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FC Franklin Covey

Filed: 8 Apr 21, 4:20pm

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

[X]QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended February 28, 2021

[   ]TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from __________ to __________

Commission file no. 1-11107

Picture 1

FRANKLIN COVEY CO.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Utah

 

87-0401551

(State of incorporation)

 

(I.R.S. employer identification number)

 

2200 West Parkway Boulevard

 

84119-2099

Salt Lake City, Utah

 

(Zip Code)

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

 

Registrant’s telephone number,

 

(801) 817-1776

Including area code

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of Each Class

Trading Symbol(s)

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $.05 Par Value

FC

New York Stock Exchange

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past

90 days.  Yes T  No  £

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).  Yes  T  No  £

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large Accelerated Filer

£

Accelerated Filer

T

Non-accelerated Filer

£

Smaller Reporting Company

£

Emerging Growth Company

£

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. £

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).   Yes  £  No  T

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of Common Stock as of the latest practicable date:

14,145,630 shares of Common Stock as of March 31, 2021


 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

FRANKLIN COVEY CO.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(in thousands, except per-share amounts)

February 28,

August 31,

2021

2020

(unaudited)

ASSETS

Current assets:

Cash and cash equivalents

$

40,343

$

27,137 

Accounts receivable, less allowance for doubtful accounts of $3,662 and $4,159

41,482

56,407 

Inventories

2,641

2,974 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

15,799

15,146 

Total current assets

100,265

101,664 

Property and equipment, net

13,159

15,723 

Intangible assets, net

44,864

47,125 

Goodwill

24,220

24,220 

Deferred income tax assets

843

1,094 

Other long-term assets

15,378

15,611 

$

198,729

$

205,437 

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

Current liabilities:

Current portion of term notes payable

$

5,000

$

5,000 

Current portion of financing obligation

2,741

2,600 

Accounts payable

5,060

5,622 

Deferred subscription revenue

57,344

59,289 

Other deferred revenue

8,126

7,389 

Accrued liabilities

22,837

22,628 

Total current liabilities

101,108

102,528 

Term notes payable, less current portion

12,500

15,000 

Financing obligation, less current portion

12,638

14,048 

Other liabilities

8,631

9,110 

Deferred income tax liabilities

4,812

5,298 

Total liabilities

139,689

145,984 

Shareholders’ equity:

Common stock, $0.05 par value; 40,000 shares authorized, 27,056 shares issued

1,353

1,353 

Additional paid-in capital

208,816

211,920 

Retained earnings

49,030

49,968 

Accumulated other comprehensive income

915

641 

Treasury stock at cost, 12,915 shares and 13,175 shares

(201,074)

(204,429)

Total shareholders’ equity

59,040

59,453 

$

198,729

$

205,437 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements


2


 

FRANKLIN COVEY CO.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND STATEMENTS

OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

(in thousands, except per-share amounts)

Quarter Ended

Two Quarters Ended

February 28,

February 29,

February 28,

February 29,

2021

2020

2021

2020

(unaudited)

(unaudited)

Net sales

$

48,162 

$

53,745 

$

96,486 

$

112,357 

Cost of sales

10,822 

15,079 

22,760 

31,662 

Gross profit

37,340 

38,666 

73,726 

80,695 

Selling, general, and administrative

33,623 

36,221 

67,306 

75,620 

Depreciation

1,740 

1,653 

3,481 

3,273 

Amortization

1,133 

1,170 

2,265 

2,340 

Income (loss) from operations

844 

(378)

674 

(538)

Interest income

16 

13 

40 

18 

Interest expense

(540)

(557)

(1,108)

(1,162)

Income (loss) before income taxes

320 

(922)

(394)

(1,682)

Income tax benefit (provision)

(366)

2,019 

(544)

2,235 

Net income (loss)

$

(46)

$

1,097 

$

(938)

$

553 

Net income (loss) per share:

Basic and diluted

$

(0.00)

$

0.08 

$

(0.07)

$

0.04 

Weighted average number of common shares:

Basic

14,082 

13,841 

14,029 

13,911 

Diluted

14,082 

13,990 

14,029 

14,118 

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

Net income (loss)

$

(46)

$

1,097 

$

(938)

$

553 

Foreign currency translation adjustments,

net of income taxes of

$0, $0, $0, and $0

(33)

90 

274 

53 

Comprehensive income (loss)

$

(79)

$

1,187 

$

(664)

$

606 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

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FRANKLIN COVEY CO.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(in thousands)

Two Quarters Ended

February 28,

February 29,

2021

2020

(unaudited)

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Net income (loss)

$

(938)

$

553

Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash

provided by operating activities:

Depreciation and amortization

5,746

5,613

Amortization of capitalized curriculum costs

1,750

2,029

Stock-based compensation

2,757

3,644

Deferred income taxes

(198)

(2,012)

Change in fair value of contingent consideration liabilities

46

(91)

Amortization of right-of-use operating lease assets

509

-

Loss on disposal of assets

-

38

Changes in assets and liabilities:

Decrease in accounts receivable, net

14,978

24,556

Decrease in inventories

346

681

Increase in prepaid expenses and other assets

(344)

(180)

Decrease in accounts payable and accrued liabilities

(244)

(6,959)

Decrease in deferred revenue

(1,497)

(8,888)

Decrease in income taxes payable/receivable

(87)

(1,605)

Decrease in other long-term liabilities

(912)

(6)

Net cash provided by operating activities

21,912

17,373

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Purchases of property and equipment

(877)

(2,516)

Curriculum development costs

(1,292)

(2,232)

Purchase of note receivable from bank

-

(2,600)

Net cash used for investing activities

(2,169)

(7,348)

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Proceeds from term notes payable

-

5,000 

Principal payments on term notes payable

(2,500)

(2,500)

Principal payments on financing obligation

(1,269)

(1,139)

Purchases of common stock for treasury

(2,971)

(13,833)

Payment of contingent consideration liabilities

(540)

(911)

Proceeds from sales of common stock held in treasury

464

484

Net cash used for financing activities

(6,816)

(12,899)

Effect of foreign currency exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents

279

(15)

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

13,206

(2,889)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the period

27,137 

27,699 

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the period

$

40,343

$

24,810

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:

Cash paid for income taxes

$

788

$

1,381

Cash paid for interest

1,085

1,144

Non-cash investing and financing activities:

Purchases of property and equipment financed by accounts payable

$

48

$

985

Acquisition of right-of-use operating lease assets for operating lease liabilities

885

-

Use of notes receivable to modify revenue contract

-

3,246 

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

4


 

FRANKLIN COVEY CO.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(in thousands and unaudited)

Accumulated

Common

Common

Additional

Other

Treasury

Treasury

Stock

Stock

Paid-In

Retained

Comprehensive

Stock

Stock

Shares

Amount

Capital

Earnings

Income

Shares

Amount

Balance at August 31, 2020

27,056 

$

1,353 

$

211,920 

$

49,968 

$

641 

(13,175)

$

(204,429)

Issuance of common stock from

treasury

 

 

(3,411)

 

 

236 

3,668 

Purchase of treasury shares

 

 

 

 

 

(89)

(1,530)

Stock-based compensation

 

 

1,158 

 

 

 

 

Cumulative translation

adjustments

 

 

 

 

307 

 

 

Net loss

 

 

 

(892)

 

 

 

Balance at November 30, 2020

27,056 

1,353 

209,667 

49,076 

948 

(13,028)

(202,291)

Issuance of common stock from

 

 

(2,014)

 

 

143 

2,222 

treasury

Purchase of treasury shares

 

 

 

 

 

(58)

(1,441)

Stock-based compensation

 

 

1,599 

 

 

 

 

Restricted stock award

 

 

(436)

 

 

28 

436 

Cumulative translation

adjustments

 

 

 

 

(33)

 

 

Net loss

 

 

 

(46)

 

 

 

Balance at February 28, 2021

27,056 

$

1,353 

$

208,816 

$

49,030 

$

915 

(12,915)

$

(201,074)

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

5


 

FRANKLIN COVEY CO.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY –

PRIOR FISCAL YEAR

(in thousands and unaudited)

Accumulated

Common

Common

Additional

Other

Treasury

Treasury

Stock

Stock

Paid-In

Retained

Comprehensive

Stock

Stock

Shares

Amount

Capital

Earnings

Income

Shares

Amount

Balance at August 31, 2019

27,056 

$

1,353 

$

215,964 

$

59,403 

$

269 

(13,087)

$

(194,975)

Issuance of common stock from

treasury

 

 

131 

 

 

123 

Purchases of common shares

for treasury

 

 

 

 

 

 

(3)

Stock-based compensation

 

 

1,851 

 

 

 

 

Cumulative translation

adjustments

 

 

 

 

(37)

 

 

Net loss

 

 

 

(544)

 

 

 

Balance at November 30, 2019

27,056 

1,353 

217,946 

58,859 

232 

(13,078)

(194,855)

Issuance of common stock from

treasury

 

 

(3,361)

 

 

241 

3,591 

Purchases of common shares

for treasury

 

 

 

 

 

(393)

(13,830)

Stock-based compensation

 

 

1,793 

 

 

 

 

Restricted stock award

 

 

(333)

 

 

21 

333 

Cumulative translation

adjustments

 

 

 

 

90 

 

 

Net income

 

 

 

1,097 

 

 

 

Balance at February 29, 2020

27,056 

$

1,353 

$

216,045 

$

59,956 

$

322 

(13,209)

$

(204,761)

See notes to condensed consolidated financial statements

6


 

FRANKLIN COVEY CO.

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(unaudited)

NOTE 1 – BASIS OF PRESENTATION

General

Franklin Covey Co. (hereafter referred to as us, we, our, or the Company) is a global company focused on organizational performance improvement. Our mission is to “enable greatness in people and organizations everywhere,” and our global structure is designed to help individuals and organizations achieve sustained superior performance through changes in human behavior. We are fundamentally a content and solutions company, and we believe that our offerings and services create the connection between capabilities and results. We have a wide range of content delivery options, including: the All Access Pass (AAP), the Leader in Me membership, and other intellectual property licenses, digital online learning, on-site training, training led through certified facilitators, blended learning, and organization-wide transformational processes, including consulting and coaching. We believe our investments in digital delivery modalities over the past few years have enabled us to deliver our content to clients in a high-quality learning environment whether those clients are working remotely or in a centralized location. We believe that our clients are able to utilize our content to create cultures whose hallmarks are high-performing, collaborative individuals, led by effective, trust-building leaders who execute with excellence and deliver measurably improved results for all of their key stakeholders.

We have some of the best-known offerings in the training industry, including a suite of individual-effectiveness and leadership-development training content based on the best-selling books, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, The Speed of Trust, The Leader in Me, and The 4 Disciplines of Execution, and proprietary content in the areas of Execution, Sales Performance, Productivity, Educational Improvement, and Customer Loyalty. Our offerings are described in further detail at www.franklincovey.com. The information posted on our website is not incorporated into this report.

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements reflect, in the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring accruals) necessary to present fairly the financial position and results of operations of the Company as of the dates and for the periods indicated. Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America have been condensed or omitted pursuant to Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) rules and regulations. The information included in this quarterly report on Form 10-Q should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes included in our annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2020.

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the dates of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

The results of operations for the quarter and two quarters ended February 28, 2021 are not necessarily indicative of results expected for the entire fiscal year ending August 31, 2021, or for any future periods.

Note on the COVID-19 Pandemic

With the rapid spread of COVID-19 around the world and the continuously evolving responses to the pandemic, we have witnessed the significant and growing negative impact of COVID-19 on the global economic and operating environment. These negative impacts significantly reduced our consolidated sales during the quarter and two quarters ended February 28, 2021 as workplaces and schools remained closed in response to the pandemic. In light of these events, we have taken measures to reduce our costs and to maintain adequate liquidity. However, due to the rapidly changing business and education environment, unprecedented market volatility, and other circumstances resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently unable to fully determine the extent of COVID-19’s impact on our business in future periods. Our business in future periods will be heavily influenced by the timing, length, and intensity of the economic recoveries in the United States and in other countries around the world. We continue to monitor evolving economic and

7


 

general business conditions and the actual and potential impacts on our financial position, results of operations, and cash flows.

Accounting Pronouncements Issued and Adopted

Credit Losses on Financial Instruments

On September 1, 2020, we adopted Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2016-13, Financial Instruments-Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments (Topic 326). This new standard is intended to improve financial reporting by requiring more timely recognition of credit losses on our trade accounts receivable and requires the measurement of all expected credit losses based on historical experience, current economic conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts. The adoption of this ASU did not have a material impact on our condensed consolidated financial statements and disclosures. For further information on our receivables, refer to Note 3, Receivables.

Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement

On September 1, 2020, we adopted ASU No. 2018-15, Intangibles—Goodwill and Other—Internal-Use Software (Subtopic 350-40): Customer's Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That Is a Service Contract (ASU 2018-15). This guidance clarifies the accounting for implementation costs in a cloud computing arrangement that is a service contract and aligns the requirements for capitalizing those costs with the capitalization requirements for costs incurred to develop or obtain internal-use software. The Company adopted ASU 2018-15 on a prospective basis and the adoption of this new standard did not have a material impact on our condensed consolidated financial statements or disclosures.

Accounting Pronouncements Issued and Not Yet Adopted

In December 2019, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued ASU No. 2019-12, Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes (ASU 2019-12), which simplifies the accounting for income taxes, eliminates certain exceptions within ASC 740, Income Taxes, and clarifies certain aspects of the current guidance to promote consistency among reporting entities. The guidance in ASU 2019-12 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, although early adoption is permitted. Most amendments within the standard are required to be applied on a prospective basis, while certain amendments must be applied on a retrospective or modified retrospective basis. We are currently evaluating the impact of the provisions of ASU 2019-12 on our consolidated financial statements.

NOTE 2 – INVENTORIES

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or net realizable value, cost being determined using the first-in, first-out method, and were comprised of the following (in thousands):

February 28,

August 31,

2021

2020

Finished goods

$

2,612

$

2,947 

Raw materials

29

27 

$

2,641

$

2,974 

NOTE 3 – RECEIVABLES

Our trade accounts receivable are recorded at net realizable value, which includes an allowance for estimated credit losses as described in Note 1, Basis of Presentation. Under the guidance found in ASC Topic 326, the “expected credit loss” model replaces the previous “incurred loss” model and requires consideration of a broader range of information to estimate expected credit losses over the lives of our trade accounts receivable. Our prior methodology for estimating credit losses on our trade accounts receivable did not differ significantly from the new requirements of Topic 326.

8


 

We maintain an allowance for credit losses related to our trade accounts receivable for future expected credit losses resulting from the inability or unwillingness of our customers to make required payments. We estimate the allowance based upon historical bad debts, current customer receivable balances, age of customer receivable balances and the customers’ financial condition in relation to a representative pool of assets consisting of customers with similar risk characteristics. The allowance is adjusted as appropriate to reflect differences in current conditions as well as changes in forecasted macroeconomic conditions. Receivables that do not share risk characteristics are evaluated on an individual basis, including those associated with customers that have a higher probability of default. Our estimate of credit losses includes expected current and future economic and market conditions surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, which did not significantly impact our allowance. We do not have a significant amount of notes or other receivables.

The following provides a reconciliation of the activity in our allowance for estimated credit losses during the quarter and two quarters ended February 28, 2021 (in thousands):

Balance at August 31, 2020

$

4,159 

Charged to costs and expenses

247 

Amounts written off

(655)

Balance at November 30, 2020

3,751 

Charged to costs and expenses

46

Amounts written off

(135)

Balance at February 28, 2021

$

3,662

No customer represented more than 10 percent of our total trade receivables balance at February 28, 2021 or August 31, 2020. Recoveries of amounts previously written off were immaterial for the periods presented.

NOTE 4 – FAIR VALUE OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

At February 28, 2021, the carrying value of our financial instruments approximated their fair values. The fair values of our contingent consideration liabilities from previous business acquisitions are considered “Level 3” measurements because we use various estimates in the valuation models to project the timing and amount of future contingent payments. The fair value of the contingent consideration liabilities from the acquisitions of Jhana Education (Jhana) and Robert Gregory Partners (RGP) changed as follows during the quarter and two quarters ended February 28, 2021 (in thousands):

Jhana

RGP

Total

Balance at August 31, 2020

$

3,067 

$

816 

$

3,883 

Change in fair value

80 

(18)

62 

Payments

(329)

-

(329)

Balance at November 30, 2020

2,818 

798 

3,616 

Change in fair value

34

(50)

(16)

Payments

(211)

-

(211)

Balance at February 28, 2021

$

2,641

$

748

$

3,389

At each quarterly reporting date, we estimate the fair value of the contingent liabilities from both the Jhana and RGP acquisitions through the use of Monte Carlo simulations. Based on the timing of expected payments, $1.1 million of the Jhana and all of the RGP contingent consideration liabilities were recorded as components of accrued liabilities at February 28, 2021. The remaining $1.5 million of the Jhana contingent consideration liability is reported in other long-term liabilities. Adjustments to the fair value of our contingent consideration liabilities are included in selling, general, and administrative expense in the accompanying condensed consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss).

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NOTE 5 – REVENUE RECOGNITION

Contract Balances

Our deferred revenue totaled $67.5 million at February 28, 2021 and $68.9 million at August 31, 2020, of which $2.0 million and $2.2 million were classified as components of other long-term liabilities at February 28, 2021, and August 31, 2020, respectively. The amount of deferred revenue that was generated from subscription offerings totaled $58.5 million at February 28, 2021 and $60.6 million at August 31, 2020. During the quarter and two quarters ended February 28, 2021, we recognized $22.9 million and $44.6 million of previously deferred subscription revenue.

Remaining Performance Obligations

When possible, we enter into multi-year non-cancellable contracts which are invoiced either upon execution of the contract or at the beginning of each annual contract period. Remaining transaction price represents contracted revenue that has not yet been recognized, including unearned revenue and unbilled amounts that will be recognized as revenue in future periods. Transaction price is influenced by factors such as seasonality, the average length of the contract term, and the ability of the Company to continue to enter multi-year non-cancellable contracts. At February 28, 2021, we had $95.9 million of remaining performance obligations, including the amount of deferred revenue related to our subscription offerings. The remaining performance obligation does not include other deferred revenue, as amounts included in other deferred revenue include items such as deposits that are generally refundable at the client’s request prior to the satisfaction of the obligation.

Disaggregated Revenue Information

Refer to Note 9, Segment Information, to these condensed consolidated financial statements for our disaggregated revenue information.

NOTE 6 – STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION

Our stock-based compensation was comprised of the following for the periods presented (in thousands):

Quarter Ended

Two Quarters Ended

February 28,

February 29,

February 28,

February 29,

2021

2020

2021

2020

Long-term incentive awards

$

1,368

$

1,566 

$

2,314

$

3,201 

Restricted stock awards

175

175 

350

350 

Employee stock purchase plan

56

52 

93

93 

$

1,599

$

1,793 

$

2,757

$

3,644 

For the quarter and two quarters ended February 28, 2021, we issued 170,992 shares and 407,125 shares, respectively, of our common stock under various stock-based compensation arrangements, including our employee stock purchase plan (ESPP). Our stock-based compensation plans also allow shares to be withheld to cover statutory income taxes if so elected by the award recipient. During the quarter and two quarters ended February 28, 2021, we withheld 58,388 shares and 147,092 shares of our common stock for taxes on stock-based compensation arrangements, which had a total fair value of $3.0 million.

Due to the significant impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our results of operations in the third quarter of fiscal 2020 and uncertainties surrounding the economic recovery from the pandemic, we determined that the long-term incentive plan (LTIP) award tranches which vest based on qualified adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization (Adjusted EBITDA) for our various LTIP awards would not vest before the end of their respective service periods. On October 2, 2020, the Organization and Compensation Committee (the Compensation Committee) of the Board of Directors modified the terms of our performance-based LTIP award tranches to extend the service period of each tranche by two years and increase each Adjusted EBITDA vesting target by $2.0 million. No time-based vesting LTIP tranches were modified. During the first quarter of fiscal 2021, we reassessed the probability that the modified award tranches would vest and concluded the modified award tranches would vest prior to the end of their respective service

10


 

periods. We accounted for the modifications in accordance with the applicable accounting guidance and are recognizing compensation cost for awards expected to vest over the remaining service period of each award.

Stock Options

On January 12, 2021, our Chief Executive Officer (CEO) exercised his remaining stock options, which would have expired on January 14, 2021. The following information applies to our stock options through February 28, 2021 (in thousands):

Weighted

Avg. Exercise

Number of

Price Per

Stock Options

Share

Outstanding at August 31, 2020

218,750 

$

11.57 

Granted

-

-

Exercised

(218,750)

(11.57)

Forfeited

-

-

Outstanding at February 28, 2021

-

$

-

Options vested and exercisable at

February 28, 2021

-

$

-

The stock options were exercised on a net basis (no cash was paid to exercise the options) and we withheld 51,738 shares of our common stock with a fair value of $1.3 million for income taxes. The intrinsic value of the exercised options totaled $2.9 million and we recognized an income tax benefit of $0.7 million during the second quarter of fiscal 2021.

Fiscal 2021 Restricted Stock Award

Our annual restricted stock award granted to non-employee members of the Board of Directors is administered under the terms of the 2019 Franklin Covey Co. Omnibus Incentive Plan, and is designed to provide our non-employee directors, who are not eligible to participate in our employee stock purchase plan, an opportunity to obtain an interest in the Company through the acquisition of shares of our common stock. The annual award is granted in January (following the annual shareholders’ meeting) of each year. For the fiscal 2020 award, each eligible director received a whole-share grant equal to $100,000 with a one year vesting period. Our restricted stock award activity during the two quarters ended February 28, 2021 consisted of the following:

Weighted-Average

Grant Date

Number of

Fair Value

Shares

Per Share

Restricted stock awards at

August 31, 2020

21,420 

$

32.68 

Granted

28,049 

24.96 

Forfeited

-

-

Vested

(21,420)

32.68 

Restricted stock awards at

February 28, 2021

28,049 

$

24.96 

At February 28, 2021, there was $0.6 million of unrecognized compensation expense remaining on the fiscal 2021 Board of Director restricted share award.

11


 

Fiscal 2021 Long-Term Incentive Plan Award

On October 2, 2020, the Compensation Committee granted a new LTIP award to our executive officers and members of senior management. The fiscal 2021 LTIP award has 2 tranches, 1 with a time-based vesting condition and 1 with a performance-based vesting condition as described below:

Time-Based Award Shares – NaN percent of the 2021 LTIP award shares vest to participants on August 31, 2023. The total number of shares that may be earned by participants at the end of the service period totals 52,696 shares. The number of shares awarded in this tranche does not fluctuate based on the achievement of financial measures.

Performance-Based Award Shares – The remaining tranche of the fiscal 2021 LTIP award is based on the highest rolling four-quarter level of qualified Adjusted EBITDA in the three-year period ending August 31, 2023. The number of shares that will vest to participants for this tranche is variable and may be 50 percent of the award (minimum award threshold) or up to 200 percent of the participant’s award (maximum threshold) depending on the level of qualified Adjusted EBITDA achieved. The number of shares that may be earned for achieving 100 percent of the performance-based objective totals 158,088 shares. The maximum number of shares that may be awarded in connection with the performance-based tranche of the 2021 LTIP totals 316,176 shares.

Employee Stock Purchase Plan

We have an employee stock purchase plan that offers qualified employees the opportunity to purchase shares of our common stock at a price equal to 85 percent of the average fair market value of our common stock on the last trading day of each fiscal quarter. During the quarter and two quarters ended February 28, 2021, we issued 11,045 shares and 26,142 shares of our common stock to participants in the ESPP.

NOTE 7 – INCOME TAXES

For the two quarters ended February 28, 2021, we recorded income tax expense of $0.5 million on a pre-tax loss of $0.4 million, resulting in an effective tax expense rate of approximately 138 percent for the first half of fiscal 2021. Our effective tax rate was adversely affected by an increase in the valuation allowance against deferred income tax assets, non-deductible executive compensation, and certain other non-deductible expenses, which were partially offset by the favorable impact of the exercise of stock options during the second quarter of fiscal 2021 (Note 6). We computed our income tax provision for the first two quarters of fiscal 2021 using the discrete method, applying the actual year-to-date effective tax rate to our pre-tax loss. We believe that this method yields a more reliable income tax calculation for the reported period. We believe the estimated annual effective tax rate method is not reasonable due to its sensitivity to small changes in forecasted annual income or loss before income taxes, which would result in significant variations in the customary relationship between income tax expense and pre-tax income or loss for interim periods.


12


 

NOTE 8 – INCOME (LOSS) PER SHARE

The following schedule shows the calculation of income (loss) per share for the periods presented (in thousands, except per-share amounts).

Quarter Ended

Two Quarters Ended

February 28,

February 29,

February 28,

February 29,

2021

2020

2021

2020

Numerator for basic and

diluted loss per share:

Net income (loss)

$

(46)

$

1,097 

$

(938)

$

553 

Denominator for basic and

diluted loss per share:

Basic weighted average shares

outstanding

14,082

13,841 

14,029

13,911 

Effect of dilutive securities:

Stock options and other

stock-based awards

-

149 

-

207 

Diluted weighted average

shares outstanding

14,082

13,990 

14,029

14,118 

EPS Calculations:

Net income (loss) per share:

Basic and diluted

$

(0.00)

$

0.08 

$

(0.07)

$

0.04 

Since we incurred a net loss for the quarter ended February 28, 2021, 0 potentially dilutive securities are included in the calculation of diluted loss per share for the quarter because such effect would be anti-dilutive. The number of dilutive stock options and other stock-based awards as of February 28, 2021 would have been approximately 71,000 shares.

NOTE 9 – SEGMENT INFORMATION

Segment Information

Our sales are primarily comprised of training and consulting services and our internal reporting and operating structure is currently organized around 2 divisions. The Enterprise Division, which consists of our Direct Office and International Licensee segments and the Education Division, which is comprised of our Education practice. Based on the applicable guidance, our operations are comprised of 3 reportable segments and 1 corporate services group. The following is a brief description of our reportable segments:

Direct Offices – Our Direct Office segment has a depth of expertise in helping organizations solve problems that require changes in human behavior, including leadership, productivity, execution, trust, and sales performance. We have a variety of principle-based offerings that help build winning and profitable cultures. This segment includes our sales personnel that serve the United States and Canada; our international sales offices located in Japan, China, the United Kingdom, Australia, Germany, Switzerland, and Austria; our government services sales channel; and our book and audio sales.

International Licensees – Our independently owned international licensees provide our offerings and services in countries where we do not have a directly-owned office. These licensee partners allow us to expand the reach of our services to large multinational organizations as well as smaller organizations in their countries. This segment’s results are primarily comprised of royalty revenues received from these licensees.

Education Practice – Centered around the principles found in The Leader in Me, the Education practice is dedicated to helping educational institutions build a culture that will produce great results. We believe these results are manifested by increases in student performance, improved school culture, decreased disciplinary issues, and increased teacher engagement and parental involvement. This segment includes our domestic and

13


 

international Education practice operations, which are focused on sales to educational institutions such as elementary schools, high schools, and colleges and universities.

Corporate and Other – Our corporate and other information includes leasing operations, shipping and handling revenues, royalty revenues from Franklin Planner Corp., and certain corporate administrative functions.

We have determined that the Company’s chief operating decision maker is the CEO, and the primary measurement tool used in business unit performance analysis is Adjusted EBITDA, which may not be calculated as similarly titled amounts disclosed by other companies. Adjusted EBITDA is a non-GAAP financial measure. For reporting purposes, our consolidated Adjusted EBITDA may be calculated as net income (loss) excluding interest expense, income taxes, depreciation expense, amortization expense, stock-based compensation, and certain other charges such as adjustments for changes in the fair value of contingent liabilities arising from business acquisitions. We reference this non-GAAP financial measure in our decision making because it provides supplemental information that facilitates consistent internal comparisons to the historical operating performance of prior periods and we believe it provides investors with greater transparency to evaluate operational activities and financial results.

Our operations are not capital intensive and we do not own any manufacturing facilities or equipment. Accordingly, we do not allocate assets to the reportable segments for analysis purposes. Interest expense and interest income are primarily generated at the corporate level and are not allocated. Income taxes are likewise calculated and paid on a corporate level (except for entities that operate in foreign jurisdictions) and are not allocated for analysis purposes.


14


 

We account for the following segment information on the same basis as the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements (in thousands).

Sales to

Quarter Ended

External

Adjusted

February 28, 2021

Customers

Gross Profit

EBITDA

Enterprise Division:

Direct offices

$

35,738

$

29,084

$

6,131

International licensees

2,429

2,100

1,505

38,167

31,184

7,636

Education practice

8,478

5,344

(858)

Corporate and eliminations

1,517

812

(1,655)

Consolidated

$

48,162

$

37,340

$

5,123

Quarter Ended

February 29, 2020

Enterprise Division:

Direct offices

$

37,973 

$

28,702 

$

4,734 

International licensees

2,691 

2,237 

1,384 

40,664 

30,939 

6,118 

Education practice

10,893 

6,460 

(1,068)

Corporate and eliminations

2,188 

1,267 

(994)

Consolidated

$

53,745 

$

38,666 

$

4,056 

Two Quarters Ended

February 28, 2021

Enterprise Division:

Direct offices

$

72,481

$

58,523

$

12,827

International licensees

5,026

4,385

2,795

77,507

62,908

15,622

Education practice

15,975

9,331

(3,142)

Corporate and eliminations

3,004

1,487

(3,641)

Consolidated

$

96,486

$

73,726

$

8,839

Two Quarters Ended

February 29, 2020

Enterprise Division:

Direct offices

$

80,085 

$

60,113 

$

10,444 

International licensees

6,411 

5,357 

3,419 

86,496 

65,470 

13,863 

Education practice

21,974 

13,117 

(2,171)

Corporate and eliminations

3,887 

2,108 

(2,675)

Consolidated

$

112,357 

$

80,695 

$

9,017 


15


 

A reconciliation of our consolidated Adjusted EBITDA to consolidated net income (loss) is provided below (in thousands).

Quarter Ended

Two Quarters Ended

February 28,

February 29,

February 28,

February 29,

2021

2020

2021

2020

Segment Adjusted EBITDA

$

6,778 

$

5,050 

$

12,480 

$

11,692 

Corporate expenses

(1,655)

(994)

(3,641)

(2,675)

Consolidated Adjusted EBITDA

5,123 

4,056 

8,839 

9,017 

Stock-based compensation

(1,599)

(1,793)

(2,757)

(3,644)

Increase (decrease) in the fair value of

contingent consideration liabilities

16 

182 

(46)

91 

Government COVID-19 assistance

27 

-

234 

-

Knowledge Capital wind-down costs

-

-

-

(389)

Gain from insurance settlement

150 

-

150 

-

Depreciation

(1,740)

(1,653)

(3,481)

(3,273)

Amortization

(1,133)

(1,170)

(2,265)

(2,340)

Income (loss) from operations

844 

(378)

674 

(538)

Interest income

16 

13 

40 

18 

Interest expense

(540)

(557)

(1,108)

(1,162)

Income (loss) before income taxes

320 

(922)

(394)

(1,682)

Income tax benefit (provision)

(366)

2,019 

(544)

2,235 

Net income (loss)

$

(46)

$

1,097 

$

(938)

$

553 

Revenue by Category

The following table presents our revenue disaggregated by geographic region (in thousands).

Quarter Ended

Two Quarters Ended

February 28,

February 29,

February 28,

February 29,

2021

2020

2021

2020

Americas

$

38,828

$

42,721 

$

77,155

$

86,756 

Asia Pacific

6,622

7,089 

13,428

17,228 

Europe/Middle East/Africa

2,712

3,935 

5,903

8,373 

$

48,162

$

53,745 

$

96,486

$

112,357 


16


 

The following table presents our revenue disaggregated by type of service (in thousands).

Quarter Ended

Services and

Leases and

February 28, 2021

Products

Subscriptions

Royalties

Other

Consolidated

Enterprise Division:

Direct offices

$

17,912

$

17,132

$

694

$

-

$

35,738

International licensees

522

-

1,907

-

2,429

18,434

17,132

2,601

-

38,167

Education practice

1,797

5,731

950

-

8,478

Corporate and eliminations

-

-

373

1,144

1,517

Consolidated

$

20,231

$

22,863

$

3,924

$

1,144

$

48,162

Quarter Ended

February 29, 2020

Enterprise Division:

Direct offices

$

21,644 

$

15,172 

$

1,157 

$

-

$

37,973 

International licensees

410 

-

2,281 

-

2,691 

22,054 

15,172 

3,438 

-

40,664 

Education practice

2,950 

6,192 

1,751 

-

10,893 

Corporate and eliminations

-

-

935 

1,253 

2,188 

Consolidated

$

25,004 

$

21,364 

$

6,124 

$

1,253 

$

53,745 

Two Quarters Ended

February 28, 2021

Enterprise Division:

Direct offices

$

37,323

$

33,747

$

1,411

$

-

$

72,481

International licensees

854

-

4,172

-

5,026

38,177

33,747

5,583

-

77,507

Education practice

3,721

10,805

1,449

-

15,975

Corporate and eliminations

-

-

708

2,296

3,004

Consolidated

$

41,898

$

44,552

$

7,740

$

2,296

$

96,486

Two Quarters Ended

February 29, 2020

Enterprise Division:

Direct offices

$

48,895 

$

29,461 

$

1,729 

$

-

$

80,085 

International licensees

1,000 

-

5,411 

-

6,411 

49,895 

29,461 

7,140 

-

86,496 

Education practice

6,535 

13,010 

2,429 

-

21,974 

Corporate and eliminations

-

-

1,314 

2,573 

3,887 

Consolidated

$

56,430 

$

42,471 

$

10,883 

$

2,573 

$

112,357 


17


 

ITEM 2.MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Management’s discussion and analysis contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements are based upon management’s current expectations and are subject to various uncertainties and changes in circumstances. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in forward-looking statements are set forth below under the heading “Safe Harbor Statement Under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.”

We suggest that the following discussion and analysis be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2020.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Overview

Franklin Covey Co. is a global company focused on individual and organizational performance improvement. We believe that our content and services create the connection between capabilities and results. Our business is currently structured around two divisions, the Enterprise Division and the Education Division. The Enterprise Division consists of our Direct Office and International Licensee segments and is focused on selling our offerings to corporations, governments, not-for-profits, and other related organizations. Franklin Covey offerings delivered through the Enterprise Division are designed to help organizations and individuals achieve their own great results. Our Education Division is centered around the principles found in The Leader in Me and is dedicated to helping educational institutions build cultures that will produce great results, including increased student performance, improved school culture, and increased parental and teacher involvement.

We are very pleased with the Company’s second quarter and fiscal 2021 year-to-date results. Our strong performance during the second quarter of fiscal 2021 reflects the continuation of four key trends that have been evident throughout the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. These trends include:

Strong growth of All Access Pass sales. All Access pass sales increased 13 percent in the second quarter of fiscal 2021, 14 percent in the first two quarters of fiscal 2021, and 15 percent over the four quarters ended February 28, 2021 when compared with the corresponding pre-pandemic periods of fiscal 2020.

Growth of All Access Pass related services. Sales of All Access Pass related services in the second quarter were even higher than add-on sales in last year’s pre-pandemic second quarter, reflecting the strong bookings of services in prior quarters, and the Company’s capabilities to deliver services live-online and digitally.

International sales are improving. Sales in our international direct offices and through our international licensee partners continued to strengthen in the second quarter.

Education Division performance is expected to improve. Despite the challenging environment for education, booking trends in the Education Division strengthened in the second quarter, even compared with the second quarter of fiscal 2020.

Over the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have been able to mitigate some of the effects of reduced sales through improved gross margins as subscription revenues increase in the overall mix of services and products sold, and through focused efforts to reduce operating expenses. As certain areas of our operations continue to recover, we believe the strength of our subscription based offerings and services led the Company to higher levels of profitability and cash flows than in the pre-pandemic second quarter of fiscal 2020. We believe these trends will continue through the remainder of fiscal 2021 and will produce improved earnings and cash flows compared with the prior year.

18


 

The following is a summary of financial highlights for the second quarter of fiscal 2021:

SalesOur consolidated sales for the second quarter of fiscal 2021 totaled $48.2 million, compared with $53.7 million in the pre-pandemic quarter ended February 29, 2020. While our consolidated sales were adversely impacted in certain areas by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, we were pleased with the continued strength of our All Access Pass and Leader in Me subscription-based services. During the second quarter of fiscal 2021, AAP sales increased 13 percent compared with the second quarter of the prior year and annual revenue retention remained strong at greater than 90 percent. The pivot to online delivery continued in the second quarter and our booking pace in the U.S/Canada recovered to be higher than the prior year. However, increased All Access Pass and related sales did not fully offset fewer coaching and consulting days delivered in the Education Division, cancelation of Education Division Symposium events in fiscal 2021, decreased materials sales, and decreased international direct office revenues. As we begin the second half of fiscal 2021 we are beginning to see signs of recovery in many of these areas as companies, schools, and individuals are adapting, and the positive effect of vaccinations is enabling certain economies to open and recover. We remain optimistic about the future and look forward to continued recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal 2021.

At February 28, 2021, we had $58.5 million of deferred subscription revenue on our balance sheet, a 22%, or $10.6 million, increase compared with deferred subscription revenue on our balance sheet at February 29, 2020. At February 28, 2021, we had $37.4 million of unbilled deferred revenue compared with $34.8 million of unbilled deferred revenue at February 29, 2020. Unbilled deferred revenue represents business that is contracted but unbilled (primarily from multiyear contracts), and excluded from our balance sheet.

Cost of Sales/Gross Profit – Our cost of sales totaled $10.8 million for the quarter ended February 28, 2021, compared with $15.1 million in the second quarter of fiscal 2020. Gross profit for the second quarter of fiscal 2021 was $37.3 million compared with $38.7 million in fiscal 2020. Our gross margin for the quarter ended February 28, 2021 improved 559 basis points to 77.5 percent of sales compared with 71.9 percent in the second quarter of the prior year, reflecting the continued increase in subscription revenues in the mix of overall sales when compared with the prior year. The decline in gross profit was primarily due to decreased sales as described above.

Operating Expenses – Our operating expenses for the quarter ended February 28, 2021 decreased $2.5 million compared with the quarter ended February 29, 2020, which was primarily due to decreased selling, general, and administrative (SG&A) expenses. Decreased SG&A expense was primarily related to decreased travel, entertainment, and marketing; decreased associate costs; and cost savings from the successful implementation of expense reduction initiatives in various areas of the Company’s operations during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Income Taxes – For the quarter ended February 28, 2021, we recorded $0.4 million of income tax expense on pre-tax income of $0.3 million, resulting in an effective tax expense rate of 114 percent compared with an effective benefit rate of 219 percent in the prior year. Our effective tax rate during the second quarter of fiscal 2021 was primarily impacted by an increase in the valuation allowance against our deferred income tax assets, which was partially offset by the exercise of stock options during the quarter. The income tax benefit recognized in the second quarter of the prior year was primarily the result of stock options exercised during the second quarter of fiscal 2020.

Operating Income and Net Loss – As a result of improved gross margins and decreased SG&A expenses, our income from operations for the quarter ended February 28, 2021 was $0.8 million compared with a loss of $(0.4) million in the prior year. For the second quarter of fiscal 2021 we recognized a net loss of $(46,000), or $(0.00) per share, compared with net income of $1.1 million, or $0.08 per diluted share, in the second quarter of the prior year, reflecting the factors noted above.

19


 

Cash Flows from Operating Activities – Our cash flows from operating activities increased 26 percent to $21.9 million for the two quarters ended February 28, 2021, compared with $17.4 million in the first half of fiscal 2020. At February 28, 2021, we had $40.3 million of cash with no borrowings on our $15.0 million secured line of credit facility.

Further details regarding our results for the quarter and two quarters ended February 28, 2021 are provided throughout the following management’s discussion and analysis.

Quarter Ended February 28, 2021 Compared with the Quarter Ended February 29, 2020

Enterprise Division

Direct Offices Segment

The Direct Office segment includes our sales personnel that serve clients in the United States and Canada; our directly owned international offices in Japan, China, the United Kingdom, Australia, and our offices in Germany, Switzerland, and Austria (GSA); and other groups such as our government services office and books and audio sales. The following comparative information is for our Direct Offices segment for the periods indicated (in thousands):

Quarter Ended

Quarter Ended

February 28,

% of

February 29,

% of

2021

Sales

2020

Sales

Change

Sales

$

35,738

100.0

$

37,973

100.0 

$

(2,235)

Cost of sales

6,654

18.6

9,271

24.4

(2,617)

Gross profit

29,084

81.4

28,702

75.6

382

SG&A expenses

22,953

64.2

23,968

63.1

(1,015)

Adjusted EBITDA

$

6,131

17.2

$

4,734

12.5

$

1,397

Sales. During the second quarter of fiscal 2021 our All Access Pass subscription revenues remained strong and increased 13 percent over the second quarter of fiscal 2020, while annual AAP revenue retention remained above 90 percent. We continue to be encouraged by the durability of AAP sales as clients have transitioned to and effectively utilized the digital delivery options available through the All Access Pass. As a result of this successful transition, our invoiced add-on services are recovering and exceeded the prior year in the U.S. and Canada. However, our facilitator material sales continue to be adversely impacted by the pandemic and declined $2.0 million compared with the prior year. Our foreign direct offices also continue to be impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic as governmental mandates limited gatherings, business activity, and training opportunities. During the second quarter of fiscal 2021, sales through our foreign direct offices decreased $1.2 million or 15 percent, compared with the prior year. Sales decreased at each of our international direct offices except China, which increased sales by $1.3 million over the prior year. Our sales in China during the second quarter of the prior year were significantly reduced by in-country restrictions imposed prior to the global spread of COVID-19, and our office in China has emerged from pandemic earlier in fiscal 2021 than our other international offices. We remain confident that our international direct offices will continue to recover during the remainder of fiscal 2021. Foreign exchange rates had a $0.4 million favorable impact on our Direct Office sales and an immaterial impact on operating income during the second quarter of fiscal 2021. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, we expect that our foreign Direct Offices will accelerate their transition to the All Access Pass in future periods, especially in China and Japan. While we are optimistic about the future of our direct office channel and AAP revenues, our future Direct Office financial performance is highly dependent upon economic recovery from the pandemic, including the opening of national and regional economies and other factors which may not be within in our control.

Gross Profit. Gross profit increased primarily due to increased recognition of previously deferred subscription services revenues in the mix of overall sales, which also increased Direct Office gross margin percentage when compared with the prior year.

SG&A Expense. Decreased Direct Office SG&A expense was primarily due to reduced travel and entertainment expense; decreased marketing expense; reduced associate expense; and cost savings initiatives which were implemented as a result of the pandemic.

20


 

International Licensees Segment

In foreign locations where we do not have a directly owned office, our training and consulting services are delivered through independent licensees. The following comparative information is for our international licensee operations for the periods indicated (in thousands):

Quarter Ended

Quarter Ended

February 28,

% of

February 29,

% of

2021

Sales

2020

Sales

Change

Sales

$

2,429

100.0

$

2,691

100.0 

$

(262)

Cost of sales

329

13.5

454

16.9

(125)

Gross profit

2,100

86.5

2,237

83.1

(137)

SG&A expenses

595

24.5

853

31.7

(258)

Adjusted EBITDA

$

1,505

62.0

$

1,384

51.4

$

121

Sales. International licensee revenues are primarily comprised of royalty revenues. Prior to the onset of the pandemic, our licensee operations had not established strong subscription businesses and were heavily reliant on live, onsite presentations. As live gatherings became prohibited by national and local ordinances to curb the spread of COVID-19, our international licensee revenues decreased significantly as the licensees’ clients sought to adapt to the rapidly changing circumstances in their countries. Despite the ongoing difficulties associated with the pandemic and the varying impacts on each country’s business environment, we continue to be encouraged by the recovery of our licensee operations as they are adapting to conditions, improving digital delivery capabilities, and increasing sales of the All Access Pass. During the second quarter of fiscal 2021, our royalty revenues decreased 16 percent compared with the prior year, which was partially offset by a 97 percent increase in our share of revenues from sales of the All Access Pass. We receive additional revenue from the international licensees for AAP sales to cover a portion of the costs of operating the AAP portal. The continued recovery of our licensee segment is highly dependent upon the re-opening of foreign economies, the ability or willingness of people to travel and meet together in groups, and increasing AAP sales to clients. We have translated AAP content into multiple languages and we believe the electronic availability of our offerings through this platform may accelerate the recovery of licensee operations if they can effectively market, adapt, and sell this online technology to their clients. Foreign exchange rates had an immaterial impact on international licensee sales and operating results during the quarter ended February 28, 2021.

Gross Profit. Gross profit decreased due to lower sales as previously described. Gross margin improved primarily due to the mix of revenue recognized during the quarter, which included less materials sales than in the prior year.

SG&A Expense. International licensee SG&A expenses decreased primarily due to cost reduction initiatives implemented in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Education Division

Our Education Division is comprised of our domestic and international Education practice operations (focused on sales to educational institutions) and includes our widely acclaimed Leader in Me program designed for students primarily in K-6 elementary schools. The following comparative information is for our Education Division in the periods indicated (in thousands):

Quarter Ended

Quarter Ended

February 28,

% of

February 29,

% of

2021

Sales

2020

Sales

Change

Sales

$

8,478

100.0

$

10,893

100.0 

$

(2,415)

Cost of sales

3,134

37.0

4,433

40.7

(1,299)

Gross profit

5,344

63.0

6,460

59.3

(1,116)

SG&A expenses

6,202

73.2

7,528

69.1

(1,326)

Adjusted EBITDA

$

(858)

(10.1)

$

(1,068)

(9.8)

$

210

Sales. Education Division sales for the quarter ended February 28, 2021 decreased primarily due to fewer consulting, coaching, and training days delivered during the quarter; the cancelation of Symposium conference events; and decreased training material sales when compared with the prior year. Due to ongoing disruptions from the COVID-19 pandemic, many training programs were postponed, canceled, or delayed, which reduced consulting, coaching, and training days delivered as educators continue to deal with ongoing education challenges and uncertainties caused by the pandemic. A significant number of the coaching and consulting days that were not able to be delivered during the first two quarters of fiscal 2021 are contractual and are expected to be delivered and recognized during the second half of fiscal 2021. Due to restrictions on in-person gatherings, we canceled our Symposium conference events during the quarter which provided

21


 

revenue and additional marketing opportunities in the second quarter of fiscal 2020. Despite the significant headwinds faced by educational institutions during the second half of fiscal 2020 as schools closed, teaching moved online, and budgets were constrained, nearly 2,200 existing Leader in Me schools renewed their Leader in Me subscriptions during fiscal 2020 (a number higher than in fiscal 2019) and 320 new Leader in Me schools were added. Some of these trends continued into the second quarter of fiscal 2021 as the number of Leader in Me schools with a contract in the advanced stages of renewal was 46 percent higher at February 28, 2021 than at the same point in the previous year. Although the pandemic has created significant challenges for our Education Division, we are encouraged by signs of recovery in fiscal 2021 as renewal trends are improving, new schools continue to be added, and stimulus funds may be available to schools during the third and fourth quarter of fiscal 2021. As of February 28, 2021, the Leader in Me program is used in over 4,300 schools in more than 50 countries.

Gross Profit. Education Division gross profit decreased primarily due to decreased sales as previously described. Education segment gross margin improved compared with the prior year primarily due to the cancelation of Symposium conferences and their associated costs and improved coaching margins on days delivered.

SG&A Expenses. Education SG&A expense decreased primarily due to reduced travel expenses, reduced variable associate costs resulting from decreased sales, and cost savings from initiatives implemented in response to the pandemic.

Other Operating Expense Items

Depreciation – Depreciation expense increased $0.1 million compared with the prior year primarily due to asset acquisitions in fiscal 2020 and early 2021. We currently expect depreciation expense will total approximately $6.5 million in fiscal 2021.

AmortizationAmortization expense decreased slightly compared with the second quarter of the prior year due to the full amortization of certain intangible assets. We expect amortization expense will total $4.5 million during fiscal 2021.

Income Taxes

Our effective income tax expense rate for the quarter ended February 28, 2021 was approximately 114 percent compared with an effective benefit rate of approximately 219 percent in the second quarter of the prior year. The income tax expense rate in the second quarter of fiscal 2021 was primarily impacted by an increase in the valuation allowance against deferred income tax assets, which was partially offset by the benefit resulting from the exercise of stock options. The income tax benefit recorded in the second quarter of the prior year was primarily due to the exercise of stock options in fiscal 2020. We computed our income tax provision for the second quarter of fiscal 2021 using the discrete method, applying the actual year-to-date effective tax rate to our pre-tax loss. We believe that this method yields a more reliable income tax calculation for the period. We believe the estimated annual effective tax rate method is not reasonable due to its sensitivity to small changes in forecasted annual income or loss before income taxes, which would result in significant variations in the customary relationship between income tax expense and pre-tax income or loss for interim periods.

Two Quarters Ended February 28, 2021 Compared with the Two Quarters Ended February 29, 2020

Enterprise Division

Direct Offices Segment

The following comparative information is for our Direct Offices segment for the periods indicated (in thousands):

Two Quarters

Two Quarters

Ended

Ended

February 28,

% of

February 29,

% of

2021

Sales

2020

Sales

Change

Sales

$

72,481 

100.0 

$

80,085 

100.0 

$

(7,604)

Cost of sales

13,958 

19.3 

19,972 

24.9 

(6,014)

Gross profit

58,523 

80.7 

60,113 

75.1 

(1,590)

SG&A expenses

45,696 

63.0 

49,669 

62.0 

(3,973)

Adjusted EBITDA

$

12,827 

17.7 

$

10,444 

13.0 

$

2,383 

22


 

Sales. During the first two quarters of fiscal 2021 our All Access Pass subscription revenues remained strong and increased 14 percent over the first half of fiscal 2020. We continue to be encouraged by the durability of AAP sales as clients transitioned to and effectively utilized the digital delivery options available through the All Access Pass. However, increased subscription revenues were offset by a $4.2 million decrease in facilitator material sales compared with the first half of fiscal 2020. As previously mentioned, our foreign direct offices also continue to be impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic as governmental mandates limit gatherings, business activity, and training opportunities. For the first two quarters of fiscal 2021, our foreign direct office sales decreased $5.0 million or 26 percent, compared with the prior year. However, foreign direct office sales for the first half of fiscal 2021 improved 58 percent over the third and fourth quarters of fiscal 2020 and we believe these offices will continue to recover during the remainder of fiscal 2021. Foreign exchange rates had a $0.8 million favorable impact on our Direct Office sales and a $0.1 million favorable impact on operating income during the first two quarters of fiscal 2021. While we are optimistic about the future of our direct office channel and AAP revenues, our future financial performance is highly dependent upon economic recovery from the pandemic, including the opening of national and regional economies and other factors which may not be within our control.

Gross Profit. Gross profit decreased due to sales performance in the first two quarters of fiscal 2021 compared with the pre-pandemic first two quarters of fiscal 2020 as described above. Direct Office gross margin increased due to increased subscription sales in the mix of services and products sold during the first half of fiscal 2021.

SG&A Expense. Decreased Direct Office SG&A expense was primarily due to reduced travel and entertainment expense; decreased marketing expense; and cost savings initiatives which were successfully implemented to save cash and preserve liquidity.

International Licensees Segment

The following comparative information is for our international licensee operations for the periods indicated (in thousands):

Two Quarters

Two Quarters

Ended

Ended

February 28,

% of

February 29,

% of

2021

Sales

2020

Sales

Change

Sales

$

5,026 

100.0 

$

6,411 

100.0 

$

(1,385)

Cost of sales

641 

12.8 

1,054 

16.4 

(413)

Gross profit

4,385 

87.2 

5,357 

83.6 

(972)

SG&A expenses

1,590 

31.6 

1,938 

30.2 

(348)

Adjusted EBITDA

$

2,795 

55.6 

$

3,419 

53.3 

$

(624)

Sales. International licensee revenues are primarily comprised of royalty revenues, which decreased significantly with the onset of COVID-19 and the elimination of nearly all in-person training events. As previously mentioned, our licensee operations had not established strong subscription businesses and were heavily reliant on live, onsite presentations at the beginning of the pandemic. We are encouraged by the recovery of our licensee operations as they are adapting to conditions, improving digital delivery capabilities, and increasing sales of the All Access Passes. Over the first two quarters of fiscal 2021, our royalty revenues decreased 23 percent compared with the prior year, which was partially offset by a 31 percent increase in our share of revenues from sales of the All Access Pass. We have translated AAP content into multiple languages to provide content to various international and multi-national entities, including our international licensees. Foreign exchange rates had an immaterial impact on international licensee sales and operating results during the two quarters ended February 28, 2021.

Gross Profit. Gross profit decreased due to lower sales as previously described. Gross margin improved primarily due to the mix of revenue recognized during the quarter, which included less materials sales than in the prior year.

SG&A Expense. International licensee SG&A expenses decreased primarily due to cost reduction initiatives implemented in response to lower revenues.


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Education Division

The following comparative information is for our Education Division in the periods indicated (in thousands):

Two Quarters

Two Quarters

Ended

Ended

February 28,

% of

February 29,

% of

2021

Sales

2020

Sales

Change

Sales

$

15,975 

100.0 

$

21,974 

100.0 

$

(5,999)

Cost of sales

6,644 

41.6 

8,857 

40.3 

(2,213)

Gross profit

9,331 

58.4 

13,117 

59.7 

(3,786)

SG&A expenses

12,473 

78.1 

15,288 

69.6 

(2,815)

Adjusted EBITDA

$

(3,142)

(19.7)

$

(2,171)

(9.9)

$

(971)

Sales. Education Division sales for the two quarters ended February 28, 2021 decreased primarily due to fewer consulting, coaching, and training days delivered; decreased training material sales; and the cancelation of Symposium conference events. Due to ongoing disruptions from the COVID-19 pandemic, many training programs were postponed, canceled, or delayed, which reduced consulting and coaching days delivered and training material sales as educators continue to deal with ongoing education challenges and uncertainties caused by the pandemic. Previously contracted coaching and consulting days are expected to be delivered during the third and fourth quarters and we are anticipating additional coaching and training days to be delivered after the conclusion of the 2020/2021 school year when teachers and administrators have professional development days available.

Gross Profit. Education Division gross profit decreased primarily due to decreased sales as previously described. Education segment gross margin declined compared with the prior year primarily due to the fixed cost of salaried coaches associated with less days delivered than the first two quarters of the prior year and increased costs from new product offerings. Partially offsetting these reductions to gross margin was the cancelation of Symposium conferences and their associated costs and reduced travel costs.

SG&A Expenses. Education SG&A expense decreased primarily due to reduced sales associate travel expenses, reduced variable associate costs resulting from decreased sales, and cost savings from initiatives implemented in response to the pandemic.

Other Operating Expense Items

Depreciation – Depreciation expense increased $0.2 million compared with the prior year primarily due to asset acquisitions in fiscal 2020 and the first two quarters of fiscal 2021.

AmortizationAmortization expense decreased $0.1 million compared with the first two quarters of the prior year due to the full amortization of certain intangible assets.

Income Taxes

Our income tax provision for the two quarters ended February 28, 2021 was $0.5 million on a pre-tax loss of $0.4 million for an effective tax expense rate of 138 percent, compared with an effective benefit rate of approximately 133 percent in the first half of fiscal 2020. Our effective tax rate in fiscal 2021 was adversely impacted by an increase in the valuation allowance on our deferred income tax assets, non-deductible executive compensation, and certain other non-deductible expenses. These factors were partially offset by the benefit from the exercise of stock options in the second quarter of fiscal 2021. The income tax benefit recorded for the first two quarters of the prior year was primarily due to the exercise of stock options in the second quarter of fiscal 2020.

We paid $0.8 million in cash for income taxes during the first half of fiscal 2021. We anticipate that our total cash paid for income taxes over the coming three to five years will be less than our total income tax provision to the extent we are able to utilize net operating loss carryforwards, foreign tax credit carryforwards, and other deferred income tax assets.

24


 

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

Introduction

In the current environment of reduced sales and an uncertain path to economic recovery, a major priority of ours has been the continued maintenance and preservation of liquidity. We believe our expense reduction efforts during late fiscal 2020 and the first half of fiscal 2021 have been successful and have significantly contributed to our cash on hand and overall liquidity at February 28, 2021. Our cash and cash equivalents at February 28, 2021 remained strong and totaled $40.3 million, with no borrowings on our $15.0 million revolving credit facility. Of our $40.3 million in cash at February 28, 2021, $13.5 million was held at our foreign subsidiaries. We routinely repatriate cash from our foreign subsidiaries and consider cash generated from foreign activities a key component of our overall liquidity position. Our primary sources of liquidity are cash flows from the sale of services in the normal course of business and available proceeds from our revolving line of credit facility. Our primary uses of liquidity include payments for operating activities, debt payments, capital expenditures (including curriculum development), contingent payments from the acquisition of businesses, working capital expansion, and purchases of our common stock.

In anticipation of potential covenant compliance issues associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and uncertainties associated with the economic recovery, on July 8, 2020, we entered into the First Modification Agreement to our 2019 Credit Agreement. The primary purpose of the First Modification Agreement is to provide temporary alternative borrowing covenants for the fiscal quarters ending August 31, 2020 through May 31, 2021. These new covenants consist of the following:

1.Minimum Liquidity – We must maintain consolidated minimum liquidity of not less than $13.0 million from August 31, 2020 through February 28, 2021 and $8.0 million at May 31, 2021.

2.Minimum Adjusted EBITDA – We must maintain rolling four-quarter Adjusted EBITDA not less than the amount set forth below at the end of the specified quarter (in thousands).

QUARTER ENDING

AMOUNT

August 31, 2020

$

11,000 

November 30, 2020

8,500 

February 28, 2021

5,000 

May 31, 2021

15,000 

Adjusted EBITDA for purposes of this calculation is not the same as generally reported by the Company in its quarterly earnings. The amounts in the table above exclude amortization of capitalized development costs which is classified in cost of sales.

3.Capital Expenditures – We may not make capital expenditures, including capitalized development costs, in an amount exceeding $8.5 million in aggregate for any fiscal year.

In addition to the new financial covenants described above, we are prohibited from making certain restricted payments, including dividend payments on our common stock and open-market purchases of our common stock until we have been in compliance with our previously existing financial covenants for two consecutive quarters.

In the event of noncompliance with these financial covenants and other defined events of default, the lender is entitled to certain remedies, including acceleration of the repayment of any amounts outstanding on the 2019 Credit Agreement. At February 28, 2021, we believe that we were in compliance with the terms and covenants applicable to the 2019 Credit Agreement and the First Modification Agreement.

In addition to our term-loan obligation and borrowings on our revolving line of credit, we have a long-term rental agreement on our corporate campus that is accounted for as a financing obligation.

The following discussion is a description of the primary factors affecting our cash flows and their effects upon our liquidity and capital resources during the two quarters ended February 28, 2021.

25


 

Cash Flows From Operating Activities

Our primary source of cash from operating activities was the sale of services to our customers in the normal course of business. Our primary uses of cash for operating activities were payments for selling, general, and administrative expenses, payments for direct costs necessary to conduct training programs, payments to suppliers for materials used in training manuals sold, and to fund working capital needs. Despite the operating difficulties resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic in the first half of fiscal 2021, our cash provided by operating activities increased 26 percent to $21.9 million compared with $17.4 million in the first two quarters of fiscal 2020. The increase was primarily due to increased income from operations and favorable changes in working capital during the first half of fiscal 2021. Our collection of accounts receivable remained strong during the first half of fiscal 2021 and provided the necessary cash to support our operations, pay our obligations, and make critical investments.

Cash Flows From Investing Activities and Capital Expenditures

Through February 28, 2021, our cash used for investing activities totaled $2.2 million. The primary uses of cash for investing activities included additional investments in the development of our offerings and purchases of property and equipment in the normal course of business.

We spent $1.3 million during the first two quarters of fiscal 2021 on the development of various content and offerings. Our previous and ongoing investments in content and digital delivery capabilities have proved to be valuable during the ongoing pandemic as we were able to quickly transition our onsite presentations to “live online” presentations. We believe continued investment in our offerings and delivery capabilities is critical to our future success and we anticipate that our capital spending for curriculum development will total $3.7 million during fiscal 2021.

Our purchases of property and equipment during the first half of fiscal 2021 consisted primarily of computer software and hardware. We expect to continue our investing in our content and delivery modalities, including the AAP and Leader in Me subscription services, and currently anticipate that our purchases of property and equipment will total approximately $2.6 million in fiscal 2021.

Cash Flows From Financing Activities

During the first two quarters of fiscal 2021, our net cash used for financing activities totaled $6.8 million. Our primary uses of financing cash included $3.8 million used for principal payments on our term loans and financing obligation, $3.0 million for purchases of our common stock for treasury, and $0.5 million of cash used to pay contingent consideration liabilities from previous business acquisitions. Our purchases of common stock during fiscal 2021 were solely for shares withheld to pay statutory income taxes on stock-based compensation awards which were distributed in the first two quarters of fiscal 2021. Partially offsetting these uses of cash were $0.5 million of proceeds from ESPP participants to purchase shares of stock during the quarter.

On November 15, 2019, our Board of Directors approved a new plan to repurchase up to $40.0 million of the Company’s outstanding common stock. The previously existing common stock repurchase plan was canceled and the new common share repurchase plan does not have an expiration date. Our uses of financing cash during the remainder of fiscal 2021 are expected to include required payments on our term loans and financing obligation, contingent consideration payments from previous business acquisitions, and may include purchases of our common stock for treasury. However, the timing and amount of common stock purchases is dependent on a number of factors, including available resources, and we are not obligated to make purchases of our common stock during any future period.

Sources of Liquidity

We expect to meet our obligations on the 2019 Credit Agreement, service our existing financing obligation, pay for projected capital expenditures, and meet other working capital requirements during fiscal 2021 from current cash balances and future cash flows from operating activities. Going forward, we will continue to incur costs necessary for the day-to-day operation of the business and may use additional credit and other financing alternatives, if necessary, for these expenditures. Our 2019 Credit Agreement expires in August 2024 and we expect to renew and amend the 2019 Credit Agreement on a regular basis to maintain the long-term borrowing capacity of this credit facility. Additional potential sources of liquidity available to us include factoring receivables, issuance of additional equity, or issuance of debt to

26


 

public or private sources. If necessary, we will evaluate all of these options and select one or more of them depending on overall capital needs and the associated cost of capital.

We believe that our existing cash and cash equivalents, cash generated by operating activities, and the availability of external funds as described above, will be sufficient for us to maintain our operations for at least the upcoming 12 months. However, our ability to maintain adequate capital for our operations in the future is dependent upon a number of factors, including sales trends, macroeconomic activity, the length and severity of business disruptions associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, our ability to contain costs, levels of capital expenditures, collection of accounts receivable, and other factors. Some of the factors that influence our operations are not within our control, such as general economic conditions and the introduction of new offerings or technology by our competitors. We will continue to monitor our liquidity position and may pursue additional financing alternatives, as described above, to maintain sufficient resources for future growth and capital requirements. However, there can be no assurance such financing alternatives will be available to us on acceptable terms, or at all.

Contractual Obligations

We have not structured any special purpose entities, or participated in any commodity trading activities, which would expose us to potential undisclosed liabilities or create adverse consequences to our liquidity. Required contractual payments primarily consist of the repayment of term loan obligations; rental payments resulting from the sale of our corporate campus (financing obligation); expected contingent consideration payments from business acquisitions; short-term purchase obligations for inventory items and other products and services used in the ordinary course of business; operating lease payments; and payments for outsourced warehousing and distribution service charges. For further information on our contractual obligations, refer to the table included in our annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2020, which was filed with the SEC on November 16, 2020.

ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS ISSUED NOT YET ADOPTED

Refer to the discussion of new accounting pronouncements as found in Note 1 to the financial statements as presented within this report.

USE OF ESTIMATES AND CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Our consolidated financial statements were prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The significant accounting policies used to prepare our consolidated financial statements, including our revenue recognition policy, are outlined primarily in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements presented in Part II, Item 8 of our annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2020. Please refer to these disclosures for further information regarding our uses of estimates and critical accounting policies. There have been no significant changes to our previously disclosed estimates or critical accounting policies.

Estimates

Some of the accounting guidance we use requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements. We regularly evaluate our estimates and assumptions and base those estimates and assumptions on historical experience, factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, and requirements under accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions, including changes in economic conditions and other circumstances that are not within our control, but which may have an impact on these estimates and our actual financial results.

SAFE HARBOR STATEMENT UNDER THE PRIVATE SECURITIES LITIGATION REFORM ACT OF 1995

Certain statements made by the Company in this report are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 as amended (the Exchange Act). Forward-looking statements include, without limitation, any statement that may predict, forecast, indicate, or imply future results, performance, or achievements, and may contain words such as “believe,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “estimate,” “project,” or words or phrases of similar meaning. In our reports and filings we may make forward-

27


 

looking statements regarding, among other things, our expectations about future sales levels and financial results, our financial performance during fiscal 2021, expected effects from the COVID-19 pandemic, including effects on how we conduct our business and our results of operations, the timing and duration of the recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, future training and consulting sales activity, expected benefits from the All Access Pass and the electronic delivery of our content, anticipated renewals of subscription offerings, the impact of new accounting standards on our financial condition and results of operations, the amount and timing of capital expenditures, anticipated expenses, including SG&A expenses, depreciation, and amortization, future gross margins, the release of new services or products, the adequacy of existing capital resources, our ability to renew or extend our line of credit facility, the amount of cash expected to be paid for income taxes, our ability to maintain adequate capital for our operations for at least the upcoming 12 months, the seasonality of future sales, future compliance with the terms and conditions of our line of credit, the ability to borrow on our line of credit, expected collection of accounts receivable, estimated capital expenditures, and cash flow estimates used to determine the fair value of long-lived assets. These, and other forward-looking statements, are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties are disclosed from time to time in reports filed by us with the SEC, including reports on Forms 8-K, 10-Q, and 10-K. Such risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the matters discussed in Item 1A of our annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2020, entitled “Risk Factors.” In addition, such risks and uncertainties may include unanticipated developments in any one or more of the following areas: cybersecurity risks; unanticipated costs or capital expenditures; delays or unanticipated outcomes relating to our strategic plans; dependence on existing products or services; the rate and consumer acceptance of new product introductions, including the All Access Pass; competition; the impact of foreign exchange rates; the number and nature of customers and their product orders, including changes in the timing or mix of product or training orders; pricing of our products and services and those of competitors; adverse publicity; and other factors which may adversely affect our business.

The risks included here are not exhaustive. Other sections of this report may include additional factors that could adversely affect our business and financial performance. Moreover, we operate in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment. New risk factors may emerge and it is not possible for our management to predict all such risk factors, nor can we assess the impact of all such risk factors on our business or the extent to which any single factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in forward-looking statements. Given these risks and uncertainties, investors should not rely on forward-looking statements as a prediction of actual results.

The market price of our common stock has been and may remain volatile. In addition, the stock markets in general have experienced increased volatility. Factors such as quarter-to-quarter variations in revenues and earnings or losses and our failure to meet expectations could have a significant impact on the market price of our common stock. In addition, the price of our common stock can change for reasons unrelated to our performance. Due to our low market capitalization, the price of our common stock may also be affected by conditions such as a lack of analyst coverage and fewer potential investors.

Forward-looking statements are based on management’s expectations as of the date made, and we do not undertake any responsibility to update any of these statements in the future except as required by law. Actual future performance and results will differ and may differ materially from that contained in or suggested by forward-looking statements as a result of the factors set forth in this Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and elsewhere in our filings with the SEC.

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Interest Rate Sensitivity

At February 28, 2021, our long-term obligations primarily consisted of term loans payable, a long-term lease agreement (financing obligation) on our corporate headquarters facility, and potential contingent consideration payments resulting from previous business acquisitions. Our overall interest rate sensitivity is primarily influenced by any amounts borrowed on term loans and our revolving line of credit facility, and the prevailing interest rates on these instruments. The effective interest rate on our term loans payable and line of credit facility is variable and was 3.5 percent at February 28, 2021. Accordingly, we may incur additional expense if interest rates increase in future periods. For example, a one percent increase in the effective interest rate on our term loans outstanding at February 28, 2021 would result in approximately $0.1 million of additional interest expense over the next 12 months. Our financing obligation has a payment structure

28


 

equivalent to a long-term leasing arrangement with a fixed interest rate of 7.7 percent, and our contingent consideration liabilities are not subject to interest rates.

There have been no other material changes from the information previously reported under Item 7A of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2020. We did not utilize any foreign currency or interest rate derivative instruments during the quarter or two quarters ended February 28, 2021.

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in the Company’s Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow for timely decisions regarding required disclosure. In designing and evaluating the disclosure controls and procedures, management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives, and management is required to apply its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures.

We evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) of the Exchange Act, as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based on this evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

There were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) or 15d-15(f)) during the most recently completed fiscal quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal controls over financial reporting.


29


 

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

Item 1A.RISK FACTORS

Except as discussed below, there have been no material changes from the risk factors previously disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 16, 2020.

Our results of operations have been adversely affected and could be materially impacted in the future by the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic.

The global spread of COVID-19 has created significant volatility, uncertainty, and economic disruption during late fiscal 2020 and early fiscal 2021. The extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic impacts our business, operations, and financial results will depend on numerous evolving factors that we may not be able to accurately predict, including: the duration, scope, and severity of the pandemic; governmental, business, and individuals’ actions that have been taken, and continue to be taken, in response to the pandemic; the impact of the pandemic on worldwide economic activity and actions taken in response; the effect on our clients, including educational institutions, and client demand for our services; our ability to sell and provide our services and solutions, including the impact of travel restrictions and from people working from home; the ability of our clients to pay for our services on a timely basis or at all; the ability to maintain sufficient liquidity; and any closure of our offices. Any of these events, or related conditions, could cause or contribute to the risks and uncertainties described in our Annual Report and could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows, and stock price.

Item 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

The following table summarizes the purchases of our common stock during the fiscal quarter ended February 28, 2021:

Period

Total Number of Shares Purchased

Average Price Paid Per Share

Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs

Maximum Dollar Value of Shares That May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plans or Programs(1)

(in thousands)

December 1, 2020 to December 31, 2020

-

$

-

-

$

39,824

January 1, 2021 to January 31, 2021

-

$

-

-

$

39,824

February 1, 2021 to February 28, 2021

-

$

-

-

$

39,824

Total Common Shares

-

$

-

-

(1)On November 15, 2019, our Board of Directors approved a new plan to repurchase up to $40.0 million of our outstanding common stock. The previously existing common stock repurchase plan was canceled and the new common share repurchase plan does not have an expiration date. We did not purchase any shares of our common stock during the quarter ended February 28, 2021 under the terms of this Board approved plan. The table above excludes 58,388 shares withheld for statutory income taxes on stock-based compensation award shares issued during the quarter. The withheld shares were valued at the closing market price on the date the award shares were issued to participants.

The actual timing, number, and value of common shares repurchased under our board-approved plan will be determined at our discretion and will depend on a number of factors, including, among others, general market and business conditions, the trading price of common shares, and applicable legal requirements. We have no obligation to repurchase any common shares under the authorization, and the repurchase plan may be suspended, discontinued, or modified at any time for any reason.


30


 

Item 6. EXHIBITS

(A)Exhibits:

31.1

Rule 13a-14(a) Certifications of the Chief Executive Officer.**

31.2

Rule 13a-14(a) Certifications of the Chief Financial Officer.**

32

Section 1350 Certifications.**

101.INS

XBRL Instance Document – the instance document does not appear in the Interactive Data File because its XBRL tags are embedded within the Inline XBRL document.**

101.SCH

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document.**

101.CAL

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document.**

101.DEF

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Definition Linkbase Document.**

101.LAB

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document.**

101.PRE

Inline XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document.**

104

Cover Page Interactive Data File (formatted as Inline XBRL and contained in Exhibit 101).**

**

Filed herewith.


31


 

SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

FRANKLIN COVEY CO.

Date: April 8, 2021

By:

/s/ Robert A. Whitman

Robert A. Whitman

Chief Executive Officer

(Duly Authorized Officer)

Date: April 8, 2021

By:

/s/ Stephen D. Young

Stephen D. Young

Chief Financial Officer

(Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)

 

32