FL Foot Locker

Document And Entity Information

Document And Entity Information - USD ($)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Mar. 25, 2019Aug. 04, 2018
Document And Entity Information [Abstract]
Document Type10-K
Amendment Flagfalse
Document Period End DateFeb. 2,
2019
Document Fiscal Year Focus2018
Document Fiscal Period FocusFY
Trading SymbolFL
Entity Common Stock, Shares Outstanding112,310,616
Entity Registrant NameFOOT LOCKER, INC.
Entity Central Index Key0000850209
Current Fiscal Year End Date--02-02
Entity Well-known Seasoned IssuerYes
Entity Voluntary FilersNo
Entity Current Reporting StatusYes
Entity Filer CategoryLarge Accelerated Filer
Entity Public Float $ 4,021,122,206

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPER

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS - USD ($) shares in Millions, $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS [Abstract]
Sales $ 7,939 $ 7,782 $ 7,766
Cost of sales5,411 5,326 5,130
Selling, general and administrative expenses1,614 1,501 1,472
Depreciation and amortization178 173 158
Litigation and Other Charges37 211 6
Income from operations699 [1]571 [1]1,000
Interest (income) / expense, net(9)(2)2
Other income(5)(5)(6)
Income before income taxes713 578 1,004
Income tax expense172 294 340
Net income $ 541 [2],[3],[4] $ 284 [2],[3],[4] $ 664
Basic earnings per share $ 4.68 $ 2.23 $ 4.95
Weighted-average shares outstanding115.6 127.2 134
Diluted earnings per share $ 4.66 $ 2.22 $ 4.91
Weighted-average shares outstanding, assuming dilution116.1 127.9 135.1
[1]Operating profit represents income before income taxes, interest (income)/expense, net, and non-operating income.C
[2]During the fourth quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a provisional $99 million tax liability for the mandatory deemed repatriation of foreign sourced net earnings and a corresponding change in our permanent reinvestment assertion under ASC 74030. During second, third, and fourth quarters 2018, the Company recorded benefits of $1 million, $23 million, and $4 million from the completion of the accounting for the Tax Act. See Note 17, Income Taxes for further information.Quarterly income per share amounts do not total to the annual amount due to changes in weighted-average shares outstanding during the year. Additionally, stock options and other potentially dilutive common shares were excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per common share for the quarter ended February 3, 2018 as the Company reported a net loss.
[3]During the fourth quarters of 2018 and 2017, the Company recorded pre-tax non-cash impairment charges totaling $19 million and $20 million, respectively. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.
[4]During the third quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a pre-tax charge of $13 million associated with the reorganization and the reduction in staff taken to improve efficiency. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMP

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Net Income $ 541 [1],[2],[3] $ 284 [1],[2],[3] $ 664
Foreign currency translation adjustment:
Translation adjustment arising during the period, net of income tax expense (benefit) of $18, $1 and $(2) million, respectively(75)114 (8)
Cash flow hedges:
Change in fair value of derivatives, net of income tax(1)(1)
Available for sale securities:
Unrealized gain on available-for-sale securities1
Pension and postretirement adjustments:
Net actuarial gain (loss) and foreign currency fluctuations arising during the year, net of income tax expense (benefit) of $2, $4 and $(10) million, respectively(24)4 4
Amortization of net actuarial gain/loss and prior service cost included in net periodic benefit costs, net of income tax expense of $4, $4, and $5 million, respectively8 7 8
Comprehensive income $ 450 368 $ 667
Foreign Currency Translation Adjustments [Member]
Pension and postretirement adjustments:
Reclassification due to the adoption of ASU 2018-024
Items Related to Pension and Postretirement Benefits [Member]
Pension and postretirement adjustments:
Reclassification due to the adoption of ASU 2018-02 $ (45)
[1]During the fourth quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a provisional $99 million tax liability for the mandatory deemed repatriation of foreign sourced net earnings and a corresponding change in our permanent reinvestment assertion under ASC 74030. During second, third, and fourth quarters 2018, the Company recorded benefits of $1 million, $23 million, and $4 million from the completion of the accounting for the Tax Act. See Note 17, Income Taxes for further information.Quarterly income per share amounts do not total to the annual amount due to changes in weighted-average shares outstanding during the year. Additionally, stock options and other potentially dilutive common shares were excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per common share for the quarter ended February 3, 2018 as the Company reported a net loss.
[2]During the fourth quarters of 2018 and 2017, the Company recorded pre-tax non-cash impairment charges totaling $19 million and $20 million, respectively. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.
[3]During the third quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a pre-tax charge of $13 million associated with the reorganization and the reduction in staff taken to improve efficiency. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CO_2

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (Parenthetical) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME [Abstract]
Net income tax expense (benefit) on translation adjustment $ (9) $ 18 $ 1
Net actuarial gain (loss) and foreign currency fluctuations arising during the year, income tax expense (benefit)(8)2 4
Amortization of net actuarial gain/loss and prior service cost included in net periodic benefit costs, income tax expense $ 3 $ 4 $ 4

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents $ 891 $ 849
Merchandise inventories1,269 1,278
Other current assets358 424
Assets, Current, Total2,518 2,551
Property and equipment, net836 866
Deferred taxes87 48
Goodwill157 160
Other intangible assets, net[1]24 46
Other assets198 290
Total Assets3,820 3,961
Current liabilities
Accounts payable387 258
Accrued and other liabilities377 358
Liabilities, Current, Total764 616
Long-term debt[2]124 125
Other liabilities426 701
Total liabilities1,314 1,442
Shareholders’ equity2,506 2,519
Liabilities and Equity, Total $ 3,820 $ 3,961
[1]The change in the ending balances also reflect the effect of foreign currency fluctuations due primarily to the movements of the euro in relation to the U.S. dollar.
[2]In 2009, the Company terminated an interest rate swap at a gain. This gain is being amortized as part of interest expense over the remaining term of the debt using the effective-yield method.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAR

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY - USD ($) shares in Thousands, $ in MillionsAdditional Paid-In Capital & Common StockTreasury Stock [Member]Retained EarningsAccumulated Other Comprehensive Loss [Member]Total
Beginning Balance at Jan. 30, 2016 $ 1,108 $ (1,371) $ 3,182 $ (366) $ 2,553
Beginning Balance (in shares) at Jan. 30, 2016173,398
Beginning Balance (in treasury shares) at Jan. 30, 2016(36,421)
Restricted stock issued (in shares)203
Issued under director and stock plans $ 32 32
Issued under director and stock plans (in shares)1,342
Share-based compensation expense $ 22 22
Excess tax benefits from equity awards20 20
Forfeitures of restricted stock1 $ (1)
Forfeitures of restricted stock (in shares)(20)
Shares of common stock used to satisfy tax withholding obligations $ (7)(7)
Shares of common stock used to satisfy tax withholding obligations (in shares)(102)
Share repurchases $ (432)(432)
Share repurchases (in shares)(6,985)
Reissued - employee stock purchase plan $ 2 2
Reissued - employee stock purchase plan (in shares)81
Retirement of treasury stock $ (283) $ 1,728 (1,445)
Retirement of treasury stock (in shares)(42,327)42,327
Net income/(loss)664 664
Cash dividends declared on common stock ($1.24, $1.10, $1.00 per share in 2017, 2016 and 2015 respectively)(147)(147)
Translation adjustment, net of tax(8)(8)
Change in cash flow hedges, net of tax(1)(1)
Pension and postretirement adjustments, net of tax12 12
Ending Balance at Jan. 28, 2017 $ 900 $ (81)2,254 (363)2,710
Ending Balance (in shares) at Jan. 28, 2017132,616
Ending Balance (in treasury shares) at Jan. 28, 2017(1,120)
Restricted stock issued (in shares)169
Issued under director and stock plans $ 11 11
Issued under director and stock plans (in shares)608
Share-based compensation expense $ 15 15
Shares of common stock used to satisfy tax withholding obligations $ (10)(10)
Shares of common stock used to satisfy tax withholding obligations (in shares)(140)
Share repurchases $ (467)(467)
Share repurchases (in shares)(12,414)
Reissued - employee stock purchase plan $ 8 8
Reissued - employee stock purchase plan (in shares)110
Retirement of treasury stock $ (84) $ 487 (403)
Retirement of treasury stock (in shares)(12,131)12,131
Net income/(loss)284 284 [1],[2],[3]
Cash dividends declared on common stock ($1.24, $1.10, $1.00 per share in 2017, 2016 and 2015 respectively)(157)(157)
Translation adjustment, net of tax114 114
Change in cash flow hedges, net of tax(1)(1)
Pension and postretirement adjustments, net of tax11 11
Unrealized gain on available-for-securities1 1
Reclassification due to the adoption of ASU 2018-02 | ASU 2018-0241 (41)
Ending Balance at Feb. 03, 2018 $ 842 $ (63)2,019 (279)2,519
Ending Balance (in shares) at Feb. 03, 2018121,262
Ending Balance (in treasury shares) at Feb. 03, 2018(1,433)
Restricted stock issued (in shares)93
Issued under director and stock plans $ 6 6
Issued under director and stock plans (in shares)175
Share-based compensation expense $ 22 22
Shares of common stock used to satisfy tax withholding obligations $ (1)(1)
Shares of common stock used to satisfy tax withholding obligations (in shares)(36)
Share repurchases $ (375)(375)
Share repurchases (in shares)(7,887)
Reissued - employee stock purchase plan $ 2 2
Reissued - employee stock purchase plan (in shares)48
Retirement of treasury stock $ (61) $ 400 (339)
Retirement of treasury stock (in shares)(8,597)8,597
Net income/(loss)541 541 [1],[2],[3]
Cash dividends declared on common stock ($1.24, $1.10, $1.00 per share in 2017, 2016 and 2015 respectively)(158)(158)
Translation adjustment, net of tax(75)(75)
Pension and postretirement adjustments, net of tax(16)(16)
Cumulative effect of the adoption new ASUs | ASU 2014-094 4
Cumulative effect of the adoption new ASUs | ASU 2016-1637 37
Ending Balance at Feb. 02, 2019 $ 809 $ (37) $ 2,104 $ (370) $ 2,506
Ending Balance (in shares) at Feb. 02, 2019112,933
Ending Balance (in treasury shares) at Feb. 02, 2019(711)
[1]During the fourth quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a provisional $99 million tax liability for the mandatory deemed repatriation of foreign sourced net earnings and a corresponding change in our permanent reinvestment assertion under ASC 74030. During second, third, and fourth quarters 2018, the Company recorded benefits of $1 million, $23 million, and $4 million from the completion of the accounting for the Tax Act. See Note 17, Income Taxes for further information.Quarterly income per share amounts do not total to the annual amount due to changes in weighted-average shares outstanding during the year. Additionally, stock options and other potentially dilutive common shares were excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per common share for the quarter ended February 3, 2018 as the Company reported a net loss.
[2]During the fourth quarters of 2018 and 2017, the Company recorded pre-tax non-cash impairment charges totaling $19 million and $20 million, respectively. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.
[3]During the third quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a pre-tax charge of $13 million associated with the reorganization and the reduction in staff taken to improve efficiency. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SH_2

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY (Parenthetical) - $ / shares12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY [Abstract]
Cash dividends declared on common stock, per share $ 1.38 $ 1.24 $ 1.10

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
From Operating Activities
Net income/(loss) $ 541 [1],[2],[3] $ 284 [1],[2],[3] $ 664
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
Non-cash impairment charges19 20 6
Depreciation and amortization178 173 158
Deferred income taxes9 105 (1)
Share-based compensation expense22 15 22
Qualified pension plan contributions(128)(25)(36)
Change in assets and liabilities:
Merchandise inventories(16)69 (25)
Accounts payable135 (31)
Accrued and other liabilities39 (30)27
Pension litigation accrual13 178
Class counsel fees paid in connection with pension litigation(97)
Other, net66 24 60
Net cash provided by operating activities781 813 844
From Investing Activities
Capital expenditures(187)(274)(266)
Cash paid for a cost method investment(89)(15)
Purchase of business, net of cash acquired2
Net cash used in investing activities(274)(289)(266)
From Financing Activities
Purchase of treasury shares(375)(467)(432)
Dividends paid on common stock(158)(157)(147)
Proceeds from exercise of stock options5 13 29
Treasury stock reissued under employee stock plan2 5 4
Shares of common stock repurchased to satisfy tax withholding(1)(10)(7)
Payment of revolving credit agreement costs(2)
Reduction in obligations under capital leases(1)
Net cash used in financing activities(527)(616)(556)
Effect of exchange rate fluctuations on cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash(30)50 3
Net change in cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash(50)(42)25
Cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash at beginning of year1,031 1,073 1,048
Cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash at end of year981 1,031 1,073
Cash Paid During the Year:
Interest11 11 11
Income taxes $ 184 $ 237 $ 341
[1]During the fourth quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a provisional $99 million tax liability for the mandatory deemed repatriation of foreign sourced net earnings and a corresponding change in our permanent reinvestment assertion under ASC 74030. During second, third, and fourth quarters 2018, the Company recorded benefits of $1 million, $23 million, and $4 million from the completion of the accounting for the Tax Act. See Note 17, Income Taxes for further information.Quarterly income per share amounts do not total to the annual amount due to changes in weighted-average shares outstanding during the year. Additionally, stock options and other potentially dilutive common shares were excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per common share for the quarter ended February 3, 2018 as the Company reported a net loss.
[2]During the fourth quarters of 2018 and 2017, the Company recorded pre-tax non-cash impairment charges totaling $19 million and $20 million, respectively. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.
[3]During the third quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a pre-tax charge of $13 million associated with the reorganization and the reduction in staff taken to improve efficiency. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.

Summary of Significant Accounti

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies [Abstract]
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Basis of Presentation
The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Foot Locker, Inc. and its domestic and international subsidiaries (the “Company”), all of which are wholly owned. All significant intercompany amounts have been eliminated. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions relating to the reporting of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results may differ from those estimates.
Reporting Year
The fiscal year end for the Company is the Saturday closest to the last day in January. Fiscal year 2018 represents the 52 weeks ended February 2, 2019. Fiscal year 2017 represented the 53 weeks ended February 3, 2018 and fiscal year 2016 represented the 52 weeks ended January 28, 2017. References to years in this annual report relate to fiscal years rather than calendar years.
Revenue Recognition
Store revenue is recognized at the point of sale and includes merchandise, net of returns, and excludes taxes. Revenue from layaway sales is recognized when the customer receives the product, rather than when the initial deposit is paid. In the first quarter of 2018, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Update 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) . In conjunction with the adoption of Topic 606, we have determined that revenue for merchandise that is shipped to our customers from our distribution centers and stores will be recognized upon shipment date. Total revenue recognized includes shipping and handling fees. We have determined that control of the promised good is passed to the customer upon shipment date since the customer has legal title, the rewards of ownership, and paid for the merchandise as of the shipment date. This reflects a change in timing in how we previously recognized revenue for our direct-to-customer sales. Prior to the adoption of Topic 606, the Company recognized such revenue upon date of delivery. As a result of this change, the Company recorded $1 million, net of tax, as an increase to opening retained earnings to reflect the cumulative effect of adopting this change. We have elected to account for shipping and handling as a fulfillment activity. The Company accrues the cost and recognized revenue for these activities upon shipment date.
Gift Cards
The Company sells gift cards which do not have expiration dates. Revenue from gift card sales is recorded when the gift cards are redeemed by customers. Effective as of the first quarter of 2018 with the adoption of Topic 606, gift card breakage is recognized as revenue in proportion to the pattern of rights exercised by the customer, unless there is a legal obligation to remit the value of unredeemed gift cards to the relevant jurisdictions. This reflects a change in our accounting for gift card breakage from the remote method to the proportional method. As a result of adopting Topic 606, the Company recorded $4 million, or $3 million net of tax, as an increase to opening retained earnings to reflect the cumulative effect of this change based upon historical redemption patterns . Additionally, breakage income was previously recorded within selling, general and administrative expenses; however, with the adoption of this standard in the first quarter of 2018, this income is reported as part of sales. This change in classification is not considered significant. The table below presents the activity of our gift card liability balance:
($ in millions)
Balance at February 4, 2018
$
38
Redemptions
(96)
Cumulative catch-up adjustment to retained earnings from the adoption of Topic 606
(4)
Breakage recognized in sales
(6)
Activations
104
Foreign currency fluctuations
(1)
Balance at February 2, 2019
$
35
The Company elected not to disclose the information about remaining performance obligations since the amount of gift cards redeemed after 12 months is not significant.
Store Pre-Opening and Closing Costs
Store pre-opening costs are charged to expense as incurred. In the event a store is closed before its lease has expired, the estimated post-closing lease exit costs, less any sublease rental income, is provided for once the store ceases to be used.
Advertising Costs and Sales Promotion
Advertising and sales promotion costs are expensed at the time the advertising or promotion takes place, net of reimbursements for cooperative advertising. Advertising expenses also include advertising costs as required by some of the Company’s mall-based leases. Cooperative advertising reimbursements earned for the launch and promotion of certain products agreed upon with vendors are recorded in the same period as the associated expenses are incurred.
Digital advertising costs are expensed as incurred, net of reimbursements for cooperative advertising. Digital advertising includes search engine marketing, such as display ads and keyword search terms, and other various forms of digital advertising. Reimbursement received in excess of expenses incurred related to specific, incremental, and identifiable advertising costs is accounted for as a reduction to the cost of merchandise and is reflected in cost of sales as the merchandise is sold.
Advertising costs, including digital advertising, which are included as a component of selling, general and administrative expenses, were as follows:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Advertising expenses
$
111
$
108
$
118
Digital advertising expenses
96
96
84
Cooperative advertising reimbursements
(25)
(20)
(20)
Net advertising expense
$
182
$
184
$
182
Catalog Costs
Catalog costs, which are primarily comprised of paper, printing, and postage, are expensed at the time the catalogs are distributed. Prior to the adoption of Topic 606, catalog costs were capitalized and amortized over the expected customer response period related to each catalog, which was generally 90 days. Cooperative reimbursements earned for the promotion of certain products are agreed upon with vendors and are recorded in the same period as the associated catalog expenses are recorded.
Catalog costs, which are included as a component of selling, general and administrative expenses, were as follows:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Catalog costs
$
18
$
19
$
26
Cooperative reimbursements

(2)
(6)
Net catalog expense
$
18
$
17
$
20
Earnings Per Share
The Company accounts for and discloses earnings per share using the treasury stock method. Basic earnings per share is computed by dividing net income for the period by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding at the end of the period. Restricted stock awards, which contain non-forfeitable rights to dividends, are considered participating securities and are included in the calculation of basic earnings per share. Diluted earnings per share reflects the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period used in the basic earnings per share computation plus dilutive common stock equivalents.
The computation of basic and diluted earnings per share is as follows:
2018
2017
2016
(in millions, except per share data)
Net Income
$
541
$
284
$
664
Weighted-average common shares outstanding
115.6
127.2
134.0
Dilutive effect of potential common shares
0.5
0.7
1.1
Weighted-average common shares outstanding assuming dilution
116.1
127.9
135.1
Earnings per share - basic
$
4.68
$
2.23
$
4.95
Earnings per share - diluted
$
4.66
$
2.22
$
4.91
Anti-dilutive share-based awards excluded from diluted calculation
1.9
1.6
0.4
Contingently issuable shares of 0.9 million for 2018, and 0.2 million for both 2017 and 2016, have not been included as the vesting conditions have not been satisfied. These shares relate to restricted stock unit awards issued in connection with the Company’s long-term incentive program.
Share-Based Compensation
The Company recognizes compensation expense for share-based awards based on the grant date fair value of those awards. Share-based compensation expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period for each vesting tranche of the award. See Note 21, Share-Based Compensation, for information on the assumptions used to calculate the fair value of stock options. Performance-based restricted stock unit awards cliff vest at the end of a three-year period based upon the Company’s achievement of pre-established goals. Upon exercise of stock options, issuance of restricted stock or units, or issuance of shares under the employees stock purchase plan, the Company will issue authorized but unissued common stock or use common stock held in treasury.
Cash, Cash Equivalents, and Restricted Cash
Cash consists of funds held on hand and in bank accounts. Cash equivalents include amounts on demand with banks and all highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less, including money market funds. Additionally, amounts due from third-party credit card processors for the settlement of debit and credit card transactions are included as cash equivalents as they are generally collected within three business days. R estricted cash represents cash that is restricted as to withdrawal or use under the terms of various agreements. Restricted cash includes amounts held in a qualified settlement fund in connection with the pension litigation as discussed in Note 22, Legal Proceedings , amounts held in escrow in connection with various leasing arrangements in Europe, and deposits held in insurance trusts in order to satisfy the requirement to collateralize part of the self-insured workers’ compensation and liability claims.
The following table provides the reconciliation of cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash, as reported on our consolidated statements of cash flows.
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Cash and cash equivalents (1)
$
891
$
849
$
1,046
Restricted cash included in other current assets (2)
59
1

Restricted cash included in other non-current assets (2)
31
181
27
Cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash
$
981
$
1,031
$
1,073
(1)
Includes cash equivalents of $834 million, $780 million, and $1,000 million for the year ended February 2, 2019, February 3, 2018, and January 28, 2017, respectively.
(2)
In connection with the pension litigation matter, the Company deposited $150 million to a qualified settlement fund during 2017, classified as long-term at that time. Included in the restricted cash balance as of February 2, 2019 is $55 million remaining of this fund that is expected to be contributed to the pension plan in early 2019 and is therefore classified as current assets. Please also see Note 22, Legal Proceedings .
Investments
As of February 3, 2018, the Company adopted ASU 2016-01, Financial Instruments – Overall (Subtopic 825-10): Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities . The Company’s $94 million of equity minority investments, under the practicability exception, are now measured at cost adjusted for changes in observable prices minus impairment. Additionally, our auction rate security classified as available-for-sale is now recorded at fair value with gains and losses reported to other income in our Statement of Operations, whereas previously changes in the fair value were reported as a component of accumulated other comprehensive loss in the Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity and were not reflected in the Consolidated Statements of Operations until a sale transaction occurred or when declines in fair value were deemed to be other-than-temporary. The adjustment recorded to retained earnings as a result of adopting ASU 2016-01 was not significant.
Minority interests, including equity method investments and convertible notes, had a carrying value of $104 million as of February 2, 2019 and are included within other assets. As of February 2, 2019, the Company held one available-for-sale security, which was the Company’s $6 million auction rate security.
See Note 19 , Fair Value Measurements , for further discussion.
Merchandise Inventories and Cost of Sales
Merchandise inventories for the Company’s Athletic Stores are valued at the lower of cost or market using the retail inventory method. Cost for retail stores is determined on the last-in, first-out (“LIFO”) basis for domestic inventories and on the first-in, first-out (“FIFO”) basis for international inventories. Merchandise inventories of the Direct-to-Customers business are valued at the lower of cost or market using weighted-average cost, which approximates FIFO.
The retail inventory method is commonly used by retail companies to value inventories at cost and calculate gross margins due to its practicality. Under the retail inventory method, cost is determined by applying a cost-to-retail percentage across groupings of similar items, known as departments. The cost-to-retail percentage is applied to ending inventory at its current owned retail valuation to determine the cost of ending inventory on a department basis. The Company provides reserves based on current selling prices when the inventory has not been marked down to market.
Transportation, distribution center, and sourcing costs are capitalized in merchandise inventories. The Company expenses the freight associated with transfers between its store locations in the period incurred. The Company maintains an accrual for shrinkage based on historical rates.
Cost of sales is comprised of the cost of merchandise, as well as occupancy, buyers’ compensation, and shipping and handling costs. The cost of merchandise is recorded net of amounts received from suppliers for damaged product returns, markdown allowances, and volume rebates, as well as cooperative advertising reimbursements received in excess of specific, incremental advertising expenses. Occupancy costs include the amortization of amounts received from landlords for tenant improvements.
Property and Equipment
Property and equipment are recorded at cost, less accumulated depreciation and amortization. Significant additions and improvements to property and equipment are capitalized. Depreciation and amortization are computed on a straight-line basis over the following estimated useful lives:
Buildings
Maximum of 50 years
Store leasehold improvements
Shorter of the asset useful life or expected term of the lease
Furniture, fixtures, and equipment
3 ‑ 10 years
Software
2 ‑ 7 years
Maintenance and repairs are charged to current operations as incurred. Major renewals or replacements that substantially extend the useful life of an asset are capitalized and depreciated.
Internal-Use Software Development Costs
The Company capitalizes certain external and internal computer software and software development costs incurred during the application development stage. The application development stage generally includes software design and configuration, coding, testing, and installation activities. Capitalized costs include only external direct cost of materials and services consumed in developing or obtaining internal-use software, and payroll and payroll-related costs for employees who are directly associated with and devote time to the internal-use software project. Capitalization of such costs ceases no later than the point at which the project is substantially complete and ready for its intended use. Training and maintenance costs are expensed as incurred, while upgrades and enhancements are capitalized if it is probable that such expenditures will result in additional functionality. Capitalized software, net of accumulated amortization, is included as a component of property and equipment and was $80 million and $67 million at February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018, respectively.
Recoverability of Long-Lived Tangible Assets
The Company performs an impairment review when circumstances indicate that the carrying value of long-lived tangible assets may not be recoverable. Management’s policy in determining whether an impairment indicator exists, a triggering event, comprises measurable operating performance criteria at the division level, as well as qualitative measures. The Company considers historical performance and future estimated results, which are predominately identified from the Company’s long-range strategic plans, in its evaluation of potential store-level impairment and then compares the carrying amount of the asset with the estimated future cash flows expected to result from the use of the asset. If the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the estimated expected undiscounted future cash flows, the Company measures the amount of the impairment by comparing the carrying amount of the asset with its estimated fair value. The estimation of fair value is measured by discounting expected future cash flows at the Company’s weighted-average cost of capital. The Company estimates fair value based on the best information available using estimates, judgments, and projections as considered necessary.
Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets
Goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite lives are reviewed for impairment annually during the first quarter of each fiscal year or more frequently if impairment indicators arise. The review of goodwill impairment consists of either using a qualitative approach to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of the assets is less than their respective carrying values or a two-step impairment test, if necessary. If, based on the results of the qualitative assessment, it is concluded that it is not more likely than not that the fair value of the intangible asset is greater than its carrying value, the two-step test is performed to identify potential impairment. If it is determined that it is not more likely than not that the fair value of the reporting unit is less than its carrying value, it is unnecessary to perform the two-step impairment test.
Based on certain circumstances, we may elect to bypass the qualitative assessment and proceed directly to performing the first step of the two-step impairment test. The first step of the two-step goodwill impairment test compares the fair value of the reporting unit to its carrying amount, including goodwill. The second step includes hypothetically valuing all the tangible and intangible assets of the reporting unit as if the reporting unit had been acquired in a business combination. Then, the implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill is compared to the carrying amount of that goodwill. If the carrying value of the asset exceeds its fair value, an impairment loss is recognized in the amount of the excess. The fair value of each reporting unit is determined using a discounted cash flow approach.
Intangible assets that are determined to have finite lives are amortized over their useful lives and are measured for impairment only when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may be impaired. Intangible assets with indefinite lives are tested for impairment if impairment indicators arise and, at a minimum, annually. The impairment review for intangible assets with indefinite lives consists of either performing a qualitative or a quantitative assessment. If the results of the qualitative assessment indicate that it is more likely than not that the fair value of the indefinite-lived intangible is less than its carrying amount, or if we elect to proceed directly to a quantitative assessment, we calculate the fair value using a discounted cash flow method, based on the relief from royalty concept, and compare the fair value to the carrying value to determine if the asset is impaired.
Derivative Financial Instruments
All derivative financial instruments are recorded in the Company’s Consolidated Balance Sheets at their fair values. For derivatives designated as a hedge, and effective as part of a hedge transaction, the effective portion of the gain or loss on the hedging derivative instrument is reported as a component of other comprehensive income/loss or as a basis adjustment to the underlying hedged item and reclassified to earnings in the period in which the hedged item affects earnings. The effective portion of the gain or loss on hedges of foreign net investments is generally not reclassified to earnings unless the net investment is disposed of. To the extent derivatives do not qualify or are not designated as hedges, or are ineffective, their changes in fair value are recorded in earnings immediately, which may subject the Company to increased earnings volatility.
Fair Value
The Company categorizes its financial instruments into a three-level fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value into three broad levels. The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3). If the inputs used to measure fair value fall within different levels of the hierarchy, the category level is based on the lowest priority level input that is significant to the fair value measurement of the instrument. Fair value is determined based upon the exit price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants exclusive of any transaction costs. The Company’s financial assets recorded at fair value are categorized as follows:
Level 1 - Quoted prices for identical instruments in active markets.
Level 2 - Quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active; and model-derived valuations in which all significant inputs or significant value-drivers are observable in active markets.
Level 3 - Model-derived valuations in which one or more significant inputs or significant value-drivers are unobservable.
Income Taxes
The Company accounts for its income taxes under the asset and liability method, which requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined on the basis of the differences between the financial statements and the tax basis of assets and liabilities, using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are recognized for tax credits and net operating loss carryforwards, reduced by a valuation allowance, which is established when it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. The effect of a change in tax rates on deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date.
The Company recognizes net deferred tax assets to the extent that it believes these assets are more likely than not to be realized. In making such a determination, the Company considers all available positive and negative evidence, including future reversals of existing taxable temporary differences, projected future taxable income, tax-planning strategies, and results of recent operations. If the Company determines that it would be able to realize its deferred tax assets in the future in excess of their net recorded amount, the Company would make an adjustment to the deferred tax asset valuation allowance, which would reduce the provision for income taxes.
A taxing authority may challenge positions that the Company adopted in its income tax filings. Accordingly, the Company may apply different tax treatments for transactions in filing its income tax returns than for income tax financial reporting. The Company regularly assesses its tax positions for such transactions and records reserves for those differences when considered necessary. Tax positions are recognized only when it is more likely than not, based on technical merits, that the positions will be sustained upon examination. Tax positions that meet the more-likely-than-not threshold are measured using a probability weighted approach as the largest amount of tax benefit that is greater than fifty percent likely of being realized upon settlement. Whether the more-likely-than-not recognition threshold is met for a tax position is a matter of judgment based on the individual facts and circumstances of that position evaluated in light of all available evidence. The Company recognizes interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits within income tax expense in the accompanying Consolidated Statement of Operations. Accrued interest and penalties are included within the related tax liability line in the Consolidated Balance Sheet.
Our income tax provision for 2018 and 2017 includes the effects of U.S. tax reform. See also Note 17, Income Taxes for more information.
Pension and Postretirement Obligations
The discount rate for the U.S. plans is determined by reference to the Bond:Link interest rate model based upon a portfolio of highly-rated U.S. corporate bonds with individual bonds that are theoretically purchased to settle the plan’s anticipated cash outflows. The cash flows are discounted to their present value and an overall discount rate is determined. The discount rate selected to measure the present value of the Company’s Canadian benefit obligations was developed by using that plan’s bond portfolio indices, which match the benefit obligations. The Company measures its plan assets and benefit obligations using the month-end date that is closest to our fiscal year end.
Insurance Liabilities
The Company is primarily self-insured for health care, workers’ compensation, and general liability costs. Accordingly, provisions are made for the Company’s actuarially determined estimates of discounted future claim costs for such risks, for the aggregate of claims reported, and claims incurred but not yet reported. Self-insured liabilities totaled $12 million and $10 million at February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018, respectively. The Company discounts its workers’ compensation and general liability reserves using a risk-free interest rate. Imputed interest expense related to these liabilities was not significant for any of the periods presented.
Accounting for Leases
The Company recognizes rent expense for operating leases as of the possession date for store leases or the commencement of the agreement for a non-store lease. Rental expense, inclusive of rent holidays, concessions, and tenant allowances are recognized over the lease term on a straight-line basis. Contingent payments based upon sales and future increases determined by inflation related indices cannot be estimated at the inception of the lease and, accordingly, are charged to operations as incurred.
See Recent Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted for information on the first quarter 2019 adoption of the new lease accounting guidance, Accounting Standards Update 2016-02, Leases .
Treasury Stock Retirement
The Company periodically retires treasury shares that it acquires through share repurchases and returns those shares to the status of authorized but unissued. The Company accounts for treasury stock transactions under the cost method. For each reacquisition of common stock, the number of shares and the acquisition price for those shares is added to the existing treasury stock count and total value. When treasury shares are retired, the Company’s policy is to allocate the excess of the repurchase price over the par value of shares acquired to both retained earnings and additional paid-in capital. The portion allocated to additional paid-in capital is determined by applying a percentage, which is determined by dividing the number of shares to be retired by the number of shares issued, to the balance of additional paid-in capital as of the retirement date.
During 2018 and 2017, the Company retired 9 million and 12 million shares, respectively, of its common stock held in treasury. The shares were returned to the status of authorized but unissued. As a result, treasury stock decreased by $400 million and $487 million as of February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018, respectively.
Foreign Currency Translation
The functional currency of the Company’s international operations is the applicable local currency. The translation of the applicable foreign currency into U.S. dollars is performed for balance sheet accounts using current exchange rates in effect at the balance sheet date and for revenue and expense accounts using the weighted-average rates of exchange prevailing during the year. The unearned gains and losses resulting from such translation are included as a separate component of accumulated other comprehensive loss within shareholders’ equity.
Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements
In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“ FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ ASU”) Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) . The core principle of Topic 606 is to recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The Company adopted ASU 2014‑09 during the first quarter of 2018 using the modified retrospective method. We recognized $5 million, or $4 million net of tax, as the cumulative effect of initially applying the new revenue standard as an increase to the opening balance of retained earnings.
In October 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-16, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory . ASU 2016-16 requires recognition of income tax consequences of an intra-entity transfer of an asset other than inventory when the transfer occurs. The Company adopted this ASU during the first quarter of 2018 using the modified retrospective method, and as a result increased deferred income tax assets by $37 million. The Company recorded an adjustment to opening retained earnings to write off the income tax effects that had been deferred from past intercompany transactions involving non-inventory assets. The Company also recorded deferred tax assets with an offset to opening retained earnings for amounts that were not previously recognized under the previous guidance but are recognized under this ASU.
Other recently adopted ASUs are discussed within the applicable disclosures throughout this document.
Recent Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted
In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) . This ASU requires lessees to recognize a lease liability, on a discounted basis, and a right-of-use asset for all leases, as well as additional disclosure regarding leasing arrangements. In July 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-11, Leases (Topic 842): Targeted Improvements, which provides an optional transition method of applying the new lease standard. Topic 842 can be applied using either a modified retrospective approach at the beginning of the earliest period presented, or as permitted by ASU 2018-11, at the beginning of the period in which it is adopted. These new leasing standards are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods therein.
The Company intends to adopt Topic 842 during the first quarter of 2019 using the optional transition method provided by ASU 2018-11. The Company has elected to apply the transition package of practical expedients permitted under the transition guidance, which among other things, allows the carryforward of prior lease classifications and the assessment of whether a contract is or contains a lease. The Company will also elect to combine lease and non-lease components for all asset classes and to keep leases with an initial term of 12 months or less off the balance sheet. Based upon our current analysis and our evaluation of the standard, we estimate the adoption will result in the addition of approximately $3.2 to $3.4 billion of assets and liabilities to our consolidated balance sheet, with no significant change to our consolidated statements of operations or cash flows. The actual asset amount will depend on the finalization of any impairment of the right-to-use assets related to previously impaired stores, which is currently under review. The adjustment for impairment will be recorded as a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings.
Other recently issued accounting pronouncements did not, or are not believed by management to, have a mater

Segment Information

Segment Information12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Segment Information [Abstract]
Segment Information2. Segment Information
The Company has integrated all available shopping channels including stores, websites, and catalogs. Store sales are primarily fulfilled from the store’s inventory but may also be shipped from any of our distribution centers or from a different store location if an item is not available at the original store. Direct-to-customer orders are primarily shipped to our customers through our distribution centers but may also be shipped from any store or a combination of our distribution centers and stores depending on the availability of particular items. Our operating segments are identified according to how our business activities are managed and evaluated by our chief operating decision maker, our CEO. Prior to fiscal 2018, the Company had two reportable segments: Athletic Stores and Direct-to-Customers.
Beginning in fiscal 2018, the Company has changed its organizational and internal reporting structure in order to execute our omni-channel strategy. In light of these changes, the Company has re-evaluated its operating segments, which now reflect the combination of stores and direct-to-customer by geography. The Company has determined that it has two operating segments, North America and International. Our North America operating segment includes the results of the following banners operating in the U.S. and Canada: Foot Locker, Kids Foot Locker, Lady Foot Locker, Champs Sports, Footaction, and SIX:02, including each of their related e-commerce businesses, as well as our Eastbay business that includes internet, catalog, and team sales. Our International operating segment includes the results of the following banners operating in Europe, Asia, Australia, and New Zealand: Foot Locker, Runners Point, Sidestep, and Kids Foot Locker, including each of their related e-commerce businesses. We have further aggregated these operating segments into one reportable segment based upon their shared customer base and similar economic characteristics. Prior-year information has been restated to reflect this change.
The Company evaluates performance based on several factors, of which the primary financial measure is the banner’s financial results referred to as division profit. Division profit reflects income before income taxes, pension litigation charge, corporate expense, non-operating income, and net interest income. The following table summarizes our results:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Division profit (1)
789
810
1,070
Less: Pension litigation and reorganization charges (2), (3)
18
191

Less: Corporate expense (4)
72
48
70
Income from operations
699
571
1,000
Interest income (expense), net
9
2
(2)
Other income
5
5
6
Income before income taxes
$
713
$
578
$
1,004
(1)
Included in the results for 2018, 2017, and 2016 are non-cash impairment charges of $19 million, $20 million, and $6 million, respectively.
During 2018, the Company recorded a charge totaling $4 million to write down store fixtures and leasehold improvements related to Runners Point, Sidestep, and SIX:02. Additionally, the Company recorded a charge of $15 million to write down the values of the trademarks/ trade names associated with Runners Point.
The 2017 amount includes a charge of $16 million to write down long-lived store assets of SIX:02, and a charge of $4 million to write down primarily long-lived store assets of Runners Point and Sidestep.
The 2016 amounts reflect charges to write down long-lived store assets of Runners Point and Sidestep. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for additional information.
(2)
Included in the 2018 and 2017 amounts are pre-tax charge of $18 million and $178 million, respectively, relating to a pension litigation matter described further in Note 22, Legal Proceedings .
(3)
Included in the 2017 amount is $13 million in pre-tax reorganization costs related to the reduction and reorganization of division and corporate staff that occurred in the third quarter of 2017, described more fully in Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges .
(4)
Corporate expense for all years presented reflects the reallocation of expense between corporate and the operating divisions. Based upon annual internal studies of corporate expense, the allocation of such expenses to the operating divisions was increased by $40 million for 2018, $4 million for 2017, and $9 million for 2016, thereby reducing corporate expense.
Sales disaggregated based upon channel as of and for the fiscal years ended February 2, 2019, February 3, 2018, and January 28, 2017 are presented in the following table.
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Sales
Stores
$
6,714
$
6,673
$
6,744
Direct-to-customers
1,225
1,109
1,022
Total sales
$
7,939
$
7,782
$
7,766
Sales and long-lived asset information by geographic area as of and for the fiscal years ended February 2, 2019, February 3, 2018, and January 28, 2017 are presented in the following tables. Sales are attributed to the country in which the sales transaction is fulfilled. Long-lived assets reflect property and equipment.
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Sales
United States
$
5,647
$
5,532
$
5,562
International
2,292
2,250
2,204
Total sales
$
7,939
$
7,782
$
7,766
Long-Lived Assets
United States
$
602
$
607
$
575
International
234
259
190
Total long-lived assets
$
836
$
866
$
765
For the year ended February 2, 2019, the countries that comprised the majority of the sales and long-lived assets for the international category were Canada, Italy, France, and Germany. No other individual country included in the international category was significant.
Depreciation and
Amortization
Capital Expenditures (1)
Total Assets
2018
2017
2016
2018
2017
2016
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Division
$
160
$
157
$
144
$
112
$
205
$
197
$
2,900
$
3,132
$
3,140
Corporate
18
16
14
75
69
69
920
829
700
Total Company
$
178
$
173
$
158
$
187
$
274
$
266
$
3,820
$
3,961
$
3,840
(1)
Represents cash capital expenditures for all years presented

Litigation and Other Charges

Litigation and Other Charges12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Litigation and Other Charges [Abstract]
Litigation and Other Charges3. Litigation and Other Charges
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Pension litigation related charges
$
18
$
178
$

Other intangible asset impairments
15


Impairment of long-lived assets
4
20
6
Reorganization costs

13

Total litigation and other charges
$
37
$
211
$
6
As more fully discussed in Note 22, Legal Proceedings , the Company recorded charges in 2018 related to the pension litigation judgment totaling $18 million. This amount included charges of $13 million, which represented adjustments to the estimated cost of reformation and interest. Professional fees in connection with the plan reformation were incurred totaling $5 million. During 2017, the Company recorded charges totaling $178 million related to the same matter.
During 2018, due to the continued underperformance of our SIX:02 stores, Runners Point, and Sidestep stores, management determined that a triggering event had occurred and, therefore, an impairment review was conducted. Total non-cash impairment recorded to write down store fixtures and leasehold improvements was $4 million and was related to Runners Point, Sidestep, and SIX:02, for 105 stores, 48 stores, and 27 stores, respectively. As of February 2, 2019, the remaining net book value of long-lived assets related to these banners was not significant. In 2017, the Company also recorded non-cash impairment charges for SIX:02, Runners Point, and Sidestep stores to write down long-lived assets totaling $20 million. The Company also performed an impairment review of other intangible assets for Runners Point and Sidestep in 2018. Accordingly, a charge of $15 million was recorded to write down the value of the trademarks/trade names associated with Runners Point. This charge was determined by determining the fair value using a discounted cash flow method, based on a relief-from-royalty concept. The fair value reflected lower anticipated future performance.
During 2017, the Company reorganized its organizational structure by adjusting certain responsibilities between our various businesses. As a result of this, as well as certain corporate staff reductions taken to improve corporate efficiency, the Company recorded a charge of $13 million. The charge consisted primarily of severance payments and benefit continuation costs for approximately 190 associates. The amount remaining to be paid as of February 2, 2019 is not significant.

Other Income

Other Income12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Other Income [Abstract]
Other Income4. Other Income
Other income includes non-operating items, such as:
-
gains from insurance recoveries,
-
lease termination gains related to the sales of leasehold interests,
-
discounts/premiums paid on the repurchase and retirement of bonds,
-
franchise royalty income,
-
changes in fair value, premiums paid, realized gains associated with foreign currency option contracts,
-
changes in the market value of our available-for-sale security in conjunction with the adoption of ASU 2016-01 effective with the beginning of 2018,
-
changes in the fair value of our equity investments, and
-
net benefit expense related to our pension and postretirement programs excluding the service cost component as required by the adoption of ASU 2017-07 as of the beginning of 2018.
Other income was $5 million in both 2018 and 2017 and was $6 million in 2016. For 2018, other income includes $6 million of royalty income, $1 million of lease termination gains, a $1 million loss on our available-for-sale security, and $1 million of net benefit expense relating to our pension and post retirement programs. Included in 2017 was $4 million of royalty income and $1 million of lease termination gains. Other income in 2016 included a gain of $2 million on a forward foreign currency contract associated with an intercompany transaction that did not qualify for hedge accounting; $2 million of royalty income; $1 million related to an insurance recovery; and $1 million of lease termination gains.

Merchandise Inventories

Merchandise Inventories12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Merchandise Inventories [Abstract]
Merchandise Inventories5. Merchandise Inventories
2018
2017
($ in millions)
LIFO inventories
$
838
$
809
FIFO inventories
431
469
Total merchandise inventories
$
1,269
$
1,278
The value of the Company’s LIFO inventories, as calculated on a LIFO basis, approximates their value as calculated on a FIFO basis.

Other Current Assets

Other Current Assets12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Other Current Assets [Abstract]
Other Current Assets6. Other Current Assets
2018
2017
($ in millions)
Prepaid rent
$
93
$
96
Net receivables
87
106
Restricted cash (1)
59
1
Prepaid income taxes
46
174
Other prepaid expenses
35
31
Income taxes receivable
20
1
Deferred tax costs
10
13
Other
8
2
$
358
$
424
(1)
Restricted cash as of February 2, 2019 includes $55 million of the qualified settlement fund that was established during 2017 in connection with the pension litigation matter. The qualified settlement fund was classified as a long-term asset as of February 3, 2018 since the timing was not known at that time.

Property and Equipment, Net

Property and Equipment, Net12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Property and Equipment, Net [Abstract]
Property and Equipment, Net7. Property and Equipment, net
2018
2017
($ in millions)
Land
$
4
$
4
Buildings:
Owned
46
44
Furniture, fixtures, equipment and software development costs:
Owned
1,177
1,145
1,227
1,193
Less: accumulated depreciation
(785)
(753)
442
440
Alterations to leased and owned buildings:
Cost
926
965
Less: accumulated amortization
(532)
(539)
394
426
$
836
$
866

Goodwill

Goodwill12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets, Net [Abstract]
Goodwill8. Goodwill
As a result of the first quarter 2018 change in our organizational and internal reporting structure, we have determined that we have one reportable segment. We have reassessed our reporting units in light of this change and have deemed the collective omni-channel banners in North America and International to be the two reporting units at which goodwill is tested. Therefore, goodwill was re-allocated to these reporting units based on their relative fair values. As required, we conducted our 2018 annual impairment review both before and after this change. Neither review resulted in the recognition of impairment, as the fair value of each reporting unit exceeded its carrying value.
Goodwill is net of accumulated impairment charges of $167 million for all periods presented.

Other Intangible Assets, net

Other Intangible Assets, net12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets, Net [Abstract]
Other Intangible Assets, net9. Other Intangible Assets, net
February 2, 2019
February 3, 2018
Wtd.
Avg.
Gross
Accum.
Net
Life in
Gross
Accum.
Net
($ in millions)
value
amort.
value
Years (2)
value
amort.
value
Amortized intangible assets: (1)
Lease acquisition costs
$
120
$
(111)
$
9
9.8
$
135
$
(122)
$
13
Trademarks / trade names
20
(15)
5
20.0
20
(14)
6
Favorable leases
7
(6)
1
9.0
7
(6)
1
$
147
$
(132)
$
15
14.1
$
162
$
(142)
$
20
Indefinite life intangible assets: (1)
Runners Point Group trademarks / trade names (3)
9
26
Other intangible assets, net
$
24
$
46
(1)
The change in the ending balances also reflect the effect of foreign currency fluctuations due primarily to the movements of the euro in relation to the U.S. dollar.
(2)
The weighted-average useful life is as of February 2, 2019 and excludes those assets that are fully amortized.
(3)
Includes a non-cash impairment charge of $15 million recorded as of February 2, 2019. This impairment charge is described more fully in Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges.
Amortizing intangible assets primarily represent lease acquisition costs, which are amounts that are required to secure prime lease locations and other lease rights, primarily in Europe. Amortization expense recorded is as follows:
($ in millions)
2018
2017
2016
Amortization expense
$
4
$
4
$
4
Estimated future amortization expense for finite lived intangibles for the next five years is as follows:
($ in millions)
2019
$
3
2020
3
2021
3
2022
2
2023
2

Other Assets

Other Assets12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Other Assets [Abstract]
Other Assets10. Other Assets
2018
2017
($ in millions)
Minority investments
$
104
$
15
Restricted cash (1)
31
181
Pension asset
7
36
Auction rate security
6
7
Deferred tax costs
-
11
Other
50
40
$
198
$
290
(1)
Restricted cash for the year ended February 3, 2018 includes $150 million deposited to a qualified settlement fund in connection with the pension litigation. Please see Note 22, Legal Proceedings for further information.

Accrued and Other Liabilities

Accrued and Other Liabilities12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Accrued and Other Liabilities [Abstract]
Accrued and Other Liabilities11. Accrued and Other Liabilities
2018
2017
($ in millions)
Other payroll and payroll related costs, excluding taxes
$
70
$
67
Taxes other than income taxes
64
63
Customer deposits (1)
41
49
Incentive bonuses
41
6
Advertising
37
22
Property and equipment (2)
26
58
Income taxes payable
5
11
Other
93
82
$
377
$
358
(1)
Customer deposits include unredeemed gift cards, merchandise credits, and deferred revenue related to undelivered merchandise for 2017 (prior to the adoption of ASU 2014-09), including layaway sales.
(2)
Accruals for property and equipment are excluded from the statements of cash flows for all years presented.

Revolving Credit Facility

Revolving Credit Facility12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Revolving Credit Facility [Abstract]
Revolving Credit Facility12. Revolving Credit Facility
On May 19, 2016, the Company entered into a credit agreement with its banks (“2016 Credit Agreement”). The 2016 Credit Agreement provides for a $400 million asset-based revolving credit facility maturing on May 19, 2021. During the term of the 2016 Credit Agreement, the Company may also increase the commitments by up to $200 million, subject to customary conditions. Interest is determined, at the Company’s option, by the federal funds rate plus a margin of 0.125 percent to 0.375 percent, or a Eurodollar rate, determined by reference to LIBOR, plus a margin of 1.125 percent to 1.375 percent depending on availability under the 2016 Credit Agreement. In addition, the Company is paying a commitment fee of 0.20 percent per annum on the unused portion of the commitments.
The 2016 Credit Agreement provides for a security interest in certain of the Company’s domestic store assets, including inventory assets, accounts receivable, cash deposits, and certain insurance proceeds. The Company is not required to comply with any financial covenants unless certain events of default have occurred and are continuing, or if availability under the 2016 Credit Agreement does not exceed the greater of $40 million and 10 percent of the Loan Cap (as defined in the 2016 Credit Agreement). There are no restrictions relating to the payment of dividends and share repurchases as long as no default or event of default has occurred and the aggregate principal amount of unused commitments under the 2016 Credit Agreement is not less than 15 percent of the lesser of the aggregate amount of the commitments and the Borrowing Base, determined as of the preceding fiscal month and on a proforma basis for the following six fiscal months.
The Company uses the 2016 Credit Agreement to support standby letters of credit in connection with insurance programs. The letters of credit outstanding as of February 2, 2019 were not significant.
During 2016, the Company paid approximately $2 million in fees relating to the 2016 Credit Agreement. Deferred financing fees are amortized over the life of the facility on a straight-line basis, which is comparable to the interest method. The unamortized balance at February 2, 2019 is $1 million. Interest expense, including facility fees, related to the revolving credit facility was $1 million for all years presented.

Long-Term Debt

Long-Term Debt12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Long-Term Debt [Abstract]
Long-Term Debt13. Long-Term Debt
2018
2017
($ in millions)
8.5% debentures payable January 2022
$
118
$
118
Unamortized gain related to interest rate swaps (1)
6
7
$
124
$
125
(1)
In 2009, the Company terminated an interest rate swap at a gain. This gain is being amortized as part of interest expense over the remaining term of the debt using the effective-yield method.
Interest expense related to long-term debt and the amortization of the associated debt issuance costs was $8 million and $9 million for the years ended February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018, respectively.

Other Liabilities

Other Liabilities12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Other Liabilities [Abstract]
Other Liabilities14. Other Liabilities
2018
2017
($ in millions)
Straight-line rent liability (1)
$
265
$
245
Pension benefits
99
19
Income taxes
29
114
Postretirement benefits
11
14
Workers’ compensation and general liability reserves
7
7
Deferred taxes
6
15
Pension litigation liability (2)

278
Other
9
9
$
426
$
701
\
(1)
Includes unamortized tenant allowances of $66 million and $64 million for the year ended February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018, respectively.
(2)
During 2018, the pension litigation liability was reclassified to our pension obligations in connection with the plan reformation. This is more fully described in Note 22, Legal Proceedings .

Leases

Leases12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Leases [Abstract]
Leases15. Leases
The Company is obligated under operating leases for almost all of its store properties. Some of the store leases contain renewal options with varying terms and conditions. Management expects that in the normal course of business, expiring leases will generally be renewed or, upon making a decision to relocate, replaced by leases on other premises. Operating lease periods generally range from 5 to 10 years.
Certain leases provide for additional rent payments based on a percentage of store sales. Also, most of the Company’s leases require the payment of certain executory costs such as insurance, maintenance, and other costs in addition to the future minimum lease payments. These costs, including the amortization of lease rights, totaled $147 million in 2018, $146 million in 2017, and $141 million in 2016. Included in the amounts below are non-store expenses that totaled $25 million in 2018 and $24 million in both 2017 and 2016.
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Minimum rent
$
728
$
714
$
667
Contingent rent based on sales
27
26
29
Sublease income
(5)
(5)
(6)
$
750
$
735
$
690
Future minimum lease payments under non-cancellable operating leases, net of future non-cancellable operating sublease payments, are:
($ in millions)
2019
$
672
2020
631
2021
583
2022
527
2023
456
Thereafter
1,408
Total operating lease commitments
$
4,277

Accumulated Other Comprehensive

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss [Abstract]
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss16. Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss
Accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of tax, is comprised of the following:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Foreign currency translation adjustments
$
(84)
$
(9)
$
(127)
Cash flow hedges


1
Unrecognized pension cost and postretirement benefit
(286)
(270)
(236)
Unrealized loss on available-for-sale security


(1)
$
(370)
$
(279)
$
(363)
The changes in accumulated other comprehensive loss for the period ended February 2, 2019 were as follows:
Foreign
Items Related
Currency
to Pension and
Translation
Postretirement
($ in millions)
Adjustments
Benefits
Total
Balance as of February 3, 2018
$
(9)
$
(270)
$
(279)
OCI before reclassification
(75)
2
(73)
Amortization of pension actuarial (gain)/loss, net of tax

8
8
Pension remeasurement, net of tax

(26)
(26)
Other comprehensive loss
(75)
(16)
(91)
Balance as of February 2, 2019
$
(84)
$
(286)
$
(370)
Reclassifications to income from accumulated other comprehensive loss for the period ended February 2, 2019 were as follows:
($ in millions)
Amortization of actuarial (gain) loss:
Pension benefits- amortization of actuarial loss
$
12
Postretirement benefits- amortization of actuarial gain
(1)
Net periodic benefit cost (see Note 20)
11
Income tax benefit
(3)
Total, net of tax
$
8

Income Taxes

Income Taxes12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Income Taxes [Abstract]
Income Taxes17. Income Taxes
The domestic and international components of pre-tax income are as follows:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Domestic
$
629
$
432
$
779
International
84
146
225
Total pre-tax income
$
713
$
578
$
1,004
Domestic pre-tax income includes the results of non-U.S. businesses that are operated in branches owned directly by the U.S. which, therefore, are subject to U.S. income tax.
The income tax provision consists of the following:
2018
2017
2016
Current:
($ in millions)
Federal
$
91
$
129
$
249
State and local
42
18
44
International
30
42
48
Total current tax provision
163
189
341
Deferred:
Federal
(4)
98
(6)
State and local
1
5
1
International
12
2
4
Total deferred tax provision
9
105
(1)
Total income tax provision
$
172
$
294
$
340
Public Law 115-97, informally known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”), was enacted on December 22, 2017. The Tax Act lowered the U.S. statutory income tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent, imposed a one-time transition tax on the Company’s foreign earnings, which previously had been deferred from U.S. income tax, and created a modified territorial system. During the fourth quarter of 2017, the Company recognized a $99 million provisional charge for the mandatory deemed repatriation of foreign sourced net earnings and a corresponding change in the permanent reinvestment assertion under ASC 740-30. During 2018, the Company finalized its assessment of the income tax effects of the Tax Act and included measurement period adjustments that reduced the provisional amounts by $28 million. These adjustments represented a $21 million reduction in the deemed repatriation tax and a $7 million benefit related to IRS accounting method changes and timing difference adjustments. Any further guidance issued after 2018 may result in changes to the Company’s provision for income tax in the period such guidance is effective.
The Tax Act included a provision effective in 2018 to tax global intangible low-taxed income (“GILTI”) of the Company’s foreign subsidiaries. The Company has adopted an accounting policy to treat GILTI tax as a current period expense. The GILTI tax expense for 2018 was not significant.
Following enactment of the Tax Act and the one-time transition tax, our historical foreign earnings are not subject to additional U.S. federal tax upon repatriation. Further, no additional U.S. federal tax will be due upon repatriation of current foreign earnings because they are either exempt or subject to U.S. tax as earned. At February 2, 2019, the Company had accumulated undistributed foreign earnings of approximately $835 million. This amount consists of historical earnings that were previously taxed under the Tax Act and post-Tax Act earnings. Investments in our foreign subsidiaries, including working capital, will continue to be permanently reinvested. Cash balances in excess of working capital needs are considered to be available for repatriation to the United States and foreign withholding taxes will be accrued as necessary on these amounts. The Company has not recorded a deferred tax liability for the difference between the financial statement carrying amount and the tax basis of its investments in foreign subsidiaries. The determination of any unrecorded deferred tax liability on this amount is not practicable due to the uncertainty of how these investments would be recovered.
A reconciliation of the significant differences between the federal statutory income tax rate and the effective income tax rate on pre-tax income is as follows:
2018
2017
2016
Federal statutory income tax rate (1)
21.0
%
33.7
%
35.0
%
Deemed repatriation tax
(2.7)
17.1

Increase in valuation allowance
2.4
1.6

State and local income taxes, net of federal tax benefit
4.7
2.0
3.1
International income taxed at varying rates
1.6
(2.3)
(3.7)
Foreign tax credits
(2.1)
(2.6)
(1.9)
Domestic/foreign tax settlements
(0.7)
(0.2)
(0.1)
Federal tax credits
(0.2)
(0.2)
(0.2)
Other, net
0.1
1.7
1.7
Effective income tax rate
24.1
%
50.8
%
33.9
%
(1)
In accordance with Section 15 of the Internal Revenue Code, the tax rate for 2017 represented a blended rate of 33.7 percent, calculated by applying a prorated percentage of the number of days prior to and subsequent to the January 1, 2018 effective date.
Deferred income taxes are provided for the effects of temporary differences between the amounts of assets and liabilities recognized for financial reporting purposes and the amounts recognized for income tax purposes. Items that give rise to significant portions of the Company’s deferred tax assets and liabilities are as follows:
2018
2017
Deferred tax assets:
($ in millions)
Tax loss/credit carryforwards and capital loss
$
39
$
23
Employee benefits
38
16
Property and equipment
35
54
Goodwill and other intangible assets
24

Straight-line rent
47
44
Other
25
27
Total deferred tax assets
$
208
$
164
Valuation allowance
(33)
(17)
Total deferred tax assets, net
$
175
$
147
Deferred tax liabilities:
Merchandise inventories
$
77
$
79
Goodwill and other intangible assets

20
Other
17
15
Total deferred tax liabilities
$
94
$
114
Net deferred tax asset
$
81
$
33
Balance Sheet caption reported in:
Deferred taxes
$
87
$
48
Other liabilities
(6)
(15)
$
81
$
33
Based upon the level of historical taxable income and projections for future taxable income, which are based upon the Company’s long-range strategic plans, management believes it is more likely than not that the Company will realize the benefits of deductible differences, net of the valuation allowances at February 2, 2019, over the periods in which the temporary differences are anticipated to reverse. However, the amount of the deferred tax asset considered realizable could be adjusted in the future if estimates of taxable income are revised. As of February 2, 2019, the Company has a valuation allowance of $33 million to reduce its deferred tax assets to an amount that is more likely than not to be realized. A valuation allowance of $28 million was recorded against tax loss carryforwards of certain foreign entities. Based on the history of losses and the absence of prudent and feasible business plans for generating future taxable income in these entities, the Company believes it is more likely than not that the benefit of these loss carryforwards will not be realized. During 2018, we established a valuation allowance of $3 million for foreign taxes assessed at rates in excess of the U.S. federal tax rate for which no U.S. foreign tax credit is available. An additional valuation allowance of $2 million relates to the deferred tax assets arising from a capital loss associated with an impairment of the Northern Group note receivable recorded in 2008. The Company does not anticipate realizing capital gains to utilize the capital loss associated with the note receivable impairment.
At February 2, 2019, the Company has U.S. state operating loss carryforwards with a potential tax benefit of $1 million that expire between 2020 and 2037. The Company will have, when realized, a capital loss with a potential benefit of $2 million arising from a note receivable. This loss will carryforward for 5 years after realization. The Company has international minimum tax credit carryforwards with a potential tax benefit of $4 million and operating loss carryforwards with a potential tax benefit of $29 million, a portion of which will expire between 2019 and 2027 and a portion of which will never expire. The state and international operating loss carryforwards do not include unrecognized tax benefits. The Company also has foreign tax credit carryforwards with a potential tax benefit of $ 3 million that expire in 2028.
The Company operates in multiple taxing jurisdictions and is subject to audit. Audits can involve complex issues that may require an extended period of time to resolve. A taxing authority may challenge positions that the Company has adopted in its income tax filings. Accordingly, the Company may apply different tax treatments for transactions in filing its income tax returns than for income tax financial reporting. The Company regularly assesses its tax positions for such transactions and records reserves for those differences.
The Company’s 2016 and 2017 U.S. Federal income tax filings are under examination by the Internal Revenue Service. The Company expects to conclude both examinations in the first quarter of 2019. The Company is participating in the IRS’s Compliance Assurance Process (“CAP”) for 2018, which is expected to conclude during 2019. The Company has started the CAP for 2019. Due to the recent utilization of net operating loss carryforwards, the Company is subject to state and local tax examinations effectively including years from 2001 to the present. To date, no adjustments have been proposed in any audits that will have a material effect on the Company’s financial position or results of operations.
At February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018, the Company had $34 million and $44 million, respectively, of gross unrecognized tax benefits, and $34 million and $44 million, respectively, of net unrecognized tax benefits that would, if recognized, affect the Company’s annual effective tax rate. The Company has classified certain income tax liabilities as current or noncurrent based on management’s estimate of when these liabilities will be settled. Interest expense and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits are classified as income tax expense. Interest income, accrued interest, and penalties were not significant for any of the periods presented. The following table summarizes the activity related to unrecognized tax benefits:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Unrecognized tax benefits at beginning of year
$
44
$
38
$
38
Foreign currency translation adjustments
(3)
4
1
Increases related to current year tax positions
2
3
8
Increases related to prior period tax positions
9
1
1
Decreases related to prior period tax positions
(13)

(2)
Settlements
(3)
(1)
(7)
Lapse of statute of limitations
(2)
(1)
(1)
Unrecognized tax benefits at end of year
$
34
$
44
$
38
It is reasonably possible that the liability associated with the Company’s unrecognized tax benefits will increase or decrease within the next twelve months. These changes may be the result of foreign currency fluctuations, ongoing audits, or the expiration of statutes of limitations. Settlements during 2019 are not expected to be significant based on current estimates. Audit outcomes and the timing of audit settlements are subject to significant uncertainty. Although management believes that adequate provision has been made for such issues, the ultimate resolution could have an adverse effect on the earnings of the Company. Conversely, if these issues are resolved favorably in the future, the related provision would be reduced, generating a positive effect on earnings. Due to the uncertainty of amounts and in accordance with its accounting policies, the Company has not recorded any potential consequences of these settlements. In addition, to the extent there are settlements in the future for certain foreign unrecognized tax benefits, the transition tax may also be revised accordingly.

Financial Instruments and Risk

Financial Instruments and Risk Management12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Financial Instruments and Risk Management [Abstract]
Financial Instruments and Risk Management18. Financial Instruments and Risk Management
The Company operates internationally and utilizes certain derivative financial instruments to mitigate its foreign currency exposures, primarily related to third-party and intercompany forecasted transactions. As a result of the use of derivative instruments, the Company is exposed to the risk that counterparties will fail to meet their contractual obligations. To mitigate this counterparty credit risk, the Company has a practice of entering into contracts only with major financial institutions selected based upon their credit ratings and other financial factors. The Company monitors the creditworthiness of counterparties throughout the duration of the derivative instrument. Additional information is contained within Note 19, Fair Value Measurements .
Derivative Holdings Designated as Hedges
For a derivative to qualify as a hedge at inception and throughout the hedged period, the Company formally documents the nature of the hedged items and the relationships between the hedging instruments and the hedged items, as well as its risk-management objectives, strategies for undertaking the various hedge transactions, and the methods of assessing hedge effectiveness and ineffectiveness. In addition, for hedges of forecasted transactions, the significant characteristics and expected terms of a forecasted transaction must be specifically identified, and it must be probable that each forecasted transaction would occur. If it were deemed probable that the forecasted transaction would not occur, the gain or loss on the derivative instrument would be recognized in earnings immediately. Gains or losses recognized in earnings for any of the periods presented were not significant. Derivative financial instruments qualifying for hedge accounting must maintain a specified level of effectiveness between the hedging instrument and the item being hedged, both at inception and throughout the hedged period, which management evaluates periodically.
The primary currencies to which the Company is exposed are the euro, British pound, Canadian dollar, and Australian dollar. For the most part, merchandise inventories are purchased by each geographic area in their respective local currency. The most significant exception to this is the United Kingdom, whose merchandise inventory purchases are denominated in euros.
For option and foreign exchange forward contracts designated as cash flow hedges of the purchase of inventory, the effective portion of gains and losses is deferred as a component of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss (“AOCL”) and is recognized as a component of cost of sales when the related inventory is sold. The amount reclassified to cost of sales related to such contracts was not significant for any of the periods presented. The effective portion of gains or losses associated with other forward contracts is deferred as a component of AOCL until the underlying transaction is reported in earnings. The ineffective portion of gains and losses related to cash flow hedges recorded to earnings was not significant for any of the periods presented. When using a forward contract as a hedging instrument, the Company excludes the time value of the contract from the assessment of effectiveness.
As of February 2, 2019, all of the Company’s hedged forecasted transactions extend less than twelve months into the future, and the Company expects all derivative-related amounts reported in AOCL to be reclassified to earnings within twelve months. The balance in AOCL as of February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018 was not significant.
The notional value of the contracts outstanding at February 2, 2019 was $117 million, and these contracts mature at various dates through January 2020.
Derivative Holdings Not Designated as Hedges
The Company enters into certain derivative contracts that are not designated as hedges, such as foreign exchange forward contracts and currency option contracts. These derivative contracts are used to manage certain costs of foreign currency-denominated merchandise purchases, intercompany transactions, and the effect of fluctuating foreign exchange rates on the reporting of foreign currency-denominated earnings. Changes in the fair value of derivative holdings not designated as hedges, as well as realized gains and premiums paid, are recorded in earnings immediately within selling, general and administrative expenses or other income, depending on the type of transaction. The aggregate amount recognized for these contracts was not significant for any of the periods presented.
The notional value of foreign exchange forward contracts outstanding at February 2, 2019 was $11 million, and these contracts mature during January 2020.
From time to time, the Company mitigates the effect of fluctuating foreign exchange rates on the reporting of foreign-currency denominated earnings by entering into currency option contracts. Changes in the fair value of these foreign currency option contracts, which are not designated as hedges, are recorded in earnings immediately within other income. The realized gains, premiums paid, and changes in the fair market value recorded were not significant for any of the periods presented. There were no currency option contracts outstanding at February 2, 2019.
Fair Value of Derivative Contracts
The following represents the fair value of the Company’s derivative contracts. Many of the Company’s agreements allow for a netting arrangement. The following is presented on a gross basis, by type of contract:
Balance Sheet
($ in millions)
Caption
2018
2017
Hedging Instruments:
Foreign exchange forward contracts
Current assets
$

$
1
Foreign exchange forward contracts
Current liabilities
$
1
$
1
Notional Values and Foreign Currency Exchange Rates
The table below presents the notional amounts for all outstanding derivatives and the weighted-average exchange rates of foreign exchange forward contracts at February 2, 2019:
Contract Value
Weighted-Average
($ in millions)
Exchange Rate
Inventory
Buy €/Sell British £
$
106
0.8859
Buy USD/Sell €
$
11
1.1448
Intercompany
Buy €/Sell Kr
$
5
9.7244
Buy US $/Sell CAD $
$
2
1.3273
Buy €/Sell CHf
$
3
1.1265
Buy €/Sell US $
$
1
1.1414
Business Risk
The retailing business is highly competitive. Price, quality, selection of merchandise, reputation, store location, advertising, and customer experience are important competitive factors in the Company’s business. The Company operates in 27 countries and purchased approximately 90 percent of its merchandise in 2018 from its top 5 suppliers. In 2018, the Company purchased approximately 66 percent of its athletic merchandise from one major supplier, Nike, Inc. (“Nike”). Each of our operating divisions is highly dependent on Nike; they individually purchased 38 to 74 percent of their merchandise from Nike.
Included in the Company’s Consolidated Balance Sheet at February 2, 2019, are the net assets of the Company’s European operations, which total $1,069 million and are located in 20 countries, 11 of which have adopted the euro as their functional currency.

Fair Value Measurements

Fair Value Measurements12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Fair Value Measurements [Abstract]
Fair Value Measurements19. Fair Value Measurements
The following table provides a summary of the recognized assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis:
As of February 2, 2019
As of February 3, 2018
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Assets
Equity investments
$

$
94
$

$

$
15
$

Available-for-sale security

6


7

Foreign exchange forward contracts




1

Total Assets
$

$
100
$

$

$
23
$

Liabilities
Foreign exchange forward contracts

1


1

Total Liabilities
$

$
1
$

$

$
1
$

The fair values of the Company’s equity investments are determined by using quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active and therefore are classified as Level 2. The fair value of the auction rate security is determined by using quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets and accordingly is classified as a Level 2 instrument. The Company’s derivative financial instruments are valued using market-based inputs to valuation models. These valuation models require a variety of inputs, including contractual terms, market prices, yield curves, and measures of volatility and therefore are classified as Level 2 instruments.
In 2018 and 2017, the Company performed impairment reviews of long-lived and intangible assets for Runners Point, Sidestep, and SIX:02. The fair value of all of the assets reviewed for both periods were measured using Level 3 inputs. Please see Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.
There were no transfers into or out of Level 1, Level 2, or Level 3 for any of the periods presented.
The carrying value and estimated fair value of long-term debt were as follows:
2018
2017
($ in millions)
Carrying value
$
124
$
125
Fair value
$
136
$
144
The fair value of long-term debt is determined by using model-derived valuations in which all significant inputs or significant value-drivers are observable in active markets and therefore are classified as Level 2. The carrying values of cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash, and other current receivables and payables approximate their fair value.

Retirement Plans and Other Bene

Retirement Plans and Other Benefits12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Retirement Plans and Other Benefits [Abstract]
Retirement Plans and Other Benefits20. Retirement Plans and Other Benefits
Pension and Other Postretirement Plans
The Company has defined benefit pension plans covering certain of its North American employees, which are funded in accordance with the provisions of the laws where the plans are in effect. In addition, the Company has a defined benefit plan for certain individuals of Runners Point Group.
The Company also sponsors postretirement medical and life insurance plans, which are available to most of its retired U.S. employees. These plans are contributory and are not funded. The measurement date of the assets and liabilities is the month-end date that is closest to our fiscal year end. The following tables set forth the plans’ changes in benefit obligations and plan assets, funded status, and amounts recognized in the Consolidated Balance Sheets:
Pension Benefits
Postretirement Benefits
2018
2017
2018
2017
($ in millions)
Change in benefit obligation
Benefit obligation at beginning of year
$
683
$
666
$
15
$
15
Service cost
18
17


Interest cost
29
25

1
Plan participants’ contributions


1
1
Actuarial (gain) / loss
(16)
25
(2)

Foreign currency translation adjustments
(4)
3


Plan reformation (1)
194



Benefits paid
(165)
(53)
(2)
(2)
Benefit obligation at end of year
$
739
$
683
$
12
$
15
Change in plan assets
Fair value of plan assets at beginning of year
$
697
$
647
Actual return on plan assets
(15)
70
Employer contributions
131
29
Foreign currency translation adjustments
(4)
4
Benefits paid
(165)
(53)
Fair value of plan assets at end of year
$
644
$
697
Funded status
$
(95)
14
$
(12)
$
(15)
Amounts recognized on the balance sheet:
Other assets
$
7
$
36
$

$

Accrued and other liabilities
(3)
(3)
(1)
(1)
Other liabilities
(99)
(19)
(11)
(14)
$
(95)
$
14
$
(12)
$
(15)
Amounts recognized in accumulated other
comprehensive loss, pre-tax:
Net loss (gain)
$
391
$
368
$
(6)
$
(5)
Prior service cost
1
1


$
392
$
369
$
(6)
$
(5)
(1)
In connection with the pension litigation more fully disclosed in Note 22, Legal Proceedings , the Company reformed its U.S. qualified pension plan during the second quarter of 2018 in accordance with the court’s order.
As of February 2, 2019, the Canadian qualified pension plan’s assets exceeded its accumulated benefit obligation. As of February 3, 2018, the assets of both the Canadian and U.S. qualified pension plans exceeded their accumulated benefit obligations. The Company’s non-qualified pension plans have an accumulated benefit obligation in excess of plan assets, as these plans are unfunded. Accordingly, the table below reflects both the U.S. qualified plan and the non-qualified plans for 2018, whereas the amounts presented for 2017 reflects the non-qualified plans.
2018
2017
($ in millions)
Projected benefit obligation
$
696
$
22
Accumulated benefit obligation
696
22
Fair value of plan assets
593

The following tables set forth the changes in accumulated other comprehensive loss (pre-tax) at February 2, 2019:
Pension
Postretirement
Benefits
Benefits
($ in millions)
Net actuarial loss (gain) at beginning of year
$
368
$
(5)
Amortization of net (loss) gain
(12)
1
Loss / (gain) arising during the year
37
(2)
Foreign currency fluctuations
(2)

Net actuarial loss (gain) at end of year (1)
$
391
$
(6)
Net prior service cost at end of year (2)
1

Total amount recognized
$
392
$
(6)
(1)
The amounts in accumulated other comprehensive loss that are expected to be recognized as components of net periodic benefit cost (income) during the next year are approximately $12 million and $(1) million related to the pension and postretirement plans, respectively.
(2)
The net prior service cost did not change during the year and is not expected to change significantly during the next year.
The following weighted-average assumptions were used to determine the benefit obligations under the plans:
Pension Benefits
Postretirement Benefits
2018
2017
2018
2017
Discount rate
4.0
%
3.7
%
4.1
%
3.7
%
Rate of compensation increase
3.6
%
3.6
%
Pension expense is actuarially calculated annually based on data available at the beginning of each year. The expected return on plan assets is determined by multiplying the expected long-term rate of return on assets by the market-related value of plan assets for the U.S. qualified pension plan and market value for the Canadian qualified pension plan. The market-related value of plan assets is a calculated value that recognizes investment gains and losses in fair value related to equities over three or five years, depending on which computation results in a market-related value closer to market value. Market-related value for the U.S. qualified plan was $615 million and $585 million for 2018 and 2017, respectively.
Assumptions used in the calculation of net benefit cost include the discount rate selected and disclosed at the end of the previous year, as well as other assumptions detailed in the table below:
Pension Benefits
Postretirement Benefits
2018
2017
2016
2018
2017
2016
Discount rate (1)
4.0
%
4.0
%
4.1
%
3.7
%
4.0
%
4.1
%
Rate of compensation increase
3.6
%
3.6
%
3.7
%
Expected long-term rate of return on assets
5.9
%
5.8
%
6.1
%
(1)
The U.S qualified pension plan was remeasured during the second quarter of 2018 in connection with the pension litigation more fully described in Note 22, Legal Proceedings . The discount rate used to determine the benefit obligation before the remeasurement was 3.7%.
The expected long-term rate of return on invested plan assets is based on the plans’ weighted-average target asset allocation, as well as historical and future expected performance of those assets. The target asset allocation is selected to obtain an investment return that is sufficient to cover the expected benefit payments and to reduce the variability of future contributions by the Company.
The following are the components of net periodic pension benefit cost and net periodic postretirement benefit income. In conjunction with the first quarter 2018 adoption of ASU 2017-07, Compensation - Retirement Benefits (Topic 715) Improving the Presentation of Net Periodic Pension Cost and Net Periodic Postretirement Benefit Cost , service cost continues to be recognized as part of SG&A expense, while the remaining pension and postretirement expense components are now recognized as part of other income. Prior periods were not reclassified as required by this ASU as the amounts were not considered significant.
The components of net benefit expense (income) are:
Pension Benefits
Postretirement Benefits
2018
2017
2016
2018
2017
2016
Service cost
$
18
$
17
$
16
$

$

$

Interest cost
29
25
26

1
1
Expected return on plan assets
(38)
(37)
(37)



Amortization of net loss (gain)
12
13
14
(1)
(2)
(2)
Net benefit expense (income)
$
21
$
18
$
19
$
(1)
$
(1)
$
(1)
Beginning in 2001, new retirees were charged the expected full cost of the medical plan, and then-existing retirees will incur 100 percent of the expected future increases in medical plan costs. Any changes in the health care cost trend rates assumed would not affect the accumulated benefit obligation or net benefit income, since retirees will incur 100 percent of such expected future increases.
The Company maintains a Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan (“SERP”), which is an unfunded plan that includes provisions for the continuation of medical and dental insurance benefits to certain executive officers and other key employees of the Company (“SERP Medical Plan”). The SERP Medical Plan’s accumulated projected benefit obligation at February 2, 2019 was $10 million. The following initial and ultimate cost trend rate assumptions were used to determine the benefit obligations under the SERP Medical Plan:
Medical Trend Rate
Dental Trend Rate
2018
2017
2016
2018
2017
2016
Initial cost trend rate
6.5
%
7.0
%
7.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
Ultimate cost trend rate
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
Year that the ultimate cost trend rate is reached
The following initial and ultimate cost trend rate assumptions were used to determine the net periodic cost under the SERP Medical Plan:
Medical Trend Rate
Dental Trend Rate
2018
2017
2016
2018
2017
2016
Initial cost trend rate
7.0
%
7.0
%
7.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
Ultimate cost trend rate
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
Year that the ultimate cost trend rate is reached
A one percentage-point change in the assumed health care cost trend rates would have the following effects on the SERP Medical Plan:
1% Increase
1% (Decrease)
($ in millions)
Effect on total service and interest cost components
$

$

Effect on accumulated postretirement benefit obligation
2
(2)
The mortality assumption used to value the Company’s 2018 and 2017 U.S. pension obligations was the RP‑2017 mortality table with generational projection using modified MP‑2017 for both males and females. The Company used the RP‑2000 mortality table with generational projection using scale AA for both males and females to value its Canadian pension obligations for both 2018 and 2017. For the SERP Medical Plan, the mortality assumption used to value the 2018 obligation was updated to the RPH‑2018 table with generational projection using MP‑2018, while in the prior year the obligation was valued using the RPH‑2017 table with generational projection using MP‑2017.
Plan Assets
The target composition of the Company’s Canadian qualified pension plan assets is 95 percent fixed-income securities and 5 percent equities. The Company believes plan assets are invested in a prudent manner with the same overall objective and investment strategy as noted below for the U.S. pension plan. The bond portfolio is comprised of government and corporate bonds chosen to match the duration of the pension plan’s benefit payment obligations. This current asset allocation will limit future volatility with regard to the funded status of the plan.
The target composition of the Company’s U.S. qualified pension plan assets is 60 percent fixed-income securities, 36.5 percent equities, and 3.5 percent real estate. The Company may alter the asset allocation targets from time to time depending on market conditions and the funding requirements of the pension plan. This current asset allocation has and is expected to limit volatility with regard to the funded status of the plan, but may result in higher pension expense due to the lower long-term rate of return associated with fixed-income securities. Due to market conditions and other factors, actual asset allocations may vary from the target allocation outlined above.
The Company believes plan assets are invested in a prudent manner with an objective of providing a total return that, over the long term, provides sufficient assets to fund benefit obligations, taking into account the Company’s expected contributions and the level of funding risk deemed appropriate. The Company’s investment strategy seeks to diversify assets among classes of investments with differing rates of return, volatility, and correlation in order to reduce funding risk. Diversification within asset classes is also utilized to ensure that there are no significant concentrations of risk in plan assets and to reduce the effect that the return on any single investment may have on the entire portfolio.
Valuation of Investments
Significant portions of plan assets are invested in commingled trust funds. These funds are valued at the net asset value of units held by the plan at year end. Stocks traded on U.S. and Canadian security exchanges are valued at closing market prices on the measurement date.
The fair values of the Company’s Canadian pension plan assets at February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018 were as follows:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
2018 Total
2017 Total*
($ in millions)
Cash and cash equivalents
$

$
1
$

$
1
$
1
Equity securities:
Canadian and international (1)
3


3
4
Fixed-income securities:
Cash matched bonds (2)

47

47
53
Total assets at fair value
$
3
$
48
$

$
51
$
58
* Each category of plan assets is classified within the same level of the fair value hierarchy for 2018 and 2017.
(1)
This category comprises one mutual fund that invests primarily in a diverse portfolio of Canadian securities.
(2)
This category consists of fixed-income securities, including strips and coupons, issued or guaranteed by the Government of Canada, provinces or municipalities of Canada including their agencies and crown corporations, as well as other governmental bonds and corporate bonds.
No Level 3 assets were held by the Canadian pension plan during 2018 and 2017.
The fair values of the Company’s U.S. pension plan assets at February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018 were as follows:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
2018 Total
2017 Total*
($ in millions)
Cash and cash equivalents
$

$
3
$

$
3
$
4
Equity securities:
U.S. large-cap (1)

106

106
115
U.S. mid-cap (1)

32

32
34
International (2)

72

72
78
Corporate stock (3)
22


22
19
Fixed-income securities:
Long duration corporate and government bonds (4)

234

234
254
Intermediate duration corporate and government bonds (5)

104

104
113
Other types of investments:
Real estate securities (6)

20

20
21
Insurance contracts




1
Total assets at fair value
$
22
$
571
$

$
593
$
639
*
(1)
These categories consist of various managed funds that invest primarily in common stocks, as well as other equity securities and a combination of other funds.
(2)
This category comprises three managed funds that invest primarily in international common stocks, as well as other equity securities and a combination of other funds.
(3)
This category consists of the Company’s common stock.
(4)
This category consists of various fixed-income funds that invest primarily in long-term bonds, as well as a combination of other funds, that together are designed to exceed the performance of related long-term market indices.
(5)
This category consists of two fixed-income funds that invest primarily in intermediate duration bonds, as well as a combination of other funds, that together are designed to exceed the performance of related indices.
(6)
This category consists of one fund that invests in global real estate securities.
No Level 3 assets were held by the U.S. pension plan during 2018 and 2017.
Contributions and Expected Payments
The Company made a contribution of $128 million to its U.S. qualified pension plan during 2018. Also during 2018, the Company also paid $3 million in pension benefits related to its non-qualified pension plans. The Company continually evaluates the amount and timing of any potential contributions. The Company anticipates making a $55 million contribution to the U.S. qualified pension plan in early 2019 representing the remaining balance of the qualified settlement fund established in 2017.
Estimated future benefit payments for each of the next five years and the five years thereafter are as follows:
Pension
Postretirement
Benefits
Benefits
($ in millions)
2019
$
140
$
1
2020
54
1
2021
53
1
2022
53
1
2023
51

2024-2028
238
2
Savings Plans
The Company has two qualified savings plans, a 401(k) plan that is available to employees whose primary place of employment is the U.S., and another plan that is available to employees whose primary place of employment is in Puerto Rico. Prior to January 1, 2018, both plans limited participation to employees who had attained at least the age of twenty-one and have completed one year of service consisting of at least 1,000 hours. Effective January 1, 2018, eligible associates may contribute to the plans following 28 days of employment and are eligible for Company matching contributions upon completion of one year of service consisting of at least 1,000 hours. As of January 1, 2019, the savings plans allow eligible employees to contribute up to 40 percent of their compensation on a pre-tax basis, subject to a maximum of $19,000 for the U.S. plan and $15,000 for the Puerto Rico plan. The Company matches 25 percent of employees’ pre-tax contributions on up to the first 4 percent of the employees’ compensation (subject to certain limitations). Matching contributions made before January 1, 2016 were made with Company stock, subsequent to this date matching contributions were made in cash. Such matching contributions are vested incrementally over the first 5 years of participation for both plans. The charge to operations for the Company’s matching contribution was $4 million and $3 million for 2018 and 2017, respectively.

Share-Based Compensation

Share-Based Compensation12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Share-Based Compensation [Abstract]
Share-Based Compensation21. Share-Based Compensation
Stock Awards
Under the Company’s 2007 Stock Incentive Plan (the “2007 Stock Plan”), stock options, restricted stock, restricted stock units, stock appreciation rights, or other share-based awards may be granted to nonemployee directors, officers and other employees of the Company, including its subsidiaries and operating divisions worldwide. Options for employees become exercisable in substantially equal annual installments over a three-year period, beginning with the first anniversary of the date of grant of the option, unless a shorter or longer duration is established at the time of the option grant. The options terminate up to ten years from the date of grant. On May 21, 2014, the 2007 Stock Plan was amended to increase the number of shares of the Company’s common stock reserved for all awards to 14 million shares. As of February 2, 2019, there were 8,762,073 shares available for issuance under this plan.
Employees Stock Purchase Plan
Under the Company’s 2013 Foot Locker Employees Stock Purchase Plan (“ESPP”), participating employees are able to contribute up to 10 percent of their annual compensation, not to exceed $25,000 in any plan year, through payroll deductions to acquire shares of the Company’s common stock at 85 percent of the lower market price on one of two specified dates in each plan year. Of the 3,000,000 shares of common stock authorized under this plan, there were 2,475,699 shares available for purchase as of February 2, 2019. During 2018 and 2017, participating employees purchased 48,196 shares and 109,790 shares, respectively.
Share-Based Compensation Expense
Total compensation expense included in SG&A and the associated tax benefits recognized related to the Company’s share-based compensation plans, were as follows:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Options and shares purchased under the ESPP
$
7
$
9
$
10
Restricted stock and restricted stock units
15
6
12
Total share-based compensation expense
$
22
$
15
$
22
Tax benefit recognized
$
3
$
4
$
6
Valuation Model and Assumptions
The Black-Scholes option-pricing model is used to estimate the fair value of share-based awards. The Black-Scholes option-pricing model incorporates various and subjective assumptions, including expected term and expected volatility.
The Company estimates the expected term of share-based awards using the Company’s historical exercise and post-vesting employment termination patterns, which it believes are representative of future behavior. The expected term for the employee stock purchase plan valuation is based on the length of each purchase period as measured at the beginning of the offering period, which is one year.
The Company estimates the expected volatility of its common stock at the grant date using a weighted-average of the Company’s historical volatility and implied volatility from traded options on the Company’s common stock. The Company believes that this combination of historical volatility and implied volatility provides a better estimate of future stock price volatility.
The risk-free interest rate assumption is determined using the Federal Reserve nominal rates for U.S. Treasury zero-coupon bonds with maturities similar to those of the expected term of the award being valued. The expected dividend yield is derived from the Company’s historical experience.
The following table shows the Company’s assumptions used to compute the share-based compensation expense:
Stock Option Plans
Stock Purchase Plan
2018
2017
2016
2018
2017
2016
Weighted-average risk free rate of interest
2.7
%
2.1
%
1.4
%
2.0
%
1.0
%
0.5
%
Expected volatility
37
%
25
%
30
%
50
%
30
%
27
%
Weighted-average expected award life (in years)
5.5
5.4
5.7
1.0
1.0
1.0
Dividend yield
3.1
%
1.9
%
1.7
%
2.0
%
2.0
%
1.8
%
Weighted-average fair value
$
12.42
$
14.74
$
15.71
$
15.29
$
10.96
$
13.33
The information set forth in the following table covers options granted under the Company’s stock option plans:
Weighted-
Weighted-
Number
Average
Average
of
Remaining
Exercise
Shares
Contractual Life
Price
(in thousands)
(in years)
(per share)
Options outstanding at the beginning of the year
2,739
$
52.45
Granted
397
44.95
Exercised
(163)
30.73
Expired or cancelled
(112)
60.41
Options outstanding at February 2, 2019
2,861
6.0
$
52.34
Options exercisable at February 2, 2019
1,994
5.0
$
50.13
The total fair value of options vested during 2018 and 2017 was $8 million and was $9 million during 2016.
During the year ended February 2, 2019, the Company received $5 million in cash from option exercises and recognized a related tax benefit of $1 million. The total intrinsic value of options exercised (the difference between the market price of the Company’s common stock on the exercise date and the price paid by the optionee to exercise the option) is presented below:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Exercised
$
4
$
22
$
56
The aggregate intrinsic value for stock options outstanding, and those outstanding and exercisable (the difference between the Company’s closing stock price on the last trading day of the period and the exercise price of the options, multiplied by the number of in-the-money stock options) is presented below:
2018
($ in millions)
Outstanding
$
24
Outstanding and exercisable
$
20
As of February 2, 2019, there was $4 million of total unrecognized compensation cost related to nonvested stock options, which is expected to be recognized over a remaining weighted-average period of 1.4 years.
The following table summarizes information about stock options outstanding and exercisable at February 2, 2019:
Options Outstanding
Options Exercisable
Weighted-
Average
Weighted-
Weighted-
Remaining
Average
Average
Range of Exercise
Number
Contractual
Exercise
Number
Exercise
Prices
Outstanding
Life
Price
Exercisable
Price
(in thousands, except prices per share and contractual life)
$9.85 to $18.84
225
1.7
$
17.10
225
$
17.10
$24.75 to $34.75
384
4.0
32.11
346
31.82
$44.78 to $45.75
649
7.2
44.92
295
45.08
$46.64 to $62.11
693
5.7
60.63
660
61.19
$63.79 to $73.21
910
7.5
68.57
468
67.19
2,861
6.0
$
52.34
1,994
$
50.13
Restricted Stock and Restricted Stock Units
Restricted shares of the Company’s common stock and restricted stock units (“RSU”) may be awarded to certain officers and key employees of the Company. Additionally, RSU awards are made to employees in connection with the Company’ long-term incentive program and to nonemployee directors. Each RSU represents the right to receive one share of the Company’s common stock provided that the performance and vesting conditions are satisfied. In 2018, 2017, and 2016 there were 1,022,895, 360,782, and 648,588 RSU awards outstanding, respectively.
Generally, awards fully vest after the passage of time, typically three years. However, RSU awards made in connection with the Company’s long-term incentive program are earned after the attainment of certain performance metrics and vest after the passage of time. Restricted stock is considered outstanding at the time of grant and the holders have voting rights. Dividends are paid to holders of restricted stock that vest with the passage of time. With regard to performance-based restricted stock, dividends will be accumulated and paid after the performance criteria are met. No dividends are paid or accumulated on RSU awards. Compensation expense is recognized using the fair market value on the date of grant and is amortized over the vesting period, provided the recipient continues to be employed by the Company.
Restricted stock and RSU activity is summarized as follows:
Weighted-Average
Number
Remaining
Weighted-Average
of
Contractual
Grant Date
Shares
Life
Fair Value
(in thousands)
(in years)
(per share)
Nonvested at beginning of year
374
$
59.15
Granted (1)
683
45.49
Vested
(106)
64.32
Performance adjustment (2)
158
Expired or cancelled
(87)
58.41
Nonvested at February 2, 2019
1,022
$
47.47
Aggregate value ($ in millions)
$
49
(1)
Approximately 0.4 million performance-based RSUs were granted during 2018 and are included as granted in the table above. The number of performance-based RSUs that are ultimately earned may vary from 0% to 200% of target depending on the achievement relative to the Company’s predefined financial performance targets.
(2)
Represents adjustments that were made to performance-based RSUs previously granted. These adjustments reflect changes in estimates based upon the Company’s current performance against predefined financial targets.
The total fair value of awards for which restrictions lapsed was $7 million, $15 million, and $9 million for 2018, 2017, and 2016, respectively. At February 2, 2019, there was $29 million of total unrecognized compensation cost related to nonvested restricted stock and RSU awards.

Legal Proceedings

Legal Proceedings12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Legal Proceedings [Abstract]
Legal Proceedings22. Legal Proceedings
Legal proceedings pending against the Company or its consolidated subsidiaries consist of ordinary, routine litigation, including administrative proceedings, incidental to the business of the Company or businesses that have been sold or discontinued by the Company in past years. These legal proceedings include commercial, intellectual property, customer, environmental, and employment-related claims. Additionally, the Company is a defendant in a purported meal break class action in California and a purported class action in New York alleging failure to pay for all hours worked by employees. The Company and certain officers of the Company are defendants in a purported securities law class action in New York. Additionally, the directors and certain officers of the Company are defendants in related derivative actions.
Management does not believe that the outcome of any such legal proceedings pending against the Company or its consolidated subsidiaries, as described above, would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position, liquidity, or results of operations, taken as a whole, based upon current knowledge and taking into consideration current accruals. Litigation is inherently unpredictable. Judgments could be rendered or settlements made that could adversely affect the Company’s operating results or cash flows in a particular period.
For the last several years, the Company and the Company’s U.S. retirement plan have been defendants in a class action (Osberg v. Foot Locker Inc. et ano., filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York) in which the plaintiff alleged that, in connection with the 1996 conversion of the retirement plan to a defined benefit plan with a cash balance formula, the Company and the retirement plan failed to properly advise plan participants of the “wear-away” effect of the conversion. In early 2018, the Company exhausted all of its legal remedies and was required to reform the pension plan consistent with the trial court’s decision and judgment. During the second quarter of 2018, the court entered its final judgment, including the ruling on the fairness of the class counsel fees. The amount accrued as of February 3, 2018 was $278 million. During the first quarter of 2018 the amount of the accrual was increased by $7 million related to a change in the estimated value of the judgment, based on additional facts as to how the reformation should be calculated. Additionally, interest of $6 million was accrued during the first and second quarters of 2018 as mandated by the provisions of the required plan reformation, bringing the total amount accrued to $291 million. In June 2018, the Company paid $97 million to class counsel representing the court-approved fees. The remaining balance of $194 million was reclassified to the pension plan obligation in connection with the reformation during the second quarter of 2018.

Quarterly Results

Quarterly Results12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Quarterly Results [Abstract]
Quarterly Results (Unaudited)23. Quarterly Results (Unaudited)
1 st Quarter
2 nd Quarter
3 rd Quarter
4 th Quarter (1)
Fiscal Year
Sales
2018
2,025
1,782
1,860
2,272
$
7,939
2017
2,001
1,701
1,870
2,210
$
7,782
Gross margin (2)
2018
666
539
588
735
$
2,528
2017
680
503
580
693
$
2,456
Operating profit (3)
2018
224
112
144
219
$
699
2017
268
72
155
76
$
571
Net income/(loss) (4), (5), (6), (7)
2018
165
88
130
158
$
541
2017
180
51
102
(49)
$
284
Basic earnings per share (8)
2018
1.39
0.76
1.14
1.40
$
4.68
2017
1.37
0.39
0.81
(0.40)
$
2.23
Diluted earnings per share (8)
2018
1.38
0.75
1.14
1.39
$
4.66
2017
1.36
0.39
0.81
(0.40)
$
2.22
(1)
The fourth quarter of 2017 represents the 14 weeks ended February 3, 2018.
(2)
Gross margin represents sales less cost of sales. Cost of sales includes: the cost of merchandise, freight, distribution costs including related depreciation expense, shipping and handling, occupancy and buyers’ compensation. Occupancy costs include rent, common area maintenance charges, real estate taxes, general maintenance, and utilities.
(3)
Operating profit represents income before income taxes, interest (income)/expense, net, and non-operating income.
(4)
Charges of $12 million, $3 million, $2 million, and $1 million were recorded during the first, second, third, and fourth quarters of 2018, respectively. Of these amounts, $13 million represented adjustments to the estimated cost of the pension plan reformation and interest. Professional fees of $5 million were incurred during 2018 related to the plan reformation. During the second and fourth quarters of 2017, the Company recorded pre-tax charges of $50 million and $128 million, respectively, related to its U.S. retirement plan litigation. See Note 22, Legal Proceedings for further information.
(5)
During the third quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a pre-tax charge of $13 million associated with the reorganization and the reduction in staff taken to improve efficiency. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.
(6)
During the fourth quarters of 2018 and 2017, the Company recorded pre-tax non-cash impairment charges totaling $19 million and $20 million, respectively. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.
(7)
During the fourth quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a provisional $99 million tax liability for the mandatory deemed repatriation of foreign sourced net earnings and a corresponding change in our permanent reinvestment assertion under ASC 740‑30. During second, third, and fourth quarters 2018, the Company recorded benefits of $1 million, $23 million, and $4 million from the completion of the accounting for the Tax Act. See Note 17, Income Taxes for further information.
(8)
Quarterly income per share amounts do not total to the annual amount due to changes in weighted-average shares outstanding during the year. Additionally, stock options and other potentially dilutive common shares were excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per common share for the quarter ended February 3, 2018 as the Company reported a net loss.

Summary of Significant Accoun_2

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policy)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies [Abstract]
Basis of PresentationBasis of Presentation
The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Foot Locker, Inc. and its domestic and international subsidiaries (the “Company”), all of which are wholly owned. All significant intercompany amounts have been eliminated. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions relating to the reporting of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results may differ from those estimates.
Reporting YearReporting Year
The fiscal year end for the Company is the Saturday closest to the last day in January. Fiscal year 2018 represents the 52 weeks ended February 2, 2019. Fiscal year 2017 represented the 53 weeks ended February 3, 2018 and fiscal year 2016 represented the 52 weeks ended January 28, 2017. References to years in this annual report relate to fiscal years rather than calendar years.
Revenue RecognitionRevenue Recognition
Store revenue is recognized at the point of sale and includes merchandise, net of returns, and excludes taxes. Revenue from layaway sales is recognized when the customer receives the product, rather than when the initial deposit is paid. In the first quarter of 2018, the Company adopted Accounting Standards Update 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) . In conjunction with the adoption of Topic 606, we have determined that revenue for merchandise that is shipped to our customers from our distribution centers and stores will be recognized upon shipment date. Total revenue recognized includes shipping and handling fees. We have determined that control of the promised good is passed to the customer upon shipment date since the customer has legal title, the rewards of ownership, and paid for the merchandise as of the shipment date. This reflects a change in timing in how we previously recognized revenue for our direct-to-customer sales. Prior to the adoption of Topic 606, the Company recognized such revenue upon date of delivery. As a result of this change, the Company recorded $1 million, net of tax, as an increase to opening retained earnings to reflect the cumulative effect of adopting this change. We have elected to account for shipping and handling as a fulfillment activity. The Company accrues the cost and recognized revenue for these activities upon shipment date.
Gift CardsGift Cards
The Company sells gift cards which do not have expiration dates. Revenue from gift card sales is recorded when the gift cards are redeemed by customers. Effective as of the first quarter of 2018 with the adoption of Topic 606, gift card breakage is recognized as revenue in proportion to the pattern of rights exercised by the customer, unless there is a legal obligation to remit the value of unredeemed gift cards to the relevant jurisdictions. This reflects a change in our accounting for gift card breakage from the remote method to the proportional method. As a result of adopting Topic 606, the Company recorded $4 million, or $3 million net of tax, as an increase to opening retained earnings to reflect the cumulative effect of this change based upon historical redemption patterns . Additionally, breakage income was previously recorded within selling, general and administrative expenses; however, with the adoption of this standard in the first quarter of 2018, this income is reported as part of sales. This change in classification is not considered significant. The table below presents the activity of our gift card liability balance:
($ in millions)
Balance at February 4, 2018
$
38
Redemptions
(96)
Cumulative catch-up adjustment to retained earnings from the adoption of Topic 606
(4)
Breakage recognized in sales
(6)
Activations
104
Foreign currency fluctuations
(1)
Balance at February 2, 2019
$
35
The Company elected not to disclose the information about remaining performance obligations since the amount of gift cards redeemed after 12 months is not significant.
Store Pre-Opening and Closing CostsStore Pre-Opening and Closing Costs
Store pre-opening costs are charged to expense as incurred. In the event a store is closed before its lease has expired, the estimated post-closing lease exit costs, less any sublease rental income, is provided for once the store ceases to be used.
Advertising Costs and Sales PromotionAdvertising Costs and Sales Promotion
Advertising and sales promotion costs are expensed at the time the advertising or promotion takes place, net of reimbursements for cooperative advertising. Advertising expenses also include advertising costs as required by some of the Company’s mall-based leases. Cooperative advertising reimbursements earned for the launch and promotion of certain products agreed upon with vendors are recorded in the same period as the associated expenses are incurred.
Digital advertising costs are expensed as incurred, net of reimbursements for cooperative advertising. Digital advertising includes search engine marketing, such as display ads and keyword search terms, and other various forms of digital advertising. Reimbursement received in excess of expenses incurred related to specific, incremental, and identifiable advertising costs is accounted for as a reduction to the cost of merchandise and is reflected in cost of sales as the merchandise is sold.
Advertising costs, including digital advertising, which are included as a component of selling, general and administrative expenses, were as follows:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Advertising expenses
$
111
$
108
$
118
Digital advertising expenses
96
96
84
Cooperative advertising reimbursements
(25)
(20)
(20)
Net advertising expense
$
182
$
184
$
182
Catalog CostsCatalog Costs
Catalog costs, which are primarily comprised of paper, printing, and postage, are expensed at the time the catalogs are distributed. Prior to the adoption of Topic 606, catalog costs were capitalized and amortized over the expected customer response period related to each catalog, which was generally 90 days. Cooperative reimbursements earned for the promotion of certain products are agreed upon with vendors and are recorded in the same period as the associated catalog expenses are recorded.
Catalog costs, which are included as a component of selling, general and administrative expenses, were as follows:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Catalog costs
$
18
$
19
$
26
Cooperative reimbursements

(2)
(6)
Net catalog expense
$
18
$
17
$
20
Earnings Per ShareEarnings Per Share
The Company accounts for and discloses earnings per share using the treasury stock method. Basic earnings per share is computed by dividing net income for the period by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding at the end of the period. Restricted stock awards, which contain non-forfeitable rights to dividends, are considered participating securities and are included in the calculation of basic earnings per share. Diluted earnings per share reflects the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period used in the basic earnings per share computation plus dilutive common stock equivalents.
The computation of basic and diluted earnings per share is as follows:
2018
2017
2016
(in millions, except per share data)
Net Income
$
541
$
284
$
664
Weighted-average common shares outstanding
115.6
127.2
134.0
Dilutive effect of potential common shares
0.5
0.7
1.1
Weighted-average common shares outstanding assuming dilution
116.1
127.9
135.1
Earnings per share - basic
$
4.68
$
2.23
$
4.95
Earnings per share - diluted
$
4.66
$
2.22
$
4.91
Anti-dilutive share-based awards excluded from diluted calculation
1.9
1.6
0.4
Contingently issuable shares of 0.9 million for 2018, and 0.2 million for both 2017 and 2016, have not been included as the vesting conditions have not been satisfied. These shares relate to restricted stock unit awards issued in connection with the Company’s long-term incentive program.
Share-Based CompensationShare-Based Compensation
The Company recognizes compensation expense for share-based awards based on the grant date fair value of those awards. Share-based compensation expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period for each vesting tranche of the award. See Note 21, Share-Based Compensation, for information on the assumptions used to calculate the fair value of stock options. Performance-based restricted stock unit awards cliff vest at the end of a three-year period based upon the Company’s achievement of pre-established goals. Upon exercise of stock options, issuance of restricted stock or units, or issuance of shares under the employees stock purchase plan, the Company will issue authorized but unissued common stock or use common stock held in treasury.
Cash, Cash Equivalents and Restricted CashCash, Cash Equivalents, and Restricted Cash
Cash consists of funds held on hand and in bank accounts. Cash equivalents include amounts on demand with banks and all highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less, including money market funds. Additionally, amounts due from third-party credit card processors for the settlement of debit and credit card transactions are included as cash equivalents as they are generally collected within three business days. R estricted cash represents cash that is restricted as to withdrawal or use under the terms of various agreements. Restricted cash includes amounts held in a qualified settlement fund in connection with the pension litigation as discussed in Note 22, Legal Proceedings , amounts held in escrow in connection with various leasing arrangements in Europe, and deposits held in insurance trusts in order to satisfy the requirement to collateralize part of the self-insured workers’ compensation and liability claims.
The following table provides the reconciliation of cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash, as reported on our consolidated statements of cash flows.
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Cash and cash equivalents (1)
$
891
$
849
$
1,046
Restricted cash included in other current assets (2)
59
1

Restricted cash included in other non-current assets (2)
31
181
27
Cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash
$
981
$
1,031
$
1,073
(1)
Includes cash equivalents of $834 million, $780 million, and $1,000 million for the year ended February 2, 2019, February 3, 2018, and January 28, 2017, respectively.
(2)
In connection with the pension litigation matter, the Company deposited $150 million to a qualified settlement fund during 2017, classified as long-term at that time. Included in the restricted cash balance as of February 2, 2019 is $55 million remaining of this fund that is expected to be contributed to the pension plan in early 2019 and is therefore classified as current assets. Please also see Note 22, Legal Proceedings .
InvestmentsInvestments
As of February 3, 2018, the Company adopted ASU 2016-01, Financial Instruments – Overall (Subtopic 825-10): Recognition and Measurement of Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities . The Company’s $94 million of equity minority investments, under the practicability exception, are now measured at cost adjusted for changes in observable prices minus impairment. Additionally, our auction rate security classified as available-for-sale is now recorded at fair value with gains and losses reported to other income in our Statement of Operations, whereas previously changes in the fair value were reported as a component of accumulated other comprehensive loss in the Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity and were not reflected in the Consolidated Statements of Operations until a sale transaction occurred or when declines in fair value were deemed to be other-than-temporary. The adjustment recorded to retained earnings as a result of adopting ASU 2016-01 was not significant.
Minority interests, including equity method investments and convertible notes, had a carrying value of $104 million as of February 2, 2019 and are included within other assets. As of February 2, 2019, the Company held one available-for-sale security, which was the Company’s $6 million auction rate security.
Merchandise Inventories and Cost of SalesMerchandise Inventories and Cost of Sales
Merchandise inventories for the Company’s Athletic Stores are valued at the lower of cost or market using the retail inventory method. Cost for retail stores is determined on the last-in, first-out (“LIFO”) basis for domestic inventories and on the first-in, first-out (“FIFO”) basis for international inventories. Merchandise inventories of the Direct-to-Customers business are valued at the lower of cost or market using weighted-average cost, which approximates FIFO.
The retail inventory method is commonly used by retail companies to value inventories at cost and calculate gross margins due to its practicality. Under the retail inventory method, cost is determined by applying a cost-to-retail percentage across groupings of similar items, known as departments. The cost-to-retail percentage is applied to ending inventory at its current owned retail valuation to determine the cost of ending inventory on a department basis. The Company provides reserves based on current selling prices when the inventory has not been marked down to market.
Transportation, distribution center, and sourcing costs are capitalized in merchandise inventories. The Company expenses the freight associated with transfers between its store locations in the period incurred. The Company maintains an accrual for shrinkage based on historical rates.
Cost of sales is comprised of the cost of merchandise, as well as occupancy, buyers’ compensation, and shipping and handling costs. The cost of merchandise is recorded net of amounts received from suppliers for damaged product returns, markdown allowances, and volume rebates, as well as cooperative advertising reimbursements received in excess of specific, incremental advertising expenses. Occupancy costs include the amortization of amounts received from landlords for tenant improvements.
Property and EquipmentProperty and Equipment
Property and equipment are recorded at cost, less accumulated depreciation and amortization. Significant additions and improvements to property and equipment are capitalized. Depreciation and amortization are computed on a straight-line basis over the following estimated useful lives:
Buildings
Maximum of 50 years
Store leasehold improvements
Shorter of the asset useful life or expected term of the lease
Furniture, fixtures, and equipment
3 ‑ 10 years
Software
2 ‑ 7 years
Maintenance and repairs are charged to current operations as incurred. Major renewals or replacements that substantially extend the useful life of an asset are capitalized and depreciated.
Internal-Use Software Development CostsInternal-Use Software Development Costs
The Company capitalizes certain external and internal computer software and software development costs incurred during the application development stage. The application development stage generally includes software design and configuration, coding, testing, and installation activities. Capitalized costs include only external direct cost of materials and services consumed in developing or obtaining internal-use software, and payroll and payroll-related costs for employees who are directly associated with and devote time to the internal-use software project. Capitalization of such costs ceases no later than the point at which the project is substantially complete and ready for its intended use. Training and maintenance costs are expensed as incurred, while upgrades and enhancements are capitalized if it is probable that such expenditures will result in additional functionality. Capitalized software, net of accumulated amortization, is included as a component of property and equipment and was $80 million and $67 million at February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018, respectively.
Recoverability of Long-Lived AssetsRecoverability of Long-Lived Tangible Assets
The Company performs an impairment review when circumstances indicate that the carrying value of long-lived tangible assets may not be recoverable. Management’s policy in determining whether an impairment indicator exists, a triggering event, comprises measurable operating performance criteria at the division level, as well as qualitative measures. The Company considers historical performance and future estimated results, which are predominately identified from the Company’s long-range strategic plans, in its evaluation of potential store-level impairment and then compares the carrying amount of the asset with the estimated future cash flows expected to result from the use of the asset. If the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the estimated expected undiscounted future cash flows, the Company measures the amount of the impairment by comparing the carrying amount of the asset with its estimated fair value. The estimation of fair value is measured by discounting expected future cash flows at the Company’s weighted-average cost of capital. The Company estimates fair value based on the best information available using estimates, judgments, and projections as considered necessary.
Goodwill and Other Intangible AssetsGoodwill and Other Intangible Assets
Goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite lives are reviewed for impairment annually during the first quarter of each fiscal year or more frequently if impairment indicators arise. The review of goodwill impairment consists of either using a qualitative approach to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of the assets is less than their respective carrying values or a two-step impairment test, if necessary. If, based on the results of the qualitative assessment, it is concluded that it is not more likely than not that the fair value of the intangible asset is greater than its carrying value, the two-step test is performed to identify potential impairment. If it is determined that it is not more likely than not that the fair value of the reporting unit is less than its carrying value, it is unnecessary to perform the two-step impairment test.
Based on certain circumstances, we may elect to bypass the qualitative assessment and proceed directly to performing the first step of the two-step impairment test. The first step of the two-step goodwill impairment test compares the fair value of the reporting unit to its carrying amount, including goodwill. The second step includes hypothetically valuing all the tangible and intangible assets of the reporting unit as if the reporting unit had been acquired in a business combination. Then, the implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill is compared to the carrying amount of that goodwill. If the carrying value of the asset exceeds its fair value, an impairment loss is recognized in the amount of the excess. The fair value of each reporting unit is determined using a discounted cash flow approach.
Intangible assets that are determined to have finite lives are amortized over their useful lives and are measured for impairment only when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may be impaired. Intangible assets with indefinite lives are tested for impairment if impairment indicators arise and, at a minimum, annually. The impairment review for intangible assets with indefinite lives consists of either performing a qualitative or a quantitative assessment. If the results of the qualitative assessment indicate that it is more likely than not that the fair value of the indefinite-lived intangible is less than its carrying amount, or if we elect to proceed directly to a quantitative assessment, we calculate the fair value using a discounted cash flow method, based on the relief from royalty concept, and compare the fair value to the carrying value to determine if the asset is impaired.
Derivative Financial InstrumentsDerivative Financial Instruments
All derivative financial instruments are recorded in the Company’s Consolidated Balance Sheets at their fair values. For derivatives designated as a hedge, and effective as part of a hedge transaction, the effective portion of the gain or loss on the hedging derivative instrument is reported as a component of other comprehensive income/loss or as a basis adjustment to the underlying hedged item and reclassified to earnings in the period in which the hedged item affects earnings. The effective portion of the gain or loss on hedges of foreign net investments is generally not reclassified to earnings unless the net investment is disposed of. To the extent derivatives do not qualify or are not designated as hedges, or are ineffective, their changes in fair value are recorded in earnings immediately, which may subject the Company to increased earnings volatility.
Fair ValueFair Value
The Company categorizes its financial instruments into a three-level fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value into three broad levels. The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3). If the inputs used to measure fair value fall within different levels of the hierarchy, the category level is based on the lowest priority level input that is significant to the fair value measurement of the instrument. Fair value is determined based upon the exit price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants exclusive of any transaction costs. The Company’s financial assets recorded at fair value are categorized as follows:
Level 1 - Quoted prices for identical instruments in active markets.
Level 2 - Quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active; and model-derived valuations in which all significant inputs or significant value-drivers are observable in active markets.
Level 3 - Model-derived valuations in which one or more significant inputs or significant value-drivers are unobservable.
Income TaxesIncome Taxes
The Company accounts for its income taxes under the asset and liability method, which requires the recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined on the basis of the differences between the financial statements and the tax basis of assets and liabilities, using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are recognized for tax credits and net operating loss carryforwards, reduced by a valuation allowance, which is established when it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. The effect of a change in tax rates on deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date.
The Company recognizes net deferred tax assets to the extent that it believes these assets are more likely than not to be realized. In making such a determination, the Company considers all available positive and negative evidence, including future reversals of existing taxable temporary differences, projected future taxable income, tax-planning strategies, and results of recent operations. If the Company determines that it would be able to realize its deferred tax assets in the future in excess of their net recorded amount, the Company would make an adjustment to the deferred tax asset valuation allowance, which would reduce the provision for income taxes.
A taxing authority may challenge positions that the Company adopted in its income tax filings. Accordingly, the Company may apply different tax treatments for transactions in filing its income tax returns than for income tax financial reporting. The Company regularly assesses its tax positions for such transactions and records reserves for those differences when considered necessary. Tax positions are recognized only when it is more likely than not, based on technical merits, that the positions will be sustained upon examination. Tax positions that meet the more-likely-than-not threshold are measured using a probability weighted approach as the largest amount of tax benefit that is greater than fifty percent likely of being realized upon settlement. Whether the more-likely-than-not recognition threshold is met for a tax position is a matter of judgment based on the individual facts and circumstances of that position evaluated in light of all available evidence. The Company recognizes interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits within income tax expense in the accompanying Consolidated Statement of Operations. Accrued interest and penalties are included within the related tax liability line in the Consolidated Balance Sheet.
Our income tax provision for 2018 and 2017 includes the effects of U.S. tax reform. See also Note 17, Income Taxes for more information.
Pension and Postretirement ObligationsPension and Postretirement Obligations
The discount rate for the U.S. plans is determined by reference to the Bond:Link interest rate model based upon a portfolio of highly-rated U.S. corporate bonds with individual bonds that are theoretically purchased to settle the plan’s anticipated cash outflows. The cash flows are discounted to their present value and an overall discount rate is determined. The discount rate selected to measure the present value of the Company’s Canadian benefit obligations was developed by using that plan’s bond portfolio indices, which match the benefit obligations. The Company measures its plan assets and benefit obligations using the month-end date that is closest to our fiscal year end.
Insurance LiabilitiesInsurance Liabilities
The Company is primarily self-insured for health care, workers’ compensation, and general liability costs. Accordingly, provisions are made for the Company’s actuarially determined estimates of discounted future claim costs for such risks, for the aggregate of claims reported, and claims incurred but not yet reported. Self-insured liabilities totaled $12 million and $10 million at February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018, respectively. The Company discounts its workers’ compensation and general liability reserves using a risk-free interest rate. Imputed interest expense related to these liabilities was not significant for any of the periods presented.
Accounting for LeasesAccounting for Leases
The Company recognizes rent expense for operating leases as of the possession date for store leases or the commencement of the agreement for a non-store lease. Rental expense, inclusive of rent holidays, concessions, and tenant allowances are recognized over the lease term on a straight-line basis. Contingent payments based upon sales and future increases determined by inflation related indices cannot be estimated at the inception of the lease and, accordingly, are charged to operations as incurred.
See Recent Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted for information on the first quarter 2019 adoption of the new lease accounting guidance, Accounting Standards Update 2016-02, Leases .
Treasury Stock RetirementTreasury Stock Retirement
The Company periodically retires treasury shares that it acquires through share repurchases and returns those shares to the status of authorized but unissued. The Company accounts for treasury stock transactions under the cost method. For each reacquisition of common stock, the number of shares and the acquisition price for those shares is added to the existing treasury stock count and total value. When treasury shares are retired, the Company’s policy is to allocate the excess of the repurchase price over the par value of shares acquired to both retained earnings and additional paid-in capital. The portion allocated to additional paid-in capital is determined by applying a percentage, which is determined by dividing the number of shares to be retired by the number of shares issued, to the balance of additional paid-in capital as of the retirement date.
During 2018 and 2017, the Company retired 9 million and 12 million shares, respectively, of its common stock held in treasury. The shares were returned to the status of authorized but unissued. As a result, treasury stock decreased by $400 million and $487 million as of February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018, respectively.
Foreign Currency TranslationForeign Currency Translation
The functional currency of the Company’s international operations is the applicable local currency. The translation of the applicable foreign currency into U.S. dollars is performed for balance sheet accounts using current exchange rates in effect at the balance sheet date and for revenue and expense accounts using the weighted-average rates of exchange prevailing during the year. The unearned gains and losses resulting from such translation are included as a separate component of accumulated other comprehensive loss within shareholders’ equity.
Recent Accounting PronouncementsRecently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements
In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“ FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ ASU”) Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) . The core principle of Topic 606 is to recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The Company adopted ASU 2014‑09 during the first quarter of 2018 using the modified retrospective method. We recognized $5 million, or $4 million net of tax, as the cumulative effect of initially applying the new revenue standard as an increase to the opening balance of retained earnings.
In October 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-16, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory . ASU 2016-16 requires recognition of income tax consequences of an intra-entity transfer of an asset other than inventory when the transfer occurs. The Company adopted this ASU during the first quarter of 2018 using the modified retrospective method, and as a result increased deferred income tax assets by $37 million. The Company recorded an adjustment to opening retained earnings to write off the income tax effects that had been deferred from past intercompany transactions involving non-inventory assets. The Company also recorded deferred tax assets with an offset to opening retained earnings for amounts that were not previously recognized under the previous guidance but are recognized under this ASU.
Other recently adopted ASUs are discussed within the applicable disclosures throughout this document.
Recent Accounting Pronouncements Not Yet Adopted
In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) . This ASU requires lessees to recognize a lease liability, on a discounted basis, and a right-of-use asset for all leases, as well as additional disclosure regarding leasing arrangements. In July 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-11, Leases (Topic 842): Targeted Improvements, which provides an optional transition method of applying the new lease standard. Topic 842 can be applied using either a modified retrospective approach at the beginning of the earliest period presented, or as permitted by ASU 2018-11, at the beginning of the period in which it is adopted. These new leasing standards are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods therein.
The Company intends to adopt Topic 842 during the first quarter of 2019 using the optional transition method provided by ASU 2018-11. The Company has elected to apply the transition package of practical expedients permitted under the transition guidance, which among other things, allows the carryforward of prior lease classifications and the assessment of whether a contract is or contains a lease. The Company will also elect to combine lease and non-lease components for all asset classes and to keep leases with an initial term of 12 months or less off the balance sheet. Based upon our current analysis and our evaluation of the standard, we estimate the adoption will result in the addition of approximately $3.2 to $3.4 billion of assets and liabilities to our consolidated balance sheet, with no significant change to our consolidated statements of operations or cash flows. The actual asset amount will depend on the finalization of any impairment of the right-to-use assets related to previously impaired stores, which is currently under review. The adjustment for impairment will be recorded as a cumulative-effect adjustment to retained earnings.
Other recently issued accounting pronouncements did not, or are not believed by management to, have a material effect on the Company’s present or future consolidated financial statements.

Summary of Significant Accoun_3

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Activity of Gift card liability balanceThe table below presents the activity of our gift card liability balance:
($ in millions)
Balance at February 4, 2018
$
38
Redemptions
(96)
Cumulative catch-up adjustment to retained earnings from the adoption of Topic 606
(4)
Breakage recognized in sales
(6)
Activations
104
Foreign currency fluctuations
(1)
Balance at February 2, 2019
$
35
Computation of Basic and Diluted Earnings Per ShareThe computation of basic and diluted earnings per share is as follows:
2018
2017
2016
(in millions, except per share data)
Net Income
$
541
$
284
$
664
Weighted-average common shares outstanding
115.6
127.2
134.0
Dilutive effect of potential common shares
0.5
0.7
1.1
Weighted-average common shares outstanding assuming dilution
116.1
127.9
135.1
Earnings per share - basic
$
4.68
$
2.23
$
4.95
Earnings per share - diluted
$
4.66
$
2.22
$
4.91
Anti-dilutive share-based awards excluded from diluted calculation
1.9
1.6
0.4
Schedule of Restricted Cash and Cash Equivalents [Table Text Block]The following table provides the reconciliation of cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash, as reported on our consolidated statements of cash flows.
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Cash and cash equivalents (1)
$
891
$
849
$
1,046
Restricted cash included in other current assets (2)
59
1

Restricted cash included in other non-current assets (2)
31
181
27
Cash, cash equivalents, and restricted cash
$
981
$
1,031
$
1,073
(1)
Includes cash equivalents of $834 million, $780 million, and $1,000 million for the year ended February 2, 2019, February 3, 2018, and January 28, 2017, respectively.
(2)
In connection with the pension litigation matter, the Company deposited $150 million to a qualified settlement fund during 2017, classified as long-term at that time. Included in the restricted cash balance as of February 2, 2019 is $55 million remaining of this fund that is expected to be contributed to the pension plan in early 2019 and is therefore classified as current assets. Please also see Note 22, Legal Proceedings .
Estimated Useful LivesDepreciation and amortization are computed on a straight-line basis over the following estimated useful lives:
Buildings
Maximum of 50 years
Store leasehold improvements
Shorter of the asset useful life or expected term of the lease
Furniture, fixtures, and equipment
3 ‑ 10 years
Software
2 ‑ 7 years
Advertising Expense [Member]
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Costs Included as Component of Selling, General and Administrative ExpensesAdvertising costs, including digital advertising, which are included as a component of selling, general and administrative expenses, were as follows:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Advertising expenses
$
111
$
108
$
118
Digital advertising expenses
96
96
84
Cooperative advertising reimbursements
(25)
(20)
(20)
Net advertising expense
$
182
$
184
$
182
Catalog Expense [Member]
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Costs Included as Component of Selling, General and Administrative ExpensesCatalog costs, which are included as a component of selling, general and administrative expenses, were as follows:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Catalog costs
$
18
$
19
$
26
Cooperative reimbursements

(2)
(6)
Net catalog expense
$
18
$
17
$
20

Segment Information (Tables)

Segment Information (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Segment Information [Abstract]
Sales and Division Operating Results for Reportable SegmentsThe Company evaluates performance based on several factors, of which the primary financial measure is the banner’s financial results referred to as division profit. Division profit reflects income before income taxes, pension litigation charge, corporate expense, non-operating income, and net interest income. The following table summarizes our results:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Division profit (1)
789
810
1,070
Less: Pension litigation and reorganization charges (2), (3)
18
191

Less: Corporate expense (4)
72
48
70
Income from operations
699
571
1,000
Interest income (expense), net
9
2
(2)
Other income
5
5
6
Income before income taxes
$
713
$
578
$
1,004
(1)
Included in the results for 2018, 2017, and 2016 are non-cash impairment charges of $19 million, $20 million, and $6 million, respectively.
During 2018, the Company recorded a charge totaling $4 million to write down store fixtures and leasehold improvements related to Runners Point, Sidestep, and SIX:02. Additionally, the Company recorded a charge of $15 million to write down the values of the trademarks/ trade names associated with Runners Point.
The 2017 amount includes a charge of $16 million to write down long-lived store assets of SIX:02, and a charge of $4 million to write down primarily long-lived store assets of Runners Point and Sidestep.
The 2016 amounts reflect charges to write down long-lived store assets of Runners Point and Sidestep. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for additional information.
(2)
Included in the 2018 and 2017 amounts are pre-tax charge of $18 million and $178 million, respectively, relating to a pension litigation matter described further in Note 22, Legal Proceedings .
(3)
Included in the 2017 amount is $13 million in pre-tax reorganization costs related to the reduction and reorganization of division and corporate staff that occurred in the third quarter of 2017, described more fully in Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges .
(4)
Corporate expense for all years presented reflects the reallocation of expense between corporate and the operating divisions. Based upon annual internal studies of corporate expense, the allocation of such expenses to the operating divisions was increased by $40 million for 2018, $4 million for 2017, and $9 million for 2016, thereby reducing corporate expense.
Disaggregation of Revenue2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Sales
Stores
$
6,714
$
6,673
$
6,744
Direct-to-customers
1,225
1,109
1,022
Total sales
$
7,939
$
7,782
$
7,766
Sales and Long-Lived Asset Information by Geographic Area2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Sales
United States
$
5,647
$
5,532
$
5,562
International
2,292
2,250
2,204
Total sales
$
7,939
$
7,782
$
7,766
Long-Lived Assets
United States
$
602
$
607
$
575
International
234
259
190
Total long-lived assets
$
836
$
866
$
765
Segment InformationDepreciation and
Amortization
Capital Expenditures (1)
Total Assets
2018
2017
2016
2018
2017
2016
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Division
$
160
$
157
$
144
$
112
$
205
$
197
$
2,900
$
3,132
$
3,140
Corporate
18
16
14
75
69
69
920
829
700
Total Company
$
178
$
173
$
158
$
187
$
274
$
266
$
3,820
$
3,961
$
3,840

Litigation and Other Charges (T

Litigation and Other Charges (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Litigation and Other Charges [Abstract]
Schedule of Litigation and Other Charges2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Pension litigation related charges
$
18
$
178
$

Other intangible asset impairments
15


Impairment of long-lived assets
4
20
6
Reorganization costs

13

Total litigation and other charges
$
37
$
211
$
6

Merchandise Inventories (Tables

Merchandise Inventories (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Merchandise Inventories [Abstract]
Schedule of Merchandise Inventories2018
2017
($ in millions)
LIFO inventories
$
838
$
809
FIFO inventories
431
469
Total merchandise inventories
$
1,269
$
1,278

Other Current Assets (Tables)

Other Current Assets (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Other Current Assets [Abstract]
Schedule of Other Current Assets2018
2017
($ in millions)
Prepaid rent
$
93
$
96
Net receivables
87
106
Restricted cash (1)
59
1
Prepaid income taxes
46
174
Other prepaid expenses
35
31
Income taxes receivable
20
1
Deferred tax costs
10
13
Other
8
2
$
358
$
424
Restricted cash as of February 2, 2019 includes $55 million of the qualified settlement fund that was established during 2017 in connection with the pension litigation matter. The qualified settlement fund was classified as a long-term asset as of February 3, 2018 since the timing was not known at that time.

Property and Equipment, Net (Ta

Property and Equipment, Net (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Property and Equipment, Net [Abstract]
Schedule of Property and Equipment2018
2017
($ in millions)
Land
$
4
$
4
Buildings:
Owned
46
44
Furniture, fixtures, equipment and software development costs:
Owned
1,177
1,145
1,227
1,193
Less: accumulated depreciation
(785)
(753)
442
440
Alterations to leased and owned buildings:
Cost
926
965
Less: accumulated amortization
(532)
(539)
394
426
$
836
$
866

Other Intangible Assets, net (T

Other Intangible Assets, net (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets, Net [Abstract]
Components of Finite-Lived Intangible Assets and Intangible Assets Not Subject to AmortizationFebruary 2, 2019
February 3, 2018
Wtd.
Avg.
Gross
Accum.
Net
Life in
Gross
Accum.
Net
($ in millions)
value
amort.
value
Years (2)
value
amort.
value
Amortized intangible assets: (1)
Lease acquisition costs
$
120
$
(111)
$
9
9.8
$
135
$
(122)
$
13
Trademarks / trade names
20
(15)
5
20.0
20
(14)
6
Favorable leases
7
(6)
1
9.0
7
(6)
1
$
147
$
(132)
$
15
14.1
$
162
$
(142)
$
20
Indefinite life intangible assets: (1)
Runners Point Group trademarks / trade names (3)
9
26
Other intangible assets, net
$
24
$
46
(1)
The change in the ending balances also reflect the effect of foreign currency fluctuations due primarily to the movements of the euro in relation to the U.S. dollar.
(2)
The weighted-average useful life is as of February 2, 2019 and excludes those assets that are fully amortized.
(3)
Includes a non-cash impairment charge of $15 million recorded as of February 2, 2019. This impairment charge is described more fully in Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges.
Amortization ExpenseAmortization expense recorded is as follows:
($ in millions)
2018
2017
2016
Amortization expense
$
4
$
4
$
4
Estimated Future Expected Amortization Expense for Finite Life Intangible AssetsEstimated future amortization expense for finite lived intangibles for the next five years is as follows:
($ in millions)
2019
$
3
2020
3
2021
3
2022
2
2023
2

Other Assets (Tables)

Other Assets (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Other Assets [Abstract]
Schedule of Other AssetsOther Assets
2018
2017
($ in millions)
Minority investments
$
104
$
15
Restricted cash (1)
31
181
Pension asset
7
36
Auction rate security
6
7
Deferred tax costs
-
11
Other
50
40
$
198
$
290
Restricted cash for the year ended February 3, 2018 includes $150 million deposited to a qualified settlement fund in connection with the pension litigation. Please see Note 22, Legal Proceedings for further information

Accrued and Other Liabilities (

Accrued and Other Liabilities (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Accrued and Other Liabilities [Abstract]
Schedule of Accrued and Other Liabilities2018
2017
($ in millions)
Other payroll and payroll related costs, excluding taxes
$
70
$
67
Taxes other than income taxes
64
63
Customer deposits (1)
41
49
Incentive bonuses
41
6
Advertising
37
22
Property and equipment (2)
26
58
Income taxes payable
5
11
Other
93
82
$
377
$
358
(1)
Customer deposits include unredeemed gift cards, merchandise credits, and deferred revenue related to undelivered merchandise for 2017 (prior to the adoption of ASU 2014-09), including layaway sales.
Accruals for property and equipment are excluded from the statements of cash flows for all years presented.

Long-Term Debt (Tables)

Long-Term Debt (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Long-Term Debt [Abstract]
Long Term Debt2018
2017
($ in millions)
8.5% debentures payable January 2022
$
118
$
118
Unamortized gain related to interest rate swaps (1)
6
7
$
124
$
125
(1)
In 2009, the Company terminated an interest rate swap at a gain. This gain is being amortized as part of interest expense over the remaining term of the debt using the effective-yield method.

Other Liabilities (Tables)

Other Liabilities (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Other Liabilities [Abstract]
Other LiabilitiesOther Liabilities
2018
2017
($ in millions)
Straight-line rent liability (1)
$
265
$
245
Pension benefits
99
19
Income taxes
29
114
Postretirement benefits
11
14
Workers’ compensation and general liability reserves
7
7
Deferred taxes
6
15
Pension litigation liability (2)

278
Other
9
9
$
426
$
701
\
(1)
Includes unamortized tenant allowances of $66 million and $64 million for the year ended February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018, respectively.
During 2018, the pension litigation liability was reclassified to our pension obligations in connection with the plan reformation. This is more fully described in Note 22, Legal Proceedings

Leases (Tables)

Leases (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Leases [Abstract]
Leases2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Minimum rent
$
728
$
714
$
667
Contingent rent based on sales
27
26
29
Sublease income
(5)
(5)
(6)
$
750
$
735
$
690
Future Minimum Lease Payments Under Non-Cancelable Operating Leases, Net of Future Non-Cancelable Operating Sublease Payments($ in millions)
2019
$
672
2020
631
2021
583
2022
527
2023
456
Thereafter
1,408
Total operating lease commitments
$
4,277

Accumulated Other Comprehensi_2

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss [Abstract]
Accumulated Other Comprehensive LossAccumulated other comprehensive loss, net of tax, is comprised of the following:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Foreign currency translation adjustments
$
(84)
$
(9)
$
(127)
Cash flow hedges


1
Unrecognized pension cost and postretirement benefit
(286)
(270)
(236)
Unrealized loss on available-for-sale security


(1)
$
(370)
$
(279)
$
(363)
Changes in Accumulated Other Comprehensive LossThe changes in accumulated other comprehensive loss for the period ended February 2, 2019 were as follows:
Foreign
Items Related
Currency
to Pension and
Translation
Postretirement
($ in millions)
Adjustments
Benefits
Total
Balance as of February 3, 2018
$
(9)
$
(270)
$
(279)
OCI before reclassification
(75)
2
(73)
Amortization of pension actuarial (gain)/loss, net of tax

8
8
Pension remeasurement, net of tax

(26)
(26)
Other comprehensive loss
(75)
(16)
(91)
Balance as of February 2, 2019
$
(84)
$
(286)
$
(370)
Reclassification from Accumulated Other Comprehensive LossReclassifications to income from accumulated other comprehensive loss for the period ended February 2, 2019 were as follows:
($ in millions)
Amortization of actuarial (gain) loss:
Pension benefits- amortization of actuarial loss
$
12
Postretirement benefits- amortization of actuarial gain
(1)
Net periodic benefit cost (see Note 20)
11
Income tax benefit
(3)
Total, net of tax
$
8

Income Taxes (Tables)

Income Taxes (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Income Taxes [Abstract]
Domestic and International Pre-Tax IncomeThe domestic and international components of pre-tax income are as follows:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Domestic
$
629
$
432
$
779
International
84
146
225
Total pre-tax income
$
713
$
578
$
1,004
Income Tax ProvisionThe income tax provision consists of the following:
2018
2017
2016
Current:
($ in millions)
Federal
$
91
$
129
$
249
State and local
42
18
44
International
30
42
48
Total current tax provision
163
189
341
Deferred:
Federal
(4)
98
(6)
State and local
1
5
1
International
12
2
4
Total deferred tax provision
9
105
(1)
Total income tax provision
$
172
$
294
$
340
Reconciliation of Significant Differences between Federal Statutory Income Tax Rate and Effective Income Tax Rate on Pre-Tax Income from Continuing OperationsA reconciliation of the significant differences between the federal statutory income tax rate and the effective income tax rate on pre-tax income is as follows:
2018
2017
2016
Federal statutory income tax rate (1)
21.0
%
33.7
%
35.0
%
Deemed repatriation tax
(2.7)
17.1

Increase in valuation allowance
2.4
1.6

State and local income taxes, net of federal tax benefit
4.7
2.0
3.1
International income taxed at varying rates
1.6
(2.3)
(3.7)
Foreign tax credits
(2.1)
(2.6)
(1.9)
Domestic/foreign tax settlements
(0.7)
(0.2)
(0.1)
Federal tax credits
(0.2)
(0.2)
(0.2)
Other, net
0.1
1.7
1.7
Effective income tax rate
24.1
%
50.8
%
33.9
%
(1)
In accordance with Section 15 of the Internal Revenue Code, the tax rate for 2017 represented a blended rate of 33.7 percent, calculated by applying a prorated percentage of the number of days prior to and subsequent to the January 1, 2018 effective date.
Significant Portions of Deferred Tax AccountsItems that give rise to significant portions of the Company’s deferred tax assets and liabilities are as follows:
2018
2017
Deferred tax assets:
($ in millions)
Tax loss/credit carryforwards and capital loss
$
39
$
23
Employee benefits
38
16
Property and equipment
35
54
Goodwill and other intangible assets
24

Straight-line rent
47
44
Other
25
27
Total deferred tax assets
$
208
$
164
Valuation allowance
(33)
(17)
Total deferred tax assets, net
$
175
$
147
Deferred tax liabilities:
Merchandise inventories
$
77
$
79
Goodwill and other intangible assets

20
Other
17
15
Total deferred tax liabilities
$
94
$
114
Net deferred tax asset
$
81
$
33
Balance Sheet caption reported in:
Deferred taxes
$
87
$
48
Other liabilities
(6)
(15)
$
81
$
33
Unrecognized Tax Benefits ActivityThe following table summarizes the activity related to unrecognized tax benefits:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Unrecognized tax benefits at beginning of year
$
44
$
38
$
38
Foreign currency translation adjustments
(3)
4
1
Increases related to current year tax positions
2
3
8
Increases related to prior period tax positions
9
1
1
Decreases related to prior period tax positions
(13)

(2)
Settlements
(3)
(1)
(7)
Lapse of statute of limitations
(2)
(1)
(1)
Unrecognized tax benefits at end of year
$
34
$
44
$
38

Financial Instruments and Ris_2

Financial Instruments and Risk Management (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Financial Instruments and Risk Management [Abstract]
Fair Value of Derivative Contracts on Gross Basis, by Type of ContractThe following is presented on a gross basis, by type of contract:
Balance Sheet
($ in millions)
Caption
2018
2017
Hedging Instruments:
Foreign exchange forward contracts
Current assets
$

$
1
Foreign exchange forward contracts
Current liabilities
$
1
$
1
Notional Amounts for Outstanding Derivatives and Weighted-Average Exchange Rates of Foreign Exchange Forward ContractsThe table below presents the notional amounts for all outstanding derivatives and the weighted-average exchange rates of foreign exchange forward contracts at February 2, 2019:
Contract Value
Weighted-Average
($ in millions)
Exchange Rate
Inventory
Buy €/Sell British £
$
106
0.8859
Buy USD/Sell €
$
11
1.1448
Intercompany
Buy €/Sell Kr
$
5
9.7244
Buy US $/Sell CAD $
$
2
1.3273
Buy €/Sell CHf
$
3
1.1265
Buy €/Sell US $
$
1
1.1414

Fair Value Measurements (Tables

Fair Value Measurements (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Fair Value Measurements [Abstract]
Assets and Liabilities Measured at Fair Value on Recurring BasisThe following table provides a summary of the recognized assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis:
As of February 2, 2019
As of February 3, 2018
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Assets
Equity investments
$

$
94
$

$

$
15
$

Available-for-sale security

6


7

Foreign exchange forward contracts




1

Total Assets
$

$
100
$

$

$
23
$

Liabilities
Foreign exchange forward contracts

1


1

Total Liabilities
$

$
1
$

$

$
1
$
Carrying Value and Estimated Fair Value of Long-Term DebtThe carrying value and estimated fair value of long-term debt were as follows:
2018
2017
($ in millions)
Carrying value
$
124
$
125
Fair value
$
136
$
144

Retirement Plans and Other Be_2

Retirement Plans and Other Benefits (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Changes in Benefit Obligations and Plan Assets, Funded Status, and Amounts Recognized in Consolidated Balance SheetsThe following tables set forth the plans’ changes in benefit obligations and plan assets, funded status, and amounts recognized in the Consolidated Balance Sheets:
Pension Benefits
Postretirement Benefits
2018
2017
2018
2017
($ in millions)
Change in benefit obligation
Benefit obligation at beginning of year
$
683
$
666
$
15
$
15
Service cost
18
17


Interest cost
29
25

1
Plan participants’ contributions


1
1
Actuarial (gain) / loss
(16)
25
(2)

Foreign currency translation adjustments
(4)
3


Plan reformation (1)
194



Benefits paid
(165)
(53)
(2)
(2)
Benefit obligation at end of year
$
739
$
683
$
12
$
15
Change in plan assets
Fair value of plan assets at beginning of year
$
697
$
647
Actual return on plan assets
(15)
70
Employer contributions
131
29
Foreign currency translation adjustments
(4)
4
Benefits paid
(165)
(53)
Fair value of plan assets at end of year
$
644
$
697
Funded status
$
(95)
14
$
(12)
$
(15)
Amounts recognized on the balance sheet:
Other assets
$
7
$
36
$

$

Accrued and other liabilities
(3)
(3)
(1)
(1)
Other liabilities
(99)
(19)
(11)
(14)
$
(95)
$
14
$
(12)
$
(15)
Amounts recognized in accumulated other
comprehensive loss, pre-tax:
Net loss (gain)
$
391
$
368
$
(6)
$
(5)
Prior service cost
1
1


$
392
$
369
$
(6)
$
(5)
(1)
In connection with the pension litigation more fully disclosed in Note 22, Legal Proceedings , the Company reformed its U.S. qualified pension plan during the second quarter of 2018 in accordance with the court’s order.
Information for Pension Plans with Accumulated Benefit Obligation in Excess of Plan AssetsAccordingly, the table below reflects both the U.S. qualified plan and the non-qualified plans for 2018, whereas the amounts presented for 2017 reflects the non-qualified plans.
2018
2017
($ in millions)
Projected benefit obligation
$
696
$
22
Accumulated benefit obligation
696
22
Fair value of plan assets
593
Changes in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss (Pre-Tax)The following tables set forth the changes in accumulated other comprehensive loss (pre-tax) at February 2, 2019:
Pension
Postretirement
Benefits
Benefits
($ in millions)
Net actuarial loss (gain) at beginning of year
$
368
$
(5)
Amortization of net (loss) gain
(12)
1
Loss / (gain) arising during the year
37
(2)
Foreign currency fluctuations
(2)

Net actuarial loss (gain) at end of year (1)
$
391
$
(6)
Net prior service cost at end of year (2)
1

Total amount recognized
$
392
$
(6)
(1)
The amounts in accumulated other comprehensive loss that are expected to be recognized as components of net periodic benefit cost (income) during the next year are approximately $12 million and $(1) million related to the pension and postretirement plans, respectively.
(2)
The net prior service cost did not change during the year and is not expected to change significantly during the next year.
Assumptions Used in the Calculation of Net Benefit CostAssumptions used in the calculation of net benefit cost include the discount rate selected and disclosed at the end of the previous year, as well as other assumptions detailed in the table below:
Pension Benefits
Postretirement Benefits
2018
2017
2016
2018
2017
2016
Discount rate (1)
4.0
%
4.0
%
4.1
%
3.7
%
4.0
%
4.1
%
Rate of compensation increase
3.6
%
3.6
%
3.7
%
Expected long-term rate of return on assets
5.9
%
5.8
%
6.1
%
(1)
The U.S qualified pension plan was remeasured during the second quarter of 2018 in connection with the pension litigation more fully described in Note 22, Legal Proceedings . The discount rate used to determine the benefit obligation before the remeasurement was 3.7%.
Net Benefit Expense (Income)The components of net benefit expense (income) are:
Pension Benefits
Postretirement Benefits
2018
2017
2016
2018
2017
2016
Service cost
$
18
$
17
$
16
$

$

$

Interest cost
29
25
26

1
1
Expected return on plan assets
(38)
(37)
(37)



Amortization of net loss (gain)
12
13
14
(1)
(2)
(2)
Net benefit expense (income)
$
21
$
18
$
19
$
(1)
$
(1)
$
(1)
Assumed Health Care Cost Trend Rates Related to Measurement of SERP Medical PlanThe following initial and ultimate cost trend rate assumptions were used to determine the benefit obligations under the SERP Medical Plan:
Medical Trend Rate
Dental Trend Rate
2018
2017
2016
2018
2017
2016
Initial cost trend rate
6.5
%
7.0
%
7.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
Ultimate cost trend rate
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
Year that the ultimate cost trend rate is reached
The following initial and ultimate cost trend rate assumptions were used to determine the net periodic cost under the SERP Medical Plan:
Medical Trend Rate
Dental Trend Rate
2018
2017
2016
2018
2017
2016
Initial cost trend rate
7.0
%
7.0
%
7.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
Ultimate cost trend rate
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
5.0
%
Year that the ultimate cost trend rate is reached
Effect of One Percentage-Point Change in Assumed Health Care Cost Trend RatesA one percentage-point change in the assumed health care cost trend rates would have the following effects on the SERP Medical Plan:
1% Increase
1% (Decrease)
($ in millions)
Effect on total service and interest cost components
$

$

Effect on accumulated postretirement benefit obligation
2
(2)
Estimated Future Benefit PaymentsEstimated future benefit payments for each of the next five years and the five years thereafter are as follows:
Pension
Postretirement
Benefits
Benefits
($ in millions)
2019
$
140
$
1
2020
54
1
2021
53
1
2022
53
1
2023
51

2024-2028
238
2
U.S. Plan [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Fair Value of Pension Plan AssetsThe fair values of the Company’s U.S. pension plan assets at February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018 were as follows:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
2018 Total
2017 Total*
($ in millions)
Cash and cash equivalents
$

$
3
$

$
3
$
4
Equity securities:
U.S. large-cap (1)

106

106
115
U.S. mid-cap (1)

32

32
34
International (2)

72

72
78
Corporate stock (3)
22


22
19
Fixed-income securities:
Long duration corporate and government bonds (4)

234

234
254
Intermediate duration corporate and government bonds (5)

104

104
113
Other types of investments:
Real estate securities (6)

20

20
21
Insurance contracts




1
Total assets at fair value
$
22
$
571
$

$
593
$
639
*
(1)
These categories consist of various managed funds that invest primarily in common stocks, as well as other equity securities and a combination of other funds.
(2)
This category comprises three managed funds that invest primarily in international common stocks, as well as other equity securities and a combination of other funds.
(3)
This category consists of the Company’s common stock.
(4)
This category consists of various fixed-income funds that invest primarily in long-term bonds, as well as a combination of other funds, that together are designed to exceed the performance of related long-term market indices.
(5)
This category consists of two fixed-income funds that invest primarily in intermediate duration bonds, as well as a combination of other funds, that together are designed to exceed the performance of related indices.
(6)
This category consists of one fund that invests in global real estate securities.
CANADA
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Fair Value of Pension Plan AssetsThe fair values of the Company’s Canadian pension plan assets at February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018 were as follows:
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
2018 Total
2017 Total*
($ in millions)
Cash and cash equivalents
$

$
1
$

$
1
$
1
Equity securities:
Canadian and international (1)
3


3
4
Fixed-income securities:
Cash matched bonds (2)

47

47
53
Total assets at fair value
$
3
$
48
$

$
51
$
58
* Each category of plan assets is classified within the same level of the fair value hierarchy for 2018 and 2017.
(1)
This category comprises one mutual fund that invests primarily in a diverse portfolio of Canadian securities.
This category consists of fixed-income securities, including strips and coupons, issued or guaranteed by the Government of Canada, provinces or municipalities of Canada including their agencies and crown corporations, as well as other governmental bonds and corporate bonds.
Benefit Obligations [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Assumptions Used in the Calculation of Net Benefit CostThe following weighted-average assumptions were used to determine the benefit obligations under the plans:
Pension Benefits
Postretirement Benefits
2018
2017
2018
2017
Discount rate
4.0
%
3.7
%
4.1
%
3.7
%
Rate of compensation increase
3.6
%
3.6
%

Share-Based Compensation (Table

Share-Based Compensation (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Share-Based Compensation [Abstract]
Total Compensation Expense and the Related Tax Benefits RecognizedTotal compensation expense included in SG&A and the associated tax benefits recognized related to the Company’s share-based compensation plans, were as follows:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Options and shares purchased under the ESPP
$
7
$
9
$
10
Restricted stock and restricted stock units
15
6
12
Total share-based compensation expense
$
22
$
15
$
22
Tax benefit recognized
$
3
$
4
$
6
Assumptions used to Compute Share-Based Compensation ExpenseThe following table shows the Company’s assumptions used to compute the share-based compensation expense:
Stock Option Plans
Stock Purchase Plan
2018
2017
2016
2018
2017
2016
Weighted-average risk free rate of interest
2.7
%
2.1
%
1.4
%
2.0
%
1.0
%
0.5
%
Expected volatility
37
%
25
%
30
%
50
%
30
%
27
%
Weighted-average expected award life (in years)
5.5
5.4
5.7
1.0
1.0
1.0
Dividend yield
3.1
%
1.9
%
1.7
%
2.0
%
2.0
%
1.8
%
Weighted-average fair value
$
12.42
$
14.74
$
15.71
$
15.29
$
10.96
$
13.33
Options Granted under Stock Option PlansThe information set forth in the following table covers options granted under the Company’s stock option plans:
Weighted-
Weighted-
Number
Average
Average
of
Remaining
Exercise
Shares
Contractual Life
Price
(in thousands)
(in years)
(per share)
Options outstanding at the beginning of the year
2,739
$
52.45
Granted
397
44.95
Exercised
(163)
30.73
Expired or cancelled
(112)
60.41
Options outstanding at February 2, 2019
2,861
6.0
$
52.34
Options exercisable at February 2, 2019
1,994
5.0
$
50.13
Total Intrinsic Value of Options ExercisedThe total intrinsic value of options exercised (the difference between the market price of the Company’s common stock on the exercise date and the price paid by the optionee to exercise the option) is presented below:
2018
2017
2016
($ in millions)
Exercised
$
4
$
22
$
56
Aggregate Intrinsic Value for Stock Options Outstanding and ExercisableThe aggregate intrinsic value for stock options outstanding, and those outstanding and exercisable (the difference between the Company’s closing stock price on the last trading day of the period and the exercise price of the options, multiplied by the number of in-the-money stock options) is presented below:
2018
($ in millions)
Outstanding
$
24
Outstanding and exercisable
$
20
Information about Stock Options Outstanding and ExercisableThe following table summarizes information about stock options outstanding and exercisable at February 2, 2019:
Options Outstanding
Options Exercisable
Weighted-
Average
Weighted-
Weighted-
Remaining
Average
Average
Range of Exercise
Number
Contractual
Exercise
Number
Exercise
Prices
Outstanding
Life
Price
Exercisable
Price
(in thousands, except prices per share and contractual life)
$9.85 to $18.84
225
1.7
$
17.10
225
$
17.10
$24.75 to $34.75
384
4.0
32.11
346
31.82
$44.78 to $45.75
649
7.2
44.92
295
45.08
$46.64 to $62.11
693
5.7
60.63
660
61.19
$63.79 to $73.21
910
7.5
68.57
468
67.19
2,861
6.0
$
52.34
1,994
$
50.13
Restricted Share and Unit ActivityRestricted stock and RSU activity is summarized as follows:
Weighted-Average
Number
Remaining
Weighted-Average
of
Contractual
Grant Date
Shares
Life
Fair Value
(in thousands)
(in years)
(per share)
Nonvested at beginning of year
374
$
59.15
Granted (1)
683
45.49
Vested
(106)
64.32
Performance adjustment (2)
158
Expired or cancelled
(87)
58.41
Nonvested at February 2, 2019
1,022
$
47.47
Aggregate value ($ in millions)
$
49
(1)
Approximately 0.4 million performance-based RSUs were granted during 2018 and are included as granted in the table above. The number of performance-based RSUs that are ultimately earned may vary from 0% to 200% of target depending on the achievement relative to the Company’s predefined financial performance targets.
(2)
Represents adjustments that were made to performance-based RSUs previously granted. These adjustments reflect changes in estimates based upon the Company’s current performance against predefined financial targets.

Quarterly Results (Tables)

Quarterly Results (Tables)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Quarterly Results [Abstract]
Quarterly Results (Unaudited)1 st Quarter
2 nd Quarter
3 rd Quarter
4 th Quarter (1)
Fiscal Year
Sales
2018
2,025
1,782
1,860
2,272
$
7,939
2017
2,001
1,701
1,870
2,210
$
7,782
Gross margin (2)
2018
666
539
588
735
$
2,528
2017
680
503
580
693
$
2,456
Operating profit (3)
2018
224
112
144
219
$
699
2017
268
72
155
76
$
571
Net income/(loss) (4), (5), (6), (7)
2018
165
88
130
158
$
541
2017
180
51
102
(49)
$
284
Basic earnings per share (8)
2018
1.39
0.76
1.14
1.40
$
4.68
2017
1.37
0.39
0.81
(0.40)
$
2.23
Diluted earnings per share (8)
2018
1.38
0.75
1.14
1.39
$
4.66
2017
1.36
0.39
0.81
(0.40)
$
2.22
(1)
The fourth quarter of 2017 represents the 14 weeks ended February 3, 2018.
(2)
Gross margin represents sales less cost of sales. Cost of sales includes: the cost of merchandise, freight, distribution costs including related depreciation expense, shipping and handling, occupancy and buyers’ compensation. Occupancy costs include rent, common area maintenance charges, real estate taxes, general maintenance, and utilities.
(3)
Operating profit represents income before income taxes, interest (income)/expense, net, and non-operating income.
(4)
Charges of $12 million, $3 million, $2 million, and $1 million were recorded during the first, second, third, and fourth quarters of 2018, respectively. Of these amounts, $13 million represented adjustments to the estimated cost of the pension plan reformation and interest. Professional fees of $5 million were incurred during 2018 related to the plan reformation. During the second and fourth quarters of 2017, the Company recorded pre-tax charges of $50 million and $128 million, respectively, related to its U.S. retirement plan litigation. See Note 22, Legal Proceedings for further information.
(5)
During the third quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a pre-tax charge of $13 million associated with the reorganization and the reduction in staff taken to improve efficiency. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.
(6)
During the fourth quarters of 2018 and 2017, the Company recorded pre-tax non-cash impairment charges totaling $19 million and $20 million, respectively. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.
(7)
During the fourth quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a provisional $99 million tax liability for the mandatory deemed repatriation of foreign sourced net earnings and a corresponding change in our permanent reinvestment assertion under ASC 740‑30. During second, third, and fourth quarters 2018, the Company recorded benefits of $1 million, $23 million, and $4 million from the completion of the accounting for the Tax Act. See Note 17, Income Taxes for further information.
(8)
Quarterly income per share amounts do not total to the annual amount due to changes in weighted-average shares outstanding during the year. Additionally, stock options and other potentially dilutive common shares were excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per common share for the quarter ended February 3, 2018 as the Company reported a net loss.

Summary of Significant Accoun_4

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Narrative) (Details) - USD ($) shares in Thousands, $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
May 04, 2019May 05, 2018Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Shares of common stock repurchased to satisfy tax withholding obligations $ 1 $ 10 $ 7
Catalog Costs, amortization periodP90D
Contingently Issuable Shares Excluded From Diluted Earnings Per Share900 200 200
Cash equivalents $ 834 $ 780 $ 1,000
Qualified Settlement Fund150
Equity minority investments94
Available-for-sale securities6
Cost Method Investment[1]104 15
Capitalized software, net of accumulated amortization80 67
Self-insured liabilities total12 $ 10
ASU 2016-16
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Increase in deferred tax assets $ 37
Cumulative Effect on Retained Earnings, Net of Tax37
ASU 2014-09
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]
New Accounting Pronouncement or Change in Accounting Principle, Cumulative Effect of Change on Equity or Net Assets5
Cumulative Effect on Retained Earnings, Net of Tax4
Revenue Recognition Timing Change | ASU 2014-09
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Cumulative Effect on Retained Earnings, Net of Tax1
Gift Card Breakage | ASU 2014-09
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]
New Accounting Pronouncement or Change in Accounting Principle, Cumulative Effect of Change on Equity or Net Assets4
Cumulative Effect on Retained Earnings, Net of Tax $ 3
Treasury Stock [Member]
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Retirement of treasury stock (in shares)8,597 12,131 42,327
Retirement of treasury stock $ (400) $ (487) $ (1,728)
Maximum [Member] | Scenario, Forecast [Member] | Accounting Standards Update 2016 02 [Member]
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Addition to Assets and Liabilities from Accounting Standards Update $ 3.4
Minimum [Member] | Scenario, Forecast [Member] | Accounting Standards Update 2016 02 [Member]
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Addition to Assets and Liabilities from Accounting Standards Update $ 3.2
U.S. Plan [Member]
Significant Accounting Policies [Line Items]
Employer's contribution $ 55
[1]Restricted cash for the year ended February 3, 2018 includes $150 million deposited to a qualified settlement fund in connection with the pension litigation. Please see Note 22, Legal Proceedings for further information

Summary of Significant Accoun_5

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies - Gift Card Liability (Details) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019USD ($)
Disaggregation of Revenue [Line Items]
Accrued gift card liability at beginning of period $ 38
Cumulative catch-up adjustment to retained earnings from the adoption of Topic 606(4)
Foreign currency fluctuations(1)
Accrued gift card liability at end of period35
Gift Card Activations [Member]
Disaggregation of Revenue [Line Items]
Activations104
Gift Card Redemption Revenue [Member]
Disaggregation of Revenue [Line Items]
Revenue recognized(96)
Gift Card Breakage Revenue [Member]
Disaggregation of Revenue [Line Items]
Revenue recognized $ (6)

Summary of Significant Accoun_6

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Costs Included as Net Advertising Expenses) (Details) - Advertising Expense [Member] - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Component Of Operating Other Cost And Expense [Line Items]
Advertising expenses $ 111 $ 108 $ 118
Digital advertising expense96 96 84
Cooperative advertising reimbursements(25)(20)(20)
Net advertising expense $ 182 $ 184 $ 182

Summary of Significant Accoun_7

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Costs Included as Component of Selling, General and Administrative Expenses) (Details) - Catalog Expense [Member] - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Component Of Operating Other Cost And Expense [Line Items]
Catalog costs $ 18 $ 19 $ 26
Cooperative reimbursements(2)(6)
Net catalog expense $ 18 $ 17 $ 20

Summary of Significant Accoun_8

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Computation of Basic and Diluted Earnings Per Share) (Details) - USD ($) $ / shares in Units, shares in Millions, $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019[4]Nov. 03, 2018Aug. 04, 2018May 05, 2018Feb. 03, 2018Oct. 28, 2017Jul. 29, 2017Apr. 29, 2017Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Antidilutive Securities Excluded from Computation of Earnings Per Share [Line Items]
Net Income $ 158 [1],[2],[3] $ 130 [1],[2],[3] $ 88 [1],[2],[3] $ 165 [1],[2],[3] $ (49)[1],[2],[3] $ 102 [1],[2],[3] $ 51 [1],[2],[3] $ 180 [1],[2],[3] $ 541 [1],[2],[3] $ 284 [1],[2],[3] $ 664
Weighted-average common shares outstanding115.6 127.2 134
Dilutive effect of potential common shares0.5 0.7 1.1
Weighted-average common shares outstanding assuming dilution116.1 127.9 135.1
Basic earnings per share (in dollars per shares) $ 1.40 $ 1.14 $ 0.76 $ 1.39 $ (0.40) $ 0.81 $ 0.39 $ 1.37 $ 4.68 $ 2.23 $ 4.95
Diluted earnings per share (in dollars per share) $ 1.39 $ 1.14 $ 0.75 $ 1.38 $ (0.40) $ 0.81 $ 0.39 $ 1.36 $ 4.66 $ 2.22 $ 4.91
Stock Option Plans [Member]
Antidilutive Securities Excluded from Computation of Earnings Per Share [Line Items]
Anti-dilutive share-based awards excluded from diluted calculation1.9 1.6 0.4
[1]During the fourth quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a provisional $99 million tax liability for the mandatory deemed repatriation of foreign sourced net earnings and a corresponding change in our permanent reinvestment assertion under ASC 74030. During second, third, and fourth quarters 2018, the Company recorded benefits of $1 million, $23 million, and $4 million from the completion of the accounting for the Tax Act. See Note 17, Income Taxes for further information.Quarterly income per share amounts do not total to the annual amount due to changes in weighted-average shares outstanding during the year. Additionally, stock options and other potentially dilutive common shares were excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per common share for the quarter ended February 3, 2018 as the Company reported a net loss.
[2]During the fourth quarters of 2018 and 2017, the Company recorded pre-tax non-cash impairment charges totaling $19 million and $20 million, respectively. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.
[3]During the third quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a pre-tax charge of $13 million associated with the reorganization and the reduction in staff taken to improve efficiency. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.
[4]The fourth quarter of 2017 represents the 14 weeks ended February 3, 2018.

Summary of Significant Accoun_9

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Restricted Cash (Reconciliation of Cash and Cash Equivalents)) (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017Jan. 30, 2016
Restricted Cash [Abstract]
Cash and cash equivalents $ 891 $ 849 $ 1,046
Restricted cash included in other current assets59 1
Restricted cash included in other non-current assets31 181 27
Cash, Cash Equivalents, Restricted Cash and Restricted Cash Equivalents, Total $ 981 $ 1,031 $ 1,073 $ 1,048

Summary of Significant Accou_10

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Estimated Useful Lives) (Details)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019
Buildings
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Estimated useful lives of the assets50 years
Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment | Maximum [Member]
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Estimated useful lives of the assets10 years
Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment | Minimum [Member]
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Estimated useful lives of the assets3 years
Software
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Estimated useful lives of the assets7 years
Software | Minimum [Member]
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Estimated useful lives of the assets2 years

Segment Information (Narrative)

Segment Information (Narrative) (Details) - segment12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Segment Information [Abstract]
Operating segments2
Number of reportable segments1 2

Segment Information (Sales and

Segment Information (Sales and Division Operating Results for Reportable Segments) (Details) $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019USD ($)Nov. 03, 2018USD ($)Aug. 04, 2018USD ($)May 05, 2018USD ($)Feb. 03, 2018USD ($)Oct. 28, 2017USD ($)Jul. 29, 2017USD ($)Apr. 29, 2017USD ($)Feb. 02, 2019USD ($)segmentFeb. 03, 2018USD ($)segmentJan. 28, 2017USD ($)
Segment Reporting Information [Line Items]
Sales $ 2,272 [1] $ 1,860 $ 1,782 $ 2,025 $ 2,210 $ 1,870 $ 1,701 $ 2,001 $ 7,939 $ 7,782 $ 7,766
Division profit789 810 1,070
Less: Pension litigation charge1 2 3 12 50 13 178
Less: Pension litigation and reorganization charges18 191
Less: Corporate expense72 48 70
Income from operations219 [1],[2] $ 144 [2] $ 112 [2] $ 224 [2]76 [2]155 [2] $ 72 [2] $ 268 [2]699 [2]571 [2]1,000
Interest income (expense), net9 2 (2)
Other income5 5 6
Income before income taxes713 578 1,004
Non-cash impairment charges19 20 $ 19 $ 20 6
Number of reportable segments | segment1 2
Other intangible assets impairments $ 15
Impairment of long-lived assets4 $ 20 6
Pension litigation charge128 (18)(178)
Reorganization costs $ 13 13
Operating Segments [Member]
Segment Reporting Information [Line Items]
Non-cash impairment charges19 20 6
Impairment of leasehold4
Other intangible assets impairments15
Operating Segments [Member] | Six02 [Member]
Segment Reporting Information [Line Items]
Impairment of long-lived assets16
Operating Segments [Member] | Runners Point Group [Member]
Segment Reporting Information [Line Items]
Impairment of long-lived assets4
Corporate, Non-Segment [Member]
Segment Reporting Information [Line Items]
Pension litigation charge18 178
Reorganization costs13
Corporate expense due to allocation changes $ 40 $ 4 $ 40 $ 4 $ 9
[1]The fourth quarter of 2017 represents the 14 weeks ended February 3, 2018.
[2]Operating profit represents income before income taxes, interest (income)/expense, net, and non-operating income.C

Segment Information (Schedule o

Segment Information (Schedule of Sales Disaggregated by Sales Channel) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019[1]Nov. 03, 2018Aug. 04, 2018May 05, 2018Feb. 03, 2018Oct. 28, 2017Jul. 29, 2017Apr. 29, 2017Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Segment Reporting Information [Line Items]
Sales $ 2,272 $ 1,860 $ 1,782 $ 2,025 $ 2,210 $ 1,870 $ 1,701 $ 2,001 $ 7,939 $ 7,782 $ 7,766
Stores
Segment Reporting Information [Line Items]
Sales6,714 6,673 6,744
Direct-to-customers
Segment Reporting Information [Line Items]
Sales $ 1,225 $ 1,109 $ 1,022
[1]The fourth quarter of 2017 represents the 14 weeks ended February 3, 2018.

Segment Information (Sales an_2

Segment Information (Sales and Long-Lived Asset Information by Geographic Area) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Nov. 03, 2018Aug. 04, 2018May 05, 2018Feb. 03, 2018Oct. 28, 2017Jul. 29, 2017Apr. 29, 2017Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Segment Reporting Information [Line Items]
Sales $ 2,272 [1] $ 1,860 $ 1,782 $ 2,025 $ 2,210 $ 1,870 $ 1,701 $ 2,001 $ 7,939 $ 7,782 $ 7,766
Long-lived assets836 866 836 866 765
U.S. Plan [Member]
Segment Reporting Information [Line Items]
Sales5,647 5,532 5,562
Long-lived assets602 607 602 607 575
International
Segment Reporting Information [Line Items]
Sales2,292 2,250 2,204
Long-lived assets $ 234 $ 259 $ 234 $ 259 $ 190
[1]The fourth quarter of 2017 represents the 14 weeks ended February 3, 2018.

Segment Information (Schedule_2

Segment Information (Schedule of Segment Information) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Segment Reporting Information [Line Items]
Depreciation and Amortization $ 178 $ 173 $ 158
Capital Expenditures187 274 266
Total Assets3,820 3,961 3,840
Operating Segments [Member]
Segment Reporting Information [Line Items]
Depreciation and Amortization160 157 144
Capital Expenditures112 205 197
Total Assets2,900 3,132 3,140
Corporate, Non-Segment [Member]
Segment Reporting Information [Line Items]
Depreciation and Amortization18 16 14
Capital Expenditures75 69 69
Total Assets $ 920 $ 829 $ 700

Litigation and Other Charges (S

Litigation and Other Charges (Schedule of Litigation and Other Charges) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Nov. 03, 2018Aug. 04, 2018May 05, 2018Feb. 03, 2018Oct. 28, 2017Jul. 29, 2017Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Litigation and Other Charges [Abstract]
Pension litigation related charges $ (128) $ 18 $ 178
Pension litigation charge $ 1 $ 2 $ 3 $ 12 $ 50 13 178
Other intangible assets impairments15
Impairment of long-lived assets4 20 $ 6
Reorganization costs $ 13 13
Total litigation and other charges $ 37 $ 211 $ 6

Litigation and Other Charges (N

Litigation and Other Charges (Narrative) (Details) $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019USD ($)Nov. 03, 2018USD ($)Aug. 04, 2018USD ($)May 05, 2018USD ($)Feb. 03, 2018USD ($)Oct. 28, 2017USD ($)Jul. 29, 2017USD ($)Feb. 02, 2019USD ($)storeFeb. 03, 2018USD ($)employeeJan. 28, 2017USD ($)
Impairment Of Assets [Line Items]
Reorganization costs $ 13 $ 13
Associates With Severance Benefits | employee190
Pension litigation charge $ 128 $ (18) $ (178)
Pension litigation charge $ 1 $ 2 $ 3 $ 12 $ 50 13 178
Plan reformation cost13
Professional fees5
Impairment of assets4 20 $ 6
Net book value of long-lived assets $ 836 $ 866 836 $ 866 $ 765
Other intangible assets impairments15
Store Fixtures and Leasehold Improvements [Member]
Impairment Of Assets [Line Items]
Impairment of assets $ 4
Store Fixtures and Leasehold Improvements [Member] | Runners Point Group [Member]
Impairment Of Assets [Line Items]
Number of stores with non-cash impairment charge | store105
Store Fixtures and Leasehold Improvements [Member] | Sidestep [Member]
Impairment Of Assets [Line Items]
Number of stores with non-cash impairment charge | store48
Store Fixtures and Leasehold Improvements [Member] | Six02 [Member]
Impairment Of Assets [Line Items]
Number of stores with non-cash impairment charge | store27
Trade Names [Member] | Runners Point Group [Member]
Impairment Of Assets [Line Items]
Other intangible assets impairments $ 15

Other Income (Narrative) (Detai

Other Income (Narrative) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Other Income Non operating [Line Items]
Other income $ 5 $ 5 $ 6
Royalty income6 4 2
Insurance Recoveries1
Realized gain associated with foreign currency option contract2
Loss on available-for-sale security1
Net benefit expense relating to our pension and post retirement1
Leasehold improvements
Other Income Non operating [Line Items]
Lease termination gains related to the sales of leasehold interests $ 1 $ 1 $ 1

Merchandise Inventories (Schedu

Merchandise Inventories (Schedule of Merchandise Inventories) (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Merchandise Inventories [Abstract]
LIFO inventories $ 838 $ 809
FIFO inventories431 469
Total merchandise inventories $ 1,269 $ 1,278

Other Current Assets (Schedule

Other Current Assets (Schedule of Other Current Assets) (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Other Current Assets [Abstract]
Prepaid rent $ 93 $ 96
Net receivables87 106
Restricted cash59 1
Prepaid income taxes46 174
Other prepaid expenses35 31
Income taxes receivable20 1
Deferred tax costs10 13
Other8 2
Other current assets358 $ 424
Qualified settlement fund $ 55

Property and Equipment, Net (Sc

Property and Equipment, Net (Schedule of Property and Equipment) (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Property and equipment, gross $ 1,227 $ 1,193
Less: accumulated depreciation(785)(753)
Property plant and equipment excluding leasehold and building improvements442 440
Property and equipment, net836 866 $ 765
Land
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Property and equipment, gross4 4
Buildings
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Property and equipment, gross46 44
Furniture, Fixtures, Equipment and Software Development Costs
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Property and equipment, gross1,177 1,145
Leasehold and Building Improvements [Member]
Property, Plant and Equipment [Line Items]
Property and equipment, gross926 965
Less: accumulated depreciation(532)(539)
Property and equipment, net $ 394 $ 426

Goodwill (Narrative) (Details)

Goodwill (Narrative) (Details) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019USD ($)itemsegmentFeb. 03, 2018segment
Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets, Net [Abstract]
Number of reportable segment | segment1 2
Number of reporting units | item2
Goodwill accumulated impairment charges | $ $ 167

Other Intangible Assets, Net (S

Other Intangible Assets, Net (Schedule of Other Intangible Assets) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Intangible Assets by Major Class [Line Items]
Amortized intangible assets, Gross value $ 147 $ 162
Amortized intangible assets, Accum. amort.(132)(142)
Amortized intangible assets, Net value $ 15 20
Amortized intangible assets, Wtd. Avg. Life in Years14 years 1 month 6 days
Other intangible assets, net[1] $ 24 46
Lease Acquisition Costs [Member]
Intangible Assets by Major Class [Line Items]
Amortized intangible assets, Gross value[1]120 135
Amortized intangible assets, Accum. amort.[1](111)(122)
Amortized intangible assets, Net value[1] $ 9 13
Amortized intangible assets, Wtd. Avg. Life in Years[1]9 years 9 months 18 days
Trademarks and Trade Names [Member]
Intangible Assets by Major Class [Line Items]
Amortized intangible assets, Gross value[1] $ 20 20
Amortized intangible assets, Accum. amort.[1](15)(14)
Amortized intangible assets, Net value[1] $ 5 6
Amortized intangible assets, Wtd. Avg. Life in Years[1]20 years
Favorable Leases [Member]
Intangible Assets by Major Class [Line Items]
Amortized intangible assets, Gross value[1] $ 7 7
Amortized intangible assets, Accum. amort.[1](6)(6)
Amortized intangible assets, Net value[1] $ 1 1
Amortized intangible assets, Wtd. Avg. Life in Years[1]9 years
Runners Point Group [Member]
Intangible Assets by Major Class [Line Items]
Indefinite life intangible assets, Net Value[1] $ 9 $ 26
[1]The change in the ending balances also reflect the effect of foreign currency fluctuations due primarily to the movements of the euro in relation to the U.S. dollar.

Other Intangible Assets, Net (A

Other Intangible Assets, Net (Amortization Expense) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets, Net [Abstract]
Amortization expense $ 4 $ 4 $ 4

Other Intangible Assets, Net (E

Other Intangible Assets, Net (Estimated Future Amortization Expense for Finite Lived Intangibles) (Details) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019USD ($)
Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets, Net [Abstract]
2019 $ 3
20203
20213
20222
2023 $ 2

Other Assets (Schedule of Other

Other Assets (Schedule of Other Assets) (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Other Assets [Abstract]
Minority investments[1] $ 104 $ 15
Restricted cash31 181 $ 27
Pension asset7 36
Auction rate security6 7
Deferred tax costs11
Other50 40
Other assets198 $ 290
Qualified Settlement Fund $ 150
[1]Restricted cash for the year ended February 3, 2018 includes $150 million deposited to a qualified settlement fund in connection with the pension litigation. Please see Note 22, Legal Proceedings for further information

Accrued and Other Liabilities_2

Accrued and Other Liabilities (Schedule of Accrued and Other Liabilities) (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Accrued and Other Liabilities [Abstract]
Other payroll and payroll related costs, excluding taxes $ 70 $ 67
Taxes other than income taxes64 63
Property and equipment26 58
Customer deposits41 49
Advertising37 22
Income taxes payable5 11
Incentive bonuses41 6
Other93 82
Accrued and other liabilities $ 377 $ 358

Revolving Credit Facility (Narr

Revolving Credit Facility (Narrative) (Details) - USD ($)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Interest expense, net $ 1,000,000 $ 1,000,000 $ 1,000,000
Revolving Credit Facility [Member]
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Credit agreement start dateMay 19,
2016
Revolving credit facility $ 400,000,000
Revolving credit facility maturity dateMay 19,
2021
Incremental facility available for credit facility $ 200,000,000
Credit facility, covenant descriptionThe Company is not required to comply with any financial covenants unless certain events of default have occurred and are continuing, or if availability under the 2016 Credit Agreement does not exceed the greater of $40 million and 10 percent of the Loan Cap (as defined in the 2016 Credit Agreement). There are no restrictions relating to the payment of dividends and share repurchases as long as no default or event of default has occurred and the aggregate principal amount of unused commitments under the 2016 Credit Agreement is not less than 15 percent of the lesser of the aggregate amount of the commitments and the Borrowing Base, determined as of the preceding fiscal month and on a proforma basis for the following six fiscal months.
Fees paid for the credit facility $ 2,000,000
Deferred financing fees, unamortized balance $ 1,000,000
Revolving Credit Facility [Member] | 2016 Credit Agreement Member
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Facility fees on unused portion of credit facility0.20%
Revolving Credit Facility [Member] | Minimum [Member]
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Credit facility, availability percentage as the lesser of Aggregate Commitments and Borrowing Base15.00%
Minimum threshold of availability under the credit agreement before the company needs to comply with financial covenants $ 40,000,000
Minimum percentage threshold of credit availability to Loan Cap before the company needs to comply with financial covenants10.00%
Federal Funds Rate [Member] | Revolving Credit Facility [Member] | Maximum [Member]
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt, basis spread on variable rate0.375%
Federal Funds Rate [Member] | Revolving Credit Facility [Member] | Minimum [Member]
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt, basis spread on variable rate0.125%
London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) [Member] | Revolving Credit Facility [Member] | Maximum [Member]
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt, basis spread on variable rate1.375%
London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) [Member] | Revolving Credit Facility [Member] | Minimum [Member]
Line of Credit Facility [Line Items]
Debt, basis spread on variable rate1.125%

Long-Term Debt (Narrative) (Det

Long-Term Debt (Narrative) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Long-Term Debt [Abstract]
Interest expense related to long-term debt $ 8 $ 9

Long-Term Debt (Schedule of Lon

Long-Term Debt (Schedule of Long-Term Debt) (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Long-Term Debt [Abstract]
8.5% debentures payable 2022 $ 118 $ 118
Unamortized gain related to interest rate swaps6 7
Debt, total[1] $ 124 $ 125
[1]In 2009, the Company terminated an interest rate swap at a gain. This gain is being amortized as part of interest expense over the remaining term of the debt using the effective-yield method.

Other Liabilities (Schedule of

Other Liabilities (Schedule of Other Liabilities) (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Other Liabilities [Abstract]
Straight-line rent liability $ 265 $ 245
Pension benefits[1]99 19
Income taxes29 114
Postretirement benefits11 14
Workers' compensation and general liability reserves7 7
Deferred taxes6 15
Pension litigation liability278
Other9 9
Other liabilities426 701
Unamortized tenant allowance $ 66 $ 64
[1]Includes unamortized tenant allowances of $66 million and $64 million for the year ended February 2, 2019 and February 3, 2018, respectively.

Leases (Narrative) (Details)

Leases (Narrative) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Schedule of Operating Leases [Line Items]
Certain executory costs related to leases $ 147 $ 146 $ 141
Operating Leases, Rent Expense750 735 690
Non store expenses [Member]
Schedule of Operating Leases [Line Items]
Operating Leases, Rent Expense $ 25 $ 24 $ 24
Minimum [Member]
Schedule of Operating Leases [Line Items]
Operating lease period5 years
Maximum [Member]
Schedule of Operating Leases [Line Items]
Operating lease period10 years

Leases (Schedule of Leases) (De

Leases (Schedule of Leases) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Leases [Abstract]
Minimum rent $ 728 $ 714 $ 667
Contingent rent based on sales27 26 29
Sublease income(5)(5)(6)
Operating Leases, Rent Expense $ 750 $ 735 $ 690

Leases (Future Minimum Lease Pa

Leases (Future Minimum Lease Payments Under Non-Cancelable Operating Leases Net of Future Non-Cancelable Operating Sublease Payments) (Details) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019USD ($)
Leases [Abstract]
2019 $ 672
2020631
2021583
2022527
2023456
Thereafter1,408
Total operating lease commitments $ 4,277

Accumulated Other Comprehensi_3

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss (Schedule of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss) (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss [Abstract]
Foreign currency translation adjustments $ (84) $ (9) $ (127)
Cash flow hedges1
Unrecognized pension cost and postretirement benefit(286)(270)(236)
Unrealized loss on available-for-sale security(1)
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax, total $ (370) $ (279) $ (363)

Accumulated Other Comprehensi_4

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss (Changes in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss) (Details) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019USD ($)
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) [Line Items]
Beginning Balance $ (279)
OCI before reclassification(73)
Amortization of pension actuarial (gain)/loss, net of tax8
Pension remeasurement, net of tax(26)
Other comprehensive income/(loss)(91)
Ending Balance(370)
Foreign Currency Translation Adjustments [Member]
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) [Line Items]
Beginning Balance(9)
OCI before reclassification(75)
Other comprehensive income/(loss)(75)
Ending Balance(84)
Items Related to Pension and Postretirement Benefits [Member]
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) [Line Items]
Beginning Balance(270)
OCI before reclassification2
Amortization of pension actuarial (gain)/loss, net of tax8
Pension remeasurement, net of tax(26)
Other comprehensive income/(loss)(16)
Ending Balance $ (286)

Accumulated Other Comprehensi_5

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss (Reclassifications from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss) (Details) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019USD ($)
Reclassification Adjustment Out Of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income [Line Items]
Net periodic benefit cost $ 11
Income tax benefit(3)
Net of tax8
Pension Benefits [Member]
Reclassification Adjustment Out Of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income [Line Items]
Net periodic benefit cost12
Postretirement Benefits [Member]
Reclassification Adjustment Out Of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income [Line Items]
Net periodic benefit cost $ (1)

Income Taxes (Narrative) (Detai

Income Taxes (Narrative) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Nov. 03, 2018Aug. 04, 2018Feb. 03, 2018Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017Jan. 30, 2016
Income Taxes [Line Items]
Federal statutory income tax rate[1]21.00%33.70%35.00%
Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, Incomplete Accounting, Transition Tax for Accumulated Foreign Earnings, Provisional Income Tax Expense $ 4 $ 23 $ 1 $ 99
Decrease in provision for accumulated foreign earnings, TCJA $ 28
Decrease in provision for accumulated foreign earnings, TCJA, due to deemed repatriation tax21
Decrease in provision for accumulated foreign earnings, TCJA, due to changes and timing differences7
undistributed foreign earnings835 835
Valuation allowance33 17 33 $ 17
Valuation allowance excess of tax rate3 3
State operating loss carryforwards, potential tax benefit1 1
Capital loss with potential benefit from a note receivable2 $ 2
Capital loss carryforward period5 years
Gross unrecognized tax benefits34 44 $ 34 44 $ 38 $ 38
Net unrecognized tax benefits that would impact effective tax rate34 $ 44 34 $ 44
Impairment Northern Group Note 2008 [Member]
Income Taxes [Line Items]
Valuation allowance2 $ 2
Minimum [Member]
Income Taxes [Line Items]
Operating loss carryforwards state, expiration date2020
Maximum [Member]
Income Taxes [Line Items]
Federal statutory income tax rate35.00%
Operating loss carryforwards state, expiration date2037
International
Income Taxes [Line Items]
International minimum tax credit carryforwards4 $ 4
Operating loss carryforwards Foreign29 $ 29
International | Minimum [Member]
Income Taxes [Line Items]
Operating loss carryforwards state, expiration date2019
International | Maximum [Member]
Income Taxes [Line Items]
Operating loss carryforwards state, expiration date2027
Foreign Tax Authority [Member]
Income Taxes [Line Items]
Valuation allowance28 $ 28
Operating loss carryforwards subject to expiration $ 3 $ 3
[1]In accordance with Section 15 of the Internal Revenue Code, the tax rate for 2017 represented a blended rate of 33.7 percent, calculated by applying a prorated percentage of the number of days prior to and subsequent to the January 1, 2018 effective date.

Income Taxes (Domestic and Inte

Income Taxes (Domestic and International Components of Pre-Tax Income) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Income Taxes [Abstract]
Domestic $ 629 $ 432 $ 779
International84 146 225
Total pre-tax income $ 713 $ 578 $ 1,004

Income Taxes (Income Tax Provis

Income Taxes (Income Tax Provision) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Current:
Federal $ 91 $ 129 $ 249
State and local42 18 44
International30 42 48
Total current tax provision163 189 341
Deferred:
Federal(4)98 (6)
State and local1 5 1
International12 2 4
Total deferred tax provision9 105 (1)
Total income tax provision $ 172 $ 294 $ 340

Income Taxes (Reconciliation of

Income Taxes (Reconciliation of Significant Differences Between Federal Statutory Income Tax Rate and Effective Income Tax Rate on Pre-Tax Income) (Details)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Income Taxes [Abstract]
Federal statutory income tax rate[1]21.00%33.70%35.00%
Deemed repatriation tax(2.70%)17.10%
Increase in valuation allowance2.40%1.60%
State and local income taxes, net of federal tax benefit4.70%2.00%3.10%
International income taxed at varying rates1.60%(2.30%)(3.70%)
Foreign tax credits(2.10%)(2.60%)(1.90%)
Domestic/foreign tax settlements(0.70%)(0.20%)(0.10%)
Federal tax credits(0.20%)(0.20%)(0.20%)
Other, net0.10%1.70%1.70%
Effective income tax rate24.10%50.80%33.90%
[1]In accordance with Section 15 of the Internal Revenue Code, the tax rate for 2017 represented a blended rate of 33.7 percent, calculated by applying a prorated percentage of the number of days prior to and subsequent to the January 1, 2018 effective date.

Income Taxes (Significant Porti

Income Taxes (Significant Portions of Deferred Tax Assets and Liabilities) (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Deferred tax assets:
Tax loss/credit carryforwards and capital loss $ 39 $ 23
Employee benefits38 16
Property and equipment35 54
Goodwill and other intangible assets24
Straight-line rent47 44
Other25 27
Total deferred tax assets208 164
Valuation allowance(33)(17)
Total deferred tax assets, net175 147
Deferred tax liabilities:
Merchandise inventories77 79
Goodwill and other intangible assets20
Other17 15
Total deferred tax liabilities94 114
Net deferred tax asset81 33
Balance Sheet caption reported in:
Deferred taxes87 48
Other liabilities(6)(15)
Net deferred tax asset $ 81 $ 33

Income Taxes (Unrecognized Tax

Income Taxes (Unrecognized Tax Benefits Activity) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Income Taxes [Abstract]
Unrecognized tax benefits at beginning of year $ 44 $ 38 $ 38
Foreign currency translation adjustments(3)4 1
Increases related to current year tax positions2 3 8
Increases related to prior period tax positions9 1 1
Decreases related to prior period tax positions(13)(2)
Settlements(3)(1)(7)
Lapse of statute of limitations(2)(1)(1)
Unrecognized tax benefits at end of year $ 34 $ 44 $ 38

Financial Instruments and Ris_3

Financial Instruments and Risk Management (Narrative) (Details) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019USD ($)contractcountry
Derivative [Line Items]
Number of countries of operation | country27
Derivatives Designated as Hedging Instruments [Member] | Forward Foreign Exchange Contracts [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Notional value of contracts outstanding | $ $ 117
Derivatives Designated as Non-Hedging Instruments [Member] | Forward Foreign Exchange Contracts [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Notional value of contracts outstanding | $ $ 11
Derivatives Designated as Non-Hedging Instruments [Member] | Foreign Currency Option Contracts [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Number of contracts outstanding | contract0
Maximum [Member] | Derivatives Designated as Hedging Instruments [Member] | Forward Foreign Exchange Contracts [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Derivative contracts maturity date2020-01
Maximum [Member] | Derivatives Designated as Non-Hedging Instruments [Member] | Forward Foreign Exchange Contracts [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Derivative contracts maturity date2020-01
Top Five Suppliers [Member] | Supplier Concentration Risk [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Concentration risk, percentage90.00%
Nike | Supplier Concentration Risk [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Concentration risk, percentage66.00%
Nike | Minimum [Member] | Supplier Concentration Risk [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Concentration risk, percentage38.00%
Nike | Maximum [Member] | Supplier Concentration Risk [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Concentration risk, percentage74.00%
European | Corporate [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Number of countries of operation | country20
Net assets | $ $ 1,069
Number of countries that uses the Euro as the functional currency | country11

Financial Instruments and Ris_4

Financial Instruments and Risk Management (Fair Value Derivative Contracts on Gross Basis by Type of Contract) (Details) - Forward Foreign Exchange Contracts [Member] - Derivatives Designated as Hedging Instruments [Member] - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Current Assets [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Fair value of derivative hedging assets $ 1
Current Liabilities [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Fair value of derivative hedging liability $ 1 $ 1

Financial Instruments and Ris_5

Financial Instruments and Risk Management (Notional Amounts for All Outstanding Derivatives and Weighted-Average Exchange Rates of Foreign Exchange Forward Contracts) (Details) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019USD ($)
Inventories | Buy Euro Sell British Pound Sterling [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Notional value of contracts outstanding $ 106
Weighted-Average Exchange Rate0.8859
Inventories | Buy US Dollar Sell Euro [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Notional value of contracts outstanding $ 11
Weighted-Average Exchange Rate1.1448
Intercompany | Buy Euro Sell Norwegian Krone [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Notional value of contracts outstanding $ 5
Weighted-Average Exchange Rate9.7244
Intercompany | Buy Us Dollar Sell Canadian Dollar [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Notional value of contracts outstanding $ 2
Weighted-Average Exchange Rate1.3273
Intercompany | Buy Euro Sell Swiss Franc [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Notional value of contracts outstanding $ 3
Weighted-Average Exchange Rate1.1265
Intercompany | Buy Euro Sell US Dollar [Member]
Derivative [Line Items]
Notional value of contracts outstanding $ 1
Weighted-Average Exchange Rate1.1414

Fair Value Measurements (Assets

Fair Value Measurements (Assets and Liabilities Measured at Fair Value on Recurring Basis) (Details) - Level 2 - Fair Value, Measurements, Recurring - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring Basis [Line Items]
Assets measured at fair value on recurring basis $ 100 $ 23
Liabilities measured at fair value on recurring basis1 1
Equity investments
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring Basis [Line Items]
Assets measured at fair value on recurring basis94 15
Available-for-sale Securities [Member]
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring Basis [Line Items]
Assets measured at fair value on recurring basis6 7
Forward Foreign Exchange Contracts [Member] | Derivative Financial Instruments, Liabilities [Member]
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring Basis [Line Items]
Liabilities measured at fair value on recurring basis $ 1 1
Forward Foreign Exchange Contracts [Member] | Derivative Financial Instruments, Assets [Member]
Fair Value, Assets and Liabilities Measured on Recurring Basis [Line Items]
Assets measured at fair value on recurring basis $ 1

Fair Value Measurements (Carryi

Fair Value Measurements (Carrying Value and Estimated Fair Value of Long-Term Debt) (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Fair Value Measurements [Abstract]
Long-term debt, Carrying value[1] $ 124 $ 125
Long-term debt, Fair value $ 136 $ 144
[1]In 2009, the Company terminated an interest rate swap at a gain. This gain is being amortized as part of interest expense over the remaining term of the debt using the effective-yield method.

Retirement Plans and Other Be_3

Retirement Plans and Other Benefits (Narrative) (Details) - USD ($)11 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2017Feb. 01, 2020Dec. 31, 2019Feb. 02, 2019Dec. 31, 2018Feb. 03, 2018
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Accumulated projected benefit obligation $ 696,000,000 $ 22,000,000
Future increases in medical plan costs to be incurred by retirees100.00%
SERP Medical Plan
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Accumulated projected benefit obligation $ 10,000,000
Savings Plan
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Defined contribution plan, employer matching contribution, percent of match25.00%
Employer's matching vesting period5 years
Employer's matching contribution $ 4,000,000 3,000,000
Eligible age to qualified savings plans21 years
Eligible service to qualified savings plans1 year28 days
Minimum eligible service hours to qualified savings plans1000 hours
Defined Contribution Plan Employer Matching Contribution Period Of Service1 year
Defined Contribution Plan Employer Matching Contribution Minimum Number of Working Hours Required1000 hours
Defined Contribution Maximum Percentage of Compensation Matched By Company4.00%
U.S. Plan [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Employer's contribution $ 55,000,000
U.S. Plan [Member] | Savings Plan
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Defined Contribution Plan, Maximum Annual Contributions Per Employee, Amount $ 19,000
Puerto Rico Plan [Member] | Savings Plan
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Defined Contribution Plan, Maximum Annual Contributions Per Employee, Amount $ 15,000
Pension Benefits [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Accumulated projected benefit obligation12,000,000
Pension benefits paid165,000,000 53,000,000
Pension Benefits [Member] | U.S. Plan [Member] | Qualified Plan [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Employer's contribution128,000,000
Market-related value of plan assets615,000,000 585,000,000
Pension Benefits [Member] | U.S. Plan [Member] | Nonqualified Plan [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Pension benefits paid $ 3,000,000
Pension Benefits [Member] | Scenario, Forecast [Member] | U.S. Plan [Member] | Qualified Plan [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Employer's contribution $ 55,000,000
Pension Benefits [Member] | Equity investments | U.S. Plan [Member] | Qualified Plan [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Target composition of plan assets36.50%
Pension Benefits [Member] | Equity investments | CANADA | Qualified Plan [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Target composition of plan assets5.00%
Pension Benefits [Member] | Fixed Income Securities | U.S. Plan [Member] | Qualified Plan [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Target composition of plan assets60.00%
Pension Benefits [Member] | Fixed Income Securities | CANADA | Qualified Plan [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Target composition of plan assets95.00%
Pension Benefits [Member] | Real Estate Investment Trust | U.S. Plan [Member] | Qualified Plan [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Target composition of plan assets3.50%
Postretirement Benefits [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Pension benefits paid $ 2,000,000 $ 2,000,000
Minimum [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Market-related value of plan assets, Period for calculation3 years
Maximum [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Market-related value of plan assets, Period for calculation5 years
Maximum [Member] | Savings Plan
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Defined Contribution Plan, Maximum Annual Contributions Per Employee, Percent40.00%

Retirement Plans and Other Be_4

Retirement Plans and Other Benefits (Changes in Benefit Obligations and Plan Assets, Funded Status, and Amounts Recognized in Consolidated Balance Sheets) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Change in benefit obligation
Benefit obligation at beginning of year $ 22
Benefit obligation at end of year696 $ 22
Change in plan assets
Fair value of plan assets at end of year593
Amounts recognized on the balance sheet:
Other assets7 36
Pension Benefits [Member]
Change in benefit obligation
Benefit obligation at beginning of year683 666
Service cost18 17 $ 16
Interest cost29 25 26
Actuarial (gain) loss(16)25
Foreign currency translation adjustments(4)3
Plan reformation194
Benefits paid(165)(53)
Benefit obligation at end of year739 683 666
Change in plan assets
Fair value of plan assets at beginning of year697 647
Actual (loss) return on plan assets(15)70
Employer contributions131 29
Foreign currency translation adjustments(4)4
Benefits paid(165)(53)
Fair value of plan assets at end of year644 697 647
Funded status(95)14
Amounts recognized on the balance sheet:
Other assets7 36
Accrued and other liabilities(3)(3)
Other liabilities(99)(19)
Amounts recognized on the Balance Sheet(95)14
Amounts recognized in accumulated other comprehensive loss, pre-tax:
Net loss (gain)391 [1]368
Prior service cost1 [2]1
Total amount recognized392 369
Postretirement Benefits [Member]
Change in benefit obligation
Benefit obligation at beginning of year15 15
Interest cost1 1
Plan participants’ contributions1 1
Actuarial (gain) loss(2)
Benefits paid(2)(2)
Benefit obligation at end of year12 15 $ 15
Change in plan assets
Benefits paid(2)(2)
Funded status(12)(15)
Amounts recognized on the balance sheet:
Accrued and other liabilities(1)(1)
Other liabilities(11)(14)
Amounts recognized on the Balance Sheet(12)(15)
Amounts recognized in accumulated other comprehensive loss, pre-tax:
Net loss (gain)(6)[1](5)
Total amount recognized $ (6) $ (5)
[1]The amounts in accumulated other comprehensive loss that are expected to be recognized as components of net periodic benefit cost (income) during the next year are approximately $12 million and $(1) million related to the pension and postretirement plans, respectively.
[2]The net prior service cost did not change during the year and is not expected to change significantly during the next year.

Retirement Plans and Other Be_5

Retirement Plans and Other Benefits (Information for Pension Plans with Accumulated Benefit Obligation in Excess of Plan Assets) (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Retirement Plans and Other Benefits [Abstract]
Projected benefit obligation $ 696 $ 22
Accumulated benefit obligation696 $ 22
Fair value of plan assets $ 593

Retirement Plans and Other Be_6

Retirement Plans and Other Benefits (Weighted-Average Assumptions used to Determine Benefit Obligations and Net Benefit Cost) (Details)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Pension Benefits [Member]
Schedule of Benefit Obligations Weighted Average Assumptions [Line Items]
Discount rate, net periodic benefit costs4.00%4.00%4.10%
Rate of compensation increase, net periodic benefit costs3.60%3.60%3.70%
Expected long-term rate of return on assets, net periodic benefit costs5.90%5.80%6.10%
Discount rate, benefit obligation4.00%3.70%
Rate of compensation increase, benefit obligation3.60%3.60%
Postretirement Benefits [Member]
Schedule of Benefit Obligations Weighted Average Assumptions [Line Items]
Discount rate, net periodic benefit costs3.70%4.00%4.10%
Discount rate, benefit obligation4.10%3.70%

Retirement Plans and Other Be_7

Retirement Plans and Other Benefits (Net Benefit Expense (Income)) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Pension Benefits [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Service cost $ 18 $ 17 $ 16
Interest cost29 25 26
Expected return on plan assets(38)(37)(37)
Amortization of net loss (gain)12 13 14
Net benefit expense (income)21 18 19
Postretirement Benefits [Member]
Defined Benefit Plan Disclosure [Line Items]
Interest cost1 1
Amortization of net loss (gain)(1)(2)(2)
Net benefit expense (income) $ (1) $ (1) $ (1)

Retirement Plans and Other Be_8

Retirement Plans and Other Benefits (Changes in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Pension Benefits [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits Recognized in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) [Line Items]
Net actuarial loss (gain) at beginning of year $ 368
Amortization of net (loss) gain(12)
Loss (gain) arising during the year37
Foreign currency fluctuations(2)
Net actuarial loss (gain) at end of year[1]391
Net prior service cost at end of year[2]1
Total amount recognized392 $ 369
Postretirement Benefits [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits Recognized in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) [Line Items]
Net actuarial loss (gain) at beginning of year(5)
Amortization of net (loss) gain1
Loss (gain) arising during the year(2)
Net actuarial loss (gain) at end of year[1](6)
Total amount recognized(6) $ (5)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss that are expected to be recognized as components of net periodic benefit cost (income) during the next year $ (1)
[1]The amounts in accumulated other comprehensive loss that are expected to be recognized as components of net periodic benefit cost (income) during the next year are approximately $12 million and $(1) million related to the pension and postretirement plans, respectively.
[2]The net prior service cost did not change during the year and is not expected to change significantly during the next year.

Retirement Plans and Other Be_9

Retirement Plans and Other Benefits (Assumed Health Care Cost Trend Rates Related to Measurement of SERP Medical Plan Obligations) (Details)12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Medical care | Defined Benefit Obligations
Health Care Cost Trend Rates Assumptions [Line Items]
Initial cost trend rate6.50%7.00%7.00%
Ultimate cost trend rate5.00%5.00%5.00%
Year that the ultimate cost trend rate is reached202520252021
Medical care | Net Periodic Benefit Costs
Health Care Cost Trend Rates Assumptions [Line Items]
Initial cost trend rate7.00%7.00%7.00%
Ultimate cost trend rate5.00%5.00%5.00%
Year that the ultimate cost trend rate is reached202520212021
Dental care | Defined Benefit Obligations
Health Care Cost Trend Rates Assumptions [Line Items]
Initial cost trend rate5.00%5.00%5.00%
Ultimate cost trend rate5.00%5.00%5.00%
Year that the ultimate cost trend rate is reached201920182017
Dental care | Net Periodic Benefit Costs
Health Care Cost Trend Rates Assumptions [Line Items]
Initial cost trend rate5.00%5.00%5.00%
Ultimate cost trend rate5.00%5.00%5.00%
Year that the ultimate cost trend rate is reached201820172016

Retirement Plans and Other B_10

Retirement Plans and Other Benefits (Effect of One Percentage-Point Change in Assumed Health Care Cost Trend Rates) (Details) - Supplemental Employee Retirement Plan [Member] $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019USD ($)
Assumed Health Care Cost Trend Rates, Effect of One Percentage Point Change [Line Items]
Effect on total service and interest cost components, 1% increase
Effect on accumulated postretirement benefit obligation, 1% increase2
Effect on total service and interest cost components, 1% (decrease)
Effect on accumulated postretirement benefit obligation, 1% (decrease) $ (2)

Retirement Plans and Other B_11

Retirement Plans and Other Benefits (Fair Values of Plan Assets) (Details) - USD ($) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets $ 593
Pension Benefits [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets644 $ 697 $ 647
Level 3 | Pension Benefits [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets0 0
U.S. Plan [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets593 639
U.S. Plan [Member] | Cash and Cash Equivalents
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets3 4
U.S. Plan [Member] | Defined Benefit Plan, Equity Securities, US, Large Cap [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[1]106 115
U.S. Plan [Member] | Defined Benefit Plan, Equity Securities, US, Mid Cap [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[1]32 34
U.S. Plan [Member] | Defined Benefit Plan, Equity Securities, Non-US [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[2]72 78
U.S. Plan [Member] | Defined Benefit Plan, Equity Securities, Corporate Stock [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[3]22 19
U.S. Plan [Member] | Fixed Income Securities, Long Term Corporate And Government Bonds [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[4]234 254
U.S. Plan [Member] | Fixed Income Securities, Medium Term Corporate And Government Bonds [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[5]104 113
U.S. Plan [Member] | Defined Benefit Plan, Real Estate [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[6]20 21
U.S. Plan [Member] | Defined Benefit Plan, Insurance Contracts [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets1
U.S. Plan [Member] | Level 1
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets22
U.S. Plan [Member] | Level 1 | Defined Benefit Plan, Equity Securities, Corporate Stock [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[3]22
U.S. Plan [Member] | Level 2
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets571
U.S. Plan [Member] | Level 2 | Cash and Cash Equivalents
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets3
U.S. Plan [Member] | Level 2 | Defined Benefit Plan, Equity Securities, US, Large Cap [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[1]106
U.S. Plan [Member] | Level 2 | Defined Benefit Plan, Equity Securities, US, Mid Cap [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[1]32
U.S. Plan [Member] | Level 2 | Defined Benefit Plan, Equity Securities, Non-US [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[2]72
U.S. Plan [Member] | Level 2 | Fixed Income Securities, Long Term Corporate And Government Bonds [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[4]234
U.S. Plan [Member] | Level 2 | Fixed Income Securities, Medium Term Corporate And Government Bonds [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[5]104
U.S. Plan [Member] | Level 2 | Defined Benefit Plan, Real Estate [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[6]20
CANADA
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets51 58
CANADA | Cash and Cash Equivalents
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets1 1
CANADA | Defined Benefit Plan, Equity Securities, Non-US [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[7]3 4
CANADA | Fixed Income Securities, Canada Cash Matched Bonds [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[8]47 53
CANADA | Level 1
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets3
CANADA | Level 1 | Defined Benefit Plan, Equity Securities, Non-US [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[7]3
CANADA | Level 2
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets48
CANADA | Level 2 | Cash and Cash Equivalents
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets1
CANADA | Level 2 | Fixed Income Securities, Canada Cash Matched Bonds [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets[8]47
CANADA | Level 3 | Pension Benefits [Member]
Schedule of Pension and Other Postiretirement Plan Assets by Fair Value [Line Items]
Fair value of plan assets $ 0 $ 0
[1]These categories consist of various managed funds that invest primarily in common stocks, as well as other equity securities and a combination of other funds.
[2]This category comprises three managed funds that invest primarily in international common stocks, as well as other equity securities and a combination of other funds.
[3]This category consists of the Company’s common stock.
[4]This category consists of various fixed-income funds that invest primarily in long-term bonds, as well as a combination of other funds, that together are designed to exceed the performance of related long-term market indices.
[5]This category consists of two fixed-income funds that invest primarily in intermediate duration bonds, as well as a combination of other funds, that together are designed to exceed the performance of related indices.
[6]This category consists of one fund that invests in global real estate securities.
[7]This category comprises one mutual fund that invests primarily in a diverse portfolio of Canadian securities.
[8]This category consists of fixed-income securities, including strips and coupons, issued or guaranteed by the Government of Canada, provinces or municipalities of Canada including their agencies and crown corporations, as well as other governmental bonds and corporate bonds.

Retirement Plans and Other B_12

Retirement Plans and Other Benefits (Estimated Future Benefit Payments) (Details) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019USD ($)
Pension Benefits [Member]
Schedule of Postemployment Expected Future Benefit Payments [Line Items]
2018 $ 140
201954
202053
202153
202251
2023 - 2027238
Postretirement Benefits [Member]
Schedule of Postemployment Expected Future Benefit Payments [Line Items]
20181
20191
20201
20211
2023 - 2027 $ 2

Share-Based Compensation (Narra

Share-Based Compensation (Narrative) (Details) - USD ($)Feb. 02, 2013Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017May 21, 2014
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Proceeds from exercise of stock options $ 5,000,000 $ 13,000,000 $ 29,000,000
Stock Option Plans [Member]
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Awards vesting period descriptionOptions for employees become exercisable in substantially equal annual installments over a three-year period, beginning with the first anniversary of the date of grant of the option, unless a shorter or longer duration is established at the time of the option grant.
Fair value of options vested $ 8,000,000 $ 8,000,000 $ 9,000,000
Tax benefit realized from options exercised1,000,000
Proceeds from exercise of stock options $ 5,000,000
Restricted Stock and Units [Member]
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Number of awards outstanding1,022,895 360,782 648,588
Fair value of awards $ 7,000,000 $ 15,000,000 $ 9,000,000
Unrecognized compensation cost29,000,000
Performance Shares [Member]
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Proceeds from exercise of stock options $ 400,000
Performance Shares [Member] | Maximum [Member]
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Share Based Compensation Arrangement By Share Based Payment Award Target Percentage of Equity Awards Earned Over Performance Period200.00%
Performance Shares [Member] | Minimum [Member]
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Share Based Compensation Arrangement By Share Based Payment Award Target Percentage of Equity Awards Earned Over Performance Period0.00%
Nonvested Stock Options [Member] | Stock Option Plans [Member]
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Unrecognized compensation cost $ 4,000,000
Unrecognized compensation cost related to nonvested stock options, weighted-average period expected to be recognized1 year 4 months 24 days
2007 Stock Plan [Member]
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Shares authorized under plan14,000,000
Share-based compensation, expiration period10 years
Options available for future grant at end of year8,762,073
2013 ESPP [Member]
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Shares authorized under plan3,000,000
Share-based compensation, maximum percentage of employee salary10.00%
Share-based compensation, maximum value permitted to purchase, per year $ 25,000
Percentage of common stock fair market value on plan85.00%
Total number of shares purchased48,196 109,790
Options available for future grant at end of year2,475,699

Share-Based Compensation (Total

Share-Based Compensation (Total Compensation Expense Included in SG&A and the Related Tax Benefits Recognized) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award, Compensation Cost [Line Items]
Total share-based compensation expense $ 22 $ 15 $ 22
Tax benefit recognized3 4 6
Stock Option Plans [Member]
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award, Compensation Cost [Line Items]
Allocated share-based compensation expense7 9 10
Restricted Stock [Member]
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award, Compensation Cost [Line Items]
Allocated share-based compensation expense $ 15 $ 6 $ 12

Share-Based Compensation (Tot_2

Share-Based Compensation (Total Intrinsic Value of Options Exercised) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Intrinsic value of stock options
Exercised $ 4 $ 22 $ 56

Share-Based Compensation (Assum

Share-Based Compensation (Assumptions Used to Compute Share-Based Compensation Expense) (Details) - $ / shares12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Stock Option Plans [Member]
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Weighted-average risk free rate of interest2.70%2.10%1.40%
Expected volatility37.00%25.00%30.00%
Weighted-average expected award life (in years)5 years 6 months5 years 4 months 24 days5 years 8 months 12 days
Dividend yield3.10%1.90%1.70%
Weighted-average fair value $ 12.42 $ 14.74 $ 15.71
2013 ESPP [Member]
Share-based Compensation Arrangement by Share-based Payment Award [Line Items]
Weighted-average risk free rate of interest2.00%1.00%0.50%
Expected volatility50.00%30.00%27.00%
Weighted-average expected award life (in years)1 year1 year1 year
Dividend yield2.00%2.00%1.80%
Weighted-average fair value $ 15.29 $ 10.96 $ 13.33

Share-Based Compensation (Optio

Share-Based Compensation (Options Granted Under Stock Option Plans) (Details) shares in Thousands12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019$ / sharesshares
Number of Shares
Options outstanding at beginning of year | shares2,739
Granted | shares397
Exercised | shares(163)
Expired or cancelled | shares(112)
Options outstanding at end of year | shares2,861
Options exercisable at end of year | shares1,994
Weighted-Average Exercise Price
Options outstanding at beginning of year | $ / shares $ 52.45
Granted | $ / shares44.95
Exercised | $ / shares30.73
Expired or cancelled | $ / shares60.41
Options outstanding at end of year | $ / shares52.34
Options exercisable at end of year | $ / shares $ 50.13
Options Outstanding, Weighted-average Remaining Contractual Life6 years
Options exercisable at end of year, Weighted-average remaining contractual life5 years

Share-Based Compensation (Aggre

Share-Based Compensation (Aggregate Intrinsic Value for Stock Options Outstanding and Exercisable) (Details) $ in MillionsFeb. 02, 2019USD ($)
Share-Based Compensation [Abstract]
Outstanding $ 24
Outstanding and exercisable $ 20

Share-Based Compensation (Infor

Share-Based Compensation (Information about Stock Options Outstanding and Exercisable) (Details) - $ / shares shares in Thousands12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018
Share-based Compensation, Shares Authorized under Stock Option Plans, Exercise Price Range [Line Items]
Options Outstanding, Number of Shares2,861 2,739
Options Outstanding, Weighted-average Remaining Contractual Life6 years
Options Outstanding, Weighted-Average Exercise Price $ 52.34 $ 52.45
Options Exercisable, Number of Shares1,994
Options Exercisable, Weighted-Average Exercise Price $ 50.13
$9.85 to $18.84 [Member]
Share-based Compensation, Shares Authorized under Stock Option Plans, Exercise Price Range [Line Items]
Range of Exercise Prices, Lower Limit9.85
Range of Exercise Prices, Upper Limit $ 18.84
Options Outstanding, Number of Shares225
Options Outstanding, Weighted-average Remaining Contractual Life1 year 8 months 12 days
Options Outstanding, Weighted-Average Exercise Price $ 17.10
Options Exercisable, Number of Shares225
Options Exercisable, Weighted-Average Exercise Price $ 17.10
$24.75 to $34.75 [Member]
Share-based Compensation, Shares Authorized under Stock Option Plans, Exercise Price Range [Line Items]
Range of Exercise Prices, Lower Limit24.75
Range of Exercise Prices, Upper Limit $ 34.75
Options Outstanding, Number of Shares384
Options Outstanding, Weighted-average Remaining Contractual Life4 years
Options Outstanding, Weighted-Average Exercise Price $ 32.11
Options Exercisable, Number of Shares346
Options Exercisable, Weighted-Average Exercise Price $ 31.82
$44.78 to $45.75 [Member]
Share-based Compensation, Shares Authorized under Stock Option Plans, Exercise Price Range [Line Items]
Range of Exercise Prices, Lower Limit44.78
Range of Exercise Prices, Upper Limit $ 45.75
Options Outstanding, Number of Shares649
Options Outstanding, Weighted-average Remaining Contractual Life7 years 2 months 12 days
Options Outstanding, Weighted-Average Exercise Price $ 44.92
Options Exercisable, Number of Shares295
Options Exercisable, Weighted-Average Exercise Price $ 45.08
$46.64 to $62.11 [Member]
Share-based Compensation, Shares Authorized under Stock Option Plans, Exercise Price Range [Line Items]
Range of Exercise Prices, Lower Limit46.64
Range of Exercise Prices, Upper Limit $ 62.11
Options Outstanding, Number of Shares693
Options Outstanding, Weighted-average Remaining Contractual Life5 years 8 months 12 days
Options Outstanding, Weighted-Average Exercise Price $ 60.63
Options Exercisable, Number of Shares660
Options Exercisable, Weighted-Average Exercise Price $ 61.19
$63.79 to $73.21 [Member]
Share-based Compensation, Shares Authorized under Stock Option Plans, Exercise Price Range [Line Items]
Range of Exercise Prices, Lower Limit63.79
Range of Exercise Prices, Upper Limit $ 73.21
Options Outstanding, Number of Shares910
Options Outstanding, Weighted-average Remaining Contractual Life7 years 6 months
Options Outstanding, Weighted-Average Exercise Price $ 68.57
Options Exercisable, Number of Shares468
Options Exercisable, Weighted-Average Exercise Price $ 67.19

Share-Based Compensation (Chang

Share-Based Compensation (Changes in Nonvested Options) (Details) - Restricted Stock and Units [Member] $ / shares in Units, shares in Thousands, $ in Millions12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019USD ($)$ / sharesshares
Number of Shares
Nonvested, Beginning Balance374
Granted683
Vested(106)
Expired or cancelled(87)
Performance adjustment158
Nonvested, Ending Balance1,022
Aggregate value | $ $ 49
Wtg. Avg. remaining contractual life (in years)1 year 10 months 24 days
Weighted-Average Grant Date Fair Value per Share
Nonvested, Beginning Balance | $ / shares $ 59.15
Granted | $ / shares45.49
Vested | $ / shares64.32
Expired or cancelled | $ / shares58.41
Nonvested, Ending Balance | $ / shares $ 47.47

Legal Proceedings (Narrative) (

Legal Proceedings (Narrative) (Details) - USD ($) $ in Millions1 Months Ended3 Months Ended6 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2018May 05, 2018Feb. 03, 2018Aug. 04, 2018Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jun. 17, 2018
Plan reformation cost $ 13
Pension litigation liability $ 278 $ 278
Pension litigation charge128 (18)(178)
Class counsel fees paid in connection with pension litigation97
Qualified Settlement Fund $ 150
Osberg V. Foot Locker, Inc [Member]
Pension litigation liability $ 278 $ 194 $ 278 $ 291
Class counsel fees paid in connection with pension litigation $ 97
Osberg Reformance Cost [Member]
Plan reformation cost $ 7
Osberg Interest On Reformation [Member]
Plan reformation cost $ 6

Quarterly Results (Schedule of

Quarterly Results (Schedule of Quarterly Results) (Details) - USD ($) $ / shares in Units, $ in Millions3 Months Ended12 Months Ended
Feb. 02, 2019Nov. 03, 2018Aug. 04, 2018May 05, 2018Feb. 03, 2018Oct. 28, 2017Jul. 29, 2017Apr. 29, 2017Feb. 02, 2019Feb. 03, 2018Jan. 28, 2017
Quarterly Results [Abstract]
Sales $ 2,272 [1] $ 1,860 $ 1,782 $ 2,025 $ 2,210 $ 1,870 $ 1,701 $ 2,001 $ 7,939 $ 7,782 $ 7,766
Gross margin[2]735 [1]588 539 666 693 580 503 680 2,528 2,456
Operating profit219 [1],[3]144 [3]112 [3]224 [3]76 [3]155 [3]72 [3]268 [3]699 [3]571 [3]1,000
Net income/(loss) $ 158 [1],[4],[5],[6] $ 130 [4],[5],[6] $ 88 [4],[5],[6] $ 165 [4],[5],[6] $ (49)[4],[5],[6] $ 102 [4],[5],[6] $ 51 [4],[5],[6] $ 180 [4],[5],[6] $ 541 [4],[5],[6] $ 284 [4],[5],[6] $ 664
Basic earnings per share: $ 1.40 [1] $ 1.14 $ 0.76 $ 1.39 $ (0.40) $ 0.81 $ 0.39 $ 1.37 $ 4.68 $ 2.23 $ 4.95
Diluted earnings per share: $ 1.39 [1] $ 1.14 $ 0.75 $ 1.38 $ (0.40) $ 0.81 $ 0.39 $ 1.36 $ 4.66 $ 2.22 $ 4.91
Pension litigation charge $ 128 $ (18) $ (178)
Pension litigation charge $ 1 $ 2 $ 3 $ 12 $ 50 13 178
Reorganization costs $ 13 13
Adjustment to estimated cost of pension plan reformation and interest13
Professional fees5
Impairment charges19 $ 20 $ 19 $ 20 $ 6
Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, Incomplete Accounting, Transition Tax for Accumulated Foreign Earnings, Provisional Income Tax Expense $ 4 $ 23 $ 1 $ 99
[1]The fourth quarter of 2017 represents the 14 weeks ended February 3, 2018.
[2]Gross margin represents sales less cost of sales. Cost of sales includes: the cost of merchandise, freight, distribution costs including related depreciation expense, shipping and handling, occupancy and buyers’ compensation. Occupancy costs include rent, common area maintenance charges, real estate taxes, general maintenance, and utilities.
[3]Operating profit represents income before income taxes, interest (income)/expense, net, and non-operating income.C
[4]During the fourth quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a provisional $99 million tax liability for the mandatory deemed repatriation of foreign sourced net earnings and a corresponding change in our permanent reinvestment assertion under ASC 74030. During second, third, and fourth quarters 2018, the Company recorded benefits of $1 million, $23 million, and $4 million from the completion of the accounting for the Tax Act. See Note 17, Income Taxes for further information.Quarterly income per share amounts do not total to the annual amount due to changes in weighted-average shares outstanding during the year. Additionally, stock options and other potentially dilutive common shares were excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per common share for the quarter ended February 3, 2018 as the Company reported a net loss.
[5]During the fourth quarters of 2018 and 2017, the Company recorded pre-tax non-cash impairment charges totaling $19 million and $20 million, respectively. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.
[6]During the third quarter of 2017, the Company recorded a pre-tax charge of $13 million associated with the reorganization and the reduction in staff taken to improve efficiency. See Note 3, Litigation and Other Charges for further information.