Company had 3 reportable segments and 3 operating segments based on its geographic locations: the Americas, Europe and Asia Pacific. These 3 segments are aligned with the Company’s internal approach to managing, reporting, and evaluating performance of its global glass operations. On July 31, 2020, the Company completed the sale of its Australia and New Zealand (“ANZ”) businesses, which comprised the majority of its businesses in the Asia Pacific region (approximately 85% of net sales in that region for the full year 2019), to Visy Industries Holdings Pty Ltd. (“Visy”).  After the sale of the ANZ businesses, the remaining businesses in the Asia Pacific region do not meet the criteria of an individually reportable segment. For the three months ended March 31, 2020, the results of the Asia Pacific segment have been recast to reflect only the results of its ANZ businesses. For all historical periods discussed in this report, the sales and operating results of the other businesses that historically comprised the Asia Pacific segment, and that have been retained by the Company, have been reclassified to Other sales and Retained corporate costs and other, respectively. For asset reporting purposes, only the assets related to the ANZ businesses have been reported in the Asia Pacific segment, while the other businesses that historically comprised this segment and that have been retained by the Company have been reclassified to the Other assets line for all periods presented.

Certain assets and activities not directly related to one of the regions or to glass manufacturing are reported with Retained corporate costs and other. These include licensing, equipment manufacturing, global engineering, certain equity investments and the remaining businesses in the Asia Pacific region that do not meet the criteria of an individually reportable segment after the sale of the ANZ businesses. Retained corporate costs and other also includes certain headquarters administrative and facilities costs and certain incentive compensation and other benefit plan costs that are global in nature and are not allocable to the reportable segments.

The Company’s measure of profit for its reportable segments is segment operating profit, which consists of consolidated earnings (loss) before interest income, interest expense, and benefit (provision) for income taxes and excludes amounts related to certain items that management considers not representative of ongoing operations, as well as certain retained corporate costs. The Company’s management uses segment operating profit, in combination with net sales and selected cash flow information, to evaluate performance and to allocate resources. Segment operating profit for reportable segments includes an allocation of some corporate expenses based on both a percentage of sales and direct billings based on the costs of specific services provided. Segment operating profit is not a recognized term under U.S. GAAP and, therefore, does not purport to be an alternative to earnings (loss) before income taxes. Further, the Company's measure of segment operating profit may not be comparable to similarly titled measures of other companies.

Financial information for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 regarding the Company’s reportable segments is as follows:

    

Three months ended March 31,

2021

 

2020

 

Net sales:

Americas

$

837

$

831

Europe

 

639

576

Asia Pacific

 

123

Reportable segment totals

 

1,476

 

1,530

Other

24

31

Net sales

$

1,500

$

1,561

6

Three months ended March 31,

    

2021

    

2020

 

Segment operating profit:

Americas

$

100

$

103

Europe

 

75

 

61

Asia Pacific

 

 

12

Reportable segment totals

 

175

 

176

Items excluded from segment operating profit:

Retained corporate costs and other

(35)

(28)

Charge related to Paddock support agreement liability

(154)

Charge for deconsolidation of Paddock

(14)

Interest expense, net

(51)

(53)

Earnings (loss) before income taxes

$

(65)

$

81

Financial information regarding the Company’s total assets is as follows:

March 31,

December 31,

March 31,

    

2021

2020

2020

Total assets:

Americas

 

$

4,755

 

$

4,927

 

$

4,693

Europe

 

3,536

 

3,507

 

3,290

Asia Pacific

 

 

 

608

Reportable segment totals

 

8,291

 

8,434

 

8,591

Other

 

534

448

913

Consolidated totals

 

$

8,825

 

$

8,882

 

$

9,504

2. Revenue

Revenue is recognized at the point in time when obligations under the terms of the Company’s contracts and related purchase orders with its customers are satisfied. This occurs with the transfer of control of glass containers, which primarily takes place when products are shipped from the Company’s manufacturing or warehousing facilities to the customer. Revenue is measured as the amount of consideration the Company expects to receive in exchange for transferring goods, which includes estimated provisions for rebates, discounts, returns and allowances. Sales, value-added, and other taxes the Company collects concurrent with revenue-producing activities are excluded from revenue. The Company’s payment terms are based on customary business practices and can vary by customer type. The term between invoicing and when payment is due is not significant. Also, the Company elected to account for shipping and handling costs as a fulfillment cost at the time of shipment.

For the three-month periods ended March 31, 2021 and March 31, 2020, the Company had no material bad debt expense, and there were no material contract assets, contract liabilities or deferred contract costs recorded on the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet.

Consistent with the disclosures in Note 1 related to the ANZ sale, Asia Pacific revenue for the three-month period ended March 31, 2020, has been recast to reflect only the revenue of the ANZ businesses. The other businesses that comprised the Asia Pacific segment and that have been retained by the Company have been reclassified to the Other sales line.

7

The following tables for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 disaggregate the Company’s revenue by customer end use:

Three months ended March 31, 2021

    

Americas

Europe

Asia Pacific

Total

Alcoholic beverages (beer, wine, spirits)

 

$

502

 

$

477

 

$

$

979

Food and other

 

209

 

118

 

 

327

Non-alcoholic beverages

 

126

 

44

 

 

170

Reportable segment totals

$

837

$

639

$

$

1,476

Other

 

24

Net sales

 

$

1,500

Three months ended March 31, 2020

    

Americas

Europe

Asia Pacific

Total

Alcoholic beverages (beer, wine, spirits)

 

$

508

$

411

$

96

$

1,015

Food and other

 

189

105

14

 

308

Non-alcoholic beverages

 

134

60

13

 

207

Reportable segment totals

$

831

$

576

$

123

$

1,530

Other

 

31

Net sales

 

$

1,561


​​

3. Credit Losses

The Company is exposed to credit losses primarily through its sales of glass containers to customers. The Company’s trade receivables from customers are due within one year or less. The Company assesses each customer’s ability to pay for the glass containers it sells to them by conducting a credit review. The credit review considers the expected billing exposure and timing for payment and the customer’s established credit rating or the Company’s assessment of the customer’s creditworthiness, based on an analysis of their financial statements when a credit rating is not available. The Company also considers contract terms and conditions, country and political risk, and business strategy in its evaluation. A credit limit is established for each customer based on the outcome of this review. The Company may require collateralized asset support or a prepayment to mitigate credit risk. The Company monitors its ongoing credit exposure through the active review of customer balances against contract terms and due dates, including timely account reconciliation, dispute resolution and payment confirmation. The Company may employ collection agencies and legal counsel to pursue the recovery of defaulted receivables.

At March 31, 2021 and March 30, 2020, the Company reported $714 million and $767 million of accounts receivable, respectively, net of allowances of $32 million and $30 million, respectively. Changes in the allowance were not material for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and March 31, 2020.

4. Inventories

Major classes of inventory at March 31, 2021, December 31, 2020 and March 31, 2020 are as follows:

March 31,

December 31,

March 31,

    

2021

    

2020

    

2020

    

 

Finished goods

$

672

$

675

$

884

Raw materials

 

119

 

129

 

121

Operating supplies

 

36

 

37

 

42

$

827

$

841

$

1,047

8

5. Derivative Instruments

The Company has certain derivative assets and liabilities, which consist of foreign exchange option and forward contracts, interest rate swaps and cross-currency swaps. The valuation of these instruments is determined primarily using the income approach, including discounted cash flow analysis on the expected cash flows of each derivative. Foreign exchange rates and interest rates are the significant inputs into the valuation models. The Company also evaluates counterparty risk in determining fair values. This analysis reflects the contractual terms of the derivatives, including the period to maturity, and uses observable market-based inputs, including interest rate curves and implied volatilities. The fair values of interest rate swaps are determined using the market standard methodology of netting the discounted future fixed cash receipts (or payments) and the discounted expected variable cash payments (or receipts). The variable cash payments (or receipts) are based on an expectation of future interest rates (forward curves) derived from observable market interest rate curves. These inputs are observable in active markets over the terms of the instruments the Company holds, and, accordingly, the Company classifies its derivative assets and liabilities as Level 2 in the hierarchy.

Cash Flow Hedges of Foreign Exchange Risk

The Company has variable-interest rate borrowings denominated in currencies other than the functional currency of the borrowing subsidiaries. As a result, the Company is exposed to fluctuations in the currency of the borrowing against the subsidiaries’ functional currency.  The Company uses derivatives to manage these exposures and designates these derivatives as cash flow hedges of foreign exchange risk.

An unrecognized gain of $10 million at March 31, 2021, an unrecognized gain of $9 million at December 31, 2020 and an unrecognized loss of $4 million at March 31, 2020, related to these cross-currency swaps, were included in Accumulated OCI, and will be reclassified into earnings within the next 12 months.

Interest Rate Swaps Designated as Fair Value Hedges

The Company enters into interest rate swaps in order to maintain a capital structure containing targeted amounts of fixed and floating-rate debt and manage interest rate risk. The Company’s fixed-to-variable interest rate swaps are accounted for as fair value hedges. The relevant terms of the swap agreements match the corresponding terms of the notes, and therefore there is no hedge ineffectiveness. The Company recorded the net of the fair market values of the swaps as a long-term liability and short-term asset, along with a corresponding net decrease in the carrying value of the hedged debt.

Cash Flow Hedges of Interest Rate Risk

The Company enters into interest rate swaps in order to maintain a capital structure containing targeted amounts of fixed and floating-rate debt and manage interest rate risk. Interest rate swaps designated as cash flow hedges involve the receipt of variable amounts from a counterparty in exchange for the Company making fixed-rate payments. These interest rate swap agreements were used to hedge the variable cash flows associated with variable-rate debt.

An unrecognized loss of less than $1 million at March 31, 2021, an unrecognized loss of less than $1 million at December 31, 2020 and an unrecognized loss of $1 million at March 31, 2020 related to these interest rate swaps, were included in Accumulated OCI, and will be reclassified into earnings within the next 12 months.

Net Investment Hedges

The Company is exposed to fluctuations in foreign exchange rates on investments it holds in non-U.S. subsidiaries and uses cross-currency swaps to partially hedge this exposure.  

Foreign Exchange Derivative Contracts Not Designated as Hedging Instruments

The Company uses short-term forward exchange or option agreements to purchase foreign currencies at set rates in the future. These agreements are used to limit exposure to fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates for significant planned purchases of fixed assets or commodities that are denominated in currencies other than the subsidiaries’ functional currency. The Company also uses foreign exchange agreements to offset the foreign currency risk for receivables and payables, including intercompany receivables, payables, and loans, not denominated in, or indexed to, their functional currencies.

9

Balance Sheet Classification

The following table shows the amount and classification (as noted above) of the Company’s derivatives at March 31, 2021, December 31, 2020 and March 31, 2020:

Fair Value of

Fair Value of

Hedge Assets

Hedge Liabilities

March 31,

December 31,

March 31,

March 31,

December 31,

March 31,

    

2021

    

2020

    

2020

    

2021

    

2020

    

2020

Derivatives designated as hedging instruments:

    

    

    

    

    

    

Interest rate swaps - fair value hedges (a)

13

17

11

Cash flow hedges of foreign exchange risk (b)

8

6

66

67

115

4

Interest rate swaps - cash flow hedges (c)

2

Net investment hedges (d)

2

1

5

39

52

Total derivatives accounted for as hedges

$

23

$

24

$

82

$

106

$

167

$

6

Derivatives not designated as hedges:

Foreign exchange derivative contracts (e)

5

1

10

3

3

5

Total derivatives

$

28

$

25

$

92

$

109

$

170

$

11

Current

$

18

$

13

$

30

$

9

$

15

$

6

Noncurrent

10

12

62

100

155

5

Total derivatives

$

28

$

25

$

92

$

109

$

170

$

11

(a) The notional amounts of the interest rate swaps designated as fair value hedges were €725 million at March 31, 2021, December 31, 2020 and March 31, 2020. The maximum maturity dates were in 2024 for all three periods.

(b) The notional amounts of the cash flow hedges of foreign exchange risk were $978 million at March 31, 2021, $978 million at December 31, 2020 and $1.424 billion at March 31, 2020. The maximum maturity dates were in 2023 for all three periods.

(c) The notional amounts of the interest rate swaps designated as cash flow hedges were $0 at March 31, 2021, $0 at December 31, 2020 and $105 million at March 31, 2020. Maximum maturity dates were in 2020 for March 31, 2020.

(d) The notional amounts of the net investment hedges were €311 million at March 31, 2021, €311 million at December 31, 2020 and €160 million at March 31, 2020. The maximum maturity dates were in 2027 for March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 and in 2020 for March 31, 2020.

(e) The notional amounts of the foreign exchange derivative contracts were $301 million, $247 million and $306 million at March 31, 2021, December 31, 2020 and March 31, 2020, respectively. The maximum maturity dates were in 2021 for all three periods.

10

Gain (Loss) Recognized in OCI
(Effective Portion)

Gain (Loss) Reclassified from
Accumulated OCI into Income

(Effective Portion) (1)

Three months ended March 31,

Three months ended March 31,

Derivatives designated as hedging instruments:

 

2021

2020

2021

2020

Cash Flow Hedges

    

    

  

  

    

    

Cash flow hedges of foreign exchange risk (a)

$

48

$

66

$

49

$

60

Net Investment Hedges

Net Investment Hedges (b)

15

4

1

2

$

63

$

70

$

50

$

62

Amount of Gain (Loss)
Recognized in Other income
(expense), net

Three months ended March 31,

Derivatives not designated as hedges:

 

2021

2020

Foreign exchange derivative contracts

    

$

10

    

$

12

    

    

(1) Gains and losses reclassified from accumulated OCI and recognized in income are recorded to (a) other expense, net or (b) interest expense, net.

6. Restructuring Accruals

Selected information related to the restructuring accruals for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 is as follows:

Employee

Other

Total

    

Costs

    

Exit Costs

    

Restructuring

Balance at January 1, 2021

$

38

$

7

$

45

Net cash paid, principally severance and related benefits

 

(3)

 

(3)

Other, including foreign exchange translation

 

1

 

1

Balance at March 31, 2021

$

35

$

8

$

43

Employee

Other

Total

    

Costs

    

Exit Costs

    

Restructuring

Balance at January 1, 2020

$

32

$

13

$

45

Net cash paid, principally severance and related benefits

 

(8)

 

(8)

Other, including foreign exchange translation

 

(2)

(1)

 

(3)

Balance at March 31, 2020

$

22

$

12

$

34

When a decision is made to take restructuring actions, the Company manages and accounts for them programmatically apart from the on-going operations of the business. Information related to major programs is presented separately, while minor initiatives are presented on a combined basis. As of March 31, 2021 and 2020, no major restructuring programs were in effect.

For the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company has paid severance and related benefits along with other exit costs that were associated with past restructuring actions. The Company expects that the majority of the remaining cash expenditures related to the accrued employee and other costs will be paid out over the next several years.

11

7. Pension Benefit Plans

The components of the net periodic pension cost for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 are as follows:

U.S.

Non-U.S.

 

    

2021

    

2020

    

2021

    

2020

 

Service cost

$

3

$

3

$

3

$

3

Interest cost

 

10

 

12

 

5

 

7

Expected asset return

(21)

(21)

(11)

(12)

Amortization of actuarial loss

16

14

3

3

Net periodic pension cost

$

8

$

8

$

$

1

The components of pension expense, other than the service cost component, are included in Other expense, net on the Condensed Consolidated Results of Operations.

8. Income Taxes

The Company calculates its interim tax provision using the estimated annual effective tax rate (“EAETR”) methodology in accordance with ASC 740-270. The EAETR is applied to the year-to-date ordinary income, exclusive of discrete items. The tax effects of discrete items are then included to arrive at the total reported interim tax provision. The determination of the EAETR is based upon a number of estimates, including the estimated annual pretax ordinary income or loss in each tax jurisdiction in which the Company operates. The tax effects of discrete items are recognized in the tax provision in the quarter they occur, in accordance with GAAP. Depending on various factors, such as the item’s significance in relation to total income and the rate of tax applicable in the jurisdiction to which it relates, discrete items in any quarter can materially impact the reported effective tax rate. The Company’s annual effective tax rate may be affected by the mix of earnings in the U.S. and foreign jurisdictions, and such factors as changes in tax laws, tax rates or regulations, changes in business, changing interpretation of existing tax laws or regulations, the finalization of tax audits and reviews, as well as other factors. As such, there can be significant volatility in interim tax provisions. The annual effective tax rate differs from the statutory U.S. Federal tax rate of 21% primarily because of varying non-U.S. tax rates.

The Company is currently under examination in various tax jurisdictions, including Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, France, Germany, Indonesia, Mexico and Peru. The years under examination range from 2004 through 2019. The Company has received tax assessments in excess of established reserves. The Company is contesting these tax assessments, and will continue to do so, including pursuing all available remedies, such as appeals and litigation, if necessary. The Company believes that adequate provisions for all income tax uncertainties have been made. However, if tax assessments are settled against the Company at amounts in excess of established reserves, it could have a material impact on the Company’s results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

12

9. Debt

The following table summarizes the long-term debt of the Company:

March 31,

December 31,

March 31,

    

2021

    

2020

    

2020

Secured Credit Agreement:

Revolving Credit Facility:

Revolving Loans

$

292

$

$

817

Term Loans:

Term Loan A

1,068

1,067

1,477

Other secured debt

110

99

330

Senior Notes:

4.875%, due 2021 (€118 million at March 31, 2020)

 

130

5.00%, due 2022

497

4.00%, due 2023

308

307

307

5.875%, due 2023

692

692

689

3.125%, due 2024 (€725 million)

866

914

813

6.375%, due 2025

296

296

296

5.375%, due 2025

298

298

297

2.875%, due 2025 (€500 million)

579

607

543

6.625%, due 2027

692

692

Finance leases

102

108

84

Other

 

6

7

13

Total long-term debt

 

5,309

 

5,087

6,293

Less amounts due within one year

 

141

142

178

Long-term debt

$

5,168

$

4,945

$

6,115

The Company presents debt issuance costs in the balance sheet as a deduction of the carrying amount of the related debt liability.

On June 25, 2019, certain of the Company’s subsidiaries entered into a Senior Secured Credit Facility Agreement (as amended by that certain Amendment No. 1 to the Third Amended and Restated Credit Agreement and Syndicated Facility Agreement dated as of December 13, 2019, and as further amended by that certain Amendment No. 2 to the Third Amended and Restated Credit Agreement and Syndicated Facility Agreement dated as of December 19, 2019, the “Agreement”), which amended and restated the previous credit agreement (the “Previous Agreement”). The proceeds from the Agreement were used to repay all outstanding amounts under the Previous Agreement.

The Agreement provides for up to $3.0 billion of borrowings pursuant to term loans and revolving credit facilities. The term loans mature, and the revolving credit facilities terminate in June 2024. At March 31, 2021, the Agreement includes a $300 million revolving credit facility, a $1.2 billion multicurrency revolving credit facility, and a $1.5 billion term loan A facility ($1,068 million outstanding balance at March 31, 2021, net of debt issuance costs). At March 31, 2021, the Company had unused credit of $1,194 million available under the Agreement. The weighted average interest rate on borrowings outstanding under the Agreement at March 31, 2021 was 1.59%.

The Agreement contains various covenants that restrict, among other things and subject to certain exceptions, the ability of the Company to incur certain indebtedness and liens, make certain investments, become liable under contingent obligations in certain defined instances only, make restricted payments, make certain asset sales within guidelines and limits, engage in certain affiliate transactions, participate in sale and leaseback financing arrangements, alter its fundamental business, and amend certain subordinated debt obligations.

The Agreement also contains 1 financial maintenance covenant, a Total Leverage Ratio (the “Leverage Ratio”), that requires the Company not to exceed a ratio of 5.0x calculated by dividing consolidated total debt, less cash and cash equivalents, by Consolidated EBITDA, with such Leverage Ratio decreasing to (a) 4.75x for the quarter ending June 30, 2021 and (b) 4.50x for the quarter ending December 31, 2021 and thereafter, as defined and described in the Agreement.

13

The maximum Leverage Ratio is subject to an increase of 0.5x for (i) any fiscal quarter during which certain qualifying acquisitions (as specified in the Agreement) are consummated and (ii) the following three fiscal quarters, provided that the Leverage Ratio shall not exceed 5.0x. The Leverage Ratio could restrict the ability of the Company to undertake additional financing or acquisitions to the extent that such financing or acquisitions would cause the Leverage Ratio to exceed the specified maximum.

Failure to comply with these covenants and other customary restrictions could result in an event of default under the Agreement. In such an event, the Company could not request borrowings under the revolving facilities, and all amounts outstanding under the Agreement, together with accrued interest, could then be declared immediately due and payable. Upon the occurrence and for the duration of a payment event of default, an additional default interest rate equal to 2.0% per annum will apply to all overdue obligations under the Agreement. If an event of default occurs under the Agreement and the lenders cause all of the outstanding debt obligations under the Agreement to become due and payable, this would result in a default under the indentures governing the Company’s outstanding debt securities and could lead to an acceleration of obligations related to these debt securities. As of March 31, 2021, the Company was in compliance with all covenants and restrictions in the Agreement.  In addition, the Company believes that it will remain in compliance and that its ability to borrow funds under the Agreement will not be adversely affected by the covenants and restrictions.

The Leverage Ratio also determines pricing under the Agreement. The interest rate on borrowings under the Agreement is, at the Company’s option, the Base Rate or the Eurocurrency Rate, as defined in the Agreement, plus an applicable margin. The applicable margin is linked to the Leverage Ratio. The margins range from 1.00% to 1.50% for Eurocurrency Loans and from 0.00% to 0.50% for Base Rate Loans. In addition, a commitment fee is payable on the unused revolving credit facility commitments ranging from 0.20% to 0.30% per annum linked to the Leverage Ratio.

Obligations under the Agreement are secured by substantially all of the assets, excluding real estate and certain other excluded assets, of certain of the Company’s domestic subsidiaries and certain foreign subsidiaries. Such obligations are also secured by a pledge of intercompany debt and equity investments in certain of the Company’s domestic subsidiaries and, in the case of foreign obligations, of stock of certain foreign subsidiaries. All obligations under the Agreement are guaranteed by certain domestic subsidiaries of the Company, and certain foreign obligations under the Agreement are guaranteed by certain foreign subsidiaries of the Company.

In May 2020, the Company issued $700 million aggregate principal amount of senior notes. The senior notes bear interest at a rate of 6.625% per annum and mature on May 13, 2027. The senior notes were issued via a private placement and are guaranteed by certain of the Company’s domestic subsidiaries. The net proceeds, after deducting debt issuance costs, totaled approximately $690 million and were used to redeem the remaining $130 million aggregate principal amount of the Company’s outstanding 4.875% senior notes due 2021, approximately $419 million aggregate principal amount of the Company’s outstanding 5.00% senior notes due 2022 and approximately $105 million of other secured borrowings. The Company recorded approximately $38 million of additional interest charges for note repurchase premiums and write-off of unamortized finance fees related to these redemptions.

In August 2020, the Company redeemed the remaining $81 million aggregate principal amount of the Company’s outstanding 5.00% senior notes due 2022. The Company recorded approximately $6 million of additional interest charges for note repurchase premiums and write-off of unamortized finance fees related to this redemption.

In order to maintain a capital structure containing appropriate amounts of fixed and floating-rate debt, the Company has entered into a series of interest rate swap agreements. These interest rate swap agreements were accounted for as either fair value hedges or cash flow hedges (see Note 5 for more information).

The Company assesses its capital raising and refinancing needs on an ongoing basis and may enter into additional credit facilities and seek to issue equity and/or debt securities in the domestic and international capital markets if market conditions are favorable. Also, depending on market conditions, the Company may elect to repurchase portions of its debt securities in the open market.

The carrying amounts reported for certain long-term debt obligations subject to frequently redetermined interest rates approximate fair value. Fair values for the Company’s significant fixed rate debt obligations are based on

14

published market quotations, and are classified as Level 1 in the fair value hierarchy. Fair values at March 31, 2021 of the Company’s significant fixed rate debt obligations are as follows:

Principal

Indicated Market

 

    

Amount

    

Price Per $

    

Fair Value

 

Senior Notes:

5.875%, due 2023

$

700

$

107.18

$

750

4.00%, due 2023

310

102.87

319

3.125%, due 2024 (€725 million)

849

103.62

880

6.375%, due 2025

300

111.61

335

5.375%, due 2025

300

105.69

317

2.875%, due 2025 (€500 million)

585

101.27

592

6.625%, due 2027

700

108.75

761

10. Contingencies

Asbestos

From 1948 to 1958, one of the Company's former business units commercially produced and sold approximately $40 million of a high-temperature, calcium-silicate based pipe and block insulation material containing asbestos. The Company sold its insulation business unit in April 1958. The Company historically received claims from individuals alleging bodily injury and death as a result of exposure to asbestos from this product (“Asbestos Claims”). Some Asbestos Claims were brought as personal injury lawsuits that typically allege various theories of liability, including negligence, gross negligence and strict liability and seek compensatory and, in some cases, punitive damages.

Predominantly, however, Asbestos Claims were historically presented to the Company under administrative claims-handling agreements, which the Company had in place with many plaintiffs’ counsel throughout the country (“Administrative Claims”). Administrative Claims required evaluation and negotiation regarding whether particular claimants qualify under the criteria established by the related claims-handling agreements. The criteria for Administrative Claims included verification of a compensable illness and a reasonable probability of exposure to a product manufactured by the Company's former business unit during its manufacturing period ending in 1958. Plaintiffs’ counsel presented, and the Company negotiated, Administrative Claims under these various agreements in differing quantities, at different times, and under a variety of conditions.

On December 26 and 27, 2019, the Company implemented the Corporate Modernization, whereby O-I Glass became the new parent entity with Owens-Illinois Group, Inc. (“O-I Group”) and Paddock Enterprises LLC (“Paddock”) as direct, wholly owned subsidiaries, with Paddock as the successor-by-merger to O-I. The Company’s legacy asbestos-related liabilities remained within Paddock, with the Company’s glass-making operations remaining under O-I Group. As part of the Corporate Modernization transactions, O-I Glass entered into a support agreement with Paddock that requires O-I Glass to provide funding to Paddock for all permitted uses, subject to the terms of the support agreement. The key objectives of the Paddock support agreement are to ensure that Paddock has the ability to fund the costs and expenses of managing the Chapter 11 process, and ultimately settle Asbestos Claims through the establishment of a trust as described below and fund certain other liabilities.

On January 6, 2020 (the “Petition Date”), Paddock voluntarily filed for relief under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware to equitably and finally resolve all of its current and future asbestos-related claims. O-I Glass and O-I Group were not included in the Chapter 11 filing. As a result of the initiation of the Chapter 11 proceeding, Paddock continues to operate in the ordinary course and with court protection from Asbestos Claims by operation of the automatic stay in Paddock’s Chapter 11 filing, which stays ongoing litigation and submission of claims against Paddock as of the Petition Date and defers the payment of Paddock’s outstanding obligations on account of settled or otherwise determined lawsuits and claims. The bankruptcy process is expected to provide a centralized forum to resolve presently pending and anticipated future lawsuits and claims associated with asbestos. Paddock’s ultimate goal in its Chapter 11 case is to confirm a plan of reorganization under section 524(g) of the Bankruptcy Code and utilize this specialized provision to establish a trust that will address all current and future

15

asbestos-related claims and that, in exchange for funding of the trust by the Company and/or its subsidiaries, will provide permanent injunctive relief, protecting the Company, each of its current and former affiliates and certain other related parties (the “Company Protected Parties”) from any Asbestos Claims based on products manufactured, sold, used, and/or distributed by Owens-Illinois, Inc.

Following the Chapter 11 filing, the activities of Paddock became subject to review and oversight by the bankruptcy court. As a result, the Company no longer has exclusive control over Paddock’s activities during the Chapter 11 proceedings. Therefore, Paddock was deconsolidated as of the Petition Date, and its assets and liabilities, which primarily included $47 million of cash, the legacy asbestos-related liabilities, as well as certain other assets and liabilities as of the Petition Date, were derecognized from the Company’s consolidated financial statements on a prospective basis. Simultaneously, the Company recognized a liability related to the Paddock support agreement, as described above, of $471 million as required under applicable accounting standards. The deconsolidation and Paddock support agreement resulted in a loss of approximately $14 million, which was reflected as a charge in the Company’s first quarter 2020 operating results. Additionally, the deconsolidation resulted in an investing outflow of $47 million in the Company’s first quarter 2020 consolidated cash flows.

On February 23, 2021, Paddock and O-I Glass commenced a court-approved mediation process regarding the terms of a potential consensual plan of reorganization pursuant to section 524(g) of the Bankruptcy Code with the Official Committee of Asbestos Personal Injury Claimants (the “ACC” or “Asbestos Claimants’ Committee”) appointed in the Paddock Chapter 11 case as the representative of current Paddock asbestos claimants, and the Legal Representative of Future Asbestos Claimants (the “FCR” or “Future Claimants’ Representative”) appointed in the Paddock Chapter 11 case as the representative of future Paddock asbestos claimants. On April 26, 2021, the Company announced that Paddock, the ACC and FCR reached an agreement in principle, supported by O-I Glass, by accepting a proposal from the mediators setting forth total consideration to fund a trust created under section 524(g) of the Bankruptcy Code upon the effective date of a consensual plan of reorganization for Paddock.

This agreement in principle, which is subject to definitive documentation and satisfaction of certain conditions, will resolve the potential liability of Paddock and the Company Protected Parties for pending and future personal injury claims related to exposure to asbestos-containing products that were allegedly manufactured, distributed, used and/or sold by Owens-Illinois, Inc. Under the Chapter 11 plan that will implement the agreement in principle, an asbestos settlement trust (the “Paddock Trust”) created pursuant to the provisions of section 524(g) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code will be established and, on the effective date of the Chapter 11 plan, will be funded with $610 million in total consideration (“Settlement Consideration”). In exchange for the Settlement Consideration, each of the Company Protected Parties is expected to receive the benefit of a release from Paddock, and Paddock and the Company Protected Parties will receive the benefit of an injunction under Section 524(g) of the Bankruptcy Code channeling Asbestos Claims to the Paddock Trust and permanently enjoining the assertion of Asbestos Claims against Paddock and the Company Protected Parties.

The agreement in principle is subject, among other things, to the negotiation and filing of a Chapter 11 plan of reorganization for Paddock incorporating the terms of such agreement (the “Plan”), acceptance of the Plan by at least 75% of Paddock’s current asbestos claimants voting on such Plan, and confirmation of the Plan by the Bankruptcy Court and approval of the injunction in favor of Paddock and the Company Protected Parties by the United States District Court for the District of Delaware (“District Court”). On the effective date of the Plan, the Settlement Consideration will be provided and Asbestos Claims against Paddock and the Company Protected Parties will be permanently enjoined.

In connection with the agreement in principle, the Company has recorded a charge of $154 million related to its potential liability under the Paddock support agreement as a recognizable subsequent event in the Company’s consolidated results of operations for the quarter ended March 31, 2021, primarily related to an increase to Paddock’s asbestos reserve estimate in consideration for the channeling injunction to be included in Paddock’s Plan protecting Company Protected Parties from Asbestos Claims, as well as certain other adjustments to Paddock’s assets and liabilities, including estimated professional fees and expenses to be incurred in confirming and implementing the Plan.

Several risks and uncertainties remain related to Paddock’s Chapter 11 case that could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, consolidated financial condition, results of operations and cash flows, including the

16

total costs of the Chapter 11 proceeding, and the length of time necessary to confirm a Plan, and the possibility that Paddock will be unsuccessful in confirming such Plan or that such Plan does not ultimately become effective. The Paddock support agreement liability of $625 million recorded on the Company’s March 31, 2021 condensed consolidated balance sheet as required under applicable accounting standards is the Company’s best estimate based on the facts and circumstances that exist at the Form 10-Q filing date. These risk factors are discussed further in Part II Item 1A–“Risk Factors.”

As noted above, the Company previously recognized a liability related to the Paddock support agreement, as described above, of $471 million as required under applicable accounting standards. That liability was based on the following analysis. Prior to the Petition Date, the Company knew of approximately 850 asbestos lawsuits pending. This figure does not include an estimate of potential Administrative Claims that could have been presented under a claims-handling agreement due to the uncertainties around presentation timing, quantities, or qualification rates. The Company historically considered Administrative Claims to be filed and disposed of when they were accepted for payment.

The lack of uniform rules in lawsuit pleading practice, technical pleading requirements in some jurisdictions, local rules, and other factors caused considerable variation in the specific amounts of monetary damages asserted in lawsuits brought prior to the Petition Date. In the Company’s experience, the monetary relief alleged in a lawsuit bore little relationship to an Asbestos Claim’s merits or its disposition value. Rather, several variables, including but not limited to, the type and severity of the asbestos disease, medical history, and exposure to other disease-causing agents; the product identification evidence against the Company and other co-defendants; the defenses available to the Company and other co-defendants; the specific jurisdiction in which the claim was made; the applicable law; and the law firm representing the claimant, affected the value.

The Company was also a defendant in other Asbestos Claims involving maritime workers, medical monitoring, co-defendants’ third-party actions, and property damage allegations. Based upon its experience, the Company assessed that these categories of Asbestos Claims would not involve any material liability. Therefore, they were not included in the description of pending or disposed matters.

From receipt of its first Asbestos Claim to the Petition Date, the Company in the aggregate disposed of approximately 401,200 Asbestos Claims at an average indemnity payment of approximately $10,200 per claim. The Company’s asbestos indemnity payments varied on a per-claim basis. Asbestos-related cash payments for 2019 were $151 million and the Company’s cash payments per claim disposed (inclusive of legal costs) were approximately $129,000 for the year ended December 31, 2019.

Prior to the Petition Date, the Company’s objective was historically to achieve, where possible, resolution of Asbestos Claims pursuant to claims-handling agreements. Failure of claimants to meet certain medical and product exposure criteria in claims-handling agreements generally reduced the number of claims that would otherwise have been received by the Company in the tort system. In addition, changes in jurisdictional dynamics, legislative acts, asbestos docket management and procedures, the substantive law, the co-defendant pool, and other external factors affected lawsuit volume, claim volume, qualification rates, claim values, and related matters. Collectively, these variables generally had the effect of increasing the Company’s per-claim average indemnity payment over time.

Beginning with the initial liability of $975 million established in 1993, the Company has accrued a total of approximately $5.0 billion through just prior to the Petition Date, before insurance recoveries, for its asbestos-related liability. The Company’s estimates of its liability were significantly affected by, among other factors, the volatility of asbestos-related litigation in the United States, the significant number of co-defendants that filed for bankruptcy, changes in mortality rates, the inherent uncertainty of future disease incidence and claiming patterns against the Company, the significant expansion of the types of defendants sued in this litigation, and changes in the extent to which such defendants participated in the resolution of cases in which the Company was also a defendant.

Prior to the Petition Date, the Company continually monitored trends that could affect its ultimate liability and analyzed the developments and variables likely to affect the resolution of Asbestos Claims. The material components of the Company’s total accrued liability were determined by the Company in connection with its annual comprehensive legal review and consisted of the following estimates, to the extent it was probable that such liabilities had been incurred

17

and could be reasonably estimated: (i) the liability for Asbestos Claims already asserted against the Company; (ii) the liability for Asbestos Claims not yet asserted against the Company; and (iii) the legal defense costs estimated to be incurred in connection with the Asbestos Claims already asserted and those Asbestos Claims the Company believed would be asserted.

Through December 31, 2019, the Company historically conducted an annual comprehensive legal review of its asbestos-related liabilities and costs in connection with finalizing and reporting its annual consolidated results of operations, unless significant changes in trends or new developments warranted an earlier review. As part of its annual comprehensive legal review, the Company provided historical Asbestos Claims data to a third party with expertise in determining the impact of disease incidence and mortality on future filing trends to develop information to assist the Company in estimating the total number of future Asbestos Claims likely to be asserted against the Company. The Company used this estimate, along with an estimation of disposition costs and related legal costs, as inputs to develop its best estimate of its total probable liability. If the results of the annual comprehensive legal review indicated that the existing amount of the accrued liability was lower (higher) than its reasonably estimable asbestos-related costs, then the Company recorded an appropriate charge (credit) to the Company’s results of operations to increase (decrease) the accrued liability.

The significant assumptions underlying the material components of the Company’s accrual historically were:

a)

settlements would continue to be limited almost exclusively to claimants who were exposed to the Company’s asbestos containing insulation prior to its exit from that business in 1958;

b)

Asbestos Claims would continue to be resolved primarily under the Company’s administrative claims-handling agreements or on terms comparable to those set forth in those agreements;

c)

the incidence of serious asbestos-related disease cases and claiming patterns against the Company for such cases would not change materially, including claiming pattern changes driven by changes in the law, procedure, or expansion of judicial resources in jurisdictions where the Company settled Asbestos Claims;

d)

the Company would be substantially able to defend itself successfully at trial and on appeal;

e)

the number and timing of additional co-defendant bankruptcies would not change significantly the assets available to participate in the resolution of cases in which the Company is a defendant; and

f)

co-defendants with substantial resources and assets would continue to participate significantly in the resolution of future Asbestos Claims.

For the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company concluded that an accrual in the amount of $486 million was required under applicable accounting standards. This amount was not discounted for the time value of money. The Company’s comprehensive legal review resulted in a charge of $35 million for the year ended December 31, 2019. As previously disclosed, the Company anticipated that adjustments to its asbestos-related accruals were possible given the inherent uncertainties involved in asbestos litigation. In the fourth quarter of 2019, this charge was primarily due to an increase in the estimated average disposition cost per claim (including related legal costs), driven primarily by a changing litigation environment more favorable to plaintiffs, and a decrease in the estimated number of claims likely to be asserted against the Company in the future that was less than the decrease expected by the Company.

Other Matters

In February 2021, severe weather conditions swept across the southern United States, curtailing access to natural gas and electricity for several of the Company’s facilities.  While the situation was most acute in Texas, access to natural gas in Mexico was also significantly impacted as Texas supplies natural gas to the country. The Company has been notified by energy providers in both the United States and Mexico that it may be assessed surcharges for usage or excess usage of electricity and natural gas during this period.  Although most of these surcharges have not yet been formally assessed, the Company believes that these costs are probable and reasonably estimable and therefore has accrued $20

18

million as of March 31, 2021, which is based on the best information available at this time.  The Company believes that it is reasonably possible that it could incur losses for this matter that materially differ from the $20 million accrued as of March 31, 2021, including amounts in excess of the amount currently recognized. However, given the lack of information available from regulators, suppliers and state and federal authorities, the Company is unable to make an estimate of the possible loss or range of losses at this time.

Other litigation is pending against the Company, in some cases involving ordinary and routine claims incidental to the business of the Company and in others presenting allegations that are non-routine and involve compensatory, punitive or treble damage claims as well as other types of relief. The Company records a liability for such matters when it is both probable that the liability has been incurred and the amount of the liability can be reasonably estimated. Recorded amounts are reviewed and adjusted to reflect changes in the factors upon which the estimates are based, including additional information, negotiations, settlements and other events.

11. Share Owners’ Equity

The activity in share owners’ equity for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 is as follows:

Share Owners’ Equity of the Company

    

    

    

    

    

Accumulated

    

    

 

Capital in

Retained

Other

Non-

Total Share

Common

Excess of

Treasury

Earnings

Comprehensive

controlling

Owners' 

Stock

Par Value

Stock

(Loss)

Loss

Interests

Equity

Balance on January 1, 2021

$

2

$

3,129

(714)

$

152

$

(2,272)

$

104

$

401

Reissuance of common stock (0.2 million shares)

(2)

4

 

2

Stock compensation (0.3 million shares)

4

 

4

Net earnings (loss)

(97)

6

 

(91)

Other comprehensive loss

(48)

(4)

 

(52)

Other

19

(2)

(19)

(2)

Balance on March 31, 2021

$

2

$

3,150

$

(712)

$

36

$

(2,320)

$

106

$

262

Share Owners’ Equity of the Company

    

    

    

    

    

Accumulated

    

    

Capital in

Retained

Other

Non-

Total Share

Common

Excess of

Treasury

Earnings

Comprehensive

controlling

Owners' 

    

Stock

    

Par Value

    

Stock

(Loss)

Loss

Interests

Equity

 

Balance on January 1, 2020

$

2

$

3,130

$

(733)

$

(89)

$

(1,843)

$

97

$

564

Reissuance of common stock (0.2 million shares)

(3)

5

 

2

Stock compensation (0.8 million shares)

1

 

1

Net earnings

50

5

 

55

Other comprehensive loss

(527)

(9)

 

(536)

Dividends declared

(8)

(8)

Other

(2)

(2)

Balance on March 31, 2020

$

2

$

3,128

$

(730)

$

(47)

$

(2,370)

$

93

$

76

19

The Company has 250,000,000 shares of common stock authorized with a par value of $.01 per share. Shares outstanding are as follows:

Shares Outstanding (in thousands)

 

March 31,

December 31,

March 31,

 

    

2021

    

2020

    

2020

 

Shares of common stock issued (including treasury shares)

 

189,796

189,305

189,210

Treasury shares

 

31,884

31,911

32,639

12. Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss

The activity in accumulated other comprehensive loss for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 is as follows:

Total

 

Accumulated

Net Effect of

Change in Certain

Other

Exchange Rate

Derivative

Employee

Comprehensive

 

    

Fluctuations

    

Instruments

    

Benefit Plans

    

Loss

 

Balance on January 1, 2021

$

(1,229)

$

(60)

$

(983)

$

(2,272)

Change before reclassifications

 

(81)

63

3

 

(15)

Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss

(50)

(a)  

 

19

(b)  

 

(31)

Translation effect

(2)

(2)

Tax effect

Other comprehensive income (loss) attributable to the Company

 

(81)

 

13

 

20

 

(48)

Balance on March 31, 2021

$

(1,310)

$

(47)

$

(963)

$

(2,320)

Total

Accumulated

 

Net Effect of

Change in Certain

Other

Exchange Rate

Derivative

Employee

Comprehensive

    

Fluctuations

    

Instruments

    

Benefit Plans

    

Loss

 

Balance on January 1, 2020

$

(813)

$

(14)

$

(1,016)

$

(1,843)

 

Change before reclassifications

 

(564)

(2)

(2)

 

(568)

Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss

11

(a)  

 

17

(b)  

 

28

Translation effect

(1)

16

15

Tax effect

(2)

(2)

Other comprehensive income (loss) attributable to the Company

 

(564)

 

6

 

31

 

(527)

Balance on March 31, 2020

$

(1,377)

$

(8)

$

(985)

$

(2,370)

(a)Amount is recorded to Other expense, net and interest expense, net on the Condensed Consolidated Results of Operations (see Note 5 for additional information).
(b)Amount is included in the computation of net periodic pension cost (see Note 7 for additional information) and net post-retirement benefit cost.

20

13. Other Expense, Net

Other expense, net for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 included the following:

Three months ended March 31,

    

2021

    

2020

Charge related to Paddock support agreement liability (see Note 10)

$

(154)

$

Charge for deconsolidation of Paddock (see Note 10)

(14)

Intangible amortization expense

(9)

(10)

Foreign currency exchange loss

(2)

Royalty income

5

4

Other income, net

4

3

$

(156)

$

(17)

14. Earnings Per Share

The following table sets forth the computation of basic and diluted earnings per share:

Three months ended March 31,

    

2021

    

2020

Numerator:

 

    

 

    

Net earnings (loss) attributable to the Company

$

(97)

$

50

Denominator (in thousands):

Denominator for basic earnings per share-weighted average shares outstanding

 

157,571

156,081

Effect of dilutive securities:

Stock options and other

 

 

1,603

Denominator for diluted earnings per share-adjusted weighted average shares outstanding

 

157,571

157,684

Basic earnings per share:

Net earnings (loss) attributable to the Company

$

(0.62)

$

0.32

Diluted earnings per share:

Net earnings (loss) attributable to the Company

$

(0.62)

$

0.32

The diluted earnings per share computation for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively, excludes 1,890,075 and 2,533,717 weighted average shares of common stock due to their antidilutive effect, which includes options to purchase, unvested restricted stock units and performance vested restricted share units. Options to purchase shares were excluded because the exercise prices of the options were greater than the average market price of the common shares. For the three months ended March 31, 2021, diluted earnings per share of common stock was equal to basic earnings per share of common stock due to the net loss attributable to the Company.

15. Supplemental Cash Flow Information

Income taxes paid in cash were as follows:

Three months ended March 31,

    

2021

    

2020

 

U.S.

$

$

2

Non-U.S.

 

10

 

32

Total income taxes paid in cash

$

10

$

34

Interest paid in cash for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 was $49 million and $58 million, respectively.

The Company uses various factoring programs to sell certain receivables to financial institutions as part of managing its cash flows. At March 31, 2021, December 31, 2020 and March 31, 2020, the amount of receivables sold

21

by the Company was $444 million, $436 million and $429 million, respectively. These amounts included $186 million, $176 million and $120 million at March 31, 2021, December 31, 2020, and March 31, 2020, respectively, for trade receivable amounts factored under supply chain financing programs linked to commercial arrangements with key customers. For the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company’s use of its factoring programs resulted in an increase of $8 million to cash from operating activities and a $110 million decrease to cash from operating activities, respectively.

16. New Accounting Pronouncement

Effects of Reference Rate Reform on Financial Reporting - In March 2020, the FASB issued ASU No. 2020-04, “Reference Rate Reform (Topic 848): Facilitation of the Effects of Reference Rate Reform on Financial Reporting,” which allows for elective contract modification guidance for contracts or other transactions that reference LIBOR or a reference rate that is expected to be discontinued as a result of reference rate reform. The Company adopted ASU No. 2020-04 effective July 1, 2020. The adoption of this ASU had no impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheet, results of operations or cash flows.

17. COVID-19 Impacts

On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization characterized COVID-19 as a global pandemic and recommended containment and mitigation measures. The Company is actively monitoring the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, which negatively impacted its business in 2020 and the first quarter of 2021 and may negatively impact its business and results of operations in the future.  

The preparation of Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, as well as the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates particularly as it relates to estimates reliant on forecasts and other assumptions reasonably available to the Company and the uncertain future impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and related economic disruptions. The extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic and related economic disruptions impact the Company’s business and financial results will depend on future developments including, but not limited to, the continued spread, duration and severity of the COVID-19 pandemic; the occurrence, spread, duration and severity of any subsequent wave or waves of outbreaks after the initial outbreak has subsided; the actions taken by the U.S. and foreign governments to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, address its impact or respond to the reduction in global and local economic activity; the occurrence, duration and severity of a global, regional or national recession, depression or other sustained adverse market event; the impact of the developments described above on its customers and suppliers; and how quickly and to what extent normal economic and operating conditions can resume. The accounting matters assessed included, but were not limited to:

• allowance for doubtful accounts and credit losses

• carrying value of inventory; and

• the carrying value of goodwill and other long-lived assets.

There was not a material impact to the above estimates in the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for the three month periods ended March 31, 2021 or March 31, 2020. The Company’s future assessment of the magnitude and duration of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as other factors, could result in material changes to the estimates and material impacts to the Company’s Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements in future reporting periods.

22

18. Divestitures

On July 31, 2020, the Company completed the sale of its ANZ businesses to Visy, an unaffiliated

company. Gross proceeds approximated AUD $947 million (including a related sale-leaseback agreement which

approximated AUD $214 million) or approximately USD $677 million. Approximately 95% of those proceeds

were received at the time of closing, and the remaining balance of approximately $58 million was received in the first quarter of 2021. In 2020, the Company recognized a net gain (including costs directly attributable to the sale of ANZ and subject to post-closing adjustments) on the divestiture of approximately $275 million, which was reported on the Other income (expense), net line in the Consolidated Results of Operations. In addition, at closing, certain subsidiaries of the Company entered into certain ancillary agreements with Visy and the ANZ businesses in respect of the provision of certain transitional and technical services to the ANZ businesses.

In January 2021, the Company completed the sale of its plant in Argentina. Gross proceeds are approximately $10 million and the gain on the sale was not material.

23

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

The Company’s measure of profit for its reportable segments is segment operating profit, which consists of consolidated earnings (loss) before interest income, interest expense, and provision (benefit) for income taxes and excludes amounts related to certain items that management considers not representative of ongoing operations as well as certain retained corporate costs. The segment data presented below is prepared in accordance with general accounting principles for segment reporting. The lines titled “reportable segment totals” in both net sales and segment operating profit, however, are non-GAAP measures when presented outside of the financial statement footnotes. Management has included reportable segment totals below to facilitate the discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations and believes this information allows the Board of Directors, management, investors and analysts to better understand the Company’s financial performance. The Company’s management uses segment operating profit, in combination with net sales and selected cash flow information, to evaluate performance and to allocate resources. Segment operating profit is not, however, intended as an alternative measure of operating results as determined in accordance with U.S. GAAP and is not necessarily comparable to similarly titled measures used by other companies.

In March 2020, the World Health Organization categorized COVID-19 as a pandemic, and it continues to spread throughout the United States and other countries across the world. To limit the spread of COVID-19, governments have taken various actions, including the issuance of stay-at-home orders and social distancing guidelines. As a result, many businesses have adjusted, reduced or suspended operating activities, either due to requirements under government orders or as a result of a reduction in demand for many products from direct or ultimate customers. Fortunately, the manufacture of glass containers has been largely viewed as essential to the important food and beverage value chain in the countries in which the Company operates. However, the Company is still impacted by broader supply chain issues and, in some cases, certain end use categories that it serves are not deemed essential. While the Company’s plants continued to operate as essential businesses, some plants suspended operations or cut back on shifts for a portion of 2020 due to government actions to address COVID-19. Additional suspensions and cutbacks may occur as the impacts from COVID-19 and related responses continue to develop.

The following discussion describes the Company’s consolidated results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2021. The COVID-19 pandemic impacted the Company’s shipment and production levels in 2020 and the first quarter of 2021, and the Company is actively monitoring the continued impact of the pandemic, which could negatively impact its business, results of operations, cash flows and financial position beyond the first quarter of 2021.

On July 31, 2020, the Company completed the sale of its Australia and New Zealand (“ANZ”) businesses, which comprised the majority of the Asia Pacific region (approximately 85% of net sales for the full year 2019), to Visy Industries Holdings Pty Ltd.  After the sale of the ANZ businesses, the remaining businesses in the Asia Pacific region do not meet the criteria of an individually reportable segment. For the 2020 results presented below, the results for the Asia Pacific reportable segment reflect only the results of the ANZ businesses. The sales and operating results of the other businesses that historically comprised the Asia Pacific segment, and that have been retained by the Company, have been reclassified to Other sales and Retained corporate costs and other, respectively.

Financial information for the three months ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 regarding the Company’s reportable segments is as follows (dollars in millions):

Three months ended

March 31,

    

2021

    

2020

    

Net Sales:

Americas

$

837

$

831

Europe

 

639

 

576

Asia Pacific

 

 

123

Reportable segment totals

 

1,476

 

1,530

Other

 

24

 

31

Net Sales

$

1,500

$

1,561

24

Three months ended

March 31,

    

2021

    

2020

Segment operating profit:

Americas

$

100

$

103

Europe

 

75

 

61

Asia Pacific

 

 

12

Reportable segment totals

 

175

 

176

Items excluded from segment operating profit:

Retained corporate costs and other

 

(35)

 

(28)

Charge related to Paddock support agreement liability

(154)

Charge for deconsolidation of Paddock

(14)

Interest expense, net

 

(51)

 

(53)

Earnings (loss) before income taxes

(65)

81

Provision for income taxes

 

(26)

 

(26)

Net earnings (loss)

 

(91)

 

55

Net earnings attributable to noncontrolling interests

 

(6)

 

(5)

Net earnings (loss) attributable to the Company

$

(97)

$

50

Note: All amounts excluded from reportable segment totals are discussed in the following applicable sections.

Executive Overview — Quarters ended March 31, 2021 and 2020

First Quarter 2021 Highlights

Net sales in the first quarter of 2021 were down approximately 4% from the same quarter in 2020, primarily due to the sale of the Company’s ANZ businesses in 2020, continued impacts from COVID-19 and the impact of severe weather in the Americas. Sales were positively impacted by the favorable effects of changes in foreign currency exchange rates and higher prices.
Segment operating profit for reportable segments was down slightly in the first quarter of 2021 compared to the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to the sale of the ANZ businesses, the impact of COVID-19 and the severe weather in the Americas. These impacts were mostly offset by strong operating performance, cost management and margin enhancement activities.
On April 26, 2021, the Company announced that its subsidiary, Paddock Enterprises LLC (“Paddock”), had reached an agreement in principle to accept the terms of a mediator’s proposal regarding a consensual plan of reorganization under the Bankruptcy Code. The agreement in principle provides for total consideration of $610 million to fund a trust on the effective date of a plan of reorganization, subject to definitive documentation and satisfaction of certain conditions. The Company has recorded a charge of $154 million related to its potential liability under the Paddock support agreement during the first fiscal quarter of 2021 primarily related to an increase to Paddock’s asbestos reserve estimate in consideration for the channeling injunction to be included in Paddock’s Plan protecting O-I Glass and its affiliates from Asbestos Claims.

Net sales for the first quarter of 2021 were $61 million lower than the first quarter of the prior year primarily due to the sale of the Company’s ANZ businesses on July 31, 2020, continued impacts from COVID-19 and the impact of severe weather in the Americas. Sales were positively impacted by the favorable effects of changes in foreign currency exchange rates and higher prices.

Loss before income taxes was $65 million in the first quarter of 2021 compared to $81 million of earnings in the prior year quarter. This decrease was primarily due to the charge recorded in the first quarter of 2021 related to the support agreement liability for Paddock. Segment operating profit for reportable segments for the first quarter of 2021 was $1 million lower than the first quarter of the prior year. The decrease was largely due to the sale of the ANZ businesses in 2020, the impact of COVID-19 and severe weather in the Americas. These impacts were partially offset by strong operating performance, cost management and margin enhancement activities.

25

Net interest expense for the first quarter of 2021 decreased $2 million compared to the first quarter of 2020, primarily due to lower debt levels in 2021.

For the first quarter of 2021, the Company recorded a net loss attributable to the Company of $97 million, or $0.62 per share, compared to net earnings attributable to the Company of $50 million, or $0.32 per share (diluted), in the first quarter of 2020. As discussed below, the loss in the first quarter of 2021 included a $154 million charge, or approximately $0.97 per share, related to the Paddock support agreement liability and in the first quarter of 2020 earnings included a $14 million charge, or approximately $0.09 per share, related to the Paddock deconsolidation, both of which management considered not representative of ongoing operations.

Results of Operations — First Quarter of 2021 compared with First Quarter of 2020

Net Sales

The Company’s net sales in the first quarter of 2021 were $1,500 million compared with $1,561 million for the first quarter of 2020, a decrease of $61 million, or approximately 4%. Total glass container shipments, in tons, were down approximately 8%, or approximately $127 million, in the first quarter of 2021 compared to the prior year quarter, primarily driven by the sale of the Company’s ANZ businesses on July 31, 2020 and the sale of the Company’s plant in Argentina in January 2021. Excluding the divested businesses, glass container shipments increased slightly and a change in mix benefited sales by approximately $10 million in the first quarter of 2021 compared to the same period in 2020 despite the impact of severe weather in the Americas and COVID-19. Favorable foreign currency exchange rates increased sales by $35 million in the first quarter of 2021 compared to the prior year quarter, driven by the U.S. dollar weakening against the Euro. Higher selling prices increased net sales by $28 million in the quarter. Other sales were approximately $7 million lower in the first quarter of 2021 than the same period in the prior year driven by lower machine parts sales to third parties.

The change in net sales of reportable segments can be summarized as follows (dollars in millions):

Reportable segment net sales - 2020

    

    

$

1,530

 

Price

$

28

Sales volume and mix

 

10

Effects of changing foreign currency rates

 

35

Divestitures

(127)

Total effect on reportable segment net sales

 

(54)

Reportable segment net sales - 2021

$

1,476

Americas: Net sales in the Americas in the first quarter of 2021 were $837 million compared to $831 million for the first quarter of 2020, an increase of $6 million, or approximately 1%. Total glass container shipments in the region were down approximately 2% in the first quarter of 2021 compared to the prior year quarter, primarily due to the impact of severe weather that affected Texas, Oklahoma and Mexico and the divestiture of a plant in Argentina in January 2021. Excluding the divestiture, glass container shipments were down approximately 1% in the first quarter of 2021. The divestiture in Argentina reduced sales by $4 million and the lower organic shipments reduced net sales by approximately $3 million in the first quarter of 2021 compared to the same period in 2020. The unfavorable effects of foreign currency exchange rate changes decreased net sales by $13 million in the first quarter of 2021 compared to 2020 as the U.S. dollar strengthened in relation to the Brazilian real, the Mexican peso and the Colombian peso. Selling prices in the region increased net sales by $26 million in the first quarter of 2021.

Europe: Net sales in Europe in the first quarter of 2021 were $639 million compared to $576 million for the first quarter of 2020, an increase of $63 million, or nearly 11%. Despite the impact of COVID-19 lockdowns in the region, glass container shipments in the first quarter of 2021 were up 2% compared to the first quarter of 2020, resulting in $13 million of higher net sales. Favorable foreign currency exchange rates increased the region’s net sales by approximately $48 million in the first quarter of 2021 as the Euro strengthened in relation to the U.S. dollar. Selling prices in Europe increased net sales by $2 million in the first quarter of 2021.

Asia Pacific: Net sales in Asia Pacific in the first quarter of 2021 were $0 compared to $123 million for the first quarter of 2020, a decrease of $123 million, due to the sale of the ANZ businesses in the third quarter of 2020.

26

Earnings (loss) before Income Taxes and Segment Operating Profit

Loss before income taxes was $65 million in the first quarter of 2021 compared to earnings before income taxes of $81 million in the first quarter of 2020, a decrease of $146 million. This decrease was largely due to a $154 million charge recorded in the first quarter of 2021 related to the Paddock support agreement liability.

Segment operating profit of the reportable segments includes an allocation of some corporate expenses based on a percentage of sales and direct billings based on the costs of specific services provided. Unallocated corporate expenses and certain other expenses not directly related to the reportable segments’ operations are included in Retained corporate costs and other. For further information, see Segment Information included in Note 1 to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

Segment operating profit of reportable segments in the first quarter of 2021 was $175 million, compared to $176 million for the first quarter of 2020, a decrease of $1 million, or less than 1%. This decrease was largely due to the sale of the ANZ businesses in 2020, the impact of COVID-19 and the severe weather in the Americas. These impacts were mostly offset by strong operating performance, cost management and margin enhancement activities.

The change in segment operating profit of reportable segments can be summarized as follows (dollars in millions):

Reportable segment operating profit - 2020

    

    

$

176

 

Net price (net of cost inflation)

$

(20)

Sales volume and mix

2

Operating costs

 

19

Effects of changing foreign currency rates

10

Divestitures

(12)

Total net effect on reportable segment operating profit

(1)

Reportable segment operating profit - 2021

$

175

Americas: Segment operating profit in the Americas in the first quarter of 2021 was $100 million compared to $103 million in the first quarter of 2020, a decrease of $3 million, or 3%. The impact of lower organic sales discussed above decreased segment operating profit by $1 million. Cost inflation, which was elevated due to the impact of higher natural gas and electricity rates as a result of severe weather, more than offset higher selling prices resulting in a net $17 million decrease to segment operating profit in the current year quarter.

Operating costs in the first quarter of 2021 were $11 million lower than the same period in the prior year, which improved segment operating profit. Included within these operating costs were benefits from the region’s margin expansion initiatives, which more than offset the significant impact of severe weather that swept across Mexico and the southern United States and resulted in production downtime, unplanned repairs and higher outbound freight costs. The effects of foreign currency exchange rates increased segment operating profit by $4 million in the current year quarter.

Included in the above discussion of the factors impacting the region’s results, the Company estimates that segment operating profit in the Americas was negatively impacted by approximately $40 million from severe weather in the first quarter of 2021, which includes approximately $20 million accrued as of March 31, 2021 for surcharges for usage or excess usage of electricity and natural gas during the period of severe weather, as well as the estimated impacts of higher energy costs, lost production downtime, lost sales, and the cost of incremental repairs.  Also, the region’s closure of a plant in the second quarter of 2020 did not have a material impact on its profitability this quarter, and significant savings are not expected in future quarters, but the closure is expected to avoid anticipated losses from this plant in the future. The outcome of this plant closure is in-line with management’s expectations.

Europe: Segment operating profit in Europe in the first quarter of 2021 was $75 million compared to $61 million in the first quarter of 2020, an increase of $14 million, or 23%. The impact of higher shipments discussed above increased segment operating profit by $3 million. The effects of foreign currency exchange rates increased segment operating profit by $6 million in the current year quarter. Benefits from margin expansion initiatives and cost control measures reduced the region’s operating costs and increased segment operating profit by approximately $8 million in the first quarter of 2021 compared to the same period in the prior year. Lower net selling prices (net of cost inflation) decreased segment operating profit by $3 million in the current quarter compared to the prior year quarter.

27

Asia Pacific: Segment operating profit in Asia Pacific in the first quarter of 2021 was $0 compared to $12 million in the first quarter of 2020, a decrease of $12 million, due to the sale of the ANZ businesses in the third quarter of 2020.

Interest Expense, Net

Net interest expense for the first quarter of 2021 was $51 million compared to $53 million for the first quarter of 2020. This decrease was primarily due to lower debt levels in 2021.

Provision for Income Taxes

The Company’s effective tax rate from operations for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was (40.0%) compared to 32.1% for the three months ended March 31, 2020.  The effective tax rate for the first quarter of 2021 differed from the first quarter of 2020 primarily due to the charge related to the Paddock support agreement liability in the first quarter of 2021.

Net Earnings (Loss) Attributable to the Company

For the first quarter of 2021, the Company recorded a net loss attributable to the Company of $97 million, or $0.62 per share, compared to net earnings attributable to the Company of $50 million, or $0.32 per share (diluted), in the first quarter of 2020. As discussed below, the loss in the first quarter of 2021 included a $154 million charge, or approximately $0.97 per share, related to the Paddock support agreement liability and in the first quarter of 2020 earnings included a $14 million charge, or approximately $0.09 per share, related to the Paddock deconsolidation, both of which management considered not representative of ongoing operations.

Forward Looking Operational and Financial Impacts from the COVID-19 Pandemic

The Company expects full year 2021 sales shipment growth to be 3 to 4% (in tons) compared to 2020 (excluding the impact of divestitures), representing a partial volume recovery to 2019 levels. Likewise, the Company expects continued benefits from its initiatives to expand margins. These incremental savings should more than offset the headwind from the temporary cost reduction efforts that were put in place in 2020 to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and that will not repeat in 2021.

The Company will continue to focus on long-term value creation, including advancing the MAGMA deployment. Also, the Company has completed approximately 75% of its divestiture program with proceeds used to reduce debt and improve financial flexibility. Finally, the Company will continue to advance the Paddock Chapter 11 process to document and finalize the terms of a plan of reorganization pursuant to section 524(g) of the Bankruptcy Code, consistent with the agreement in principle announced on April 26, 2021, which is expected to achieve a final, certain and equitable resolution of its legacy asbestos-related claims liabilities.

Cash provided by operating activities is expected to approximate $615 million or higher in 2021. This outlook assumes the continued suspension of all asbestos-related claims payments, pending confirmation and effectiveness of a plan of reorganization for Paddock. In addition, capital expenditures in 2021 are expected to be approximately $375 million.

The Company will continue to actively monitor the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. The extent to which the Company’s operations will be impacted by the pandemic will depend largely on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be accurately predicted, including new information that may emerge concerning the severity of the outbreak and actions by government authorities to contain the outbreak or treat its impact, among other things.

28

Items Excluded from Reportable Segment Totals

Retained Corporate Costs and Other

After the sale of the ANZ businesses, the remaining businesses in the Asia Pacific region do not meet the criteria of an individually reportable segment. Starting on August 1, 2020 and for the historical periods, the operating results of the other businesses that were historically included in the Asia Pacific segment and that have been retained by the Company have been reclassified to Retained corporate costs and other. The results of these entities were not significant for the three month periods ended March 31, 2021 or March 31, 2020.

Retained corporate costs and other for the first quarter of 2021 were $35 million compared to $28 million for the first quarter of 2020. These costs were higher in the first quarter of 2021 due to additional research and development expenses related to MAGMA, higher marketing expense for the Company’s glass advocacy campaign and higher expense related to the change in position of foreign currency derivatives. 

Charge for Paddock Support Agreement Liability

On April 26, 2021, the Company announced that its subsidiary, Paddock Enterprises LLC (“Paddock”), had reached an agreement in principle to accept the terms of a mediator’s proposal regarding a consensual plan of reorganization under the Bankruptcy Code. The agreement in principle provides for total consideration of $610 million to fund a trust on the effective date of a plan of reorganization, subject to definitive documentation and satisfaction of certain conditions. The Company has recorded a charge of $154 million related to its potential liability under the Paddock support agreement during the first fiscal quarter of 2021 primarily related to an increase to Paddock’s asbestos reserve estimate in consideration for the channeling injunction to be included in Paddock’s Plan protecting O-I Glass and its affiliates from Asbestos Claims.

See Note 10 to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for further information.

Charge for Deconsolidation of Paddock

Following its Chapter 11 filing in January 2020, the activities of Paddock are now subject to review and oversight by the bankruptcy court. As a result, the Company no longer has exclusive control over Paddock’s activities during the bankruptcy proceedings. Therefore, Paddock was deconsolidated as of the Petition Date, and its assets and liabilities, which primarily included $47 million of cash, the legacy asbestos-related liabilities, as well as certain other assets and liabilities, were derecognized from the Company’s consolidated financial statements. Simultaneously, the Company recognized a liability related to the support agreement of $471 million, based on the accrual required under applicable accounting standards. Taken together, these transactions resulted in a loss of approximately $14 million, which was recorded as a charge in the first quarter of 2020.

See Note 10 to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for further information.

Discontinued Operations

On December 6, 2018, an ad hoc committee for the World Bank’s International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (“ICSID”) rejected the request by the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela (“Venezuela”) to annul the award issued by an ICSID tribunal in favor of OI European Group B.V. (“OIEG”) related to the 2010 expropriation of OIEG’s majority interest in two plants in Venezuela (the “Award”). The annulment proceeding with respect to the Award is now concluded.

On July 31, 2017, OIEG sold its right, title and interest in amounts due under the Award to an Ireland-domiciled investment fund. Under the terms of the sale, OIEG received a payment, in cash, at closing equal to $115 million (the “Cash Payment”). OIEG may also receive additional payments in the future (“Deferred Amounts”) calculated based on the total compensation that is received from Venezuela as a result of collection efforts or as settlement of the Award with Venezuela. OIEG’s right to receive any Deferred Amounts is subject to the limitations described below.

OIEG’s interest in any amounts received in the future from Venezuela in respect of the Award is limited to a percentage of such recovery after taking into account reimbursement of the Cash Payment to the purchaser and

29

reimbursement of legal fees and expenses incurred by the Company and the purchaser. OIEG’s percentage of such recovery will also be reduced over time. Because the Award has yet to be satisfied and the ability to successfully enforce the Award in countries that are party to the ICSID Convention is subject to significant challenges, the Company is unable to reasonably predict the amount of recoveries from the Award, if any, to which the Company may be entitled in the future. Any future amounts that the Company may receive from the Award are highly speculative and the timing of any such future payments, if any, is highly uncertain. As such, there can be no assurance that the Company will receive any future payments under the Award beyond the Cash Payment.

A separate arbitration involving two other subsidiaries of the Company -- Fabrica de Vidrios Los Andes, C.A. (“Favianca”), and Owens-Illinois de Venezuela, C.A. (“OIDV”) -- was initiated in 2012 to obtain compensation primarily for third-party minority shareholders’ lost interests in the two expropriated plants. However, on November 13, 2017, ICSID issued an award that dismissed this arbitration on jurisdiction grounds.  In March 2018, OIDV and Favianca submitted to ICSID an application to annul the November 13, 2017 award; on November 22, 2019, OIDV and Favianca’s request to annul the award was rejected by an ICSID ad hoc committee.  The two subsidiaries are evaluating potential next steps.

For the three-month periods ended March 31, 2021 and March 31, 2020, the Company did not incur any significant losses from discontinued operations.

Capital Resources and Liquidity

On June 25, 2019, certain of the Company’s subsidiaries entered into a Senior Secured Credit Facility Agreement (as amended by that certain Amendment No. 1 to the Third Amended and Restated Credit Agreement and Syndicated Facility Agreement dated as of December 13, 2019, and as further amended by that certain Amendment No. 2 to the Third Amended and Restated Credit Agreement and Syndicated Facility Agreement dated as of December 19, 2019, the “Agreement”), which amended and restated the previous credit agreement (the “Previous Agreement”). The proceeds from the Agreement were used to repay all outstanding amounts under the Previous Agreement.

The Agreement provides for up to $3.0 billion of borrowings pursuant to term loans and revolving credit facilities. The term loans mature, and the revolving credit facilities terminate in June 2024. At March 31, 2021, the Agreement includes a $300 million revolving credit facility, a $1.2 billion multicurrency revolving credit facility, and a $1.5 billion term loan A facility ($1,068 million outstanding balance at March 31, 2021, net of debt issuance costs). At March 31, 2021, the Company had unused credit of $1,194 million available under the Agreement. The weighted average interest rate on borrowings outstanding under the Agreement at March 31, 2021 was 1.59%.

The Agreement contains various covenants that restrict, among other things and subject to certain exceptions, the ability of the Company to incur certain indebtedness and liens, make certain investments, become liable under contingent obligations in certain defined instances only, make restricted payments, make certain asset sales within guidelines and limits, engage in certain affiliate transactions, participate in sale and leaseback financing arrangements, alter its fundamental business, and amend certain subordinated debt obligations.

The Agreement also contains one financial maintenance covenant, a Total Leverage Ratio (the “Leverage Ratio”), that requires the Company not to exceed a ratio of 5.0x calculated by dividing consolidated total debt, less cash and cash equivalents, by Consolidated EBITDA, with such Leverage Ratio decreasing to (a) 4.75x for the quarter ending June 30, 2021 and (b) 4.50x for the quarter ending December 31, 2021 and thereafter, as defined and described in the Agreement. The maximum Leverage Ratio is subject to an increase of 0.5x for (i) any fiscal quarter during which certain qualifying acquisitions (as specified in the Agreement) are consummated and (ii) the following three fiscal quarters, provided that the Leverage Ratio shall not exceed 5.0x. The Leverage Ratio could restrict the ability of the Company to undertake additional financing or acquisitions to the extent that such financing or acquisitions would cause the Leverage Ratio to exceed the specified maximum.

Failure to comply with these covenants and other customary restrictions could result in an event of default under the Agreement. In such an event, the Company could not request borrowings under the revolving facilities, and all amounts outstanding under the Agreement, together with accrued interest, could then be declared immediately due and payable.

30

Upon the occurrence and for the duration of a payment event of default, an additional default interest rate equal to 2.0% per annum will apply to all overdue obligations under the Agreement. If an event of default occurs under the Agreement and the lenders cause all of the outstanding debt obligations under the Agreement to become due and payable, this would result in a default under the indentures governing the Company’s outstanding debt securities and could lead to an acceleration of obligations related to these debt securities. As of March 31, 2021, the Company was in compliance with all covenants and restrictions in the Agreement.  In addition, the Company believes that it will remain in compliance and that its ability to borrow funds under the Agreement will not be adversely affected by the covenants and restrictions.

The Leverage Ratio also determines pricing under the Agreement. The interest rate on borrowings under the Agreement is, at the Company’s option, the Base Rate or the Eurocurrency Rate, as defined in the Agreement, plus an applicable margin. The applicable margin is linked to the Leverage Ratio. The margins range from 1.00% to 1.50% for Eurocurrency Loans and from 0.00% to 0.50% for Base Rate Loans. In addition, a commitment fee is payable on the unused revolving credit facility commitments ranging from 0.20% to 0.30% per annum linked to the Leverage Ratio.

Obligations under the Agreement are secured by substantially all of the assets, excluding real estate and certain other excluded assets, of certain of the Company’s domestic subsidiaries and certain foreign subsidiaries. Such obligations are also secured by a pledge of intercompany debt and equity investments in certain of the Company’s domestic subsidiaries and, in the case of foreign obligations, of stock of certain foreign subsidiaries. All obligations under the Agreement are guaranteed by certain domestic subsidiaries of the Company, and certain foreign obligations under the Agreement are guaranteed by certain foreign subsidiaries of the Company.

In May 2020, the Company issued $700 million aggregate principal amount of senior notes. The senior notes bear interest at a rate of 6.625% per annum and mature on May 13, 2027. The senior notes were issued via a private placement and are guaranteed by certain of the Company’s domestic subsidiaries. The net proceeds, after deducting debt issuance costs, totaled approximately $690 million and were used to redeem the remaining $130 million aggregate principal amount of the Company’s outstanding 4.875% senior notes due 2021, approximately $419 million aggregate principal amount of the Company’s outstanding 5.00% senior notes due 2022 and approximately $105 million of other secured borrowings. The Company recorded approximately $38 million of additional interest charges for note repurchase premiums and write-off of unamortized finance fees related to these redemptions.

In August 2020, the Company redeemed the remaining $81 million aggregate principal amount of the Company’s outstanding 5.00% senior notes due 2022. The Company recorded approximately $6 million of additional interest charges for note repurchase premiums and write-off of unamortized finance fees related to this redemption.

In order to maintain a capital structure containing appropriate amounts of fixed and floating-rate debt, the Company has entered into a series of interest rate swap agreements. These interest rate swap agreements were accounted for as either fair value hedges or cash flow hedges (see Note 5 for more information).

The Company assesses its capital raising and refinancing needs on an ongoing basis and may enter into additional credit facilities and seek to issue equity and/or debt securities in the domestic and international capital markets if market conditions are favorable. Also, depending on market conditions, the Company may elect to repurchase portions of its debt securities in the open market.

Cash Flows

Operating activities: Cash utilized by operating activities was $56 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, compared to $315 million utilized for the three months ended March 31, 2020. The decrease in cash utilized by operating activities in the first three months of 2021 was primarily due to a lower use of cash from working capital than in the same period in 2020. In the first quarter of both 2021 and 2020, all asbestos-related payments were stayed as a result of Paddock’s Chapter 11 filing in early January 2020. See Note 10 to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information on Paddock.

Working capital was a use of cash of $229 million in the first three months of 2021, compared to a use of cash of $461 million in the same period in 2020. The primary reason for the lower use of cash from working capital in the first three months of 2021 was due to lower accounts receivable and inventory levels. For the three months ended March 31,

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2021 and 2020, the Company’s use of its accounts receivable factoring programs resulted in an increase of $8 million to cash from operating activities and a $110 million decrease to cash from operating activities, respectively. Excluding the impact of accounts receivable factoring, the Company’s days sales outstanding were slightly lower as of March 31, 2021 compared to March 31, 2020, which also contributed to a lower use of cash from working capital. Inventory levels also declined as the Company reduced production levels to align with lower sales demand throughout the pandemic and this resulted in approximately $59 million of a lower use of cash from working capital in the first three months of 2021 compared to the same period in the prior year. In addition, the Company experienced a $31 million increase in cash provided by other operating items for the first three months of 2021 compared to the same period in the prior year, which included the impact of higher dividends received from equity investments.

Investing activities: Cash utilized by investing activities was $31 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, compared to $165 million utilized for the three months ended March 31, 2020. Capital spending for property, plant and equipment was $93 million during the first three months of 2021, compared to $120 million in the same period in 2020. The Company estimates that its full year 2021 capital expenditures should be approximately $375 million.

On July 31, 2020, the Company completed the sale of its ANZ businesses to Visy. Approximately 95% of proceeds were received at time of closing and the remaining balance of $58 million was received by the Company in the first quarter of 2021. The Company also received approximately $4 million from the sale of its plant in Argentina in the first quarter of 2021.

Following the Chapter 11 filing in January 2020, the activities of Paddock are now subject to review and oversight by the bankruptcy court. As a result, the Company no longer has exclusive control over Paddock’s activities during the bankruptcy proceedings. Therefore, Paddock was deconsolidated and its assets and liabilities were derecognized from the Company’s financial statements, which resulted in an investing outflow of $47 million in the Company’s first quarter of 2020 condensed consolidated cash flows. See Note 10 to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for more information.

Financing activities:  Cash provided by financing activities was $288 million for the three months ended March 31, 2021, compared to $849 million of cash provided by financing activities for the three months ended March 31, 2020. The decrease in cash provided by financing activities was primarily due to lower net borrowings in the first quarter of 2021. In March 2020, the Company borrowed approximately $600 million on its $1.5 billion revolving credit facility to bolster cash-on-hand as a proactive measure to ensure financial flexibility at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Company did not borrow at the same level in the first quarter of 2021.

The Company paid $8 million in dividends in the first quarter of 2020 and did not pay any dividends in the first quarter of 2021. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Company suspended its dividend after the first quarter of 2020 and has no plans to reinstate it at this time.

The Company anticipates that cash flows from its opera­tions and from utiliza­tion of credit available under the Agreement will be sufficient to fund its operating and seasonal working capital needs, debt service and other obligations on a short-term (12 months) and long-term basis. However, as the Company cannot predict the duration or scope of the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on its customers and suppliers, the negative financial impact to the Company’s results cannot be reasonably estimated, but could be material. The Company is actively managing the business to maintain cash flow and it has significant liquidity. The Company believes that these factors will allow it to meet its anticipated funding requirements. The Company anticipates that cash flows in 2021 will continue to benefit from the operation of the automatic stay in Paddock’s Chapter 11 filing, which stays ongoing litigation and submission of claims and defers payment in connection with asbestos-related liabilities until a plan of reorganization is confirmed and becomes effective.


Critical Accounting Estimates

The Company’s analysis and discussion of its financial condition and results of operations are based upon its consolidated financial statements that have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“U.S. GAAP”). The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. The Company evaluates these estimates and assumptions on an ongoing basis. Estimates and assumptions are based on historical and other factors believed to be

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reasonable under the circumstances at the time the financial statements are issued. The results of these estimates may form the basis of the carrying value of certain assets and liabilities and may not be readily apparent from other sources. Actual results, under conditions and circumstances different from those assumed, may differ from estimates.

The impact of, and any associated risks related to, estimates and assumptions are discussed within Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, as well as in the Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements, if applicable, where estimates and assumptions affect the Company’s reported and expected financial results.

There have been no other material changes in critical accounting estimates at March 31, 2021 from those described in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.


Forward-Looking Statements

This document contains “forward-looking” statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) and Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933. Forward-looking statements reflect the Company's current expectations and projections about future events at the time, and thus involve uncertainty and risk. The words “believe,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “will,” “could,” “would,” “should,” “may,” “plan,” “estimate,” “intend,” “predict,” “potential,” “continue,” and the negatives of these words and other similar expressions generally identify forward-looking statements.

It is possible that the Company’s future financial performance may differ from expectations due to a variety of factors including, but not limited to the following: (1) the risk that the proposed plan of reorganization may not be approved by the bankruptcy court or that other conditions necessary to implement the agreement in principle may not be satisfied, (2) the actions and decisions of participants in the bankruptcy proceeding, and the actions and decisions of third parties, including regulators, that may have an interest in the bankruptcy proceedings, (3) the terms and conditions of any reorganization plan that may ultimately be approved by the bankruptcy court, (4) delays in the confirmation or consummation of a plan of reorganization due to factors beyond the Company’s and Paddock’s control, (5) risks with respect to the receipt of the consents necessary to effect the reorganization, (6) risks inherent in, and potentially adverse developments related to, the bankruptcy proceeding, that could adversely affect the company and the company’s liquidity or results of operations, (7) the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the various governmental, industry and consumer actions related thereto, (8) the Company’s ability to obtain the benefits it anticipates from the Corporate Modernization, (9) the Company’s ability to manage its cost structure, including its success in implementing restructuring or other plans aimed at improving the Company’s operating efficiency and working capital management, achieving cost savings, and remaining well-positioned to address the Company’s legacy liabilities, (10) the Company’s ability to acquire or divest businesses, acquire and expand plants, integrate operations of acquired businesses and achieve expected benefits from acquisitions, divestitures or expansions, (11) the Company’s ability to achieve its strategic plan, (12) the Company’s ability to improve its glass melting technology, known as the MAGMA program, (13) foreign currency fluctuations relative to the U.S. dollar, (14) changes in capital availability or cost, including interest rate fluctuations and the ability of the Company to refinance debt on favorable terms, (15) the general political, economic and competitive conditions in markets and countries where the Company has operations, including uncertainties related to Brexit, economic and social conditions, disruptions in the supply chain, competitive pricing pressures, inflation or deflation, changes in tax rates and laws, natural disasters and weather, (16) the Company’s ability to generate sufficient future cash flows to ensure the Company’s goodwill is not impaired, (17) consumer preferences for alternative forms of packaging, (18) cost and availability of raw materials, labor, energy and transportation, (19) consolidation among competitors and customers, (20) unanticipated expenditures with respect to data privacy, environmental, safety and health laws, (21) unanticipated operational disruptions, including higher capital spending, (22) the Company’s ability to further develop its sales, marketing and product development capabilities, (23) the failure of the Company’s joint venture partners to meet their obligations or commit additional capital to the joint venture, (24) the ability of the Company and the third parties on which it relies for information technology system support to prevent and detect security breaches related to cybersecurity and data privacy, (25) changes in U.S. trade policies, and the other risk factors discussed in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020 and any subsequently filed Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q or the Company’s other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

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It is not possible to foresee or identify all such factors. Any forward-looking statements in this document are based on certain assumptions and analyses made by the Company in light of its experience and perception of historical trends, current conditions, expected future developments, and other factors it believes are appropriate in the circumstances. Forward-looking statements are not a guarantee of future performance and actual results or developments may differ materially from expectations. While the Company continually reviews trends and uncertainties affecting the Company's results of operations and financial condition, the Company does not assume any obligation to update or supplement any particular forward-looking statements contained in this document.

Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

There have been no material changes in market risk at March 31, 2021 from those described in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.


Item 4. Controls and Procedures.

The Company maintains disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the Company’s Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms and that such information is accumulated and communicated to the Company’s management, including its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. In designing and evaluating the disclosure controls and procedures, management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives, and management is required to apply its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures. Also, the Company has investments in certain unconsolidated entities. As the Company does not control or manage these entities, its disclosure controls and procedures with respect to such entities are necessarily substantially more limited than those maintained with respect to its consolidated subsidiaries.

As required by Rule 13a-15(b) of the Exchange Act, the Company carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of management, including its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based on the foregoing, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective at the reasonable assurance level as of March 31, 2021.

As required by Rule 13a-15(d) of the Exchange Act, the Company carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of management, including its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of any change in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. There have been no changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting during the fiscal quarter ended March 31, 2021 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to material affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Although the Company has modified its workplace practices globally due to the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in most of its administrative employees working remotely, this has not materially affected its internal control over financial reporting. The Company is continually monitoring and assessing the COVID-19 situation on its internal controls to minimize the impact on their design and operating effectiveness.

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PART II — OTHER INFORMATION

Item 1. Legal Proceedings.

SEC regulations require the Company to disclose certain information about environmental proceedings if the Company reasonably believes that such proceedings may result in monetary sanctions above a stated threshold. The Company uses a threshold of $1 million for purposes of determining whether disclosure of any such proceedings is required.  No such environmental proceedings were pending or contemplated as of March 31, 2021.  

For further information on legal proceedings, see Note 10 to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements, “Contingencies,” that is included in Part I of this Quarterly Report and incorporated herein by reference.

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

Other than below, there have been no material changes in risk factors at March 31, 2021 from those described in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

The resolution of asbestos claims pursuant to Paddock’s recently announced agreement-in-principle is subject to a number of risks and uncertainties that may prevent or delay implementation of the resolution of these claims on the terms set forth in such agreement-in-principle.

On April 26, 2021, the Company announced that its subsidiary, Paddock Enterprises LLC (“Paddock”) reached an agreement in principle to accept the terms of a mediator’s proposal regarding a consensual plan of reorganization under the Bankruptcy Code. The agreement in principle provides for total consideration of $610 million to fund a trust on the effective date of a plan of reorganization, subject to definitive documentation and satisfaction of certain conditions. The agreement in principle was reached with both the Future Claimants’ Representative and the Asbestos Claimants’ Committee, who agreed to support a plan of reorganization for Paddock that incorporates the settlement (the “Plan”). The Plan will require the approval by at least 75% of asbestos claimants voting on the Plan and be subject to approval by the Bankruptcy Court and the District Court. If approved and consummated, the Plan would permanently resolve all current and future asbestos claims against Paddock, and would protect all of O-I Glass and its subsidiaries from those claims, under Section 524(g) of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.

The confirmation and consummation of the Plan, and accordingly the final resolution of asbestos claims against Paddock in accordance with the Plan, are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, which could have the effect of delaying or preventing the confirmation and consummation of the Plan, increasing the Company’s costs in connection with effecting the settlement and the consummation of the Plan or reducing the benefit related to the consummation of the Plan. In light of these risks and uncertainties, the Company cannot provide assurance that the Plan, as contemplated by the agreement in principle, will be consummated on the time schedule that the Company anticipates or at all, or if consummated that the Company will recognize all benefits from the consummation of the Plan that the Company anticipates. These risks and uncertainties include:

the risk that the parties to the settlement are unable to agree upon the final plan documents, including the Plan, to effectuate the settlement;
the risk that the Plan is not approved by a favorable vote of 75% of the holders of asbestos claims voting on the Plan;
the risk that the Plan is not approved by the Bankruptcy Court or the District Court and that orders so approving the Plan and issuing the protective injunctions do not become final; and
risks and uncertainties if any interested parties object to the Plan or appeal any order issued by the Bankruptcy Court or District Court approving the Plan, which objections and appeals, even if favorably resolved, may delay the consummation of the Plan and increase the Company’s costs in connection with the agreement-in-principle and related proceedings.

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Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.

The Company did not purchase any shares of its common stock for the three months ended March 31, 2021. In February 2021, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized a $150 million anti-dilutive share repurchase program for the Company’s common stock that the Company intends to use to offset stock-based compensation provided to the Company’s directors, officers and employees. This authorization supersedes and replaces any prior repurchase authorizations.

 

Item 6. Exhibits.

Exhibit 10.1

Form of Employee Restricted Stock Unit Agreement for use under the Owens-Illinois, Inc. Amended and Restated 2017 Incentive Award Plan.

Exhibit 10.2

Form of Employee Performance Stock Unit Agreement for use under the Owens-Illinois, Inc. Amended and Restated 2017 Incentive Award Plan.

Exhibit 31.1

Certification of Principal Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

Exhibit 31.2

Certification of Principal Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

Exhibit 32.1*

Certification of Principal Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350.

Exhibit 32.2*

Certification of Principal Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350.

Exhibit 101

Financial statements from the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q of O-I Glass, Inc. for the quarter ended March 31, 2021, formatted in iXBRL (Inline eXtensible Business Reporting Language): (i) the Condensed Consolidated Results of Operations, (ii) the Condensed Consolidated Comprehensive Income, (iii) the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets, (iv) the Condensed Consolidated Cash Flows and (v) the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

Exhibit 104

Cover Page Interactive Data file (formatted as iXBRL and contained in Exhibit 101).

*

This exhibit shall not be deemed “filed” for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and is not incorporated by reference into any filing of the Company, whether made before or after the date hereof, regardless of any general incorporation language in such filing.

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SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

O-I GLASS, INC.

Date

April 30, 2021

By

/s/ John A. Haudrich

John A. Haudrich

Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

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