Loading...
Docoh

Fri. 10 Jun 2022, 3:36pm ET Benzinga Government, News, Regulations

An official claimed that the United States would withdraw a 17-month-old rule that people arriving in the country by air test negative for COVID-19, a move that comes after strong lobbying by airlines and the travel industry, reported Reuters.

With the hectic summer travel season taking off and airlines bracing for record demand, many airlines believe Americans are avoiding overseas travel because they are afraid of testing positive and becoming stranded abroad.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined that the science and data show the pre-departure COVID tests are no longer necessary, stated the official.

The move will be in effect at 12:01 a.m. on Sunday, and the CDC will review the decision in 90 days, according to the official.

The United States has required incoming international air travelers to provide pre-departure negative tests since January 2021. According to two administration officials, the government proposed easing the testing requirements only for vaccinated travelers.

American Airlines Group (NASDAQ:AAL) Chief Executive Robert Isom said last week at a conference that the testing requirements were "nonsensical" and were depressing leisure and business travel.

Delta Air Lines (NYSE:DAL) CEO Ed Bastian told Reuters that eliminating the rules would increase travel, noting that 44 of the 50 countries Delta serves do not require testing.

Price Action: AAL shares are trading lower by 3.65% at $14.92 and DAL lower by 3.62% at $35.42 on the last check Friday.

Photo by Mufid Majnun on Unsplash