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Equus Total Return (EQS)

Filed: 15 Nov 21, 4:02pm

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

 

 QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended September 30, 2021

 

or

 

 TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE  ACT OF 1934

For the transition period to

Commission File Number 814-00098

EQUUS TOTAL RETURN, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware76-0345915

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

  

700 Louisiana St., 48th Floor

Houston, Texas

 

77002

(Address of principal executive offices)(Zip Code)

 

(Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, if Changed Since Last Report)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (713) 529-0900

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

Name of each exchange

on which registered

Common StockNew York Stock Exchange

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer  Accelerated filer Non-accelerated filer Smaller Reporting Company Emerging Growth Company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company. Yes No

 

There were 13,518,146 shares of the registrant’s common stock, $.001 par value, outstanding, as of November 15, 2021.

   

 

 

EQUUS TOTAL RETURN, INC.

(A Delaware Corporation)

INDEX

 

 Page
PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION 
Item 1. Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements3
Condensed Balance Sheets3
Condensed Statements of Operations4
Condensed Statements of Changes in Net Assets5
Condensed Statements of Cash Flows6
Financial Highlights7
Schedules of Investments8
Notes to Condensed Financial Statements12
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations29
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure about Market Risk34
Item 4. Controls and Procedures34
PART II. OTHER INFORMATION 
Item 1. Legal Proceedings35
Item 1A. Risk Factors35
Item 6. Exhibits36
SIGNATURE37
  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 2 

 

 

EQUUS TOTAL RETURN, INC.

CONDENSED BALANCE SHEETS

(Unaudited)

Part I. Financial Information

Item 1. Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements

 

  September 30, 2021 December 31, 2020
     
(in thousands, except per share amounts)        
Assets        
Investments in portfolio securities at fair value:        
     Control investments (cost at $7,961 and $7,611, respectively) $12,000  $7,000 
        Total investments in portfolio securities at fair value  12,000   7,000 
Temporary cash investments  —     24,000 
Cash and cash equivalents  22,891   23,639 
Restricted cash  —     240 
Accounts receivable from affiliates  350   350 
Escrow receivable  1,226   3,413 
Other assets  556   181 
          Total assets  37,023   58,823 
Liabilities and net assets        
     Accounts payable  84   54 
     Accrued compensation  693   990 
     Accounts payable to related parties  3   2 
     Borrowing under margin account  —     24,000 
          Total liabilities  780   25,046 
         
Commitments and contingencies (see Note 2)        
         
Net assets $36,243  $33,777 
         
Net assets consist of:        
     Common stock, par value $13  $13 
     Capital in excess of par value  74,685   56,142 
     Accumulated deficit  (38,455)  (22,378)
          Total net assets $36,243  $33,777 
Shares of common stock issued and outstanding, $.001 par value, 100,000 and 50,000 shares authorized, respectively  13,518   13,518 
Shares of preferred stock issued and outstanding, $.001 par value, 10,000 and 5,000 shares authorized, respectively  —     —   
Net asset value per share $2.68  $2.50 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 3 

 

 

EQUUS TOTAL RETURN, INC.

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(Unaudited)

 

  

Three Months Ended

September 30,

 

Nine Months Ended

September 30,

(in thousands, except per share amounts) 2021 2020 2021 2020
Investment income:                
     Interest and dividend income:                
        Non-affiliate investments - related party $—    $—    $—    $193 
        Non-affiliate investments  —     98   —     98 
           Total interest and dividend income  —     98   —     291 
     Interest from temporary cash investments  —     —     —     3 
     Other income - director fees  —     6   —     18 
         Total investment income  —     104   —     312 
                 
Expenses:                
     Compensation expense  329   418   1,169   1,113 
     Professional fees  113   195   581   803 
     Director fees and expenses  76   84   249   260 
     Professional liability expenses  178   80   344   201 
     General and administrative expenses  33   33   89   139 
     Mailing, printing and other expenses  21   8   78   74 
     Taxes  6   6   20   15 
     Interest expense  1   3   3   19 
          Total expenses  757   827   2,533   2,624 
                 
Net investment loss  (757)  (723)  (2,533)  (2,312)
                 
Net realized (loss) gain:                
     Escrow receivable  526   —     349   —   
     Temporary cash investments  —     —     —     8 
        Net realized (loss) gain  526   —     349   8 
                 
Net unrealized appreciation (depreciation) of portfolio securities:                
     Control investments  1,750   (6,575)  4,650   (8,075)
     Non-affiliate investments - related party  —     3,260   —     1,741 
Net change in net unrealized appreciation (depreciation) of portfolio securities  1,750   (3,315)  4,650   (6,334)
                 
                 
Net increase (decrease) increase in net assets resulting from operations $1,519  $(4,038) $2,466  $(8,638)
                 
Net increase (decrease) in net assets resulting from operations per share:                
      Basic and diluted $0.11  $(0.30) $0.18  $(0.64)
Weighted average shares outstanding:                
      Basic and diluted  13,518   13,518   13,518   13,518 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 4 

 

EQUUS TOTAL RETURN, INC.

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN NET ASSETS

(Unaudited)

 

  Common Stock    
(in thousands) Number of Shares Par Value Capital in Excess of Par Value Accumulated Deficit Total Net Assets
 Balances at January 1, 2020  13,518   13  $56,062  $(10,086) $45,989 
 Share-based incentive compensation  —     —     80   —     80 
 Net decrease in net assets resulting from  operations  —     —     —     (7,175)  (7,175)
 Balances at March 31, 2020  13,518  $13  $56,142  $(17,261) $38,894 
 Net increase in net assets resulting from  operations  —     —     —     2,575   2,575 
 Balances at June 30, 2020  13,518  $13  $56,142  $(14,686) $41,469 
 Share-based incentive compensation  —     —     —     —     —   
 Net decrease in net assets resulting from  operations  —     —     —     (4,038)  (4,038)
 Balances at September 30, 2020  13,518  $13  $56,142  $(18,724) $37,431 
                     
                     
 Balances at January 1, 2021  13,518  $13  $56,142  $(22,378) $33,777 
 Net increase in net assets resulting from  operations  —     —     —     298   298 
 Balances at March 31, 2021  13,518  $13  $56,142  $(22,080) $34,075 
 Recharacterization of net capital losses  —     —     18,543   (18,543)  —   
 Net increase in net assets resulting from  operations  —     —     —     649   649 
 Balances at June 30, 2021  13,518  $13  $74,685  $(39,974) $34,724 
 Net increase in net assets resulting from  operations  —     —     —     1,519   1,519 
 Balances at September 30, 2021  13,518  $13  $74,685  $(38,455) $36,243 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

 5 

 

 

EQUUS TOTAL RETURN, INC.

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Unaudited)

 

  Nine Months ended September 30,
(in thousands) 2021 2020
Reconciliation of increase (decrease) in net assets resulting from operations to net cash provided by operating activities:    
Net increase (decrease) in net assets resulting from operations $2,466  $(8,638)
Adjustments to reconcile net increase (decrease) in net assets resulting from operations to net cash provided by operating activities:        
     Net realized gain:        
       Escrow receivable  (349)  —   
       Temporary cash investments  —     (8)
     Net change in unrealized (appreciation) depreciation of portfolio securities        
       Control investments  (4,650)  8,075 
       Non-affiliate investments - related party  —     (1,741)
     Share-based incentive compensation  —     80 
     Purchase of portfolio securities  (350)  (561)
     Dividends exchanged for portfolio securities  —     (156)
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:        
     Sales of temporary cash investments, net  24,000   1,999 
     Accrued interest and dividend receivable  —     561 
     Accrued escrow receivable  2,538   —   
     Other assets  (375)  (121)
     Accounts payable and accrued liabilities  (267)  140 
     Accounts payable to related parties  (1)  7 
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities  23,012   (363)
Cash flows from financing activities:        
     Borrowings under margin account  —     80,001 
     Repayments under margin account  (24,000)  (81,992)
Net cash used in financing activities  (24,000)  (1,991)
Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents  (988)  (2,354)
Cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash at beginning of period  23,879   4,256 
         
Cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash at end of period $22,891  $1,902 
Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:        
     Interest paid $1  $8 
     Income taxes paid $20  $15 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

 6 

 

 

EQUUS TOTAL RETURN, INC.

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

(Unaudited)

 

  Nine Months ended September 30,
  2021 2020
     
Investment income $—    $0.02 
Expenses  0.19   0.19 
         
Net investment loss  (0.19)  (0.17)
         
Net realized loss  0.03   —   
Net change in unrealized appreciation (depreciation) of portfolio securities  0.34   (0.60)
Net change in unrealized depreciation of portfolio securities - related party  —     0.13 
Net increase (decrease) in net assets resulting from operations  0.18   (0.64)
Capital transactions:        
  Shares issued for portfolio securities  —     0.01 
  Dilutive effect of shares issued  —     —   
Decrease in net assets resulting from capital transactions  —     0.01 
Net increase (decrease) in net assets  0.18   (0.63)
Net assets at beginning of period  2.50   3.40 
Net assets at end of period, basic and diluted $2.68  $2.77 
Weighted average number of shares outstanding during period,        
     in thousands  13,518   13,518 
Market price per share:        
      Beginning of period $2.16  $1.82 
      End of period $2.32  $1.21 
Selected information and ratios:        
      Ratio of expenses to average net assets  7.23%  6.29%
      Ratio of net investment loss to average net assets  (7.23%)  (5.55%)
      Ratio of net increase (decrease) in net assets resulting from operations to average net       assets7.04%  (20.71%)
      Return on net asset value  7.20%  (18.53%)
      Total return on market price (1)  7.41%  (33.52%)

 

 (1)Total return = [(ending market price per share - beginning price per share) / beginning market price per share].

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 7 

 

 

EQUUS TOTAL RETURN, INC.

SCHEDULE OF INVESTMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

(Unaudited)

(in thousands, except share data)

 

Name and location of   Date of Initial   Cost of Fair
Portfolio Company Industry Investment Investment Investment Value(1)
         
Control Investments:  Majority-owned (2):        

Equus Energy, LLC (3)

 Houston, TX

   Energy     December 2011    Member interest (100%) $7,961  $12,000 
                   
Total Control Investments: Majority-owned (represents 100% of total investments at fair value) $7,961  $12,000 
Total Investments           $7,961  $12,000 

 

(1)See Note 3 to the financial statements, Valuation of Investments.

(2)Majority owned investments are generally defined under the 1940 Act as companies in which we own more than 50% of the voting securities of the company.

(3)Level 3 Portfolio Investment.

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 8 

 

 

EQUUS TOTAL RETURN, INC.

SCHEDULE OF INVESTMENTS – (Continued)

SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

(Unaudited)

 

All of our portfolio securities are restricted from public sale without prior registration under the Securities Act of 1933 (hereafter, the “Securities Act”) or other relevant regulatory authority. We negotiate certain aspects of the method and timing of the disposition of our investment in each portfolio company, including registration rights and related costs.

 

As a business development company (“BDC”), we may invest up to 30% of our assets in non-qualifying portfolio investments, as permitted by the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the “1940 Act”). Specifically, we may invest up to 30% of our assets in entities that are not considered “eligible portfolio companies” (as defined in the 1940 Act), including companies located outside of the United States, entities that are operating pursuant to certain exceptions under the 1940 Act, and publicly-traded entities with a market capitalization exceeding $250 million. As of September 30, 2021, we had invested 32.4% of our assets in securities of portfolio companies that constituted qualifying investments under the 1940 Act. As of September 30, 2021, all of our investments are in enterprises that are considered eligible portfolio companies under the 1940 Act. We provide significant managerial assistance to our sole remaining portfolio company that comprises 100% of the total value of the investments in portfolio securities as of September 30, 2021.

 

We are classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the 1940 Act, which means we are not limited in the proportion of our assets that may be invested in the securities of a single user. The value of one segment called “Energy” includes our sole remaining portfolio company and was 33.1% of our net asset value, 32.4% of our total assets and 100% of our investments in portfolio company securities (at fair value) as of September 30, 2021. Changes in business or industry trends or in the financial condition, results of operations, or the market’s assessment of any single portfolio company will affect the net asset value and the market price of our common stock to a greater extent than would be the case if we were a “diversified” company holding numerous investments.

 

Our investments in portfolio securities consist of the following types of securities as of September 30, 2021 (in thousands): 

 

Type of Securities Cost Fair Value Fair Value as Percentage of Net Assets
       
Limited liability company investments $7,961  $12,000   33.1%
             
Total $7,961  $12,000   33.1%

 

The following is a summary by industry of the Fund’s investments in portfolio securities as of September 30, 2021 (in thousands):

 

Industry Fair Value Fair Value as Percentage of Net Assets
 Energy  $12,000   33.1%
 Total  $12,000   33.1%

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

 9 

 

 

EQUUS TOTAL RETURN, INC.

SCHEDULE OF INVESTMENTS

DECEMBER 31, 2020

(Unaudited)

(in thousands, except share data)

 

Name and location of   Date of Initial     Cost of Fair
Portfolio Company Industry Investment Investment Principal Investment Value(1)
  ��      
Control Investments:  Majority-owned (2):         

Equus Energy, LLC (3) 

 Houston, TX

   Energy     December 2011    Member interest (100%)     $7,611  $7,000 
                       
Total Control Investments: Majority-owned (represents 22.6% of total investments at fair value)     $7,611  $7,000 
Total Investment in Portfolio Securities        $7,611  $7,000 
Temporary Cash Investments                      
U.S. Treasury Bill  Government   December 2020  UST 0% 1/21 $24,000  $24,000  $24,000 
Total Temporary Cash Investments (represents 77.4% of total investments at fair value)     $24,000  $24,000 
Total Investments               $31,611  $31,000 

 

(1)See Note 3 to the financial statements, Valuation of Investments.

(2)Majority owned investments are generally defined under the 1940 Act as companies in which we own more than 50% of the voting securities of the company.

(3)Level 3 Portfolio Investment.

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

 

 10 

 

 

EQUUS TOTAL RETURN, INC.

SCHEDULE OF INVESTMENTS – (Continued)

DECEMBER 31, 2020

(Unaudited)

(in thousands, except share data)

 

All of our portfolio securities are restricted from public sale without prior registration under the Securities Act or other relevant regulatory authority. We negotiate certain aspects of the method and timing of the disposition of our investment in each portfolio company, including registration rights and related costs.

 

As a BDC, we may invest up to 30% of our assets in non-qualifying portfolio investments, as permitted by the 1940 Act. Specifically, we may invest up to 30% of our assets in entities that are not considered “eligible portfolio companies” (as defined in the 1940 Act), including companies located outside of the United States, entities that are operating pursuant to certain exceptions under the 1940 Act, and publicly- traded entities with a market capitalization exceeding $250 million. As of December 31, 2020, we had invested 11.9% of our assets in securities of portfolio companies that constituted qualifying investments under the 1940 Act. As of December 31, 2020, all of our investments were in enterprises that are considered eligible portfolio companies under the 1940 Act. We provide significant managerial assistance to our sole remaining portfolio company that comprises 100% of the total value of the investments in portfolio securities as of December 31, 2020.

 

We are classified as a “non-diversified” investment company under the 1940 Act, which means we are not limited in the proportion of our assets that may be invested in the securities of a single user. The value of one segment called “Energy” includes our sole remaining portfolio company and was 20.7% of our net asset value, 11.9% of our total assets and 100% of our investments in portfolio company securities (at fair value) as of December 31, 2020. Changes in business or industry trends or in the financial condition, results of operations, or the market’s assessment of any single portfolio company will affect the net asset value and the market price of our common stock to a greater extent than would be the case if we were a “diversified” company holding numerous investments.

 

Our investments in portfolio securities consist of the following types of securities as of December 31, 2020 (in thousands):

 

Type of Securities Cost Fair Value Fair Value as Percentage of Net Assets
       
Limited liability company investments $7,611  $7,000   20.7%
             
Total $7,611  $7,000   20.7%

 

The following is a summary by industry of the Fund’s investments in portfolio securities as of December 31, 2020 (in thousands):

 

Industry Fair Value Fair Value as Percentage of Net Assets
 Energy  $7,000   20.7%
 Total  $7,000   20.7%

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements. 

 11 

 

EQUUS TOTAL RETURN, INC.

NOTES TO CONDENSED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2021

(Unaudited)

 

 (1)       Description of Business and Basis of Presentation

 

Description of Business—Equus Total Return, Inc. (“we,” “us,” “our,” “Equus” the “Company” and the “Fund”), a Delaware corporation, was formed by Equus Investments II, L.P. (the “Partnership”) on August 16, 1991. On July 1, 1992, the Partnership was reorganized and all of the assets and liabilities of the Partnership were transferred to the Fund in exchange for shares of common stock of the Fund. Our shares trade on the NYSE under the symbol ‘EQS’. On August 11, 2006, our shareholders approved the change of the Fund’s investment strategy to a total return investment objective. This strategy seeks to provide the highest total return, consisting of capital appreciation and current income. In connection with this strategic investment change, the shareholders also approved the change of name from Equus II Incorporated to Equus Total Return, Inc.

 

We attempt to maximize the return to stockholders in the form of current investment income and long-term capital gains by investing in the debt and equity securities of companies with a total enterprise value between $5.0 million and $75.0 million, although we may engage in transactions with smaller or larger investee companies from time to time. We seek to invest primarily in companies pursuing growth either through acquisition or organically, leveraged buyouts, management buyouts and recapitalizations of existing businesses or special situations. Our income-producing investments consist principally of debt securities including subordinated debt, debt convertible into common or preferred stock, or debt combined with warrants and common and preferred stock. Debt and preferred equity financing may also be used to create long-term capital appreciation through the exercise and sale of warrants received in connection with the financing. If we remain a BDC, we will seek to achieve capital appreciation by making investments in equity and equity-oriented securities issued by privately-owned companies in transactions negotiated directly with such companies. Given market conditions over the past several years and the performance of our portfolio, our Management and Board of Directors believe it prudent to continue to review alternatives to refine and further clarify the current strategies.

 

We elected to be treated as a BDC under the 1940 Act, although our shareholders have authorized us to withdraw this election on or before January 31, 2022 (see Note 6 “Conversion to an Operating Company – Authorization to Withdraw BDC Election” below). We currently qualify as a regulated investment company (“RIC”) for federal income tax purposes and, therefore, are not required to pay corporate income taxes on any income or gains that we distribute to our stockholders. We have certain wholly owned taxable subsidiaries (“Taxable Subsidiaries”) each of which holds one or more portfolio investments listed on our Schedules of Investments. The purpose of these Taxable Subsidiaries is to permit us to hold certain income- producing investments or portfolio companies organized as limited liability companies, or LLCs, (or other forms of pass-through entities) and still satisfy the RIC tax requirement that at least 90% of our gross revenue for income tax purposes must consist of investment income. Absent the Taxable Subsidiaries, a portion of the gross income of these income-producing investments or of any LLC (or other pass-through entity) portfolio investment, as the case may be, would flow through directly to us for the 90% test. To the extent that such income did not consist of investment income, it could jeopardize our ability to qualify as a RIC and, therefore, cause us to incur significant federal income taxes. The income of the LLCs (or other pass-through entities) owned by Taxable Subsidiaries is taxed to the Taxable Subsidiaries and does not flow through to us, thereby helping us preserve our RIC status and resultant tax advantages. We do not consolidate the Taxable Subsidiaries for income tax purposes and they may generate income tax expense because of the Taxable Subsidiaries’ ownership of the portfolio companies. We reflect any such income tax expense on our Statements of Operations.

 

Impact of COVID-19—In 2019, SARS-CoV-2, a highly contagious pathogen which causes COVID-19, coronavirus disease, or simply, the ‘coronavirus’, arose in Wuhan Province, China. By the second quarter of 2020, all U.S. States had imposed various restrictions on travel, movement, and public assembly, and substantial portions of the U.S. economy, including the energy industry, were materially and negatively affected as a result.

 12 

 

The highly contagious nature of the coronavirus and its various strains has caused numerous private and public organizations to substantially alter the way in which they operate. In some cases, these workplace and operational alterations have become permanent. Many such organizations have, to the extent possible, required employees to work remotely to reduce opportunities for contagion. We have also taken steps to minimize the exposure of our employees and service providers by allowing all such persons to work from a remote location. We utilize a cloud-based storage and retrieval system for our records and can communicate electronically or by telephone with third parties such as our financial institutions, legal and accounting advisors, and our portfolio companies. Our day-to-day operations and management have not, therefore, been materially affected by the coronavirus pandemic. However, the rise of the Delta variant, as well as other coronavirus strains, and continued government directives on social distancing and other conditions and restrictions have impaired our ability to travel to attend board meetings, negotiations, and other functions which are endemic to the interpersonal nature of private equity investing. As a consequence, our ability to source new investment prospects, facilitate dispositions of existing portfolio holdings, or consummate a substantial transaction has been constrained by these limitations. Should these disruptions and restrictions continue as a result of the coronavirus, we cannot, therefore, assure you that our operations as a BDC or our efforts to effect a transformative transaction involving Equus will not be materially adversely affected thereby.

 

Although our Company and our portfolio investments are generally affected by macroeconomic factors such as changes in the U.S. economy and fluctuations in energy prices, we are presently unable to predict either the potential near-term or longer-term impact that the coronavirus may have on our financial and operating results due to numerous uncertainties regarding the duration and severity of the crisis. Moreover, we are unable to predict the effect that the economic dislocation caused by the coronavirus will have on our efforts to complete a transformative transaction as described below. The ultimate impact of the coronavirus pandemic is highly uncertain and subject to change, and our business, results of operations, and financial condition have been and will likely continue to be impacted by future developments concerning the pandemic and the resulting economic disruption.

 

Basis of Presentation—In accordance with Article 6 of Regulation S-X under the Securities Act and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (“Exchange Act”), we do not consolidate portfolio company investments, including those in which we have a controlling interest. Our interim unaudited financial statements were prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”), for interim financial information and in accordance with the requirements of reporting on Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X, under the Exchange Act. Accordingly, they are unaudited and exclude some disclosures required for annual financial statements. We believe that we have made all adjustments, consisting solely of normal recurring accruals, necessary for the fair presentation of these interim financial statements.

 

The results of operations for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 are not necessarily indicative of results that ultimately may be achieved for the remainder of the year. The interim unaudited financial statements and notes thereto should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes thereto included in the Fund’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020, as filed with the SEC.

 

(2)       Liquidity and Financing Arrangements

 

Liquidity—There are several factors that may materially affect our liquidity during the reasonably foreseeable future. We are evaluating the impact of current market conditions on our portfolio company valuations and their ability to provide current income. We have followed valuation techniques in a consistent manner; however, we are cognizant of current market conditions that might affect future valuations of portfolio securities. In view of the foregoing, we believe that our operating cash flow and cash on hand will be sufficient to meet operating requirements from the date of this filing through the next twelve months.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents—As of September 30, 2021, we had cash and cash equivalents of $22.9 million. We had $12.0 million of our net assets of $36.2 million invested in portfolio securities.

 

As of December 31, 2020, we had cash and cash equivalents of $23.6 million. We had $7.0 million of our net assets of $33.8 million invested in portfolio securities.

 

We exclude “Restricted Cash and Temporary Cash Investments” used for purposes of complying with RIC requirements from cash equivalents.

 

Restricted Cash and Temporary Cash InvestmentsAs of September 30, 2021, we did not secure a quarter-end margin loan as we have historically done, and thus had no restricted cash and temporary cash investments as of that date.

 13 

As of December 31, 2020, we had $24.2 million of restricted cash and of temporary cash investments, including primarily the proceeds of a quarter-end margin loan that we incurred to maintain the diversification requirements applicable to a RIC. Of this amount, $24.0 million was invested in U.S. Treasury bills and $0.2 million represented a required 1% brokerage margin deposit. These securities were held by a securities brokerage firm and pledged along with other assets to secure repayment of the margin loan. The U.S. Treasury bills matured on January 5, 2021 and we subsequently repaid this margin loan, plus interest.

 

Dividends—So long as we remain a BDC, we will pay out net investment income and/or realized net capital gains, if any, on an annual basis as required under the 1940 Act.

 

Investment Commitments—Under certain circumstances, we may be called on to make follow-on investments in certain portfolio companies. If we do not have sufficient funds to make follow-on investments, the portfolio company in need of the investment may be negatively impacted. Also, our equity interest in the estimated fair value of the portfolio company could be reduced.

 

As of September 30, 2021, we had a follow-on commitment of $150,000 to invest in additional equity of Equus Energy, LLC.

 

RIC Borrowings, Restricted Cash and Temporary Cash Investments—We may periodically borrow sufficient funds to maintain the Fund’s RIC status by utilizing a margin account with a securities brokerage firm. We cannot assure you that any such arrangement will be available in the future. If we are unable to borrow funds to make qualifying investments, we may no longer qualify as a RIC. We would then be subject to corporate income tax on the Fund’s net investment income and realized capital gains, and distributions to stockholders would be subject to income tax as ordinary dividends. If we remain a BDC and do not become an operating company as described in Note 6 – Conversion to an Operating Company below, our failure to continue to qualify as a RIC could be materially adverse to us and our stockholders.

 

As of December 31, 2020, we borrowed $24.0 million to maintain our RIC status by utilizing a margin account with a securities brokerage firm. We collateralized such borrowings with restricted cash and temporary cash investments in U.S. Treasury bills of $24.2 million.

 

Asset Coverage Ratio—Under the 1940 Act, BDCs are required to have an asset coverage ratio of 200%, meaning that the maximum debt that may be incurred by a BDC is the BDC’s net asset value. Pursuant to amendments made to the 1940 Act in March 2018, BDCs may now, with stockholder or board of directors approval, reduce this ratio to 150%, meaning that the maximum debt that may be incurred by a BDC is two times the BDC’s net asset value. In November 2019, we obtained approval of our shareholders to reduce our asset coverage ratio to 150%. This authorization permits Equus to borrow up to twice the value of the Fund’s net assets. Other than the margin loan obtained by the Fund from time to time to acquire U.S. Treasury bills to maintain our RIC status as described above, we have not yet undertaken any other additional borrowings.

 

Certain Risks and Uncertainties—Market and economic volatility which has become endemic in the past few years, together with the economic dislocation caused by the onset of the coronavirus, has constrained the availability of debt financing for small and medium-sized companies such as Equus and its portfolio companies. Such debt financing generally has shorter maturities, higher interest rates and fees, and more restrictive terms than debt facilities available in the past. In addition, during these years and continuing into the third quarter of 2021, the price of our common stock remained well below our net asset value, thereby making it undesirable to issue additional shares of our common stock below net asset value.

 

Because of these challenges, our near-term strategies shifted from originating debt and equity investments to preserving liquidity necessary to meet our operational needs. Key initiatives that we have previously undertaken to provide necessary liquidity include monetizations, the suspension of dividends and the internalization of management. We are also evaluating potential opportunities that could enable us to effect a change to our business and become an operating company as described in Note 6 – Conversion to an Operating Company. We believe we have sufficient liquidity to meet our operating requirements for 12 months from the date of this filing.

 

 (3)Significant Accounting Policies

 

The following is a summary of significant accounting policies followed by the Fund in the preparation of our financial statements:

 

Use of Estimates—The preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Although we believe the estimates and assumptions used in preparing these financial statements and related notes are reasonable in light of known facts and circumstances, actual results could differ from those estimates.

 14 

Valuation of Investments—For most of our investments, market quotations are not available. With respect to investments for which market quotations are not readily available or when such market quotations are deemed not to represent fair value, our Board has approved a multi-step valuation process each quarter, as described below:

 

 1.Each portfolio company or investment is reviewed by our investment professionals;

 

 2.With respect to investments with a fair value exceeding $2.5 million that have been held for more than one year, we engage independent valuation firms to assist our investment professionals. These independent valuation firms conduct independent valuations and make their own independent assessments;

 

 3.Our Management produces a report that summarized each of our portfolio investments and recommends a fair value of each such investment as of the date of the report;

 

 4.The Audit Committee of our Board reviews and discusses the preliminary valuation of our portfolio investments as recommended by Management in their report and any reports or recommendations of the independent valuation firms, and then approves and recommends the fair values of our investments so determined to our Board for final approval; and

 

 5.The Board discusses valuations and determines the fair value of each portfolio investment in good faith based on the input of our Management, the respective independent valuation firm, as applicable, and the Audit Committee.

 

During the first twelve months after an investment is made, we rely on the original investment amount to determine the fair value unless significant developments have occurred during this twelve-month period which would indicate a material effect on the portfolio company (such as results of operations or changes in general market conditions).

Investments are valued utilizing various methodologies and approaches, including a yield analysis, enterprise value (“EV”) analysis, net asset value analysis, liquidation analysis, discounted cash flow analysis, or a combination of methods, as appropriate. The yield analysis uses loan spreads and other relevant information implied by market data involving identical or comparable assets or liabilities. Under the EV analysis, the EV of a portfolio company is first determined and allocated over the portfolio company’s securities in order of their preference relative to one another (i.e., “waterfall” allocation). To determine the EV, we typically use a market multiples approach that considers relevant and applicable market trading data of guideline public companies, transaction metrics from precedent M&A transactions and/or a discounted cash flow analysis. The net asset value analysis is used to derive a value of an underlying investment (such as real estate property) by dividing a relevant earnings stream by an appropriate capitalization rate. For this purpose, we consider capitalization rates for similar properties as may be obtained from guideline public companies and/or relevant transactions. The liquidation analysis is intended to approximate the net recovery value of an investment based on, among other things, assumptions regarding liquidation proceeds based on a hypothetical liquidation of a portfolio company’s assets. The discounted cash flow analysis uses valuation techniques to convert future cash flows or earnings to a range of fair values from which a single estimate may be derived utilizing an appropriate discount rate. The measurement is based on the net present value indicated by current market expectations about those future amounts.

In estimating the fair value of our interest in Equus Energy, we have given more emphasis to a market approach that examines developed and undeveloped reserves and mineral acreage values, as well as a market approach that examines comparable industry transactions involving oil and gas assets in proximity to the leasehold interests held by Equus Energy. Our management received advice and assistance from a third-party valuation firm to support our determination of the fair value of this investment.

In applying these methodologies, additional factors that we consider in fair value pricing our investments may include, as we deem relevant: security covenants, call protection provisions, and information rights; the nature and realizable value of any collateral; the portfolio company’s ability to make payments; the principal markets in which the portfolio company does business; publicly available financial ratios of peer companies; the principal market; and enterprise values, among other factors. Also, any failure by a portfolio company to achieve its business plan or obtain and maintain its financing arrangements could result in increased volatility and result in a significant and rapid change in its value.

 15 

Our general intent is to hold our loans to maturity when appraising our privately held debt investments. As such, we believe that the fair value will not exceed the cost of the investment. However, in addition to the previously described analysis involving allocation of value to the debt instrument, we perform a yield analysis assuming a hypothetical current sale of the security to determine if a debt security has been impaired. The yield analysis considers changes in interest rates and changes in leverage levels of the portfolio company as compared to the market interest rates and leverage levels. Assuming the credit quality of the portfolio company remains stable, the Fund will use the value determined by the yield analysis as the fair value for that security if less than the cost of the investment.

 

We record unrealized depreciation on investments when we determine that the fair value of a security is less than its cost basis, and will record unrealized appreciation when we determine that the fair value is greater than its cost basis.

 

Fair Value Measurement—Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date and sets out a fair value hierarchy. The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3). Inputs are broadly defined as assumptions market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability. The three levels of the fair value hierarchy are described below:

 

Level 1—Unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the reporting entity has the ability to access at the measurement date.

 

Level 2—Inputs other than quoted prices within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly; and fair value is determined through the use of models or other valuation methodologies.

 

Level 3—Inputs are unobservable for the asset or liability and include situations where there is little, if any, market activity for the asset or liability. The inputs into the determination of fair value are based upon the best information under the circumstances and may require significant management judgment or estimation.

 

In certain cases, the inputs used to measure fair value may fall into different levels of the fair value hierarchy. In such cases, an investment’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. Our assessment of the significance of a particular input to the fair value measurement in its entirety requires judgment, and considers factors specific to the investment.

 

Investments for which prices are not observable are generally private investments in the debt and equity securities of operating companies. A primary valuation method used to estimate the fair value of these Level 3 investments is the discounted cash flow method (although a liquidation analysis, option theoretical, or other methodology may be used when more appropriate). The discounted cash flow approach to determine fair value (or a range of fair values) involves applying an appropriate discount rate(s) to the estimated future cash flows using various relevant factors depending on investment type, including comparing the latest arm’s length or market transactions involving the subject security to the selected benchmark credit spread, assumed growth rate (in cash flows), and capitalization rates/multiples (for determining terminal values of underlying portfolio companies). The valuation based on the inputs determined to be the most reasonable and probable is used as the fair value of the investment. In the case of our investment in Equus Energy, we also examine acreage values in comparable transactions and assess the impact upon the working interests held by Equus Energy. The determination of fair value using these methodologies may take into consideration a range of factors including, but not limited to, the price at which the investment was acquired, the nature of the investment, local market conditions, trading values on public exchanges for comparable securities, current and projected operating performance, financing transactions subsequent to the acquisition of the investment and anticipated financing transactions after the valuation date.

 

To assess the reasonableness of the discounted cash flow approach, the fair value of equity securities, including warrants, in portfolio companies may also consider the market approach—that is, through analyzing and applying to the underlying portfolio companies, market valuation multiples of publicly-traded firms engaged in businesses similar to those of the portfolio companies. The market approach to determining the fair value of a portfolio company’s equity security (or securities) will typically involve: (1) applying to the portfolio company’s trailing twelve months (or current year projected) EBITDA a low to high range of enterprise value to EBITDA multiples that are derived from an analysis of publicly-traded comparable companies, in order to arrive at a range of enterprise values for the portfolio company; (2) subtracting from the range of calculated enterprise values the outstanding balances of any debt or equity securities that would be senior in right of payment to the equity securities we hold; and (3) multiplying the range of equity values derived therefrom by our ownership share of such equity tranche in order to arrive at a range of fair values for our equity security (or securities). Application of these valuation methodologies involves a significant degree of judgment by Management.

 16 

Due to the inherent uncertainty of determining the fair value of Level 3 investments that do not have a readily available market value, the fair value of the investments may differ significantly from the values that would have been used had a ready market existed for such investments and may differ materially from the values that may ultimately be received or settled. Further, such investments are generally subject to legal and other restrictions or otherwise are less liquid than publicly traded instruments. If we were required to liquidate a portfolio investment in a forced or liquidation sale, we might realize significantly less than the value at which such investment had previously been recorded. With respect to Level 3 investments, where sufficient market quotations are not readily available or for which no or an insufficient number of indicative prices from pricing services or brokers or dealers have been received, we undertake, on a quarterly basis, our valuation process as described above.

 

We assess the levels of the investments at each measurement date, and transfers between levels are recognized on the subsequent measurement date closest in time to the actual date of the event or change in circumstances that caused the transfer. There were no transfers among Level 1, 2 and 3 for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

As of September 30, 2021, investments measured at fair value on a recurring basis are categorized in the tables below based on the lowest level of significant input to the valuations:

 

    Fair Value Measurements as of September 30, 2021
(in thousands) Total 

Quoted Prices in Active Markets for Identical Assets

(Level 1)

 

Significant Other Observable Inputs

(Level 2)

 

Significant Unobservable Inputs

(Level 3)

Assets        
Investments:        
Control investments $12,000  $—    $—    $12,000 
Total investments and temporary cash investments $12,000  $—    $—    $12,000 

 

As of December 31, 2020, investments measured at fair value on a recurring basis are categorized in the tables below based on the lowest level of significant input to the valuations:

 

    Fair Value Measurements as of December 31, 2020
(in thousands) Total 

Quoted Prices in Active Markets for Identical Assets

(Level 1)

 

Significant Other Observable Inputs

(Level 2)

 

Significant Unobservable Inputs

(Level 3)

Assets        
Investments:        
Control investments $7,000  $—    $—    $7,000 
Total investments  7,000   —     —     7,000 
        Temporary cash investments  24,000   24,000   —     —   
Total investments and temporary cash investments $31,000  $24,000  $—    $7,000 

 

The following table provides a reconciliation of fair value changes during the three months ended September 30, 2021 for all investments for which we determine fair value using unobservable (Level 3) factors:

 

    Fair value measurements using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3)
(in thousands) Control Investments Affiliate Investments Non-affiliate Investments Total
Fair value as of June 30, 2021     $10,250  $—    $—    $10,250
Change in unrealized appreciation      1,750   —     —    1,750
Fair value as of September 30, 2021     $12,000  $—    $—    $12,000

 

 17 

The following table provides a reconciliation of fair value changes during the nine months ended September 30, 2021 for all investments for which we determine fair value using unobservable (Level 3) factors:

    Fair value measurements using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3)
(in thousands) Control Investments Affiliate Investments Non-affiliate Investments Total
Fair value as of January 1, 2021     $7,000  $—    $—    $7,000
Change in unrealized appreciation      4,650   —     —    4,650
Purchases of portfolio securities      350   —     —    350
Fair value as of September 30, 2021     $12,000  $—    $—    $12,000

 

The following table provides a reconciliation of fair value changes during the three months ended September 30, 2020 for all investments for which we determine fair value using observable (Level 3) factors:

    Fair value measurements using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3)
(in thousands) Control Investments Affiliate Investments Non-affiliate Investments Total
Fair value as of June 30, 2020     $5,500  $27,500  $977  $33,977
Change in unrealized appreciation      (561)  (3,500)  —    (4,061)
Purchase of portfolio securites      561   —     —    561
Fair value as of September 30, 2020     $5,500  $24,000  $977  $30,477

 

The following table provides a reconciliation of fair value changes during the nine months ended September 30, 2020 for all investments for which we determine fair value using unobservable (Level 3) factors:

 

    Fair value measurements using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3)
(in thousands) Control Investments Affiliate Investments Non-affiliate Investments Total
Fair value as of January 1, 2020     $8,000  $26,500  $977  $35,477
Change in unrealized appreciation      (3,061)  (2,500)  —    (5,561)
Purchases of portfolio securities      561   —     —    561
Fair value as of September 30, 2020     $5,500  $24,000  $977  $30,477

 

Our investment portfolio is not composed of homogeneous debt and equity securities that can be valued with a small number of inputs. Instead, the majority of our investment portfolio is composed of complex debt and equity securities with distinct contract terms and conditions. As such, our valuation of each investment in our portfolio is unique and complex, often factoring in numerous different inputs, including historical and forecasted financial and operational performance of the portfolio company, project cash flows, market multiples comparable market transactions, the priority of our securities compared with those of other investors, credit risk, interest rates, independent valuations and reviews and other inputs.

 

The following table summarizes the significant non-observable inputs in the fair value measurements of our Level 3 investments by category of investment and valuation technique as of September 30, 2021: (fair value expressed in thousands; acreage range expressed in dollars and not rounded):

 

        Range
(in thousands) Fair Value Valuation Techniques Unobservable Inputs Minimum Maximum Weighted Average
Limited liability company investments   

Asset approach

Guideline transaction method

Market approach

 Acreage value (per acre)  $    5,000  $      9,000  $      7,000
  $            12,000  

Recovery Rate

Reserve Adjustment Factors 

 75% 100% 100%

 

Because of the inherent uncertainty of the valuation of portfolio securities which do not have readily ascertainable market values, amounting to $12.0 million and $7.0 million as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively, our fair value determinations may materially differ from the values that would have been used had a ready market existed for these securities.

 

We adjust our net asset value for the changes in the value of our publicly held securities, if applicable, and material changes in the value of private securities, generally determined on a quarterly basis or as announced in a press release, and report those amounts to Lipper Analytical Services, Inc. Our net asset value appears in various publications, including Barron’s and The Wall Street Journal.

 18 

Escrowed Receivables, at Estimated Fair Value—In December 2020, we sold our interest in PalletOne, Inc (“PalletOne”). A portion of the proceeds from the sale was placed in a cash escrow account to secure the representations and warranties made to the purchaser. On March 31, 2021, we received $2.5 million in cash from PalletOne. We recognized a capital gain of $0.5 million due to the change in our estimated fair value of this receivable, which was $1.2 million as of September 30, 2021. See Subsequent Events.

 

Investment Transactions—Investment transactions are recorded on the accrual method. Realized gains and losses on investments sold are computed on a specific identification basis.

 

We classify our investments in accordance with the requirements of the 1940 Act. Under the 1940 Act, “Control Investments” are defined as investments in companies in which the Fund owns more than 25% of the voting securities or maintains greater than 50% of the board representation. Under the 1940 Act, “Affiliate Investments” are defined as those non-control investments in companies in which we own between 5% and 25% of the voting securities. Under the 1940 Act, “Non-affiliate Investments” are defined as investments that are neither Control Investments nor Affiliate Investments. See also Note 4 for discussion of related party investment transactions.

 

Interest and Dividend Income Recognition—We record interest income, adjusted for amortization of premium and accretion of discount, on an accrual basis to the extent that we expect to collect such amounts. We accrete or amortize discounts and premiums on securities purchased over the life of the respective security using the effective yield method. The amortized cost of investments represents the original cost adjusted for the accretion of discount and/or amortization of premium on debt securities. We stop accruing interest on investments when we determine that interest is no longer collectible. We may also impair the accrued interest when we determine that all or a portion of the current accrual is uncollectible. If we receive any cash after determining that interest is no longer collectible, we treat such cash as payment on the principal balance until the entire principal balance has been repaid, before we recognize any additional interest income. We will write off uncollectible interest upon the occurrence of a definitive event such as a sale, bankruptcy, or reorganization of the relevant portfolio interest. Dividend income is recorded as dividends are declared by the portfolio company or at the point an obligation exists for the portfolio company to make a distribution.

 

Net Realized Gains or Losses and Net Change in Unrealized Appreciation or Depreciation—Realized gains or losses are measured by the difference between the net proceeds from the sale or redemption of an investment or a financial instrument and the cost basis of the investment or financial instrument, without regard to unrealized appreciation or depreciation previously recognized, and includes investments written-off during the period net of recoveries and realized gains or losses from in-kind redemptions. Net change in unrealized appreciation or depreciation reflects the net change in the fair value of the portfolio company investments and financial instruments and the reclassification of any prior period unrealized appreciation or depreciation on exited investments and financial instruments to realized gains or losses.

 

Payment in Kind Interest (PIK)—From time to time, we have loans in our portfolio that may pay PIK interest. We add PIK interest, if any, computed at the contractual rate specified in each loan agreement, to the principal balance of the loan and recorded as interest income. To maintain our status as a RIC, we must pay out to stockholders this non-cash source of income in the form of dividends even if we have not yet collected any cash in respect of such investments. To the extent we remain BDC and a RIC, we will continue to pay out net investment income and/or realized capital gains, if any, on an annual basis as required under the 1940 Act.

 

Earnings Per Share—Basic and diluted per share calculations are computed utilizing the weighted-average number of shares of common stock outstanding for the period. In accordance with ASC 260, Earnings Per Share, the unvested shares of restricted stock awarded pursuant to our equity compensation plans are participating securities and, therefore, are included in the basic earnings per share calculation. As a result, for all periods presented, there is no difference between diluted earnings per share and basic earnings per share amounts.

 

Distributable Earnings—The components that make up distributable earnings (accumulated undistributed deficit) on the Condensed Balance Sheet as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 are as follows:

 

 As of
September 30, 2021
 

As of

December 31, 2020

Accumulated undistributed net investment losses $(42,843) $(40,310)
Unrealized appreciation of portfolio securities, net  4,039   (611)
Accumulated undistributed net capital gains  349   18,543 
Accumulated earnings deficit $(38,455) $(22,378)

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In general, we may take certain adjustments to the classification of net assets as a result of permanent book-to-tax differences, which may include differences in the book and tax basis of certain assets and liabilities, and undistributed net capital gains for which we have loss carryforwards, among other items. During the nine months ended September 30, 2021, we recharacterized $18.5 million in accumulated undistributed net capital gains for which we had loss carryforwards, among other items. Accordingly, this recharacterization has increased capital in excess of par and decreased accumulated deficit.

 

Taxes—So long as we remain a BDC, we intend to comply with the requirements of the Internal Revenue Code necessary to qualify as a RIC and, as such, will not be subject to federal income taxes on otherwise taxable income (including net realized capital gains) which is distributed to stockholders. Therefore, no provision for federal income taxes is recorded in the financial statements. We borrow money from time to time to maintain our tax status under the Internal Revenue Code as a RIC. See Note 1 for discussion of Taxable Subsidiaries and see Note 2 for further discussion of the Fund’s RIC borrowings.

 

All corporations organized in the State of Delaware are required to file an Annual Report and to pay a franchise tax. As a result, we paid Delaware Franchise tax in the amount of $0.03 million for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

Texas margin tax applies to legal entities conducting business in Texas. The margin tax is based on our Texas sourced taxable margin. The tax is calculated by applying a tax rate to a base that considers both revenue and expenses and therefore has the characteristics of an income tax. As a result, we have no provision for margin tax expense for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, and we expect no state income tax for the year ended December 31, 2021.

 

Although on March 27, 2020, the U.S. government enacted the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”), which contains provisions intended to mitigate the adverse economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Our portfolio companies did not benefit from the CARES Act or any other subsequent legislation intended to provide financial relief or assistance.

 

Cash Flows—For purposes of the Statements of Cash Flows, we consider all highly liquid temporary cash investments purchased with an original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents. We include our investing activities within cash flows from operations.

 

Recent Accounting Standards—We consider the applicability and impact of all accounting standard updates (“ASU”) issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”). ASUs not listed below were assessed and either determined to be not applicable or expected to have minimal impact on our financial statements.

 

Accounting Standards Recently Adopted— In May 2020, the SEC adopted rule amendments that will impact the requirement of investment companies, including BDCs, to disclose the financial statements of certain of their portfolio companies or acquired funds (the “Final Rules”). The Final Rules adopted a new definition of “significant subsidiary” set forth in Rule 1-02(w)(2) of Regulation S-X under the Securities Act. Rules 3-09 and 4-08(g) of Regulation S-X require investment companies to include separate financial statements or summary financial information, respectively, in such investment company’s periodic reports for any portfolio company that meets the definition of “significant subsidiary.” The Final Rules amend the definition of “significant subsidiary” in a manner that is intended to more accurately capture those portfolio companies that are more likely to materially impact the financial condition of an investment company. The Final Rules became effective on January 1, 2021, but voluntary compliance was permitted in advance of the effective date. The Company elected to comply with the Final Rules effective June 30, 2020 which reduced the requirement for the Company to provide separate audited financial statements and summarized financial information for its controlled portfolio companies going forward.

 

 (4)Related Party Transactions and Agreements

Except as noted below, as compensation for services to the Fund, each Independent Director receives an annual fee of $40,000 paid quarterly in arrears, a fee of $2,000 for each meeting of the Board of Directors or committee thereof attended in person, a fee of $1,000 for participation in each telephonic meeting of the Board or committee thereof, and reimbursement of all out-of-pocket expenses relating to attendance at such meetings. The chair of each of our standing committees (audit, compensation, and nominating and governance) also receives an annual fee of $50,000, payable quarterly in arrears. We may also pay other one-time or recurring fees to members of our Board of Directors in special circumstances. None of our interested directors receive annual fees for their service on the Board of Directors.

 

In respect of services provided to the Fund by members of the Board not in connection with their roles and duties as directors, the Fund pays a rate of $300 per hour for services. We paid Kenneth I. Denos, P.C., a professional corporation owned by Kenneth I. Denos, a director of the Fund, $249,675 during the nine months ended September 30, 2020. Effective November 1, 2020, we entered into a written agreement with Mr. Denos to receive, in lieu of an hourly rate, a fixed monthly fee of $30,000.

 20 

(5)       Portfolio Securities

During the nine months ended September 30, 2021, we made a follow-on investment of $0.35 million in Equus Energy, LLC.

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2021, we recognized a capital gain of $0.5 million due to the change in the estimated fair value of our escrow receivable related to the sale of PalletOne.

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2021, with respect to our holding in Equus Energy, LLC, we recorded an increase in the fair value of $5.0 million and an increase in our cost basis of $0.35 million, resulting in a net change in unrealized appreciation of $4.65 million. Such change in fair value was  principally due to increases in mineral acreage prices and a substantial increase in short-and long-term prices for crude oil and natural gas.  

During the nine months ended September 30, 2020, in connection with our shareholding in MVC, we received dividends in the form of additional MVC shares valued at $0.2 million, together with $134,585 in cash.

During the nine months ended September 30, 2020, we converted into equity $0.6 million in advances we made to Equus Energy, LLC, our wholly-owned subsidiary.

During the nine months ended September 30, 2020, we recorded a net change in unrealized appreciation of $6.3 million, to a net unrealized appreciation of $19.0 million. Such change in unrealized appreciation resulted primarily from the following changes:

 (i)Decrease in the fair value of our shareholding in MVC Capital, Inc. (“MVC”) of $0.8 million due to a decrease in the share price of MVC which was partially offset by the receipt of dividend payments in the form of additional shares of MVC during the period;

 

 (ii)Decrease in the fair value of our holdings in Equus Energy, LLC of $3.0 million, principally due to decreases in mineral acreage prices and a substantial decrease in the short- and long-term prices for crude oil, which fell from $61.06 per barrel at December 31, 2019 to $20.48 at March 31, 2020, before recovering moderately to $40.22 at September 30, 2020; and

 

 (iii)Decrease in the fair value of our shareholding in PalletOne, Inc. of $2.5 million due to a less favorable outlook for the Company in 2021 and the remainder of 2020.

 

(6)       Conversion to an Operating Company

Authorization to Withdraw BDC Election— On August 17, 2021, holders of a majority of the outstanding common stock of the Fund approved our cessation as a BDC under the 1940 Act and authorized our Board to cause the Fund’s withdrawal of its election to be classified as a BDC, effective as of a date designated by the Board and our Chief Executive Officer, but no later than January 31, 2022. This authorization and others which preceded it are a consequence of our expressed intent to transform Equus into an operating company or a permanent capital vehicle. Notwithstanding any such authorization to withdraw our BDC election, we will not submit any such withdrawal unless and until Equus has entered into a definitive agreement to effect a transformative transaction. Further, even if we are again authorized to withdraw our election as a BDC, we will require a subsequent affirmative vote from holders of a majority of our outstanding voting shares to enter into any such definitive agreement or change the nature of our business. While we are presently evaluating various opportunities that could enable us to accomplish this transformation, we cannot assure you that we will be able to do so within any particular time period or at all, and, although we expect that our shareholders will extend our current authorization we do not expect to cause the Fund to withdraw its election to be classified as BDC by January 31, 2022. Moreover, we cannot assure you that the terms of any such transformative transaction would be acceptable to us.

 

Increase in Authorized Shares—On January 20, 2021, holders of a majority of the outstanding common stock of the Fund approved the restatement of our Certificate of Incorporation to increase the number of our authorized shares of common stock from 50,000,000 to 100,000,000, and the number of our authorized shares of preferred stock from 5,000,000 to 10,000,000. The increase is intended to help facilitate the transformation of Equus into an operating company and provide sufficient authorized shares to evaluate larger business concerns as possible acquisition or merger candidates.

 21 

 

 (7)2016 Equity Incentive Plan

 

Share-Based Incentive Compensation—On June 13, 2016, our shareholders approved the adoption of our 2016 Equity Incentive Plan (“Incentive Plan”). On January 10, 2017, the SEC issued an order approving the Incentive Plan and certain awards intended to be made thereunder. The Incentive Plan is intended to promote the interests of the Fund by encouraging officers, employees, and directors of the Fund and its affiliates to acquire or increase their equity interest in the Fund and to provide a means whereby they may develop a proprietary interest in the development and financial success of the Fund, to encourage them to remain with and devote their best efforts to the business of the Fund, thereby advancing the interests of the Fund and its stockholders. The Incentive Plan is also intended to enhance the ability of the Fund and its affiliates to attract and retain the services of individuals who are essential for the growth and profitability of the Fund. The Incentive Plan permits the award of restricted stock as well as common stock purchase options. The maximum number of shares of common stock that are subject to awards granted under the Incentive Plan is 2,434,728 shares. The term of the Incentive Plan will expire on June 13, 2026. On March 17, 2017, we granted awards of restricted stock under the Incentive Plan to certain of our directors and executive officers in the aggregate amount of 844,500 shares. The awards are each subject to a vesting requirement over a 3-year period unless the recipient thereof is terminated or removed from their position as a director or executive officer without “cause”, or as a result of constructive termination, as such terms are defined in the respective award agreements entered into by each of the recipients and the Fund. As of March 31, 2020, all awards granted under the Incentive Plan were fully vested. We account for share-based compensation using the fair value method, as prescribed by ASC 718. Accordingly, for restricted stock awards, we measure the grant date fair value based upon the market price of our common stock on the date of the grant and amortize the fair value of the awards as share-based compensation expense over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting term. We recorded compensation expense of $0.08 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020, in connection with these awards.

 

 (8)Equus Energy, LLC

 

Equus Energy was formed in November 2011 as a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Fund to make investments in companies in the energy sector, with particular emphasis on income-producing oil & gas properties. In December 2011, we contributed $250,000 to the capital of Equus Energy. On December 27, 2012, we invested an additional $6.8 million in Equus Energy for the purpose of additional working capital and to fund the purchase of $6.6 million in working interests, which presently comprise 141 producing and non-producing oil and gas wells. On September 30, 2020, the Fund provided an additional $0.6 million in capital to Equus Energy for the purpose of additional working capital. On June 30, 2021, the Fund provided an additional $0.3 million in capital to Equus Energy for the purpose of additional working capital. The working interests include associated development rights of approximately 21,520 acres situated on 10 separate properties in Texas and Oklahoma. The working interests range from a de minimus amount to 50% of the leasehold that includes these wells.

 

The wells are operated by a number of experienced operators, including the operator of Equus Energy’s 40 well interests located in the Conger Field, an oil and gas field on the edge of the Permian Basin that has experienced gas and hydrocarbon extraction in multiple formations. Equus Energy, which holds a 50% working interest in each of these Conger Field wells, was working with the operator in a recompletion program, now presently on hold, of existing Conger Field wells to the Wolfcamp formation, a zone containing oil as well as gas and natural gas liquids. Part of Equus Energy’s acreage rights described above also includes a 50% working interest in possible new drilling to the base of the Canyon formation on 2,400 acres in the Conger Field. Also included in the interests acquired by Equus Energy are working interests of 7.5% and 2.5% in the Burnell and North Pettus Units, respectively, which collectively comprise approximately 13,000 acres located in the area known as the “Eagle Ford Shale” play.

 

The Impact of COVID-19 and Other Events—2020 witnessed unprecedented systemic events that had a material effect on oil prices globally and continued through the first three quarters of the year. Commencing in the fourth quarter of 2020, crude and natural gas prices began to rise and, as of the date of this filing on Form 10-Q, have recovered to, or have exceeded, pre-pandemic levels.

 

Notwithstanding present pricing conditions and forecasts for the remainder of 2021, operators of the leasehold interests held by Equus Energy have not yet undertaken significant capital expenditures, which could have a material adverse effect upon the operations and long-term financial condition of Equus Energy. To conserve existing cash resources or create additional cash resources during the next year, Equus Energy intends to either: (i) attempt to secure equity or debt financing from one or more institutional sources, which sources may include the Fund, a commercial lender, or other investors, (ii) request that its operators shut-in additional wells, (iii) sell certain of its oil and gas holdings, or (iv) undertake a combination of the foregoing. However, we cannot assure you that Equus Energy will be able to implement these plans successfully, or that such plans will generate sufficient liquidity to continue as a going concern. The factors discussed above, therefore, raise substantial doubt about Equus Energy’s ability to continue as a going concern.

 22 

Going-Concern—The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements of Equus Energy have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities and other commitments in the normal course of business. As such, the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements do not include adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of assets and their carrying amount, or the amount and classification of liabilities that may result should the Equus Energy be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Revenue and Income—During the three months ended September 30, 2021, Equus Energy’s revenue, operating revenue less direct operating expenses, and net loss were $0.2 million, $0.08 million, and ($0.03) million, respectively, as compared to revenue, operating revenue less direct operating expenses, and net loss which were $0.1 million, ($0.08) million, and ($0.2) million, respectively, for the three months ended September 30, 2020.

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2021, Equus Energy’s revenue, operating revenue less direct operating expenses, and net loss were $0.6 million, $0.1 million, and ($0.07) million, respectively, as compared to revenue, operating revenue less direct operating expenses, and net loss which were $0.3 million, ($0.15) million, and ($0.36) million, respectively, for the three months ended September 30, 2020.

 

Capital Expenditures—During the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and September 30, 2020, Equus Energy’s investment, respectively, in capital expenditures for small repairs and improvements was not significant.

 

We do not consolidate Equus Energy or its wholly-owned subsidiaries and accordingly only the value of our investment in Equus Energy is included on our balance sheets. Our investment in Equus Energy is valued in accordance with our normal valuation procedures and is based in part on a reserve report prepared for Equus Energy by Lee Keeling & Associates, Inc., an independent petroleum engineering firm, the transactions and values of comparable companies in this sector, and the estimated value of leasehold mineral interests associated with the acreage held by Equus Energy. A valuation of Equus Energy was performed by a third-party valuation firm, who recommended a value range of Equus Energy consistent with the fair value determined by our Management (See Schedule of Investments).

 

 

 

 

 

 23 

 

Below is summarized consolidated financial information for Equus Energy as of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 and for the three months and nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively (in thousands):

 

EQUUS ENERGY, LLC

Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

  September 30, December 31,
  2021 2020
     
     
Assets    
Current assets:        
Cash and cash equivalents $694  $621 
Accounts receivable  156   77 
Total current assets  850   698 
Oil and gas properties  8,093   8,061 
Less: accumulated depletion, depreciation and amortization  (8,093)  (8,061)
Net oil and gas properties  —    —   
Total assets$850 $698 
         
Liabilities and member's deficit        
Current liabilities:        
Accounts payable and other $100  $229 
Due to affiliate  350   350 
Total current liabilities  450   579 
Asset retirement obligations  213   208 
Total liabilities 663  787 
         
Total member's equity (deficit)  187   (89)
         
Total liabilities and member'sequity (deficit)$850 $698 

 

Revenue and direct operating expenses for the various oil and gas assets included in the unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations below represent the net collective working and revenue interests acquired by Equus Energy.

 24 

 

EQUUS ENERGY, LLC

Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations 

 

EQUUS ENERGY, LLC
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
             
         
  Three months ended September 30, Nine months ended September 30,
  2021 2020 2021 2020
         
         
Operating revenue $237  $120  $623  $337 
Operating expenses                
Direct operating expenses  155   200   482   492 
General and administrative  53   38   178   187 
Depletion, depreciation, amortization and accretion  2   84   5   21 
Impairment of oil and gas properties  —     —     32   —   
Total operating expenses  210   322   697   700 
Net loss  27   (202)  (74)  (363)

 

EQUUS ENERGY, LLC

Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

 

  Nine months ended September 30,
  2021 2020
     
Cash flows from operating activities:        
         
Net loss $(74) $(320)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to        
net cash used in operating activities:        
Depletion, depreciation and amortization  5   15 
Impairment  32   —   
Changes in operating assets and liabilites:        
Accounts receivable  (79)  22 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets  —     34 
Accounts payable and other  (129)  (15)
Due to Parent  —     —   
Net cash used in operating activities  (245)  (264)
         
Cash flows from investing activities:        
Investment in oil & gas properties  (32)  (30)
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities  (32)  (30)
         
Cash flows from financing activities:        
Member contributions  350   —   
Net cash provided by investing activities  350   —   
Net increase (decrease) in cash  73   (294)
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period  621   553 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period $694  $259 

 

 25 

Critical Accounting Policies for Equus Energy

Oil & Gas Properties—Equus Energy and its wholly-owned subsidiary EQS Energy Holdings, Inc. (collectively, “the Company”) follow the Full Cost Method of Accounting for oil and gas properties. Under the full cost method, all costs associated with property acquisition, exploration, and development activities are capitalized. Capitalized costs include lease acquisitions, geological and geophysical work, delay rentals, costs of drilling, completing and equipping successful and unsuccessful oil and gas wells and related costs. Gains or losses are normally not recognized on the sale or other disposition of oil and gas properties. Gains or losses are normally reflected as an adjustment to the full cost pool. Any excess of the net book value of proved oil and gas properties over the ceiling is charged to expense and reflected as additional impairment in the accompanying statements of operations.

 

The capitalized costs of oil and gas properties, plus estimated future development costs relating to proved reserves and estimated cost of dismantlement and abandonment, net of salvage value, are amortized on a unit-of-production method over the estimated productive life of the proved oil and gas reserves. Unevaluated oil and gas properties are excluded from this calculation. Depletion, depreciation, amortization and accretion expense for the Company’s oil and gas properties totaled $5 thousand and $21 thousand for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

Capitalized oil and gas property costs are limited to an amount (the ceiling limitation) equal to the sum of the following:

 

 (a)As of September 30, 2021, the present value of estimated future net revenue from the projected production of proved oil and gas reserves, calculated at the simple arithmetic average, first-day-of-the-month prices during the twelve-month period before the balance sheet date (with consideration of price changes only to the extent provided by contractual arrangements) and a discount factor of 10%;

 

 (b)The cost of investments in unproved and unevaluated properties excluded from the costs being amortized; and

 

 (c)The lower of cost or estimated fair value of unproved properties included in the costs being amortized.

 

When it is determined that oil and gas property costs exceed the ceiling limitation, an impairment charge is recorded to reduce its carrying value to the ceiling limitation. The Company recognized an impairment loss on its oil and gas properties during the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020 of $32 thousand and $0, respectively.

 

The costs of certain unevaluated leasehold acreage and certain wells being drilled are not amortized. The Company excludes all costs until proved reserves are found or until it is determined that the costs are impaired. Costs not amortized are periodically assessed for possible impairment or reduction in value. If a reduction in value has occurred, costs being amortized are increased accordingly.

 

Revenue Recognition—The Company recognizes revenue in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers.

The Company’s revenue is generated primarily from the sale of oil, gas and natural gas liquids (“NGL”) produced from working interests and to a lesser extent from royalty interests in oil and gas properties owned by the Company. As a working interest owner, the Company is responsible for the incurred production expenses proportionate to the interest stipulated in the operating agreement. As a non-operator, the Company does not manage the daily well operations, which are borne by the well operator. Sales of oil, gas and NGLs are recognized at the time control of the product is transferred to the customer.

Various arrangements amongst the eleven different oil and gas properties all differ in some respects, although they do share the commonality that, as a non-operating working interest holder, the Company does not engage in the selling process, but instead relies on the operator, as their selling agent, for negotiating and determining pricing, volume, and delivery terms. Such pricing terms are often a function of a specified discount from the daily/monthly NYMEX or Henry Hub average. The discount is usually based on differentials such as distance of the field/wells from the distribution node or the buyer’s storage facility, as well as the quality of the product itself (i.e., in the case of oil, its gravity).

 26 

Revenue is measured based on consideration specified in the contract with the customer, and excludes any amounts collected on behalf of third parties. The Company recognizes revenue in the amount that reflects the consideration it expects to be entitled to in exchange for transferring control of those goods to the customer. The contract consideration is typically allocated to specific performance obligations in the contract according to the terms of the contract. Each unit of oil or gas is considered a separate performance obligation under the contract. Wells are spot measured once a month to determine production and the composition of each of the products (i.e. oil, gas, NGLs) from the well. Each month the consideration obtained by the operator is allocated to the related performance obligations.

Performance Obligations

A performance obligation is a promise in a contract to transfer a distinct good or service to the customer, and is the unit of account in ASC 606. A contract’s transaction price is allocated to each distinct performance obligation and recognized as revenue when, or as, the performance obligation is satisfied. Revenue is recognized when performance obligations are satisfied in accordance with contractual terms, in an amount that reflects the consideration the Company expects to be entitled to in exchange for services rendered.

 

Depending on the contract and commodity, there are various means by which upstream entities can transfer control (i.e., at the wellhead, inlet, tailgate of the processing plant, or a location where the product is delivered to a third party). The Company has control of the commodity before it is extracted, therefore consideration must be given to whether the transfer of control of the commodity is to the operator or to the end customer at the point of sale.

 

Unless special arrangements are entered into, the Company’s performance obligations are generally considered performed when control of the extracted commodity transfers when it is delivered to the end customer at the agreed-upon market or index price. At the end of each month, when the performance obligation is satisfied, the variable consideration can be reasonably estimated. Variances between the Company’s estimated revenue and actual payments are recorded in the month the payment is received. 

Principal vs. Agent

While the guidance on principal versus agent considerations is similar to legacy GAAP, the key difference is that ASC 606 focuses on control of the specified goods and services as the overarching principle for entities to consider when determining whether they are acting as a principal or an agent. This could result in entities reaching different conclusions than they did under legacy GAAP.

 

An entity acting as a principal records revenue on a gross basis if it controls a promised good or service before transferring that good or service to the customer. An entity is an agent if it does not control the promised good or service before transfer to the customer. If the entity is an agent, it records as revenue the net amount it retains for its agency services. However, due to the uncertainty of the variable pricing component and the separation of expenses billed to the Company from the consideration processed and paid by the operator, the revenue is recorded at net.

 27 

Under the Company’s normal operating activity arrangements, the operator is responsible for negotiating, fulfilling and collecting the agreed-upon amount from the sale with the end customer and is, therefore, determined to be acting as agent on behalf of the Company. The principal versus agent consideration will continue to be assessed for new contracts, both within and outside the company’s normal operating activities.

        Income Taxes—A limited liability company is not subject to the payment of federal income taxes as components of its income and expenses flow through directly to the members. However, the Company is subject to certain state income taxes. Texas margin tax applies to legal entities conducting business in Texas. The margin tax is based on our Texas sourced taxable margin. The tax is calculated by applying a tax rate to a base that considers both revenue and expenses and therefore has the characteristics of an income tax. Taxable Subsidiaries may generate income tax expense because of the Taxable Subsidiaries’ ownership of the portfolio companies. We reflect any such income tax expense on our Statements of Operations. The Company had no federal income tax expense for the nine months ending September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively.

 

Asset Retirement Obligations—The fair value of asset retirement obligations are recorded in the period in which they are incurred if a reasonable estimate of fair value can be made, and the corresponding cost is capitalized as part of the carrying amount of the related long-lived asset. The fair value of the asset retirement obligation is measured using expected future cash outflows discounted at the Company’s credit- adjusted risk-free interest rate. Fair value, to the extent possible, should include a market risk premium for unforeseeable circumstances. No market risk premium was included in the Company’s asset retirement obligation fair value estimate since a reasonable estimate could not be made. The liability is accreted to its then present value each period, and the capitalized cost is depleted or amortized over the estimated recoverable reserves using the units-of-production method.

 

 (9)Subsequent Events

 

Management performed an evaluation of the Fund’s activity through the date the financial statements were issued, noting the following subsequent event:

 

In October 2021, we received $1.2 million for the cash escrow receivable related to the sale of PalletOne.

 

 28 

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

Equus Total Return, Inc. (“we,” “us,” “our,” “Equus,” and the “Fund”), a Delaware corporation, was formed on August 16, 1991. Our shares trade on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol ‘EQS’. Our investment strategy seeks to provide the highest total return, consisting of capital appreciation and current income.

 

The information contained in this section should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and notes thereto appearing elsewhere in this Quarterly Report and in conjunction with the financial statements and notes thereto in the Fund’s Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020, as filed with the SEC. In addition, some of the statements in this report constitute forward-looking statements. The matters discussed in this Quarterly Report, as well as in future oral and written statements by management of Equus, that are forward-looking statements are based on current management expectations that involve substantial risks and uncertainties which could cause actual results to differ materially from the results expressed in, or implied by, these forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements relate to future events or our future financial performance. We generally identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expects,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “could,” “intends,” “target,” “projects,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential” or “continue” or the negative of these terms or other similar words. Important assumptions include our ability to originate new investments, achieve certain margins and levels of profitability, and the availability of additional capital. In light of these and other uncertainties, the inclusion of a forward-looking statement in this Quarterly Report should not be regarded as a representation by us that our plans or objectives will be achieved. The forward- looking statements contained in this Quarterly Report include statements as to:

 

 our future operating results;
 our business prospects and the prospects of our existing and prospective portfolio companies;
 the return or impact of current and future investments;
 our contractual arrangements and other relationships with third parties;
 the dependence of our future success on the general economy and its impact on the industries in which we invest;
 the financial condition and ability of our existing and prospective portfolio companies to achieve their objectives;
 our expected financings and investments;
 our regulatory structure and tax treatment;
 our ability to qualify and operate as a BDC and a RIC, including the impact of changes in laws or regulations governing our operations, or the operations of our portfolio companies;
 the adequacy of our cash resources and working capital;
 the timing of cash flows, if any, from the operations of our portfolio companies;
 the impact of fluctuations in interest rates on our business;
 the valuation of our investments in portfolio companies, particularly those having no liquid trading market;
 our ability to recover unrealized losses;
 market conditions and our ability to access additional capital, if deemed necessary;
 developments in the global economy as well as the public health crisis related to the COVID-19 virus and resulting demand and supply for oil and natural gas;
 natural or man-made disasters and other external events that may disrupt our operations; and 
 continued volatility of oil and natural gas prices.
 29 

 

 There are a number of important risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those indicated by such forward-looking statements. For a discussion of factors that could cause our actual results to differ from forward-looking statements contained in this Quarterly Report, please see the discussion in Part II, “Item 1A. Risk Factors”, and in Part I, “Item 1A. Risk Factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 (“10-K”). In particular, you should carefully consider the risks we have described in the 10-K and elsewhere in this Quarterly Report concerning our efforts to transform Equus into an operating company, as well as the coronavirus pandemic and the economic impact of the coronavirus on the Fund and our portfolio companies and oil and gas markets. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements made in this Quarterly Report relate only to events as of the date on which the statements are made. We undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances occurring after the date this Quarterly Report is filed with the SEC. 

We attempt to maximize the return to stockholders in the form of current investment income and long-term capital gains by investing in the debt and equity securities of companies with a total enterprise value of between $5.0 million and $75.0 million, although we may engage in transactions with smaller or larger investee companies from time to time. We seek to invest primarily in companies pursuing growth either through acquisition or organically, leveraged buyouts, management buyouts and recapitalizations of existing businesses or special situations. Our income-producing investments consist principally of debt securities including subordinate debt, debt convertible into common or preferred stock, or debt combined with warrants and common and preferred stock. Debt and preferred equity financing may also be used to create long- term capital appreciation through the exercise and sale of warrants received in connection with the financing. To the extent that we remain a BDC, we will seek to achieve capital appreciation by making investments in equity and equity-oriented securities issued by privately-owned companies (and smaller public companies) in transactions negotiated directly with such companies. Given market conditions over the past several years and the performance of our portfolio, our management and Board of Directors believe it is prudent to continue to review alternatives to refine and further clarify the current strategies.

We elected to be treated as a BDC under the 1940 Act. We currently qualify as a RIC for federal income tax purposes and, therefore, are not required to pay corporate income taxes on any income or gains that we distribute to our stockholders. We have a wholly-owned Taxable Subsidiary which holds one of our portfolio investments listed on our Schedules of Investments. The purpose of this Taxable Subsidiary is to permit us to hold certain income-producing investments or portfolio companies organized as limited liability companies, or LLCs, (or other forms of pass-through entities) and still satisfy the RIC tax requirement that at least 90% of our gross revenue for income tax purposes must consist of investment income. Absent the Taxable Subsidiary, a portion of the gross income of these income- producing investments or of any LLC (or other pass-through entity) portfolio investment, as the case may be, would flow through directly to us for the 90% test. To the extent that such income did not consist of investment income, it could jeopardize our ability to qualify as a RIC and, therefore, cause us to incur significant federal income taxes. The income of the LLCs (or other pass-through entities) owned by Taxable Subsidiary is taxed to the Taxable Subsidiary and does not flow through to us, thereby helping us preserve our RIC status and resultant tax advantages. We do not consolidate the Taxable Subsidiary for income tax purposes and they may generate income tax expense because of the Taxable Subsidiary’s ownership of the portfolio investment. We reflect any such income tax expense on our Statements of Operations.

 

Conversion to an Operating Company

 

Authorization to Withdraw BDC Election. On August 17, 2021, holders of a majority of the outstanding common stock of the Fund approved our cessation as a BDC under the 1940 Act and authorized our Board to cause the Fund’s withdrawal of its election to be classified as a BDC, effective as of a date designated by the Board and our Chief Executive Officer, but no later than January 31, 2022. This authorization and others which preceded it are a consequence of our expressed intent to transform Equus into an operating company or a permanent capital vehicle. Notwithstanding any such authorization to withdraw our BDC election, we will not submit any such withdrawal unless and until Equus has entered into a definitive agreement to effect a transformative transaction. Further, even if we are again authorized to withdraw our election as a BDC, we will require a subsequent affirmative vote from holders of a majority of our outstanding voting shares to enter into any such definitive agreement or change the nature of our business. While we are presently evaluating various opportunities that could enable us to accomplish this transformation, we cannot assure you that we will be able to do so within any particular time period or at all, and, although we expect our shareholders will extend our current authorization, we do not expect to cause the Fund to withdraw its election to be classified as a BDC by January 31, 2022. Moreover, we cannot assure you that the terms of any such transformative transaction would be acceptable to us.

 

 30 

 

Increase in Authorized Shares. On January 20, 2021, holders of a majority of the outstanding common stock of the Fund approved the restatement of our Certificate of Incorporation to increase the number of our authorized shares of common stock from 50,000,000 to 100,000,000, and the number of our authorized shares of preferred stock from 5,000,000 to 10,000,000. The increase is intended to help facilitate the transformation of Equus into an operating company and provide sufficient authorized shares to evaluate larger business concerns as possible acquisition or merger candidates.

 

Reduction in Asset Coverage Ratio

On November 14, 2019, our shareholders approved a reduction in our asset coverage ratio from 200% to 150%. Prior to the reduction, we were restricted in the amount that we could borrow to the value of our net assets. The reduction in our asset coverage from 200% to 150% means that we may now borrow up to twice the value of our net assets. Except for a margin loan that we have previously procured each quarter to acquire U.S. Treasury bills as part of the maintenance of our RIC status, we have not incurred any additional borrowings as a consequence of this authorization.

 

2016 Equity Incentive Plan

 

On June 13, 2016, our shareholders approved the adoption of our 2016 Equity Incentive Plan (“Incentive Plan”). On January 10, 2017, the SEC issued an order approving the Incentive Plan and certain awards intended to be made thereunder. The Incentive Plan is intended to promote the interests of the Fund by encouraging officers, employees, and directors of the Fund and its affiliates to acquire or increase their equity interest in the Fund and to provide a means whereby they may develop a proprietary interest in the development and financial success of the Fund, to encourage them to remain with and devote their best efforts to the business of the Fund, thereby advancing the interests of the Fund and its stockholders. The Incentive Plan is also intended to enhance the ability of the Fund and its affiliates to attract and retain the services of individuals who are essential for the growth and profitability of the Fund. The Incentive Plan permits the award of restricted stock as well as common stock purchase options. The maximum number of shares of common stock that are subject to awards granted under the Incentive Plan is 2,434,728 shares. The term of the Incentive Plan will expire on June 13, 2026. On March 17, 2017, we granted awards of restricted stock under the Plan to certain of our directors and executive officers in the aggregate amount of 844,500 shares. The awards were each subject to a vesting requirement over a 3-year period unless the recipient thereof was terminated or removed from their position as a director or executive officer without “cause”, or as a result of constructive termination, as such terms are defined in the respective award agreements entered into by each of the recipients and the Fund. As of March 31, 2020, all awards granted under the Incentive Plan were fully vested. We account for share-based compensation using the fair value method, as prescribed by ASC 718. Accordingly, for restricted stock awards, we measure the grant date fair value based upon the market price of our common stock on the date of the grant and amortize the fair value of the awards as share-based compensation expense over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting term. We recorded compensation expense of $0.08 million for the three months ended March 31, 2020 in connection with these awards.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

See the Fund’s Critical Accounting Policies from the disclosure set forth in the Fund’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020.

 

Current Market Conditions

 

Impact of the Coronavirus Generally. The introduction of the coronavirus has had a substantial detrimental impact on markets and economic forecasts for governments and businesses worldwide, and could have a materially adverse impact upon our operations and that of our sole remaining portfolio company, although the extent of the impact cannot be determined at the present time. Beginning in the first quarter of 2020, all U.S. states and many foreign countries implemented significant travel, movement, and assembly restrictions, as well as restrictions on the movement of goods. Beginning in September 2020, a number of U.S. states began to relax certain restrictions on commercial and social activity, including permitting some primary, secondary, and university students to return to in-person classes.

 

Largely as a consequence of this type of increased social interaction, the U.S. experienced a resurgence in COVID-19 infections and concomitant deaths that continued through the first two quarters of 2021. In addition, beginning in late 2020, a number of new and more highly contagious strains of the virus began to appear, most notably of which was the Delta variant, which was first encountered in the United States in March 2021. The resurgence in infections and the introduction of these new strains resulted in the return of proscriptions on certain social gatherings, some of which continued through the end of the third quarter of 2021.

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As of October 28, 2021, the number of U.S. deaths attributable to the coronavirus stood at over 742,000. Beginning in late 2020, however, a number of global pharmaceutical companies introduced one and two-dose COVID-19 vaccines to the market, and in the third quarter of 2021, also introduced a third ‘booster’ shot to address new variants to the virus. On October 28, 2021, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (“CDC”) reported that 78.0% of the U.S. population above the age of 12 had received at least one dose of these vaccines. With lowering infection and death rates, a number of states had begun again to relax restrictions on social and commercial activity, and most of these states had also relaxed requirements regarding the wearing of a protective face mask. However, the CDC has reported that persons infected with the Delta variant can carry up to 1,000 times more virus in their nasal passages than compared to the original coronavirus strain, making it one of the most highly contagious respiratory diseases encountered in many years. The virulence of this and other strains has led some states and foreign countries to delay or even reverse an easing of certain social activity proscriptions.

 

Impact of the Coronavirus on Our Operations. The highly contagious nature of the coronavirus and its various strains has caused numerous private and public organizations to substantially alter the way in which they operate. In some cases, these workplace and operational alterations have become permanent. Many such organizations have, to the extent possible, required employees to work remotely to reduce opportunities for contagion. We have also taken steps to minimize the exposure of our employees and service providers by allowing all such persons to work from a remote location. We utilize a cloud-based storage and retrieval system for our records and can communicate electronically or by telephone with third parties such as our financial institutions, legal and accounting advisors, and our portfolio companies. Our day-to-day operations and management has not, therefore, been materially affected by the coronavirus pandemic. However, government directives on social distancing and other restrictions and conditions have impaired our ability to travel to attend board meetings, negotiations, and other functions which are endemic to the interpersonal nature of private equity investing. As a consequence, our ability to source new investment prospects, facilitate dispositions of existing portfolio holdings, or consummate a substantial transaction has been constrained by these limitations. Should these disruptions and restrictions continue as a result of the coronavirus, we cannot, therefore, assure you that our operations as a BDC or our efforts to effect a transformative transaction involving Equus will not be materially adversely affected thereby.

 

Impact of Geopolitical Events and the Coronavirus on the Oil and Gas Sector. 2020 witnessed unprecedented systemic events that had a material effect on oil prices globally and continued through the first three quarters of the year. Commencing in the fourth quarter of 2020, crude and natural gas prices began to experience a sustained increase and, as of the date of this filing on Form 10-Q, have recovered to, or have exceeded, pre-pandemic levels. Notwithstanding present pricing conditions and forecasts for the remainder of 2021, operators of the leasehold interests held by Equus Energy have not yet undertaken significant capital expenditures, which could have a material adverse effect upon the operations and long-term financial condition of Equus Energy. To conserve existing cash resources or create additional cash resources during the next year, Equus Energy intends to either: (i) attempt to secure equity or debt financing from one or more institutional sources, which sources may include the Fund, a commercial lender, or other investors, (ii) request that its operators shut-in additional wells, (iii) sell certain of its oil and gas holdings, or (iv) undertake a combination of the foregoing. However, we cannot assure you that Equus Energy will be able to implement these plans successfully, or that such plans will generate sufficient liquidity to fund the operating expenses of Equus Energy over the next twelve-months.

 

 The U.S. Economy. Largely resulting from the economic disruption caused by the coronavirus, the U.S. economy was highly volatile during 2020, but finished the year on a strong upward trend. With the decrease in infection rates and deaths, together with increased vaccination rates and a substantial fiscal stimulus, the U.S. economy began to stabilize, posting annualized increases of 6.4% and 6.7%, respectively, in GDP growth during the first and second quarters of 2021. The rise of the Delta variant and the phasing out of stimulus payments contributed to slowing growth in the third quarter of 2021, which posted an annualized increase of 2.0%, significantly below the Conference Board Economic Forecast of 3.5%. The Conference Board expects U.S. GDP to increase overall by 5.7% for all of 2021, 3.8% for 2022, and 3.0% for 2023. The sector that contributed most significantly to the GDP increase during the first nine months of 2021 was consumer spending, principally driven by additional stimulus checks being delivered in the first and second quarters. (Sources: U.S. Dept. of Commerce Bureau of Economic Analysis, Conference Board Leading Economic Index, CNBC)

 

Employment and Housing. Prior to the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, the U.S. unemployment rate stood at 3.5%, a historic low. The rate peaked at 14.7% in April 2020 and finished the year at 6.7%. The first nine months of 2021 saw this number further reduced to 4.8% as of September 30, 2021. Commensurate with expected strong GDP growth overall in 2021, Goldman Sachs predicts the unemployment rate to be 4.1% by the end of 2021. In keeping with this trend, with the exception of a few months during the height of the pandemic, the U.S. housing market saw robust growth throughout 2020 and into the first nine months of 2021. At the end of the third quarter of 2021, the median home value was $400,000 for the first time in history, and the average sale price during the third quarter of 2021 also set a record at $453,000. Given the escalation in property values, a number of industry analysts have begun to consider if a significant price correction will occur later in 2021 or in 2022. (Sources: U.S. Dept. of Commerce, St. Louis Federal Reserve; Bureau of Labor Statistics, CNBC; Reuters).

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Merger, Acquisition, and Private Equity Activity. Merger and acquisition activity in the first nine months of 2021 totaled $4.3 trillion, a record for a nine month period. KPMG is predicting that total merger and acquisition values for all of 2021 will be $6.0 trillion, which amount would surpass 2019 as the highest ever. A combination of low interest rates and high equity values contributed to this trend, which is expected to continue for the remainder of 2021 and into 2022. (Sources: Bloomberg, Financial Times; Reuters).

 

Private equity firms, special purpose acquisition companies (SPACs) and operating companies accumulated more than $7.6 trillion in cash during 2020 in anticipation of economic fallout from COVID-19. Due to such accumulation, companies were more likely to use their own securities rather than cash as currency in M&A transactions than in prior years. Of particular note is the increased use of SPACs as acquisition vehicles during 2020, which activity hit an all-time high of 317 SPAC transactions during the first quarter of 2021. This number then slowed to 106 and 111 transactions during the second and third quarters, respectively, of 2021, principally due to enhanced SEC scrutiny, but is again expected to gain momentum in the fourth quarter of the year. Private equity firms invested more in underperforming companies than during the 2008-09 market downturn, principally as a result of low capital costs and the anticipated short-term effect of the negative economic fallout from the coronavirus. Private debt and equity funds continued to increase in size, with U.S. debt funds now averaging more than $1.0 billion. The first half of 2021 witnessed a record $580 billion in private equity transactions, with some industry analysts predicting the year 2021 to surpass $1.0 trillion in total private equity deals. Despite this increasing activity, low interest rates and large amounts of undeployed capital from previous have continued to put upward pressure on asset prices and have constrained expected investment yields. (Sources: Pitchbook, Forbes).

 

During the three months ended September 30, 2021, our net asset value increased from $2.57 per share to $2.68 per share, an increase of 4.3%. As of September 30, 2021, our common stock is trading at a 15.5% discount to our net asset value as compared to 36.0% as of December 31, 2020.

 

Over the past several years, we have executed certain initiatives to enhance liquidity, achieve a lower operational cost structure, provide more assistance to portfolio companies and realize certain of our portfolio investments. Specifically, we changed the composition of our Board of Directors and Management, terminated certain of our follow-on investments, internalized the management of the Fund, suspended our managed distribution policy, modified our investment strategy to pursue shorter term liquidation opportunities, pursued non-cash investment opportunities, and sold certain of our legacy and underperforming investment holdings. We believe these actions continue to be necessary to protect capital and liquidity in order to preserve and enhance shareholder value. Because our Management is internalized, certain of our expenses should not increase commensurate with an increase in the size of the Fund and, therefore, to the extent we remain a BDC, we expect to achieve efficiencies in our cost structure if we are able to grow the Fund.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

We generate cash primarily from maturities, sales of securities and borrowings, as well as capital gains realized upon the sale of portfolio investments. We use cash primarily to make additional investments, either in new companies or as follow-on investments in the existing portfolio companies and to pay the dividends to our stockholders.

 

Because of the nature and size of the portfolio investments, we may periodically borrow funds to make qualifying investments to maintain our tax status as a RIC. We often borrow such funds by utilizing a margin account with a securities brokerage firm. There is no assurance that such arrangement will be available in the future. If we are unable to borrow funds to make qualifying investments, Equus may no longer qualify as a RIC. The Fund would then be subject to corporate income tax on its net investment income and realized capital gains, and distributions to stockholders would be subject to income tax as ordinary dividends.

 

The Fund has the ability to borrow funds and issue forms of senior securities representing indebtedness or stock, such as preferred stock, subject to certain restrictions. Net taxable investment income and net taxable realized gains from the sales of portfolio investments are intended to be distributed at least annually, to the extent such amounts are not reserved for payment of expenses and contingencies or to make follow-on or new investments.

 

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We reserve the right to retain net long-term capital gains in excess of net short-term capital losses for reinvestment or to pay contingencies and expenses. Such retained amounts, if any, will be taxable to the Fund as long-term capital gains and stockholders will be able to claim their proportionate share of the federal income taxes paid on such gains as a credit against their own federal income tax liabilities. Stockholders will also be entitled to increase the adjusted tax basis of their Fund shares by the difference between their undistributed capital gains and their tax credit.

 

We are evaluating the impact of current market conditions on our portfolio company valuations and their ability to provide current income. We believe we have followed valuation techniques in a reasonably consistent manner; however, we are cognizant of current market conditions that might affect future valuations of portfolio securities. In view of our present status as a BDC and our anticipated transformation into an operating company, we believe that our operating cash flow and cash on hand will be sufficient to meet operating requirements and to finance routine capital expenditures through the next twelve months.

 

Results of Operations

 

Investment Income and Expense

 

Net investment loss was $0.8 million for the three months ended September 30, 2021 and $0.7 million September 30, 2020, respectively. Net investment loss was $2.5 million and $2.3 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021, and September 30, 2020, respectively

 

Investment income declined to $0.0 million for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021, respectively from $0.1 million and $0.3 million for the three and nine ended September 30, 2020, respectively due to the sale of interest/dividend bearing investments. Total expense was relatively unchanged at $0.8 million for the three months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, respectively and $2.5 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and $2.6 million for the nine months ended September 30, 2020, respectively.

 

Realized Gains and Losses on Sales of Portfolio Securities

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2021, we realized a gain of $0.5 million from the adjustment of the escrow receivable from the sale of PalletOne, Inc.

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2020, we realized a gain of $8.0 thousand from the sale of temporary cash investments.

  

Changes in Unrealized Appreciation/Depreciation of Portfolio Securities

 

 During the nine months ended September 30, 2021, with respect to our holding in Equus Energy, LLC, we recorded an increase in the fair value of $5.0 million and an increase in our cost basis of $0.35 million, resulting in a net change in unrealized appreciation of $4.65 million. Such change in fair value was  principally due to increases in mineral acreage prices and a substantial increase in short-and long-term prices for crude oil and natural gas.  

During the nine months ended September 30, 2020, in connection with our shareholding in MVC Capital, Inc. (“MVC”), we received dividends in the form of additional MVC shares valued at $0.2 million, together with $134,585 in cash.

During the nine months ended September 30, 2020, we recorded a net change in unrealized appreciation of $6.3 million, to a net unrealized appreciation of $19.0 million. Such change in unrealized appreciation resulted primarily from the following changes:

 (i)Decrease in the fair value of our shareholding in MVC of $0.8 million due to a decrease in the share price of MVC which was partially offset by the receipt of dividend payments in the form of additional shares of MVC during the period;

 

 (ii)Decrease in the fair value of our holdings in Equus Energy, LLC of $3.0 million, principally due to decreases in mineral acreage prices and a substantial decrease in the short- and long-term prices for crude oil, which fell from $61.06 per barrel at December 31, 2019 to $20.48 at March 31, 2020, before recovering moderately to $40.22 at September 30, 2020; and

 

 (iii)Decrease in the fair value of our shareholding in PalletOne, Inc. of $2.5 million due to a less favorable outlook for the Company in 2021 and the remainder of 2020.

 

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Dividends

 

We will pay out net investment income and/or realized capital gains, if any, on an annual basis as required under the Investment Company Act of 1940.

 

Portfolio Securities

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2021, we made a follow-on investment of $0.35 million in Equus Energy, LLC.

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2020, we converted into equity $0.6 million in advances we made to Equus Energy, LLC, our wholly-owned subsidiary.

 

Subsequent Events

 

Management performed an evaluation of the Fund’s activity through the date the financial statements were issued, noting the following subsequent event:

 

In October 2021, we received $1.2 million for the cash escrow receivable related to the sale of PalletOne.

 

 

 

 

 

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Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure about Market Risk

 

We are subject to financial market risks, including changes in interest rates with respect to investments in debt securities and outstanding debt payable, as well as changes in marketable equity security prices. In the future, we may invest in companies outside the United States, including in Europe and Asia, which would give rise to exposure to foreign currency value fluctuations. We do not use derivative financial instruments to mitigate any of these risks. The return on investments is generally not affected by foreign currency fluctuations.

 

Our investments in portfolio securities consist of some fixed-rate debt securities. Since the debt securities are generally priced at a fixed rate, changes in interest rates do not directly affect interest income. In addition, changes in market interest rates are not typically a significant factor in the determination of fair value of these debt securities, since the securities are generally held to maturity. We determine their fair values based on the terms of the relevant debt security and the financial condition of the issuer.

 

A major portion of our investment portfolio consists of debt and equity investments in private companies. Modest changes in public market equity prices generally do not significantly impact the estimated fair value of these investments. However, significant changes in market equity prices can have a longer-term effect on valuations of private companies, which could affect the carrying value and the amount and timing of gains or losses realized on these investments. A small portion of the investment portfolio could also consist of common stock in publicly traded companies. These investments are directly exposed to equity price risk, in that a hypothetical ten percent change in these equity prices would result in a similar percentage change in the fair value of these securities.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

 

We maintain disclosure controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Fund in the reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Our management, with the participation of our Fund’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, have evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operations of the Fund’s “disclosure controls and procedures” (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934) as of September 30, 2021. Based on their evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that the Fund’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective at a reasonable assurance level. There has been no change in our internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended September 30, 2021, that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

 

 

 

 

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Part II. Other Information

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings 

From time to time, the Fund is a party to certain proceedings incidental to the normal course of our business including the enforcement of our rights under contracts with our portfolio companies. While the outcome of these legal proceedings cannot at this time be predicted with certainty, we do not expect that these proceedings will have a material effect upon the Fund’s financial condition or results of operations.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

In connection with our efforts to convert Equus into an operating company in furtherance of our plan to convert the Fund into an operating company, we may be subject to a number of risks associated with this process, the transactions that would embody a consolidation of Equus with another company, as well as specific risks associated with the commercial enterprise with which Equus may seek to combine itself. We intend to identify, as will be reasonably possible, such risks and include the same in our subsequent filings and reports with the SEC.

 

Although the U.S. and global economy has begun to show strong signs of recovery, the economic dislocation precipitated by the coronavirus pandemic is still rapidly evolving. As of the date of filing of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q (“10-Q”), we are unable to predict either the potential near-term or longer-term impact that the coronavirus may have on our financial and operating results due to numerous uncertainties regarding the duration and severity of the crisis. To the greatest extent possible, we intend to operate our business in the ordinary course. Nevertheless, the ultimate impact of the coronavirus pandemic is highly uncertain and subject to change, and our business, results of operations, and financial condition have been and will likely continue to be impacted by future developments concerning the pandemic and the resulting economic disruption. We may also seek debt or equity financing to increase our liquidity and availability to make future investments or pursue a transformative transaction.

 

Readers should carefully consider these risks and all other information contained in our annual report on Form 10-K (“10-K”) for the year ended December 31, 2020, including the Fund’s financial statements and the related notes thereto. The risks and uncertainties described in our 10-K and throughout this 10-Q are not the only ones facing the Fund.

 

Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to us, or not presently deemed material by us, may also impair our operations and performance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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 Item 6. Exhibits

3.       Articles of Incorporation or Bylaws

(a)Restated Certificate of Incorporation of the Fund. [Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3(a) to Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 21, 2021]
(b)Certificate of Merger, dated June 30, 1993, between the Fund and Equus Investments Incorporated [Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3(b) to Registrant’s Annual Report on form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2007]
(c)Amended and Restated Bylaws of the Fund [Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3(c) to Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on June 30, 2014]

10.       Material Contracts

(a)Safekeeping Agreement between the Fund and Amegy Bank, dated August 16, 2008. [Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10(c) to Registrant’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011]
(b)Form of Indemnification Agreement between the Fund and its directors and certain officers. [Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10(d) to Registrant’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2011]
(c)Code of Ethics of the Fund (Rule 17j-1). [Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10(f) to Registrant’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009]
(d)2016 Equity Incentive Plan, adopted June 13, 2016. [Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 1 to Registrant’s Definitive Proxy Statement filed on May 5, 2016]

31.       Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Certifications

1.Certification by Chief Executive Officer*
2.Certification by Chief Financial Officer*

32.       Rule 1350 Certifications

1.Certification by Chief Executive Officer*
2.Certification by Chief Financial Officer*

 

* Filed herewith

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SIGNATURE

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has caused this report to be signed by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

 

 

Dated: November 15, 2021

 

 

EQUUS TOTAL RETURN, INC.
 
/s/ John A. Hardy
John A. Hardy
Chief Executive Officer

 

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