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CHSCP CHS

Filed: 7 Apr 21, 6:04am
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

Form 10-Q
 Quarterly Report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the quarterly period endedFebruary 28, 2021
or
 Transition Report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 for the transition period from to

Commission file number: 001-36079
CHS Inc.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
Minnesota41-0251095
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)
5500 Cenex Drive
Inver Grove Heights,Minnesota55077
(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)
  (651)355-6000
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each classTrading symbol(s)Name of each exchange on which registered
8% Cumulative Redeemable Preferred StockCHSCPThe Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
Class B Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock, Series 1CHSCOThe Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
Class B Reset Rate Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock, Series 2CHSCNThe Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
Class B Reset Rate Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock, Series 3CHSCMThe Nasdaq Stock Market LLC
Class B Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock, Series 4CHSCLThe Nasdaq Stock Market LLC

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit such files).
Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer," "smaller reporting company," and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer o
Accelerated filer o
Non-accelerated filerSmaller reporting companyEmerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the Registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
Yes No

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer's classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date:
The issuer has no common stock outstanding.



TABLE OF CONTENTS



Unless the context otherwise requires, for purposes of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, the words "CHS," "we," "us" and "our" refer to CHS Inc., a Minnesota cooperative corporation, and its subsidiaries as of February 28, 2021.

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

    This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains and our other publicly available documents may contain, and our officers, directors and other representatives may from time to time make "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements can be identified by words such as "anticipate," "intend," "plan," "goal," "seek," "believe," "project," "estimate," "expect," "strategy," "future," "likely," "may," "should," "will" and similar references to future periods. Forward-looking statements are neither historical facts nor assurances of future performance. Instead, they are based only on our current beliefs, expectations and assumptions regarding the future of our businesses, financial condition and results of operations, future plans and strategies, projections, anticipated events and trends, the economy and other future conditions. Because forward-looking statements relate to the future, they are subject to inherent uncertainties, risks and changes in circumstances that are difficult to predict and many of which are outside of our control. Our actual results and financial condition may differ materially from those indicated in the forward-looking statements. Therefore, you should not place undue reliance on any of these forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause our actual results and financial condition to differ materially from those indicated in the forward-looking statements are discussed or identified in our public filings made with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, including in the "Risk Factors" discussion in Item 1A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended August 31, 2020. Any forward-looking statements made by us in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are based only on information currently available to us and speak only as of the date on which the statement is made. We undertake no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether written or oral, that may be made from time to time, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise, except as required by applicable law.
1

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1.     FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

CHS INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Unaudited)
 February 28,
2021
August 31,
2020
 (Dollars in thousands)
ASSETS
Current assets: 
Cash and cash equivalents$217,675 $140,874 
Receivables2,336,920 2,366,047 
Inventories4,246,051 2,742,138 
Other current assets2,150,250 1,017,488 
Total current assets8,950,896 6,266,547 
Investments3,639,453 3,630,033 
Property, plant and equipment4,866,751 4,957,938 
Other assets1,109,043 1,139,429 
Total assets$18,566,143 $15,993,947 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITIES
Current liabilities:  
Notes payable$2,952,392 $1,575,491 
Current portion of long-term debt167,792 189,287 
Accounts payable2,042,475 1,724,516 
Accrued expenses451,593 501,904 
Other current liabilities1,948,781 928,843 
Total current liabilities7,563,033 4,920,041 
Long-term debt1,604,313 1,601,836 
Other liabilities679,014 652,897 
Commitments and contingencies (Note 13)00
Equities:  
Preferred stock2,264,038 2,264,038 
Equity certificates5,159,756 5,161,610 
Accumulated other comprehensive loss(222,458)(233,924)
Capital reserves1,509,902 1,618,147 
Total CHS Inc. equities8,711,238 8,809,871 
Noncontrolling interests8,545 9,302 
Total equities8,719,783 8,819,173 
Total liabilities and equities$18,566,143 $15,993,947 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).
2

CHS INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(Unaudited)
 Three Months EndedSix Months Ended
 February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
 (Dollars in thousands)
Revenues$8,320,159 $6,598,226 $17,035,802 $14,219,711 
Cost of goods sold8,218,439 6,283,171 16,755,978 13,579,113 
Gross profit101,720 315,055 279,824 640,598 
Marketing, general and administrative expenses161,510 199,570 332,171 367,901 
Operating (loss) earnings(59,790)115,485 (52,347)272,697 
Interest expense28,855 33,411 53,905 68,382 
Other income(17,846)(11,352)(30,470)(24,850)
Equity income from investments(64,109)(34,398)(114,132)(84,060)
(Loss) income before income taxes(6,690)127,824 38,350 313,225 
Income tax expense31,668 2,130 7,339 8,794 
Net (loss) income(38,358)125,694 31,011 304,431 
Net (loss) income attributable to noncontrolling interests(129)247 (431)1,102 
Net (loss) income attributable to CHS Inc. $(38,229)$125,447 $31,442 $303,329 
    
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).

3

CHS INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(Unaudited)
Three Months EndedSix Months Ended
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
 (Dollars in thousands)
Net (loss) income$(38,358)$125,694 $31,011 $304,431 
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax:
Pension and other postretirement benefits3,869 3,746 7,514 8,819 
Cash flow hedges(559)(5,812)1,110 (11,684)
Foreign currency translation adjustment(761)(8,519)2,842 (9,358)
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax2,549 (10,585)11,466 (12,223)
Comprehensive (loss) income(35,809)115,109 42,477 292,208 
Comprehensive (loss) income attributable to noncontrolling interests(129)247 (431)1,102 
Comprehensive (loss) income attributable to CHS Inc. $(35,680)$114,862 $42,908 $291,106 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).


4

CHS INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)
 Six Months Ended
 February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
 (Dollars in thousands)
Cash flows from operating activities:  
Net income$31,011 $304,431 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash (used in) provided by operating activities:  
Depreciation and amortization, including amortization of deferred major maintenance267,726 272,652 
Equity income from investments, net of distributions received(3,687)40,109 
Provision for doubtful accounts(4,674)1,883 
Deferred taxes35,797 (5,763)
Other, net(18,495)4,181 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:  
Receivables(100,398)507,844 
Inventories(1,495,856)(814,318)
Accounts payable and accrued expenses273,448 (54,786)
Other, net(119,417)45,365 
Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities(1,134,545)301,598 
Cash flows from investing activities:  
Acquisition of property, plant and equipment(164,565)(224,962)
Proceeds from disposition of property, plant and equipment7,741 6,959 
Expenditures for major maintenance(10,050)(8,809)
Proceeds from sale of business39,567 — 
Changes in CHS Capital notes receivable, net43,283 209,608 
Financing extended to customers(1,816)(4,475)
Payments from customer financing5,589 8,709 
Other investing activities, net10,633 12,805 
Net cash used in investing activities(69,618)(165)
Cash flows from financing activities:  
Proceeds from notes payable and long-term debt16,930,536 11,403,077 
Payments on notes payable, long-term debt and finance lease obligations(15,483,358)(11,486,347)
Preferred stock dividends paid(84,334)(84,334)
Redemptions of equities(12,486)(8,834)
Cash patronage dividends paid(21,416)(90,030)
Other financing activities, net(9,222)(13,079)
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities1,319,720 (279,547)
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents1,026 (5,613)
Increase in cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash116,583 16,273 
Cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash at beginning of period216,993 299,675 
Cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash at end of period$333,576 $315,948 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).
5

CHS INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Unaudited)

Note 1        Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of Presentation

    These unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements reflect, in the opinion of management, all normal recurring adjustments necessary for a fair statement of our financial position, results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented. The results of operations and cash flows for interim periods are not necessarily indicative of results for a full fiscal year because of the seasonal nature of our businesses, among other things. Our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and notes are presented as permitted by the requirements for Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto for the year ended August 31, 2020, included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC").

Significant Accounting Policies

    The following significant accounting policy was updated or changed since our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended August 31, 2020.

Receivables

    As described in the "Recent Accounting Pronouncements" section, we adopted Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") No. 2016-13, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses ("ASC Topic 326"): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments, on September 1, 2020, using the modified retrospective approach. Our accounting policies with respect to ASC Topic 326 are included in Note 3, Receivables.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

    Except for the recent accounting pronouncement described below, other recent accounting pronouncements are not expected to have a material impact on our condensed consolidated financial statements.

Adopted

    In June 2016, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued ASC Topic 326. The amendments in this ASU introduce a new approach, based on expected losses, to estimate credit losses on certain types of financial instruments. This ASU is intended to provide financial statement users with more decision-useful information about the expected credit losses associated with most financial assets measured at amortized cost and certain other instruments, including trade and other receivables, loans, held-to-maturity debt securities, net investments in leases and off-balance sheet credit exposures. Entities are required to apply the provisions of this ASU as a cumulative-effect adjustment to the opening balance of capital reserves as of the beginning of the first reporting period in which the guidance is adopted. As part of our adoption efforts, we performed various data-gathering activities, developed a credit losses model, performed data analyses and made accounting policy election determinations. The impact of adoption did not have a material impact on our condensed consolidated financial statements.

Not Yet Adopted

None.








6

Note 2        Revenues

    The following table presents revenues recognized under Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers ("ASC Topic 606"), disaggregated by reportable segment, as well as the amount of revenues recognized under ASC Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging ("ASC Topic 815"), and other applicable accounting guidance for the three and six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020. Other applicable accounting guidance primarily includes revenues recognized under ASC Topic 842, Leases, and ASC Topic 470, Debt, that fall outside the scope of ASC Topic 606.
ASC Topic 606ASC Topic 815Other GuidanceTotal Revenues
Three Months Ended February 28, 2021(Dollars in thousands)
Energy$1,243,072 $129,086 $$1,372,158 
Ag1,169,411 5,753,333 15,468 6,938,212 
Corporate and Other4,535 5,254 9,789 
Total revenues$2,417,018 $5,882,419 $20,722 $8,320,159 
Three Months Ended February 29, 2020
Energy$1,375,905 $85,145 $$1,461,050 
Ag1,066,783 4,035,447 21,972 5,124,202 
Corporate and Other5,343 7,631 12,974 
Total revenues$2,448,031 $4,120,592 $29,603 $6,598,226 
Six Months Ended February 28, 2021
Energy$2,308,036 $321,969 $$2,630,005 
Ag2,513,910 11,840,572 29,132 14,383,614 
Corporate and Other10,995 11,188 22,183 
Total revenues$4,832,941 $12,162,541 $40,320 $17,035,802 
Six Months Ended February 29, 2020
Energy$3,069,753 $286,720 $$3,356,473 
Ag2,425,409 8,351,534 59,114 10,836,057 
Corporate and Other10,883 16,298 27,181 
Total revenues$5,506,045 $8,638,254 $75,412 $14,219,711 

    Less than 1% of revenues accounted for under ASC Topic 606 included within the table above are recorded over time; these revenues are primarily related to service contracts.

Contract Assets and Contract Liabilities

    Contract assets relate to unbilled amounts arising from goods that have already been transferred to the customer where the right to payment is not conditional on the passage of time. This results in recognition of an asset, as the amount of revenue recognized at a certain point in time exceeds the amount billed to the customer. Contract assets are recorded in receivables within our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets and were not material as of February 28, 2021, or August 31, 2020.

    Contract liabilities relate to advance payments from customers for goods and services that we have yet to provide. Contract liabilities of $783.2 million and $139.1 million as of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, respectively, are recorded within other current liabilities on our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. For the three months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020, we recognized revenues of $19.9 million and $39.6 million related to contract liabilities, respectively. For the six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020, we recognized revenues of $91.6 million and $131.6 million related to contract liabilities, respectively. These amounts were included in the other current liabilities balance at the beginning of the respective periods.

7

Note 3        Receivables
February 28,
2021
August 31,
2020
(Dollars in thousands)
Trade accounts receivable$1,650,031 $1,476,585 
CHS Capital short-term notes receivable442,172 563,934 
Other392,769 491,068 
Gross receivables2,484,972 2,531,587 
Less: allowances and reserves148,052 165,540 
Total receivables$2,336,920 $2,366,047 
    
    Receivables are composed of trade accounts receivable, short-term notes receivable in our wholly-owned subsidiary, CHS Capital, LLC ("CHS Capital"), and other receivables, less an allowance for expected credit losses. The allowance for expected credit losses is based on our best estimate of expected credit losses in existing receivable balances and is determined using historical write-off experience, adjusted for various industry and regional data and current expectations of future credit losses.

Notes receivable from commercial borrowers are collateralized by various combinations of mortgages, personal property, accounts and notes receivable, inventories and assignments of capital stock from certain regional cooperatives. These loans are originated in various states, primarily in the Upper Midwest region of the United States, the most significant of which include North Dakota and Minnesota. CHS Capital also has loans receivable from producer borrowers that are collateralized by various combinations of growing crops, livestock, inventories, accounts receivable, personal property and supplemental mortgages and are originated primarily in the same states as the commercial notes.

    In addition to the short-term balances included in the table above, CHS Capital had long-term notes receivable with durations of generally not more than 10 years, totaling $93.0 million and $101.5 million as of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, respectively. Long-term notes receivable are included in other assets on our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. As of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, the commercial notes represented 67% and 33%, respectively, and the producer notes represented 33% and 67%, respectively, of total CHS Capital notes receivable.

    CHS Capital has commitments to extend credit to customers if there are no violations of contractually established conditions. As of February 28, 2021, CHS Capital customers had additional available credit of $618.0 million. No significant troubled debt restructuring activity occurred and no third-party customer or borrower accounted for more than 10% of the total receivables balance as of February 28, 2021, or August 31, 2020.

Note 4        Inventories        
February 28,
2021
August 31,
2020
(Dollars in thousands)
Grain and oilseed$1,927,931 $1,064,079 
Energy714,798 696,858 
Agronomy1,403,480 822,535 
Processed grain and oilseed155,492 126,022 
Other44,350 32,644 
Total inventories$4,246,051 $2,742,138 

    As of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, we valued approximately 11% and 16%, respectively, of inventories, primarily crude oil and refined fuels within our Energy segment, using the lower of cost, determined on the LIFO method, or net realizable value. If the FIFO method of accounting had been used, inventories would have been higher than the reported amount by $284.3 million and $93.5 million as of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, respectively. Actual valuation of inventory under the LIFO method can be made only at the end of each year based on inventory levels and costs at that time. Interim LIFO calculations are based on management's estimates of expected year-end inventory levels and values and are subject to final year-end LIFO inventory valuation.

8

Note 5        Investments
February 28,
2021
August 31,
2020
 (Dollars in thousands)
Equity method investments:
CF Industries Nitrogen, LLC$2,651,652 $2,662,618 
Ventura Foods, LLC374,895 381,351 
Ardent Mills, LLC215,942 208,927 
Other equity method investments265,588 253,182 
Other investments131,376 123,955 
Total investments$3,639,453 $3,630,033 

    Joint ventures and other investments, in which we have significant ownership and influence but not control, are accounted for in our condensed consolidated financial statements using the equity method of accounting. Our significant equity method investments consist of CF Industries Nitrogen, LLC ("CF Nitrogen"); Ventura Foods, LLC ("Ventura Foods"); Ardent Mills, LLC ("Ardent Mills"); and TEMCO, LLC ("TEMCO"), which are summarized below. In addition to recognition of our share of income from equity method investments, our equity method investments are evaluated for indicators of other-than-temporary impairment on an ongoing basis in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States ("U.S. GAAP"). Other investments consist primarily of investments in cooperatives without readily determinable fair values and are generally measured at cost, unless an impairment or other observable market price change occurs, requiring an adjustment. Approximately $394.0 million of cumulative undistributed earnings from our equity method investees are included in the investments balance as of February 28, 2021.

CF Nitrogen

    We have an approximate $2.7 billion investment in CF Nitrogen, a strategic venture with CF Industries Holdings, Inc. ("CF Industries"). The investment consists of an approximate 10% membership interest (based on product tons) in CF Nitrogen. We account for this investment using the hypothetical liquidation at book value method, recognizing our share of the earnings and losses of CF Nitrogen as equity income from investments in our Nitrogen Production segment based on our contractual claims on the entity's net assets pursuant to the liquidation provisions of the CF Nitrogen Limited Liability Company Agreement, adjusted for the semi-annual cash distributions we receive as a result of our membership interest in CF Nitrogen.

    The following table provides summarized unaudited financial information for our equity method investment in CF Nitrogen for the six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020:
Six Months Ended
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
(Dollars in thousands)
Net sales$1,285,625 $1,297,018 
Gross profit321,565 297,630 
Net earnings297,297 280,599 
Earnings attributable to CHS Inc.53,033 62,757 
9

Ventura Foods
    
    We have a 50% interest in Ventura Foods, a joint venture with Mitsui & Co., that produces and distributes primarily vegetable-oil-based products. We account for Ventura Foods as an equity method investment, and our share of the results of this equity method investment are included in Corporate and Other.

The following table provides aggregate summarized unaudited financial information for our equity method investment in Ventura Foods for the six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020:
Six Months Ended
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
(Dollars in thousands)
Net sales$1,107,024 $1,229,151 
Gross profit134,311 150,818 
Net earnings42,620 45,117 
Earnings attributable to CHS Inc.21,310 22,557 

Ardent Mills and TEMCO

    We have a 12% interest in Ardent Mills, which is a joint venture with Cargill Incorporated ("Cargill") and Conagra Brands, Inc., and is the largest flour miller in the United States. Additionally, we have a 50% interest in TEMCO, which is a joint venture with Cargill focused on export elevation, primarily to Asia. We account for Ardent Mills and TEMCO as equity method investments, and our shares of the results of these equity method investments are included in Corporate and Other and our Ag segment, respectively.

The following table provides aggregate summarized unaudited financial information for our equity method investments in Ardent Mills and TEMCO for the six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020:
Six Months Ended
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
(Dollars in thousands)
Net sales$4,395,607 $3,070,160 
Gross profit287,843 170,294 
Net earnings145,783 44,145 
Earnings attributable to CHS Inc.30,419 (3,879)
    
    Our investments in other equity method investees are not significant in relation to our condensed consolidated financial statements, either individually or in the aggregate.

Note 6        Notes Payable and Long-Term Debt

Our notes payable and long-term debt are subject to various restrictive requirements for maintenance of minimum consolidated net worth and other financial ratios. We were in compliance with our debt covenants as of February 28, 2021. The table below summarizes our notes payable as of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020.
February 28,
2021
August 31,
2020
(Dollars in thousands)
Notes payable$2,249,275 $763,215 
CHS Capital notes payable703,117 812,276 
Total notes payable$2,952,392 $1,575,491 
    
    As of February 28, 2021, our primary line of credit was a five-year unsecured revolving credit facility with a syndicate of domestic and international banks. The credit facility provides a committed amount of $2.75 billion that expires on July 16, 2024. As of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, the outstanding balance on this facility was $1.3 billion and $345.0 million, respectively.
10


    We have a receivables and loans securitization facility ("Securitization Facility") with certain unaffiliated financial institutions ("Purchasers"). Under the Securitization Facility, we and certain of our subsidiaries ("Originators") sell trade accounts and notes receivable ("Receivables") to Cofina Funding, LLC ("Cofina"), a wholly-owned bankruptcy-remote indirect subsidiary of CHS. Cofina in turn transfers the Receivables to the Purchasers, and this arrangement is accounted for as a secured borrowing. We use the proceeds from the sale of Receivables under the Securitization Facility for general corporate purposes and settlements are made on a monthly basis. The amount available under the Securitization Facility fluctuates over time based on the total amount of eligible Receivables generated during the normal course of business. As of February 28, 2021, total availability under the Securitization Facility was $538.0 million, all of which had been utilized.

    We also have a repurchase facility ("Repurchase Facility") related to the Securitization Facility. Under the Repurchase Facility, we can borrow up to $150.0 million, collateralized by a subordinated note issued by Cofina in favor of the Originators and representing a portion of the outstanding balance of the Receivables sold by the Originators to Cofina under the Securitization Facility. As of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, the outstanding balance under the Repurchase Facility was $150.0 million.

On September 24, 2020, the Securitization Facility and Repurchase Facility were amended, increasing the maximum availability under the Securitization Facility to $600.0 million from $500.0 million and extending their respective termination dates to July 30, 2021.

On February 19, 2021, we amended our 10-year term loan facility to convert the entire $366.0 million aggregate principle amount outstanding thereunder into a revolving loan, which can be paid down and readvanced in an amount up to the referenced $366.0 million until February 19, 2022. On February 19, 2022, the total funded loan balance outstanding reverts to a nonrevolving term loan that is payable on September 4, 2025. There was no balance outstanding under this facility as of February 28, 2021.

On August 14, 2020, we entered into a Note Purchase Agreement to borrow $375.0 million of debt in the form of notes. The notes under this Note Purchase Agreement are structured in four series with maturities ranging from 7 to 15 years and interest accruing at rates ranging from 3.24% to 3.73%, subject to certain adjustments depending on our ratio of consolidated funded debt to consolidated cash flow. The funding of these notes took place on November 2, 2020. This funding is being used to pay debt maturities and manage liquidity.

    Interest expense for the three months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020, was $28.9 million and $33.4 million, respectively, net of capitalized interest of $2.1 million and $3.4 million, respectively. Interest expense for the six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020, was $53.9 million and $68.4 million, respectively, net of capitalized interest of $4.2 million and $6.2 million, respectively.

Note 7        Income Taxes

    Our effective tax rate for the three months ended February 28, 2021, was (473.4)%, compared to 1.7% for the three months ended February 29, 2020. Our effective tax rate for the six months ended February 28, 2021, was 19.1%, compared to 2.8% for the six months ended February 29, 2020. Our income tax expense reflects the mix of full-year earnings projected across business units and equity management assumptions, which were partially offset by tax benefits related to an intercompany transfer of assets for tax planning. Income taxes and effective tax rate vary each year based on profitability and nonpatronage business activity during each of the comparable years.

    Our uncertain tax positions are affected by the tax years that are under audit or remain subject to examination by the relevant taxing authorities. Reserves are recorded against unrecognized tax benefits when we believe certain fully supportable tax return positions are likely to be challenged and we may not prevail. If we were to prevail on all positions taken in relation to uncertain tax positions, $129.8 million and $111.3 million of the unrecognized tax benefits would ultimately benefit our effective tax rate as of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, respectively. It is reasonably possible that the total amount of unrecognized tax benefits could significantly change in the next 12 months.

11

Note 8        Equities

Changes in Equities

    Changes in equities for the three and six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020, are as follows:
 Equity Certificates Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Loss
   
Capital
Equity
Certificates
Nonpatronage
Equity
Certificates
Nonqualified Equity CertificatesPreferred
Stock
Capital
Reserves
Noncontrolling
Interests
Total
Equities
 (Dollars in thousands)
Balances, August 31, 2020$3,724,187 $28,727 $1,408,696 $2,264,038 $(233,924)$1,618,147 $9,302 $8,819,173 
Reversal of prior year redemption estimates7,726 — — — 7,726 
Redemptions of equities(6,539)(31)(1,156)— — — (7,726)
Preferred stock dividends— — — — — (84,334)— (84,334)
Other, net(654)(47)(197)— — (7,798)35 (8,661)
Net income (loss)— — — — — 69,671 (302)69,369 
Other comprehensive income, net of tax— — — — 8,917 — — 8,917 
Estimated 2021 cash patronage refunds— — — — — (9,304)— (9,304)
Estimated 2021 equity redemptions(9,304)— — — — — — (9,304)
Balances, November 30, 2020$3,715,416 $28,649 $1,407,343 $2,264,038 $(225,007)$1,586,382 $9,035 $8,785,856 
Reversal of prior year patronage and redemption estimates4,760 (211,970)— — 233,345 — 26,135 
Distribution of 2020 patronage refunds— — 214,720 — — (236,136)— (21,416)
Redemptions of equities(4,177)(35)(548)— — — (4,760)
Preferred stock dividends— — — — — (42,167)— (42,167)
Other, net(26)— (15)— — 1,068 (361)666 
Net loss— — — — — (38,229)(129)(38,358)
Other comprehensive income, net of tax— — — — 2,549 — — 2,549 
Estimated 2021 cash patronage refunds— — — — — 5,639 — 5,639 
Estimated 2021 equity redemptions5,639 — — — — — — 5,639 
Balances, February 28, 2021$3,721,612 $28,614 $1,409,530 $2,264,038 $(222,458)$1,509,902 $8,545 $8,719,783 
 Equity Certificates Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Loss
   
Capital
Equity
Certificates
Nonpatronage
Equity
Certificates
Nonqualified Equity CertificatesPreferred
Stock
Capital
Reserves
Noncontrolling
Interests
Total
Equities
 (Dollars in thousands)
Balances, August 31, 2019$3,753,493 $29,074 $1,206,310 $2,264,038 $(226,933)$1,584,158 $7,390 $8,617,530 
Reversal of prior year redemption estimates5,447 — — — 5,447 
Redemptions of equities(4,721)(54)(672)— — — (5,447)
Preferred stock dividends— — — — — (84,334)— (84,334)
ASC Topic 842 cumulative-effect adjustment33,707 33,707 
Other, net(8)— (39)— — (1,312)410 (949)
Net income— — — — — 177,882 855 178,737 
Other comprehensive loss, net of tax— — — — (1,638)— — (1,638)
Estimated 2020 cash patronage refunds— — — — — (28,504)— (28,504)
Estimated 2020 equity redemptions(91,633)— — — — — — (91,633)
Balances, November 30, 2019$3,662,578 $29,020 $1,205,599 $2,264,038 $(228,571)$1,681,597 $8,655 $8,622,916 
Reversal of prior year patronage and redemption estimates3,387 (472,398)— — 562,398 — 93,387 
Distribution of 2019 patronage refunds— — 474,066 — — (564,096)— (90,030)
Redemptions of equities(2,998)(20)(369)— — — (3,387)
Preferred stock dividends— — — — — (42,167)— (42,167)
Other, net(201)— — — 10 (324)(512)
Net income— — — — — 125,447 247 125,694 
Other comprehensive loss, net of tax— — — — (10,585)— — (10,585)
Estimated 2020 cash patronage refunds— — — — — (22,206)— (22,206)
Estimated 2020 equity redemptions(49,154)— — — — — — (49,154)
Balances, February 29, 2020$3,613,612 $29,000 $1,206,901 $2,264,038 $(239,156)$1,740,983 $8,578 $8,623,956 

12

Preferred Stock Dividends

    The following is a summary of dividends per share by series of preferred stock for the three and six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020.
Three Months EndedSix Months Ended
Nasdaq symbolFebruary 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
Series of preferred stock:(Dollars per share)
8% Cumulative RedeemableCHSCP$0.50 $0.50 $1.50 $1.50 
Class B Cumulative Redeemable, Series 1CHSCO$0.49 $0.49 $1.48 $1.48 
Class B Reset Rate Cumulative Redeemable, Series 2CHSCN$0.44 $0.44 $1.33 $1.33 
Class B Reset Rate Cumulative Redeemable, Series 3CHSCM$0.42 $0.42 $1.27 $1.27 
Class B Cumulative Redeemable, Series 4CHSCL$0.47 $0.47 $1.41 $1.41 

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)        

    Changes in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) by component, net of tax, are as follows for the three and six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020:
Pension and Other Postretirement BenefitsCash Flow HedgesForeign Currency Translation AdjustmentTotal
(Dollars in thousands)
Balance as of August 31, 2020, net of tax$(159,680)$10,886 $(85,130)$(233,924)
Other comprehensive income (loss), before tax:
Amounts before reclassifications(125)14,506 3,629 18,010 
Amounts reclassified4,977 (12,284)(7,307)
Total other comprehensive income, before tax4,852 2,222 3,629 10,703 
Tax effect(1,207)(553)(26)(1,786)
Other comprehensive income, net of tax3,645 1,669 3,603 8,917 
Balance as of November 30, 2020, net of tax$(156,035)$12,555 $(81,527)$(225,007)
Other comprehensive income (loss), before tax:
Amounts before reclassifications2,929 (587)2,342 
Amounts reclassified5,151 (3,673)1,478 
Total other comprehensive income (loss), before tax5,151 (744)(587)3,820 
Tax effect(1,282)185 (174)(1,271)
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax3,869 (559)(761)2,549 
Balance as of February 28, 2021, net of tax$(152,166)$11,996 $(82,288)$(222,458)











13

Pension and Other Postretirement BenefitsCash Flow HedgesForeign Currency Translation AdjustmentTotal
(Dollars in thousands)
Balance as of August 31, 2019, net of tax$(172,478)$15,297 $(69,752)$(226,933)
Other comprehensive income (loss), before tax:
Amounts before reclassifications(85)(3,331)(2,411)(5,827)
Amounts reclassified4,977 (4,473)504 
Total other comprehensive income (loss), before tax4,892 (7,804)(2,411)(5,323)
Tax effect181 1,932 1,572 3,685 
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax5,073 (5,872)(839)(1,638)
Balance as of November 30, 2019, net of tax$(167,405)$9,425 $(70,591)$(228,571)
Other comprehensive income (loss), before tax:
Amounts before reclassifications(5,975)(8,540)(14,515)
Amounts reclassified4,977 (1,747)3,230 
Total other comprehensive income (loss), before tax4,977 (7,722)(8,540)(11,285)
Tax effect(1,231)1,910 21 700 
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax3,746 (5,812)(8,519)(10,585)
Balance as of February 29, 2020, net of tax$(163,659)$3,613 $(79,110)$(239,156)

    Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) were related to pension and other postretirement benefits, cash flow hedges and foreign currency translation adjustments. Pension and other postretirement reclassifications include amortization of net actuarial loss, prior service credit and transition amounts and are recorded as cost of goods sold, marketing, general and administrative expenses, and other income (see Note 9, Benefit Plans, for further information). Gains or losses associated with cash flow hedges are recorded as cost of goods sold (see Note 11, Derivative Financial Instruments and Hedging Activities, for further information). Gains or losses on foreign currency translation reclassifications related to sales of businesses are recorded as other income.

Note 9        Benefit Plans

    We have various pension and other defined benefit and defined contribution plans, in which substantially all employees may participate. We also have nonqualified supplemental executive and Board retirement plans.

14

    Components of net periodic benefit costs for the three and six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020, are as follows:
Three Months Ended
Qualified
Pension Benefits
Nonqualified
Pension Benefits
Other Benefits
 February 28, 2021February 29, 2020February 28, 2021February 29, 2020February 28, 2021February 29, 2020
Components of net periodic benefit costs: (Dollars in thousands)
Service cost$11,307 $10,538 $108 $101 $297 $262 
Interest cost4,141 5,431 68 107 123 187 
Expected return on assets(10,910)(11,671)
Prior service cost (credit) amortization45 45 (28)(28)(111)(111)
Actuarial loss (gain) amortization5,447 5,396 53 25 (341)(348)
Net periodic benefit cost (benefit)$10,030 $9,739 $201 $205 $(32)$(10)
Six Months Ended
Qualified
Pension Benefits
Nonqualified
Pension Benefits
Other Benefits
 February 28, 2021February 29, 2020February 28, 2021February 29, 2020February 28, 2021February 29, 2020
Components of net periodic benefit costs: (Dollars in thousands)
Service cost$22,614 $21,076 $217 $203 $593 $525 
Interest cost8,281 10,861 136 214 246 374 
Expected return on assets(21,821)(23,342)
Prior service cost (credit) amortization89 89 (57)(57)(223)(223)
Actuarial loss (gain) amortization10,895 10,791 106 49 (682)(696)
Net periodic benefit cost (benefit)$20,058 $19,475 $402 $409 $(66)$(20)

    The service cost component of defined benefit net periodic benefit cost is recorded in cost of goods sold and marketing, general and administrative expenses. The other components of net periodic benefit cost are recorded in other income.

Employer Contributions

    Any contributions made during fiscal 2021 will depend primarily on market returns on the pension plan assets and minimum funding level requirements. No contributions were made to the pension plans during the six months ended February 28, 2021, and we do not currently anticipate being required to make contributions for our pension plans in fiscal 2021.

Note 10        Segment Reporting

    We are an integrated agricultural enterprise, providing grain, foods and energy resources to businesses and consumers on a global basis. We provide a wide variety of products and services, from initial agricultural inputs such as fuels, farm supplies, crop nutrients and crop protection products, to agricultural outputs that include grains and oilseeds, grain and oilseed processing and food products, and the production and marketing of ethanol. We define our operating segments in accordance with ASC Topic 280, Segment Reporting, to reflect the manner in which our chief operating decision-maker, our Chief Executive Officer, evaluates performance and allocates resources in managing our businesses. We have aggregated those operating segments into three reportable segments: Energy, Ag and Nitrogen Production.

    Our Energy segment produces and provides primarily for the wholesale distribution of petroleum products and transportation of those products. Our Ag segment purchases and further processes or resells grains and oilseeds originated by our country operations business, by our member cooperatives and by third parties; serves as a wholesaler and retailer of crop inputs; and produces and markets ethanol. Our Nitrogen Production segment consists solely of our equity method investment in CF Nitrogen, which entitles us, pursuant to a supply agreement that we entered into with CF Nitrogen, to purchase up to a specified quantity of granular urea and urea ammonium nitrate annually from CF Nitrogen. Corporate and Other represents our financing and hedging businesses, which consist primarily of financial services related to crop production and a U.S.
15

Commodity Futures Trading Commission-regulated futures commission merchant for commodities hedging. Our nonconsolidated investments in Ventura Foods and Ardent Mills are also included in our Corporate and Other category.
    
    Corporate administrative expenses and interest are allocated to each reportable segment and Corporate and Other, based on direct use of services, such as information technology and legal, and other factors or considerations relevant to the costs incurred.

    Many of our business activities are highly seasonal and operating results vary throughout the year. Our revenues generally trend lower during the second and fourth fiscal quarters and higher during the first and third fiscal quarters; however, our income (loss) before income taxes does not necessarily follow the same trend due to weather and other events that can impact profitability. For example, in our Ag segment, our country operations business generally experiences higher volumes and revenues during the fall harvest and spring planting seasons, which generally correspond to our first and third fiscal quarters, respectively. Additionally, our agronomy business generally experiences higher volumes during the spring planting season. Our global grain marketing operations are subject to fluctuations in volume and income based on producer harvests, world grain prices, demand and global trade volumes. Our Energy segment generally experiences higher volumes in certain operating areas, such as refined products, in the spring, summer and early fall when gasoline and diesel fuel use by agricultural producers is highest and is subject to global supply and demand forces. Other energy products, such as propane, generally experience higher volumes during the winter heating and fall crop-drying seasons.

    Our revenues, assets and cash flows can be significantly affected by global market prices for commodities such as petroleum products, natural gas, grains, oilseeds, crop nutrients and flour. Changes in market prices for commodities that we purchase without a corresponding change in the selling prices of those products can affect revenues and operating earnings. Commodity prices are affected by a wide range of factors beyond our control, including weather, crop damage due to plant disease or insects, drought, availability and adequacy of supply, availability of a reliable rail and river transportation network, outbreaks of disease, government regulations and policies, global trade disputes, and general political and economic conditions.

    While our revenues and operating results are derived primarily from businesses and operations that are wholly-owned or subsidiaries and limited liability companies in which we have a controlling interest, a portion of our business operations are conducted through companies in which we hold ownership interests of 50% or less or do not control the operations. We account for these investments primarily using the equity method of accounting, wherein we record our proportionate share of income or loss reported by the entity as equity income from investments, without consolidation of the revenues and expenses of the entity in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations. In our Nitrogen Production segment, this consists of our approximate 10% membership interest (based on product tons) in CF Nitrogen. In Corporate and Other, this principally includes our 50% ownership in Ventura Foods and our 12% ownership in Ardent Mills. See Note 5, Investments, for more information on these entities.
    Reconciling amounts primarily represent the elimination of revenues between segments. Such transactions are executed at market prices to more accurately evaluate the profitability of individual business segments.

    Segment information for the three and six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020, is presented in the tables below.
EnergyAgNitrogen ProductionCorporate
and Other
Reconciling
Amounts
Total
Three Months Ended February 28, 2021(Dollars in thousands)
Revenues, including intersegment revenues$1,470,465 $6,942,185 $$12,046 $(104,537)$8,320,159 
Intersegment revenues(98,307)(3,973)(2,257)104,537 — 
Revenues, net of intersegment revenues$1,372,158 $6,938,212 $$9,789 $$8,320,159 
Operating (loss) earnings(55,449)2,093 (8,240)1,806 (59,790)
Interest expense1,063 16,630 12,241 (1,086)28,855 
Other income(990)(11,636)(302)(6,004)1,086 (17,846)
Equity income from investments(832)(16,945)(31,344)(14,988)(64,109)
(Loss) income before income taxes$(54,690)$14,044 $11,165 $22,791 $$(6,690)
16

EnergyAgNitrogen ProductionCorporate
and Other
Reconciling
Amounts
Total
Three Months Ended February 29, 2020(Dollars in thousands)
Revenues, including intersegment revenues$1,561,908 $5,127,441 $$14,049 $(105,172)$6,598,226 
Intersegment revenues(100,858)(3,239)(1,075)105,172 — 
Revenues, net of intersegment revenues$1,461,050 $5,124,202 $$12,974 $$6,598,226 
Operating earnings (loss)137,187 (6,809)(10,559)(4,334)115,485 
Interest expense(187)20,759 11,971 3,032 (2,164)33,411 
Other income(938)(11,395)(348)(835)2,164 (11,352)
Equity (income) loss from investments(609)4,672 (27,923)(10,538)(34,398)
Income (loss) before income taxes$138,921 $(20,845)$5,741 $4,007 $$127,824 
EnergyAgNitrogen ProductionCorporate
and Other
Reconciling
Amounts
Total
Six Months Ended February 28, 2021(Dollars in thousands)
Revenues, including intersegment revenues$2,828,310 $14,392,490 $$27,528 $(212,526)$17,035,802 
Intersegment revenues(198,305)(8,876)(5,345)212,526 — 
Revenues, net of intersegment revenues$2,630,005 $14,383,614 $— $22,183 $— $17,035,802 
Operating (loss) earnings(123,834)77,617 (15,862)9,732 (52,347)
Interest expense826 31,135 23,403 1,145 (2,604)53,905 
Other income(1,472)(23,453)(1,867)(6,282)2,604 (30,470)
Equity income from investments(1,321)(27,118)(53,033)(32,660)(114,132)
(Loss) income before income taxes$(121,867)$97,053 $15,635 $47,529 $$38,350 
Total assets as of February 28, 2021$4,415,250 $8,687,820 $2,667,517 $2,795,556 $— $18,566,143 
EnergyAgNitrogen ProductionCorporate
and Other
Reconciling
Amounts
Total
Six Months Ended February 29, 2020(Dollars in thousands)
Revenues, including intersegment revenues$3,589,803 $10,843,434 $$29,999 $(243,525)$14,219,711 
Intersegment revenues(233,330)(7,377)(2,818)243,525 — 
Revenues, net of intersegment revenues$3,356,473 $10,836,057 $— $27,181 $— $14,219,711 
Operating earnings (loss)298,386 (7,226)(18,381)(82)272,697 
Interest expense187 41,500 24,101 6,870 (4,276)68,382 
Other income(1,902)(22,848)(1,916)(2,460)4,276 (24,850)
Equity (income) loss from investments(973)8,829 (62,757)(29,159)(84,060)
Income (loss) before income taxes$301,074 $(34,707)$22,191 $24,667 $$313,225 

Note 11        Derivative Financial Instruments and Hedging Activities

    We enter into various derivative instruments to manage our exposure to movements primarily associated with agricultural and energy commodity prices and, to a lesser degree, foreign currency exchange rates and interest rates. Except for certain interest rate swaps and certain pay-fixed, receive-variable, cash-settled swaps related to future crude oil purchases, which are accounted for as fair value hedges and cash flow hedges, respectively, our derivative instruments represent economic hedges of price risk for which hedge accounting under ASC Topic 815 is not applied. Rather, the derivative instruments are recorded on our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets at fair value with changes in fair value being recorded directly to earnings, primarily within cost of goods sold in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations. See Note 12, Fair Value Measurements, for additional information. The majority of our exchange traded agricultural commodity futures are settled daily through CHS Hedging, our wholly-owned futures commission merchant.

The following tables present the gross fair values of derivative assets, derivative liabilities and margin deposits (cash collateral) recorded on our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets, along with related amounts permitted to be offset in accordance with U.S. GAAP. Although we have certain netting arrangements for our exchange-traded futures and options contracts and certain over-the-counter ("OTC") contracts, we have elected to report our derivative instruments on a gross basis on our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets under ASC Topic 210-20, Balance Sheet - Offsetting.
17

February 28, 2021
Amounts Not Offset on Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet but Eligible for Offsetting
Gross Amount RecognizedCash CollateralDerivative InstrumentsNet Amount
(Dollars in thousands)
Derivative Assets
Commodity derivatives$980,141 $— $18,849 $961,292 
Foreign exchange derivatives7,221 — 5,891 1,330 
Embedded derivative asset15,865 — 15,865 
Total$1,003,227 $— $24,740 $978,487 
Derivative Liabilities
Commodity derivatives$515,002 $1,893 $19,964 $493,145 
Foreign exchange derivatives64,669 5,891 58,778 
Total$579,671 $1,893 $25,855 $551,923 
August 31, 2020
Amounts Not Offset on Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet but Eligible for Offsetting
Gross Amount RecognizedCash CollateralDerivative InstrumentsNet Amount
 (Dollars in thousands)
Derivative Assets
Commodity derivatives$327,493 $— $2,980 $324,513 
Foreign exchange derivatives11,809 — 9,385 2,424 
Embedded derivative asset18,998 — 18,998 
Total$358,300 $— $12,365 $345,935 
Derivative Liabilities
Commodity derivatives$343,343 $956 $5,578 $336,809 
Foreign exchange derivatives69,466 9,385 60,081 
Total$412,809 $956 $14,963 $396,890 

    Derivative assets and liabilities with maturities of 12 months or less are recorded in other current assets and other current liabilities, respectively, on our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. Derivative assets and liabilities with maturities greater than 12 months are recorded in other assets and other liabilities, respectively, on our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets. The amount of long-term derivative assets recorded on our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, was $15.2 million and $21.2 million, respectively. The amount of long-term derivative liabilities recorded on our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, was $4.3 million and $5.4 million, respectively.

18

Derivatives Not Designated as Hedging Instruments

    The majority of our derivative instruments have not been designated as hedging instruments. The following table sets forth the pretax gains (losses) on derivatives not accounted for as hedging instruments that have been included in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three and six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020.
Three Months EndedSix Months Ended
Location of Gain (Loss)February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
(Dollars in thousands)
Commodity derivativesCost of goods sold$(191,284)$100,268 $(392,646)$142,942 
Foreign exchange derivativesCost of goods sold(30,881)(37,148)(8,240)(47,309)
Foreign exchange derivativesMarketing, general and administrative expenses(435)195 173 1,938 
Embedded derivativeOther income302 348 1,866 1,917 
Total$(222,298)$63,663 $(398,847)$99,488 

Commodity Contracts
    
    As of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, we had outstanding commodity futures and options contracts that were used as economic hedges, as well as fixed-price forward contracts related to physical purchases and sales of commodities. The table below presents the notional volumes for all outstanding commodity contracts.
 February 28, 2021August 31, 2020
LongShortLongShort
 (Units in thousands)
Grain and oilseed (bushels)851,400 1,181,716 664,673892,303
Energy products (barrels)12,560 11,779 10,0286,570
Processed grain and oilseed (tons)609 2,320 6573,304
Crop nutrients (tons)177 74127
Ocean freight (metric tons)370 1,14095
Natural gas (MMBtu)200 

Foreign Exchange Contracts

    We conduct a substantial portion of our business in U.S. dollars, but we are exposed to risks relating to foreign currency fluctuations primarily due to global grain marketing transactions in South America, the Asia Pacific region and Europe, and purchases of products from Canada. We use foreign currency derivative instruments to mitigate the impact of exchange rate fluctuations. Although we have some risk exposure related to foreign currency transactions, a larger impact with exchange rate fluctuations is the ability of foreign buyers to purchase U.S. agricultural products and the competitiveness of U.S. agricultural products compared to the same products offered by alternative sources of world supply. The notional amounts of our foreign exchange derivative contracts were $1.4 billion and $1.2 billion as of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, respectively.

Embedded Derivative Asset

    Under the terms of our strategic investment in CF Nitrogen, if the CF Industries credit rating is reduced below certain levels by two of three specified credit ratings agencies, we are entitled to receive a nonrefundable annual payment of $5.0 million from CF Industries. These payments will continue on an annual basis until the date that the CF Industries credit rating is upgraded to or above certain levels by two of the three specified credit ratings agencies or February 1, 2026, whichever is earlier.

    Since the CF Industries credit rating was reduced below the specified levels during fiscal 2017, we have received an annual payment of $5.0 million from CF Industries. Gains totaling $1.9 million were recognized in other income in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for each of the six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020.
19

The fair value of the embedded derivative asset recorded on our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet as of February 28, 2021, was equal to $15.9 million. The current and long-term portions of the embedded derivative asset are included in other current assets and other assets on our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets, respectively. See Note 12, Fair Value Measurements, for additional information regarding valuation of the embedded derivative asset.

Derivatives Designated as Cash Flow Hedging Strategies

    Certain pay-fixed, receive-variable, cash-settled swaps are designated as cash flow hedges of future crude oil purchases in our Energy segment. We also designate certain pay-variable, receive-fixed, cash-settled swaps as cash flow hedges of future refined product sales. These hedging instruments and the related hedged items are exposed to significant market price risk and potential volatility. As part of our risk management strategy, we look to hedge a portion of our expected future crude oil needs and the resulting refined product output based on prevailing futures prices, management's expectations about future commodity price changes and our risk appetite. We may also elect to dedesignate certain derivative instruments previously designated as cash flow hedges as part of our risk management strategy. Amounts recorded in other comprehensive income for these dedesignated derivative instruments remain in other comprehensive income and are recognized in earnings in the period the underlying transaction affects earnings. As of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, the aggregate notional amount of cash flow hedges was 1.5 million and 9.7 million barrels, respectively.

    The following table presents the fair value of our commodity derivative instruments designated as cash flow hedges and the line items on our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets in which they are recorded.
Derivative AssetsDerivative Liabilities
Balance Sheet LocationFebruary 28, 2021August 31,
2020
Balance Sheet LocationFebruary 28, 2021August 31,
2020
(Dollars in thousands)(Dollars in thousands)
Other current assets$11,008 $34,052 Other current liabilities$1,154 $8,821 

    The following table presents the pretax losses recorded in other comprehensive income relating to cash flow hedges for the three and six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020:
Three Months EndedSix Months Ended
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
 (Dollars in thousands)
Commodity derivatives$(2,084)$(8,130)$(110)$(15,233)

    The following table presents the pretax gains relating to cash flow hedges that were reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive loss into our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three and six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020:
Three Months EndedSix Months Ended
Location of GainFebruary 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
  (Dollars in thousands)
Commodity derivativesCost of goods sold$4,082 $2,126 $16,755 $6,978 

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Note 12        Fair Value Measurements

    ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurements, defines fair value as the price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date.

We determine fair values of derivative instruments and other assets, based on the fair value hierarchy established in ASC Topic 820, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. Observable inputs are inputs that reflect the assumptions market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability based on the best information available under the circumstances. ASC Topic 820 describes three levels within its hierarchy that may be used to measure fair value, and our assessment of relevant instruments within those levels is as follows: Level 1 inputs are quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 2 inputs include quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active, and inputs (other than quoted prices) that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs for the asset or liability. Categorization within the valuation hierarchy is based upon the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

    Recurring fair value measurements as of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, are as follows:
February 28, 2021
Quoted Prices in
Active Markets
for Identical
Assets
(Level 1)
Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level 2)
Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
(Level 3)
Total
(Dollars in thousands)
Assets    
Commodity derivatives$1,856 $989,293 $$991,149 
Foreign exchange derivatives7,302 7,302 
Deferred compensation assets49,314 49,314 
Embedded derivative asset15,865 15,865 
Segregated investments and marketable securities185,224 185,224 
Other assets5,991 5,991 
Total$242,385 $1,012,460 $$1,254,845 
Liabilities    
Commodity derivatives$4,409 $511,748 $$516,157 
Foreign exchange derivatives64,669 64,669 
Total$4,409 $576,417 $$580,826 
21

August 31, 2020
Quoted Prices in
Active Markets
for Identical
Assets
(Level 1)
Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level 2)
Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
(Level 3)
Total
(Dollars in thousands)
Assets
Commodity derivatives$5,762 $355,783 $$361,545 
Foreign exchange derivatives11,523 11,523 
Deferred compensation assets47,669 47,669 
Embedded derivative asset18,998 18,998 
Segregated investments and marketable securities85,950 85,950 
Other assets5,276 5,276 
Total$144,657 $386,304 $$530,961 
Liabilities
Commodity derivatives$6,037 $346,126 $$352,163 
Foreign exchange derivatives69,467 69,467 
Total$6,037 $415,593 $$421,630 

    Commodity and foreign exchange derivatives. Exchange-traded futures and options contracts are valued based on unadjusted quoted prices in active markets and are classified within Level 1. Our forward commodity purchase and sales contracts with fixed-price components, select ocean freight contracts and other OTC derivatives are determined using inputs that are generally based on exchange traded prices and/or recent market bids and offers, adjusted for location-specific inputs, and are classified within Level 2. Location-specific inputs are driven by local market supply and demand and are generally based on broker or dealer quotations or market transactions in either the listed or OTC markets. Changes in the fair values of these contracts are recognized in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations as a component of cost of goods sold.

    Deferred compensation and other assets. Our deferred compensation investments consist primarily of rabbi trust assets that are valued based on unadjusted quoted prices on active exchanges and are classified within Level 1. Changes in the fair values of these other assets are primarily recognized in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations as a component of marketing, general and administrative expenses.

    Embedded derivative asset. The embedded derivative asset relates to contingent payments inherent to our investment in CF Nitrogen. The inputs used in the fair value measurement include the probability of future upgrades and downgrades of the CF Industries credit rating based on historical credit rating movements of other public companies and the discount rates applied to potential annual payments based on applicable historical and current yield coupon rates. Based on these observable inputs, our fair value measurement is classified within Level 2. See Note 11, Derivative Financial Instruments and Hedging Activities, for additional information.

    Segregated investments and marketable securities. Our segregated investments and marketable securities are comprised of investments in various government agencies and U.S. Treasury securities, which are valued using quoted market prices and classified within Level 1.
    
Note 13        Commitments and Contingencies

Environmental

    We are required to comply with various environmental laws and regulations incidental to our normal business operations. To meet compliance requirements, we establish reserves for the future costs of remediation of identified issues that are both probable and can be reasonably estimated, which are included in cost of goods sold and marketing, general and administrative expenses in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations. The resolution of any such matters may affect consolidated net income for any fiscal period; however, we believe any resulting liabilities, individually or in aggregate, will not have a material effect on our condensed consolidated financial statements during any fiscal year.

22

Other Litigation and Claims

    We are involved as a defendant in various lawsuits, claims and disputes, which are in the normal course of our business. The resolution of any such matters may affect net income for any fiscal period; however, we believe any resulting liabilities, individually or in aggregate, will not have a material effect on our condensed consolidated financial statements during any fiscal year.

Guarantees

    We are a guarantor for lines of credit and performance obligations of related, nonconsolidated companies. Our bank covenants allow maximum guarantees of $1.0 billion, of which $181.3 million were outstanding on February 28, 2021. We have collateral for a portion of these contingent obligations. We have not recorded a liability related to the contingent obligations as we do not expect to pay out any cash related to them, and the fair values are considered immaterial. The underlying loans to the counterparties for which we provide these guarantees were current as of February 28, 2021.

Note 14        Leases

    We assess arrangements at inception to determine whether they contain a lease. An arrangement is considered to contain a lease if it conveys the right to control the use of an asset for a period of time in exchange for consideration. The right to control the use of an asset must include both (a) the right to obtain substantially all economic benefits associated with an identified asset and (b) the right to direct how and for what purpose the identified asset is used. Certain arrangements provide us with the right to use an identified asset; however, most of these arrangements are not considered to represent a lease as we do not control how and for what purpose the identified asset is used. For example, our supply agreements, warehousing and distribution services agreements, and transportation services agreements generally do not contain leases.

    We lease property, plant and equipment used in our operations primarily under operating lease agreements and, to a lesser extent, under finance lease agreements. Our operating leases are primarily for railcars, equipment, vehicles and office space, many of which contain renewal options and escalation clauses. Renewal options are included as part of the right of use asset and liability when it is reasonably certain that we will exercise the renewal option; however, renewal options are generally not included as we are not reasonably certain to exercise such options.

    Operating lease right of use assets and liabilities for operating leases are recognized at the lease commencement date for leases in excess of 12 months based on the present value of lease payments over the lease term. For measurement and classification of lease agreements, lease and nonlease components are grouped into a single lease component for all asset classes. Variable lease payments are excluded from measurement of right of use assets and liabilities and generally include payments for nonlease components such as maintenance costs, payments for leased assets beyond their noncancelable lease term and payments for other nonlease components such as sales tax. The discount rate used to calculate present value is our collateralized incremental borrowing rate or, if available, the rate implicit in the lease. The incremental borrowing rate is determined for each lease based primarily on its lease term. Certain lease arrangements include rental payments adjusted annually based on changes in an inflation index. Our lease arrangements generally do not contain residual value guarantees or material restrictive covenants.

    Lease expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term. The components of lease expense recognized in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations are as follows:
Three Months EndedSix Months Ended
February 28, 2021February 29, 2020February 28, 2021February 29, 2020
(Dollars in thousands)
Operating lease expense$18,060 $20,538 $35,974 $36,098 
Finance lease expense:
Amortization of assets1,890 1,073 3,945 3,262 
Interest on lease liabilities230 261 476 485 
Short-term lease expense4,068 6,317 8,424 9,660 
Variable lease expense863 710 1,541 913 
Total net lease expense*$25,111 $28,899 $50,360 $50,418 
*Income related to sub-lease activity is not material and has been excluded from the table above.

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    Supplemental balance sheet information related to operating and finance leases is as follows:
Balance Sheet LocationFebruary 28, 2021August 31, 2020
(Dollars in thousands)
Operating leases
Assets
Operating lease right of use assetsOther assets$265,684 $257,834 
Liabilities
Current operating lease liabilitiesAccrued expenses58,766 57,200 
Long-term operating lease liabilitiesOther liabilities210,440 203,691 
Total operating lease liabilities$269,206 $260,891 
Finance leases
Assets
Finance lease assetsProperty, plant and equipment$40,502 $44,860 
Liabilities
Current finance lease liabilitiesCurrent portion of long-term debt6,827 7,993 
Long-term finance lease liabilitiesLong-term debt20,379 23,467 
Total finance lease liabilities$27,206 $31,460 
Weighted average remaining lease term (in years)
Operating leases8.18.3
Finance leases6.26.0
Weighted average discount rate
Operating leases3.05 %3.11 %
Finance leases3.37 %3.33 %

    Supplemental cash flow and other information related to operating and finance leases are as follows:
Six Months Ended
February 28, 2021February 29, 2020
(Dollars in thousands)
Cash paid for amounts included in measurement of lease liabilities:
Operating cash flows from operating leases$37,460 $28,368 
Operating cash flows from finance leases476 485 
Financing cash flows from finance leases4,602 3,285 
Supplemental noncash information:
Right of use assets obtained in exchange for lease liabilities27,919 18,162 
Right of use asset modifications18,038 3,967 

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    Maturities of lease liabilities as of February 28, 2021, were as follows:
February 28, 2021
Finance LeasesOperating Leases
(Dollars in thousands)
Remainder of fiscal 2021$3,775 $35,958 
Fiscal 20227,051 62,491 
Fiscal 20236,121 48,834 
Fiscal 20243,494 38,956 
Fiscal 20252,086 28,928 
After fiscal 20258,113 105,485 
Total maturities of lease liabilities30,640 320,652 
Less amounts representing interest3,434 51,446 
Present value of future minimum lease payments27,206 269,206 
Less current lease liabilities6,827 58,766 
Long-term lease liabilities$20,379 $210,440 

Note 15        Other Current Assets and Liabilities

    Other current assets and liabilities as of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, are as follows:

February 28,
2021
August 31,
2020
Other current assets(Dollars in thousands)
Derivative assets (Note 11)$999,072 $371,195 
Margin and related deposits328,849 194,097 
Supplier advance payments515,663 198,699 
Other306,666 253,497 
Total other current assets$2,150,250 $1,017,488 
Other current liabilities
Customer margin deposits and credit balances$218,217 $149,539 
Customer advance payments1,084,039 300,100 
Derivative liabilities (Note 11)576,543 416,204 
Dividends and equity payable69,982 63,000 
Total other current liabilities$1,948,781 $928,843 
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ITEM 2.    MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

    This Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations ("MD&A") is intended to provide a reader of our financial statements with a narrative from the perspective of our management on our financial condition and results of operations, liquidity and certain other factors that may affect our future results. Our MD&A is presented in the following sections:

Overview
Business Strategy
Fiscal 2021 Second Quarter Highlights
Fiscal 2021 Trends Update
Operating Metrics
Results of Operations
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Off-Balance Sheet Financing Arrangements
Contractual Obligations
Critical Accounting Policies
Recent Accounting Pronouncements

    Our MD&A should be read in conjunction with our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended August 31, 2020 (including the information presented therein under Risk Factors), as well as the condensed consolidated financial statements and the related notes included in Item 1 of Part I of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

Overview

    CHS Inc. is a diversified company that provides grain, food, agronomy and energy resources to businesses and consumers on a global scale. As a cooperative, we are owned by farmers, ranchers and member cooperatives across the United States. We also have preferred shareholders who own our five series of preferred stock, all of which are listed and traded on the Global Select Market of The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC. We operate in the following three reportable segments:

Energy. Produces and provides primarily for the wholesale distribution and transportation of petroleum products.
Ag. Purchases and further processes or resells grains and oilseeds originated by our country operations business, by our member cooperatives and by third parties; also serves as a wholesaler and retailer of agronomy products.
Nitrogen Production. Consists solely of our equity method investment in CF Industries Nitrogen, LLC ("CF Nitrogen"), and produces and distributes nitrogen fertilizer.

    In addition, our financing and hedging businesses, along with our nonconsolidated wheat milling and food production and distribution joint ventures, have been aggregated within Corporate and Other.
    
    The condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of CHS and all subsidiaries and limited liability companies in which we have a controlling interest. The effects of all significant intercompany transactions have been eliminated.

    Corporate administrative expenses and interest are allocated to each reporting segment, along with Corporate and Other, based on direct use of services, such as information technology and legal, and other factors or considerations relevant to the costs incurred.

    Management's Focus. When evaluating our operating performance, management focuses on gross profit and income before income taxes ("IBIT"). As a company that operates heavily in global commodities, there is significant unpredictability and volatility in pricing, costs and global trade volumes. Consequently, we focus on managing the margin we can earn and the resulting IBIT. Management also focuses on ensuring balance sheet strength through appropriate management of financial liquidity, leverage, capital allocation and cash flow optimization.

    Seasonality. Many of our business activities are highly seasonal and our operating results vary throughout the year. Our revenues generally trend lower during the second and fourth fiscal quarters and higher during the first and third fiscal quarters; however, our IBIT does not necessarily follow the same trend due to weather and other events that can impact profitability. For example, in our Ag segment, our country operations business generally experiences higher volumes and revenues during the fall harvest and spring planting seasons, which generally correspond to our first and third fiscal quarters,
26

respectively. Additionally, our agronomy business generally experiences higher volumes during the spring planting season. Our global grain marketing operations are subject to fluctuations in volume and income based on producer harvests, world grain prices, demand and global trade volumes. Our Energy segment generally experiences higher volumes in certain operating areas, such as refined products, in the spring, summer and early fall when gasoline and diesel fuel use by agricultural producers is highest and is subject to global supply and demand forces. Other energy products, such as propane, generally experience higher volumes during the winter heating and fall crop-drying seasons. The graphs below depict the seasonality inherent in our businesses.
chscp-20210228_g1.jpg
chscp-20210228_g2.jpg

    Pricing and Volumes. Our revenues, assets and cash flows can be significantly affected by global market prices and sales volumes of commodities such as petroleum products, natural gas, grains, oilseed products and agronomy products. Changes in market prices for commodities we purchase without a corresponding change in the selling prices of those products can affect revenues and operating earnings. Similarly, increased or decreased sales volumes without a corresponding change in the purchase and selling prices of those products can affect revenues and operating earnings. Commodity prices and sales volumes are affected by a wide range of factors beyond our control, including weather, crop damage due to plant disease or insects, drought, availability/adequacy of supply of a commodity, availability of reliable rail and river transportation network, outbreaks of disease, government regulations and policies, global trade disputes and general political/economic conditions.

Business Strategy

    Our business strategies focus on an enterprisewide effort to create an experience that empowers customers to make CHS their first choice, expands market access to add value for our owners, and transforms and evolves our core businesses by capitalizing on changing market dynamics. To execute on these strategies, we are focused on implementing agile, efficient and sustainable new technology platforms; building robust and efficient supply chains; hiring, developing and retaining high-
27

performing, diverse and passionate teams; achieving operational excellence and continuous improvement; and maintaining a strong balance sheet.

Fiscal 2021 Second Quarter Highlights

Strong global demand drove commodity prices higher, and improved trade relations between the United States and foreign trade partners led to continued volume increases for grain and oilseed, which significantly improved earnings in our Ag segment compared to the prior year.
Although improved from the first quarter of fiscal 2021, unfavorable market conditions in our refined fuels business, driven primarily by the COVID-19 pandemic and exceptionally high costs for renewable energy credits, resulted in volume and margin declines that significantly reduced earnings compared to the prior year.
Focused cost reduction initiatives launched during the current year resulted in reduced marketing, general and administrative expenses.
A significant portion of our global employees continued with remote working arrangements. In addition to remote working arrangements, we also increased hygiene and infection-control processes at all our facilities and developed risk mitigation and exposure policies applicable to our enterprise. The costs of those activities were not material during the second quarter of fiscal 2021 and are not expected to be material for the remainder of fiscal 2021. In addition, our operations were deemed to be essential infrastructure industries by federal and state governments, which allowed us to continue operating all our facilities and operations.

Fiscal 2021 Trends Update

Our Energy and Ag segments operate in cyclical environments in which unforeseen market conditions can have significant positive or negative impacts. As with virtually all other companies in the United States, we are dealing with effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Most of our operations are considered to be essential; however, periods of depressed demand and pricing could result in decreased profitability and the need to assess for potential impairments. The rollout of COVID-19 vaccines and other efforts to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States and globally could also impact the profitability of our businesses. Refer to Item 1A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended August 31, 2020, for additional considerations of risks the COVID-19 pandemic may continue to have on our business, liquidity, capital resources and financial results.

Although improving from the lows of the prior fiscal year, the energy industry continued to experience significant volume and margin reductions. These reductions are primarily the result of the COVID-19 pandemic, which began in our second quarter of fiscal 2020 and significantly reduced our profitability. In addition, the cost of renewable energy credits has increased significantly, which negatively impacted our profitability during the second quarter of fiscal 2021. We are unable to predict how long the current environment will last or the severity of the financial and operational impacts; however, we expect uncertainty and volatility to drive unfavorable market conditions in the energy industry that will negatively impact our profitability through the remainder of fiscal 2021.

    Although challenges remain, the U.S. agricultural industry has experienced increased demand for grain and oilseed commodities following the Phase One trade agreement with China, which has resulted in increased volumes and improved commodity prices. Unforeseen global market conditions can positively or negatively impact agricultural commodity prices and volumes sold. We are unable to predict these conditions or the severity of the impact such conditions could have on our pricing and volumes. In addition to global supply and demand impacts, regional factors such as unpredictable weather conditions could impact our operations. As a result, while we expect revenues, margins and cash flows from core operations in our Ag segment to stabilize through the remainder of fiscal 2021, unforeseen global market conditions with negative impacts remain a risk that could put pressure on asset valuations in our Ag segment.

In addition to market conditions that impact our businesses, we will continue to take actions to protect our financial health while continuing to deliver on our enterprise resource planning system implementation and advance our targeted operating model, with actions that include implementing plans to substantially reduce budgeted costs and improving cash flow management with the objective of generating substantial additional operating cash flows.







28

Operating Metrics

Energy

    Our Energy segment operations primarily include our Laurel, Montana, and McPherson, Kansas, refineries, which process crude oil to produce refined products, including gasolines, distillates and other products. The following table provides information about our consolidated refinery operations.
Three Months EndedSix Months Ended
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
Refinery throughput volumes(Barrels per day)
Heavy, high-sulfur crude oil96,847 97,863 94,709 91,410 
All other crude oil56,302 75,156 58,202 76,988 
Other feedstocks and blendstocks11,744 12,671 13,791 14,978 
Total refinery throughput volumes164,893 185,690 166,702 183,376 
Refined fuel yields
Gasolines77,479 89,160 80,890 90,721 
Distillates68,916 77,714 67,376 75,321 

    We are subject to the Renewable Fuels Standard, which requires refiners to blend renewable fuels (e.g., ethanol, biodiesel) into their finished transportation fuels or purchase renewable energy credits, known as Renewable Identification Numbers ("RINs"), in lieu of blending. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency generally establishes new annual renewable fuel percentage standards for each compliance year in the preceding year. We generate RINs through our blending activities, but we cannot generate enough RINs to meet the needs of our refining capacity and RINs must be purchased on the open market. The price of RINs can be volatile, with prices for D6 ethanol RINs and D4 ethanol RINs rising by 350% and 125%, respectively, during the second quarter of fiscal 2021 compared to the same period of the prior year, which negatively impacted our profitability during the second quarter of fiscal 2021.

    In addition to our internal operational reliability, the profitability of our Energy segment is largely driven by crack spreads (i.e., the price differential between refined products and inputs such as crude oil) and Western Canadian Select ("WCS") crude oil differentials (i.e., the price differential between West Texas Intermediate ("WTI") crude oil and WCS crude oil), which are driven by the supply and demand of refined product markets. Crack spreads and the WCS crude oil differential each decreased during the three and six months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year, contributing to a significant decline in IBIT for the Energy segment. The table below provides information about average market reference prices and differentials that impact our Energy segment.    
Three Months EndedSix Months Ended
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
Market indicators
WTI crude oil (dollars per barrel)$52.74 $55.96 $46.46 $56.03 
WTI - WCS crude oil differential (dollars per barrel)$11.91 $21.56 $10.85 $17.27 
Group 3 2:1:1 crack spread (dollars per barrel)*$12.55 $13.21 $10.10 $15.84 
Group 3 5:3:2 crack spread (dollars per barrel)*$12.08 $12.37 $9.73 $14.90 
D6 ethanol RIN (dollars per RIN)$0.8745 $0.1945 $0.7115 $0.1806 
D4 ethanol RIN (dollars per RIN)$1.0385 $0.4616 $0.9245 $0.5102 
*Group 3 refers to the oil refining and distribution system serving Midwest markets from the Gulf Coast through the Plains States.








29

Ag

    Our Ag segment operations work together to facilitate production, purchase, sale and eventual use of grain and other agricultural commodities within the United States and internationally. Profitability in our Ag segment is largely driven by throughput and production volumes, as well as commodity price spreads; however, revenues and cost of goods sold ("COGS") are largely affected by market-driven commodity prices that are outside our control. The table below provides information about average market prices for agricultural commodities and our sales/throughput volumes that impacted our Ag segment for the three and six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020.
Three Months EndedSix Months Ended
Market Source*February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
Commodity prices
Corn (dollars per bushel)Chicago Board of Trade$5.29 $3.79 $4.64 $3.81 
Soybeans (dollars per bushel)Chicago Board of Trade$13.63 $9.00 $12.23 $9.00 
Wheat (dollars per bushel)Chicago Board of Trade$6.21 $5.47 $5.82 $5.32 
Urea (dollars per ton)Green Markets NOLA$293.00 $221.00 $259.00 $223.00 
Urea ammonium nitrate (dollars per ton)Green Markets NOLA$154.88 $130.00 $137.10 $141.00 
Ethanol (dollars per gallon)Chicago Platts$1.54 $1.35 $1.50 $1.42 
Volumes
Grain and oilseed (thousands of bushels)665,030 583,749 1,411,613 1,203,288 
North American grain and oilseed port throughput (thousands of bushels)218,616 127,093 438,322 263,949 
Crop nutrients (thousands of tons)1,534 1,476 3,409 3,327 
Ethanol (thousands of gallons)218,147 225,524 438,918 447,800 
*Market source information represents the average month-end price during the period.




30

Results of Operations

Three Months Ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020
Three Months Ended
February 28,
2021
% of RevenuesFebruary 29,
2020
% of Revenues
(Dollars in thousands)
Revenues$8,320,159 100.0 %$6,598,226 100.0 %
Cost of goods sold8,218,439 98.8 6,283,171 95.2 
Gross profit101,720 1.2 315,055 4.8 
Marketing, general and administrative expenses161,510 1.9 199,570 3.0 
Operating (loss) earnings(59,790)(0.7)115,485 1.8 
Interest expense28,855 0.3 33,411 0.5 
Other income(17,846)(0.2)(11,352)(0.2)
Equity income from investments(64,109)(0.8)(34,398)(0.5)
(Loss) income before income taxes(6,690)(0.1)127,824 1.9 
Income tax expense31,668 0.4 2,130 — 
Net (loss) income(38,358)(0.5)125,694 1.9 
Net (loss) income attributable to noncontrolling interests(129)— 247 — 
Net (loss) income attributable to CHS Inc. $(38,229)(0.5)%$125,447 1.9 %

    The charts below detail revenues, net of intersegment revenues, and IBIT by reportable segment for the three months ended February 28, 2021. Our Nitrogen Production reportable segment represents an equity method investment that records earnings and allocated expenses, but not revenues.
chscp-20210228_g3.jpg
chscp-20210228_g4.jpg



31

Income (Loss) Before Income Taxes by Segment

Energy
Three Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
(Loss) income before income taxes$(54,690)$138,921 $(193,611)(139.4)%

    The following waterfall analysis and commentary presents the changes in our Energy segment IBIT for the three months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year.
chscp-20210228_g5.jpg
*See commentary related to these changes in the marketing, general and administrative expenses, interest expense, other income and equity income from investments sections of this Results of Operations.

The change in Energy segment IBIT reflects the following:
Less advantageous market conditions in our refined fuels business compared to the same period of the prior year resulted in significantly lower margins and volumes. These market conditions were driven by the continued impact of the demand shocks occurring during the COVID-19 pandemic that resulted in a combination of decreased WCS crude oil differentials experienced on heavy Canadian crude oil processed by our refineries and lower crack spreads.
Significantly higher RIN prices negatively impacted margins by approximately $40.0 million.
Lower propane margins and volumes due to warmer winter weather conditions during most of the second quarter of fiscal 2021 and increased distribution costs reduced income compared to the same period during the prior year.














32

Ag
Three Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Income (loss) before income taxes$14,044 $(20,845)$34,889 167.4 %

    The following waterfall analysis and commentary presents the changes in our Ag segment IBIT for the three months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year.
chscp-20210228_g6.jpg
*See commentary related to these changes in the marketing, general and administrative expenses, interest expense, other income and equity income from investments sections of this Results of Operations.

The change in Ag segment IBIT reflects the following:
Favorable weather conditions and improved relations between the United States and foreign trade partners drove increased volumes of feed and farm supplies and grain and oilseed commodities, respectively.
Decreased marketing, general and administrative expenses associated with focused cost reduction initiatives and increased equity income from our investment in TEMCO, LLC ("TEMCO").
Decreased margins on grain and oilseed resulted from global commodity market conditions during the second quarter of fiscal 2021, including mark-to-market losses which we expect to reverse over time. The decreased margins were partially offset by improved margins for certain other agricultural products, including processing and food ingredients, which improved as a result of stronger soybean crush margins.

All Other Segments
Three Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Nitrogen Production IBIT*$11,165 $5,741 $5,424 94.5 %
Corporate and Other IBIT$22,791 $4,007 $18,784 468.8 %
*See Note 5, Investments, of the notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements that are included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for additional information.

    Our Nitrogen Production segment IBIT increased as a result of higher equity method income attributed to increased sale prices of urea, which is produced and sold by CF Nitrogen. Corporate and Other IBIT increased due to a combination of factors, including decreased marketing, general and administrative expenses as a result of focused cost-reduction initiatives, decreased interest expense due to decreased interest rates and increased equity income from our equity method investment in Ardent Mills, LLC ("Ardent Mills") as a result of increased demand for flour.
33

Revenues by Segment

Energy
Three Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Revenues$1,372,158 $1,461,050 $(88,892)(6.1)%

    The following waterfall analysis and commentary presents the changes in our Energy segment revenues for the three months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year.
chscp-20210228_g7.jpg
The change in Energy segment revenues reflects the following:
Decreased selling prices and volumes for refined fuels as a result of global market conditions, including continued impact of the demand shocks occurring during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as product mix, contributed to $100.3 million and $40.1 million decreases in revenues, respectively.
Lower volumes of propane driven by lower demand as a result of warm winter weather conditions during most of the second quarter of fiscal 2021 contributed to a $13.6 million decrease in revenues.
Lower revenues were partially offset by increased selling prices for propane as a result of global market conditions during the second quarter of fiscal 2021, which positively impacted revenue by $70.7 million.



















34

Ag
Three Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Revenues$6,938,212 $5,124,202 $1,814,010 35.4 %

    The following waterfall analysis and commentary presents the changes in our Ag segment revenues for the three months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year.
chscp-20210228_g8.jpg
The change in Ag segment revenues reflects the following:
Improved trade relations between the United States and foreign trade partners and favorable weather conditions for most of the winter compared to the same period of the prior year drove increased volumes. Stronger grain and oilseed movement contributed to a $612.5 million increase in revenues with the remaining increase being composed primarily of improved sales volumes of agronomy products and feed and farm supplies.
Due to a planned business model change at our TEMCO equity method investment to increase its operational efficiency, we experienced decreased revenues and COGS on certain transactions associated with TEMCO, which partially offset strong volume growth in grain and oilseed during the three months ended February 28, 2021.
Higher pricing for grain and oilseed was driven by increased global demand and contributed to a $937.9 million increase in revenues. The remaining price increase was attributed to a combination of mostly offsetting price increases and decreases for processing and food ingredients, feed and farm supplies and agronomy products, which fluctuated as a result of global market conditions and product mix.

All Other Segments
Three Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Corporate and Other revenues*$9,789 $12,974 $(3,185)(24.5)%
*Our Nitrogen Production reportable segment represents an equity method investment that records earnings and allocated expenses, but not revenues.
    
    Corporate and Other revenues decreased during the three months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year as a result of lower revenues in our financing business due to market-driven interest rate reductions.


35

Cost of Goods Sold by Segment

Energy
Three Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Cost of goods sold$1,380,045 $1,270,092 $109,953 8.7 %
    
    The following waterfall analysis and commentary presents the changes in our Energy segment COGS for the three months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year.
chscp-20210228_g9.jpg
The change in Energy segment COGS reflects the following:
Increased costs for propane as a result of global market conditions and increased distribution costs resulted in an $85.0 million increase of COGS.
Increased costs for refined fuels as a result of global market conditions contributed to a $75.5 million increase of COGS, the majority of which related to the impact of significantly higher RIN prices.
Decreased volumes of refined fuels and propane contributed to $34.7 million and $12.1 million decreases of COGS, respectively. Decreased refined fuels volumes were driven by the continued impact of the demand shocks occurring during the COVID-19 pandemic. Decreased propane volumes were due to lower demand that resulted from warm winter weather conditions during most of the second quarter of fiscal 2021.


















36

Ag
Three Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Cost of goods sold$6,841,093 $5,012,580 $1,828,513 36.5 %
    
    The following waterfall analysis and commentary presents the changes in our Ag segment COGS for the three months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year.
chscp-20210228_g10.jpg
The change in Ag segment COGS reflects the following:
Volume increases in the Ag segment resulted primarily from improved trade relations between the United States and foreign trade partners and favorable weather conditions during the winter compared to the same period of the prior year. Stronger grain and oilseed movement contributed to a $606.3 million increase of COGS with the remaining increase being composed primarily of improved sales volumes of agronomy products and feed and farm supplies.
Due to a planned business model change at our TEMCO equity method investment to increase its operational efficiency, we experienced decreased revenues and COGS on certain transactions associated with TEMCO, which partially offset strong volume growth in grain and oilseed during the three months ended February 28, 2021.
Higher pricing for grain and oilseed resulted from increased global demand and contributed to a $1.0 billion increase of COGS. Changes in costs for other agricultural products were mostly offsetting and driven by a combination of global market conditions and product mix.

All Other Segments
Three Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Nitrogen Production COGS$422 $996 $(574)(57.6)%
Corporate and Other COGS$(3,121)$(498)$(2,623)(526.7)%

    There were no significant changes to COGS in our Nitrogen Production segment or Corporate and Other during the three months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year.






37

Marketing, General and Administrative Expenses
Three Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Marketing, general and administrative expenses$161,510 $199,570 $(38,060)(19.1)%
    
    Marketing, general and administrative expenses decreased during the three months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the three months ended February 29, 2020, due to decreased employee-related expenses, lower bad debt expenses and various cost reduction initiatives launched during the current year.

Interest Expense
Three Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Interest expense$28,855 $33,411 $(4,556)(13.6)%

    Interest expense decreased during the three months ended February 28, 2021, as a result of lower interest rates compared to the same period of the prior year.

Other Income
Three Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Other income$17,846 $11,352 $6,494 57.2 %

    Other income increased during the three months ended February 28, 2021, primarily due to an investment gain that did not occur during the same period of the prior year.

Equity Income from Investments
Three Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Equity income from investments*$64,109 $34,398 $29,711 86.4 %
*See Note 5, Investments, of the notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements that are included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for additional information.

    We record equity income or loss for investments in which we have an ownership interest of 50% or less and have significant influence, but not control, for our proportionate share of income or loss reported by the entity, without consolidating the revenues and expenses of the entity in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations. Equity income from investments increased during the three months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year, primarily due to increased equity income associated with our equity method investment in TEMCO, which experienced a significant increase in volumes and profitability with increased trade flows to China. In addition, TEMCO changed its business model during the three months ended February 28, 2021, which has improved its operating efficiency. CF Nitrogen and Ardent Mills experienced higher equity income during the second quarter of fiscal 2021 as a result of higher urea prices and increased demand for flour, respectively.







38

Income Tax Expense
Three Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Income tax expense$31,668 $2,130 $29,538 1,386.8 %

    Increased income tax expense during the three months ended February 28, 2021, primarily reflected changes in the mix of full-year earnings projected across business units and equity management assumptions. Effective tax rates for the three months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020, were (473.4)% and 1.7%, respectively. Federal and state statutory rates applied to nonpatronage business activity were 24.9% and 24.7% for the three months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020, respectively. Income taxes and effective tax rate vary each year based on profitability and nonpatronage business activity during each of the comparable years.


39

Six Months Ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020
Six Months Ended
February 28,
2021
% of RevenuesFebruary 29,
2020
% of Revenues
(Dollars in thousands)
Revenues$17,035,802 100.0 %$14,219,711 100.0 %
Cost of goods sold16,755,978 98.4 13,579,113 95.5 
Gross profit279,824 1.6 640,598 4.5 
Marketing, general and administrative expenses332,171 1.9 367,901 2.6 
Operating (loss) earnings(52,347)(0.3)272,697 1.9 
Interest expense53,905 0.3 68,382 0.5 
Other income(30,470)(0.2)(24,850)(0.2)
Equity income from investments(114,132)(0.7)(84,060)(0.6)
Income before income taxes38,350 0.2 313,225 2.2 
Income tax expense7,339 — 8,794 0.1 
Net income31,011 0.2 304,431 2.1 
Net (loss) income attributable to noncontrolling interests(431)— 1,102 — 
Net income attributable to CHS Inc. $31,442 0.2 %$303,329 2.1 %
    
The charts below detail revenues, net of intersegment revenues, and IBIT by reportable segment for the six months ended February 28, 2021. Our Nitrogen Production reportable segment represents an equity method investment that records earnings and allocated expenses, but not revenues.
chscp-20210228_g11.jpg
chscp-20210228_g12.jpg





40

Income (Loss) Before Income Taxes by Segment

Energy
Six Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Income (loss) before income taxes$(121,867)$301,074 $(422,941)(140.5)%
    
The following waterfall analysis and commentary presents the changes in our Energy segment IBIT for the six months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year.
chscp-20210228_g13.jpg
*See commentary related to these changes in the marketing, general and administrative expenses, interest expense, other income and equity income from investments sections of this Results of Operations.

The change in Energy segment IBIT reflects the following:
Less advantageous market conditions in our refined fuels business compared to the same period of the prior year resulted in significantly lower margins and volumes. These market conditions were driven by continued impact of the demand shocks occurring during the COVID-19 pandemic, which resulted in a combination of decreased crack spreads and decreased WCS crude oil differentials experienced on heavy Canadian crude oil processed by our refineries.
Significantly higher RIN prices negatively impacted margins by approximately $63.0 million.
Lower propane margins due to the reversal of hedging gains recognized during the prior year and reduced propane volumes as a result of warmer, drier fall and winter weather conditions during fiscal 2021 reduced income compared to the same period during the prior year.













41

Ag
Six Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Income (loss) before income taxes$97,053 $(34,707)$131,760 379.6 %
    
The following waterfall analysis and commentary presents the changes in our Ag segment IBIT for the six months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year.
chscp-20210228_g14.jpg
*See commentary related to these changes in the marketing, general and administrative expenses, interest expense, other income and equity income from investments sections of this Results of Operations.

The change in Ag segment IBIT reflects the following:
Improved relations between the United States and foreign trade partners drove increased volumes of grain and oilseed commodities.
Favorable weather conditions during the fall harvest and winter compared to the prior year contributed to increased volumes and margins across much of our Ag segment, particularly feed and farm supplies and processing food and ingredients. These improved margins were partially offset by decreased grain and oilseed margins, including mark-to-market losses which we expect to reverse over time.
We saw decreased marketing, general and administrative expenses associated with focused cost-reduction initiatives and increased equity income from our investment in TEMCO.

All Other Segments
Six Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Nitrogen Production IBIT*$15,635 $22,191 $(6,556)(29.5)%
Corporate and Other IBIT$47,529 $24,667 $22,862 92.7 %
*See Note 5, Investments, of the notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements that are included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for additional information.

    Although urea and UAN margins improved during the second quarter of fiscal 2021, our Nitrogen Production segment experienced decreased IBIT due to lower equity method income attributed to reduced sale prices of UAN and increased natural gas costs, which were partially offset by increased sale prices of urea. Corporate and Other IBIT increased primarily due to decreased marketing, general and administrative expenses as a result of focused cost reduction efforts, decreased interest expense due to decreased interest rates and increased equity income from our equity method investment in Ardent Mills as a result of increased demand for flour.
42

Revenues by Segment

Energy
Six Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Revenues$2,630,005 $3,356,473 $(726,468)(21.6)%
    
The following waterfall analysis and commentary presents the changes in our Energy segment revenues for the six months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year.
chscp-20210228_g15.jpg
The change in Energy segment revenues reflects the following:
Decreased selling prices and volumes for refined fuels as a result of global market conditions, including the continued impact of the demand shocks occurring during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as product mix, contributed to $590.0 million and $117.0 million decreases in revenues, respectively.
Decreased volumes of propane resulting from lower demand due to warm and drier weather conditions during the fall and winter contributed to a $75.1 million decrease in revenues. This decrease was partially offset by higher selling prices for propane as a result of global market conditions during fiscal 2021, which resulted in a $73.1 million increase of revenues.



















43

Ag
Six Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Revenues$14,383,614 $10,836,057 $3,547,557 32.7 %
    
The following waterfall analysis and commentary presents the changes in our Ag segment revenues for the six months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year.
chscp-20210228_g16.jpg
The change in Ag segment revenues reflects the following:
Trade relations improved between the United States and foreign trade partners and weather conditions were more favorable during the fall harvest and winter compared to the same period of the prior year. Stronger grain and oilseed shipments contributed to a $1.7 billion increase in revenues with the remaining increase being composed primarily of improved sales volumes of agronomy products and feed and farm supplies.
Due to a planned business model change at our TEMCO equity method investment to increase its operational efficiency, we experienced decreased revenues and COGS on certain transactions associated with TEMCO, which partially offset strong volume growth in grain and oilseed during fiscal 2021.
Higher pricing for grain and oilseed was driven by increased global demand and contributed to a $1.6 billion increase in revenues. The price increase attributed to grain and oilseed was partially offset by feed and farm supplies price decreases, which were the result of improved global market conditions and product mix.

All Other Segments
Six Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Corporate and Other revenues*$22,183 $27,181 $(4,998)(18.4)%
*Our Nitrogen Production reportable segment represents an equity method investment that records earnings and allocated expenses, but not revenues.
    
    Corporate and Other revenues decreased during the six months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year as a result of lower revenues in our financing business due to market-driven interest rate reductions.


44

Cost of Goods Sold by Segment

Energy
Six Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Cost of goods sold$2,661,087 $2,956,254 $(295,167)(10.0)%
    
    The following waterfall analysis and commentary presents the changes in our Energy segment COGS for the six months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year.
chscp-20210228_g17.jpg
The change in Energy segment COGS reflects the following:
Decreased costs and volumes for refined fuels as a result of global market conditions, including the continued impact of demand shocks occurring during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as product mix, contributed to $231.9 million and $104.3 million decreases of COGS, respectively. The decreased COGS for refined fuels was partially offset by significantly higher costs for RINs of approximately $63.0 million.
Lower volumes of propane contributed to a $62.5 million decrease of COGS, which were driven by lower demand that resulted from warm and drier weather conditions during the fall harvest and winter heating season.
Global market conditions, reversal of hedging gains recognized during the prior year and elevated costs contributed to a $120.5 million increase of COGS for propane that partially offset the decreased costs for refined fuels.


















45

Ag
Six Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Cost of goods sold$14,101,435 $10,622,780 $3,478,655 32.7 %
    
    The following waterfall analysis and commentary presents the changes in our Ag segment COGS for the six months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year.
chscp-20210228_g18.jpg
The change in Ag segment COGS reflects the following:
Improved trade relations between the United States and foreign trade partners and favorable weather conditions during the fall harvest and winter compared to the same period of the prior year drove volumes higher. Stronger grain and oilseed shipments contributed to a $1.8 billion increase of COGS with the remaining increase being composed primarily of improved volumes of agronomy products and feed and farm supplies.
Due to a planned business model change at our TEMCO equity method investment to increase its operational efficiency, we experienced decreased revenues and COGS on certain transactions associated with TEMCO, which partially offset strong volume growth in grain and oilseed during fiscal 2021.
Higher prices for grain and oilseed resulted from increased global demand and contributed to a $1.6 billion increase of COGS. The price increase attributed to grain and oilseed was partially offset by price decreases for feed and farm supplies, which were driven by global market conditions and product mix.

All Other Segments
Six Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Nitrogen Production COGS$843 $1,534 $(691)(45.0)%
Corporate and Other COGS$(7,387)$(1,455)$(5,932)407.7%

    There were no significant changes to COGS in our Nitrogen Production segment or Corporate and Other during the six months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year.






46

Marketing, General and Administrative Expenses
Six Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Marketing, general and administrative expenses$332,171 $367,901 $(35,730)(9.7)%
    
    Marketing, general and administrative expenses decreased during the six months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the six months ended February 29, 2020, due to lower employee-related expenses, lower bad debt expenses and focused cost reduction initiatives launched during the current year.

Interest Expense
Six Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Interest expense$53,905 $68,382 $(14,477)(21.2)%
    
Interest expense decreased during the six months ended February 28, 2021, as a result of lower interest rates compared to the same period of the prior year.

Other Income
Six Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Other income$30,470 $24,850 $5,620 22.6 %
    
Other income increased during the six months ended February 28, 2021, primarily due to investment gains that did not occur during the same period of the prior year.

Equity Income from Investments
Six Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Equity income from investments*$114,132 $84,060 $30,072 35.8 %
*See Note 5, Investments, of the notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements that are included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for additional information.

    We record equity income or loss for investments in which we have an ownership interest of 50% or less and have significant influence, but not control, for our proportionate share of income or loss reported by the entity, without consolidating the revenues and expenses of the entity in our Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations. Equity income from investments increased during the six months ended February 28, 2021, compared to the same period during the prior year, primarily due to increased equity income associated with our equity method investment in TEMCO, which experienced a significant increase in volumes and profitability with increased trade flows to China. In addition, TEMCO changed its business model during the six months ended February 28, 2021, which has improved its operating efficiency.









47

Income Tax Expense
Six Months EndedChange
February 28,
2021
February 29,
2020
DollarsPercent
 (Dollars in thousands)
Income tax expense$7,339 $8,794 $(1,455)(16.5)%
    
Decreased income tax expense during the six months ended February 28, 2021, primarily reflects changes in the mix of full-year earnings projected across business units and equity management assumptions, as well as tax benefits related to an intercompany transfer of assets for tax planning. Effective tax rates for the six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020, were 19.1% and 2.8%, respectively. Federal and state statutory rates applied to nonpatronage business activity were 24.9% and 24.7% for the six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020, respectively. Income taxes and effective tax rate vary each year based on profitability and nonpatronage business activity during each of the comparable years.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Summary

    In assessing our financial condition, we consider factors such as working capital and internal benchmarking related to our applicable covenants and other financial criteria. We fund our operations primarily through a combination of cash flows from operations supplemented with borrowings under our revolving credit facility. We fund our capital expenditures and growth primarily through cash, operating cash flow and long-term debt financing.

    On February 28, 2021, we had working capital, defined as current assets less current liabilities, of $1.4 billion, and a current ratio, defined as current assets divided by current liabilities, of 1.2 compared to working capital of $1.3 billion and a current ratio of 1.3 on August 31, 2020. On February 29, 2020, we had working capital of $1.1 billion and a current ratio of 1.2 compared to working capital of $1.1 billion and a current ratio of 1.2 on August 31, 2019. Working capital and the current ratio may not be computed the same as similarly titled measures used by other companies. We believe this information is meaningful to investors as a measure of operational efficiency and short-term financial health.

    As of February 28, 2021, we had cash and cash equivalents of $217.7 million, total equities of $8.7 billion, long-term debt (including current maturities) of $1.8 billion and notes payable of $3.0 billion. Our capital allocation priorities include maintaining the safety and compliance of our operations, paying interest on debt and preferred stock dividends, returning cash to our member-owners in the form of cash patronage and equity redemptions, and taking advantage of strategic opportunities that benefit our owners. We will continue to consider opportunities to further diversify and enhance our sources and amounts of liquidity. We believe cash generated by operating and investing activities, along with available borrowing capacity under our credit facilities, will be sufficient to support our operations for the foreseeable future and we expect to remain in compliance with our loan covenants.

    As we continue to navigate the impact of COVID-19 on our business and operations, we have strengthened our liquidity through a variety of means, including curtailing certain spending and reprioritizing capital expenditures. We are actively managing our short-term and long-term liquidity.

48

Fiscal 2021 and 2020 Activity

On February 19, 2021, we amended our 10-year term loan facility to convert the entire $366.0 million aggregate principle amount outstanding thereunder into a revolving loan, which can be paid down and readvanced in an amount up to the referenced $366.0 million until February 19, 2022. On February 19, 2022, the total funded loan balance outstanding reverts to a nonrevolving term loan that is payable on September 4, 2025. There was no balance outstanding under this facility as of February 28, 2021.

On August 14, 2020, we entered into a Note Purchase Agreement to borrow $375.0 million of debt in the form of notes. The notes under this Note Purchase Agreement are structured in four series with maturities ranging from 7 to 15 years and interest accruing at rates ranging from 3.24% to 3.73%, subject to certain adjustments depending on our ratio of consolidated funded debt to consolidated cash flow. The funding of these notes took place on November 2, 2020. This funding is being used to pay debt maturities and manage liquidity.

    We have a receivables and loans securitization facility ("Securitization Facility") with certain unaffiliated financial institutions ("Purchasers"). Under the Securitization Facility, we and certain of our subsidiaries ("Originators") sell trade accounts and notes receivable ("Receivables") to Cofina Funding, LLC ("Cofina"), a wholly-owned bankruptcy-remote indirect subsidiary of CHS. Cofina in turn transfers the Receivables to the Purchasers and this arrangement is accounted for as a secured borrowing. We use the proceeds from the sale of Receivables under the Securitization Facility for general corporate purposes and settlements are made on a monthly basis. The amount available under the Securitization Facility fluctuates over time based on the total amount of eligible Receivables generated during the normal course of business. As of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, total availability under the Securitization Facility was $538.0 million and $423.0 million, respectively, all of which had been utilized.

    We also have a repurchase facility ("Repurchase Facility") related to the Securitization Facility. Under the Repurchase Facility, we can borrow up to $150.0 million, collateralized by a subordinated note issued by Cofina in favor of the Originators and representing a portion of the outstanding balance of the Receivables sold by the Originators to Cofina under the Securitization Facility. As of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, the outstanding balance under the Repurchase Facility was $150.0 million.

    On September 24, 2020, the Securitization Facility and Repurchase Facility were amended, increasing the maximum availability under the Securitization Facility to $600.0 million from $500.0 million and extending their respective termination dates to July 30, 2021.

Cash Flows

    The following table presents summarized cash flow data for the six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020:
Six Months EndedChange
February 28, 2021February 29, 2020Dollars
 (Dollars in thousands)
Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities$(1,134,545)$301,598 $(1,436,143)
Net cash used in investing activities(69,618)(165)(69,453)
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities1,319,720 (279,547)1,599,267 
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents1,026 (5,613)6,639 
Increase in cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash$116,583 $16,273 $100,310 

    Cash flows from operating activities can fluctuate significantly from period to period as a result of various factors, including seasonality and timing differences associated with purchases, sales, taxes and other business decisions. The $1.4 billion decrease in cash provided by operating activities reflects decreased net income during fiscal 2021 compared to the same period of the prior fiscal year and working capital increases, primarily associated with increased receivables and inventories.

49

    The $69.5 million increase in cash used in investing activities primarily reflects timing differences associated with borrowings and payments for CHS Capital notes receivable balances during fiscal 2021 compared to the same period during fiscal 2020.

    The $1.6 billion increase in cash provided by financing activities primarily reflects increased net cash inflows associated with our notes payable and long-term debt facilities, including the $375.0 million Note Purchase Agreement funding during the first quarter of fiscal 2021.

Future Uses of Cash

    We expect to utilize cash and cash equivalents, cash generated by operating activities and cash raised through the Note Purchase Agreement to fund capital expenditures, major maintenance, debt and interest payments, preferred stock dividends, patronage and equity redemptions. The following is a summary of our primary cash requirements for fiscal 2021:

Capital expenditures. We expect total capital expenditures for fiscal 2021 to be approximately $467.5 million, compared to capital expenditures of $418.4 million in fiscal 2020. During the six months ended February 28, 2021, we acquired property, plant and equipment of $164.6 million.
Debt and interest. We expect to repay approximately $555.3 million of long-term debt and finance lease obligations and incur interest payments related to long-term debt of approximately $73.7 million during fiscal 2021. During the six months ended February 28, 2021, we repaid $20.0 million of scheduled long-term debt maturities and an additional $366.0 million of long-term debt maturities.
Preferred stock dividends. We had approximately $2.3 billion of preferred stock outstanding on February 28, 2021. We expect to pay dividends on our preferred stock of approximately $168.7 million during fiscal 2021.
Patronage. Our Board of Directors authorized approximately $30.0 million of our fiscal 2020 patronage-sourced earnings to be paid to our member-owners during fiscal 2021.
Equity redemptions. Our Board of Directors has authorized equity redemptions of $38.0 million to be distributed in fiscal 2021 in the form of redemptions of qualified and nonqualified equity owned by individual producer members and association members. During the six months ended February 28, 2021, we redeemed $12.5 million of member equity.

Future Sources of Cash
    
    We fund our current operations primarily through a combination of cash flows from operations and committed and uncommitted revolving credit facilities, including our Securitization Facility and Repurchase Facility. We believe these sources will provide adequate liquidity to meet our working capital needs. We fund certain of our long-term capital needs, primarily those related to acquisitions of property, plant and equipment, with cash flows from operations and by issuing long-term debt and term loans. In addition, our wholly-owned subsidiary, CHS Capital, makes loans to member cooperatives, businesses and individual producers of agricultural products included in our cash flows from investing activities and has financing sources as detailed below in "CHS Capital Financing."

Working Capital Financing

    We finance our working capital needs through committed and uncommitted lines of credit with domestic and international banks. We believe our current cash balances and available capacity on our committed lines of credit will provide adequate liquidity to meet our working capital needs. The following table summarizes our primary committed line of credit as of February 28, 2021:
Primary Revolving
Credit Facilities
MaturitiesTotal CapacityBorrowings OutstandingInterest Rates
(Fiscal Year)(Dollars in thousands)
Committed five-year unsecured facility2024$2,750,000 $1,265,000 LIBOR or base rate + 0.00% to 1.55%

    Our primary line of credit is a five-year unsecured revolving credit facility with a syndicate of domestic and international banks. The credit facility provides a committed amount of $2.75 billion that expires on July 16, 2024. We also maintain certain uncommitted bilateral facilities to support our working capital needs with borrowings outstanding of $475.0 million as of February 28, 2021.

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    In addition to our facilities above, our wholly-owned subsidiaries CHS Europe S.a.r.l. and CHS Agronegocio Industria e Comercio Ltda have lines of credit with $325.7 million outstanding as of February 28, 2021, and our other international subsidiaries have lines of credit with $108.0 million outstanding as of February 28, 2021.
    
Long-term Debt Financing

    The following table presents summarized long-term debt data (including current maturities) as of February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020:
February 28,
2021
August 31,
2020
 (Dollars in thousands)
Private placement debt$1,715,576 $1,363,725 
Bank financing— 366,000 
Finance lease obligations27,206 31,460 
Other notes and contract payable33,787 34,709 
Deferred financing costs(4,464)(4,771)
$1,772,105 $1,791,123 

CHS Capital Financing
    
    For a description of the Securitization Facility and the Repurchase Facility, see above in "Fiscal 2021 and 2020 Activity."    

    CHS Capital sells loan commitments it has originated to Compeer Financial, PCA, d/b/a ProPartners Financial on a recourse basis. Total outstanding commitments under the program were $150.0 million as of February 28, 2021, of which $6.9 million was borrowed with an interest rate of 1.37%.

    CHS Capital borrows funds under short-term notes issued as part of a surplus funds program. Borrowings under this program are unsecured and bear interest at variable rates ranging from 0.10% to 1.40% as of February 28, 2021, and are due upon demand. Borrowings under these notes totaled $82.4 million as of February 28, 2021.

Covenants    

    Our long-term debt is mostly unsecured; however, restrictive covenants under various debt agreements require maintenance of minimum consolidated net worth and other financial ratios. We were in compliance with all debt covenants and restrictions as of February 28, 2021. Based on our current fiscal 2021 projections, we expect continued covenant compliance.

    All outstanding private placement notes conform to financial covenants applicable to those of our amended and restated five-year unsecured revolving credit facility. The notes provide that if our ratio of consolidated funded debt to consolidated cash flows is greater than 3.0 to 1.0, the interest rate on outstanding notes will be increased between 0.25% and 1.00%, depending on the related note series, the actual ratio and/or whether the notes have an investment grade rating from a nationally recognized statistical rating organization, until the ratio becomes 3.0 to 1.0, or less. During the three months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020, our ratio of consolidated funded debt to consolidated cash flows remained below 3.0 to 1.0.

Patronage and Equity Redemptions

    In accordance with our bylaws and by action of our Board of Directors, annual net earnings from patronage sources are distributed to consenting patrons following the close of each fiscal year and are based on financial performance. During the six months ended February 28, 2021, we distributed $21.4 million of cash patronage related to the year ended August 31, 2020. During the six months ended February 29, 2020, we distributed cash patronage of $90.0 million.

    In accordance with authorization from our Board of Directors, we expect total cash redemptions related to the year ended August 31, 2020, which will be distributed in fiscal 2021, to be approximately $38.0 million and to include redemptions of qualified and nonqualified equity owned by individual producer members and association members. During the six months ended February 28, 2021, $12.5 million of that amount was redeemed in cash, compared to $8.8 million redeemed in cash during the six months ended February 29, 2020.
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Preferred Stock    
    
    Dividends paid on our preferred stock during the six months ended February 28, 2021, and February 29, 2020, were $84.3 million. The following is a summary of our outstanding preferred stock as of February 28, 2021, all shares of which are listed on the Global Select Market of The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC:
Nasdaq SymbolIssuance DateShares OutstandingRedemption ValueNet Proceeds (a)Dividend Rate
 (b) (c)
Dividend Payment FrequencyRedeemable Beginning (d)
(Dollars in millions)
8% Cumulative RedeemableCHSCP(e)12,272,003 $306.8 $311.2 8.00 %Quarterly7/18/2023
Class B Cumulative Redeemable, Series 1CHSCO(f)21,459,066 $536.5 $569.3 7.875 %Quarterly9/26/2023
Class B Reset Rate Cumulative Redeemable, Series 2CHSCN3/11/201416,800,000 $420.0 $406.2 7.10 %Quarterly3/31/2024
Class B Reset Rate Cumulative Redeemable, Series 3CHSCM9/15/201419,700,000 $492.5 $476.7 6.75 %Quarterly9/30/2024
Class B Cumulative Redeemable, Series 4CHSCL1/21/201520,700,000 $517.5 $501.0 7.50 %Quarterly1/21/2025
(a) Includes patron equities redeemed with preferred stock.
(b) Class B Reset Rate Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock, Series 2, accumulates dividends at a rate of 7.10% per year until March 31, 2024, and then at a rate equal to the three-month LIBOR plus 4.298%, not to exceed 8.00% per annum, subsequent to March 31, 2024.
(c) Class B Reset Rate Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock, Series 3, accumulates dividends at a rate of 6.75% per year until September 30, 2024, and then at a rate equal to the three-month LIBOR plus 4.155%, not to exceed 8.00% per annum, subsequent to September 30, 2024.
(d) Preferred stock is redeemable for cash at our option, in whole or in part, at a per-share price equal to the per-share liquidation preference of $25.00 per share, plus all dividends accumulated and unpaid on that share to and including the date of redemption, beginning on the dates set forth in this column.
(e) The 8% Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock was issued at various times from 2002 through 2010.
(f) Shares of Class B Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock, Series 1, were issued on September 26, 2013; August 25, 2014; March 31, 2016; and March 30, 2017.

Off-Balance Sheet Financing Arrangements

    Guarantees

    We are a guarantor for lines of credit and performance obligations of related companies. As of February 28, 2021, our bank covenants allowed maximum guarantees of $1.0 billion, of which $181.3 million were outstanding. We have collateral for a portion of these contingent obligations. We have not recorded a liability related to the contingent obligations as we do not expect to pay out any cash related to them, and the fair values are considered immaterial. The underlying loans to the counterparties for which we provide guarantees were current as of February 28, 2021.     

Debt

    We have no material off-balance sheet debt.

Loan Participations

    We engaged in off-balance sheet arrangements through certain loan participation agreements. Refer to further details about these arrangements in Note 3, Receivables, of the notes to the consolidated financial statements in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended August 31, 2020.

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Contractual Obligations

    Our contractual obligations presented in Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended August 31, 2020, have not materially changed during the six months ended February 28, 2021.

Critical Accounting Policies

    Other than as described within the Significant Accounting Policies section of Note 1, Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies, to our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, our critical accounting policies as presented in Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended August 31, 2020, have not materially changed during the six months ended February 28, 2021.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements
    
    See Note 1, Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies, to our unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for a description of recent accounting pronouncements that apply to us.

ITEM 3.     QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

    We did not experience material changes in market risk exposures for the period ended February 28, 2021, that would affect the quantitative and qualitative disclosures presented in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended August 31, 2020.

ITEM 4.    CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures    
    
    Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934), as of February 28, 2021. Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that, as of that date, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective.

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
    
There have been no changes in internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended February 28, 2021, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect our internal control over financial reporting.

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PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

ITEM 1.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

    We are involved as a defendant in various lawsuits, claims and disputes, which are in the normal course of our business. The resolution of any such matters may affect consolidated net income for any fiscal period; however, our management believes any resulting liabilities, individually or in aggregate, will not have a material effect on our condensed consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows during any fiscal year.

Between January 8, 2021, and March 16, 2021, a total of 21 putative class action lawsuits were filed in the United States District Courts for the District of Idaho, the Southern District of Illinois, the District of Kansas, the District of Minnesota and the Eastern District of Pennsylvania naming us and several other crop protection manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers, including BASF Corporation; Bayer CropScience, LP; Bayer CropScience, Inc.; Cargill Incorporated; Corteva, Inc.; Federated Co–Operatives Ltd.; GROWMARK FS, LLC, GROWMARK, Inc.; Nutrien AG Solutions Inc.; Simplot AB Retail Sub, Inc.; Syngenta Corporation; Tenkoz, Inc.; Univar Solutions, Inc.; and Winfield Solutions, LLC, as defendants. The lawsuits allege that the defendants violated various federal and state laws, including antitrust, unfair competition, consumer protection and unjust enrichment laws by conspiring to maintain supracompetitive prices in seeds and crop protection chemicals, such as fungicides, herbicides and insecticides ("Crop Inputs"), and to engage in a group boycott intended to prevent companies utilizing electronic sales platforms from competing in the Crop Inputs retail sales market, thereby harming farmers. The plaintiffs in the lawsuits seek to represent all persons or entities in the United States that, since January 1, 2014, have purchased a Crop Input manufactured by a defendant from either a defendant or other retailer. The lawsuits seek treble damages and injunctive and other relief. It is currently too early in the litigation to evaluate the likelihood of any particular outcome or of any estimate of the amount or range of potential loss.
    
ITEM 1A.     RISK FACTORS

    There have been no material changes from the risk factors disclosed in Item 1A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended August 31, 2020.

ITEM 6.     EXHIBITS
ExhibitDescription
Amendment No. 4 to the CHS Inc. Deferred Compensation Plan (2015 Restatement).
Amendment No. 6 to the CHS Inc. Deferred Compensation Plan (2015 Restatement).
Amendment No. 3 to 2015 Credit Agreement (10–Year Term Loan), dated as of February 19, 2021, by and among CHS Inc., CoBank, ACB, for its own benefit as a syndication party and as the administrative agent for the benefit of the present and future syndication parties, and the other syndication parties party thereto. (Incorporated by reference to our Current Report on Form 8-K filed February 24, 2021).
Certification of the Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
Certification of the Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
Certification of the Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
Certification of the Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as Adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
101.INSXBRL Instance Document (the instance document does not appear in the Interactive Data File because its XBRL tags are embedded within the Inline XBRL document).
101.SCHXBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document.
101.CALXBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document.
101.DEFXBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document.
101.LABXBRL Taxonomy Extension Labels Linkbase Document.
101.PREXBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document.
104Cover Page Interactive Data File (Formatted as Inline XBRL and contained in Exhibit 101).


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SIGNATURES

    Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

CHS Inc.
(Registrant)
Date:April 7, 2021By:/s/ Olivia Nelligan
Olivia Nelligan
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer




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