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Mexican Petroleum

Filed: 28 Sep 21, 8:00pm
0000932782 srt:GuarantorSubsidiariesMember 2020-06-30
 
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
 
FORM
6-K
 
 
REPORT OF FOREIGN PRIVATE ISSUER
PURSUANT TO RULE
13a-16
OR
15d-16
UNDER THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the month of
September, 2021
Commission File Number
0-99
 
 
PETRÓLEOS MEXICANOS
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
 
MEXICAN PETROLEUM
(Translation of registrant’s name into English)
United Mexican States
(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
Avenida Marina Nacional No. 329
Colonia Verónica Anzures
11300 Ciudad de México,
México
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant files or will file annual reports under cover of Form
20-F
or Form
40-F.
Form
20-F  ☒            
Form
40-F  ☐
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is submitting the Form
6-K
in paper as permitted by Regulation
S-T
Rule 101(b)(1)
Yes  ☐             No  ☒
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is submitting the Form
6-K
in paper as permitted by Regulation
S-T
Rule 101(b)(7)
Yes  ☐             No  ☒
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant by furnishing the information contained in this form is also thereby furnishing the information to the Commission pursuant to Rule
12g3-2(b)
under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
Yes  ☐             No  ☒
 
 
 

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS
The following discussion of PEMEX’s recent results should be read in conjunction with the annual report on Form
20-F
of Petróleos Mexicanos for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 as filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (which we refer to as the SEC) on May 17, 2021 (which we refer to as the Form
20-F)
and, in particular, “Item 4—Information on the Company” and “Item 5—Operating and Financial Review and Prospects” in the Form
20-F
and with the unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements of PEMEX included in this report beginning on page
F-1.
In this document, “PEMEX” refers to Petróleos Mexicanos, the following operating subsidiaries—Pemex Exploración y Producción (Pemex Exploration and Production), Pemex Transformación Industrial (Pemex Industrial Transformation), Pemex Logística (Pemex Logistics), for periods prior to July 1, 2019, Pemex Perforación y Servicios (Pemex Drilling and Services) and Pemex Etileno (Pemex Ethylene), and, for periods prior to January 1, 2021, Pemex Fertilizantes (Pemex Fertilizers), (which we refer to collectively as the subsidiary entities), and the subsidiary companies listed in Note 5 to the unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements included herein. Petróleos Mexicanos hereby designates this report on Form
6-K
as being incorporated by reference into the Offering Circular dated October 28, 2019, as supplemented on February 10, 2020, relating to its U.S. $112,000,000,000 Medium-Term Notes Program, Series C, due 1 Year or More from Date of Issue.
Exchange Rates
On September 24, 2021, the noon buying rate for cable transfers in New York reported by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System was Ps. 20.0940 = U.S. $1.00.
We maintain our consolidated financial statements and accounting records in Mexican pesos (pesos or Ps.). Unless otherwise indicated, we have translated all peso amounts to U.S. dollars in this report, including all convenience translations of our unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements included herein, as of and for the
six-months
ended June 30, 2021, at an exchange rate of Ps. 19.8027 = U.S. $1.00, which is the exchange rate that the
Secretaría de Hacienda y Crédito Público
(Ministry of Finance and Public Credit) instructed us to use on June 30, 2021, and as of and for the year ended December 31, 2020, at an exchange rate of Ps. 19.9487 = U.S. $1.00, which is the exchange rate that the Ministry of Finance and Public Credit instructed us to use on December 31, 2020. You should not construe these translations from pesos into dollars as actually representing such U.S. dollar amounts or meaning that you could convert such amounts into U.S. dollars at the rates indicated.
Pemex Fertilizers
Prior to January 1, 2021,
Pemex Fertilizantes
(Pemex Fertilizers) operated as an additional productive state-owned subsidiary. On January 12, 2021, the Board of Directors of Petróleos Mexicanos issued the
Declaratoria de Extinción de Pemex Fertilizantes
(Declaration of Extinction of Pemex Fertilizers), which was published in the Official Gazette of the Federation on January 27, 2021 and became effective on January 1, 2021. As of January 1, 2021, all of the assets, liabilities, rights and obligations of Pemex Fertilizers were assumed by, and transferred to, Pemex Industrial Transformation, and Pemex Industrial Transformation became, as a matter of Mexican law, the successor to Pemex Fertilizers. Pemex Fertilizers was in turn dissolved effective as of January 1, 2021.
Government Equity Capital Contribution
For the
six-month
period ended June 30, 2021, the Federal Government of Mexico, which we refer to as the Mexican Government, has made equity capital contributions in the amount of Ps. 113.2 billion (U.S. $5.7 billion) to Petróleos Mexicanos.
We used these funds to reduce our overall indebtedness, manage the maturity profile of our debt, improve our financial position and carry out the construction of the new Dos Bocas Refinery. For more information on other recent support measures implemented by the Mexican Government, see “Liquidity and Capital Resources—Overview—Government Support” in the Form
20-F.
 
2

Selected Financial Data
The selected financial data as of December 31, 2020 is derived from the audited consolidated financial statements of PEMEX included in the Form
20-F.
The selected financial data as of June 30, 2021 and for the
six-month
periods ended June 30, 2021 and 2020 is derived from the unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements of PEMEX included in this report, which were prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard (IAS) 34 “Interim Financial Reporting” (IAS 34).
For the year ended December 31, 2020, we recognized a net loss of Ps. 509.1 billion and had negative equity of Ps. 2,404.7 billion. We had negative working capital of Ps. 442.6 billion during the same period. Cash flows from operating activities were Ps. 65.3 billion for the year ended December 31, 2020. As of and for the
six-month
period ended June 30, 2021, we recognized a net loss of Ps. 23.0 billion and had negative equity of Ps. 2,073.3 billion. We had negative working capital of Ps. 461.4 billion and cash flows from operating activities of Ps. 20.7 billion during the
six-months
ended June 30, 2021. We have disclosed the circumstances that have caused these negative trends and the actions we are taking to face them below.
We also have substantial debt, including substantial short-term debt. This debt was mainly incurred to finance investments to carry out our operations. Due to our heavy fiscal burden resulting from the payment of hydrocarbon extraction duties and other taxes that we are required to pay to the Mexican Government, the cash flows derived from our operations in recent years have not been sufficient to fund our operations and investment programs. As a result, our indebtedness has increased significantly, and our working capital has deteriorated. In addition, the significant crude oil price drop, which started in March 2020, and the negative economic impact as a result of the current global health crisis caused by the
COVID-19
pandemic, have negatively impacted our financial performance. During the first
six-months
of 2021, the weighted average Mexican crude oil price was U.S. $61.96 per barrel, an increase of U.S. $21.05 per barrel as compared to the 2020 weighted average Mexican crude oil export price of U.S. $40.91 per barrel. As of September 24, 2021, the weighted average Mexican crude oil export price was U.S. $70.59 per barrel. While prices have begun to increase, they remain volatile, and any future decline in international crude oil and natural gas prices will have a similar negative impact on our results of operations and financial condition.
We believe we have the capacity to comply with our payment obligations and our operating continuity, including our ability to refinance debt. However, our future cash flows are uncertain due to circumstances outside of our control. Any adverse impact from sustained decrease in crude oil prices below the budgeted average price for 2021 and from the slow-down of the economy would have an adverse impact on our results of operation, cash flows and may require us to consider additional actions to address these shortfalls. The combined effect of the above-mentioned events indicates the existence of significant doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. For more information on the circumstances that have caused these negative trends and the concrete actions we are taking to improve our results, strengthen our ability to continue operating and achieve revenue maximization and efficiencies, see “Item 5—Operating and Financial Review and Prospects—Overview” and “Item 5—Operating and Financial Review and Prospects—Liquidity and Capital Resources” in the Form
20-F
and Notes
18-F
and 20 to our unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements included herein.
In this report we include selected financial data from our statement of financial position as of June 30, 2021 and from our statement of comprehensive income and our statement of cash flows for the
six-month
period ended June 30, 2021. In addition, we include selected financial data from our statement of financial position as of December 31, 2020, as well as the statement of comprehensive income and the statement of cash flows for the
six-month
period ended June 30, 2020 for comparison purposes.
 
3

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA OF PEMEX
 
   
As of and for the period ended
(1)
 
   
December 31,

2020
  
June 30,
(2)
 
  
2020
  
2021
 
   
(millions of pesos)
 
Statement of Comprehensive Income Data
    
Net sales
   953,662   465,803   664,989 
Operating (loss) income
   (63,063  616   163,705 
Financing income
   16,742   9,252   15,221 
Financing cost
   (161,765  (96,841  (74,163
Derivative financial instruments income (cost), net
   17,096   (15,021  (12,358
Foreign exchange (loss) income, net
   (128,949  (419,661  23,596 
Net (loss)
   (509,052  (606,587  (22,994
Statement of Financial Position Data (end of period)
    
Cash and cash equivalents
   39,990   n.a.   41,536 
Total assets
   1,928,488   n.a.   2,037,020 
Long-term debt
(3)
   1,867,630   n.a.   1,776,848 
Total long-term liabilities
(4)
   3,560,805   n.a.   3,237,701 
Total equity (deficit)
   (2,404,727  n.a.   (2,073,260
Statement of Cash Flows Data
    
Depreciation and amortization
   129,632   64,325   68,198 
Acquisition of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment
(5)
   (114,977  (54,261  (65,616
 
Note: n.a. = Not applicable.
 
(1)
Includes Petróleos Mexicanos, the subsidiary entities and the subsidiary companies listed in Note 5 to the unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements included herein.
(2)
Derived from June 2021 interim financial statements, which are unaudited.
(3)
Long-term debt does not include short-term indebtedness of Ps. 503,055 million (U.S. $25,403 million) as of June 30, 2021.
(4)
Total long-term liabilities do not include short-term liabilities of Ps. 872,578 million (U.S. $44,064 million) as of June 30, 2021.
(5)
Includes capitalized finance cost.
Source: PEMEX’s unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements.
 
4

Capitalization of PEMEX
The following table sets forth our capitalization as of June 30, 2021.
 
   
As of June 30, 2021
(1)
 
   
(millions of pesos or U.S. dollars)
 
Long-term leases
(2)
   Ps. 52,999   U.S. $2,676 
Long-term external debt
   1,623,100    81,964 
Long-term domestic debt
   153,748    7,764 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total long-term debt
(3)
  
 
1,776,848
 
  
 
89,728
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total long-term leases and long-term debt
  
 
1,829,847
 
  
 
92,404
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Certificates of Contribution “A”
(4)
   638,105    32,223 
Mexican Government contributions to Petróleos Mexicanos
   43,731    2,208 
Legal reserve
   1,002    51 
Accumulated other comprehensive result
   (9,998   (505
Accumulated deficit from prior years
   (2,723,476   (137,531
Net (loss)
(5)
   (22,885   (1,156
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total controlling interest
  
 
(2,073,521
  
 
(104,710
Total
non-controlling
interest
   261    13 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total equity (deficit)
  
 
(2,073,260
  
 
(104,697
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total capitalization
  
 
(243,413
  
 
(12,293
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
Note:
Numbers may not total due to rounding.
(1)
Derived from June 2021 interim financial statements, which are unaudited. Convenience translations into U.S. dollars of amounts in pesos have been made at the established exchange rate of Ps. 19.8027 = U.S. $1.00 as of June 30, 2021. Such translations should not be construed as a representation that the peso amounts have been or could be converted into U.S. dollar amounts at the foregoing or any other rate.
(2)
Total long-term leases does not include short-term leases of Ps. 8,197 million (U.S. $414 million) as of June 30, 2021.
(3)
Total long-term debt does not include short-term indebtedness of Ps. 503,055 million (U.S. $25,403 million) as of June 30, 2021.
(4)
Equity instruments held by the Mexican Government.
(5)
Excluding amounts attributable to
non-controlling
interests of Ps. 108 million for the
six-month
period ended June 30, 2021.
Source:
PEMEX’s unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements.
 
5

Operating and Financial Review and Prospects
Results of Operations of PEMEX—For the six months ended June 30, 2021 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2020.
General
The selected consolidated interim financial information set forth below is derived from our unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements included elsewhere in this report. This interim financial information should be read in conjunction with the Form
20-F
and, in particular, “Item 4—Information on the Company” and “Item 5—Operating and Financial Review and Prospects” in the Form
20-F,
and with the unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements of PEMEX included in this report beginning on page
F-1.
 
   
Six months ended June 30,
(1)
 
   
2020
   
2021
(2)
 
   
(millions of pesos or U.S. dollars)
 
Net Sales
      
Domestic
   Ps. 256,982    Ps. 344,327   U.S. $17,388 
Export
   206,401    318,598    16,089 
Services income
   2,420    2,064    104 
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total of sales
   465,803    664,989    33,581 
Reversal of impairment of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment, net
   7,925    32,192    1,626 
Cost of sales
   396,199    463,839    23,423 
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Gross income
   77,529    233,342    11,783 
Distribution, transportation and sale expenses
   8,568    6,914    349 
Administrative expenses
   72,875    67,250    3,396 
Other revenues
   6,235    5,483    277 
Other expenses
   (1,704   (956   (48
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Operating income
   617    163,705    8,267 
Financing income
   9,252    15,221    769 
Financing cost
   (96,841   (74,163   (3,745
Derivative financial instruments (cost), net
   (15,021   (12,358   (624
Foreign exchange (loss) gain, net
   (419,661   23,596    1,192 
(Loss) profit sharing in joint ventures and associates
   (811   (3,208   (162
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
(Loss) income before duties, taxes and other
   (522,466   112,793    5,696 
Total duties, taxes and other
   84,121    135,787    6,857 
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Net (loss)
   (606,587   (22,994   (1,161
Other comprehensive results
   25,571    241,286    12,185 
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total comprehensive (loss) income
   (581,016   218,292    11,023 
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
Note:
Numbers may not total due to rounding.
(1)
Derived from June 2021 interim financial statements, which are unaudited.
(2)
Convenience translations into U.S. dollars of amounts in pesos have been made at the established exchange rate of Ps. 19.8027 = U.S. $1.00 at June 30, 2021. Such translations should not be construed as a representation that the peso amounts have been or could be converted into U.S. dollars at the foregoing or any other rate.
Source: PEMEX’s unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements.
Total Sales
Total sales increased by 42.8% or Ps. 199.2 billion in the first six months of 2021, from Ps. 465.8 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 665.0 billion in the first six months of 2021, mainly due to a 95.8% increase in the weighted average price of Mexican crude oil.
Domestic Sales
Domestic sales increased by 34.0% in the first six months of 2021, from Ps. 257.0 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 344.3 billion in the first six months of 2021, mainly due to increases in the sales prices of gasoline, natural gas and natural gas liquids. Domestic sales of petroleum products increased by 18.8% in the first six months of 2021, from Ps. 213.8 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 254.1 billion in the first six months of 2021, mainly due to a 28.9% increase in the sales volume of premium gasoline, 62.5% increase in the sales volume of fuel oil, and 19.7% increase in the sales volume of jet fuel.
Domestic sales of natural gas increased by 219.6% in the first six months of 2021, from Ps. 9.7 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 31.0 billion in the first six months of 2021, mainly due to a 251.4% increase in its average sales price.
Domestic sales of liquefied petroleum gas increased by 79.3% in the first six months of 2021, from Ps. 13.4 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 24.1 billion in the first six months of 2021, mainly as a result of a 79.9% increase in its average sales price.
 
6

Export Sales
Export sales increased by 54.4% in peso terms in the first six months of 2021 (with U.S. dollar-denominated export revenues translated to pesos at the exchange rate on the date of the corresponding export sale), from Ps. 206.4 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 318.6 billion in the first six months of 2021. This increase was mainly due to a 95.8% increase in the weighted average Mexican export crude oil price in the first six months of 2021, compared to the first six months of 2020. From January 1 to June 30, 2020, the weighted average Mexican export crude oil price was U.S. $31.50 per barrel, compared to U.S. $61.69 per barrel in the same period of 2021.
Crude oil and condensate sales increased by 44.2%, from Ps. 148.0 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 213.4 billion in the first six months of 2021, and in U.S. dollar terms increased by 70.8%, from U.S. $6.5 billion in the first six months of 2020 to U.S. $11.1 billion in the first six months of 2021. The weighted average price per barrel of crude oil exports in the first six months of 2021 was U.S. $61.69, 95.8% higher than the weighted average price of U.S. $31.50 in the first six months of 2020.
Export sales of petroleum products, including products derived from natural gas and natural gas liquids, increased by 163.2%, from Ps. 10.6 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 27.9 billion in the first six months of 2021, primarily due to a 75.0% increase in the sales volume of fuel oil.
For the
six-month
period ended June 30, 2021, the average exchange rate of the U.S. dollar against the Mexican peso was Ps. 20.1847 = U.S. $1.00, compared to Ps. 21.6091 = U.S. $1.00 during the same period of 2020, representing an appreciation of the peso against the U.S. dollar by Ps. 1.4244 (or 6.6%), which had an unfavorable effect on our export sales of Ps. 33.6 billion.
Service Income
Service income decreased by 12.5% in the first six months of 2021, from Ps. 2.4 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 2.1 billion in the first six months of 2021, mainly as a result of a decrease in transportation services provided by Pemex Industrial Transformation and Pemex Logistics to third parties.
(Reversal) Impairment of Wells, Pipelines, Properties, Plant and Equipment, Net
Net reversal of impairment of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment increased by Ps. 24.3 billion in the first six months of 2021 as compared to the first six months of 2020, from a net reversal of impairment of Ps. 7.9 billion as of June 30, 2020 to a net reversal of impairment of Ps. 32.2 billion as of June 30, 2021. This net reversal of impairment was primarily due to (1) a net reversal of impairment of Ps. 28.2 billion in the cash generating units (CGUs) of Pemex Exploration and Production, mainly due to an increase in projected crude oil prices and a decrease in the discount rate and (2) a net reversal of impairment of Ps. 3.9 billion in the CGU of Pemex Industrial Transformation, mainly due to an increase in sales prices and a decrease in the discount rate.
Cost of Sales
Cost of sales increased by 17.1%, from Ps. 396.2 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 463.8 billion in the first six months of 2021. This increase was mainly due to (1) a Ps. 31.5 billion increase in import purchases, primarily Premium gasoline and natural gas, due to increased demand, which, in turn, was primarily the result of the gradual recovery of economic activity following the decline caused by the
COVID-19
pandemic and (2) a Ps. 17.2 billion increase in exploration and extraction taxes and duties, mainly due to the recovery of hydrocarbon prices from lows reached in the initial months of the
COVID-19
pandemic.
 
7

General Expenses
Total general expenses (including distribution, transportation and sale expenses and administrative expenses) decreased by 8.8%, from Ps. 81.4 billion for the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 74.2 billion for the first six months of 2021, mainly due to a decrease in net periodic cost of employee benefit.
Other Revenues
Other revenues decreased by Ps. 0.7 billion in the first six months of 2021, from Ps. 6.2 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 5.5 billion in the first six months of 2021. This decrease was mainly due to a Ps. 0.5 billion decrease in income from insurance recovery.
Other Expenses
Other expenses decreased by Ps. 0.7 billion in the first six months of 2021, from Ps. 1.7 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 1.0 billion in the first six months of 2021. This decrease was mainly due to a decrease of Ps. 1.4 billion in disposal of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment which was offset by an increase of Ps. 0.7 billion in expenses related to provisions for trial in process.
Financing Income
Financing income increased by Ps. 5.9 billion in the first six months of 2021, from Ps. 9.3 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 15.2 billion in the first six months of 2021. This increase was mainly due to effects from the recognition of changes in accounts receivable as a result of the sale of hydrocarbons to Asia.
Financing Cost
Financing cost decreased by Ps. 22.6 billion in the first six months of 2021, from Ps. 96.8 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 74.2 billion in the first six months of 2021, mainly due to the effect of the 0.7% appreciation of the peso against the U.S. dollar for the
six-month
period ended June 30, 2021, as compared to a depreciation of 21.9% for the same period of 2020.
Derivative Financial Instruments (Cost), Net
Derivative financial instruments (cost), net, decreased by Ps. 2.7 billion, from a derivative financial instruments cost of Ps. 15.0 billion in the first six months of 2020 to a derivative financial instruments cost of Ps. 12.4 billion in the first six months of 2021, due to (1) an increase in the fair value of our favorable cross-currency swaps, arising from the depreciation of the U.S. dollar against other currencies in which our debt is denominated and (2) a net increase in other derivative financial instruments, such as currency options and interest rate options.
Foreign Exchange Gain (Loss), Net
A substantial portion of our debt, 85.4% as of June 30, 2021, is denominated in foreign currency. Foreign exchange loss decreased by Ps. 443.3 billion, from a foreign exchange loss of Ps. 419.7 billion in the first six months of 2020 to a foreign exchange gain of Ps. 23.6 billion in the first six months of 2021, primarily due to the effect of appreciation of the peso against the U.S. dollar for the first six months of 2021, as compared to the depreciation of the peso against the U.S. dollar for the first six months of 2020. The value of the peso in U.S. dollar terms depreciated by 21.9%, from Ps. 18.8452 = U.S. $1.00 as of December 31, 2019 to Ps. 22.9715 = U.S. $1.00 as of June 30, 2020, as compared to a 0.7% appreciation of the peso in U.S. dollar terms from Ps. 19.9487 = U.S. $1.00 as of December 31, 2020 to Ps. 19.8027 = U.S. $1.00 as of June 30, 2021.
 
8

Duties, Taxes and Other
The
Derecho por la Utilidad Compartida
(Profit-sharing Duty, or DUC) and other duties and taxes paid increased by 61.5% in the first six months of 2021, from Ps. 84.1 billion in the first six months of 2020 to Ps. 135.8 billion in the first six months of 2021, mainly due to an increase in the Profit-sharing Duty of Ps. 63.2 billion, principally driven by the 95.8% increase in the weighted average export price of Mexican crude oil, from U.S. $31.50 per barrel in the first six months of 2020 to U.S. $61.69 per barrel in the first six months of 2021; partially offset by the favorable effect of deferred income tax of Ps. 9.4 billion. Duties and taxes represented 18.1% and 20.4% of total sales in the first six months of 2021 and 2020, respectively.
Net (Loss)
In the first six months of 2021, we had a net loss of Ps. 23.0 billion, as compared to a net loss of Ps. 606.6 billion in the first six months of 2020.
This decrease in net loss was mainly the result of (1) a Ps. 199.2 billion increase in total sales, mainly due to an increase in the weighted average price of Mexican crude oil exports, (2) a Ps. 24.3 billion increase in net reversal of impairment of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment and (3) a Ps. 443.3 billion decrease in foreign exchange loss, mainly due to the appreciation of the peso against the U.S. dollar for the first six months of 2021 as compared to the depreciation of the peso against the U.S. dollar for first six months of 2020; partially offset by (1) a Ps. 67.6 billion increase in cost of sales, mainly in cost of import purchases (primarily Premium gasoline and natural gas) due to increase demand, which in turn was primarily the result of the gradual recovery of economic activity following the decline caused by the
COVID-19
pandemic and (2) a Ps. 51.7 billion increase in taxes and duties, mainly due to a 95.8% increase in the weighted average export price of Mexican crude oil.
Other Comprehensive Results
In the first six months of 2021, we reported a total comprehensive gain of Ps. 241.3 billion as compared to a total comprehensive gain of Ps. 25.6 billion in the first six months of 2020, mainly due to an increase in the actuarial gains for employee benefits as a result of an increase in the discount rate and expected rate of return on plan assets used in the actuarial computation method.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Overview
During the first six months of 2021, our liquidity position was adversely affected mainly due to an increase in income taxes and duties payable and an increase in short-term debt as a result of indebtedness primarily incurred to meet our working capital needs and to the reclassification of credits with a current maturity of less than one year from long-term debt to short-term debt. This negative impact to our liquidity position was partially offset by (1) a decrease in the balance of accounts payable to suppliers in the first six months of 2021 due to payments made by us, (2) an increase in other accounts receivable, mainly taxes to be recovered and prepaid taxes, (3) an increase in customers due to higher sales and (4) an increase in the value of the inventories derived from the increase in oil prices in the first six months of 2021 compared to oil prices in the same period of 2020.
Our principal uses of new funds in the first six months of 2021 were the payment of debt maturities due during the same period and capital expenditures. We met the requirement to pay such debt maturities primarily with cash provided by cash flows from borrowings, which amounted to Ps. 746.5 billion. During the first six months of 2021, our net cash flow from operating activities amounted to Ps. 20.7 billion and our net cash flow used in investing activities amounted Ps. 102.0 billion, which included Ps. 102.3 billion used in the acquisition of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment, intangible assets and other assets.
Our 2021 budget includes Ps. 45.1 billion, which is classified as financial investment, rather than capital expenditures, related to capital contributions for our subsidiary company PTI Infraestructura de Desarrollo, which is developing the construction of the Dos Bocas Refinery. During the first six months of 2021, works in progress related to the Dos Bocas Refinery, including payments made in advance to contractors, have increased by Ps. 29.4 billion from Ps. 5.2 billion as of December 31, 2020 to Ps. 34.6 billion as of June 30, 2021.
 
9

As of June 30, 2021, we owed our suppliers Ps. 254.8 billion, as compared to Ps. 282.0 billion as of December 31, 2020. As a result of the decrease in these obligations, we believe net cash flows from our operating and financing activities during the next twelve months, together with available cash and cash equivalents, will be sufficient to meet our working capital, debt service and capital expenditure requirements in such period
.
The
Ley de Ingresos de la Federación para el Ejercicio Fiscal de
2021
(the Federal Revenue Law for the Fiscal Year 2021) applicable to us as of January 1, 2020 provides for the incurrence of up to Ps. 42.1 billion of net indebtedness through a combination of domestic and international capital markets offerings and borrowings from domestic and international financial institutions.
We have a substantial amount of debt, including a substantial amount of short-term debt. Due to our heavy tax burden, our cash flow from operations in recent years has not been sufficient to fund our capital expenditures and other expenses and, accordingly, our debt has significantly increased and our working capital has deteriorated. Periods of low oil prices and increased oil price volatility, together with our declining production, have also had a negative impact on our ability to generate positive cash flows, which, together with our heavy tax burden, has further exacerbated our ability to fund our capital expenditures and other expenses. Despite fluctuating oil prices and our heavy tax burden, our cash flow from operations for the
six-month
period ended June 30, 2021, together with our funds from financing activities, was sufficient to fund our capital expenditures and other expenses. We expect that net cash flows from our operations and financing activities will also be sufficient to meet our working capital requirements, debt service and capital expenditures for the remainder of 2021. We continue to evaluate our capital expenditures needs and opportunities in light of the ongoing
COVID-19
pandemic.
As of June 30, 2021, our total indebtedness, including accrued interest, was Ps. 2,279.9 billion (U.S. $115.1 billion), in nominal terms, which represents a 0.9% increase in peso terms compared to our total indebtedness, including accrued interest, of Ps. 2,258.7 billion (U.S. $113.2 billion) as of December 31, 2020. As of June 30, 2021, 34.1% of our existing debt, or Ps. 778.2 billion (U.S. $39.3 billion), including accrued interest, is scheduled to mature in the next three years. Our working capital deteriorated during the
six-month
period ended June 30, 2021, from a negative working capital of Ps. 442.5 billion (U.S. $22.2 billion) as of December 31, 2020, to a negative working capital of Ps. 461.4 billion (U.S. $23.0 billion) as of June 30, 2021. Our level of debt may increase further in the short or medium term, as a result of new financing activities or future depreciation of the peso as compared to the U.S. dollar, and may have an adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity position. To service our debt, we have relied and may continue to rely on a combination of cash flow from operations, drawdowns under our available credit facilities, refinancing our existing indebtedness and repurchase transactions. In addition, we are taking actions to improve our financial position, as discussed above.
We currently have a substantial amount of employee benefits liabilities. Benefits to employees were approximately 31.7% of our total liabilities as of June 30, 2021, and any adjustments recorded will affect our net income and/or comprehensive net income during the corresponding period. As of June 30, 2021, our substantial unfunded reserve for retirement pensions and seniority premiums was approximately Ps. 1,302.1 billion. For more information on our Employee Benefits and Benefit Pension Plan, see “Item 5—Operating and Financial Review and Prospects—Critical Accounting Policies—Employee Benefits” and “Item 5—Operating and Financial Review and Prospects—Critical Accounting Policies—Benefit Pension Plan” in the Form
20-F.
Ratings address our creditworthiness and the likelihood of timely payment of our long-term debt securities. Ratings are not a recommendation to purchase, hold or sell securities and may be changed, suspended or withdrawn at any time. Our current ratings and the rating outlooks depend, in part, on economic conditions and other factors that affect credit risk and are outside our control, as well as assessments of the creditworthiness of Mexico. Certain ratings agencies have recently lowered Mexico’s credit ratings and their assessment of Mexico’s creditworthiness has and may further affect our credit ratings.
 
10

Ratings actions related to us that occurred in 2021 include the following:
 
  
On March 31, 2021, Fitch Ratings affirmed our long-term foreign and local currency ratings at
BB-.
The rating outlook is stable. In addition, Fitch simultaneously affirmed our national long-term ratings at A(mex) and national short-term ratings at F1(mex), and has withdrawn all national scale ratings for commercial reasons.
 
  
On April 30, 2021, HR Ratings affirmed our global credit ratings to HR BBB+(G) with a negative outlook and affirmed our local credit rating at HR AAA with a stable outlook.
 
  
On July 27, 2021, Moody’s lowered our credit rating for our outstanding notes, as well as credit ratings based on our guarantee to A3.mx/Ba3 from A2.mx/Ba2.
Further downgrades of our credit ratings, particularly those below investment grade, may have material adverse consequences on our ability to access the financial markets and/or our cost of financing. In turn, this could significantly harm our ability to meet our existing obligations, financial condition and results of operations.
If such constraints occur at a time when our cash flow from operations is less than the resources necessary to meet our debt service obligations, in order to provide additional liquidity to our operations, we could be forced to further reduce our planned capital expenditures, implement further austerity measures and/or utilize alternative financing mechanisms that do not constitute public debt. A reduction in our capital expenditure program could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations. Additionally, such measures may not be sufficient to permit us to meet our obligations. For more information regarding our credit ratings, please see “Item 5—Selected Financial Data—Liquidity and Capital Resources” in our Form
20-F.
Going Concern
Our unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which assumes that we can meet our payment obligations as they become due. As we describe in Notes
2-B
and
18-F
to our unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements included herein, there exists significant doubts concerning our ability to continue operating as a going concern. We discuss the circumstances that have caused these negative trends, as well our plans to improve our results, strengthen our ability to continue operating and achieve revenue maximization and efficiencies in Notes
2-B
and
18-F
to our unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements included herein. We intend to continue taking actions to improve our results of operations, capital expenditure plans and financial condition. We continue operating as a going concern, and our unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.
Cash Flows from Operating, Investing and Financing Activities
During the first six months of 2021, net cash flows from operating activities totaled Ps. 20.7 billion, as compared to net cash flows used in operating activities, which totaled Ps. 35.4 billion in the first six months of 2020. During the first six months of 2021, our net cash flows used in investing activities totaled Ps. 102.0 billion, as compared to Ps. 62.5 billion in the first six months of 2020. During the first six months of 2021, new financings totaled Ps. 746.5 billion and payments of principal and interest totaled Ps. 775.8 billion, as compared to Ps. 576.4 billion and Ps. 562.7 billion, respectively, during the first six months of 2020. During the first six months of 2021, we applied net funds of Ps. 102.3 billion to acquisitions of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment, other assets and intangible assets as compared to Ps. 62.6 billion in the first six months of 2020.
As of June 30, 2021, our cash and cash equivalents totaled Ps. 41.5 billion, as compared to Ps. 40.0 billion as of December 31, 2020. See Note 9 to our unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements included herein for more information about our cash and cash equivalents.
 
11

Liquidity Position
We define liquidity as funds available under our lines of credit as well as cash and cash equivalents. The following table summarizes our liquidity position as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020.
 
   
As of
 
   
June 30, 2021
   
December 31, 2020
 
   
(millions of pesos)
 
Amounts available under existing credit facilities
   Ps. 7,965    Ps. 74,903 
Cash and cash equivalents
   41,536    39,990 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Liquidity
   Ps. 49,501    Ps. 114,893 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Our lines of credit are fully committed and accordingly available at any time. We have a total amount of Ps. 189,481 million (U.S. $7,700 million and Ps. 37,000 million) in credit lines in order to provide liquidity, subject to our authorized net indebtedness. As of June 30, 2021, we had withdrawn Ps. 181,515 million (U.S. $7,525 million and Ps. 32,500 million) from these credit lines and had available Ps. 7,966 million (U.S. $175 million Ps. 4,500 million). As of September 24, we had withdrawn Ps. 169,737 million (U.S. $7,225 million and Ps. 25,000 million) from these credit lines and had available Ps. 21,516 million (U.S. $475 million and Ps. 12,000 million).
The following table summarizes our sources and uses of cash for the
six-month
periods ended June 30, 2021 and 2020:
 
   
For the six-month period ended

June 30,
 
   
2021
   
2020
 
   
(millions of pesos)
 
Net cash flows from (used in) operating activities
   Ps. 20,734    Ps. (35,447) 
Net cash flows (used in) investing activities
   (101,983   (62,466
Net cash flows from financing activities
   82,089    58,517 
Effects of foreign exchange on cash balances
   706    16,035 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
   Ps. 1,546    Ps. (23,361) 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Note: Numbers may not total due to rounding.
Recent Financing Activities
During the period from June 30, 2021 to September 24, 2021, we participated in the following financing activities:
 
  
On July 8, 2021, we entered into a U.S. $300,000,000 term loan due July 2024, which bears interest at a floating rate linked to the London Inter Bank Offered Rate (LIBOR) plus 320 basis points.
 
  
On July 16, 2021, we entered into a U.S. $750,000,000 term loan due January 2023, which bears interest at a floating rate linked to LIBOR plus a variable margin between 170 and 345 basis points determined by our long-term currency denominated debt ratings issued by S&P, Fitch and Moody’s.
 
  
On July 21, 2021, we renewed a promissory note entered into in January 2021 for Ps. 4,000,000,000 and an original term of 180 days. This renewal was carried out for Ps. 3,000,000,000 and a term of 120 days at a rate linked to TIIE plus 257.5 basis points.
 
  
On July 21, 2021, we renewed a promissory note entered into in January 2021 for Ps. 2,500,000,000 and an original term of 180 days. This renewal was carried out for Ps. 3,500,000,000 and a term of 161 days at a rate linked to TIIE plus 240 basis points.
 
  
On September 13, 2021, we entered into a U.S. $500,000,000 term loan due December 2021, which bears interest at a floating rate linked to LIBOR plus 200 basis points.
 
  
On September 21, 2021, we entered into a U.S. $300,000,000 promissory notes in three tranches due December 2021. These tranches bear interest at a floating rate linked to LIBOR plus 200 to 245 basis points.
During the period from July 1, 2021 to September 24, 2021, Holdings Holanda Services, B.V., as debtor, obtained U.S. $7,041 million in financing from its revolving credit lines and repaid U.S. $6,986 million. As of June 30, 2021, the outstanding amount under these revolving credit lines was U.S. $2,273 million. As of September 24, 2021, the outstanding amount under these revolving credit lines was U.S. $2,328 million.
For our financing activities for the period from January 1, 2021 to May 11, 2021, see “Item 5—Operating and Financial Review and Prospects—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Financing Activities—2021 Financing Activities” in the Form
20-F.
As of June 30, 2021, and as of the date of this report, we were not in default under any of our financing agreements.
 
12

Business Overview
Production
Set forth below are our selected summary operating data.
 
   
Six months ended

June 30,
   
 
   
 
 
   
2020
   
2021
   
Change
   
%
 
Operating Highlights
        
Production
        
Liquid crude oil (tbpd)
(1)(3)
   1,706    1,726    20    1.2 
Natural gas (mmcfpd)
(2)(3)
   3,624    3,679    55    1.5 
Petroleum products (tbpd)
(4)
   603    714    111    18.4 
Dry gas from units (mmcfpd)
   2,247    2,025    (222   (9.9
Natural gas liquids (tbpd)
   218    176    (42   (19.3
Petrochemicals (tt)
   767    676    (91   (11.9
Average crude oil exports (tbpd)
(5)
        
Isthmus
  U.S. $101.2   U.S. $145.7    45    44.0 
Maya
   1,041.3    848.9    (192   (18.5
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total
  U.S. $1,142.5   U.S. $994.6    (147.9   (12.9
Value of crude oil exports
(value in millions of U.S. dollars)
(5)
  U.S. $6,671.3   U.S. $10,849.1   U.S. $4,177.8    62.6 
Average PEMEX crude oil export prices per barrel
(6)
        
Isthmus
  U.S. $31.31   U.S. $60.90    29.6    94.5 
Maya
   32.50    60.31    27.8    85.6 
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Weighted average price
(7)
  U.S. $31.81   U.S. $60.27    28.5    89.5 
West Texas Intermediate crude oil average price per barrel
(5)
  U.S. $37.47   U.S. $61.22    23.8    63.4 
 
Notes: Numbers may not total due to rounding.
tbpd = thousands of barrels per day
mmcfpd = millions of cubic feet per day
tt = thousands of tons
n.a. not available
 
(1)
Includes crude oil and condensates.
(2)
Gas production does not include nitrogen.
(3)
Does not consider the production of oil and gas corresponding to the partner.
(4)
Gasoline production does not consider transfers.
(5)
The volume and value of crude oil exports reflects customary adjustments by P.M.I. Comercio Internacional, S.A. de C.V. (which we refer to as PMI), P.M.I. Trading Designated Activity Company (formerly P.M.I. Trading, Ltd., which we refer to as P.M.I. Trading DAC), P.M.I. Norteamérica, S.A. de C.V., (which we refer to as
PMI-NASA,
and, together with PMI and P.M.I. Trading DAC, we collectively refer to as the PMI Subsidiaries) to reflect the percentage of water in each shipment as of June 30, 2021.
(6)
Average price during period indicated based on billed amounts.
(7)
On September 24, 2021, the weighted average price of our crude oil export mix was U.S. $70.59 per barrel.
(8)
On September 24, 2021, the West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price was U.S. $73.98 per barrel.
Source: Petróleos Mexicanos and the PMI Subsidiaries.

Liquid crude oil daily production increased by 1.2% in the first six months of 2021, from 1,706 thousand barrels per day in the first six months of 2020 to 1,726 thousand barrels per day in the first six months of 2021. This increase was mainly due to:
 
  
a 15.3% and 77.7% increase in the production of light crude oil and condensates, respectively, of the Yaxche, Quesqui, Ixachi, Mulach, Octli and Tlacame fields and improved field performance.
Partially offset by:
 
  
a 4.7% decrease in the production of heavy crude oil, primarily due to the deceleration of development activities and declining production at certain fields of the
Ku-Maloob-Zaap
business unit, as well as a production stoppage for approximately 11 thousand barrels per day in January to suppress leaks in the 36” diameter pipeline from the Yaxche A platform to the Dos Bocas Maritime Terminal.
During the first six months of 2021, natural gas production increased by 1.5%, from 3,624 million cubic feet per day in the first six months of 2020 to 3,679 million cubic feet per day in the same period of 2021. This increase in production was primarily a result of:
 
  
a 0.5% increase in associated gas production, primarily due to an increase in the production of the Quesqui field and improved field performance; and
 
  
a 4.4% increase in
non-associated
gas production, mainly due to the incorporation of the production of the Ixachi field.
Production of petroleum products increased by 18.4% in the first six months of 2021, from 603 thousand barrels per day in the first six months of 2020 to 714 thousand barrels per day in the first six months of 2021. The increase in production of petroleum products was mainly due to the increase in crude oil processing levels recorded, which is explained by the continuity of the National Refining System rehabilitation program.
The production of distillates (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel) in the National Refining System increased by 31 thousand barrels per day in the first six months of 2021 as compared to the first six months of 2020. This increase in the production of distillates was mainly due to the Tula, Salina Cruz and Cadereyta refineries increasing production by 21 thousand barrels per day, 19 thousand barrels per day and 17 thousand barrels per day, respectively
During the first six months of 2021, dry gas production decreased by 9.9%, as compared to the same period of 2020. This decrease was mainly explained by a decrease in gas production at the Nuevo Pemex, Burgos and Poza Rica gas processing complexes. The decrease in gas production at the Nuevo Pemex, Burgos and Poza Rica gas processing complexes was mainly due to lower supply of sour and sweet wet gas from Pemex Exploration and Production.
During the first six months of 2021, natural gas liquids production decreased by 19.3%, as compared to the same period of 2020. The decrease was the result of a decrease in sour and sweet gas received from Pemex Exploration and Production fields.
During the first six months of 2021, the production of petrochemical products decreased by 91 thousand tons, a 11.9% decrease as compared to the first six months of 2020. This decrease was mainly explained by:
 
  
an 80 thousand ton decrease in the production of sulfur, as a result of lower production at the Ciudad Pemex, Nuevo Pemex and Cactus gas processing complexes, due to the shutdown of their sulfur recovery units, as the result of corrective maintenance;
 
  
a 67 thousand ton decrease in the production of ethane derivatives, mainly due to the derivatives units experiencing operational and auxiliary services difficulties;
 
  
a 40 thousand ton decrease in the production of aromatics and derivatives, mainly due to the intermittent operation of the continuous catalytic regenerative (CCR) plant at La Cangrejera petrochemical complex, due to problems with the supply of auxiliary services and the failure of a compressor; and
 
  
a 2 ton decrease in the production of propylene, due to lower production at La Cangrejera and Morelos petrochemical complexes due to decreased reliability.
This decrease was partially offset by:
 
  
a 53 thousand ton increase in the production of methane derivatives, which includes the production of ammonia and methanol, due to the stable operation of the ammonia VI unit of the Cosoleacaque petrochemical complex since March 2021, as a result of the maintenance work carried out on the refrigeration system unit, and the stable and unrestricted commercial operation of the methanol unit of the Independencia petrochemical complex since January 1, 2021;
 
  
a 29 thousand ton increase in the production of other petrochemicals, mainly due to an increase in the production of carbon dioxide at the Cosoleacaque petrochemical complex; and
 
  
a 16 thousand ton increase in raw material for carbon black production, mainly due to increased processing of heavy crude oil at the Cadereyta and Madero refineries.

Impacts of the
COVID-19
Pandemic in 2021
The ongoing effects on our business and our financial performance of the
COVID-19
pandemic remain highly uncertain. If the impact of the
COVID-19
pandemic continues for an extended period of time, it could adversely affect our ability to operate our business in the manner and on the timelines previously planned. Further, it could have accounting consequences, such as decreases in our revenues and the value of our inventories, foreign exchange losses, impairments of fixed assets, and affect our ability to operate effective internal control over financial reporting. For further information regarding the impact of the
COVID-19
pandemic on us, see “Item 3–—Risk Factors Related to Our Operations—Crude oil and natural gas prices are volatile and low crude oil and natural gas prices adversely affect our income and cash flows and the amount of hydrocarbon reserves that we have the right to extract and sell”, “Item 3––Risk Factors—The outbreak of
COVID-19
has had and may continue to have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition” and “Item 5—Overview” in the Form
20-F.
Industrial Transformation
Retail Service Stations
As of June 30, 2021, there were a total of 7,136 Pemex franchise gas stations, a decrease of 4.4% as compared to 7,468 Pemex gas stations as of December 31, 2020. As of June 30, 2021, 7,091 of these Pemex franchise gas stations were privately owned and operated as franchises, a decrease of 4.5% as compared to 7,423 privately-owned franchises as of December 31, 2020, while the remaining 45 were owned by Pemex Industrial Transformation, which was the same as of December 31, 2020. This decrease was mainly due to ongoing increased competition in the open market. In addition, as of June 30, 2021, Pemex Industrial Transformation supplied oil products to 6,082 gas stations outside of the Pemex franchise program, an increase of 7.3% as compared to 5,666 gas stations as of December 31, 2020. As of June 30, 2021, 951 of the gas stations outside of the Pemex franchise model operated under sublicenses of the Pemex brand, an increase of 7.7% as compared to 883 gas stations as of December 31, 2020 and, as of June 30, 2021. 5,131 gas stations used third party brands as of June 30, 2021, an increase of 7.3% as compared to 4,783 gas stations as of December 31, 2020. For more information regarding our gas stations, see “Item 4—Information on the Company—Industrial Transformation—Refining—Domestic Sales” and Item 4—Information on the Company—International Trading—Gas Stations in the United States” in the Form
20-F.

Deer Park Refinery
Since 1993, through our subsidiary company
PMI-NASA,
we have held a 49.99% interest in a limited partnership with Shell Oil Company, which holds a refinery located in Deer Park, Texas. The refinery has the capacity to process 340 thousand barrels per day of crude oil. Under the Deer Park Limited Partnership agreement, Shell Oil Company, as operator, is responsible for determining feedstock requirements. Shell Oil Company
and PMI-NASA
each provide 50% of the refinery’s crude oil input and own 50% of the refinery’s output. This agreement is limited to the specific purpose of operating the Deer Park refinery.
On May 24, 2021, the Board of Directors of Petróleos Mexicanos approved the investment for the acquisition of Shell Oil Company’s interest in the Deer Park Refining Limited Partnership L.P. On the same date, we signed an agreement to acquire the 50.01% interest in the Deer Park Limited Partnership currently held by Shell Oil Company, with an estimated price of U.S. $596.0 million, such that upon closing we will own 100% of the Deer Park refinery. The acquisition of the Deer Park refinery will be fully financed by the Mexican Government and is expected to close during the last quarter of 2021, subject to regulatory approvals and other customary conditions to closing. This acquisition is part of our self-sufficiency objective to supply fuel demand in Mexico.
Directors and Senior Management
Effective as of August 3, 2021, Mr. Rogelio Eduardo Ramírez de la O was ratified by the Chamber of Deputies as Secretary of Finance and Public Credit and therefore, in accordance with the Ley de Petróleos Mexicanos (Law of Petróleos Mexicanos), as member of the Board of Directors of Petróleos Mexicanos, replacing Mr. Arturo Herrera Gutierrez.
Exploration and Production
On July 2, 2021, an undersea gas pipeline ruptured in our
Ku-Maloob-Zaap
field in the Gulf of Mexico. The ensuing gas leak caused a fire in the ocean. According to our investigation, lightning in the area caused the fire when it struck gas that had risen to the ocean’s surface. We brought the gas leak under control within five hours. No oil leaked as a result of the accident and there were no reported injuries or deaths.
On July 5, 2021, the
Secretaría de Energía
(Ministry of Energy, or SENER) awarded control of the Zama field to us. We had been in discussions with the Block 7 Consortium, which is composed of Talos Energy Offshore Mexico 7, S. de R.L. de C.V., Sierra O&G Exploración y Producción, S. de R.L. de C.V. (now a WSDM company) and Premier Oil Exploration and Production Mexico, S.A. de C.V., in order to jointly submit a proposed unification agreement to the SENER. We were unable to reach an agreement with respect to the unification of the Zama field and, therefore, the SENER was empowered to award control of the field.
On August 22, 2021, a fire broke out at the
E-Ku-A2
platform of our
Ku-A
processing center in the
Ku-Maloob
Zaap business unit. Unfortunately, seven people lost their lives and six people were injured in the fire. Due to the fire, we temporarily stopped production at 125 wells. While we restored production of these wells as of August 30, 2021, this stoppage resulted in a decrease in production of 1.6 million barrels.
 
16


 
PETRÓLEOS MEXICANOS,
PRODUCTIVE STATE-OWNED SUBSIDIARIES
AND SUBSIDIARY COMPANIES
UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED
INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
AS OF JUNE 30, 2021 AND DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND
FOR THE THREE AND
SIX-MONTH
PERIODS ENDED
JUNE 30, 2021 AND 2020
 
F-1

PETRÓLEOS MEXICANOS, PRODUCTIVE STATE-OWNED SUBSIDIARIES
AND SUBSIDIARY COMPANIES
UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
AS OF JUNE 30, 2021 AND DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND FOR THE THREE AND
SIX-MONTH
PERIODS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 AND 2020
Index
 
 
 
Contents
  
Page
  
Unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements of:
   
  
  F-3
  
  F-4
  
  F-6
  
  F-7
  
  
F-8 
to F-53
 
F-2

PETRÓLEOS MEXICANOS, PRODUCTIVE STATE-OWNED SUBSIDIARIES AND SUBSIDIARY COMPANIES
UNDAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED INTERIM STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL POSITION
AS OF JUNE 30, 2021 AND DECEMBER 31, 2020
(Figures stated in thousands, except as noted)
 
 
   Note  June 30, 2021  December 31, 2020 
ASSETS
            
Current assets:
            
Cash and cash equivalents
  8,9  Ps. 41,535,969  Ps.39,989,781 
Customers
  8,10   97,934,559   68,382,413 
Other financing receivable
  8,10   39,738,861   31,615,623 
Other
non-financing
receivable
  10   112,743,372   89,789,428 
Inventories
  11   83,141,990   52,605,661 
Current portion of the Government Bonds
  8, 15-B   15,973,436   18,036,557 
Derivative financial instruments
  8   18,625,086   25,947,993 
Other current assets
      1,486,420   3,492,283 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total current assets
      411,179,693   329,859,739 
Non-current
assets:
            
Investments in joint ventures and associates
  8,12   8,617,412   12,015,129 
Wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment, net
  13   1,303,450,733   1,276,129,521 
Rights of use
      56,970,930   59,195,257 
Long-term notes receivable, net of current portion
  8,15-A   858,648   886,827 
Long-term portion of the Government Bonds
  8,15-B   110,783,999   111,512,962 
Deferred income taxes and duties
      85,128,031   108,529,199 
Intangible assets, net
  14   23,003,774   22,775,784 
Other assets
  15-C   37,026,758   7,583,510 
Total
non-current
assets
     
Ps
.
1,625,840,285  
Ps
.
 
1,598,628,189 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total assets
     Ps. 2,037,019,978  Ps. 1,928,487,928 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
LIABILITIES
            
Current liabilities:
            
Short-term debt and current portion of long—term debt
  8,16  Ps
.
503,054,910  Ps.391,097,267 
Short-term leases
  8   8,197,327   8,106,937 
Suppliers
  8   254,834,764   281,978,041 
Income taxes and duties payable
      64,055,788   51,200,314 
Accounts and accrued expenses payable
  8   34,033,948   30,709,497 
Derivative financial instruments
  8   8,401,709   9,318,015 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total current liabilities
     
Ps
.
872,578,446  
Ps
.
772,410,071 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Long-term liabilities:
            
Long-term debt, net of current portion
  8,16   1,776,848,493   1,867,630,050 
Long-term leases, net of current portion
  8   52,998,972   55,077,191 
Employee benefits
      1,302,069,834   1,535,168,086 
Provisions for sundry creditors
  17, 19   96,647,328   94,625,884 
Other liabilities
      6,567,307   4,891,562 
Deferred income taxes and duties
      2,569,555   3,412,114 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total long-term liabilities
     
Ps
.
 
3,237,701,489  
Ps
.
3,560,804,887 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total liabilities
     
Ps
.
4,110,279,935  
P
s.
4,333,214,958 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
EQUITY (DEFICIT)
            
Controlling interest:
            
Certificates of Contribution “A”
  18  Ps. 638,105,447  Ps. 524,931,447 
Mexican Government contributions
      43,730,591   43,730,591 
Legal reserve
      1,002,130   1,002,130 
Accumulated other comprehensive result
      (9,998,279  (251,284,990
Accumulated deficit:
            
From prior years
      (2,723,475,900  (2,214,597,087
Net loss for the period
      (22,885,349  (508,878,813
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total controlling interest
      (2,073,521,360  (2,405,096,722
Total
non-controlling
interest
      261,403   369,692 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total equity (deficit)
     Ps.(2,073,259,957)  Ps.(2,404,727,030) 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total liabilities and equity (deficit)
     Ps. 2,037,019,978  Ps. 1,928,487,928 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements.
 
F-3

PETRÓLEOS MEXICANOS, PRODUCTIVE STATE-OWNED SUBSIDIARIES AND SUBSIDIARY
COMPANIES
UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED INTERIM STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
FOR THE
SIX-MONTH
PERIODS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 AND 2020
(Figures stated in thousands, except as noted)
 
   Note  2021  2020 
Net sales:
            
Domestic
     Ps.344,327,164 Ps.256,981,527 
Export
      318,597,981   206,401,422 
Services income
      2,063,727   2,420,226 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total of sales
  7   664,988,872   465,803,175 
Reversal of impairment of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment, net
  13   32,192,460   7,924,576 
Cost of sales
      463,838,720   396,199,258 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Gross income
      233,342,612   77,528,493 
Distribution, transportation and sale expenses
      6,913,752   8,568,416 
Administrative expenses
      67,250,355   72,875,246 
Other revenues
      5,483,414   6,234,886 
Other expenses
      (955,817  (1,704,077
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Operating income
      163,706,102   615,640 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Financing income
(1)
      15,221,002   9,252,136 
Financing (cost)
(2)
      (74,163,068  (96,841,499
Derivative financial instruments (cost), net
      (12,357,848  (15,020,580
Foreign exchange gain (loss), net
      23,595,953   (419,660,915
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Sum of financing (costs) net, derivative instruments (cost) net and foreign exchange gains(loss), net
      (47,703,961  (522,270,858
(Loss) sharing in joint ventures and associates
  12   (3,208,284  (810,624
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Income (loss) before duties, taxes and other
      112,793,857   (522,465,842
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Profit-sharing duty, net
      135,551,525   72,310,729 
Income tax expense
      235,696   11,810,752 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total duties, taxes and other
      135,787,221   84,121,481 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Net (loss)
     Ps.(22,993,364 Ps.(606,587,323
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Other comprehensive results:
            
Items that will be reclassified subsequently to profit or loss:
            
Currency translation effect
      (250,749  25,625,590 
Items that will not be reclassified subsequently to profit or loss:
            
Actuarial gains (losses)—employee benefits, net of taxes
  18 d.  Ps.241,537,186  Ps.(54,156
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total other comprehensive results
      241,286,437   25,571,434 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total comprehensive income (loss)
     Ps.218,293,073  Ps.(581,015,889
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Net loss attributable to:
            
Controlling interest
     Ps.(22,885,349 Ps.(606,461,210
Non-controlling
interest
      (108,015  (126,113
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Net (loss)
     Ps.(22,993,364 Ps.(606,587,323
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Other comprehensive results attributable to:
            
Controlling interest
     Ps.241,286,711  Ps.25,660,799 
Non-controlling
interest
      (274  (89,365
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total other comprehensive results
     Ps.241,286,437  Ps.25,571,434 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Comprehensive income (loss):
            
Controlling interest
     Ps.218,401,362  Ps.(580,800,411
Non-controlling
interest
      (108,289  (215,478
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total comprehensive income (loss)
     
Ps.
 
218,293,073  
Ps.
 
(581,015,889
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements.
 
 
(1) 
Includes financing income from investments.
(2) 
Mainly interest on debt.
 
F-4

PETRÓLEOS MEXICANOS, PRODUCTIVE STATE-OWNED SUBSIDIARIES AND SUBSIDIARY
COMPANIES
UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED INTERIM STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
FOR THE THREE-MONTH PERIODS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 AND 2020
(Figures stated in thousands, except as noted)
 
   Note  2021  2020 
Net sales:
            
Domestic
     Ps.176,692,084  Ps.99,199,107 
Export
      169,628,253   81,260,836 
Services income
      1,115,378   1,233,118 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total of sales
  7   347,435,715   181,693,061 
(Impairment) of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment, net
  13   (14,437,323  (18,391,590
Cost of sales
      245,386,451   153,139,702 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Gross income
      87,611,941   10,161,769 
Distribution, transportation and sale expenses
      3,815,840   5,174,677 
Administrative expenses
      33,700,377   37,972,304 
Other revenues
      2,940,977   3,354,345 
Other expenses
      (738,534  46,080 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Operating income (loss)
      52,298,167   (29,584,787
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Financing income
(3)
      4,898,904   3,553,559 
Financing (cost)
(4)
      (37,112,797  (43,938,985
Derivative financial instruments (cost), net
      (2,425,848  632,390 
Foreign exchange gain, net
      80,200,387   49,545,434 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Sum of financing (costs) net, derivative instruments (cost) net and foreign exchange gains, net
      45,560,646   9,792,398 
(Loss) sharing in joint ventures and associates
  12   (1,366,193  (919,067
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Income (loss) before duties, taxes and other
      96,492,620   (20,711,456
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Profit-sharing duty, net
      74,334,821   14,747,723 
Income tax expense
      7,793,567   8,877,522 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total duties, taxes and other
      82,128,388   23,625,245 
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
     Ps.14,364,232  Ps.(44,336,701
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Other comprehensive results:
            
Items that will be reclassified subsequently to profit or loss:
            
Currency translation effect
      (7,350,952  (3,111,539
Items that will not be reclassified subsequently to profit or loss:
            
Actuarial losses—employee benefits, net of taxes
  18 d.  Ps.(7,794,399 Ps.(191,178,079
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total other comprehensive results
      (15,145,351  (194,289,618
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total comprehensive (loss)
     Ps.(781,119 Ps.(238,626,319
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Net loss attributable to:
            
Controlling interest
     Ps.14,411,719  
P
s.
(44,331,120
Non-controlling
interest
      (47,487  (5,581
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
     Ps.14,364,232  Ps.(44,336,701
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Other comprehensive results attributable to:
            
Controlling interest
     Ps.(15,144,291 Ps.(194,221,795
Non-controlling
interest
      (1,060  (67,823
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total other comprehensive results
     
Ps.
 
(15,145,351 Ps.(194,289,618
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Comprehensive (loss) income:
            
Controlling interest
     Ps.(732,572 Ps.(238,552,915
Non-controlling
interest
      (48,547  (73,404
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total comprehensive (loss)
     Ps.(781,119 
Ps.
 
(238,626,319
      
 
 
  
 
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements.
 
 
 
(1) 
Includes financing income from investments.
(2) 
Mainly interest on debt.
 
F-5

PETRÓLEOS MEXICANOS, PRODUCTIVE STATE-OWNED SUBSIDIARIES AND SUBSIDIARY COMPANIES
UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED INTERIM STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY (DEFICIT), NET
FOR THE
SIX-MONTH
PERIODS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 AND 2020
(Figures stated in thousands, except as noted)
 
   Controlling interest       
               Accumulated other comprehensive income
(loss)
  Accumulated deficit          
   Certificates of
Contribution “A”
   Mexican
Government
contributions
   Legal reserve   Cumulative
currency translation
effect
  Actuarial (losses)
gains on employee
benefits effect
  For the period  From prior years  Total  
Non-controlling

interest
  Total equity
(deficit), net
 
Balances as of December 31, 2019
  Ps.478,675,447   Ps.43,730,591   Ps.1,002,130   Ps.43,229,070  Ps.(283,307,660 Ps.(281,490,302 Ps.(1,933,106,785 Ps.(1,931,267,509 Ps.(141,793 Ps.(1,931,409,302
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Transfer to accumulated deficit
   —      —      —      —     —     281,490,302   (281,490,302  —     —     —   
Increase in Mexican Government contributions
   46,063,000    —      —      —     —     —     —     46,063,000   —     46,063,000 
Non-controlling
divestment
   —      —      —      —     —     —     —     —     783,748   783,748 
Total comprehensive (loss) income
   —      —      —      25,714,955   (54,156  (606,461,210  —     (580,800,411  (215,478  (581,015,889
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Balances as of June 30, 2020
   524,738,447    43,730,591    1,002,130    68,944,025   (283,361,816  (606,461,210  (2,214,597,087  (2,466,004,920  426,477   (2,465,578,443)
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Balances as of December 31, 2020
  Ps.524,931,447   Ps.43,730,591   Ps.1,002,130   Ps.51,201,257  Ps.(302,486,247 Ps.(508,878,813 Ps.(2,214,597,087 Ps.(2,405,096,722 Ps.369,692  Ps.(2,404,727,030
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Transfer to accumulated deficit
   —      —      —      —     —     508,878,813   (508,878,813  —     —     —   
Increase in Mexican Government contributions
   113,174,000    —      —      —     —     —     —     113,174,000   —     113,174,000 
Total comprehensive income (loss)
   —      —      —      (250,476  241,537,187   (22,885,349  —     218,401,362   (108,289  218,293,073 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Balances as of June 30, 2021
  Ps.
 
638,105,447   Ps.
 
43,730,591   Ps.
 
1,002,130   Ps.50,950,781  Ps.
 
(60,949,060)  Ps.
 
(22,885,349 Ps.
 
(2,723,475,900 Ps.
 
(2,073,521,360 Ps.261,403  Ps.
 
(2,073,259,957
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements.
 
F-6

PETRÓLEOS MEXICANOS, PRODUCTIVE STATE-OWNED SUBSIDIARIES AND SUBSIDIARY 
COMPANIES
UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
FOR THE
SIX-MONTH
PERIODS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 AND 2020
(Figures stated in thousands, except as noted)
 
   2021  2020 
Operating activities
         
Net (loss)
  Ps.(22,993,364 Ps.(606,587,323
Items related to investment activities
         
Income taxes and duties
   135,787,221   84,121,480 
Depreciation and amortization of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment
   68,197,867   64,324,775 
Amortization of intangible assets
   81,275   190,744 
(Reversal of impairment) of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment
   (32,192,460  (7,924,576
Capitalized unsuccessful wells
   6,476   3,237,075 
Unsuccessful wells from intangible assets
   4,663,242   4,258,607 
Loss from derecognition of disposal of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment
   1,047,168   2,043,836 
Depreciation of rights of use
   3,254,163   3,691,546 
Impairment of rights of use
   213,260   —   
Unrealized foreign exchange (income) of reserve for well abandonment
   1,620,504   1,770,407 
Gains from the transfer of shares
   —     (833,180
Loss sharing in joint ventures and associates
   3,208,284   810,624 
Items related to financing activities
         
Unrealized foreign exchange (income) loss
   (23,916,994  397,694,576 
Interest expense
   74,163,068   96,841,499 
Interest income
   (15,221,002  (3,966,492
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
    197,918,708   39,673,598 
Profit-sharing duty paid
   (120,757,320  (68,057,759
Derivative financial instruments
   6,406,601   (11,035,118)
Accounts receivable
   (46,178,939  1,545,038 
Inventories
   (22,968,510  28,148,874 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
   3,324,450   6,429,833 
Suppliers
   (29,135,136  (55,742,807
Provisions for sundry creditors
   3,301,332   20,255,055 
Employee benefits
   8,438,936   33,298,143 
Other taxes and duties
   20,384,181   (29,962,047
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
Net cash flows from (used in) operating activities
   20,734,303   (35,447,190
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
Investing activities
         
Interests collected
   295,948   —   
Resources from the transfer of shares
   —     134,716 
Other notes receivable
   —     36,338 
Other assets
   (27,437,384  75,914 
Acquisition of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment
   (65,616,447  (54,261,437
Intangible assets
   (9,224,626  (8,451,176
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
Net cash flows (used in) investing activities
   (101,982,509  (62,465,645
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
(Cash deficit) before financing activities
   (81,248,206)  (97,912,835
Financing activities
         
Increase in equity due to Certificates of Contribution “A”
   113,174,000   46,063,000 
Long-term receivables from the Mexican Government
   —     4,080,544 
Interest received for long-term
receivables
from the Mexican Government
   3,472,081   903,126 
Lease payments of principal
   (2,880,331  —   
Lease payments of interest
   (2,310,719  (6,159,671
Loans obtained from financial institutions
   746,457,255   576,365,276 
Debt payments, principal only
   (699,214,601  (494,855,903
Interest paid
   76,608,807  (67,879,184
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
Net cash flows from (used in) financing activities
   82,088,878   58,517,188 
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
Net
increase 
(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
   840,672   (39,395,647
Effects of foreign exchange on cash balances
   705,516   16,035,097 
Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the period
   39,989,781   60,621,631 
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the period (Note 9)
  Ps.41,535,969  Ps.37,261,081 
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements.
 
F-7

PETRÓLEOS MEXICANOS, PRODUCTIVE STATE-OWNED SUBSIDIARIES AND SUBSIDIARY COMPANIES
NOTES TO THE UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED INTERIM FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
AS OF JUNE 30, 2021 AND DECEMBER 31, 2020 AND
FOR THE THREE AND
SIX-MONTH
PERIODS ENDED JUNE 30, 2021 AND 2020
(Figures stated in thousands, except as noted)
NOTE 1. STRUCTURE
 
AND BUSINESS OPERATIONS OF PETRÓLEOS MEXICANOS, SUBSIDIARY ENTITIES AND SUBSIDIARY COMPANIES
Petróleos Mexicanos was created by a decree issued by the Mexican Congress on June 7, 1938. The decree was published in the
Diario Oficial de la Federación
(“Official Gazette of the Federation”) on July 20, 1938 and came into effect on that date. On December 20, 2013, the
Decreto por el que se reforman y adicionan diversas disposiciones de la Constitución Política de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos, en Materia de Energía
(Decree that amends and supplements various provisions of the Mexican Constitution relating to energy matters), was published in the Official Gazette of the Federation. This Decree came into effect on December 21, 2013 and includes transitional articles setting forth the general framework and timeline for implementing legislation relating to the energy sector.
On August 11, 2014, the
Ley de Petróleos Mexicanos
(the “Petróleos Mexicanos Law”) was published in the Official Gazette of the Federation. The Petróleos Mexicanos Law became effective on October 7, 2014, except for certain provisions. On December 2, 2014, the
Secretaría de Energía
(“Ministry of Energy”) published in the Official Gazette of the Federation the declaration pursuant to which the special regime governing Petróleos Mexicanos’ activities relating to productive state-owned subsidiaries, affiliates, compensation, assets, administrative liabilities, state dividend, budget and debt came into effect. On June 10, 2015, the
Disposiciones Generales de Contratación para Petróleos Mexicanos y sus Empresas Productivas Subsidiarias
(General Contracting Provisions for Petróleos Mexicanos and its productive state-owned subsidiaries) was published in the Official Gazette of the Federation and the following day the special regime for acquisitions, leases, services and public works matters came into effect.
Once the Petróleos Mexicanos Law came into effect, Petróleos Mexicanos was transformed from a decentralized public entity to a productive state-owned company. Petróleos Mexicanos is a legal entity empowered to own property and carry on business in its own name with the purpose of carrying out exploration and extraction of crude oil and other hydrocarbons in the United Mexican States (“Mexico”), as well as the collecting, selling and trading of hydrocarbons.
The Subsidiary Entities,
Pemex Exploración y Producción
(“Pemex Exploration and Production”),
Pemex Transformación
Industrial
(“Pemex Industrial Transformation”) and
Pemex Logística
(“Pemex Logistics”) are productive state-owned subsidiaries empowered to own property and carry on business in their own names, subject to the direction and coordination of Petróleos Mexicanos (the “Subsidiary Entities”).
The primary purposes of the Subsidiary Entities are as follows:
 
  
Pemex Exploration and Production: This entity is in charge of exploration and extraction of crude oil and solid, liquid or gaseous hydrocarbons in Mexico, in the exclusive economic zone of Mexico and abroad, as well as drilling services and repair and services of wells;
 
  
Pemex Industrial Transformation: This entity performs activities related to refining, transformation, processing, importing, exporting, trading and the sale of hydrocarbons, as well as commercializes, distributes and trades methane, ethane and propylene, directly or through others; as well as producing, distributing and trading ammonia and its derivatives and fertilizers, as well as provides related services; and
 
  
Pemex Logistics: This entity provides transportation, storage and related services for crude oil, petroleum products and petrochemicals to PEMEX (as defined below) and other companies, through pipelines and maritime and terrestrial means, and provides guard and management services.
The principal distinction between the Subsidiary Entities and the Subsidiary Companies (as defined below) is that the Subsidiary Entities are productive state-owned entities, whereas the Subsidiary Companies are affiliate companies that were formed in accordance with the applicable laws of each of the respective jurisdictions in which they were incorporated.
The “Subsidiary Companies” are defined as those companies which are controlled, directly or indirectly, by Petróleos Mexicanos.
“Associates,” as used herein, means those companies in which Petróleos Mexicanos has significant influence but not control or joint control over its financial and operating policies. Petróleos Mexicanos, the Subsidiary Entities and the Subsidiary Companies are referred to collectively herein as “PEMEX”.
PEMEX’s address and its principal place of business is: Av. Marina Nacional No. 329, Col. Verónica Anzures, Alcaldía Miguel Hidalgo, 11300, Ciudad de México, México.
 
F-8

NOTE 2. AUTHORIZATION AND BASIS OF PREPARATION
Authorization –
On September
2
8
, 2021, these unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements under IFRS and the notes hereto were authorized for issuance by the following officers: Mr. Octavio Romero Oropeza, Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Alberto Velázquez García, Chief Financial Officer, Mr. Carlos Fernando Cortez González, Deputy Director of Budgeting and Accounting, and Mr. Oscar René Orozco Piliado, Associate Managing Director of Accounting.
Statement of compliance –
PEMEX prepared its unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, and for the
six-month
periods ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, in accordance with IAS 34, “Interim Financial Reporting” (“IAS 34”) of the International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”).
These unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements do not include all the information and disclosures required for full annual consolidated financial statements and should be read in conjunction with PEMEX’s audited consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2020. PEMEX estimates that there is no significant impact on its unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements due to the seasonality of operations. These unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements follow the same accounting policies and methods of computation as PEMEX’s audited consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2020.
 
A.
Basis of accounting
These unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements have been prepared using the historical cost basis method, except for the following items, which have been measured using an alternative basis.
 
Item
  
Basis of measurement
Derivative Financial Instruments (“DFIs”)  Fair Value
Employee Benefits  Fair Value of plan assets less present value of the obligation (defined benefit plan)
 
B.
Going concern
The unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis, which assumes that PEMEX will be able to continue its operations and can meet its payment obligations for a reasonable period. (See Note
18-f).
 
F-9

C.
Functional
 
and reporting currency
These unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements are presented in Mexican pesos, which is both PEMEX’s functional currency and reporting currency, due to the following:
 
 i.
The economic environment in which PEMEX operates is Mexico, where the legal currency is the Mexican peso;
 
 ii.
The budget through which Petróleos Mexicanos and its Subsidiary Entities operate as entities of the Mexican Government, including the ceiling for personnel services, is elaborated, approved and exercised in Mexican pesos
;
 
 iii.
Employee benefits provision was approximately 32% and 35% of PEMEX’s total liabilities as of each of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively. This provision is computed, denominated and payable in Mexican pesos; and
 
 iv.
Cash flows for payment of general expenses, taxes and duties are realized in Mexican pesos.
Although the sales prices of certain products are based on international U.S. dollar-indices, final domestic selling prices are governed by the economic and financial policies established by the Mexican Government. Accordingly, ca
s
h flows from domestic sales are generated and received in Mexican pesos
.
Mexico’s monetary policy regulator, the
Banco de México
(“Mexican Central Bank”), requires that Mexican Government entities other than financial entities sell their foreign currency to the Mexican Central Bank in accordance with its terms, receiving Mexican pesos in exchange, which is the currency of legal tender in Mexico.
Terms definition –
References in these unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements and the related notes to “pesos” or “Ps.” refers to Mexican pesos, “U.S. dollars” or “U.S. $” refers to dollars of the United States of America, “yen” or “¥” refers to Japanese yen, “euro” or “€” refers to the legal currency of the European Economic and Monetary Union, “Pounds sterling” or “£” refers to the legal currency of the United Kingdom and “Swiss francs” or “CHF” refers to the legal currency of the Swiss Confederation. Figures in all currencies are presented in thousands of the relevant currency unit, except exchange rates and product and share prices.
 
D.
Use of judgments and estimates
The preparation of the unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements in accordance with IFRS requires the use of estimates and assumptions made by PEMEX’s management that affect the recorded amounts of assets and liabilities and the disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities as of the date of these unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements, as well as the recorded amounts of income, costs and expenses during the period. Actual results may differ from these estimates.
Significant estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed, and the effects of such revisions are recognized in the periods in which any estimates are revised and in any future periods affected by such revision.
The significant judgements made by management in applying PEMEX’s accounting policies and the key sources of estimation uncertainty were the same as those described in PEMEX’s audited consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2020.
 
 i.
Measurement of fair values
Some of PEMEX’s accounting policies and disclosures require the measurement of the fair values of financial assets and liabilities, as well as
non-financial
assets and liabilities.
PEMEX has an established control framework with respect to the measurement of fair values. This includes a valuation team that has overall responsibility for overseeing all significant fair value measurements, including Level 3 fair values.
The valuation team regularly reviews significant unobservable inputs and valuation adjustments. If third party information, such as broker quotes or pricing services, is used to measure fair values, then the valuation team assesses the evidence obtained from the third parties to support the conclusion that these valuations meet the requirements of IFRS, including the level in the fair value hierarchy in which the valuations should be classified.
 
F-10

When measuring the fair value of an asset or a liability, PEMEX uses market observable data as far as possible. Fair values are categorized into different levels in a fair value hierarchy based on the inputs used in the valuation techniques as follows.
 
  
Level 1: quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.
 
  
Level 2: inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly (i.e. as prices) or indirectly (i.e. derived from prices).
 
  
Level 3: inputs for the asset or liability that are not based on observable market data (unobservable inputs).
If the inputs used to measure the fair value of an asset or a liability might be categorized in different levels of the fair value hierarchy, then the fair value measurement is categorized in its entirety in the same level of the fair value hierarchy as the lowest level input that is significant to the entire measurement.
PEMEX recognizes
transfers
between levels of the fair value hierarchy at the end of the reporting period during which the change has occurred.
NOTE 3. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
The accounting policies applied in the
preparation
of these unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements are consistent with those applied in the preparation of PEMEX’s annual consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2020, except for the adoption of new standards effective as of January 1, 2021. However, these new standards have not had
an
 impact on the unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements of PEMEX.
In connection with the Interest Rate Benchmark Reform – Phase 2 (Amendments to IFRS 9, IAS 39, IFRS 7, IFRS 4 and IFRS 16), which became effective on January 1, 2021, the amendments address issues that might affect financial reporting as a result of reforms to IBOR interest rate benchmarks, including the effects of changes to contractual cash flows or hedging relationships arising from the replacement of IBOR interest rate benchmarks with alternative benchmark rates. The amendments provide practical relief from certain requirements in IFRS 9, IAS 39, IFRS 7, IFRS 4 and IFRS 16 relating to:
 
  
changes in the basis for determining contractual cash flows of financial assets, financial liabilities and lease liabilities; and
 
  
hedge accounting
.
The discontinuation of the publication of these rates was originally scheduled for December 2021. Nevertheless, on November 2020, the ICE Benchmark Administration Limited (known as “ICE”) announced an extension until June 2023 for the publication of the most common LIBOR rates in dollars.
Therefore, PEMEX has identified and is reviewing contracts, expiring after the applicable cessation dates, that could have an impact derived from the change in the aforementioned rates. PEMEX will continue working on any amendments to the contracts which may be required as a result of the transition.
PEMEX has a reduced number of financial instruments (debt instruments and DFIs) referenced to floating rates in U.S. dollars with maturity and interest rate fixation after June 2023.
PEMEX is currently monitoring the evolution of the IBORs transition in the market, to anticipate any negative impact that these changes could have.
Once the alternative reference rates are defined, as well as the new discount curves and any other valuation parameters, PEMEX will be able to estimate the impact that such changes will have on financial instruments’ market value and financial cost.
NOTE 4. STANDARDS ISSUED BUT NOT YET EFFECTIVE
A number of new standards and amendments to standards are effective for annual periods beginning after January 1, 2021, and earlier application is permitted; however, PEMEX has not early adopted any of the forthcoming new or amended standards in preparing these unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements.
 
F-11

NOTE 5. SUBSIDIARY ENTITIES AND SUBSIDIARY COMPANIES
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the Subsidiary Entities consolidated in these financial statements include Pemex Exploration and Production, Pemex Industrial Transformation and Pemex Logistics. Former Subsidiary Entity Pemex Fertilizers was also consolidated in these financial statements until December 31, 2020.
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the consolidated Subsidiary Companies are as follows:
 
  
PEP Marine, DAC. (“PEP DAC”)
(v)(viii)
 
  
P.M.I. Holdings, B.V. (“PMI HBV”)
(i)(vii)(xii)
 
  
P.M.I. Trading DAC (“PMI Trading”)
(i)(vii)(xi)
 
  
P.M.I. Holdings Petróleos España, S. L. (“HPE”)
(i)(vii)(viii)
 
  
P.M.I. Services North America, Inc. (“PMI SUS”)
(i)(vii)(x)
 
  
P.M.I. Norteamérica, S. A. de C. V. (“PMI NASA”)
(i)(vii)(viii)
 
  
P.M.I. Comercio Internacional, S. A. de C. V. (“PMI CIM”)
(i)(ii)(viii)
 
  
P.M.I. Campos Maduros SANMA, S. de R. L. de C. V. (“SANMA”)
(vii)(viii)
 
  
Pro-Agroindustria,
S. A. de C. V. (“AGRO”)
(vii)(viii)
 
  
P.T.I. Infraestructura de Desarrollo, S. A. de C. V. (“PTI ID”)
(vi)(vii)(viii)
 
  
P.M.I. Cinturón Transoceánico Gas Natural, S. A. de C. V. (“PMI CT”)
(i)(iii)
 
  
P.M.I. Transoceánico Gas LP, S. A. de C. V. (“PMI TG”)
(i)(iii)
 
  
P.M.I. Servicios Portuarios Transoceánicos, S. A. de C. V. (“PMI SP”)
(i)(vii)(viii)
 
  
P.M.I. Midstream del Centro, S. A. de C. V. (“PMI MC”)
(i)(vi)
 
  
PEMEX Procurement International, Inc. (“PPI”)
(vii)(x)
 
  
Hijos de J. Barreras, S. A. (“HJ BARRERAS”)
(ii)(iv)
 
  
PEMEX Finance, Ltd. (“FIN”)
(vii)(xiii)
 
  
Mex Gas Internacional, S. L. (“MGAS”)
(vii)(viii)
 
  
Pemex Desarrollo e Inversión Inmobiliaria, S. A. de C. V. (“PDII”)
(vii)(viii)
 
  
Kot Insurance Company, AG. (“KOT”)
(vii)(xiii)
 
  
PPQ Cadena Productiva, S.L. (“PPQCP”)
(vii)(viii)
 
  
III Servicios, S. A. de C. V. (“III Servicios”)
(vii)(viii)
 
  
PM.I. Ducto de Juárez, S. de R.L. de C.V. (“PMI DJ”)
(i)(vii)(viii)
 
  
PMX Fertilizantes Holding, S.A de C.V. (“PMX FH”)
(vii)(viii)
 
  
PMX Fertilizantes Pacífico, S.A. de C.V. (“PMX FP”)
(vii)(viii)
 
  
Grupo Fertinal (“GP FER”)
(vii)(viii)
 
  
Compañía Mexicana de Exploraciones, S.A. de C.V. (“COMESA”)
(ii)(viii)
 
  
P.M.I. Trading Mexico, S.A. de C.V. (“TRDMX”)
(i)(vii)(viii)
 
  
Holdings Holanda Services, B.V. (“HHS”)
(vii)(xii)
 
F-12

 i.
Member Company of the “PMI Subsidiaries”. 
 
 ii.
Non-controlling
interest company. (98.33% in PMI CIM and 60.0% in COMESA).
 
 iii.
These companies were merged into PMI NASA in 2020.
 
 iv.
As of May 2020, this company is not included in the consolidation (see Note
18-g).
 
 v.
This company was liquidated in August 2020.
 
 vi.
This company was liquidated in April 2020.
 
 vii.
Petróleos Mexicanos owns 100.0% of the interests in this Subsidiary Company
.
 
 viii.
Operates in Mexico.
 
 ix.
Operates in Spain.
 
 x.
Operates in United States of America.
 
 xi.
Operates in Ireland.
 
 xii.
Operates in Netherlands.
 
 xiii.
Operates in Switzerland.
 
 xiv.
Operates in Cayman Islands.
NOTE 6. SEGMENT FINANCIAL INFORMATION
PEMEX’s primary business is the exploration and production of crude oil and natural gas, as well as the production, processing, marketing and distribution of petroleum and petrochemical products. As of June 30, 2021, PEMEX’s operations were conducted through five business segments: Exploration and Production, Industrial Transformation, Logistics, the Trading Companies and Corporate and Other Operating Subsidiary Companies. Until December 31, 2020, PEMEX’s operations were also conducted through an additional business segment, Fertilizers (merged into the Industrial Transformation segment as of January 1, 2021). Due to PEMEX’s structure, there are significant amounts of inter-segment sales among the reporting segments, which are made at internal transfer prices established by PEMEX that are intended to reflect international market prices.
The primary sources of revenue for PEMEX’s business segments are as described below:
 
  
The exploration and production segment earns revenues from domestic sales of crude oil and natural gas, and from exporting crude oil through certain of the Trading Companies. Crude oil export sales are made through the agent subsidiary company PMI CIM, to 17 major customers in various foreign markets. Approximately half of PEMEX’s crude oil is sold to Pemex Industrial Transformation.
 
  
The industrial transformation segment earns revenues from sales of refined petroleum products and derivatives, mainly to third parties within the domestic market. This segment also sells a significant portion of the fuel oil it produces to the
Comisión Federal de Electricidad
(Federal Eletricity Commission, or “CFE”) and a significant portion of jet fuel produced to the
Aeropuertos y Servicios Auxiliares
(Airports and Auxiliary Services Agency). The refining segment’s most important products are different types of gasoline and diesel.
The industrial transformation segment also earns revenues from domestic sources generated by sales of natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, naphtha, butane and ethane and certain other petrochemicals such as methane derivatives, ethane derivatives, aromatics and derivatives.
 
  
The logistics segment earns income from transportation and storage of crude oil, petroleum products and petrochemicals, as well as related services, which it provides by employing pipelines and offshore and onshore resources, and from providing services related to the maintenance, handling, guarding and management of these products.
 
  
The fertilizers segment earns revenues from trading ammonia, fertilizers and its derivatives, mostly in the domestic market. This entity was merged into the Industrial Transformation segment as of January 1, 2021.
 
  
The trading companies segment, which consist of PMI CIM, PMI NASA, PMI Trading and MGAS (the “Trading Companies”), earns revenues from trading crude oil, natural gas and petroleum and petrochemical products in international markets.
 
  
The segment related to corporate and other operating Subsidiary Companies provides administrative, financing, consulting and logistical services, as well as economic, tax and legal advice and
re-insurance
services to PEMEX’s entities and companies.
The following tables present the condensed financial information of these segments, after elimination of unrealized intersegment gain (loss), and include only select line items. As a result, the line items presented below may not total. The columns before intersegment eliminations include unconsolidated figures. These reporting segments are those which PEMEX’s management evaluates in its analysis of PEMEX and on which it bases its decision-making. These reporting segments are presented in PEMEX’s reporting currency.
F-13

 
As of/ for the six -month period ended

June 30, 202
1
  
Exploration
and
Production
  
Industrial
Transformation
  
Logistics
  
Trading
Companies
  
Corporate and
Other Operating
Subsidiary
Companies
  
Intersegment
eliminations
  
Total
 
Sales:
                             
Trade
  Ps.206,706,617   318,437,410   —     132,581,557   5,199,561   —     662,925,145 
Intersegment
   200,919,297   76,375,499   40,891,703   176,130,213   43,255,866   (537,572,578  —   
Services income
   42,762   174,569   1,407,366   431,703   7,327   —     2,063,727 
Reversal of impairment of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment, net
   28,192,228   3,890,372   109,860   —     —     —     32,192,460 
Cost of sales
   202,361,364   431,665,030   22,060,617   297,963,237   16,067,440   (506,278,968  463,838,720 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Gross income (loss)
   233,499,540   (32,787,180  20,348,312   11,180,236   32,395,314   (31,293,610  233,342,612 
Distribution, transportation and sales expenses
   167,743   7,764,429   98,483   742,884   56,422   (1,916,209  6,913,752 
Administrative expenses
   26,153,766   24,650,353   7,868,371   779,982   37,135,549   (29,337,666  67,250,355 
Other revenue
   1,378,180   2,660,105   69,256   156,327   1,219,546   —     5,483,414 
Other expense
s
   (1,041,832  (109,792  169,574   (4,738  (14,220  45,191   (955,817
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Operating income (loss)
   207,514,379   (62,651,649  12,620,288   9,808,959   (3,591,331  5,456   163,706,102 
Financing income
   37,893,946   205,019   2,921,438   167,642   70,898,926   (96,865,969  15,221,002 
Financing cost
   (64,308,499  (7,573,113  (199,573  (950,928  (97,991,470  96,860,515   (74,163,068
Derivative financial instruments (cost) income, net
   (8,422,174  (5,942  —     (1,154,363  (2,775,369  —     (12,357,848
Foreign exchange gain (loss), net
   22,864,530   (131,264  61,832   (122,546  923,401   —     23,595,953 
(Loss) profit sharing in joint ventures and associates
   (192,518  (19,521  (2  (1,156,698  5,539,878   (7,379,423  (3,208,284
Taxes, duties and other
   135,551,525   —     637,450   618,669   (1,020,423  —     135,787,221 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Net (loss) income
  Ps.59,798,139   (70,176,470  14,766,533   5,973,397   (25,975,542  (7,379,421  (22,993,364
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total current assets
  Ps.929,907,879   184,344,445   191,503,918   211,632,518   1,075,450,065   (2,181,659,132  411,179,693 
Total
non-current
assets
   883,293,718   386,391,522   156,491,044   38,663,651   895,172,990   (734,172,640  1,625,840,285 
Total current liabilities
   477,657,736   553,633,258   42,220,288   165,948,402   1,812,699,805   (2,179,581,043  872,578,446 
Total
non-current
liabilities
   2,207,242,912   624,006,831   72,099,089   237,352   2,073,051,508   (1,738,936,203  3,237,701,489 
Equity (deficit), net
   (871,699,051  (606,904,122  233,675,585   84,110,415   (1,915,128,258  1,002,685,474   (2,073,259,957
Depreciation and amortization
   56,428,366   7,512,553   2,780,632   124,117   1,352,199   —     68,197,867 
Depreciation of rights of use
   186,344   2,029,953   372,305   482,173   397,184   —     3,467,959 
Net periodic cost of employee benefits excluding items recognized in other comprehensive income
   16,503,105   23,989,048   3,854,837   —     14,760,558   —     59,107,548 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
F-14

As of/ for the three-month period ended

June 30, 2021
  
Exploration
and
Production
  
Industrial
Transformation
  
Logistics
  
Trading
Companies
  
Corporate and
Other Operating
Subsidiary
Companies
  
Intersegment
eliminations
  
Total
 
Sales:
                             
Trade
  Ps. 112,143,204   161,510,111   —     69,363,611   3,303,411   —     346,320,337 
Intersegment
   99,561,700   40,431,438   21,406,880   94,335,188   16,629,872   (272,365,078  —   
Services income
   26,329   129,689   739,964   192,751   26,645   —     1,115,378 
(Impairment) of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment, net
   (13,733,070  (704,252  —     —     —     —     (14,437,322
Cost of sales
   113,559,192   216,887,135   11,432,901   156,847,516   9,550,404   (262,890,696  245,386,452 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Gross income (loss)
   84,438,971   (15,520,149  10,713,943   7,044,034   10,409,524   (9,474,382  87,611,941 
Distribution, transportation and sales expenses
   89,816   4,259,392   32,601   361,672   77,399   (1,005,040  3,815,840 
Administrative expenses
   8,975,254   11,975,691   1,716,339   418,163   19,026,881   (8,411,951  33,700,377 
Other revenue
   740,426   1,923,834   47,177   85,863   143,677   
 
 
   2,940,977 
Other expenses
   (805,255  (69,033  85,282   (3,148  (5,492  59,112   (738,534
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Operating income (loss)
   75,309,072   (29,900,431  9,097,462   6,346,914   (8,556,571  1,721   52,298,167 
Financing income
   16,538,988   94,789   1,384,779   91,436   34,134,997   (47,346,085  4,898,904 
Financing cost
   (31,001,258  (3,980,924  (116,439  (479,137  (48,879,404  47,344,363   (37,112,799
Derivative financial instruments (cost) income, net
   3,088,752   2,168   —     (736,998  (4,779,769  —     (2,425,847
Foreign exchange gain (loss), net
   71,050,692   4,374,952   218,953   (101,760  4,657,551   —     80,200,388 
(Loss) profit sharing in joint ventures and associates
   (107,859  184,185   18   907,020   49,006,481   (51,356,038  (1,366,193
Taxes, duties and other
   74,334,821   —     (809,143  (405,257  9,007,967       82,128,388 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Net income (loss)
  Ps.60,543,566   (29,225,261  11,393,916   6,432,732   16,575,318   (51,356,039  14,364,232 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
   32,302,418   3,850,452   1,121,390   65,864   674,408   —     38,014,532 
Depreciation of rights of use
   108,904   1,014,977   571,020   236,051   345,628   —     2,276,580 
Net periodic cost of employee benefits excluding items recognized in other comprehensive income
   8,952,586   12,786,223   2,374,865   —     7,970,763   —     32,084,437 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
F-1
5

As of/ for the six -month period ended

June 30, 2020
  
Exploration
and
Production
  
Industrial
Transformation (1)
  
Logistics
  
Trading
Companies
  
Corporate and
Other Operating
Subsidiary
Companies
  
Intersegment
eliminations
  
Total
 
Sales:
                             
Trade
  Ps. 140,600,291   247,044,887   —     71,666,720   4,071,051   —     463,382,949 
Intersegment
   109,739,595   37,301,471   43,755,291   146,707,221   60,486,083   (397,989,661  —   
Services income
   65,632   60,488   2,219,276   47,722   27,108   —     2,420,226 
Reversal of impairment (Impairment) of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment, net
   10,633,701   (2,709,125  —     —     —     —     7,924,576 
Cost of sales
   168,268,001   326,164,193   19,184,795   214,808,734   14,197,416   (346,423,881  396,199,258 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Gross income (loss)
   92,771,218   (44,466,472  26,789,772   3,612,929   50,386,826   (51,565,780  77,528,493 
Distribution, transportation and sales expenses
   81,187   9,704,583   81,861   597,693   142,619   (2,039,527  8,568,416 
Administrative expenses
   43,554,497   29,569,178   9,041,895   1,045,114   38,979,264   (49,314,702  72,875,246 
Other revenue
   609,026   1,951,828   143,572   261,585   3,268,875   —     6,234,886 
Other expenses
   (1,558,017  (45,550  (10,339  (163,863  (129,705  203,397   (1,704,077
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Operating income (loss)
   48,186,543   (81,833,955  17,799,249   2,067,844   14,404,113   (8,154  615,640 
Financing income
   37,023,438   259,692   1,236,074   159,966   91,989,346   (121,416,380  9,252,136 
Financing cost
   (96,330,084  (5,800,178  (198,591  (430,597  (115,506,582  121,424,533   (96,841,499
Derivative financial instruments (cost) income, net
   (13,879,389  (12,805  —     (592,059  (536,327  —     (15,020,580
Foreign exchange (loss), net
   (369,425,793  (27,905,896  (780,239  (647,165  (20,901,822  —     (419,660,915
Profit (loss) sharing in joint ventures and associates
   2,325   (2,706,684  (1,152  (1,047,613  (583,346,129  586,288,629   (810,624
Taxes, duties and other
   72,310,729   —     4,442,883   4,394,878   2,972,991   —     84,121,481 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Net (loss) income
  Ps.(466,733,689)   (117,999,826  13,612,458   (4,884,502  (616,870,392  586,288,628   (606,587,323
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total current assets
  Ps.950,698,400   262,193,199   8,029,413   117,541,969   865,029,183   (1,908,828,771  294,663,393 
Total
non-current
assets
   763,623,170   549,353,774   3,303,103   48,591,499   871,553,065   (662,583,727  1,573,840,884 
Total current liabilities
   386,991,882   322,090,395   14,531,641   77,635,378   1,667,499,324   (1,905,883,147  562,865,473 
Total
non-current
liabilities
   2,643,771,581   786,030,467   6,488,779   2,711,596   2,497,808,346   (2,099,794,462  3,837,016,307 
Equity (deficit), net
   (1,316,441,893  (296,573,889  (9,687,904  85,786,494   (2,428,725,422  1,434,265,111   (2,531,377,503
Depreciation and amortization
   50,491,080   9,664,356   2,894,992   158,778   1,115,569   —     64,324,775 
Depreciation of rights of use
   163,778   2,474,242   110,008   576,304   367,214   —     3,691,546 
Net periodic cost of employee benefits excluding items recognized in other comprehensive income
   17,895,613   29,833,798   331,646   —     16,377,306   —     64,438,363 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
(1)
On January 1, 2021, Pemex Fertilizers was merged into Pemex Industrial Transformation. For comparison purposes, all operations for periods prior to the merger are presented in the Pemex Industrial Transf
o
rmation segment
.
 
F-1
6

As of/ for the three -month period

ended June 30, 2020
  
Exploration
and
Production
  
Industrial
Transformation
(1)
  
Logistics
  
Trading
Companies
  
Corporate and
Other Operating
Subsidiary
Companies
  
Intersegment
eliminations
  
Total
 
Sales:
                             
Trade
  Ps.50,026,945   93,574,325   —     34,454,780   2,403,893   —     180,459,943 
Intersegment
   44,080,306   17,011,525   21,153,047   41,301,527   38,398,713   (161,945,118   
Services income
   47,065   31,886   1,057,687   26,002   70,478   —     1,233,118 
(Impairment) reversal of impairment of wells, pipelines, properties, plant and equipment, net
   (11,339,187  (7,054,769  —     2,366   —     —     (18,391,590
Cost of sales
   81,839,627   113,625,300   10,829,157   66,646,434   4,716,582   (124,517,398  153,139,702 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Gross income (loss)
   975,502   (10,062,333  11,381,577   9,138,241   36,156,502   (37,427,720  10,161,769 
Distribution, transportation and sales expenses
   37,445   6,135,956   (36,315  305,232   76,675   (1,344,316  5,174,677 
Administrative expenses
   29,204,734   17,745,256   6,067,358   516,893   20,586,668   (36,148,605  37,972,304 
Other revenue
   469,813   576,430   114,915   104,799   2,088,388   —     3,354,345 
Other expenses
   248,412   (2,508  (1,892  (132,053  3,334   (69,213  46,080 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Operating (loss) income
   (27,548,452  (33,369,623  5,463,557   8,288,862   17,584,881   (4,012  (29,584,787
Financing income
   16,539,597   125,405   672,494   75,217   40,877,726   (54,736,880  3,553,559 
Financing cost
   (41,333,547  (3,357,297  (128,838  (149,676  (53,710,522  54,740,895   (43,938,985
Derivative financial instruments (cost) income, net
   13,199,179   7,172   —     (2,613,030  (9,960,931  —     632,390 
Foreign exchange gain (loss), net
   43,946,023   2,700,681   289,687   (75,472  2,684,515       49,545,434 
Profit (loss) sharing in joint ventures and associates
   178   98,592   (6,621  542,203   (36,829,544  35,276,125   (919,067
Taxes, duties and other
   14,768,900   —     3,410,564   2,538,280   2,907,501   —     23,625,245 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Net (loss) income
  Ps.(9,965,922  (33,795,070  2,879,715   3,529,824   (42,261,376  35,276,128   (44,336,701
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
   23,075,460   5,048,330   1,456,697   79,407   552,681   —     30,212,575 
Depreciation of rights of use
   (57,421  1,234,920   84,093   251,880   186,527   —     1,699,999 
Net periodic cost of employee benefits excluding items recognized in other comprehensive income
   9,539,926   16,701,294   271,371      9,839,376   —     36,351,967 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
(1)
On January 1, 2021, Pemex Fertilizers
 
was merged into Pemex Industrial Transformation. For comparison purposes, all operations for periods prior to the merger are presented in the Pemex Industrial Transformation segment
.
 
As of/ for the year ended December 31, 2020
 
Exploration
and
Production
  
Industrial
Transformation
(1)
  
Logistics
  
Trading
Companies
  
Corporate and
Other

Operating
Subsidiary
Companies
  
Intersegment
eliminations
  
Total
 
Total current assets
  Ps.937,017,021   155,514,025   166,202,857   168,261,357   906,149,787   (2,003,285,308  329,859,739 
Total
non-current
assets
  884,741,960   331,853,787   167,498,268   40,084,813   750,322,623   (575,873,262  1,598,628,189 
Total current liabilities
  464,163,895   405,696,477   39,568,364   129,161,357   1,734,633,918   (2,000,813,940  772,410,071 
Total
non-current
liabilities
  2,363,252,154   714,743,134   90,624,955   1,121,488   2,218,921,311   (1,827,858,155  3,560,804,887 
Equity (deficit), net
  (1,005,657,068  (633,071,799  203,507,806   78,063,325   (2,297,082,819  1,249,513,525   (2,404,727,030
Depreciation and amortization
  101,126,295   19,744,860   5,917,668   317,241   2,525,756   —     129,631,820 
Depreciation of rights of use
  313,008   4,715,238   460,957   992,148   747,880   —     7,229,231 
Net periodic cost of employee benefits excluding items recognized in other comprehensive income
  35,356,366   51,845,677   8,927,651   (1,156  32,680,002   —     128,808,540 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
(1)
On January 1, 2021, Pemex Fertilizers was m
e
rged into Pemex Industrial Transformation. For comparison purposes, all operations for periods prior to the merger are presented in the Pemex Industrial Transformation segment.
 
F-1
7

NOTE 7. REVENUE
For the
six-month
periods ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, revenues
 
from sales to third parties were as follows:
 
A.
Revenue disaggregation
 
For the
six-month
period ended June 30,
  
Exploration

and Production
   
Industrial
Transformation
(1)
   
Logistics
   
Trading
Companies
   
Corporate
and Other
Operating
Subsidiary
Companies
   
Total
 
Geographical market 2021
                              
United States
   Ps.
 
116,938,407
    —      —      100,998,666    1,468,491    219,405,564 
Other
   59,263,824    —      —      7,778,714    326,755    67,369,293 
Europe
   30,426,403    —      —      1,396,721    —      31,823,124 
Local
   120,745    318,611,979    1,407,366    22,839,159    3,411,642    346,390,891 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total
  
 
Ps.
 
206,749,379
 
  
 
318,611,979
 
  
 
1,407,366
 
  
 
133,013,260
 
  
 
5,206,888
 
  
 
664,988,872
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
2020
                              
United States
   Ps.
 
83,070,103
    —      —      59,174,052    —      142,244,155 
Other
   15,651,931    —      —      4,037,368    925,203    20,614,502 
Europe
   41,756,656    —      —      292,156    18,899    42,067,711 
Local
   187,233    247,105,375    2,219,276    8,210,866    3,154,057    260,876,807 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total
  
 
Ps.
 
140,665,923
 
  
 
247,105,375
 
  
 
2,219,276
 
  
 
71,714,442
 
  
 
4,098,159
 
  
 
465,803,175
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Major products and services 2021
                              
Crude oil
   Ps.
 
206,628,634
    —      —      23,138    —      206,651,772 
Gas
   77,983    54,278,836    —      33,823,129    —      88,179,948 
Refined petroleum products
   —      257,013,275    —      96,880,359    —      353,893,634 
Other
   —      7,145,299    —      1,854,931    5,199,561    14,199,791 
Services
   42,762    174,569    1,407,366    431,703    7,327    2,063,727 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total
  
 
Ps.
 
206,749,379
 
  
 
318,611,979
 
  
 
1,407,366
 
  
 
133,013,260
 
  
 
5,206,888
 
  
 
664,988,872
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
2020
                        
Crude oil
   
Ps.
 
140,478,690
    —      —      —      —      140,478,690 
Gas
   121,601    26,561,986    —      16,226,582    —      42,910,169 
Refined petroleum products
   —      214,730,172    —      54,283,845    —      269,014,017 
Other
   —      5,752,729    —      1,156,293    4,071,051    10,980,073 
Services
   65,632    60,488    2,219,276    47,722    27,108    2,420,226 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total
  
 
Ps.
 
140,665,923
 
  
 
247,105,375
 
  
 
2,219,276
 
  
 
71,714,442
 
  
 
4,098,159
 
  
 
465,803,175
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Timing of revenue recognition 2021
                              
Products transferred at a point in time
   Ps. 206,706,617    288,421,474    1,407,366    132,581,557    5,199,561    634,316,575 
Products and services transferred over the time
   42,762    30,190,505    —      431,703    7,327    30,672,297 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total
  
 
Ps.
 
206,749,379
 
  
 
318,611,979
 
  
 
1,407,366
 
  
 
133,013,260
 
  
 
5,206,888
 
  
 
664,988,872
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Timing of revenue recognition 2020
                              
Products transferred at a point in time
   Ps. 140,600,291    247,044,887    —      71,666,720    4,071,051    463,382,949 
Products and services transferred over the time
   65,632    60,488    2,219,276    47,722    27,108    2,420,226 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total
  
 
Ps.
 
140,665,923
 
  
 
247,105,375
 
  
 
2,219,276
 
  
 
71,714,442
 
  
 
4,098,159
 
  
 
465,803,175
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
(1) 
On January 1, 2021, Pemex Fertilizers was merged into Pemex Industrial Transformation. For comparison purposes, all operations for periods prior to the merger are presented in the Pemex Industrial Transformation segment.
 
F-1
8

For the three-month period ended June 30,
  
Exploration

and

Production
   
Industrial
Transformation (1)
   
Logistics
   
Trading
Companies
  
Corporate
and Other
Operating
Subsidiary
Companies
  
Total
 
Geographical market 2021
                            
United States
  Ps.65,399,780    —      —      52,701,405   600,467   118,701,652 
Other
   30,939,904    —      —      3,378,230   323,953   34,642,087 
Europe
   15,757,994    —      —      751,041   —     16,509,035 
Local
   71,855    161,639,800    739,964    12,725,685   2,405,636   177,582,940 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total
  
Ps.
112,169,533
 
  
 
161,639,800
 
  
 
739,964
 
  
 
69,556,362
 
 
 
3,330,056
 
 
 
347,435,715
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
2020
                            
United States
  Ps.31,897,015    —      —      27,258,745   —     59,155,760 
Other
   6,924,662    —      —      2,293,844   124,737   9,343,243 
Europe
   11,145,290    —      —      290,395   59,930   11,495,615 
Local
   107,043    93,606,211    1,057,687    4,637,798   2,289,704   101,698,443 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total
  
Ps.
50,074,010
 
  
 
93,606,211
 
  
 
1,057,687
 
  
 
34,480,782
 
 
 
2,474,371
 
 
 
181,693,061
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Major products and services 2021
                            
Crude oil
  Ps.112,097,678    —      —      23,138   —     112,120,816 
Gas
   45,526    17,821,932    —      11,192,713   —     29,060,171 
Refined petroleum products
   —      140,055,179    —      66,272,399   —     206,327,578 
Other
   —      3,633,000    —      (8,124,639  3,303,411   (1,188,229
Services
   26,329    129,689    739,964    192,751   26,645   1,115,378 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total
  
Ps.
112,169,533
 
  
 
161,639,800
 
  
 
739,964
 
  
 
69,556,362
 
 
 
3,330,056
 
 
 
347,435,715
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
2020
                            
Crude oil
  
Ps
.
49,966,966    —      —      —     —     49,966,966 
Gas
   59,979    13,163,721    —      7,293,722   —     20,517,422 
Refined petroleum products
   —      78,158,754    —      26,307,601   (1,151  104,465,204 
Other
   —      2,251,850    —      853,457   2,405,044   5,510,351 
Services
   47,065    31,886    1,057,687    26,002   70,478   1,233,118 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total
  
Ps.
50,074,010
 
  
 
93,606,211
 
  
 
1,057,687
 
  
 
34,480,782
 
 
 
2,474,371
 
 
 
181,693,061
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Timing of revenue recognition 2021
                            
Products transferred at a point in time
  Ps.112,143,204    153,461,053    739,964    69,363,611   3,303,411   339,011,243 
Products and services transferred over the time
   26,329    8,178,747    —      192,751   26,645   8,424,472 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total
  
Ps.
 
112,169,533
 
  
 
161,639,800
 
  
 
739,964
 
  
 
69,556,362
 
 
 
3,330,056
 
 
 
347,435,715
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Timing of revenue recognition 2020
                            
Products transferred at a point in time
  Ps.50,026,945    93,574,325    —      34,454,780   2,403,893   180,459,943 
Products and services transferred over the time
   47,065    31,886    1,057,687    26,002   70,478   1,233,118 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total
  
Ps.
50,074,010
 
  
 
93,606,211
 
  
 
1,057,687
 
  
 
34,480,782
 
 
 
2,474,371
 
 
 
181,693,061
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
(1)
On January 1, 2021, Pemex Fertilizers w
a
s merged into Pemex Industrial Transformation. For comparison purposes, all operations for periods prior to the merger are presented in the Pemex Industrial Transformation segment.
 
F-
19

Revenue is measured b
a
sed on the consideration specified in a contract with a customer. PEMEX recognizes revenue when it transfers control over a good or service to a customer.
The following table provides information about the nature and timing of the satisfaction of performance obligations in contracts with customers, including significant payment terms and the related revenue.
 
Products / services
  
Nature, performance obligations
  
Timing of revenue recognition
Crude oil sales  
Export sales of crude oil are based on delivery terms established in contracts or orders. All sales are performed by the Free on Board International commercial term (“FOB” Incoterm).
 
Crude oil sale contracts consider possible customers’ claims due to product quality, volume or delays in boarding, which are estimated in the price of the transaction. For orders that have variations in price, revenue is adjusted on the closing date of each period. The subsequent variations in the fair value at the different reporting dates are recognized according to IFRS 9.
 
The price of the product is determined based on a market components formula and the sale of crude oil.
  
Revenue is recognized at a point in time when control of the crude oil has transferred to the customer, which occurs when the product is delivered at the point of shipping. Invoices are generated at that time and are mostly payable within the deadlines established in contracts or orders. Payments in respect of crude oil sold and delivered shall be made within 30 days after the date of the bill of lading therefor.
 
For international market crude oil sales, revenue is recognized with a provisional price, which undergoes subsequent adjustments until the product has arrived at the port of destination. There may be a period of up to 2 months in determining the final sale price, such as in the case of sales to some regions.
 
Revenue is initially measured by estimating variables such as quality and volume claims, delays in boarding etc.
   
Sale of petroleum products  
For all petroleum products, there is only one performance obligation that includes transport and handling services to the point of delivery.
 
The price is determined based on the price at the point of delivery, adding the price of the services rendered (freight, handling of jet fuel, etc.) with the provisions and terms established by the
Comisión Reguladora de Energía
(Energy Regulatory Commission or “CRE”). There are penalties for delivery failures and/or payment obligations, as well as quality and volume claims, which are known days after the transaction.
  
Revenue is recognized at a point in time when control is transferred to the customer, which occurs either at the point of shipping or when it is delivered at the customer’s facilities. Therefore, transportation fees can be included in the price of sale of the product and are considered part of a single performance obligation since transportation is rendered before control is transferred.
 
Revenue is initially measured by estimating variables such as quality and volume claims, etc. Invoices are usually payable within 30 days.
   
Sales of natural gas  
There is only one performance obligation that includes transport and handling services to the point of delivery.
 
The transaction price is established at the time of sale, including the estimation of variable considerations such as capacity, penalties, adjustments for quality or volume claims, and incentives for the purchase of products; which are known days after the transaction. Such variable consideration is recognized to the extent that it is probable that it will not be reversed in a future period.
  
Revenue is recognized at a point in time when control is transferred to the customer, which occurs when it is delivered at the customer’s facilities. Therefore, transportation fees can be included in the price of sale of the product and are considered part of a single performance obligation since transportation is rendered before control is transferred.
 
Revenue is initially measured by estimating variables such as quality and volume claims, etc. Invoices are usually payable within 30 days.
Services  
In cases where within the same service order there are transportation and storage services, there could exist more than one performance obligation, depending on the term of the service.
 
Price is not distributed when there is a performance obligation, except, when there is more than one performance obligation, in which case, the price of the transaction will be assigned according to the service price established in the service order.
 
When there is a performance obligation, the price is not distributed, but if it is considered that there is more than one performance obligation, the price of the transaction is considered based on the prices established in the service orders and which also include penalties such as quality and volume claims.
  
Income is recognized over time as the service is rendered.
 
Invoices are usually payable within 22 days.
   
Other products  
There is only one performance obligation that includes transportation for delivery to destination.
 
The sale and delivery of the product are made at the same time and because they are FOB, transportation fees are included in the price of sale of the product.
 
The transaction price is established at the time of sale, including the estimation of variable considerations such as capacity, penalties, extraordinary sales not included in contracts, adjustments for quality or volume claims, and incentives for the purchase of products; which are known days after the transaction.
  
The price of the product is estimated on the date of sale and considers variables such as quality and volume claims, etc.
 
Invoices are usually payable within 30 days.
 
B.
Accounts receivable in the statement of financial position
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, PEMEX had accounts receivable derived from customer contracts in the amounts of Ps. 97,934,559 and Ps. 68,382,413, respectively
(see Note
10-A).
 
C.
Practical expedients
 
 
i.
Significant financial component, less than one year
PEMEX does not need to adjust the amount committed in consideration for goods and services to account for the effects of a significant financing component, since the transfer and the time of payment of a good or service committed to the customer is less than one year.
 
 
ii.
Practical expedient
PEMEX applied the practical expedient, so disclosure about remaining performance obligations that conclude in less than one year is not needed.
When PEMEX is entitled to consideration for an amount that directly corresponds to the value of the performance that PEMEX has completed, it may recognize an income from ordinary activities for the amount to which it has the right to invoice.
NOTE 8. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
 
A.
Accounting classifications and fair values of financial instruments
The following tables present information about PEMEX’s carrying amounts and fair values of financial assets and financial liabilities, including their levels in the fair value hierarchy, as of June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020. It does not include fair value information for financial assets and financial liabilities not measured at fair value if the carrying amount is a reasonable approximation of fair value.
 
F-
2
1

   Carrying amount  Fair value hierarchy 
As of June 30, 2021
In thousands of pesos
  FVTPL  FVOCI –
debt
instruments
   FVOCI –
equity
instruments
   Financial
assets at
amortized
cost
   Other financial
liabilities
  Total carrying
amount
  Level 1   Level 2  Level 3   Total 
Financial assets measured at fair value
                                              
Derivative financial instruments
  Ps.18,625,086   —      —      —      —    Ps.18,625,086   —      18,625,086   —      18,625,086 
Equity instruments
(i)
   —     —      384,665    —      —     384,665   —      384,665   —      384,665 
   
 
 
                   
Total
  Ps.18,625,086   —      384,665    —      —    Ps.19,009,751                   
Financial assets not measured at fair value
                                              
Cash and cash equivalents
  Ps.—     —      —      41,535,969    —     41,535,969   —      —     —      —   
Customers, net
   —     —      —      97,934,559    —     97,934,559   —      —     —      —   
Other
non-financial
accounts receivable
   —     —      —      2,342,932    —     2,342,932   —      —     —      —   
Employees and officers
   —     —      —      3,689,915    —     3,689,915   —      —     —      —   
Sundry debtors
   —     —      —      36,048,946    —     36,048,946   —      —     —      —   
Investments in joint ventures, associates and other
   —     —      —      8,617,412    —     8,617,412   —      —     —      —   
Long-term notes receivable
   —     —      —      858,648    —     858,648   —      —     —      —   
Government Bonds
   —     —      —      126,757,435    —     126,757,435   126,323,478    —     —      126,323,478 
Other assets
   —     —      —      1,961,812    —     1,961,812   —      —     —      —   
   
 
 
                   
Total
  Ps.—     —      —      319,747,628    —    Ps.319,747,628                   
Financial liabilities measured at fair value
                                              
Derivative financial instruments
  Ps.(8,401,709  —      —      —      —    Ps.(8,401,709  —      (8,401,709  —      (8,401,709
   
 
 
                   
Total
  Ps.
 
(8,401,709  —      —      —      —    Ps.(8,401,709                  
Financial liabilities not measured at fair value
                                              
Suppliers
  Ps.—     —      —      —      (254,834,764 Ps.(254,834,764  —      —     —      —   
Accounts and accrued expenses payable
   —     —      —      —      (34,033,948  (34,033,948  —      —     —      —   
Leases
   —     —      —      —      (61,196,299  (61,196,299  —      —     —      —   
Debt
   —     —      —      —      (2,279,903,403  (2,279,903,403  —      (2,264,714,818  —      (2,264,714,818
   
 
 
                   
Total
  Ps.—     —      —      —      (2,629,968,414 Ps.
 
(2,629,968,414                  
 
(i)
Related to
 
our participation in TAG Pipeline Sur, S. de R.L. de C.V.
 
F-22

   Carrying amount  Fair value hierarchy 
As of December 31, 2020
In thousands of pesos
  FVTPL  FVOCI –
debt
instruments
   FVOCI –
equity
instruments
   Financial
assets at
amortized
cost
   Other financial
liabilities
  Total carrying
amount
  Level 1   Level 2  Level 3   Total 
Financial assets measured at fair value
                                              
Derivative financial instruments
  Ps.25,947,993   —      —      —      —     25,947,993   —      25,947,993   —      25,947,993 
Equity instruments
(i)
   —     —      384,665    —      —     384,665   —      384,665   —      384,665 
   
 
 
                   
Total
  Ps.25,947,993   —      384,665    —      —    
P
s.
26,332,658                   
Financial assets not measured at fair value
                                              
Cash and cash equivalents
  Ps.—     —      —      39,989,781    —    
P
s.
39,989,781   —      —     —      —   
Customers, net
   —     —      —      68,382,413    —     68,382,413   —      —     —      —   
Other
non-financial
accounts receivable
   —     —      —      1,944,413    —     1,944,413   —      —     —      —   
Employees and officers
   —     —      —      3,539,505    —     3,539,505   —      —     —      —   
Sundry debtors
   —     —      —      28,076,118    —     28,076,118   —      —     —      —   
Investments in joint ventures, associates and other
   —     —      —      12,015,129    —     12,015,129   —      —     —      —   
Long-term notes receivable
   —     —      —      886,827    —     886,827   —      —     —      —   
Government Bonds
   —     —      —      129,549,519    —     129,549,519   129,320,536    —     —      129,320,536 
Other assets
   —     —      —      3,824,913    —     3,824,913   —      —     —      —   
   
 
 
                   
Total
  Ps.—     —      —      288,208,618    —    Ps.288,208,618                   
Financial liabilities measured at fair value
                                              
Derivative financial instruments
  Ps.
 
(9,318,015  —      —      —      —    Ps.(9,318,015  —      (9,318,015  —      (9,318,015
   
 
 
                   
Total
  Ps.(9,318,015  —      —      —      —    Ps.(9,318,015                  
Financial liabilities not measured at fair value
                                              
Suppliers
  Ps.—     —      —      —      (281,978,041)  Ps. (281,978,041)   —      —     —      —   
Accounts and accrued expenses payable
   —     —      —      —      (30,709,497  (30,709,497  —      —     —      —   
Leases
   —     —      —      —      (63,184,128  (63,184,128  —      —     —      —   
Debt
   —     —      —      —      (2,258,727,317  (2,258,727,317  —      (2,232,694,117  —      (2,232,694,117
   
 
 
                   
Total
  Ps.—     —      —      —      (2,634,598,983 Ps.
 
(2,634,598,983                  
 
(i) 
Related to our participation in TAG Pipeline Sur, S. de R.L. de C.V.
Debt is recognized at amortized cost and the fair value of debt is estimated using quotes from major market sources which are then adjusted internally using standard market pricing models. As a result of relevant assumptions, the estimated fair value does not necessarily represent the actual terms at which existing transactions could be liquidated or unwound. 
 
F-2
3

B. Fair value hierarchy
PEMEX values the fair value of its financial instruments under standard methodologies commonly applied in the financial markets. PEMEX’s related assumptions and inputs therefore fall under the three Levels of the fair value hierarchy for market participant assumptions, as described below.

The fair values determined by Level 1 inputs utilize quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Fair values determined by Level 2 inputs are based on quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets, and inputs other than quoted prices that are observed for assets or liabilities. Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs for the assets or liabilities, and include situations where there is little, if any, market activity for the assets or liabilities.
Management uses appropriate valuation techniques based on the available inputs to measure the fair values of PEMEX’s applicable financial assets and liabilities.
When available, PEMEX measures fair value using Level 1 inputs, because they generally provide the most reliable evidence of fair value.
C. Fair value of DFIs
PEMEX periodically evaluates its exposure to international hydrocarbon prices, interest rates and foreign currencies and uses DFIs as a mitigation mechanism when potential sources of market risk are identified.
PEMEX monitors the fair value of its DFI portfolio on a periodic basis. The fair value represents the price at which one party would assume the rights and obligations of the other, and is calculated for DFIs through models commonly used in the international financial markets, based on inputs obtained from major market information systems and price providers. Therefore, PEMEX does not have an independent third party to value its DFIs.
PEMEX calculates the fair value of its DFIs through the tools developed by its market information providers such as Bloomberg, and through valuation models implemented in software packages used to integrate all of PEMEX´s business areas and accounting, such as SAP (System Applications Products). PEMEX does not have policies to designate a calculation or valuation agent.
PEMEX’s DFI portfolio is composed primarily of swaps, for which fair value is estimated by projecting future cash flows and discounting them with the corresponding discount factor; for currency and interest rate options, this is done through the Black Scholes Model, and for crude oil options, through the Levy model for Asian options.
According to IFRS 13 “Fair Value Measurement”, the
mark-to-market
value of DFIs must reflect the creditworthiness of the parties. Consequently, the fair value of a DFI takes into account the risk that either party may default on its obligation. Due to the above, PEMEX applies the credit value adjustment (“CVA”) method to calculate the fair value of its DFIs.
Because PEMEX’s hedges are cash flow hedges, their effectiveness is preserved regardless of the variations in the underlying assets or reference variables, thus asset flows are fully offset by liabilities flows. Therefore, it is not necessary to measure or monitor the hedges’ effectiveness.
PEMEX’s DFIs’ fair-value assumptions and inputs fall under Level 2 of the fair value hierarchy for market participant assumptions.
D. Accounting treatment applied and impact in the financial statements
PEMEX enters into derivatives transactions with the sole purpose of hedging financial risks related to its operations, firm commitments, planned transactions and assets and liabilities recorded on its statement of financial position. Nonetheless, some of these transactions do not qualify for hedge accounting treatment because they do not meet the requirements of the accounting standards for designation as hedges. They are therefore recorded in the financial statements as instruments entered into for trading purposes, despite the fact that their cash flows are offset by the cash flows of the positions (assets or liabilities) to which they relate. As a result, the changes in their fair value are recognized in the “Derivative financial instruments (cost) income, net” line item in the consolidated statement of comprehensive income.
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the net fair value of PEMEX’s DFIs (including both DFIs that have not reached maturity and those that have reached maturity but have not been settled), recognized in the consolidated statement of financial position, was Ps. 10,223,377 and Ps. 16,629,978, respectively. As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, PEMEX did not have any DFIs designated as hedges for accounting purposes.
 
F-2
4

All of PEMEX’s DFIs are treated, for accounting purposes, as instruments entered into for trading purposes, therefore any change in their fair value, caused by any act or event, impacts directly in the “Derivative financial instruments (cost) income, net” line item in the consolidated statement of comprehensive income.
For the six months periods ended June 30,
 
2021 and 2020, PEMEX recognized a net loss of Ps. 12,357,848 and Ps. 15,020,580, respectively, in the “Derivative financial instruments (cost) income, net” line item with respect to DFIs treated as instruments entered into for trading purposes.
In accordance with established accounting policies, PEMEX has analyzed the different contracts that PEMEX has entered into and has determined that according to the terms thereof none of these agreements meet the criteria to be classified as embedded derivatives. Accordingly, as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, PEMEX did not recognize any embedded derivatives (foreign currency or index).
E. IBOR reference rates
 
transition
As a result of the decision made by the Financial Stability Board (FSB), the Interbank Offered Rates (IBORs), such as the LIBOR in dollars (overnight “O/N”, one week “1W”, two months “2M”, and twelve months “12M”) or the EURIBOR in Euros, are expected to cease to be published in 2022 and are expected to be replaced by alternative reference rates, based on risk-free rates obtained from market operations.
The discontinuation of the publication of these rates was originally scheduled for December 2021. Nevertheless, on November 2020, the ICE Benchmark Administration Limited (known as “ICE”) announced an extension until June 2023 for the publication of the most common LIBOR rates in dollars (one month “1M”, three months “3M”, and six months “6M”).
Therefore, PEMEX has identified and is reviewing contracts expiring after the applicable cessation dates, that could be impacted by the change in the aforementioned rates.
PEMEX has a reduced number of financial instruments referenced to floating rates in Euros and U.S. dollars with maturity and interest rate fixation after December 2021 and June 2023, respectively. This portfolio of financial instruments is composed of debt instruments and DFIs as shown below:
 
        
  
Reference Rate
  
Notional Amount
As of June 30, 2021
(in millions of each currency)
   LIBOR 1M USD  3,232
Debt
  LIBOR 3M USD  594
   LIBOR 6M USD  911
 
  EURIBOR 3M USD  650
   
   LIBOR 1M USD  2,500
DFI
  LIBOR 3M USD  156
   LIBOR 6M USD  244
 
 Note:
Notional amounts with maturity after December 31, 2021 for Euros and after June 30, 2023 for U.S. dollars.
In the event that
Tasa de Interés Interbancaria de Equilibrio
(“TIIE”) ceases to be published, the portfolio of financial instruments referenced to these floating rates is composed of debt instruments and DFIs as shown below:
 
   
Reference Rate
  
Notional Amount
As of June 30, 2021
(in millions of each currency)
   TIIE 28D MXN  6,188
Debt
  TIIE 91D MXN  29,688
DFI
  TIIE 28D MXN  33,513
 
 Note:
Notional amounts with maturity after December 31, 2021.
PEMEX’s portfolio consists of additional debt instruments that will mature during the year, as well as additional debt instruments and DFIs referenced at fixed rates, including fixed rate debt instruments and DFIs in currencies that are not listed in the tables above. PEMEX’s fixed rate portfolio will not be impacted by the IBOR transition.
Currently, PEMEX is monitoring the evolution of the IBORs transition in the market, in order to anticipate any negative impact that these changes could have. Further, PEMEX will continue working on any amendments to its contracts that may be required as a result of the transition.
Once the alternative reference rates are defined, as well as the new discount curves and any other valuation parameters, PEMEX will be able to estimate the impact that such changes will have on financial instruments’ market value and financial cost.
Regarding PMI Trading, its credit agreements to date have incorporated flexible provisions that would help to smooth the transition to an alternative rate, in the event that LIBOR rates cease to be published prematurely. PMI Trading continuously monitors the evolution of LIBOR transition to anticipate any impact on its credit agreements and to amend the credit agreements whenever it is required.
NOTE 9. CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, cash and cash equivalents were as follows:
 
   
June 30, 2021
   
December 31, 2020
 
Cash on hand and in banks
 
(i)
   Ps. 28,780,228    Ps. 20,211,875 
Highly liquid investments
(ii)
   12,755,741    19,777,906 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
Ps. 41,535,969
   
Ps. 39,989,781
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 (i)
Cash on hand and in banks is primarily composed of cash in banks.
 
 (ii)
Mainly composed of short-term Mexican Government investments.
NOTE 10. CUSTOMERS AND OTHER ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, accounts receivable and other receivables were as follows:
 
 A.
Customers
 
   
June 30, 2021
   
December 31, 2020
 
Domestic customers, net
   Ps. 46,434,445   Ps.35,049,717 
Export customers, net
   51,500,114    33,332,696 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total customers
  
 
Ps. 97,934,559
 
  
Ps.
68,382,413
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 B.
Other financial and
non-financial
accounts receivable
 
   
June 30, 2021
   
December 31, 2020
 
Financial assets:
          
Sundry debtors
(1)
  Ps. 36,048,946
 
 
  Ps.28,076,118 
Employees and officers
   3,689,915    3,539,505 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total financial assets
  
Ps.
39,738,861
 
  
Ps.
31,615,623
 
Non-financial
assets:
          
Taxes to be recovered and prepaid taxes
    74,092,943    55,187,272 
Special Tax on Production and Services
   36,307,498    32,657,743 
Other accounts receivable
   2,342,931    1,944,413 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total
non-financial
assets:
  
Ps.
 
112,743,372
 
  
Ps.
89,789,428
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
(1) 
Includes Ps. (138,785) and Ps. (197,215) of impairment, as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.
 
F-2
5

NOTE 11. INVENTORIES
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, inventories were as follows:
 
   
June 30, 2021
   
December 31, 2020
 
Refined and petrochemicals products
  Ps.41,575,560   Ps.32,175,910 
Products in transit
   20,403,820    3,476,807 
Crude oil
   16,336,807    11,997,570 
Materials and products in stock
   4,629,607    4,736,659 
Gas and condensate products
   192,960    142,136 
Materials in transit
   3,236    76,579 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
Ps. 83,141,990
   
Ps. 52,605,661
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
NOTE 12. INVESTMENTS IN JOINT VENTURES AND ASSOCIATES
The investments in joint ventures and associates as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, were as follows:
 
   Percentage
of investment
  
June 30,

2021
   
December 31,
2020
 
Deer Park Refining Limited
   49.99%  Ps. 6,302,330   Ps. 9,635,176 
Sierrita Gas Pipeline LLC
.
   35.00%   1,260,786    1,232,464 
Frontera Brownsville, LLC.
   50.00%   455,818    479,520 
Texas Frontera, LLC.
   50.00%   194,741    197,708 
Administración Portuaria Integral de Dos Bocas, S.A. de C.V.
   40.00%   172,975    208,152 
CH 4 Energía, S.A. de C.V.
   50.00%   148,513    141,339 
Other, net
   Various   82,249    120,770 
       
 
 
   
 
 
 
      
Ps. 8,617,412
   
Ps. 12,015,129
 
       
 
 
   
 
 
 
(Loss) profit sharing in joint ventures and associates:
 
   
For the six-month period ended
June 30,
 
   
2021
   
2020
 
Deer Park Refining Limited
  Ps.(3,325,154  
 
Ps.
(947,260
Administración Portuaria Integral de Dos Bocas, S.A. de C.V.
   (35,177   13,806 
Sierrita Gas Pipeline, LLC.
   66,876    76,532 
Frontera Brownsville, LLC.
   24,115    22,337 
Texas Frontera, LLC.
   13,462    21,368 
CH 4 Energía, S.A. de C.V.
   7,174    3,745 
Ductos el Peninsular, S.A.P.I. de C.V.
   (2   (1,152
Other, net
   40,422    —   
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
(Loss) sharing in joint ventures and associates, net
  
Ps.
 
(3,208,284
  
 
Ps. 
(810,624
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
F-2
6

 
   
For the three-month period ended
June 30,
 
   
2021
   
2020
 
Deer Park Refining Limited
  Ps.(1,404,901  Ps.
 
(1,010,731
Administración Portuaria Integral de Dos Bocas, S.A. de C.V.
   (35,177   26,112 
Sierrita Gas Pipeline LLC
.
   33,595    51,675 
Frontera Brownsville, LLC.
   9,139    10,365 
Texas Frontera, LLC.
   6,847    10,055 
CH4 Energía S.A. de C.V.
   1,542    77 
Ductos el Peninsular, S. A. P. I. de C. V.
   18    (6,620
Other, net
   22,744    —   
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
(Loss) sharing in joint ventures and associates, net
  
Ps.
 
(1,366,193
  
Ps.
(919,067
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Additional information about the significant
investments
in joint ventures and associates is presented below:
 
 
Deer Park Refining Limited (Joint Venture)
. On March 31, 1993, PMI NASA acquired 49.99% of the Deer Park Refinery. In its capacity as general partner of Deer Park Refining Limited Partnership, Shell is responsible for the operation and management of the refinery (installed
capacity
of approximately 340,000 barrels per day of crude oil). Management decisions are made jointly with respect to investment in or disposal of assets, distribution of dividends, indebtedness and equity operations. In accordance with the investment contract and the operation of the agreement, the participants have the rights to the net assets in the proportion of their participation. This joint venture is recorded under the equity method.
On May 24, 2021, the Board of Directors of Petróleos Mexicanos approved the investment for the acquisition of Shell Oil Company’s interest in the Deer Park Refining Limited Partnership L.P. On the same date, Petróleos Mexicanos signed an agreement to acquire the 50.01% interest in the Deer Park Limited Partnership currently held by Shell Oil Company, with an estimated price of U.S. $596,000, such that upon closing PEMEX will own 100% of the Deer Park refinery. The acquisition of the Deer Park refinery will be fully financed by the Mexican Government and is expected to close during the last quarter of 2021, subject to regulatory approvals and other customary conditions to closing. This acquisition is part of our self-sufficiency objective to supply fuel demand in Mexico.
Associates
 
  
Sierrita Gas Pipeline LLC.
This company was created on June 24, 2013. Its main activity is the developing of projects related to the transportation infrastructure of gas in the United States. This investment is recorded under the equity method.
 
  
Frontera Brownsville, LLC
. Effective April 1, 2011, PMI SUS entered into a joint venture with TransMontaigne Operating Company L.P. to create Frontera Brownsville, LLC. Frontera Brownsville, LLC was incorporated in Delaware, United States, and has the corporate power to own and operate certain facilities for the storage and treatment of clean petroleum products. This investment is recorded under the equity method.
 
  
Texas Frontera, LLC
. This company was constituted on July 27, 2010, and its principal activity is the lease of tanks for the storage of refined product. PMI SUS, which owns 50% interest in Texas Frontera, entered into a joint venture with Magellan OLP, L.P., and together they are entitled to the results in proportion of
their
respective investment. The company has 7 tanks with a capacity of 120,000 barrels per tank. This joint venture is recorded under the equity method.
 
  
CH4 Energía, S.A. de C.V.
This company
was
constituted on December 21, 2000. CH4 Energía engages in the purchase and sale of natural gas and in activities related to the trading of natural gas, such as transport and distribution in Valle de Toluca, Mexico. This joint venture is recorded under the equity method.
 
  
Administración Portuaria Integral de Dos Bocas, S.A. de C.V.
This company was constituted on August 12, 1999. Its primary activity is administrating the Dos Bocas port, which is in Mexico’s public domain, promoting the port’s infrastructure and providing related port services. This investment is recorded under the equity method. 
 
  
Ductos el Peninsular S.A.P.I. de C.V.
 
This company was created on September 22, 2014. Its primary activity is the construction and operation of an integral transportation system and storage of petroleum products in the Peninsula of Yucatán.
 
F-2
7
 

NOTE 13. WELLS, PIPELINES, PROPERTIES, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, NET
 
  
Plants
  
Drilling
equipment
  
Pipelines
  
Wells
  
Buildings
  
Offshore
platforms
  
Furniture and
equipment
  
Transportation
equipment
  
Construction
in progress 
(1)
  
Land
  
Unproductive
fixed assets
  
Other

fixed assets
   
Total fixed
assets
 
Investment
                                             
 
  
 
     
Balances as of January 1, 2020
 
 
Ps. 848,841,327
 
 
 
13,092,824
 
 
 
460,935,077
 
 
 
1,303,668,946
 
 
 
63,318,227
 
 
 
326,482,942
 
 
 
50,407,562
 
 
 
16,355,218
 
 
 
139,925,440
 
 
 
44,149,536
 
 
 
—  
 
 
 
—  
 
  
 
3,267,177,099
 
Acquisitions
  5,918,741   (3,078  713,306   8,186,133   1,220,301   1,313,245   73,983   959,754   43,178,921   779,898   —     —      62,341,204 
Reclassifications
  (1,963,411  —     101,327   —     (7,280  0     150,879   (73,609  42,424   47,190   16   —      (1,702,464
Capitalization
  432,546   —     6,626,995   24,349,676   13,879   1,474,545   5,198   0     (32,989,533  86,694   —     —      —   
(Impairment)
  (15,648,621  —     (6,880,060  (16,661,200  0     (9,736,235  —     0     (1,819,404  —     —     —      (50,745,520
Reversal of impairment
  8,644,317   —     1,011,652   35,080,511   429,790   13,503,826   —     0     0     —     —     —      58,670,096 
Disposals
  (1,140,879  —     (1,559,844  (151,405  (944,145  —     (571,445  (70,169  (162,111  (210,005  (16  —      (4,810,019
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Balances as of June 30, 2020
 
 
Ps. 845,084,020
 
 
 
13,089,746
 
 
 
460,948,453
 
 
 
1,354,472,661
 
 
 
64,030,772
 
 
 
333,038,323
 
 
 
50,066,177
 
 
 
17,171,194
 
 
 
148,175,737
 
 
 
44,853,313
 
 
 
—  
 
 
 
—  
 
  
 
3,330,930,396
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Balances as of January 1, 2020
 
 
Ps. 848,841,327
 
 
 
13,092,824
 
 
 
460,935,077
 
 
 
1,303,668,946
 
 
 
63,318,227
 
 
 
326,482,942
 
 
 
50,407,562
 
 
 
16,355,218
 
 
 
139,925,440
 
 
 
44,149,536
 
 
 
—  
 
 
 
—  
 
  
 
3,267,177,099
 
Acquisitions
  13,934,129   246,351   1,911,502   15,602,539   1,118,794   3,696,726   294,329   552,865   131,963,334   543,472   —     —      169,864,041 
Reclassifications
  (1,446,201  —     228,056   —     361,131   —     410,240   7,586   (1,234,963  115,107   24,601   —      (1,534,443
Capitalization
  9,906,725   —     19,022,425   42,183,243   616,006   15,695,486   8,835   1,532   (87,150,784  (283,468  —     —      —   
(Impairment)
  (66,031,126  —     (9,392,862  (48,028,474  (65,964  (16,210,995  —     —     (20,210,911  —     —     —      (159,940,332
Reversal of impairment
  9,797,281   153,456   11,943,047   73,801,995   1,563,299   25,872,979   8,159   426,560   19,856   —     —     —      123,586,632 
Disposals
  (3,297,113     (2,855,580  —     (6,599,754  (1,184,109  (2,300,115  (514,229  (1,441,548  (298,828  (24,601  —      (18,515,877
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Balances as of December 31, 2020
 
 
Ps. 811,705,022
 
 
 
13,492,631
 
 
 
481,791,665
 
 
 
1,387,228,249
 
 
 
60,311,739
 
 
 
354,353,029
 
 
 
48,829,010
 
 
 
16,829,532
 
 
 
161,870,424
 
 
 
44,225,819
 
  —     —     
 
3,380,637,120
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Acquisitions
  3,880,893   —     827,389   16,016,060   10,822   1,215,842   732,709   23,263   41,666,809   —     —     —      64,373,787 
Reclassifications
  (25,191  —     (21,158  9,491   (27  14,966   (4,920  (5,303  (1,920  (1,660  1,625   —      (34,097
Capitalization
  603,525   —     1,797,529   20,344,576   49,009   2,148,170   118,110   —     (25,060,919  —     —     —      —   
(Impairment)
  (4,953,757  —     (8,286,406  (23,215,425  —     1,362,306   —     —     —     —     (1,421  —      (35,094,703
Reversal of impairment
  10,786,947   —     3,311,419   51,541,252   —     1,537,685   —     109,860   —     —     —     —      67,287,163 
Disposals
  (65,719  —     (28,862  —     (38,932  —     (19,156  (49,427  (1,118,730  (15,164  (204  —      (1,336,194
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Balances as of June 30, 2021
 
 
Ps. 821,931,720
 
 
 
13,492,631
 
 
 
479,391,576
 
 
 
1,451,924,203
 
 
 
60,332,611
 
 
 
360,631,998
 
 
 
49,655,753
 
 
 
16,907,925
 
 
 
177,355,664
 
 
 
44,208,995
 
 
 
—  
 
 
 
  
 
  
 
3,475,833,076
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Accumulated depreciation and amortization
                                                     
Balances as of January 1, 2020
 
 
Ps. (481,465,163)
 
 
 
(5,517,449
 
 
(189,419,296
 
 
(1,025,041,461
 
 
(43,624,163
 
 
(193,535,087
 
 
(43,047,957
 
 
(7,977,961
 
 
—  
 
 
 
—  
 
 
 
—  
 
 
 
—  
 
  
 
(1,989,628,537
Depreciation and amortization
  (21,266,709  (227,586  (6,509,285  (27,967,312  (987,990  (5,816,001  (1,155,393  (394,499  —     —     —     —      (64,324,775
Reclassifications
  2,017,565   —     (242,871  —     7,421   —     (68,412  (11,239  —     —     —     —      1,702,464 
Disposals
  679,050   —     692,385   —     771,012   0     509,248   114,487   —     —     —     —      2,766,182 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Balances as of June 30, 2020
 
 
Ps.
 
(500,035,257)
 
 
 
(5,745,035
 
 
(195,479,067
 
 
(1,053,008,773
 
 
(43,833,720
 
 
(199,351,088
 
 
(43,762,514
 
 
(8,269,212
 
 
—  
 
 
 
—  
 
 
 
—  
 
  —     
 
(2,049,484,666
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Balances as of January 1, 2020
 
 
Ps.
 
(481,465,163)
 
 
 
(5,517,449
 
 
(189,419,296
 
 
(1,025,041,461
 
 
(43,624,163
 
 
(193,535,087
 
 
(43,047,957
 
 
(7,977,961
 
 
—  
 
 
 
 
 
 
—  
 
 
 
—  
 
  
 
(1,989,628,537
Depreciation and amortization
  (42,071,837  (384,993  (14,042,861  (56,325,342  (1,989,834  (11,671,929  (2,249,987  (895,037  —        —     —      (129,631,820
Reclassifications
  1,782,525   —     (90,590  —     (103,562  —     (203,053  149,123   —        —     —      1,534,443 
Disposals
  1,172,277   —     2,576,418   —     5,824,019   968,552   2,164,127   512,922   —        —     —      13,218,315 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Balances as of December 31, 2020
 
 
Ps.
 
(520,582,198)
 
 
 
(5,902,442
 
 
(200,976,329
 
 
(1,081,366,803
 
 
(39,893,540
 
 
(204,238,464
 
 
(43,336,870
 
 
(8,210,953
  —     —     —     —     
 
(2,104,507,599
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
  (18,091,427  (165,407  (7,917,965  (32,861,788  (922,250  (6,932,087  (996,256  (310,687  —     —     —     —      (68,197,867
Reclassifications
  47,616   —     (5,964  —     25   —     1,659   (9,239  —     —     —     —      34,097 
Disposals
  6,367   —     154,721   —     112,861   —     (7,215  22,292   —     —     —     —      289,026 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Balances as of June 30, 2021
 
 
Ps. (538,619,642)
 
 
 
(6,067,849
 
 
(208,745,537
 
 
(1,114,228,591
 
 
(40,702,904
 
 
(211,170,551
 
 
(44,338,682
 
 
(8,508,587
  —     —     —     —     
 
(2,172,382,343
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Wells, pipelines, properties, plant and
equipment—net as of June 30, 2020
 
 
Ps. 342,331,315
 
 
 
7,344,711
 
 
 
229,678,985
 
 
 
288,329,751
 
 
 
20,197,052
 
 
 
119,530,161
 
 
 
6,303,663
 
 
 
8,901,982
 
 
 
148,175,737
 
 
 
44,853,313
 
 
 
—  
 
 
 
—  
 
  
 
1,215,646,670
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Wells, pipelines, properties, plant and
equipment—net as of December 31, 2020
 
 
Ps. 291,122,824
 
 
 
7,590,189
 
 
 
280,815,336
 
 
 
305,861,446
 
 
 
20,418,199
 
 
 
150,114,565
 
 
 
5,492,140
 
 
 
8,618,579
 
 
 
161,870,424
 
 
 
44,225,819
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
1,276,129,521
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Wells, pipelines, properties, plant and
equipment—net as of June 30, 2021
 
 
Ps. 283,312,078
 
 
 
7,424,782
 
 
 
270,646,039
 
 
 
337,695,612
 
 
 
19,629,707
 
 
 
149,461,447
 
 
 
5,317,071
 
 
 
8,399,338
 
 
 
177,355,664
 
 
 
44,208,995
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
1,303,450,733
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Depreciation rates
  3 to 5
%
   5%   2 to 7
%
   —     3 to
 
7
%
   4%   3 to 10
%
   4 to 20
%
                      
Estimated useful lives
  20 to 35   20   15 to 45   —     33 to 35   25   3 to 10   5 to 25                      
 
(1)
Mainly wells, pipelines and plants.
 
F-2
8

A.
 
 
 
 
 
For the
six-month
period ended June 30, 2021 and the year ended December 31, 2020, the financing cost identified with fixed assets in the
 
construction
 
or
installation stage, capitalized as part of the value of such fixed assets, was Ps. 1,487,241 and Ps. 3,893,248, respectively. Financing
 
costs during the
six-month
period ended June 30, 2021 and the year ended December 31, 2020 were 6.15% to 6.35% and 5.75% to 7.08%,
 
respectively.
 
B.
The combined depreciation of fixed assets and amortization of wells for the
six-month
periods ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, recognized in operating
costs and expenses, was Ps. 68,197,867, and Ps. 64,324,775, respectively, which includes costs related to plugging and abandonment of wells for the
six-month
periods ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, of Ps. 68,335 and Ps. 1,502,323, respectively.
 
C.
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, provisions relating to future plugging of wells costs amounted to Ps. 77,567,029
and Ps. 77,125,513
,
respectively, and are presented in the “Provisions for plugging of wells” (see Note 17).
 
D
.
As of June 30, 2021 and 2020, the translation effect of property, plant and equipment items from a different currency than the
 
presentation
 
currency
was
 
Ps. 800,793
and Ps. 74,512,844
, respectively.
 
E.
During the
six-month
periods ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, PEMEX recognized a reversal of impairment of Ps. 32,192,460 and Ps. 7,924,576,
respectively, which is presented as a separate line item in the consolidated statement of comprehensive income as follows:
 
       
2021
       
2020
 
       
Reversal of
impairment
   
(Impairment)
  
Reversal of
impairment /
(Impairment), net
       
Reversal of
impairment
   
(Impairment)
  
Reversal of
impairment /
(Impairment), net
 
Pemex Exploration and Production
   Ps.    54,790,402    (26,598,174  28,192,228    Ps.    48,936,567    (38,302,866  10,633,701 
Pemex Industrial Transformation
        7,822,877    (3,932,505  3,890,372         5,496,926    (8,206,051  (2,709,125
Pemex Logistics
        109,860    0
  
   109,860         0
  
    0
  
   0   
        
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
        
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
Total
  
 
Ps.
 
  
 
62,723,139
 
  
 
(30,530,679
 
 
32,192,460
 
  
 
Ps.
 
  
 
54,433,493
 
  
 
(46,508,917
 
 
7,924,576
 
        
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
        
 
 
   
 
 
  
 
 
 
Cash Generating Unit (CGU) of Pemex Exploration and Production
During the
six-month
periods ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, Pemex Exploration and Production recognized a net reversal of impairment, of Ps. 28,192,228 and Ps. 10,633,701, respectively.
The net reversal of impairment was in the following CGUs:
 
   2021   2020 
Cantarell
  
 
Ps. 31,525,044
 
  
 
37,273,206
 
Aceite Terciario del Golfo
  
 
7,866,243
 
  
 
10,133,871
 
Crudo Ligero Marino
  
 
7,062,045
 
  
 
0  
 
Antonio J. Bermudez
  
 
5,446,794
 
  
 
0  
 
Tamaulipas Constituciones
  
 
1,787,997
 
  
 
0  
 
Arenque
  
 
600,607
 
  
 
415,367
 
Ixtal - Manik  
 
481,672
 
  
 
0  
 
Burgos
  
0
   
955,460
 
Cuenca de Mascupana  
 
0
 
  
 
158,663
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Reversal of impairment
  
 
54,790,402
 
  
 
48,936,567
 
Chuc
  
 
(10,556,097
  
 
(20,959,512
Tsimin Xux
   (7,479,619   (14,774,073
Burgos
   (6,343,726   0 
Ku-Maloob-Zaap
   (993,579   0   
Cuenca de Veracruz
   (494,368   0   
Ogarrio Magallanes
   (308,809   0   
Misión (Cee)
   (297,469   (28,424
Cactus Sitio Grande
   (123,472   0   
Cuenca de Mascupana   (1,035   0   
Crudo Ligero Marino   0    (1,045,288)
Ixtal - Manik   0      (1,335,000
Costero
   0      (160,569
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
(Impairment)
   (26,598,174)   (38,302,866
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Reversal of impairment, ne
t
  
 
Ps. 28,192,228
 
  
 
10,633,701
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
F-
29

As of June 30, 2021, Pemex Exploration and Production recognized a net reversal of impairment of Ps. 28,192,228, mainly due to: (i) an increase in crude oil prices, generating a positive effect of Ps. 36,638,596, mainly in the Cantarell, Antonio J. Bermúdez and Aceite Terciario del Golfo (“ATG”) CGUs; (ii) a positive effect of Ps. 42,3127,857, due to a decrease in the discount rate from 6.23% to 5.68%, mainly in the Cantarell, ATG, Ixtal Manik and Antonio J. Bermudez CGUs; and (iii) an increase in proven reserves in the new Ixachi, Xikin, Jaatsul, Cheek, Uchbal, TetL, Teekit, Suuk, Pokche and Mulach fields. These effects were offset by (i) a decrease in production volume of crude oil and higher transportation and distribution costs, resulting in a negative effect of Ps. 41,010,776, mainly in the Burgos, Chuc and Tsimin Xux CGUs; (ii) an exchange rate effect of Ps. 3,280,961, as a result of the appreciation of the peso against the U.S. dollar, from a peso/U.S. dollar exchange rate of Ps. 19.9487 = U.S. $1.00 as of December 31, 2020 to Ps. 19.8027 = U.S. $1.00 as of June 30, 2021; (iii) a negative tax effect of Ps. 1,713,106, mainly in the Cantarell, Antonio J. Bermúdez and ATG CGUs, due to higher income as a result of an increase in hydrocarbon prices and a decrease in the discount rate with respect to December 31, 2020; and (iv) a higher than expected cost on disposal of abandoned fixed assets of Ps. 4,769,381, due to the fact that these assets did not represent an investment for the remainder of financial year 2021, nor for the immediately subsequent years.
As of June 30, 2020, Pemex Exploration and Production recognized a net reversal of impairment of Ps.
10, 633,701
, mainly due to: (i) a positive exchange rate effect of Ps. 44,168,701 mainly in the Cantarell, ATG, Chuc, Tsimin, Xux, Ixtal Manik and Burgos CGUs; (ii) an increase in future net cash flows generating a positive effect of Ps. 39,752,000, mainly in the Cantarell, Burgos and ATG CGUs, as a result of an increase in volume production profiles that lead to increased future revenue estimates. There were additional increases in the volume production profiles of the new Ixachi, Xikin, Uchbal, Tetl, Teekit, Suuk, Pokche and Mulach fields; (iii) lower taxes of Ps. 3,020,000, mainly in the Chuc, Crudo Ligero Marino and Tsimin Xux CGUs, due to lower income from production profiles. These effects were partially offset by (i) a decrease in crude oil and gas prices, generating a negative effect of Ps. (40,320,000), mainly in the Chuc, Tsimin Xux, Burgos, Ixtal Manik and Crudo Ligero Marino CGUs and (ii) a negative effect from the discounting of future cash flows of Ps. (35,987,000), mainly in the Cantarell and ATG CGUs.
The CGUs of Pemex Exploration and Production are investment projects in productive fields with hydrocarbon reserves associated with proved reserves. These productive hydrocarbon fields contain varying degrees of heating power consisting of a set of wells and are supported by fixed assets associated directly with production, such as pipelines, production facilities, offshore platforms, specialized equipment and machinery.
Each project represents the smallest unit which can concentrate the core revenues, with clear costs and expenses that enable future cash flows (value in use) to be determined.
Pemex Exploration and Production determines the recoverable amount of fixed assets based on the long-term estimated prices for Pemex Exploration and Production’s proved reserves. The recoverable amount on each asset is the value in use.
 
F-
3
0

To determine the value in use of long-lived assets associated to hydrocarbon extraction, the net present value of reserves is determined based on the following assumptions:
 
   
June 30,
 
   
2021
   
2020
 
Average crude oil price
   54.56 USD/bl    50.29 USD/bl 
Average gas price
   4.69 USD/mpc    5.27 USD/mpc 
Average condensates price
   63.77 USD/bl    56.67 USD/bl 
Discount rate
   5.68% annual    6.30% annual 
For 2021 and 2020 the total forecast production, calculated with a horizon of 25 years was 6,401 and 6,914 million barrels of crude oil equivalent, respectively.
Pemex Exploration and Production, in compliance with practices observed in the industry, estimates the recovery value of asset by determining its value in use, based on cash flows associated with proved reserves after taxes and using a discount rate, also after taxes.
As of June 30, 2021 and 2020, values in use for CGUs with impairment or reversal of impairment are:
 
       2021   2020 
Ku-Maloob-Zaap
   Ps.    649,487,778    841,469,387 
Cuenca de Veracruz
        166,211,278    103,282,178 
Cantarell
        137,428,547    131,401,801 
Chuc
        57,934,076    18,780,072 
Aceite Terciario del Golfo
        47,101,553    10,827,447 
Antonio J. Bermudez
        28,163,353    45,749,266 
Cactus Sitio Grande
        26,541,444    17,309,257 
Ogarrio Magallanes
        26,500,675    21,484,583 
Crudo Ligero Marino
        23,397,377    (9,234,885
Tsimin Xux
        22,906,019    16,532,723 
Ixtal—Manik
        15,760,675    10,805,971 
Burgos
        10,807,474    7,279,062 
Poza Rica
        8,275,931    13,409,099 
Tamaulipas Constituciones
        6,632,326    16,617,388 
Arenque
        5,843,838    8,949,799 
Cuenca de Macuspana
        1,020,364    23,478 
        
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total
  
 
Ps.
 
  
 
1,234,012,708
 
  
 
1,254,686,626
 
        
 
 
   
 
 
 
F-3
1

Cash Generating Units of Pemex Industrial Transformation
During the
six-month
periods ended June 30, 2021 a
n
d 2020, Pemex Industrial Transformation recognized a net reversal of impairment and impairment of Ps. 3,890,372 and Ps. (2,709,125) respectively.
The net reversal of impairment and impairment were in the following cash generating units:
 
   2021   2020 
Tula Refinery
  Ps.5,712,131    2,919,561 
Minatitlán Refinery
   1,104,019    2,577,365 
Morelos Petrochemical Complex
   1,006,727    0   
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Reversal of impairment
   7,822,877    5,496,926 
Madero Refinery
   (3,932,505   (8,206,051
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
(Impairment)
   (3,932,505   (8,206,051
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Reversal of impairment (impairment)
  
Ps.
3,890,372
 
  
 
(2,709,125
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
As of June 30, 2021, Pemex Industrial Transformation recognized a net reversal of impairment of Ps.
 
3,890,372
. This net reversal of impairment was mainly due to (i) a decrease in the discount rate of CGUs of refined products and ethylene products by 1.88% and 0.11%, respectively and (ii) an increase in the sale prices of products. These effects were partially offset by the appreciation of the peso against the U.S. dollar, from a peso/U.S. dollar exchange rate of Ps.
19.9487
= U.S. $1.00 as of December 31, 2020 to Ps.
19.8027
= U.S. $1.00 as of June 30, 2021, which are used as cash flows when U.S. dollars are taken
as reference. 
As of June 30, 2020, the net impairment of Ps.
(2,709,125)
was mainly due to: (i) lower production levels, mainly at the Madero Refinery; (ii) a decrease in the sale prices of products; (iii) an increase in the discount rate of CGUs of refined products and gas by 0.24% and 0.21%, respectively, and in the discount rate of CGUs of petrochemicals and ethylene products by 0.05%, and 0.04% respectively; and (iv) the depreciation of the peso against the U.S. dollar, from a peso/U.S. dollar exchange rate of Ps.
18.8452
= U.S. $1.00 as of December 31, 2019 to Ps.
22.9715
= U.S. $1.00 as of June 30, 2020, which are used as cash flows when U.S. dollars are taken as reference.
To determine the value in use of long-lived assets associated with the cash-generating units of Pemex Industrial Transformation, the net present value of cash flows was determined based on the following assumptions:
 
   
As of June 30,
 
   
2021
  
2020
  
2021
  
2020
  
2021
  
2020
  
2021
  
2020
 
   Refining  Gas  Petrochemicals  Ethylene 
Average crude oil Price per barrel
  U.S. $56.61  U.S. $35.50   N.A.   N.A.   N.A. 
Processed volume
(i)
   921 Mbd   775 Mbd   Variable because the load inputs are diverse 
Rate of Ps./U.S. dollar
   19.8027   22.9715   19.8027   22.9715   19.8027   22.9715   19.8027   22.9715 
Useful lives of the cash generating units (year average)
   11   12   7   7   6   7   5   6 
Discount rate (% annual)
   8.95  11.63  10.00  9.72  8.18  8.81  8.18  8.17
Period*
   2021-2032   2021-2027   2021-2026   2021-2025 
 
The first 5 years are projected and stabilize at year 6.
(i)
Average of the first 4 years
CGUs in Pemex Industrial Transformation are processing centers grouped according to their types of processes as refineries, gas complex processors, and petrochemical centers. These centers produce various finished products for direct sale to customers or intermediate products that can be processed in another of its cash generating units or by a third party. Each processing center of Pemex Industrial Transformation represents the smallest unit that has distinguishable revenues, with clear costs and expenses that enable future cash flows (value in use) to be determined.
Cash flow determinations are made based on PEMEX’s business plans, operating financial programs, forecasts of future prices of products related to the processes of the cash generating units, budget programs and various statistical models that consider historical information of processes and the capacity of various processing centers.
 
F-3
2

As of June 30, 2021 and 2020, the value in use for the impairment of fixed assets was as follows:
 
   
2021
   
2020
 
Tula Refinery
  Ps.59,876,872    57,078,940 
Salina Cruz Refinery
   48,166,092    41,073,212 
Minatitlán Refinery
   18,696,336    68,093,035 
Morelos Petrochemical Complex
   9,397,241    0   
Madero Refinery
   2,474,929    17,390,498 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total
  
Ps.
 138,611,470
 
  
 
183,635,685
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
NOTE 14. INTANGIBLE ASSETS, NET
At June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, intangible assets, net were mainly wells unassigned to a reserve and other components of intangible assets, which amounted to Ps. 23,003,774 and Ps. 22,775,784, respectively, mainly due to wells unassigned to a reserve and other intangible assets, as follows:
 
 a.
Wells unassigned to a reserve
 
   
June 30,

2021
   
December 31,
2020
   
June 30,

2020
 
Wells unassigned to a reserve:
               
Balance at the beginning of period
  Ps. 21,435,160   Ps. 12,831,281   Ps. 12,831,281 
Additions to construction in progress
   9,092,291    23,237,519    8,449,972 
Transfers against expenses
   (4,663,242   (8,404,284   (4,258,607
Transfers against fixed assets
   (4,311,419   (6,229,356   (2,205,449
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Balance at the end of period
  
Ps.
 21,552,790
 
  
Ps.
 21,435,160
 
  
Ps.
 14,817,197
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 b.
Other intangible assets
 
   
June 30,

2021
   
December 31,
2020
 
Licenses
   Ps. 5,054,004    Ps. 4,885,305 
Exploration expenses, evaluation of assets and concessions
   1,766,892    1,769,100 
Accumulated amortization
   (5,369,912   (5,313,781
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Balance at the end of the period
  
 
Ps. 1,450,984
 
  
 
Ps. 1,340,624
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
NOTE 15. MEXICAN GOVERNMENT LONG-TERM NOTES RECEIVABLE AND OTHER ASSETS
A.   Long-term notes receivable
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the balance of long-term notes receivable was as follows:
 
   
June 30,
2021
   
December 31,
2020
 
Promissory notes issued by the Mexican Government
  Ps.0     Ps.0   
Other long-term notes receivable
(1)
   858,648    886,827 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total long-term notes receivable
  
Ps.
 858,648
 
  
Ps.
 886,827
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
(1)
 
Mainly collection rights related to Value Added Tax from the
non-recourse
factoring contract between Pemex Logistics and Banco Mercantil del Norte, S.A.
 
F-3
3

On December 24, 2015, the
Secretaría de Hacienda y Crédito Público
(Ministry of Finance and Public Credit, or “SHCP”) published in the Official Gazette of the Federation the
Disposiciones de carácter general relativas a la asunción por parte del Gobierno Federal de obligaciones de pago de pensiones y jubilaciones a cargo de Petróleos Mexicanos y sus empresas productivas subsidiarias
(General provisions regarding the assumption by the Mexican Government of the payment obligations related to pensions and retirement plans of Petróleos Mexicanos and its productive state-owned subsidiaries). These regulations stated the terms, conditions, financing mechanisms and payment arrangements pursuant to which the SHCP would assume a portion of the payment obligations related to PEMEX’s pensions and retirement plans. An independent expert reviewed the calculation, the methodology used, the maturity profile and all of the information provided by PEMEX
.
In accordance with these provisions and prior to the completion of the independent expert’s review described above, on December 24, 2015, the Mexican Government issued in advance payment, through the SHCP, a Ps. 50,000,000
non-negotiable
promissory note due December 31, 2050 payable to Petróleos Mexicanos. The promissory note, which accrued interest at a rate of 6.93% per year, was recognized as a long-term note receivable in
non-current
assets once the independent expert named by SHCP concluded its review.
On August 5, 2016, Petróleos Mexicanos received promissory notes issued by the Mexican Government at a discount value of Ps. 184,230,586 as of June 29, 2016, as part of the Mexican Government’s assumption of a portion of the payment liabilities related to Petróleos Mexicanos and Subsidiary Entities’ pensions and retirement plans, which notes were delivered in exchange for the Ps. 50,000,000 promissory notes issued to Petróleos Mexicanos on December 24, 2015. On August 15, 2016, Petróleos Mexicanos exchanged Ps. 47,000,000 of these promissory notes for short-term floating rate Mexican Government debt securities, known as
Bonos de Desarrollo del Gobierno Federal
(Development Bonds of the Mexican Government, or “BONDES D”). Petróleos Mexicanos then sold the BONDES D to Mexican development banks at market prices.
Petróleos Mexicanos recognized a Ps. 135,439,612 increase in equity as a result of the Ps. 184,230,586 of the promissory notes as of June 29, 2016, minus the Ps. 50,000,000 promissory note received by Petróleos Mexicanos on December 24, 2015, plus a Ps. 1,209,026 increase in the value of the promissory notes from June 29, 2016 to August 15, 2016, the date on which PEMEX received the promissory notes.
During the period from January 1 to November 19, 2020, PEMEX recorded Ps. 7,097,040 in accrued interests from these receivable promissory notes. This amount was recognized as financing income in the unaudited condensed consolidated interim statement of comprehensive income.
On March 31, 2020, Petróleos Mexicanos received the payment of promissory note No. 4 in the amount of Ps. 4,983,670 (Ps. 4,102,622 of principal and Ps. 881,048 of interest), which was transferred to the
Fideicomismo Fondo Laboral Pemex
(“FOLAPE”).
On November 19, 2020, Petróleos Mexicanos and the SHCP agreed to exchange 16 promissory notes in favor of Petróleos Mexicanos (notes 5 to 20) in a total amount of Ps. 128,656,192 for 18 series of Mexican Government local bonds (the “Government Bonds”). The resources from the Government Bonds will be exclusively transferred to the FOLAPE for the payments related to its pension and retirement plan obligations.
The roll-forward related to the promissory notes is as follows:
 
   
For the year ended
December 31, 2020
(i)
 
Balance at the beginning of the year
  Ps.126,534,822 
Collected promissory notes
   (4,102,622
Accrued interests
   7,097,040 
Interests received from promissory notes
   (881,048
Reversal of (impairment) of the promissory notes
   8,000 
Exchange from promissory notes to Bonds
   (128,656,192
   
 
 
 
Balance at the end of the period
  
Ps.
0  
 
   
 
 
 
 
(i) 
Until November 19, 2020.
 
F-
3
4

B
.
Government Bonds
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the balance of the Government Bonds (see Note
15-A),
included Government Bonds valued at amortized cost as follows:
 
   
June 30,

2021
   
December 31,
2020
 
Government Bonds
  Ps. 126,757,435   Ps. 129,549,519 
Less: current portion of Government Bonds, net of expected credit losses
(1)
   15,973,436    18,036,557 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total long-term notes receivable Government Bonds
  
Ps.
 110,783,999
 
  
Ps.
 111,512,962
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
(1) 
Includes an expected credit loss of Ps. 14,909.
As of November 19, 2020, the value of the Government Bonds was Ps. 128,786,611, and the liability was Ps. 95,597,610, resulting in a net active position of Ps. 33,189,001.
On November 20, 2020, Petróleos Mexicanos monetized the whole of the Government Bonds by entering into a three-year financial arrangement to partially raise an equivalent of Ps. 95,597,610 at an annual rate of 8.56275%, maturing November 24, 2023. Petróleos Mexicanos retains the risks, benefits and economic rights of the Government Bonds, which were delivered to a financial institution. Petróleos Mexicanos will continue to collect coupon and principal payments from the securities throughout the term of the transaction. Therefore, Petróleos Mexicanos recognizes the Government Bonds as restricted assets and recognizes short-term debt for the monetization. The resources from the Government Bonds will be transferred to the FOLAPE for payments related to its pension and retirement plan obligations.
During the period from January 1 to June 30, 2021, interest income generated by the Government Bonds amounted to Ps. 3,478,512 of which Petróleos Mexicanos received payments in the amount of Ps. 3,472,081. Interest income generated by the Government Bonds amounted to Ps. 2,103,099 during the period from November 20, 2020 to December 31, 2020. Petróleos Mexicanos received payments in the amount of Ps. 817,270, which were recognized as financial income in the consolidated statement of comprehensive income.
The Government Bonds consist of 18 series of development bonds (D Bonds, M Bonds and UDI Bonds) issued by the SHCP with maturities between 2021 and 2026, with a notional amount of Ps. 118,280,727 and Ps. 913,482 in UDIs.
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the fair value of the transferred assets was Ps.126,323,478 and Ps. 129,320,536, and the fair value of the associated liabilities was Ps. 97,014,650 and Ps. 95,630,214, resulting in a net position of Ps. 29,308,828 and Ps. 33,690,322.
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the recorded liability was Ps. 96,461,665 (Ps. 95,597,610 of principal and Ps. 864,055 of interest) and
Ps. 96,461,665 (Ps. 95,597,610 of principal and Ps. 864,055 of interest), respectively.
The roll-forward of the Mexican Bonds is as follows:
 
   
June 30,
2021
   
December 31,
2020
 
Balance as of the beginning of the year
   Ps.
 
129,549,519
   
 
0  
 
Promissory notes value at the beginning of the exchange as of
November 19, 2020
   0      128,656,192 
Financial income from the Exchange of promissory notes to Bonds
   0      130,419 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Initial value of Mexican Bonds
   0      128,786,611 
Accrued interests
   3,478,512    2,103,099 
Interests received from bonds
   (3,472,081   (817,270
Impact of the valuation of bonds in UDIS
   205,333    (505,339
Amortized cost
   (3,006,521     
Reversal
(
Impairment) of bonds
   2,673    (17,582
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Balance at the end of the period
  
 
Ps.
 
126,757,435
 
  
 
129,549,519
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
F-
3
5

C
.
Other assets
As of June 30,
 
2021 and December 31, 2020, the balance of other assets was as follows:
 
   
June 30,

2021
   
December 31,
2020
 
Payments in advance
(1)
   Ps. 34,553,411    Ps. 5,223,679 
Other
(2)
   1,816,743    1,680,934 
Insurance
   656,604    678,897 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Total other assets
  
Ps. 37,026,758
   
Ps. 7,583,510
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
(1)
Mainly advance payments to contractors for
 
the construction of the Dos Bocas refinery.
(2)
Includes restricted cash for Ps. 50,657 as of June 30, 2021, as a result of a cash retention ordered by the court in a commercial judgement promoted by OPCO Soluciones, S.A. de C.V. against PEMEX’s subsidiary company AGRO, due to lack of payment by this subsidiary company.
NOTE 16. DEBT
The Federal Income Law applicable to PEMEX as of January 1, 2021, published in the Official Gazette of the Federation on November 25, 2020, authorized Petróleos Mexicanos and its Subsidiary Entities to incur a 
domestic
net debt up to Ps. 22,000,000 and an external net debt up to U.S. $1,000,000. PEMEX can incur additional
domestic
or external debt, as long as the total amount of net debt (Ps. 42,000,000, equivalent to U.S. $2,100,000) does not exceed the ceiling established by the Federal Income Law.
The Board of Directors approves the terms and conditions for the incurrence of obligations that constitute public debt of Petróleos Mexicanos for each fiscal year, in accordance with the Petróleos Mexicanos Law and the
Reglamento de la Ley de Petróleos Mexicanos
(Regulations to the Petróleos Mexicanos Law). The terms and conditions are promulgated in accordance with the guidelines approved by the SHCP for Petróleos Mexicanos for the respective fiscal year.
During the period from January 1 to June 30, 2021, PEMEX participated in the following financing activities:
 
  
On January 22, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos issued Ps. 2,500,000 of promissory notes due July 2021
,
at a rate linked to the
six-month
Tasa de Interés Interbancaria de Equilibrio (“TIIE”) plus 240 basis points.
 
  
On January 22, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos issued Ps. 4,000,000 of promissory notes due July 2021
,
at a rate linked to the
six-month
TIIE plus 248 basis points.
 
  
On January 22, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos entered into a credit agreement guaranteed by an export credit agency for a line of credit in the amount of U.S.$152,237 due January 2031
,
at a rate linked to the
one-year
London Inter Bank Offered Rate (LIBOR) plus 138 basis points.
 
  
On March 23, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos renewed a promissory note for Ps. 2,000,0000 at a rate linked to the
six-month
TIIE plus 238 basis points. Petróleos Mexicanos entered into the original promissory note in January 2021 for a term for 60 days, and the renewal was for a further term of 90 days
 
  
On April 13, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos issued Ps. 1,500,000 promissory notes due in July 2021, at a rate linked to the 91 day TIIE plus 215 basis points.
 
F-3
6

  
On April 22, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos renewed Ps. 4,000,000 promissory notes due in October 2021, at a rate linked to the 182 day TIIE plus 248 basis points. The original maturity of the promissory notes was July 2021.
 
  
On May 10, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos entered into a U.S. $400,000 term loan in two tranches, one of U.S. $65,000 and the second of U.S. $335,000, both due March 2031. Both tranches bear interest at a floating rate linked to
six-month
LIBOR plus 48 basis points.
 
  
On May 21, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos renewed and restructured a term loan for U.S. $300,000 which bears interest at a floating rate linked to LIBOR plus a variable margin between 170 and 345 basis points determined by Petróleos Mexicanos’ long-term currency denominated debt ratings issued by S&P, Fitch and Moody’s.
 
  
On June 21, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos renewed a promissory note entered into in March 2021 for Ps. 2,000,000 and an original term of 90 days. This renewal was carried out for a term of 180 days at a rate linked to TIIE plus 260 basis points.
All of the debt securities listed above are jointly and severally guaranteed by Pemex Exploration and Production, Pemex Industrial Transformation and Pemex Logistics and their respective successors and assignees.
As of June 30, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos and PMI Trading had U.S. $7,700,000 and Ps. 37,000,000 in available credit lines in order to provide liquidity, of which U.S. $175,000 and Ps. 4,500,000 are available.
All of the financing activities mentioned above were guaranteed by Pemex Exploration and Production, Pemex Industrial Transformation and Pemex Logistics and their respective successors and assignees.
From January 1 to June 30, 2021, PMI Trading obtained U.S. $25,095,575 from its revolving credit line and repaid U.S. $25,209,441. As of December 31, 2020, the outstanding amount under this revolving credit line was U.S. $2,387,065. As of June 30, 2021, the outstanding amount under this revolving credit line was U.S. $2,273,199.
The following table presents the roll-forward of total debt of PEMEX for the
six-month
periods ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, and for the year ended December 31, 2020, which includes short and long-term debt:
 
   
June 30,

2021
(i)
   
December 31,

2020
(i)
   
June 30,

2020
(i)
 
Changes in total debt:
               
At the beginning of the period
   Ps. 2,258,727,317    Ps. 1,983,174,088    Ps. 1,983,174,088 
Loans obtained - financing institutions
   746,457,255    1,292,197,518    576,365,276 
Debt payments
   (699,214,601   (1,151,962,147   (494,855,903
Accrued interest
(ii)
   73,310,692    144,207,950    78,796,843 
Interest paid
   (76,608,807   (130,989,150   (67,879,184
Foreign exchange
   (22,768,453   122,099,058    385,873,077 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
At the end of the period
  
Ps. 2,279,903,403
   
Ps. 2,258,727,317
   
Ps. 2,461,474,197
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
(i)
These amounts include accounts payable by Financed Public Works Contracts (“FPWC”) (formerly known as Multiple Services Contracts), which do not generate cash flows.
(ii) 
As of June 30, 2021 it includes amortized cost of Ps. 396,777 consisting of Ps. 489,825 of expenses and discounts related to issuance of debt and Ps. (93,048) of fees to the issuance of debt. As of December 31, 2020 it includes amortized cost of Ps. 1,555,266 consisting of Ps. 1,868,501 of expenses and discounts related to issuance of debt and Ps. (313,275) of fees to the issuance of debt.
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, PEMEX used the following exchange rates to translate the outstanding balances in foreign currencies to pesos in the statement of financial position:
 
   
June 30,
2021
   
December 31,
2020
 
   (in pesos) 
U.S. dollar
   19.8027    19.9487 
Japanese yen
   0.1791    0.1933 
Pounds sterling
   27.4960    27.2579 
Euro
   23.6147    24.4052 
Swiss francs
   21.5354    22.5720 
 
F-3
7
 

NOTE 17. PROVISIONS FOR SUNDRY CREDITORS
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, the provisions for sundry creditors and others is as follows:
 
   
June 30,

2021
   
December 31,
2020
 
Provision for plugging of wells (Note 13.C)
  Ps.77,567,029   Ps.77,125,513 
Provision for trials in process (Note 19)
   8,820,440    8,321,816 
Provision for environmental costs
   10,259,859    9,178,555 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
   
Ps.
 
96,647,328
   
Ps.
 
94,625,884
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
NOTE 18. EQUITY (DEFICIT)
 
a.
Certificates of Contribution “A”
The capitalization agreement between
 
Petróleos Mexicanos and t
h
e Mexican Government states that the Certificates of Contribution “A” constitute permanent capital.    
During the
six-months
ended June 30, 2021, PEMEX received a payment of Ps. 113,174,000 from Certificates of Contribution “A” from the Mexican Government.
During the year ended December 31, 2020, Petróleos Mexicanos received a payment of Ps. 46,256,000, as part of the contributions to PEMEX established in the Federal Budget for 2020.
PEMEX’s Certificates of Contribution “A” are as follows:
 
   
Amount
 
Certificates of Contribution “A” as of December 31, 2019
  Ps.478,675,447 
Increase in Certificates of Contribution “A” during 2020
   46,256,000 
   
 
 
 
Certificates of Contribution “A” as of December 31, 2020
  Ps.524,931,447 
Increase in Certificates of Contribution “A” during the
six-months
ended June 30, 2021
   113,174,000 
   
 
 
 
Certificates of Contribution “A” as of June 30, 2021
  
Ps.
 
638,105,447
 
   
 
 
 
 
b.
Mexican Government contributions
Mexican Government contributions made in the form of Certificates of Contribution “A” during the
six-month
period ended June 30, 2021 were designated for the payment of debt and for the construction of the Dos Bocas Refinery, as follows:
 
Date
  
Amount
 
January 22
(i)
  Ps.12,000,000 
February 11
(i)
   10,000,000 
February 24
(ii)
   32,062,000 
March 5
(i)
   7,000,000 
March 26
 
(i)
   2,000,000 
April 5
(i)
   5,000,000 
April 26
 
(i)
   2,050,000 
May 3
(i)
   7,000,000 
May 4
(ii)
   32,062,000 
June 21
(i)
   4,000,000 
   
 
 
 
Total
  
Ps.
 
113,174,000
 
   
 
 
 
 
(i)
Capital contributions to the construction of the Dos Bocas Refinery.
(ii)
Capital contributions to debt’s payments.
During the
six-months
ended June 30, 2021 and during 2020, there were no Mexican Government contributions other than those in the form of Certificates of Contribution “A”.
F-3
8

c.
Legal reserve
Under Mexican law, each of the Subsidiary Companies is required to allocate a certain percentage of its net income to a legal reserve fund until the fund reaches an amount equal to a certain percentage of each Subsidiary Company’s capital stock.
As of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, there were no changes to the legal reserve.
 
d.
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
As a result of the discount rate analysis related to employee benefits liability, for the
six-month
period ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, PEMEX recognized net actuarial gains (losses) in other comprehensive income Ps. 241,537,187 and Ps. (54,156), respectively,
 
which are presented
net of deferred income tax
 
of Ps. (10,468,424) and Ps. (54,170), respectively,
related to retirement and post-employment benefits. The variation related to retirement and post-employment benefits was the result of an increase in the discount and return on plan assets rates from
 7.08% as of December 31, 2020 to 7.94% as of June 30, 2021.
 
e.
Accumulated deficit from prior years
PEMEX has recorded negative earnings in the past several years. However, the
Ley de Concursos Mercantiles
(Commercial Bankruptcy Law of Mexico) is not applicable to Petróleos Mexicanos and the Subsidiary Entities. Furthermore, the financing agreements to which PEMEX is a party do not provide for financial covenants that would be breached or events of default that would be triggered as a consequence of negative equity.
 
f.
Uncertainty related to going concern
The unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis.
Facts and conditions
PEMEX also has substantial debt (including an increase in short-term debt), incurred mainly to finance the investments needed to carry out its operations and capital investment projects. Due to its heavy fiscal burden resulting from the payment of hydrocarbon extraction duties and other taxes, the cash flows derived from PEMEX’s operations in recent years have not been sufficient to fund its operations and capital expenditure programs. As a result, PEMEX’s indebtedness has increased significantly, and its working capital has deteriorated. Additionally, the significant crude oil price drop, which started in March 2020 and the negative economic impact as a result of the current global health crisis caused by the
Covid-19
pandemic have negatively impacted PEMEX´s financial performance. PEMEX’s 2020 revenues decreased both from the decline in crude oil prices and from a decrease in the demand of petroleum products.
Additionally, in March and April 2020, and again in July 2021, certain ratings agencies downgraded PEMEX’s credit rating. Most recent credit downgrades have been mainly driven by the effects of
Covid-19
and the associated reduced economic activity, low crude oil prices, concerns about PEMEX’s liquidity needs and its negative free cash flows and the downgrade of the Mexican Government’s sovereign debt rating. These downgrades could have an impact on PEMEX´s access to the financial markets, the cost and terms of PEMEX’s new debt and contract renegotiations that PEMEX may carry out during 2021 and 2022.
 
F-
39

During the
six-months
ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, PEMEX recognized a net loss of Ps. 22,993,364, and Ps. 606,587,323, respectively. In addition, as of June 30,
 
2021 and December 31, 2020, PEMEX had a negative equity of Ps. 2,073,259,957 and Ps. 2,404,727,030, respectively, mainly due to continuous net losses and a negative working capital of Ps.
 
461,398,753
 
and Ps. 442,550,332 as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, respectively.
PEMEX has budget autonomy, and, in public finance terms, is subject to the cash flows financial balance goals approved in the
Decreto de Presupuesto de Egresos de la Federación
(Federal Expenditure Budget Decree). This represents the difference between its gross revenues (inflows) and its total budgeted expenditures (outflows) including the financial cost of its debt, which is proposed by the SHCP and approved by the
Cámara de Diputados
(Chamber of Deputies). The Federal Budget for 2021 authorized PEMEX to have a negative financial balance budget of Ps. 92,687,000. This shortfall does not consider payments of principal of PEMEX’s debt due in 2021.
As of June 30, 2021, PEMEX has short-term debt maturities of Ps. 503,054,910 (principal and interest).
The combined effect of the above-mentioned events indicates the existence of significant doubt about PEMEX’s ability to continue as a going concern.
Actions-
PEMEX and the Mexican Government are carrying out the
following
actions, among others, to preserve liquidity:
PEMEX was granted a tax credit applicable to the Profit-sharing Duty of up to Ps. 73,280,000 pursuant to the presidential decree of the Mexican Government of February 19, 2021. As of June 30, 2021, PEMEX has applied Ps. 36,640,000 of this tax credit.
It is expected that PEMEX will
receive
scheduled equity contributions from the Mexican Government during 2021, through the Ministry of Energy for Ps. 96,720,000, of which as of July 26, 2021 Ps. 64,124,000, have been received. The resources from these contributions will be used for short-term maturities of long-term debt will not affect PEMEX’s compliance with its financial balance goal established for 2021.
In June 2021, PEMEX received Ps. 1,172,295 in non-refundable funds from
Fondo Nacional de Infraestructura
(FONADIN) for payments to contractors of the Tula Refinery rehabilitation project. This amount was recognized as other revenues in PEMEX´s statements of comprehensive income in June 2021.
PEMEX is subject to a lower tax burden in 2021, since the share-profit duty decreased to 54% in 2021 from 58% in 2020.
PEMEX has Ps. 189,480,790 (U.S. $7,700,000 and Ps. 37,000,000) in available credit lines in order to provide liquidity, if necessary. As of June 30, 2021, PEMEX had used Ps. 181,515,318 (U.S.$ 7,525,000 of its lines of credit denominated in U.S. dollars and Ps.
32,500,000
of its lines of credit denominated in pesos) and had a total availability of Ps. 7,965,472 (U.S. $175,000 and Ps. 4,500,000).
Revenues from alternative financing mechanisms that do not constitute public debt.
In addition, PEMEX may raise funds from the markets in accordance with prevailing conditions, to refinance its debt.
Further, PEMEX has the capacity to refinance its short-term debt maturities through direct loans and revolving credit facilities and loans guaranteed by export credit agencies. PEMEX also established in conjunction with development and commercial banks
Cadenas Productivas PEMEX Plus
(Productive Chains Plus Program) to aid for the payment to suppliers and contractors.
The
Ley de Ingresos de la Federación para el Ejercicio Fiscal de 2021
(“Revenue Law for 2021”) also authorized PEMEX a net additional
indebtedness up to Ps. 42,100,000 (Ps. 22,000,000 and U.S. $1,000,000), which is considered as public debt by the Mexican Government and may be used to partially cover its negative financial balance. In accordance with the Revenue Law for 2021, crude oil revenues between 42.12 and up to 44.12 U.S. dollars per barrel will be directed to improve PEMEX´s financial balance goal for 2021 and revenues above 44.12 U.S. dollars per barrel may be used for operating expenses and capital expenditures.
 
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0

PEMEX reviews and aligns its capital expenditures portfolio in accordance with updated economic assumptions on a periodic basis and giving priority to those projects which increase production in an efficient manner and at the lowest cost.
Further, on March 22, 2021, the Board of Directors of Petróleos Mexicanos approved the business plan of Petróleos Mexicanos and its Subsidiary Companies for 2021-2025 (the “2021-2025 Business Plan”).
Prices of crude oil, natural gas and petroleum products have begun to recover in the first months of 2021, and economic activity has begun to increase.
Petróleos Mexicanos and its Subsidiary Entities are not subject to the Commercial Bankruptcy Law of Mexico and none of PEMEX’s existing financing agreements include any financial covenants that could lead to the demand for immediate payment of its debt due to having negative equity or
non-compliance
with financial ratios.
PEMEX prepared its consolidated financial statements as of June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 on a going concern basis. There are certain conditions that have generated important uncertainty and significant doubts concerning the entity’s ability to continue operating, including recurring net losses, negative working capital and negative equity. These financial statements do not contain any adjustments that would be required if they were not prepared on a going concern basis.
 
g.
Non-controlling
interest
PEMEX does not currently own all of the shares of PMI CIM and COMESA, variations in income and equity from these entities are also presented in the consolidated statements of changes in equity (deficit) as
“non-controlling
interest.”
As of June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020,
non-controlling
interest represented losses of Ps. 261,403 and Ps. 369,692, respectively, in PEMEX’s equity (deficit).
NOTE 19. CONTINGENCIES
In the ordinary course of business, PEMEX is named in a number of lawsuits of various types. PEMEX evaluates the merit of each claim and assesses the likely outcome. PEMEX has not recorded provisions related to ongoing legal proceedings due to the fact that an unfavorable resolution is not expected in such proceedings, with the exception of the proceedings described in further detail in this Note.
PEMEX is involved in various civil, tax, criminal, administrative, labor and commercial lawsuits and arbitration proceedings. The results of these proceedings are uncertain as of the date of these unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements. As of June 30, 2021, and December 31, 2020, PEMEX had accrued a reserve of Ps. 8,820,440 and Ps. 8,321,816, respectively, for these contingent liabilities.
As of June 30, 2021, the current status of the principal lawsuits in which PEMEX is involved is as follows:
 
  
On April 4, 2011, Pemex Exploration and Production was summoned before the
Séptima Sala Regional Metropolitana
(Seventh Regional Metropolitan Court) of the
Tribunal Federal de Justicia Fiscal y Administrativa
(Tax and Administrative Federal Court) in connection with an administrative claim (No.
4957/11-17-07-1)
filed by EMS Energy Services de México, S. de R.L. de C.V. and Energy Maintenance Services Group I. LLC requesting that Pemex Exploration and Production’s termination of the public works contract be declared null and void. In a concurrent proceeding, the plaintiffs also filed an administrative claim (No.
13620/15-17-06)
against Pemex Exploration and Production before the
Sexta Sala Regional Metropolitana
(Sixth Regional Metropolitan Court) of the Tax and Administrative Federal Court in Mexico City seeking damages totaling U.S. $193,713
related to the above-mentioned contract. Pemex Exploration and Production filed a response requesting the two administrative claims be joined in a single proceeding, which was granted. On April 30, 2019, a judgment was issued by the
Segunda Sección de la Sala Superior
(“Second Section of the Superior Court”) in favor of Pemex Exploration and Production. On June 25, 2019, the plaintiffs filed an amparo (D.A. 397/2019) before the
Tercer Tribunal Colegiado en Materia Administrativa del Primer Circuito
(Third Administrative Joint Court of the First Circuit), which was granted. On March 12, 2020, Pemex Exploration and Production filed a motion to review against the resolution granting this amparo before the Third Administrative Joint Court of the First Circuit. On October 1, 2020, the Third Administrative Joint Court declared the resolution null and void, among others. Pemex Exploration and Production filed an amparo which was admitted. A motion to review was filed before the
Suprema Corte de Justicia de la Nación
(Supreme Court of Justice of the Nation), which is still pending as of the date of these financial statements. 
 
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1
 

  
On December 12, 2017, Pemex Exploration and Production was summoned in connection with an arbitration claim (no. 23217/JPA) filed by SUBSEA 7 de México, S. de R.L. de C.V. (“SUBSEA 7”) seeking U.S. $153,000 related to additional expenses in connection with pipelines construction contracts (No. 420832856 and 420833820). On January 5, 2018, Pemex Exploration and Production filed a response to the arbitration request and its counterclaim. On September 14, 2018, the defendant received the claim briefs including documentation and related evidence and the amount sought under this claim was increased to U.S. $310,484. On January 4, 2019, Pemex Exploration and Production filed a response to the claim. On February 14, 2019, SUBSEA 7 filed its reply. In June 2019, a hearing was held and on October 4, 2019 the parties filed their pleadings. The final award was issued on July 28, 2020, and notice was provided on July 30, 2020. Pemex Exploration and Production was ordered to pay U.S. $34,576 and Ps. 70,668. Pemex Exploration and Production filed a resolution to declare this award null and void and SUBSEA 7 was summoned. As of the date of these financial statements, the evidentiary stage is still pending.
 
  
On February 6, 2019, the
Sala Regional
 
del Golfo Norte
(North Gulf Regional Court) of the Tax and Administrative Federal Court summoned Pemex Drilling and Services (now Pemex Exploration and Production) in connection with a claim
(752/17-18-01-7)
filed by Micro Smart System de Mexico, S. de R.L. de C.V. (“Micro Smart System”), challenging a settlement statement dated March 14, 2017, related to a works contract number 424049831 dated December 9, 2009, seeking the payment of: U.S. $240,448 for work performed and U.S. $284 for work estimates. On May 8, 2019, a response to this claim was admitted and evidence was filed by Pemex Exploration and Production. On July 1, 2019, the Second Section of the Superior Court was instructed to review the claim. On September 24, 2019, the plaintiff filed its pleadings. On February 13, 2020, the Second Section of the Superior Court declared that the plaintiff partially proved its claim and no payments shall be made by the defendant. On September 8, 2020, the judgment was published in the
Gaceta Judicial
(“Jurisdictional Gazette
). On September 29, 2020, Pemex Exploration and Production filed a motion to clarify this judgment, which was granted on November 24, 2020 and notified on December 10, 2020. On October 2, 2020 the plaintiff filed an
amparo
against this judgment. On June 11, 2021, the court approved Micro Smart System’s motion requesting the court deny the entry of Pemex Exploration and Production’s expert. On June 17, 2021, Pemex Exploration and Production filed a motion seeking to declare the inadmissibility of Micro Smart System’s prior motion. As of the date of these financial statements, a final resolution is still pending.
 
  
On October 18, 2019, the
Sala Regional Peninsular
(Regional Peninsular Court) of the
Tribunal Federal de Justicia Administrativa
(Federal Justice Administrative Court) in Mérida, Yucatán summoned Pemex Exploration and Production in connection with a claim
(91/19-16-01-9)
filed by PICO México Servicios Petroleros, S. de R.L. de C.V. requesting that Pemex Exploration and Production’s termination of the public works contract (no. 428814828) be declared null and void and seeking U.S. $137.3 for expenses and related damages, among other claims. On December 12, 2019, Pemex Exploration and Production filed a response to this claim. On March 28, 2020, a notification dated February 10, 2020 was received in which the extended claim was admitted. On February 10, 2020 the expert appointed by the plaintiff was accepted. On February 18, 2020 an extension requested by the accounting expert appointed by Pemex Exploration and Production was accepted and his opinion was filed and ratified on August 11, 2020. On June 1, 2020 an independent expert was designated. As of the date of these financial statements, this designation is still pending.
 
  
Tech Man Group, S.A. de C.V. filed an administrative claim
(7804/18-17-09-8)
against Pemex Industrial Transformation seeking Ps. 2,009,598 for, among other things, payment of expenses and penalties in connection with a public works contract
(CO-OF-019-4008699-11)
before the
Tribunal Fiscal de Justicia Administrativa
(Fiscal Court of Administrative Justice). On June 25, 2019, a response was filed by Pemex Industrial Transformation as well as a motion against the admission of the claim, which was accepted. On October 2, 2019, the opinion of the accounting and construction experts submitted by the defendant was filed. On February 17, 2020, Pemex Industrial Transformation requested the
Tribunal Fiscal de Justicia Administrativa
(Fiscal Court of Administrative Justice) to appoint a new accounting expert since the previous appointed expert rejected his designation. On March 2, 2020, the independent construction expert filed his opinion. On August 7, 2020, the
Novena Sala Regional Metropolitana
(Ninth Regional Metropolitan Court) of the Federal Justice Court appointed an independent accounting expert, who filed his report on December 7, 2020. As of the date of these financial statements, a final resolution is still pending.
 
  
Constructora Norberto Odebrecht, S.A. filed an administrative claim against Pemex Industrial Transformation (file
No. 4742/19-17-01-7)
seeking U.S. $113,582 and Ps. 14,607 in connection with a termination resolution (no. 1,757) dated January 14, 2019, and issued by Pemex Industrial Transformation, which awarded U.S. $51,454 in favor of Pemex Industrial Transformation. The claim was admitted. On November 11, 2020, Pemex Industrial Transformation filed a response to this claim. As of the date of these financial statements, a final resolution is still pending.
 
  
On August 1, 2017, Pemex Exploration and Production was summoned in connection with an administrative claim (no.
11590/17-17-06-2)
filed by Proyectos y Cimentaciones Industriales, S.A. de C.V. before the Sixth Regional Metropolitan Court seeking Ps. 800,000 and U.S. $12,820 and to have the settlement certificate dated March 22, 2017 related to a services agreement declared null and void. On May 16, 2019, the “Second Section of the Superior Court issued a judgment in favor of Pemex Exploration and Production. On July 1, 2019, the
Décimo Primer Tribunal Colegiado en Materia Administrativa
(“Eleventh Administrative Joint Court”) admitted an
amparo
(no. 399/2019) filed by the plaintiff. On August 8, 2019, the defendant filed its pleadings. On April 22, 2021 the Eleventh Administrative Joint Court denied the
amparo
and confirmed the judgment dated May 16, 2019. As of the date of these financial statements, this claim has concluded.
The results of these proceedings are uncertain until their final resolutions are issued by the appropriate authorities. PEMEX has recorded liabilities for loss contingencies when it is probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount thereof can be reasonably estimated. When a reasonable estimation could not be made, qualitative disclosure was provided in the notes to these unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements. PEMEX does not disclose amounts accrued for each individual claim because such disclosure could adversely affect PEMEX’s legal strategy, as well as the outcome of the related litigation.
 
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2

NOTE 20. SUBSEQUENT EVENTS
During the period from June 30 to September
24
, 2021 
 
A.
Recent financing
 
activities
 
  
On July 8, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos entered into a U.S. $300,000 term loan due July 2024, which bears interest at a floating rate linked to LIBOR plus 320 basis points.
 
  
On July 16, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos entered into a U.S. $750,000 term loan due January 2023, which bears interest at a floating rate linked to LIBOR plus a variable margin between 170 and 345 basis points determined by Petróleos Mexicanos long-term currency denominated debt ratings issued by S&P, Fitch and Moody’s.
 
  
On July 21, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos renewed a promissory note entered into in January 2021 for Ps. 4,000,000 and an original term of 180 days. This renewal was carried out for Ps. 3,000,000 and a term of 120 days at a rate linked to TIIE plus 257.5 basis points.
 
  
On July 21, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos renewed a promissory note entered into in January 2021 for Ps. 2,500,000 and an original term of 180 days. This renewal was carried out for Ps. 3,500,000 and a term of 161 days at a rate linked to TIIE plus 240 basis points.
 
  
On September 13, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos entered into a U.S. $500,000 term loan due December 2021, which bears interest at a floating rate linked to LIBOR plus 200 basis points.
 
  
On September 21, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos entered into a U.S. $300,000 promissory notes in three tranches due December 2021. These tranches bear interest at a floating rate linked to LIBOR plus 200 to 245 basis points.
As of June 30, 2021, the outstanding amount under PMI Trading revolving credit line was U.S. 
$2,273,199.
From
July 1
to
September 24
, 2021, PMI Trading obtained U.S.
 $7,040,647 from its revolving credit line and repaid U.S. $6,986,054.
As of
September 24
, 2021, the outstanding amount under this revolving credit line was U.S. 
$2,327,793.
As of September 24, 2021, Petróleos Mexicanos had U.S.
$5,500,000 and Ps. 37,000,000
in available credit lines in order to provide liquidity, of which U.S.
$325,000
 
and Ps. 12,000,000 remain currently available.
 
B.
Exchange rates and crude oil prices
As of September 24, 2021, the Mexican
peso-U.S.
dollar exchange rate was
Ps. 20.0328
 
per U.S. dollar which represents a
1.2
% depreciation of the value of the peso in U.S. dollar terms as compared to the exchange rate as of June 30, 2021, which was
Ps. 19.8027
 
per U.S. dollar. This increase in U.S. dollar exchange rate from June 30, 2021 to September 24, 2021, has led to an increase of
Ps. 22,634,447
 
in PEMEX’s foreign exchange loss as of September 24, 2021.
As of September 24, 2021, the weighted aver
a
ge price of the crude oil exported by PEMEX was U.S.
$70.59
 
per barrel as compared to the average price as of June 30, 2021 which was
U.S.
$69.30
 
per barrel, this represents a price increase of approximately
 
1.9%.
 
C.
Contributions from the Mexican Government
During the period from July 1 to September 24, 2021, the Mexican Government made the following contributions to Petróleos Mexicanos through the Ministry of Energy in order to support the construction of the Dos Bocas Refinery:
 
Date
  
Amount
 
July 5
  Ps. 4,000,000 
July 22
   3,780,000 
August 2
  
32,596,000
 
August 9
  
1,500,000
 
August 17
  
1,500,000
 
August 25
  
2,000,000
 
August 31
  
4,000,000
 
   
 
 
 
Tota
l
  
Ps.
 49,376,000
 
   
 
 
 
In July 2021, PEMEX received Ps. 3,712,354 in non-refundable funds from FONADIN for payments to contractors of the Tula Refinery rehabilitation project. This amount was recognized as other revenues in PEMEX´s statements of comprehensive income in July 2021.
 
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NOTE 21. SUBSIDIARY GUARANTOR INFORMATION
The following unaudited consolidating information presents: (i) unaudited condensed consolidated statements of financial position at June 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020 and (ii) unaudited condensed consolidated statements of comprehensive income and cash flows for the
six-month
periods ended June 30, 2021 and 2020, of Petróleos Mexicanos, the Subsidiary Guarantors and the
Non-Guarantor
Subsidiaries (as defined below).
These unaudited condensed consolidated statements were prepared in conformity with International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board, with one exception: for the purposes of the presentation of the subsidiary guarantor information, the Subsidiary Entities and Subsidiary Companies have been accounted for as investments under the equity method by Petróleos Mexicanos. Earnings of subsidiaries are therefore reflected in Petróleos Mexicanos’ investment account and earnings. The principal elimination entries eliminate Petróleos Mexicanos’ investment in subsidiaries and inter-company balances and transactions. Pemex Exploration and Production, Pemex Industrial Transformation, Pemex Logistics (collectively, the “Subsidiary Guarantors”) and Pemex Fertilizers (merged with Pemex Industrial Transformation as of December 31, 2020) are 100%-owned subsidiaries of the Mexican Government. The guarantees by the Subsidiary Guarantors of Petróleos Mexicanos’ payment obligations under this indebtedness are full, unconditional, joint and several. Pemex Fertilizers (merged with Pemex Industrial Transformation as of December 31, 2020), Pemex Finance Ltd. and the Subsidiary Companies collectively comprise the
non-guarantor
subsidiaries (the
“Non-Guarantor
Subsidiaries”).
The Pemex Project Funding Master Trust (the “Master Trust”), which was a trust formed for the purpose of financing PEMEX’s projects, was dissolved effective December 20, 2011 and is no longer consolidated in the financial statements of PEMEX as of December 31, 2011 and thereafter.
The following table sets forth, as of June 30, 2021, the principal amount outstanding of the registered debt securities originally issued by the Master Trust. As noted above, Petróleos Mexicanos has assumed, as primary obligor, all of the obligations of the Master Trust under these debt securities. The obligations of Petróleos Mexicanos are guaranteed by the Subsidiary Guarantors:
Table 1: Registered Debt Securities originally issued by the Master Trust and Assumed by Petróleos Mexicanos
 
Security
  
Primary
obligor
  
Guarantors
  
Principal amount
outstanding
(U.S. $)
    
6.625% Guaranteed Bonds due 2035  Petróleos Mexicanos  Pemex Exploration and Production, Pemex Industrial Transformation and Pemex Logistics  2,749,000
    
6.625% Guaranteed Bonds due 2038  Petróleos Mexicanos  Pemex Exploration and Production, Pemex Industrial Transformation and Pemex Logistics  491,175
    
8.625% Bonds due 2022  Petróleos Mexicanos  Pemex Exploration and Production, Pemex Industrial Transformation and Pemex Logistics  89,609
    
8.625% Guaranteed Bonds due 2023  Petróleos Mexicanos  Pemex Exploration and Production, Pemex Industrial Transformation and Pemex Logistics  63,705
    
9.50% Guaranteed Bonds due 2027  Petróleos Mexicanos