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ISBA ISABELLA BANK

Filed: 29 Apr 21, 12:07pm

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
Quarterly Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of The Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2021
or
Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of The Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the transition period from                     to                     
Commission File Number: 0-18415
Isabella Bank Corporation
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Michigan38-2830092
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
401 N. Main StMt. Pleasant MI48858
(Address of principal executive offices)(Zip code)
(989) 772-9471
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
N/A
(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each classTrading Symbol(s)Name of each exchange on which registered
NoneN/AN/A
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.      Yes      No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).      Yes      No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filerAccelerated filer
Non-accelerated filerSmaller reporting company
Emerging growth company
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).   Yes   ☒  No
The number of common shares outstanding of the registrant’s Common Stock (no par value) was 7,950,438 as of April 27, 2021.


ISABELLA BANK CORPORATION
QUARTERLY REPORT ON FORM 10-Q
Table of Contents
2

Forward Looking Statements
This report contains certain forward looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Rule 175 promulgated thereunder, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended and Rule 3b-6 promulgated thereunder. We intend such forward looking statements to be covered by the safe harbor provisions for forward looking statements contained in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, and are included in this statement for purposes of these safe harbor provisions. Forward looking statements, which are based on certain assumptions and describe future plans, strategies and expectations, are generally identifiable by use of the words “believe”, “expect”, “intend”, “anticipate”, “estimate”, “project”, or similar expressions. Our ability to predict results or the actual effect of future plans or strategies is inherently uncertain. Factors which could have a material adverse effect on our operations and future prospects include, but are not limited to, changes in: interest rates, general economic conditions, federal or state tax laws, monetary and fiscal policy, a health crisis, the quality or composition of the loan or investment portfolio, demand for loan products, fluctuation in the value of collateral securing our loan portfolio, deposit flows, competition, cybersecurity risk, demand for financial services in our market area, and accounting principles, policies and guidelines. These risks and uncertainties should be considered in evaluating forward looking statements and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements. Further information concerning our business, including additional factors that could materially affect our consolidated financial results, is included in our filings with the SEC.
Glossary of Acronyms and Abbreviations
The acronyms and abbreviations identified below may be used throughout this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q or in our other SEC filings. You may find it helpful to refer back to this page while reading this report.
ACL: Allowance for credit lossesFTE: Fully taxable equivalent
AFS: Available-for-saleGAAP: U.S. generally accepted accounting principles
ALCO: Asset-Liability CommitteeIFRS: International Financial Reporting Standards
ALLL: Allowance for loan and lease lossesIRR: Interest rate risk
AOCI: Accumulated other comprehensive incomeISDA: International Swaps and Derivatives Association
ASC: FASB Accounting Standards CodificationLIBOR: London Interbank Offered Rate
ASU: FASB Accounting Standards UpdateN/A: Not applicable
ATM: Automated teller machineN/M: Not meaningful
BHC Act: Bank Holding Company Act of 1956NAV: Net asset value
CARES Act: Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security ActNSF: Non-sufficient funds
CECL: Current expected credit lossesOCI: Other comprehensive income (loss)
CFPB: Consumer Financial Protection BureauOMSR: Originated mortgage servicing rights
CIK: Central Index KeyOREO: Other real estate owned
COVID-19: Coronavirus disease 2019OTTI: Other-than-temporary impairment
CRA: Community Reinvestment ActPBO: Projected benefit obligation
DIF: Deposit Insurance FundPCAOB: Public Company Accounting Oversight Board
DIFS: Department of Insurance and Financial ServicesPPP: Paycheck Protection Program
Directors Plan: Isabella Bank Corporation and Related Companies Deferred Compensation Plan for DirectorsRabbi Trust: A trust established to fund our Directors Plan
Dividend Reinvestment Plan: Isabella Bank Corporation Stockholder Dividend Reinvestment Plan and Employee Stock Purchase PlanRSP: Isabella Bank Corporation Restricted Stock Plan
Exchange Act: Securities Exchange Act of 1934SBA: Small Business Administration
FASB: Financial Accounting Standards BoardSEC: U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
FDIC: Federal Deposit Insurance CorporationSOX: Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
FFIEC: Federal Financial Institutions Examinations CouncilTax Act: Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, enacted December 22, 2017
FRB: Federal Reserve BankTDR: Troubled debt restructuring
FHLB: Federal Home Loan BankXBRL: eXtensible Business Reporting Language
Freddie Mac: Federal Home Loan Mortgage CorporationYield Curve: U.S. Treasury Yield Curve
3

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1. Financial Statements.
INTERIM CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (UNAUDITED)
(Dollars in thousands)
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents
Cash and demand deposits due from banks$25,775 $31,296 
Interest bearing balances due from banks295,792 215,344 
Total cash and cash equivalents321,567 246,640 
AFS securities, at fair value367,324 339,228 
Mortgage loans AFS1,965 2,741 
Loans
Commercial725,540 756,686 
Agricultural91,629 100,461 
Residential real estate305,909 307,543 
Consumer72,840 73,621 
Gross loans1,195,918 1,238,311 
Less allowance for loan and lease losses9,271 9,744 
Net loans1,186,647 1,228,567 
Premises and equipment24,886 25,140 
Corporate owned life insurance policies28,057 28,292 
Accrued interest receivable6,422 6,882 
Equity securities without readily determinable fair values17,383 17,383 
Goodwill and other intangible assets48,324 48,331 
Other assets12,857 14,174 
TOTAL ASSETS$2,015,432 $1,957,378 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Deposits
Noninterest bearing$404,710 $375,395 
Interest bearing demand deposits328,440 302,444 
Certificates of deposit under $250 and other savings823,916 781,286 
Certificates of deposit over $25086,515 107,192 
Total deposits1,643,581 1,566,317 
Borrowed funds141,967 158,747 
Accrued interest payable and other liabilities11,602 13,726 
Total liabilities1,797,150 1,738,790 
Shareholders’ equity
Common stock — no par value 15,000,000 shares authorized; issued and outstanding 7,958,883 shares (including 65,274 shares held in the Rabbi Trust) in 2021 and 7,997,247 shares (including 59,162 shares held in the Rabbi Trust) in 2020141,366 142,247 
Shares to be issued for deferred compensation obligations4,272 4,183 
Retained earnings67,728 64,460 
Accumulated other comprehensive income4,916 7,698 
Total shareholders’ equity218,282 218,588 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY$2,015,432 $1,957,378 




See notes to interim condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).
4

INTERIM CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME (UNAUDITED)
(Dollars in thousands except per share amounts)
Three Months Ended 
 March 31
 20212020
Interest income
Loans, including fees$13,097 $13,254 
AFS securities
Taxable1,165 1,489 
Nontaxable865 1,053 
Federal funds sold and other163 405 
Total interest income15,290 16,201 
Interest expense
Deposits1,668 2,791 
Borrowings421 1,408 
Total interest expense2,089 4,199 
Net interest income13,201 12,002 
Provision for loan losses(523)788 
Net interest income after provision for loan losses13,724 11,214 
Noninterest income
Service charges and fees1,695 1,353 
Net gain on sale of mortgage loans745 151 
Wealth management fees696 572 
Earnings on corporate owned life insurance policies186 182 
Gains from redemption of corporate owned life insurance policies146 524 
Other64 216 
Total noninterest income3,532 2,998 
Noninterest expenses
Compensation and benefits5,877 5,869 
Furniture and equipment1,373 1,461 
Occupancy945 867 
Other2,622 2,748 
Total noninterest expenses10,817 10,945 
Income before federal income tax expense6,439 3,267 
Federal income tax expense1,041 203 
NET INCOME$5,398 $3,064 
Earnings per common share
Basic$0.68 $0.39 
Diluted$0.67 $0.38 
Cash dividends per common share$0.27 $0.27 








See notes to interim condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).
5

INTERIM CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (UNAUDITED)
(Dollars in thousands)
Three Months Ended 
 March 31
 20212020
Net income$5,398 $3,064 
Unrealized gains (losses) on AFS securities arising during the period(3,545)6,311 
Reclassification adjustment for net (gains) losses included in net income(71)
Tax effect (1)
742 (1,393)
Unrealized gains (losses) on AFS securities, net of tax(2,803)4,847 
Unrealized gains (losses) on derivative instruments arising during the period26 (136)
Tax effect (1)
(5)28 
Unrealized gains (losses) on derivative instruments, net of tax21 (108)
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax(2,782)4,739 
Comprehensive income (loss)$2,616 $7,803 
(1)See “Note 10 – Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income” for tax effect reconciliation.























See notes to interim condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).
6

INTERIM CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY (UNAUDITED)
(Dollars in thousands except per share amounts)
Common Stock
Common Shares
Outstanding
AmountCommon Shares to be
Issued for
Deferred
Compensation
Obligations
Retained
Earnings
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
Totals
Balance, January 1, 20207,910,804 $141,069 $5,043 $62,099 $1,971 $210,182 
Comprehensive income (loss)— — — 3,064 4,739 7,803 
Issuance of common stock69,907 1,330 — — — 1,330 
Common stock transferred from the Rabbi Trust to satisfy deferred compensation obligations— 364 (364)— — 
Share-based payment awards under the Directors Plan— — 123 — — 123 
Common stock purchased for deferred compensation obligations— (650)— — — (650)
Common stock repurchased pursuant to publicly announced repurchase plan(59,420)(1,168)— — — (1,168)
Cash dividends paid ($0.27 per common share)— — — (2,122)— (2,122)
Balance, March 31, 20207,921,291 $140,945 $4,802 $63,041 $6,710 $215,498 
Balance, January 1, 20217,997,247 $142,247 $4,183 $64,460 $7,698 $218,588 
Comprehensive income (loss)— — — 5,398 (2,782)2,616 
Issuance of common stock18,482 387 — — — 387 
Common stock transferred from the Rabbi Trust to satisfy deferred compensation obligations— 71 (71)— — 
Share-based payment awards under the Directors Plan— — 160 — — 160 
Share-based compensation expense recognized in earnings under the RSP— — — — 
Common stock purchased for deferred compensation obligations— (194)— — — (194)
Common stock repurchased pursuant to publicly announced repurchase plan(56,846)(1,149)— — — (1,149)
Cash dividends paid ($0.27 per common share)— — — (2,130)— (2,130)
Balance, March 31, 20217,958,883 $141,366 $4,272 $67,728 $4,916 $218,282 




















See notes to interim condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).
7

INTERIM CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (UNAUDITED)
(Dollars in thousands)
Three Months Ended 
 March 31
 20212020
OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Net income$5,398 $3,064 
Reconciliation of net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Undistributed earnings of equity securities without readily determinable fair values94 
Provision for loan losses(523)788 
Depreciation612 668 
Amortization of OMSR177 97 
Amortization of acquisition intangibles13 
Net amortization of AFS securities438 444 
Net gains on sale of AFS securities(71)
Net gain on sale of mortgage loans(745)(151)
OMSR impairment loss245 
Net (gains) losses on foreclosed assets28 (42)
Increase in cash value of corporate owned life insurance policies, net of expenses(177)(170)
Gains from redemption of corporate owned life insurance policies(146)(524)
Share-based payment awards under the Directors Plan160 123 
Share-based payment awards under the RSP
Origination of loans held-for-sale(17,692)(8,890)
Proceeds from loan sales19,213 8,717 
Net changes in operating assets and liabilities which provided (used) cash:
Accrued interest receivable460 (521)
Other assets997 (379)
Accrued interest payable and other liabilities(1,135)(111)
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities7,076 3,394 
INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Activity in AFS securities
Sales26,855 
Maturities, calls, and principal payments19,388 12,674 
Purchases(51,467)(11,012)
Net loan principal (originations) collections42,365 10,487 
Proceeds from sales of foreclosed assets193 51 
Purchases of premises and equipment(358)(372)
Proceeds from redemption of corporate owned life insurance policies558 1,458 
Funding of low income housing tax credit investments(226)(150)
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities10,453 39,991 
8

INTERIM CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (continued)
(Dollars in thousands)
Three Months Ended 
 March 31
 20212020
FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Net increase (decrease) in deposits$77,264 $8,232 
Net increase (decrease) in borrowed funds(16,780)(12,828)
Cash dividends paid on common stock(2,130)(2,122)
Proceeds from issuance of common stock387 1,330 
Common stock repurchased(1,149)(1,168)
Common stock purchased for deferred compensation obligations(194)(650)
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities57,398 (7,206)
Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents74,927 36,179 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period246,640 60,572 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period$321,567 $96,751 
SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOWS INFORMATION:
Interest paid$2,111 $4,214 
SUPPLEMENTAL NONCASH INFORMATION:
Transfers of loans to foreclosed assets$78 $117 





















See notes to interim condensed consolidated financial statements (unaudited).
9

NOTES TO INTERIM CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
(Dollars in thousands except per share amounts)
Note 1 – Basis of Presentation
As used in these notes, as well as in Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, references to the “Corporation”, “Isabella”, “we”, “our”, “us”, and similar terms refer to the consolidated entity consisting of Isabella Bank Corporation and its subsidiary. References to Isabella Bank or the “Bank” refer to Isabella Bank Corporation’s subsidiary, Isabella Bank.
The accompanying unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with GAAP for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by GAAP for complete financial statements. In our opinion, all adjustments considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. Operating results for the three-month period ended March 31, 2021 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2021. For further information, refer to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.
Our accounting policies are materially the same as those discussed in Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.
Reclassifications: Certain amounts reported in the interim 2020 consolidated financial statements have been reclassified to conform with the 2021 presentation.
Note 2 – Accounting Standards Updates
Pending
ASU No. 2016-13: “Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments”, as amended
In June 2016, ASU No. 2016-13 was issued and updated the measurement for credit losses for AFS debt securities and assets measured at amortized cost which include loans, trade receivables, and any other financial assets with the contractual right to receive cash. Current GAAP requires an “incurred loss” methodology for recognizing credit losses that delays recognition until it is probable a loss has been incurred. Under the incurred loss approach, entities are limited to a probable initial recognition threshold when credit losses are measured; an entity generally only considers past events and current conditions in measuring the incurred loss.
Under the new guidance, the incurred loss impairment methodology is replaced with a methodology that reflects current expected credit losses (CECL). This methodology requires consideration of a broader range of reasonable and supportable information to calculate credit loss estimates. The measurement of expected credit losses is based on relevant information about past events, including historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts that affect the collectability of the reported amount. An entity must use judgment in determining the relevant information and estimation methods that are appropriate in its circumstances which applies to assets measured either collectively or individually.
The update allows an entity to revert to historical loss information that is reflective of the contractual term (considering the effect of prepayments) for periods that are beyond the time frame for which the entity is able to develop reasonable and supportable forecasts. In addition, the disclosures of credit quality indicators in relation to the amortized cost of financing receivables, a current disclosure requirement, are further disaggregated by year of origination (or vintage). The vintage information will be useful for financial statement users to better assess changes in underwriting standards and credit quality trends in asset portfolios over time and the effect of those changes on credit losses.
Overall, the update will allow entities the ability to measure expected credit losses without the restriction of incurred or probable losses that exist under current GAAP. For users of the financial statements, the update requires disclosure of decision-useful information about the expected credit losses on financial instruments and other commitments to extend credit held by a reporting entity at each reporting date. The new authoritative guidance was originally effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019. Effective October 16, 2019, the FASB approved and issued changes to the implementation date of this guidance for some filers. As a smaller reporting company, as defined by the SEC, our implementation date was delayed from January 1, 2020 to January 1, 2023. Early adoption continues to be permissible under the revised implementation date. This guidance may have a significant impact on the results of our operations and financial statement disclosures as well as that of the banking industry as a whole.
10

We have invested a considerable amount of effort toward this guidance and will continue to invest considerable effort until our implementation date. An internal committee was formed and is accountable for timely and accurate adoption of the guidance. A service provider that has focused on the ALLL for more than 10 years and serves hundreds of financial institutions has been engaged to provide us with education, advisory, and software solutions exclusively related to the ACL. We will run parallel processes which will help to ensure we are ready to calculate, review, and report the ACL by the required implementation date.
Note 3 – AFS Securities
The amortized cost and fair value of AFS securities, with gross unrealized gains and losses, are as follows at:
 March 31, 2021
Amortized
Cost
Gross
Unrealized
Gains
Gross
Unrealized
Losses
Fair
Value
U.S. Treasury$29,484 $$113 $29,371 
States and political subdivisions136,261 4,133 65 140,329 
Auction rate money market preferred3,200 24 3,224 
Mortgage-backed securities73,687 2,148 75,835 
Collateralized mortgage obligations113,275 3,593 116,865 
Corporate1,700 1,700 
Total$357,607 $9,898 $181 $367,324 
 December 31, 2020
Amortized
Cost
Gross
Unrealized
Gains
Gross
Unrealized
Losses
Fair
Value
States and political subdivisions$137,710 $5,946 $$143,656 
Auction rate money market preferred3,200 37 3,237 
Mortgage-backed securities85,926 2,726 88,652 
Collateralized mortgage obligations97,430 4,553 101,983 
Corporate1,700 1,700 
Total$325,966 $13,262 $0 $339,228 
The amortized cost and fair value of AFS securities by contractual maturity at March 31, 2021 are as follows:
MaturingSecurities with Variable Monthly Payments or Noncontractual Maturities
Due in
One Year
or Less
After One
Year But
Within
Five Years
After Five
Years But
Within
Ten Years
After
Ten Years
Total
U.S. Treasury$$19,774 $9,710 $$$29,484 
States and political subdivisions22,079 63,279 23,655 27,248 136,261 
Auction rate money market preferred3,200 3,200 
Mortgage-backed securities73,687 73,687 
Collateralized mortgage obligations113,275 113,275 
Corporate1,700 1,700 
Total amortized cost$22,079 $83,053 $35,065 $27,248 $190,162 $357,607 
Fair value$22,137 $84,508 $36,247 $28,508 $195,924 $367,324 
Expected maturities for government sponsored enterprises and states and political subdivisions may differ from contractual maturities because issuers may have the right to call or prepay obligations.
As the auction rate money market preferred investments have continual call dates, they are not reported by a specific maturity group. Because of their variable monthly payments, mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations are not reported by a specific maturity group.
11

A summary of the sales activity of AFS securities was as follows for the:
Three Months Ended March 31
20212020
Proceeds from sales of AFS securities$$26,855 
Realized gains (losses)$$71 
Applicable income tax expense (benefit)$$15 
The following information pertains to AFS securities with gross unrealized losses at March 31, 2021, aggregated by investment category and length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous loss position. There were no AFS securities with gross unrealized losses in a continuous loss position at December 31, 2020.
 March 31, 2021
 Less Than Twelve MonthsTwelve Months or More 
Gross
Unrealized
Losses
Fair
Value
Gross
Unrealized
Losses
Fair
Value
Total
Unrealized
Losses
U.S. Treasury$113 $29,370 $$$113 
States and political subdivisions65 5,442 65 
Collateralized mortgage obligations10,023 
Total$181 $44,835 $0 $$181 
Number of securities in an unrealized loss position:6 0 6 
The reduction in unrealized gains on our AFS securities portfolio resulted from the recent increases in intermediate-term and long-term benchmark interest rates.
As of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, we conducted an analysis to determine whether any AFS securities currently in an unrealized loss position should be identified as other-than-temporarily impaired. Such analyses considered, among other factors, the following criteria:
Has the value of the investment declined more than what is deemed to be reasonable based on a risk and maturity adjusted discount rate?
Is the investment credit rating below investment grade?
Is it probable the issuer will be unable to pay the amount when due?
Is it more likely than not that we will have to sell the security before recovery of its cost basis?
Has the duration of the investment been extended?
Based on our analysis, which included the criteria outlined above and the fact that we have asserted that we do not have to sell any AFS securities in an unrealized loss position, we do not believe that the values of any AFS securities are other-than-temporarily impaired as of March 31, 2021 or December 31, 2020, with the exception of one municipal bond previously identified which had no activity during the period.

12

Note 4 – Loans and ALLL
We grant commercial, agricultural, residential real estate, and consumer loans to customers situated primarily in Clare, Gratiot, Isabella, Mecosta, Midland, Montcalm, and Saginaw counties in Michigan. The ability of the borrowers to honor their repayment obligations is often dependent upon the real estate, agricultural, manufacturing, retail, gaming, tourism, health care, higher education, and general economic conditions of this region. Substantially all of our consumer and residential real estate loans are secured by various items of property, while commercial loans are secured primarily by real estate, business assets, and personal guarantees. A portion of loans are unsecured.
Loans that we have the intent and ability to hold in our portfolio are reported at their outstanding principal balance adjusted for any charge-offs, the ALLL, and deferred fees or costs. Unless a loan has a nonaccrual status, interest income is accrued over the term of the loan based on the principal amount outstanding. Loan origination fees and certain direct loan origination costs are capitalized and recognized as a component of interest income over the term of the loan using the appropriate amortization method.
The accrual of interest on commercial and agricultural loans, as well as residential real estate loans, is discontinued at the time a loan is 90 days or more past due unless the credit is well-secured and in the process of short-term collection. Upon transferring a loan to nonaccrual status, we perform an evaluation to determine the net realizable value of the underlying collateral. This evaluation is used to help determine if a charge-off is necessary. Consumer loans are typically charged-off no later than 180 days past due. Past due status is based on the contractual term of the loan. In all cases, a loan is placed in nonaccrual status at an earlier date if collection of principal or interest is considered doubtful.
When a loan is placed in nonaccrual status, all interest accrued in the current calendar year, but not collected, is reversed against interest income while interest accrued in prior calendar years, but not collected, is charged against the ALLL. Loans may be returned to accrual status after six months of continuous performance and achievement of current payment status.
Commercial and agricultural loans include loans for commercial real estate, commercial operating loans, advances to mortgage brokers, farmland and agricultural production, and loans to states and political subdivisions. Repayment of these loans is dependent upon the successful operation and management of a business. We minimize our risk by limiting the amount of direct credit exposure to any one borrower to $15,000. Borrowers with direct credit needs of more than $15,000 may be serviced through the use of loan participations with other commercial banks. Commercial and agricultural real estate loans commonly require loan-to-value limits of 80% or less. Depending upon the type of loan, past credit history, and current operating results, we may require the borrower to pledge accounts receivable, inventory, property, or equipment. Government agency guarantee may be required. Personal guarantees and/or life insurance beneficiary assignments are generally required from the owners of closely held corporations, partnerships, and sole proprietorships. In addition, we may require annual financial statements, prepare cash flow analyses, and review credit reports.
We entered into a mortgage purchase program in 2016 with a financial institution where we participate in advances to mortgage brokers (“advances”). The mortgage brokers originate residential mortgage loans with the intent to sell them on the secondary market. We participate in the advance to the mortgage broker, which is secured by the underlying mortgage loan, until it is ultimately sold on the secondary market. As such, the average life of each participated advance is approximately 20-30 days. Funds from the sale of the loan are used to pay off our participation in the advance to the mortgage broker. We classify these advances as commercial loans and include the outstanding balance in commercial loans on our consolidated balance sheets. Under the participation agreement, we committed to a maximum outstanding aggregate amount of $40,000. The difference between our outstanding balance and the maximum outstanding aggregate amount is classified as “Unfunded commitments under lines of credit” in the “Contractual Obligations and Loan Commitments” section of the Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations of this report.
We offer adjustable rate mortgages, construction loans, and fixed rate residential real estate loans which have amortization periods up to a maximum of 30 years. We consider the anticipated direction of interest rates, balance sheet duration, the sensitivity of our balance sheet to changes in interest rates, our liquidity needs, and overall loan demand to determine whether or not to sell fixed rate loans to Freddie Mac.
Our lending policies generally limit the maximum loan-to-value ratio on residential real estate loans to 100% of the lower of the appraised value of the property or the purchase price. Private mortgage insurance is typically required on loans with loan-to-value ratios in excess of 80% unless the loan qualifies for government guarantees.

13

Underwriting criteria for originated residential real estate loans generally include:
Evaluation of the borrower’s ability to make monthly payments.
Evaluation of the value of the property securing the loan.
Ensuring the payment of principal, interest, taxes, and hazard insurance does not exceed 28% of a borrower’s gross income.
Ensuring all debt servicing does not exceed 40% of income.
Verification of acceptable credit reports.
Verification of employment, income, and financial information.
Appraisals are performed by independent appraisers and are reviewed for appropriateness. Generally, mortgage loan requests are reviewed by our mortgage loan committee or through a secondary market underwriting system; loans in excess of $1,000 require the approval of our Internal Loan Committee, the Executive Loan Committee, the Board of Directors’ Loan Committee, or the Board of Directors.
Consumer loans include secured and unsecured personal loans. Loans are amortized for a period of up to 15 years based on the age and value of the underlying collateral. The underwriting emphasis is on a borrower’s perceived intent and ability to pay rather than collateral value. No consumer loans are sold to the secondary market.
The ALLL is established as losses are estimated to have occurred through a provision for loan losses charged to earnings. Full or partial loan balances are charged against the ALLL when we believe uncollectability is probable. Subsequent recoveries, if any, are credited to the ALLL.
The ALLL is evaluated on a regular basis for appropriateness. Our periodic review of the collectability of a loan considers historical experience, the nature and volume of the loan portfolio, adverse situations that may affect the borrower’s ability to repay, estimated value of any underlying collateral, and prevailing economic conditions. This evaluation is inherently subjective as it requires estimates that are susceptible to significant revision as more information becomes available.
The primary factors behind the determination of the level of the ALLL are specific allocations for impaired loans, historical loss percentages, as well as unallocated components. Specific allocations for impaired loans are primarily determined based on the difference between the loan’s outstanding balance and the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, or the fair value of the collateral, less costs to sell, if the loan is collateral dependent. Historical loss allocations are calculated at the loan class and segment levels based on a migration analysis of the loan portfolio, with the exception of advances to mortgage brokers, over the preceding five years. With no historical losses on advances to mortgage brokers, there is no allocation related to this portfolio. The unallocated component of the allowance reflects the margin of imprecision inherent in the underlying assumptions used in the methodologies for estimating specific and general losses in the portfolio.
While we have experienced fluctuations in credit quality indicators in recent periods, credit quality remained strong at March 31, 2021. The COVID-19 pandemic led to the temporary and some permanent closures of businesses throughout the communities in which we serve, which also led to increased unemployment. We increased the ALLL during 2020 as a result of increased economic and environmental related risk factors, primarily driven by COVID-19. While these risk factors remain in 2021, improvement in credit quality indicators and a reduction in loans outstanding resulted in a reduction to the ALLL as of March 31, 2021.
Summaries of the ALLL and the recorded investment in loans by segments follows:
 Allowance for Loan Losses
Three Months Ended March 31, 2021
CommercialAgriculturalResidential Real EstateConsumerUnallocatedTotal
January 1, 2021$2,162 $311 $1,363 $798 $5,110 $9,744 
Charge-offs(31)(128)— (159)
Recoveries82 55 70 209 
Provision for loan losses(514)(83)(255)216 113 (523)
March 31, 2021$1,699 $230 $1,163 $956 $5,223 $9,271 
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 Allowance for Loan Losses and Recorded Investment in Loans
March 31, 2021
CommercialAgriculturalResidential Real EstateConsumerUnallocatedTotal
ALLL
Individually evaluated for impairment$587 $25 $768 $$$1,380 
Collectively evaluated for impairment1,112 205 395 956 5,223 7,891 
Total$1,699 $230 $1,163 $956 $5,223 $9,271 
Loans
Individually evaluated for impairment$14,300 $15,459 $4,136 $$33,895 
Collectively evaluated for impairment711,240 76,170 301,773 72,840 1,162,023 
Total$725,540 $91,629 $305,909 $72,840 $1,195,918 
 Allowance for Loan Losses
Three Months Ended March 31, 2020
CommercialAgriculturalResidential Real EstateConsumerUnallocatedTotal
January 1, 2020$1,914 $634 $2,047 $922 $2,422 $7,939 
Charge-offs(4)(16)(15)(123)(158)
Recoveries22 33 27 46 128 
Provision for loan losses443 (161)(342)116 732 788 
March 31, 2020$2,375 $490 $1,717 $961 $3,154 $8,697 
 Allowance for Loan Losses and Recorded Investment in Loans
December 31, 2020
CommercialAgriculturalResidential Real EstateConsumerUnallocatedTotal
ALLL
Individually evaluated for impairment$84 $56 $771 $$$911 
Collectively evaluated for impairment2,078 255 592 798 5,110 8,833 
Total$2,162 $311��$1,363 $798 $5,110 $9,744 
Loans
Individually evaluated for impairment$9,821 $13,796 $4,319 $$27,936 
Collectively evaluated for impairment746,865 86,665 303,224 73,621 1,210,375 
Total$756,686 $100,461 $307,543 $73,621 $1,238,311 
15

The following tables display the internally assigned credit risk ratings for commercial and agricultural credit exposures as of:
 March 31, 2021
 CommercialAgricultural
Real EstateOtherAdvances to Mortgage BrokersTotalReal EstateOtherTotalTotal
Rating
1 - Excellent$$76 $$76 $$$$76 
2 - High quality1,552 12,688 14,240 536 11 547 14,787 
3 - High satisfactory74,559 50,682 9,457 134,698 11,565 3,823 15,388 150,086 
4 - Low satisfactory401,410 130,470 531,880 33,333 12,922 46,255 578,135 
5 - Special mention13,941 6,206 20,147 12,490 3,307 15,797 35,944 
6 - Substandard16,180 6,991 23,171 7,173 3,418 10,591 33,762 
7 - Vulnerable46 1,282 1,328 2,587 276 2,863 4,191 
8 - Doubtful188 188 188 
9 - Loss
Total$507,688 $208,395 $9,457 $725,540 $67,872 $23,757 $91,629 $817,169 
 December 31, 2020
 CommercialAgricultural
Real EstateOtherAdvances to Mortgage BrokersTotalReal EstateOtherTotalTotal
Rating
1 - Excellent$$$$$$$$
2 - High quality2,308 13,406 15,714 541 11 552 16,266 
3 - High satisfactory69,327 51,093 50,258 170,678 14,411 5,312 19,723 190,401 
4 - Low satisfactory403,733 122,025 525,758 34,464 17,600 52,064 577,822 
5 - Special mention15,049 6,174 21,223 13,137 3,240 16,377 37,600 
6 - Substandard15,854 6,130 21,984 5,267 2,693 7,960 29,944 
7 - Vulnerable26 1,303 1,329 3,208 387 3,595 4,924 
8 - Doubtful190 190 190 
9 - Loss
Total$506,297 $200,131 $50,258 $756,686 $71,218 $29,243 $100,461 $857,147 
Internally assigned credit risk ratings are reviewed, at a minimum, when loans are renewed or when management has knowledge of improvements or deterioration of the credit quality of individual credits. Descriptions of the internally assigned credit risk ratings for commercial and agricultural loans are as follows:
1. EXCELLENT – Substantially Risk Free
Credit has strong financial condition and solid earnings history, characterized by:
High liquidity, strong cash flow, low leverage.
Unquestioned ability to meet all obligations when due.
Experienced management, with management succession in place.
Secured by cash.

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2. HIGH QUALITY – Limited Risk
Credit with sound financial condition and a positive trend in earnings supplemented by:
Favorable liquidity and leverage ratios.
Ability to meet all obligations when due.
Management with successful track record.
Steady and satisfactory earnings history.
If loan is secured, collateral is of high quality and readily marketable.
Access to alternative financing.
Well defined primary and secondary source of repayment.
If supported by guaranty, the financial strength and liquidity of the guarantor(s) are clearly evident.
3. HIGH SATISFACTORY – Reasonable Risk
Credit with satisfactory financial condition and further characterized by:
Working capital adequate to support operations.
Cash flow sufficient to pay debts as scheduled.
Management experience and depth appear favorable.
Loan performing according to terms.
If loan is secured, collateral is acceptable and loan is fully protected.
4. LOW SATISFACTORY – Acceptable Risk
Credit with bankable risks, although some signs of weaknesses are shown:
Would include most start-up businesses.
Occasional instances of trade slowness or repayment delinquency – may have been 10-30 days slow within the past year.
Management’s abilities are apparent yet unproven.
Weakness in primary source of repayment with adequate secondary source of repayment.
Loan structure generally in accordance with policy.
If secured, loan collateral coverage is marginal.
To be classified as less than satisfactory, only one of the following criteria must be met.
5. SPECIAL MENTION – Criticized
Credit constitutes an undue and unwarranted credit risk but not to the point of justifying a classification of substandard. The credit risk may be relatively minor yet constitutes an unwarranted risk in light of the circumstances surrounding a specific loan:
Downward trend in sales, profit levels, and margins.
Impaired working capital position.
Cash flow is strained in order to meet debt repayment.
Loan delinquency (30-60 days) and overdrafts may occur.
Shrinking equity cushion.
Diminishing primary source of repayment and questionable secondary source.
Management abilities are questionable.
Weak industry conditions.
Litigation pending against the borrower.
Loan may need to be restructured to improve collateral position or reduce payments.
Collateral or guaranty offers limited protection.
Negative debt service coverage, however the credit is well collateralized and payments are current.

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6. SUBSTANDARD – Classified
Credit is inadequately protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the borrower or of the collateral pledged. There is a distinct possibility we will implement collection procedures if the loan deficiencies are not corrected. Any commercial loan placed in nonaccrual status will be rated “7” or worse. In addition, the following characteristics may apply:
Sustained losses have severely eroded the equity and cash flow.
Deteriorating liquidity.
Serious management problems or internal fraud.
Original repayment terms liberalized.
Likelihood of bankruptcy.
Inability to access other funding sources.
Reliance on secondary source of repayment.
Litigation filed against borrower.
Interest non-accrual may be warranted.
Collateral provides little or no value.
Requires excessive attention of the loan officer.
Borrower is uncooperative with loan officer.
7. VULNERABLE – Classified
Credit is considered “Substandard” and warrants placing in nonaccrual status. Risk of loss is being evaluated and exit strategy options are under review. Other characteristics that may apply:
Insufficient cash flow to service debt.
Minimal or no payments being received.
Limited options available to avoid the collection process.
Transition status, expect action will take place to collect loan without immediate progress being made.
8. DOUBTFUL – Workout
Credit has all the weaknesses inherent in a “Substandard” loan with the added characteristic that collection and/or liquidation is pending. The possibility of a loss is extremely high, but its classification as a loss is deferred until liquidation procedures are completed, or reasonably estimable. Other characteristics that may apply:
Normal operations are severely diminished or have ceased.
Seriously impaired cash flow.
Original repayment terms materially altered.
Secondary source of repayment is inadequate.
Survivability as a “going concern” is impossible.
Collection process has begun.
Bankruptcy petition has been filed.
Judgments have been filed.
Portion of the loan balance has been charged-off.
9. LOSS – Charge-off
Credit is considered uncollectible and of such little value that their continuance as bankable assets is not warranted. This classification is for charged-off loans but does not mean that the asset has absolutely no recovery or salvage value. These loans are further characterized by:
Liquidation or reorganization under Bankruptcy, with poor prospects of collection.
Fraudulently overstated assets and/or earnings.
Collateral has marginal or no value.
Debtor cannot be located.
Over 120 days delinquent.
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Our primary credit quality indicator for residential real estate and consumer loans is the individual loan’s past due aging. The following tables summarize the past due and current loans for the entire loan portfolio as of:
 March 31, 2021
 Accruing Interest
and Past Due:
 Total Past Due and Nonaccrual  
30-59
Days
60-89
Days
90 Days
or More
NonaccrualCurrentTotal
Commercial
Commercial real estate$$64 $$46 $110 $507,578 $507,688 
Commercial other42 1,282 1,324 207,071 208,395 
Advances to mortgage brokers9,457 9,457 
Total commercial42 64 1,328 1,434 724,106 725,540 
Agricultural
Agricultural real estate2,775 2,775 65,097 67,872 
Agricultural other276 276 23,481 23,757 
Total agricultural3,051 3,051 88,578 91,629 
Residential real estate
Senior liens1,153 153 1,310 270,688 271,998 
Junior liens3,533 3,533 
Home equity lines of credit34 34 30,344 30,378 
Total residential real estate1,187 153 1,344 304,565 305,909 
Consumer
Secured30 30 69,873 69,903 
Unsecured2,933 2,937 
Total consumer34 34 72,806 72,840 
Total$1,263 $68 $0 $4,532 $5,863 $1,190,055 $1,195,918 
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 December 31, 2020
 Accruing Interest
and Past Due:
 Total Past Due and Nonaccrual  
30-59
Days
60-89
Days
90 Days
or More
NonaccrualCurrentTotal
Commercial
Commercial real estate$333 $$$26 $359 $505,938 $506,297 
Commercial other486 1,303 1,789 198,342 200,131 
Advances to mortgage brokers50,258 50,258 
Total commercial819 1,329 2,148 754,538 756,686 
Agricultural
Agricultural real estate3,398 3,398 67,820 71,218 
Agricultural other387 388 28,855 29,243 
Total agricultural3,785 3,786 96,675 100,461 
Residential real estate
Senior liens3,203 145 199 3,547 269,425 272,972 
Junior liens25 25 3,791 3,816 
Home equity lines of credit30,747 30,755 
Total residential real estate3,236 145 199 3,580 303,963 307,543 
Consumer
Secured93 93 70,349 70,442 
Unsecured3,176 3,179 
Total consumer96 96 73,525 73,621 
Total$4,152 $145 $0 $5,313 $9,610 $1,228,701 $1,238,311 
Impaired Loans
Loans may be classified as impaired if they meet one or more of the following criteria:
1.There has been a charge-off of its principal balance (in whole or in part);
2.The loan has been classified as a TDR; or
3.The loan is in nonaccrual status.
Impairment is measured on a loan-by-loan basis for commercial and agricultural loans by comparing the loan’s outstanding balance to the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, or the fair value of the collateral, less costs to sell, if the loan is collateral dependent. Large groups of smaller-balance, homogeneous residential real estate and consumer loans are collectively evaluated for impairment by comparing the loan’s unpaid principal balance to the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate.
We do not recognize interest income on impaired loans in nonaccrual status. For impaired loans not classified as nonaccrual, interest income is recognized daily, as earned, according to the terms of the loan agreement and the principal amount outstanding.
20

The following is a summary of impaired loans as of:
 March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
Recorded BalanceUnpaid Principal BalanceValuation AllowanceRecorded BalanceUnpaid Principal BalanceValuation Allowance
Impaired loans with a valuation allowance
Commercial real estate$2,805 $2,805 $587 $2,048 $2,290 $79 
Commercial other107 107 
Agricultural real estate1,025 1,075 25 1,994 1,994 54 
Agricultural other1,355 1,355 
Residential real estate senior liens4,136 4,394 768 4,319 4,661 771 
Total impaired loans with a valuation allowance7,966 8,274 1,380 9,823 10,407 911 
Impaired loans without a valuation allowance
Commercial real estate6,807 7,123 3,006 3,080 
Commercial other4,688 4,688 4,660 4,660 
Agricultural real estate10,155 10,155 8,681 8,731 
Agricultural other4,279 4,279 1,766 1,766 
Total impaired loans without a valuation allowance25,929 26,245 18,113 18,237 
Impaired loans
Commercial14,300 14,616 587 9,821 10,137 84 
Agricultural15,459 15,509 25 13,796 13,846 56 
Residential real estate4,136 4,394 768 4,319 4,661 771 
Total impaired loans$33,895 $34,519 $1,380 $27,936 $28,644 $911 




















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The following is a summary of impaired loans for the:
 Three Months Ended March 31
20212020
Average Recorded BalanceInterest Income RecognizedAverage Recorded BalanceInterest Income Recognized
Impaired loans with a valuation allowance
Commercial real estate$2,424 $28 $821 $25 
Commercial other54 460 
Agricultural real estate1,510 11 1,878 24 
Agricultural other678 1,355 22 
Residential real estate senior liens4,228 43 5,343 55 
Total impaired loans with a valuation allowance8,894 82 9,857 132 
Impaired loans without a valuation allowance
Commercial real estate4,907 101 4,562 59 
Commercial other4,674 40 2,390 15 
Agricultural real estate9,418 132 7,782 59 
Agricultural other3,023 61 3,235 
Home equity lines of credit87 
Consumer secured
Total impaired loans without a valuation allowance22,022 334 18,058 146 
Impaired loans
Commercial12,059 169 8,233 105 
Agricultural14,629 204 14,250 112 
Residential real estate4,228 43 5,430 61 
Consumer
Total impaired loans$30,916 $416 $27,915 $278 
As a result of line of credit agreements with borrowers, we had committed to advance $816 and $98 in additional funds to be disbursed in connection with impaired loans as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.
Troubled Debt Restructurings
A loan modification is considered to be a TDR when the modification includes terms outside of normal lending practices to a borrower who is experiencing financial difficulties.
Typical concessions granted include, but are not limited to:
Agreeing to interest rates below prevailing market rates for debt with similar risk characteristics.
Extending the amortization period beyond typical lending guidelines for loans with similar risk characteristics.
Agreeing to an interest-only payment structure and delaying principal payments.
Forgiving principal.
Forgiving accrued interest.

To determine if a borrower is experiencing financial difficulties, factors we consider include:
The borrower is currently in default on any debt.
The borrower would likely default on any debt if the concession is not granted.
The borrower’s cash flow is insufficient to service all debt if the concession is not granted.
The borrower has declared, or is in the process of declaring, bankruptcy.
The borrower is unlikely to continue as a going concern (if the entity is a business).

22

The following is a summary of TDRs granted for the:
Three Months Ended March 31
20212020
Number of LoansPre-Modification Recorded InvestmentPost-Modification Recorded InvestmentNumber of LoansPre-Modification Recorded InvestmentPost-Modification Recorded Investment
Commercial other$4,652 $4,652 $963 $963 
Agricultural other3,712 3,712 593 593 
Residential real estate93 93 
Total9 $8,364 $8,364 6 $1,649 $1,649 
The following is a summary of concessions we granted to borrowers experiencing financial difficulty for the:
Three Months Ended March 31
20212020
Below Market Interest RateBelow Market Interest Rate and Extension of Amortization PeriodBelow Market Interest RateBelow Market Interest Rate and Extension of Amortization Period
 Number of LoansPre-Modification Recorded InvestmentNumber of LoansPre-Modification Recorded InvestmentNumber of LoansPre-Modification Recorded InvestmentNumber of LoansPre-Modification Recorded Investment
Commercial other$3,189 $1,463 $919 $44 
Agricultural other3,712 593 
Residential real estate93 
Total7 $6,901 2 $1,463 1 $919 5 $730 
We did not restructure any loans by forgiving principal or accrued interest in the three-month periods ended March 31, 2021 or 2020.
Based on our historical loss experience, losses associated with TDRs are not significantly different than other impaired loans within the same loan segment. As such, TDRs, including TDRs that have been modified in the past 12 months that subsequently defaulted, are analyzed in the same manner as other impaired loans within their respective loan segment.
We had 0 loans that defaulted in the three-month periods ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 which were modified within 12 months prior to the default date.
The following is a summary of TDR loan balances as of:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
TDRs$31,515 $24,930 
Measures we have taken to assist our customers in connection with the COVID-19 pandemic include loan programs that provide short-term payment relief.  Under these programs, borrowers whose loans were in good standing as of March 1, 2020 could elect to defer full or partial payments for a period not to exceed 180 days. Bank regulators issued a statement on March 22, 2020, and a revised statement on April 7, 2020, which provided confirmation that short-term loan modifications made on a good faith basis in response to COVID-19 to borrowers with a current payment status are not categorized as TDRs. Pursuant to this guidance, borrowers granted a short-term loan modification meeting this criteria were not categorized as TDR as of March 31, 2021.

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Note 5 – Borrowed Funds
Borrowed funds consist of the following obligations as of:
March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
AmountRateAmountRate
FHLB advances$90,000 1.68 %$90,000 1.68 %
Securities sold under agreements to repurchase without stated maturity dates51,967 0.12 %68,747 0.13 %
Total$141,967 1.11 %$158,747 1.01 %
FHLB advances are collateralized by a blanket lien on all qualified 1-4 family residential real estate loans, specific AFS securities, and FHLB stock.
The following table lists the maturities and weighted average interest rates of FHLB advances as of:
 March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
AmountRateAmountRate
Fixed rate due 2021$50,000 1.91 %$50,000 1.91 %
Variable rate due 2021 (1)
10,000 0.50 %10,000 0.52 %
Fixed rate due 202220,000 1.97 %20,000 1.97 %
Fixed rate due 202610,000 1.17 %10,000 1.17 %
Total$90,000 1.68 %$90,000 1.68 %
(1)Hedged advance (see “Derivative Instruments” section below)
Securities sold under agreements to repurchase are classified as secured borrowings and are reflected at the amount of cash received in connection with the transaction. The securities underlying the agreements have a carrying value and a fair value of $51,986 and $68,773 at March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. Such securities remain under our control. We may be required to provide additional collateral based on the fair value of underlying securities.
Securities sold under repurchase agreements without stated maturity dates, federal funds purchased, and FRB Discount Window advances generally mature within one to four days from the transaction date. We had no federal funds purchased or FRB Discount Window advances during the three-month periods ended March 31, 2021 and 2020.
A summary of securities sold under repurchase agreements without stated maturity dates was as follows for the:
Three Months Ended March 31
20212020
Maximum Month End BalanceAverage BalanceWeighted Average Interest Rate During the PeriodMaximum Month End BalanceAverage BalanceWeighted Average Interest Rate During the Period
Securities sold under agreements to repurchase without stated maturity dates$54,288 $54,145 0.12 %$32,236 $30,923 0.10 %
We had pledged AFS securities and 1-4 family residential real estate loans in the following amounts at:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
Pledged to secure borrowed funds$299,288 $302,041 
Pledged to secure repurchase agreements51,986 68,773 
Pledged for public deposits and for other purposes necessary or required by law31,190 39,641 
Total$382,464 $410,455 
24

AFS securities pledged to repurchase agreements without stated maturity dates consisted of the following at:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
States and political subdivisions$8,656 $12,728 
Mortgage-backed securities24,690 30,250 
Collateralized mortgage obligations18,640 25,795 
Total$51,986 $68,773 
AFS securities pledged to repurchase agreements are monitored to ensure the appropriate level is collateralized. In the event of maturities, calls, significant principal repayments, or significant decline in market values, we have an adequate level of AFS securities to pledge to satisfy collateral requirements.
As of March 31, 2021, we had the ability to borrow up to an additional $218,743, based on assets pledged as collateral. We had no investment securities that were restricted from being pledged for specific purposes.
Derivative Instruments
We use interest rate swaps to manage exposure to interest rate risk and variability in cash flows. The interest rate swap, associated with our variable rate borrowings, was designated upon inception as cash flow hedges of forecasted interest payments. We entered into a LIBOR-based interest rate swap that involves the receipt of variable amounts in exchange for fixed rate payments, in effect converting variable rate debt to fixed rate debt.
Cash flow hedges are assessed for effectiveness using regression analysis. The effective portion of changes in fair value are recorded in OCI and subsequently reclassified into interest expense in the same period in which the related interest on the variable rate borrowings affects earnings. In the event that a portion of the changes in fair value were determined to be ineffective, the ineffective amount would be recorded in earnings.
The following tables provide information on derivatives related to variable rate borrowings as of:
March 31, 2021
Pay RateReceive RateRemaining Life (Years)Notional AmountBalance Sheet LocationFair Value
Derivatives designated as hedging instruments
Cash Flow Hedges:
Interest rate swaps1.56 %3-Month LIBOR0.1$10,000 Other liabilities$(28)
December 31, 2020
Pay RateReceive RateRemaining Life (Years)Notional AmountBalance Sheet LocationFair Value
Derivatives designated as hedging instruments
Cash Flow Hedges:
Interest rate swaps1.56 %3-Month LIBOR0.3$10,000 Other liabilities$(54)
Derivatives contain an element of credit risk which arises from the possibility that we will incur a loss as a result of a counterparty failing to meet its contractual obligations. Credit risk is minimized through counterparty collateral, transaction limits and monitoring procedures. We also manage dealer credit risk by entering into interest rate derivatives only with primary and highly rated counterparties, the use of ISDA master agreements, and the use of counterparty limits. We do not anticipate any losses from failure of interest rate derivative counterparties to honor their obligations.

25

Note 6 – Computation of Earnings Per Common Share
Basic earnings per common share represents income available to common shareholders divided by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per common share includes additional common shares that would have been outstanding if dilutive potential common shares had been issued. Potential common shares that may be issued relate solely to outstanding shares in the Directors Plan and grant awards under the RSP.
Earnings per common share have been computed based on the following for the:
 Three Months Ended 
 March 31
20212020
Average number of common shares outstanding for basic calculation7,969,462 7,892,421 
Average potential effect of common shares in the Directors Plan (1)
114,384 163,186 
Average potential effect of common shares in the RSP4,678 
Average number of common shares outstanding used to calculate diluted earnings per common share8,088,524 8,055,607 
Net income$5,398 $3,064 
Earnings per common share
Basic$0.68 $0.39 
Diluted$0.67 $0.38 
(1)Exclusive of shares held in the Rabbi Trust
Note 7 – Restricted Stock Plan
We adopted the RSP, an equity-based bonus plan, in 2020. Under the RSP, we may award restricted stock bonuses to eligible employees on an annual basis that are not fully transferable or vested until certain conditions are met. Currently, the eligible employees are the Corporation's President and CEO, CFO and the Bank's President. The RSP authorizes the issuance of unvested restricted stock to an eligible employee with a maximum award ranging from 25% to 40% of the employee’s annual salary, on a calendar year basis. The employee must also satisfy the annual performance targets and measures established by the Board of Directors. If these grant conditions are not satisfied, then the award of restricted shares will lapse or be adjusted appropriately, at the discretion of the Board of Directors. All Grant Agreements contain vesting conditions and clawback provisions. Expense related to RSP awards was $4 for the three-month period ended March 31, 2021. There was no expense for three-month period ended March 31, 2020.
Note 8 – Other Noninterest Expenses
A summary of expenses included in other noninterest expenses is as follows for the:
Three Months Ended 
 March 31
20212020
Audit, consulting, and legal fees$436 $433 
ATM and debit card fees417 323 
FDIC insurance premiums231 156 
Memberships and subscriptions211 199 
Marketing costs209 203 
Loan underwriting fees190 166 
Director fees159 182 
Donations and community relations146 330 
All other623 756 
Total other noninterest expenses$2,622 $2,748 

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Note 9 – Federal Income Taxes
The reconciliation of the provision for federal income taxes and the amount computed at the federal statutory tax rate of income before federal income tax expense is as follows for the:
Three Months Ended 
 March 31
20212020
Income taxes at statutory rate$1,352 $686 
Effect of nontaxable income
Interest income on tax exempt municipal securities(172)(203)
Earnings on corporate owned life insurance policies(70)(148)
Other(6)(4)
Total effect of nontaxable income(248)(355)
Effect of nondeductible expenses
Effect of tax credits(72)(132)
Federal income tax expense$1,041 $203 
Note 10 – Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income
The following table summarizes the changes in AOCI by component for the:
Three Months Ended March 31
20212020
Unrealized
Gains
(Losses) on
AFS
Securities
Unrealized
Gains
(Losses) on Derivative Instruments
Defined
Benefit
Pension Plan
TotalUnrealized
Gains
(Losses) on
AFS
Securities
Unrealized
Gains
(Losses) on Derivative Instruments
Defined
Benefit
Pension Plan
Total
Balance, January 1$10,485 $(42)$(2,745)$7,698 $4,612 $54 $(2,695)$1,971 
OCI before reclassifications(3,545)26 (3,519)6,311 (136)6,175 
Amounts reclassified from AOCI(71)(71)
Subtotal(3,545)26 (3,519)6,240 (136)6,104 
Tax effect742 (5)737 (1,393)28 (1,365)
OCI, net of tax(2,803)21 (2,782)4,847 (108)4,739 
Balance, March 31$7,682 $(21)$(2,745)$4,916 $9,459 $(54)$(2,695)$6,710 
Included in OCI for the three-month periods ended March 31, 2021 and 2020 are changes in unrealized gains and losses related to auction rate money market preferred stocks. These investments, for federal income tax purposes, have no deferred federal income taxes related to unrealized gains or losses given the nature of the investments.
27

A summary of the components of unrealized gains on AFS securities included in OCI follows for the:
 Three Months Ended March 31
 20212020
Auction Rate Money Market Preferred StocksAll Other AFS SecuritiesTotalAuction Rate Money Market Preferred StocksAll Other AFS SecuritiesTotal
Unrealized gains (losses) arising during the period$(13)$(3,532)$(3,545)$(393)$6,704 $6,311 
Reclassification adjustment for net (gains) losses included in net income(71)(71)
Net unrealized gains (losses)(13)(3,532)(3,545)(393)6,633 6,240 
Tax effect742 742 (1,393)(1,393)
Unrealized gains (losses), net of tax$(13)$(2,790)$(2,803)$(393)$5,240 $4,847 
Note 11 – Fair Value
Under fair value measurement and disclosure authoritative guidance, we group assets and liabilities measured at fair value into three levels, based on the markets in which the assets and liabilities are traded, and the reliability of the assumptions used to determine fair value, based on the prioritization of inputs in the valuation techniques. These levels are:
Level 1:Valuation is based upon quoted prices for identical instruments traded in active markets.
Level 2:Valuation is based upon quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active and model-based valuation techniques for which all significant assumptions are observable in the market.
Level 3:Valuation is generated from model-based techniques that use at least one significant assumption not observable in the market. These unobservable assumptions reflect estimates of assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability.
The asset’s or liability’s fair value measurement level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest level of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement. Valuation techniques maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. Transfers between measurement levels are recognized at the end of reporting periods.
Fair value measurement requires the use of an exit price notion which may differ from entrance pricing. Generally we believe our assets and liabilities classified as Level 1 or Level 2 approximate an exit price notion.
Following is a description of the valuation methodologies, key inputs, and an indication of the level of the fair value hierarchy in which the assets or liabilities are classified.
AFS securities: AFS securities are recorded at fair value on a recurring basis. Level 1 fair value measurement is based upon quoted prices for identical instruments. Level 2 fair value measurement is based upon quoted prices for similar instruments. If quoted prices are not available, fair values are measured using independent pricing models or other model-based valuation techniques such as the present value of future cash flows, adjusted for the security’s credit rating, prepayment assumptions and other factors such as credit loss and liquidity assumptions. The values for Level 1 and Level 2 investment securities are generally obtained from an independent third party. On a quarterly basis, we compare the values provided to alternative pricing sources.
Loans: We do not record loans at fair value on a recurring basis. However, some loans are classified as impaired and a specific allowance for loan losses may be established. Loans for which it is probable that payment of interest and principal will be significantly different than the contractual terms of the original loan agreement are considered impaired. Once a loan is identified as impaired, we measure the estimated impairment. The fair value of impaired loans is estimated using one of several methods, including the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, or the fair value of the collateral, less costs to sell, if the loan is collateral dependent. Those impaired loans not requiring an allowance represent loans for which the fair value of the expected repayments or collateral exceed the recorded investments in such loans.
We review the net realizable values of the underlying collateral for collateral dependent impaired loans on at least a quarterly basis for all loan types. To determine the collateral value, we utilize independent appraisals, broker price opinions, or internal evaluations. We review these valuations to determine whether an additional discount should be applied given the age of market information that may have been considered as well as other factors such as costs to sell an asset if it is determined that the
28

collateral will be liquidated in connection with the ultimate settlement of the loan. We use these valuations to determine if any specific reserves or charge-offs are necessary. We may obtain new valuations in certain circumstances, including when there has been significant deterioration in the condition of the collateral, if the foreclosure process has begun, or if the existing valuation is deemed to be outdated.
The following tables list the quantitative fair value information about impaired loans as of:
March 31, 2021
Valuation TechniqueFair ValueUnobservable InputActual RangeWeighted Average
Discount applied to collateral:
Real Estate20% - 30%23%
Equipment20% - 35%31%
Cash crop inventory40%40%
Discounted value$25,504Livestock30%30%
Other inventory50%50%
Accounts receivable25% - 50%30%
Liquor license75%75%
Furniture, fixtures & equipment45%45%
December 31, 2020
Valuation TechniqueFair ValueUnobservable InputActual RangeWeighted Average
Discount applied to collateral:
Real Estate20% - 30%23%
Equipment20% - 50%32%
Discounted value$19,540Cash crop inventory40%40%
Livestock30%30%
Other inventory50%50%
Accounts receivable25% - 50%27%
Liquor license75%75%
Collateral discount rates may have ranges to accommodate differences in the age of the independent appraisal, broker price opinion, or internal evaluation.
Derivative instruments: Derivative instruments, consisting solely of interest rate swaps, are recorded at fair value on a recurring basis. Derivatives qualifying as cash flow hedges, when highly effective, are reported at fair value in other assets or other liabilities on our Consolidated Balance Sheets with changes in value recorded in OCI. Should the hedge no longer be considered effective, the ineffective portion of the change in fair value is recorded directly in earnings in the period in which the change occurs. The fair value of a derivative is determined by quoted market prices and model-based valuation techniques. As such, we classify derivative instruments as Level 2.
OMSR: OMSR (which are included in other assets) are subject to impairment testing. To test for impairment, we utilize a discounted cash flow analysis using interest rates and prepayment speed assumptions currently quoted for comparable instruments and discount rates. If the valuation model reflects a value less than the carrying value, OMSR are adjusted to fair value through a valuation allowance as determined by the model. As such, we classify OMSR subject to nonrecurring fair value adjustments as Level 2.
The preceding methods described may produce a fair value calculation that may not be indicative of net realizable value or reflective of future fair values. Although we believe our valuation methods are appropriate and consistent with other market participants, the use of different methodologies or assumptions to determine the fair value of certain financial instruments could result in a different fair value measurement.
29

Estimated Fair Values of Financial Instruments Not Recorded at Fair Value in their Entirety on a Recurring Basis
Disclosure of the estimated fair values of financial instruments, which differ from carrying values, often requires the use of estimates. In cases where quoted market values in an active market are not available, we use present value techniques and other valuation methods to estimate the fair values of our financial instruments. These valuation methods require considerable judgment and the resulting estimates of fair value can be significantly affected by the assumptions made and methods used.
The carrying amount and estimated fair value of financial instruments not recorded at fair value in their entirety on a recurring basis were as follows as of:
 March 31, 2021
Carrying
Value
Estimated
Fair Value
Level 1Level 2Level 3
ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents$321,567 $321,567 $321,567 $$
Mortgage loans AFS1,965 1,983 1,983 
Gross loans1,195,918 1,195,343 1,195,343 
Less allowance for loan and lease losses9,271 9,271 9,271 
Net loans1,186,647 1,186,072 1,186,072 
Accrued interest receivable6,422 6,422 6,422 
Equity securities without readily determinable fair values (1)
17,383 N/A
OMSR2,276 2,503 2,503 
LIABILITIES
Deposits without stated maturities1,288,838 1,288,838 1,288,838 
Deposits with stated maturities354,743 359,655 359,655 
Borrowed funds141,967 143,067 143,067 
Accrued interest payable459 459 459 
 December 31, 2020
 Carrying
Value
Estimated
Fair Value
Level 1Level 2Level 3
ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents$246,640 $246,640 $246,640 $$
Mortgage loans AFS2,741 2,858 2,858 
Gross loans1,238,311 1,239,718 1,239,718 
Less allowance for loan and lease losses9,744 9,744 9,744 
Net loans1,228,567 1,229,974 1,229,974 
Accrued interest receivable6,882 6,882 6,882 
Equity securities without readily determinable fair values (1)
17,383 N/A
OMSR2,308 2,480 2,480 
LIABILITIES
Deposits without stated maturities1,183,336 1,183,336 1,183,336 
Deposits with stated maturities382,981 389,455 389,455 
Borrowed funds158,747 160,250 160,250 
Accrued interest payable481 481 481 
(1)Due to the characteristics of equity securities without readily determinable fair values, they are not disclosed under a specific fair value hierarchy. When an impairment or write-down related to these securities is recorded, such amount would be classified as a nonrecurring Level 3 fair value adjustment.
30

Financial Instruments Recorded at Fair Value
The table below presents the recorded amount of assets and liabilities measured at fair value on:
 March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
TotalLevel 1Level 2Level 3TotalLevel 1Level 2Level 3
Recurring items
AFS securities
U.S. Treasury$29,371 $$29,371 $$$$$
States and political subdivisions140,329 140,329 143,656 143,656 
Auction rate money market preferred3,224 3,224 3,237 3,237 
Mortgage-backed securities75,835 75,835 88,652 88,652 
Collateralized mortgage obligations116,865 116,865 101,983 101,983 
Corporate1,700 1,700 1,700 1,700 
Total AFS securities367,324 367,324 339,228 339,228 
Derivative instruments28 28 54 54 
Nonrecurring items
Impaired loans (net of the ALLL)25,504 25,504 19,540 19,540 
OMSR2,276 2,276 2,308 2,308 
Foreclosed assets384 384 527 527 
Total$395,516 $0 $369,628 $25,888 $361,657 $0 $341,590 $20,067 
Percent of assets and liabilities measured at fair value%93.45 %6.55 %%94.45 %5.55 %
We recorded an impairment related to OMSR of $0 and $245 through earnings for the three-month period ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. We recorded losses of $0 and $6 through earnings related to the fair value changes in foreclosed assets for the three-month period ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. We had no other assets or liabilities recorded at fair value with changes in fair value recognized through earnings, on a recurring basis or nonrecurring basis, as of March 31, 2021. Further, we had no unrealized gains and losses included in OCI for recurring Level 3 fair value measurements held at the end of the reporting period.
Note 12 – Operating Segments
Our reportable segments are based on legal entities that account for at least 10% of net operating results. The Bank as of March 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020 and for the three-month periods ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, represent approximately 90% or more of our consolidated total assets and operating results. As such, no additional segment reporting is presented.

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Note 13 – Parent Company Only Financial Information
Interim Condensed Balance Sheets
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
ASSETS
Cash on deposit at the Bank$2,366 $2,670 
Investments in subsidiaries167,788 166,096 
Premises and equipment1,517 1,529 
Other assets47,874 48,352 
TOTAL ASSETS$219,545 $218,647 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Other liabilities$1,263 $59 
Shareholders' equity218,282 218,588 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY$219,545 $218,647 
Interim Condensed Statements of Income
Three Months Ended 
 March 31
20212020
Income
Dividends from subsidiaries$1,300 $1,750 
Interest income
Other income (loss)
Total income1,306 1,752 
Expenses
Occupancy and equipment16 15 
Audit, consulting, and legal fees118 132 
Director fees85 94 
Other264 293 
Total expenses483 534 
Income before income tax benefit and equity in undistributed earnings of subsidiaries823 1,218 
Federal income tax benefit100 112 
Income before equity in undistributed earnings of subsidiaries923 1,330 
Undistributed earnings of subsidiaries4,475 1,734 
Net income$5,398 $3,064 
32

Interim Condensed Statements of Cash Flows
Three Months Ended 
 March 31
20212020
Operating activities
Net income$5,398 $3,064 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to cash provided by operations
Undistributed earnings of subsidiaries(4,475)(1,734)
Undistributed earnings of equity securities without readily determinable fair values94 
Share-based payment awards under the Directors Plan160 123 
Share-based payment awards under the RSP
Depreciation13 11 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities which provided (used) cash
Other assets478 (100)
Other liabilities1,204 
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities2,782 1,466 
Investing activities
Financing activities
Cash dividends paid on common stock(2,130)(2,122)
Proceeds from the issuance of common stock387 1,330 
Common stock repurchased(1,149)(1,168)
Common stock purchased for deferred compensation obligations(194)(650)
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities(3,086)(2,610)
Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents(304)(1,144)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period2,670 1,360 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period$2,366 $216 
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Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
ISABELLA BANK CORPORATION FINANCIAL REVIEW
(Dollars in thousands except per share amounts)
The following is management's discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations for the unaudited three-month periods ended March 31, 2021 and 2020. This analysis should be read in conjunction with our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020 and with the unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements and notes, beginning on page 4 of this report.
Executive Summary
During the three months ended March 31, 2021, we reported net income of $5,398 and earnings per common share of $0.68. Net income and earnings per common share for the same periods of 2020 were $3,064 and $0.39, respectively. A decline in the interest rate environment was a large driver of a $911 decrease in interest income for the first three months of 2021 compared to the same period in 2020. Interest expense on deposits and borrowings decreased $2,110 for the three-month period ended March 31, 2021 compared to the same period in 2020 primarily due to reduced interest rates and reduced reliance on higher-cost borrowings. Net interest income increased by $1,199 for the three-month period ended March 31, 2021 in comparison to the same period in 2020. The provision for loan losses decreased by $1,311 for the three-month period ended March 31, 2021 compared to the same period in 2020. During 2020, increased economic and environmental risk factors, predominantly driven by COVID-19, drove a significant increase in the provision. During 2021, improvement in credit quality indicators, such as past due and nonaccrual loans and unemployment rates, resulted in a reduction in the ALLL and provision reversal. Noninterest income increased $534 during the first three months of 2021 compared to the same period in 2020, mainly as a result of net gain on sold mortgage loans. Noninterest expenses for the first three months of 2021 declined $128 in comparison to the same period in 2020 and can be attributed to strong operating expense control.
As of March 31, 2021, total assets and assets under management were $2,015,432 and $2,768,405, respectively. Assets under management include loans sold and serviced of $298,514 and investment and trust assets managed by Isabella Wealth of $454,459, in addition to assets on our consolidated balance sheet. Our securities portfolio increased $28,096 since December 31, 2020, predominantly due to purchases of treasury securities. Loans outstanding as of March 31, 2021 totaled $1,195,918. During the first three months of 2021, gross loans declined $42,393 which was largely driven by a decrease in advances to mortgage brokers. Total deposits were $1,643,581 as of March 31, 2021, which was an increase of $77,264 since December 31, 2020. Increases in demand and savings deposits, largely as a result of SBA PPP and government stimulus funds, were the main drivers of the increase in deposits. All regulatory capital ratios for the Bank exceeded the minimum thresholds to be considered a “well capitalized” institution.
Our net yield on interest earning assets (FTE) was 2.98% for the three months ended March 31, 2021, as compared to 2.98% for the three months ended March 31, 2020. Management implemented strategic programs focused on improving our net yield on interest earning assets, which includes enhanced pricing related to loans and a reduced reliance on higher-cost borrowed funds and brokered deposits as funding sources. While these efforts have helped, the current interest rate environment has had a negative impact on the yield of interest earning assets and future improvements may be gradual. We are committed to increasing earnings and shareholder value through growth in our loan portfolio while maintaining strong underwriting standards, growth in our wealth management services, managing operating costs and increasing our presence within our geographical footprint.
Recent Events and Legislation
Impact of COVID-19: Unexpected and unprecedented changes have occurred during 2020 and into 2021 as the result of COVID-19.  This aggressive and persistent virus causes a respiratory disease and can result in serious illness or death.  The World Health Organization has declared the situation a global pandemic. The pandemic created significant market volatility, economic uncertainty, and disruption to normal business operations around the world, with slowdowns and shutdowns affecting entire industries.
The CARES Act, an unprecedented federal government support program, was enacted on March 27, 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.  It is a $2 trillion stimulus package intended to provide financial relief across the country. The CARES Act included the PPP, which enabled businesses to obtain a forgivable SBA loan to meet payroll, rent, utility, and mortgage interest obligations for the 24-week period following the loan origination, and re-open quickly once the public health crisis ends. The first applications for PPP funds, with a term of two years, were accepted beginning on April 3, 2020.  During 2020, we facilitated more than 950 SBA PPP loans for a total of $99,459 and we are pleased to have the opportunity to continue providing funding in 2021 under an additional government stimulus program. As of March 31, 2021, we funded over 650 SBA
34

PPP loans for a total of $49,868 under this additional government stimulus program. Bank regulators issued an interim rule that neutralizes the regulatory capital effects by allowing a zero percent risk weight, for capital purposes, to loans originated under the PPP. The capital rule was issued April 9, 2020, with an immediate effective date.
During 2020, many of our customers expressed their general concern about the uncertain economic conditions, but it is still premature to reasonably predict the magnitude of the impact. One measure we deployed to assist our customers included changes to service charges and fees on deposit accounts. Since the COVID-19 pandemic led to an increase in the need for electronic services and products, we elected to temporarily waive certain charges and fees, and permanently remove some charges and fees, to ease the financial stress on our customers. Other measures we have taken to assist our customers include loan programs that provide short-term payment relief. Under these programs, borrowers whose loans were in good standing as of March 1, 2020 could elect to defer full or partial payments for a period not to exceed 180 days.  Loan payment deferrals totaled $306,103, or 23.8% of gross loans, as of June 30, 2020. As of September 30, 2020, active loan payment deferrals declined to $103,858, or 8.0% of gross loans, as the majority of borrowers granted loan payment deferrals had reverted back to contractual payments. As of December 31, 2020, active loan payment deferrals declined even further and totaled $6,048, or 0.5% of gross loans. As of March 31, 2021, we had active loan payment deferrals totaling $5,974, or 0.5% of gross loans.
Bank regulators issued a statement on March 22, 2020, and a revised statement on April 7, 2020, which provided confirmation that short-term loan modifications made on a good faith basis in response to COVID-19 to borrowers with a current payment status are not categorized as TDRs. Pursuant to this guidance, short-term loan modifications meeting this criteria were not categorized as TDR as of March 31, 2021. These programs, along with the SBA PPP, could mask or delay the detection or reporting of deterioration in credit quality indicators.
The extent to which COVID-19 impacts our business will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with any accuracy. Future developments include new information which may emerge concerning the severity of COVID-19 and the actions to contain the coronavirus or treat its impact, among others. We expect the significance of the pandemic, including the extent of its effect on our financial and operational results, to be dictated by, among other factors, its duration, the success of efforts to contain it and the impact of actions taken in response, including the development and distribution of effective vaccines. Uncertainty created by the pandemic is pervasive, and has impacted our operations, customers, and various areas of risk. With the uncertainty created by COVID-19, it's challenging to determine the full impact of our ongoing financial and operational results. We continue to closely monitor external events and are in continual discussion with our customers to assess, prepare and respond to conditions as they evolve.
Reclassifications
Certain amounts reported in the interim 2020 consolidated financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the 2021 presentation.
Subsequent Events
We evaluated subsequent events after March 31, 2021 through the date our interim condensed consolidated financial statements were issued for potential recognition and disclosure. No subsequent events require financial statement recognition or disclosure between March 31, 2021 and the date our interim condensed consolidated financial statements were issued.
35

Results of Operations (Unaudited)
The following table outlines our quarter-to-date results of operations and provides certain performance measures as of, and for the three-month periods ended:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
September 30
2020
June 30
2020
March 31
2020
INCOME STATEMENT DATA
Interest income$15,290 $16,402 $15,700 $15,869 $16,201 
Interest expense2,089 2,858 3,203 3,565 4,199 
Net interest income13,201 13,544 12,497 12,304 12,002 
Provision for loan losses(523)256 516 105 788 
Noninterest income3,532 4,119 4,060 3,246 2,998 
Noninterest expenses10,817 18,638 10,950 10,700 10,945 
Federal income tax expense (benefit)1,041 (508)734 558 203 
Net income (loss)$5,398 $(723)$4,357 $4,187 $3,064 
PER SHARE
Basic earnings (loss)$0.68 $(0.10)$0.55 $0.53 $0.39 
Diluted earnings (loss)$0.67 $(0.10)$0.54 $0.52 $0.38 
Dividends$0.27 $0.27 $0.27 $0.27 $0.27 
Tangible book value$21.35 $21.29 $21.75 $21.52 $21.10 
Quoted market value
High$22.50 $21.95 $19.00 $19.50 $24.50 
Low$19.45 $15.73 $15.75 $15.60 $16.00 
Close (1)
$21.75 $19.57 $16.74 $18.25 $18.00 
Common shares outstanding (1)
7,958,883 7,997,247 8,007,901 7,977,019 7,921,291 
PERFORMANCE RATIOS
Return on average total assets1.09 %(0.15)%0.90 %0.89 %0.68 %
Return on average shareholders' equity9.78 %(1.30)%7.78 %7.63 %5.68 %
Return on average tangible shareholders' equity12.53 %(1.63)%9.93 %9.81 %7.35 %
Net interest margin yield (FTE)2.98 %3.04 %2.89 %2.92 %2.98 %
BALANCE SHEET DATA (1)
Gross loans$1,195,918 $1,238,311 $1,303,308 $1,284,385 $1,175,936 
AFS securities$367,324 $339,228 $363,054 $380,414 $407,189 
Total assets$2,015,432 $1,957,378 $1,971,697 $1,913,227 $1,815,904 
Deposits$1,643,581 $1,566,317 $1,495,095 $1,440,678 $1,322,083 
Borrowed funds$141,967 $158,747 $238,349 $236,268 $263,171 
Shareholders' equity$218,282 $218,588 $222,545 $219,991 $215,498 
Gross loans to deposits72.76 %79.06 %87.17 %89.15 %88.95 %
ASSETS UNDER MANAGEMENT (1)
Loans sold with servicing retained$298,514 $301,377 $289,524 $263,332 $257,285 
Assets managed by Isabella Wealth$454,459 $443,967 $403,730 $395,214 $359,968 
Total assets under management$2,768,405 $2,702,722 $2,664,951 $2,571,773 $2,433,157 
ASSET QUALITY (1)
Nonperforming loans to gross loans0.38 %0.43 %0.38 %0.42 %0.59 %
Nonperforming assets to total assets0.26 %0.31 %0.30 %0.33 %0.43 %
ALLL to gross loans0.78 %0.79 %0.73 %0.69 %0.74 %
CAPITAL RATIOS (1)
Shareholders' equity to assets10.83 %11.17 %11.29 %11.50 %11.87 %
Tier 1 leverage8.56 %8.37 %8.76 %8.86 %9.09 %
Common equity tier 1 capital13.77 %12.97 %12.90 %12.90 %12.72 %
Tier 1 risk-based capital13.77 %12.97 %12.90 %12.90 %12.72 %
Total risk-based capital14.54 %13.75 %13.64 %13.60 %13.41 %
(1) At end of period
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The following table outlines our year-to-date results of operations and provides certain performance measures as of, and for the three-month periods ended:
March 31
2021
March 31
2020
March 31
2019
INCOME STATEMENT DATA
Interest income$15,290 $16,201 $16,481 
Interest expense2,089 4,199 4,292 
Net interest income13,201 12,002 12,189 
Provision for loan losses(523)788 34 
Noninterest income3,532 2,998 2,490 
Noninterest expenses10,817 10,945 10,800 
Federal income tax expense1,041 203 349 
Net income$5,398 $3,064 $3,496 
PER SHARE
Basic earnings$0.68 $0.39 $0.44 
Diluted earnings$0.67 $0.38 $0.43 
Dividends$0.27 $0.27 $0.26 
Tangible book value$21.35 $21.10 $19.47 
Quoted market value
High$22.50 $24.50 $24.50 
Low$19.45 $16.00 $22.25 
Close (1)
$21.75 $18.00 $23.75 
Common shares outstanding (1)
7,958,883 7,921,291 7,906,078 
PERFORMANCE RATIOS
Return on average total assets1.09 %0.68 %0.77 %
Return on average shareholders' equity9.78 %5.68 %7.00 %
Return on average tangible shareholders' equity12.53 %7.35 %9.29 %
Net interest margin yield (FTE)2.98 %2.98 %3.02 %
BALANCE SHEET DATA (1)
Gross loans$1,195,918 $1,175,936 $1,144,832 
AFS securities$367,324 $407,189 $494,842 
Total assets$2,015,432 $1,815,904 $1,806,974 
Deposits$1,643,581 $1,322,083 $1,277,963 
Borrowed funds$141,967 $263,171 $311,684 
Shareholders' equity$218,282 $215,498 $202,413 
Gross loans to deposits72.76 %88.95 %89.58 %
ASSETS UNDER MANAGEMENT (1)
Loans sold with servicing retained$298,514 $257,285 $259,127 
Assets managed by Isabella Wealth$454,459 $359,968 $475,560 
Total assets under management$2,768,405 $2,433,157 $2,541,661 
ASSET QUALITY (1)
Nonperforming loans to gross loans0.38 %0.59 %0.64 %
Nonperforming assets to total assets0.26 %0.43 %0.44 %
ALLL to gross loans0.78 %0.74 %0.73 %
CAPITAL RATIOS (1)
Shareholders' equity to assets10.83 %11.87 %11.20 %
Tier 1 leverage8.56 %9.09 %8.91 %
Common equity tier 1 capital13.77 %12.72 %12.45 %
Tier 1 risk-based capital13.77 %12.72 %12.45 %
Total risk-based capital14.54 %13.41 %13.12 %
(1) At end of period
37

Average Balances, Interest Rates, and Net Interest Income
The following schedules present the daily average amount outstanding for each major category of interest earning assets, non-earning assets, interest bearing liabilities, and noninterest bearing liabilities. These schedules also present an analysis of interest income and interest expense for the periods indicated. All interest income is reported on a FTE basis using a federal income tax rate of 21%. Loans in nonaccrual status, for the purpose of the following computations, are included in the average loan balances. FRB and FHLB restricted equity holdings are included in other interest earning assets.
Three Months Ended
March 31, 2021December 31, 2020March 31, 2020
Average
Balance
Tax
Equivalent
Interest
Average
Yield /
Rate
Average
Balance
Tax
Equivalent
Interest
Average
Yield /
Rate
Average
Balance
Tax
Equivalent
Interest
Average
Yield /
Rate
INTEREST EARNING ASSETS
Loans$1,201,693 $13,097 4.36 %$1,258,775 $13,997 4.45 %$1,168,070 $13,254 4.54 %
Taxable investment securities190,450 1,165 2.45 %205,522 1,302 2.53 %251,797 1,489 2.37 %
Nontaxable investment securities131,850 1,194 3.62 %134,026 1,200 3.58 %152,368 1,418 3.72 %
Fed funds sold— — %— — %— — — %
Other295,104 163 0.22 %227,920 223 0.39 %90,297 405 1.79 %
Total earning assets1,819,099 15,619 3.43 %1,826,246 16,722 3.66 %1,662,532 16,566 3.99 %
NONEARNING ASSETS
Allowance for loan losses(9,833)(9,603)(7,968)
Cash and demand deposits due from banks28,944 28,606 21,556 
Premises and equipment25,151 25,656 26,252 
Accrued income and other assets113,101 119,230 110,786 
Total assets$1,976,462 $1,990,135 $1,813,158 
INTEREST BEARING LIABILITIES
Interest bearing demand deposits$315,189 $77 0.10 %$285,731 $94 0.13 %$235,161 $83 0.14 %
Savings deposits531,302 149 0.11 %487,014 148 0.12 %426,634 634 0.59 %
Time deposits367,892 1,442 1.57 %383,436 1,608 1.68 %404,717 2,074 2.05 %
Borrowed funds144,145 421 1.17 %224,155 1,008 1.80 %270,648 1,408 2.08 %
Total interest bearing liabilities1,358,528 2,089 0.62 %1,380,336 2,858 0.83 %1,337,160 4,199 1.26 %
NONINTEREST BEARING LIABILITIES
Demand deposits383,189 370,042 246,262 
Other13,910 16,446 14,130 
Shareholders’ equity220,835 223,311 215,606 
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity$1,976,462 $1,990,135 $1,813,158 
Net interest income (FTE)$13,530 $13,864 $12,367 
Net yield on interest earning assets (FTE)2.98 %3.04 %2.98 %
Net interest income is the amount by which interest income on earning assets exceeds the interest expense on interest bearing liabilities. Net interest income is influenced by changes in the balance and mix of assets and liabilities, as well as market interest rates. While we exert some control over these factors, FRB monetary policy and competition have a significant impact. For analytical purposes, net interest income is adjusted to an FTE basis by including the income tax savings from interest on tax exempt loans and nontaxable investment securities, thus making year to year comparisons more meaningful.
38

Volume and Rate Variance Analysis
The following table sets forth the effect of volume and rate changes on interest income and expense for the periods indicated. Changes in interest due to volume and rate were determined as follows:
Volume—change in volume multiplied by the previous period's rate.
Rate—change in the FTE rate multiplied by the previous period's volume.
The change in interest due to both volume and rate has been allocated to volume and rate changes in proportion to the relationship of the absolute dollar amounts of the change in each.
 Three Months Ended 
 March 31, 2021 Compared to 
 December 31, 2020 
 Increase (Decrease) Due to
Three Months Ended 
 March 31, 2021 Compared to 
 March 31, 2020 
 Increase (Decrease) Due to
VolumeRateNetVolumeRateNet
Changes in interest income
Loans$(626)$(274)$(900)$375 $(532)$(157)
Taxable investment securities(93)(44)(137)(374)50 (324)
Nontaxable investment securities(20)14 (6)(187)(37)(224)
Other54 (114)(60)338 (580)(242)
Total changes in interest income(685)(418)(1,103)152 (1,099)(947)
Changes in interest expense
Interest bearing demand deposits(26)(17)24 (30)(6)
Savings deposits13 (12)126 (611)(485)
Time deposits(64)(102)(166)(176)(456)(632)
Borrowed funds(296)(291)(587)(509)(478)(987)
Total changes in interest expense(338)(431)(769)(535)(1,575)(2,110)
Net change in interest margin (FTE)$(347)$13 $(334)$687 $476 $1,163 
The flattening of the yield curve continues to place pressure on our net interest margin and led to a decline in our net yield on interest earning assets. Given the uncertainty in rates and the economic environment as a result of COVID-19, improvement in our net yield on interest earning assets could be gradual.
 Average Yield / Rate for the Three-Month Periods Ended:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
September 30
2020
June 30
2020
March 31
2020
Total earning assets3.43 %3.66 %3.61 %3.74 %3.99 %
Total interest bearing liabilities0.62 %0.83 %0.95 %1.07 %1.26 %
Net yield on interest earning assets (FTE)2.98 %3.04 %2.89 %2.92 %2.98 %
 Quarter to Date Net Interest Income (FTE)
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
September 30
2020
June 30
2020
March 31
2020
Total interest income (FTE)$15,619 $16,722 $16,027 $16,216 $16,566 
Total interest expense2,089 2,858 3,203 3,565 4,199 
Net interest income (FTE)$13,530 $13,864 $12,824 $12,651 $12,367 
39

Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses
The viability of any financial institution is ultimately determined by its management of credit risk. Loans represent our single largest concentration of risk. The ALLL is our estimation of incurred losses within the existing loan portfolio. We allocate the ALLL throughout the loan portfolio based on our assessment of the underlying risks associated within each loan segment. Our assessments include allocations based on specific impairment valuation allowances, historical charge-offs, internally assigned credit risk ratings, and past due and nonaccrual balances. A portion of the ALLL is not allocated to any one loan segment, but is instead a representation of other qualitative risks that reflect the margin of imprecision inherent in the underlying assumptions used in the methodologies for estimating specific and general losses in the portfolio.
The following table summarizes our charge-offs, recoveries, provision for loan losses, and ALLL balances as of, and for the:
Three Months Ended 
 March 31
20212020
ALLL at beginning of period$9,744 $7,939 
Charge-offs
Commercial31 
Agricultural— 16 
Residential real estate— 15 
Consumer128 123 
Total charge-offs159 158 
Recoveries
Commercial82 22 
Agricultural33 
Residential real estate55 27 
Consumer70 46 
Total recoveries209 128 
Net loan charge-offs (recoveries)(50)30 
Provision for loan losses(523)788 
ALLL at end of period$9,271 $8,697 
Net loan charge-offs (recoveries) to average loans outstanding % %
The following table summarizes our charge-offs, recoveries, provisions for loan losses, and ALLL balances as of, and for the three-month periods ended:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
September 30
2020
June 30
2020
March 31
2020
Total charge-offs$159 $111 $46 $66 $158 
Total recoveries209 93 159 141 128 
Net loan charge-offs (recoveries)(50)18 (113)(75)30 
Net loan charge-offs (recoveries) to average loans outstanding % %(0.01)%(0.01)% %
Provision for loan losses$(523)$256 $516 $105 $788 
Provision for loan losses to average loans outstanding(0.04)%0.02 %0.04 %0.01 %0.07 %
ALLL$9,271 $9,744 $9,506 $8,877 $8,697 
ALLL as a % of loans at end of period0.78 %0.79 %0.73 %0.69 %0.74 %
While we have experienced fluctuations in credit quality indicators in recent periods, credit quality remained strong at March 31, 2021. The COVID-19 pandemic led to the temporary and some permanent closures of businesses throughout the communities in which we serve, which also led to increased unemployment. We increased the ALLL during 2020 as a result of increased economic and environmental related risk factors, primarily driven by COVID-19. While these risk factors remain in 2021, improvement in credit quality indicators and a reduction in loans outstanding resulted in a reduction to the ALLL as of March 31, 2021.
40

The economic impact from the COVID-19 pandemic could pose significant credit risk due to the potential inability of consumer and commercial borrowers to make contractual payments. In late March 2020, we implemented payment programs for borrowers to alleviate the financial setback due to the temporary closure of businesses and lost wages. These programs, along with the SBA PPP and government stimulus funding, could mask or delay the detection or reporting of deterioration in credit quality indicators. We continue to monitor the economic impact from COVID-19 as it relates to credit risk to ensure the ALLL is appropriate.
The following table illustrates the two main components of the ALLL as of:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
September 30
2020
June 30
2020
March 31
2020
ALLL
Individually evaluated for impairment$1,380 $911 $869 $950 $1,309 
Collectively evaluated for impairment7,891 8,833 8,637 7,927 7,388 
Total$9,271 $9,744 $9,506 $8,877 $8,697 
ALLL to gross loans
Individually evaluated for impairment0.12 %0.07 %0.07 %0.07 %0.11 %
Collectively evaluated for impairment0.66 %0.72 %0.66 %0.62 %0.63 %
Total0.78 %0.79 %0.73 %0.69 %0.74 %
While we utilize our best judgment and information available, the ultimate adequacy of the ALLL is dependent upon a variety of factors beyond our control, including the performance of our borrowers, the economy, and changes in interest rates. We closely monitor overall credit quality indicators and our policies and procedures related to the analysis of the ALLL to ensure that the ALLL remains at an appropriate level.
For further discussion of the allocation of the ALLL, see “Note 4 – Loans and ALLL” of our interim condensed consolidated financial statements.
Loans Past Due and Loans in Nonaccrual Status
Fluctuations in past due and nonaccrual status loans can have a significant impact on the ALLL. To determine the potential impact, and corresponding estimated losses, we analyze our historical loss trends on loans past due greater than 30 days and nonaccrual status loans for indications of additional deterioration.
 Total Past Due and Nonaccrual Loans
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
September 30
2020
June 30
2020
March 31
2020
Commercial$1,434 $2,148 $2,082 $1,986 $6,180 
Agricultural3,051 3,786 3,903 4,455 4,870 
Residential real estate1,344 3,580 1,160 384 3,426 
Consumer34 96 72 45 366 
Total$5,863 $9,610 $7,217 $6,870 $14,842 
Total past due and nonaccrual loans to gross loans0.49 %0.78 %0.55 %0.53 %1.26 %
The increase in past due and nonaccrual status loans during the first quarter of 2020 was primarily the result of deterioration in credit quality for a small number of commercial loans. This increase was not a result of the economic impact of COVID-19 or any other apparent factor.
A summary of loans past due and in nonaccrual status, including the composition of the ending balance of nonaccrual status loans by type, is included in “Note 4 – Loans and ALLL” of our interim condensed consolidated financial statements.
41

Troubled Debt Restructurings
We have taken a proactive approach modifying loans to assist borrowers who are willing to work with us, thus making them less likely to default, and to avoid foreclosure. This approach has permitted certain borrowers to accept a payment structure that will allow them to continue making payments in lieu of foreclosure. Modifications have been successful for us and our customers as very few of the modified loans have resulted in foreclosures. The majority of modifications result in terms that satisfy our criteria for continued interest accrual. TDRs that have been placed in nonaccrual status may be placed back on accrual status after six months of continued performance and achievement of current payment status.
We restructure debt with borrowers who, due to financial difficulties, are unable to service their debt under the original terms. We may extend the amortization period, reduce interest rates, allow temporary interest-only payment structures, forgive principal, forgive interest, or grant a combination of these modifications. Typically, the modifications are for a period of three years or less. There were no TDRs that were government sponsored as of March 31, 2021 or December 31, 2020.
Losses associated with TDRs, if any, are included in the estimation of the ALLL during the quarter in which a loan is identified as a TDR, and we review the analysis of the ALLL estimation each reporting period thereafter to ensure its continued appropriateness.
The following tables provide roll-forwards of TDRs for the:
Three Months Ended March 31, 2021
 Accruing InterestNonaccrualTotal
Number
of
Loans
BalanceNumber
of
Loans
BalanceNumber
of
Loans
Balance
January 1, 2021108 $22,200 7 $2,730 115 $24,930 
New modifications8,364 — — 8,364 
Principal advances (payments)— (1,060)— (162)— (1,222)
Loans paid off(4)(557)— — (4)(557)
March 31, 2021113 $28,947 7 $2,568 120 $31,515 
Three Months Ended March 31, 2020
 Accruing InterestNonaccrualTotal
Number
of
Loans
BalanceNumber
of
Loans
BalanceNumber
of
Loans
Balance
January 1, 2020122 $21,194 9 $3,543 131 $24,737 
New modifications1,156 493 1,649 
Principal advances (payments)— (984)— (106)— (1,090)
Loans paid off(13)(1,098)— — (13)(1,098)
Transfers to OREO— — (1)(81)(1)(81)
March 31, 2020114 $20,268 9 $3,849 123 $24,117 
The following table summarizes our TDRs as of:
 March 31, 2021December 31, 2020 
Accruing
Interest
NonaccrualTotalAccruing
Interest
NonaccrualTotalTotal
Change
Current$28,625 $2,441 $31,066 $22,017 $2,421 $24,438 $6,628 
Past due 30-59 days322 — 322 183 — 183 139 
Past due 60-89 days— 103 103 — — — 103 
Past due 90 days or more— 24 24 — 309 309 (285)
Total$28,947 $2,568 $31,515 $22,200 $2,730 $24,930 $6,585 
Additional disclosures about TDRs are included in “Note 4 – Loans and ALLL” of our interim condensed consolidated financial statements.

42

Impaired Loans
The following is a summary of information pertaining to impaired loans as of:
 March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
Recorded
Balance
Unpaid
Principal
Balance
Valuation
Allowance
Recorded
Balance
Unpaid
Principal
Balance
Valuation
Allowance
TDRs
Commercial real estate$9,454 $9,707 $587 $4,915 $5,169 $79 
Commercial other3,509 3,509 — 3,567 3,567 
Agricultural real estate10,635 10,635 22 9,667 9,667 54 
Agricultural other4,171 4,171 — 2,903 2,903 
Residential real estate senior liens3,746 3,902 696 3,878 4,073 692 
Total TDRs31,515 31,924 1,305 24,930 25,379 832 
Other impaired loans
Commercial real estate158 221 — 139 201 — 
Commercial other1,179 1,179 — 1,200 1,200 — 
Agricultural real estate545 595 1,008 1,058 — 
Agricultural other108 108 — 218 218 — 
Residential real estate senior liens390 492 72 441 588 79 
Total other impaired loans2,380 2,595 75 3,006 3,265 79 
Total impaired loans$33,895 $34,519 $1,380 $27,936 $28,644 $911 
We continue to devote considerable attention to identifying impaired loans and adjusting the net carrying value of these loans to their current net realizable values through the establishment of a specific reserve or the recognition of a charge-off.
Additional disclosures related to impaired loans are included in “Note 4 – Loans and ALLL” of our interim condensed consolidated financial statements.

43

Nonperforming Assets
The following table summarizes our nonperforming assets as of:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
September 30
2020
June 30
2020
March 31
2020
Nonaccrual status loans$4,532 $5,313 $4,946 $5,319 $6,913 
Accruing loans past due 90 days or more— — — 53 40 
Total nonperforming loans4,532 5,313 4,946 5,372 6,953 
Foreclosed assets384 527 651 776 564 
Debt securities230 230 230 230 230 
Total nonperforming assets$5,146 $6,070 $5,827 $6,378 $7,747 
Nonperforming loans as a % of total loans0.38 %0.43 %0.38 %0.42 %0.59 %
Nonperforming assets as a % of total assets0.26 %0.31 %0.30 %0.33 %0.43 %
The accrual of interest on commercial and agricultural loans, as well as residential real estate loans, is discontinued at the time a loan is 90 days or more past due unless the credit is well-secured and in the process of short-term collection. Upon transferring a loan to nonaccrual status, we perform an evaluation to determine the net realizable value of the underlying collateral. This evaluation is used to help determine if a charge-off is necessary. Consumer loans are typically charged-off no later than 180 days past due. Loans may be placed back on accrual status after six months of continued performance and achievement of current payment status. While the level of nonperforming loans has fluctuated in recent periods, it remains low in comparison to peer banks.
The following table summarizes nonaccrual loans as of:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
September 30
2020
June 30
2020
March 31
2020
Commercial$1,328 $1,329 $1,364 $1,367 $1,643 
Agricultural3,051 3,785 3,538 3,656 4,606 
Residential real estate153 199 44 296 661 
Consumer— — — — 
Total$4,532 $5,313 $4,946 $5,319 $6,913 
Included in the nonaccrual loan balances above were loans currently classified as TDR as of:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
September 30
2020
June 30
2020
March 31
2020
Commercial$127 $129 $134 $28 $304 
Agricultural2,399 2,559 2,563 2,568 3,441 
Residential real estate42 42 — — 104 
Total$2,568 $2,730 $2,697 $2,596 $3,849 
Additional disclosures about nonaccrual status loans are included in “Note 4 – Loans and ALLL” of our interim condensed consolidated financial statements.
44

Noninterest Income and Noninterest Expenses
Significant noninterest income balances are highlighted in the following tables for the:
Three Months Ended March 31
   Change
20212020$%
Service charges and fees
ATM and debit card fees$999 $794 $205 25.82 %
Service charges and fees on deposit accounts436 587 (151)(25.72)%
Freddie Mac servicing fee214 159 55 34.59 %
Net OMSR income (loss)(32)(261)229 N/M
Other fees for customer services78 74 5.41 %
Total service charges and fees1,695 1,353 342 25.28 %
Net gain on sale of mortgage loans745 151 594 393.38 %
Wealth management fees696 572 124 21.68 %
Earnings on corporate owned life insurance policies186 182 2.20 %
Gains from redemption of corporate owned life insurance policies146 524 (378)(72.14)%
All other64 216 (152)(70.37)%
Total noninterest income$3,532 $2,998 $534 17.81 %
ATM and debit card fees fluctuate from period to period based primarily on their usage. While we do not anticipate significant changes to our ATM and debit card fee structure, we do expect that fee income will continue to increase during the remainder of 2021 as the usage of ATM and debit cards continues to increase.
Service charges and fees on deposit accounts declined in 2020 as a result of waived fees. In response to COVID-19, which has led to an increase in the need for electronic services and products, we elected to temporarily waive certain charges and fees, and permanently remove some charges and fees, to ease the financial stress of our customers. As such, service charges and fees during the remainder of 2021 may not exceed 2020 levels.
OMSR income results are driven, in part, by changes in offering rates on residential mortgage loans, anticipated prepayments in the servicing-retained portfolio, and the volume of loans within the servicing-retained portfolio. Increased prepayment speeds, as a result of a decline in interest rates during the first quarter of 2020, were the primary driver of the losses recognized during the first quarter of 2020. While the volume of loans serviced has increased during the last year, which increases the value of the servicing rights, we recognized a loss during the first quarter of 2021. OMSR income during the remainder of 2021 may continue to experience fluctuations and could vary from 2020 levels.
Net gain on sale of mortgage loans fluctuates as the result of a change in the amount of loans sold and pricing. The amount of loans sold is driven by customer demand and balance sheet management strategies. We experienced a significant increase in loan demand during most of 2020 and into 2021 which led to an increase in the number and dollar amount of loans sold. As such, net gain on sale of mortgage loans increased significantly. As demand is expected to slow during the remainder of 2021, net gain on sale of mortgage loans is not expected to exceed 2020 levels.
The increase in wealth management fees in the first quarter of 2021 was driven by a combination of the growth in the stock market and increased new business activity in comparison to the same period last year. Wealth management fees during the remainder of 2021 may not exceed 2020 levels due to the uncertainty in the stock market as a result of COVID-19.
We recognized income during the first quarter of 2021 and 2020 from the redemption of corporate owned life insurance policies in connection with the passing of retired bank employees.
The fluctuations in all other income are spread throughout various categories, none of which are individually significant.
45

Significant noninterest expense balances are highlighted in the following tables for the:
Three Months Ended March 31
  Change
20212020$%
Compensation and benefits$5,877 $5,869 $0.14 %
Furniture and equipment1,373 1,461 (88)(6.02)%
Occupancy945 867 78 9.00 %
Other
Audit, consulting, and legal fees436 433 0.69 %
ATM and debit card fees417 323 94 29.10 %
FDIC insurance premiums231 156 75 48.08 %
Memberships and subscriptions211 199 12 6.03 %
Marketing costs209 203 2.96 %
Loan underwriting fees190 166 24 14.46 %
Director fees159 182 (23)(12.64)%
Donations and community relations146 330 (184)(55.76)%
All other623 756 (133)(17.59)%
Total other noninterest expenses2,622 2,748 (126)(4.59)%
Total noninterest expenses$10,817 $10,945 $(128)(1.17)%
We have experienced increased usage of ATM and debit cards which has resulted in increased income and also increased ATM and debit card expenses. Based on the anticipated continuation of increased ATM and debit card usage, expenses during the remainder of 2021 are anticipated to exceed 2020 levels.
Donations and community relations increased during 2020 as a result of initiatives designed to deepen and strengthen our relationship with the communities in which we operate and serve which includes an expanded footprint. In addition to providing monetary contributions, some of these initiatives include volunteering our time, which is not a component of donations and community relations costs. While government restrictions and temporary business closures related to COVID-19 have impacted our ability to maintain the level of support in the first quarter of 2021, we anticipate an increase in the level of community support during the remainder of 2021.
The fluctuations in all other expenses are spread throughout various categories, none of which are individually significant.

46

Analysis of Changes in Financial Condition
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
$ Change% Change
(unannualized)
ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents$321,567 $246,640 $74,927 30.38 %
AFS securities
Amortized cost of AFS securities357,607 325,966 31,641 9.71 %
Unrealized gains (losses) on AFS securities9,717 13,262 (3,545)(26.73)%
AFS securities367,324 339,228 28,096 8.28 %
Mortgage loans AFS1,965 2,741 (776)(28.31)
Loans
Gross loans1,195,918 1,238,311 (42,393)(3.42)%
Less allowance for loan and lease losses9,271 9,744 (473)(4.85)%
Net loans1,186,647 1,228,567 (41,920)(3.41)%
Premises and equipment24,886 25,140 (254)(1.01)%
Corporate owned life insurance policies28,057 28,292 (235)(0.83)%
Accrued interest receivable6,422 6,882 (460)(6.68)%
Equity securities without readily determinable fair values17,383 17,383 — — %
Goodwill and other intangible assets48,324 48,331 (7)(0.01)%
Other assets12,857 14,174 (1,317)(9.29)%
TOTAL ASSETS$2,015,432 $1,957,378 $58,054 2.97 %
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Liabilities
Deposits$1,643,581 $1,566,317 $77,264 4.93 %
Borrowed funds141,967 158,747 (16,780)(10.57)%
Accrued interest payable and other liabilities11,602 13,726 (2,124)(15.47)%
Total liabilities1,797,150 1,738,790 58,360 3.36 %
Shareholders’ equity218,282 218,588 (306)(0.14)%
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY$2,015,432 $1,957,378 $58,054 2.97 %
As shown above, total assets increased $58,054 from December 31, 2020. Cash and cash equivalents increased primarily as a result of an increase in customer deposits of $77,264. We experienced a $42,393 decline in loans during the first three months of 2021 which was largely driven by a decrease in advances to mortgage brokers within the commercial loan portfolio.
The following table outlines the changes in loan balances:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
$ Change% Change
(unannualized)
Commercial$725,540 $756,686 $(31,146)(4.12)%
Agricultural91,629 100,461 (8,832)(8.79)%
Residential real estate305,909 307,543 (1,634)(0.53)%
Consumer72,840 73,621 (781)(1.06)%
Total$1,195,918 $1,238,311 $(42,393)(3.42)%
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The following table displays loan balances as of:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
September 30
2020
June 30
2020
March 31
2020
Commercial$725,540 $756,686 $821,102 $799,632 $695,278 
Agricultural91,629 100,461 102,263 103,162 108,856 
Residential real estate305,909 307,543 304,559 307,926 302,016 
Consumer72,840 73,621 75,384 73,665 69,786 
Total$1,195,918 $1,238,311 $1,303,308 $1,284,385 $1,175,936 
Loan demand has been negatively impacted by the pandemic as some customers hesitated to borrow while competition for new commercial loan opportunities continues to be strong. Growth during the second quarter of 2020 was driven primarily by SBA PPP loans. Advances to mortgage brokers was the driver behind both growth during the third quarter of 2020 and the decline during the first quarter of 2021. As a result of the short-term nature of SBA PPP loans, the commercial loan portfolio could decline during the remainder of 2021. Agricultural loans have continued to decline over the last year due to the competitive environment. Residential real estate and consumer loans experienced fluctuations over the last year but have increased overall. Growth is expected to continue in both the residential mortgage and consumer loan portfolios during the remainder of 2021.
The following table outlines the changes in deposit balances:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
$ Change% Change
(unannualized)
Noninterest bearing demand deposits$404,710 $375,395 $29,315 7.81 %
Interest bearing demand deposits328,440 302,444 25,996 8.60 %
Savings deposits555,688 505,497 50,191 9.93 %
Certificates of deposit331,413 358,165 (26,752)(7.47)%
Brokered certificates of deposit14,029 14,029 — — %
Internet certificates of deposit9,301 10,787 (1,486)(13.78)%
Total$1,643,581 $1,566,317 $77,264 4.93 %
The following table displays deposit balances as of:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
September 30
2020
June 30
2020
March 31
2020
Noninterest bearing demand deposits$404,710 $375,395 $353,082 $340,321 $249,424 
Interest bearing demand deposits328,440 302,444 287,809 263,567 237,392 
Savings deposits555,688 505,497 474,483 458,167 435,207 
Certificates of deposit331,413 358,165 354,210 352,118 358,534 
Brokered certificates of deposit14,029 14,029 14,029 14,029 27,458 
Internet certificates of deposit9,301 10,787 11,482 12,476 14,068 
Total$1,643,581 $1,566,317 $1,495,095 $1,440,678 $1,322,083 
Total deposits have increased over the past 12 months with significant growth in non-contractual deposits, such as demand and savings deposits. This trend is anticipated to continue during 2021 as the financial markets continue to exhibit significant signs of instability. Additionally, government stimulus programs have driven growth in deposits. We experienced a decline in certificates of deposit over the past year as a result of the low interest rate environment with customers moving their funds into demand and savings accounts. Brokered certificates of deposit offer another source of funding and may fluctuate from period to period based on our funding needs, including changes in assets such as loans and investments. During 2020, we used excess funds to reduce higher-cost deposits, such as brokered certificates of deposit. This trend is expected to continue into 2021.
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The primary objective of our investing activities is to provide for safety of the principal invested. Secondary considerations include providing earnings and liquidity while managing our overall exposure to changes in interest rates. Over the last two years, the flat yield curve encouraged the use of excess funds to reduce higher-cost borrowings as opposed to investing in AFS securities. However, based on balance sheet strategies, excess funds above what is required to retire higher-cost funding sources may prudently be deployed to purchase of AFS securities in future periods.
The following table displays fair values of AFS securities as of:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
September 30
2020
June 30
2020
March 31
2020
U.S. Treasury$29,371 $— $— $— $— 
States and political subdivisions140,329 143,656 148,401 146,785 163,116 
Auction rate money market preferred3,224 3,237 3,194 2,979 2,726 
Mortgage-backed securities75,835 88,652 104,165 119,029 126,554 
Collateralized mortgage obligations116,865 101,983 107,294 111,621 114,793 
Corporate1,700 1,700 — — — 
Total$367,324 $339,228 $363,054 $380,414 $407,189 
Borrowed funds include FHLB advances, securities sold under agreements to repurchase, and federal funds purchased. The balance of borrowed funds fluctuates from period to period based on our funding needs that arise from changes in loans, investments, and deposits. To provide balance sheet growth, we may utilize borrowings and brokered deposits to fund earning assets. The following table displays borrowed funds balances as of:
March 31
2021
December 31
2020
September 30
2020
June 30
2020
March 31
2020
FHLB advances$90,000 $90,000 $205,000 $205,000 $235,000 
Securities sold under agreements to repurchase without stated maturity dates51,967 68,747 33,349 31,268 28,171 
Total$141,967 $158,747 $238,349 $236,268 $263,171 
During the fourth quarter of 2020, we elected to extinguish $100,000 of FHLB advances based on our level of cash reserves and strategic initiatives. Due to a significant increase in one account during the fourth quarter of 2020, our level of securities sold under agreements to repurchase increased as of December 31, 2020. The balance of securities sold under agreements to repurchase declined during the first quarter of 2021 and is expected to continue to decline during the remainder of 2021.
Contractual Obligations and Loan Commitments
We have various financial obligations, including contractual obligations and commitments related to deposits and borrowings, which may require future cash payments. We also have loan related commitments that may impact liquidity. The commitments include unused lines of credit, commercial and standby letters of credit, and commitments to grant loans. These commitments to grant loans include residential mortgage loans with the majority committed to be sold to the secondary market. Many of these commitments historically have expired without being drawn upon and do not necessarily represent our future cash requirements.
We are party to credit related financial instruments with off-balance-sheet risk. These financial instruments are entered into in the normal course of business to meet the financing needs of our customers. These financial instruments involve, to varying degrees, elements of credit and interest rate risk in excess of the amounts recognized in the consolidated balance sheets. The contractual or notional amounts of these instruments reflect the extent of involvement we have in a particular class of financial instrument.
Our exposure to credit-related loss in the event of nonperformance by the counterparties to the financial instruments for commitments to extend credit and standby letters of credit could be up to the contractual notional amount of those instruments. We use the same credit policies when analyzing the creditworthiness of counterparties as we do for extending loans to customers. No significant losses are anticipated as a result of these commitments.
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Capital
Capital consists solely of common stock, retained earnings, and accumulated other comprehensive income (loss). We are authorized to raise capital through dividend reinvestment, employee and director stock purchases, and shareholder stock purchases. Pursuant to these authorizations, we issued 18,482 shares or $387 of common stock during the first three months of 2021, as compared to 69,907 shares or $1,330 of common stock during the same period in 2020. We also offer the Directors Plan in which participants purchase stock units through deferred fees, in lieu of cash payments. Pursuant to this plan, we increased shareholders’ equity by $160 and $123 during the three-month periods ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. We also grant restricted stock awards pursuant to the RSP. Pursuant to this plan, we increased shareholders’ equity by $4 during the first three months of 2021.
We have publicly announced a common stock repurchase plan. Pursuant to this plan, we repurchased 56,846 shares or $1,149 of common stock during the first three months of 2021 and 59,420 shares or $1,168 during the first three months of 2020. As of March 31, 2021, we were authorized to repurchase up to an additional 46,110 shares of common stock.
The FRB has established minimum risk based capital guidelines. Pursuant to these guidelines, a framework has been established that assigns risk weights to each category of on and off-balance-sheet items to arrive at risk adjusted total assets. Regulatory capital is divided by the risk adjusted assets with the resulting ratio compared to the minimum standard to determine whether a corporation has adequate capital.
The common equity tier 1 capital ratio has a minimum requirement of 4.50%. The minimum standard for primary, or Tier 1 capital is 6.00% and the minimum standard for total capital is 8.00%. The minimum requirements presented below include the minimum required capital levels based on the Basel III Capital Rules. Capital requirements to be considered well capitalized are based upon prompt corrective action regulations, as amended to reflect the changes under the Basel III Capital Rules. The following table sets forth these requirements and our ratios as of:
March 31, 2021December 31, 2020
ActualMinimum Required - BASEL IIIRequired to be Considered Well CapitalizedActualMinimum Required - BASEL IIIRequired to be Considered Well Capitalized
Common equity tier 1 capital13.77 %7.00 %6.50 %12.97 %7.00 %6.50 %
Tier 1 capital13.77 %8.50 %8.00 %12.97 %8.50 %8.00 %
Total capital14.54 %10.50 %10.00 %13.75 %10.50 %10.00 %
Tier 1 leverage8.56 %4.00 %5.00 %8.37 %4.00 %5.00 %
There are no significant regulatory constraints placed on our capital. At March 31, 2021, the Bank also exceeded minimum capital requirements.
Liquidity
Liquidity is monitored regularly by our ALCO, which consists of members of senior management. The committee reviews projected cash flows, key ratios, and liquidity available from both primary and secondary sources.
Our primary sources of liquidity are cash and cash equivalents and unencumbered AFS securities. These categories totaled $588,160 or 29.18% of assets as of March 31, 2021, compared to $444,051 or 22.69% as of December 31, 2020. The increase in the amount and percentage of primary liquidity is a direct result of an increase in market deposits and a deliberate reduction in non-market funding which required collateralization. Liquidity is important for financial institutions because of their need to meet loan funding commitments, depositor withdrawal requests, and various other commitments including expansion of operations, investment opportunities, and payment of cash dividends. Based on these same factors, daily liquidity could vary significantly.
Deposit accounts are our primary source of funds. Our secondary sources include the ability to borrow from the FHLB, from the FRB, and through various correspondent banks in the form of federal funds purchased and a line of credit. These funding methods typically carry a higher interest rate than traditional market deposit accounts. In recent periods, we have elected to use excess funds to reduce borrowings and other higher-cost funding sources. Some borrowed funds, including FHLB advances, FRB Discount Window advances, and repurchase agreements, require us to pledge assets, typically in the form of AFS securities or loans, as collateral. As of March 31, 2021, we had available lines of credit of $218,743.
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Our stress testing of liquidity increased during 2020 and continues to evolve due to economic uncertainly as a result of COVID-19. Our liquidity position remained strong at the end of the first quarter of 2021 which is illustrated in the following table:
March 31
2021
Total cash and cash equivalents$321,567 
Available lines of credit
Fed funds lines with correspondent banks93,000 
FHLB borrowings115,527 
FRB Discount Window5,216 
Other lines of credit5,000 
Total available lines of credit218,743 
Unencumbered lendable value of FRB collateral, estimated1
200,000 
Total cash and liquidity$740,310 
(1)Includes estimated unencumbered lendable value of FHLB collateral of $120,000
The following table summarizes our sources and uses of cash for the three-month period ended March 31:
20212020$ Variance
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities$7,076 $3,394 $3,682 
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities10,453 39,991 (29,538)
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities57,398 (7,206)64,604 
Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents74,927 36,179 38,748 
Cash and cash equivalents January 1246,640 60,572 186,068 
Cash and cash equivalents March 31$321,567 $96,751 $224,816 
Fair Value
We utilize fair value measurements to record fair value adjustments to certain assets and liabilities and to determine fair value disclosures. AFS securities, cash flow hedge derivative instruments and certain liabilities are recorded at fair value on a recurring basis. Additionally, from time to time, we may be required to record at fair value other assets on a nonrecurring basis, such as mortgage loans AFS, impaired loans, goodwill, foreclosed assets, OMSR, and certain other assets and liabilities. These nonrecurring fair value adjustments typically involve the application of lower of cost or market accounting or write downs of individual assets.
For further information regarding fair value measurements see “Note 11 – Fair Value” of our interim condensed consolidated financial statements.
Market Risk
Our primary market risks are interest rate risk and liquidity risk. IRR is the exposure of our net interest income to changes in interest rates. IRR results from the difference in the maturity or repricing frequency of a financial institution's interest earning assets and its interest bearing liabilities. Managing IRR is the fundamental method by which financial institutions earn income and create shareholder value. Excessive exposure to IRR could pose a significant risk to our earnings and capital.
The FRB has adopted a policy requiring banks to effectively manage the various risks that can have a material impact on safety and soundness. The risks include credit, interest rate, liquidity, operational, and reputational. We have policies, procedures, and internal controls for measuring and managing these risks. Specifically, our Funds Management policy and procedures include defining acceptable types and terms of investments and funding sources, liquidity requirements, limits on investments in long-term assets, limiting the mismatch in repricing opportunities of assets and liabilities, and the frequency of measuring and reporting to our Board of Directors.
The primary technique to measure IRR is simulation analysis. Simulation analysis forecasts the effects on the balance sheet structure and net interest income under a variety of scenarios that incorporate changes in interest rates, the shape of yield curves, interest rate relationships, loan prepayments, and funding sources. These forecasts are compared against net interest income projected in a stable interest rate environment. While many assets and liabilities reprice either at maturity or in
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accordance with their contractual terms, several balance sheet components demonstrate characteristics that require an evaluation to more accurately reflect their repricing behavior. Key assumptions in the simulation analysis include prepayments on loans, probable calls of investment securities, changes in market conditions, loan volumes and loan pricing, deposit sensitivity, and customer preferences. These assumptions are inherently uncertain as they are subject to fluctuation and revision in a dynamic rate environment. As a result, the simulation analysis cannot precisely forecast the impact of rising and falling interest rates on net interest income. Actual results will differ from simulated results due to many other factors, including changes in balance sheet components, interest rate changes, changes in market conditions, and management strategies. We regularly monitor our projected net interest income sensitivity to ensure that it remains within established limits.
Gap analysis, the secondary method to measure IRR, measures the cash flows and/or the earliest repricing of our interest bearing assets and liabilities. This analysis is useful for measuring trends in the repricing characteristics of the balance sheet. Significant assumptions are required in this process because of the embedded repricing options contained in assets and liabilities. Residential real estate and consumer loans allow the borrower to repay the balance prior to maturity without penalty, while commercial and agricultural loans may have prepayment penalties. The amount of prepayments is dependent upon many factors, including the interest rate of a given loan in comparison to the current offering rates, the level of home sales, and the overall availability of credit in the market place. Generally, a decrease in interest rates will result in an increase in cash flows from these assets. A significant portion of our securities are callable or have prepayment options. The call and prepayment options are more likely to be exercised in a period of decreasing interest rates. Savings and demand accounts may generally be withdrawn on request without prior notice. The timing of cash flows from these deposits is estimated based on historical experience. Certificates of deposit have penalties that discourage early withdrawals.
We do not believe there has been a material change in the nature or categories of our primary market risk exposure, or the particular markets that present the primary risk of loss. We do not know of or expect there to be any material change in the general nature of our primary market risk exposure in the near term, and we do not expect to make material changes to our market risk methods in the near term. We may change those methods in the future to adapt to changes in circumstances or to implement new techniques.
Our primary market risk exposures related to the COVID-19 pandemic remain uncertain. A review of our market risk methods are ongoing and modeling is incorporating additional assumptions to account for this uncertainty related to this crisis. Repricing, cash flows, and prepayment projections for loans and mortgage-backed securities are not expected to behave as they would be expected to in a more stable interest rate environment. The SBA PPP loan is a newer instrument and has payment characteristics that could create uncertainty in our assumptions. In late March 2020, we implemented loan repayment programs for customers to alleviate the financial setback caused by the temporary closure of businesses and lost wages. Under these programs, borrowers whose loans were in good standing as of March 1, 2020 could elect to defer full or partial payments for a short period of time. Customer deposit levels may experience unusual fluctuations due to government support programs, customer and business needs, and general money supply. We continue to closely monitor customer and economic indicators to develop more precise market risk assumptions as the economic impact of this crisis begins to reveal itself.
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.
The information presented in the section captioned “Market Risk” in Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations is incorporated herein by reference.
Item 4. Controls and Procedures.
DISCLOSURE CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
We carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of the Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15(d)-15(e) under the Exchange Act) as of March 31, 2021, pursuant to Exchange Act Rule 13a-15. Based upon that evaluation, the Principal Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures as of March 31, 2021, were effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed in reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act are recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in SEC rules and forms.
CHANGES IN INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING
During the most recent fiscal quarter, no change occurred in our internal control over financial reporting that materially affected, or is likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

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PART II – OTHER INFORMATION
Item 1. Legal Proceedings.
We are not involved in any material legal proceedings. We are involved in ordinary, routine litigation incidental to our business; however, no such routine proceedings are expected to result in any material adverse effect on operations, earnings, financial condition, or cash flows.
Item 1A. Risk Factors.
There have been no material changes to the risk factors disclosed in Item 1A in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.
(A)None
(B)None
(C)Repurchases of Common Stock
We have adopted and publicly announced a common stock repurchase plan. The plan was last amended on April 28, 2021, to allow for the repurchase of an additional 500,000 shares of common stock after that date. These authorizations do not have expiration dates. As common shares are repurchased under this plan, they are retired and revert back to the status of authorized, but unissued common shares.
The following table provides information for the three-month period ended March 31, 2021, with respect to this plan:
 Common Shares RepurchasedTotal Number of Common Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plan or ProgramMaximum Number of Common Shares That May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plans or Programs
NumberAverage Price
Per Common Share
Balance, December 31102,956 
January 1 - 319,109 $20.97 9,109 93,847 
February 1 - 2841,636 19.91 41,636 52,211 
March 1 -316,101 21.14 6,101 46,110 
Balance, March 3156,846 $20.21 56,846 46,110 
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities.
Not applicable.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.
Not applicable.
Item 5. Other Information.
Not applicable.


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Item 6. Exhibits.
(a) Exhibits
Exhibit NumberExhibits
101.1*101.INS (XBRL Instance Document)
101.SCH (XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document)
101.CAL (XBRL Calculation Linkbase Document)
101.LAB (XBRL Taxonomy Label Linkbase Document)
101.DEF (XBRL Taxonomy Linkbase Document)
101.PRE (XBRL Taxonomy Presentation Linkbase Document)
*    In accordance with Rule 406T of Regulations S-T, the XBRL related information shall not be deemed to be “filed” for purposes of Section 18 of the Exchange Act, or otherwise subject to the liability of that section, and shall not be part of any registration statement or other document filed under the Securities Act or the Exchange Act, except as shall be expressly set forth by specific reference in such filing.
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SIGNATURES
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.
Isabella Bank Corporation
Date:April 28, 2021/s/ Jae A. Evans
Jae A. Evans
President, Chief Executive Officer
(Principal Executive Officer)
Date:April 28, 2021/s/ Neil M. McDonnell
Neil M. McDonnell
Chief Financial Officer
(Principal Financial Officer)
55