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AHR Amarc Resources

Filed: 28 Jul 21, 8:00pm
 
 

  
UNITED STATES 
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 20-F
 
☐ REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) or 12(g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
OR
 
☒ ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2021
 
OR
 
☐ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
OR
 
☐ SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from___________ to_____________
 
 
 
Commission file number 0-49869
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
 
BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA
(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
14th Floor, 1040 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6E 4H1
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
Sebastian Tang, Chief Financial Officer
Facsimile No.: 604-684-8092
14th Floor, 1040 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6E 4H1
 
(Name, Telephone, E-mail and/or Facsimile number and Address of Company Contact Person)
 
Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
Title of Each Class: Not applicable           
Name of each exchange on which registered: Not applicable
 
Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
 
Common shares with no par value
Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act: None
 
Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer's classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report:
 
180,602,894 common shares as of March 31, 2021
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
 
 ☐  Yes ☒  No
 
 

 
 
If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
 
 ☐  Yes ☒  No
   
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
 
 ☒  Yes ☐  No
  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
 
 ☒  Yes ☐  No
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (check one):
 
Large accelerated filer ☐
Non-accelerated filer ☒
Accelerated filer ☐
Emerging growth company ☒
 
If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards† provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.
 
Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:
 
U.S.GAAP ☐International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board ☒Other ☐
 
If “Other” has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow:
 
  Item 17 ☐  Item 18 ☐
 
If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
 
 ☐  Yes ☒  No
 
 

 
 

 
 
T A B L E  O F  C O N T E N T S
 

 

 
 
GENERAL
 
In this Annual Report on Form 20-F, all references to “we”, “Amarc” or the “Company” refer to Amarc Resources Ltd.
 
The Company uses the Canadian Dollar as its reporting currency. All references in this document to “Dollars” or “$” are expressed in Canadian Dollars (“CAD”, “C$”), unless otherwise indicated. See also Item 3 – Key Information for more detailed currency and conversion information.
 
Except as noted, the information set forth in this Annual Report is as of July 27, 2021 and all information included in this document should only be considered correct as of such date.
 
 
 
Cautionary Note to Investors Concerning Forward-looking Statements
 
 
This discussion and analysis includes certain statements that may be deemed “forward-looking statements”. All such statements, other than statements of historical fact that address exploration drilling, exploitation activities and other related events or developments are forward-looking statements. Although Amarc Resources Ltd. (“Amarc”) believes the expectations expressed in such forward-looking statements are based on reasonable assumptions, such statements are not guarantees of future performance and actual results or developments may differ materially from those in the forward-looking statements. Assumptions used by Amarc to develop forward-looking statements include the following: Amarc’s projects will obtain all required environmental and other permits and all land use and other licenses, studies and exploration of Amarc’s projects will continue to be positive and no geological or technical problems will occur. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those in forward-looking statements include market prices, potential environmental issues or liabilities associated with exploration, development and mining activities, exploitation and exploration successes, continuity of mineralization, uncertainties related to the ability to obtain necessary permits, licenses and tenure and delays due to third party opposition, changes in and the effect of government policies regarding mining and natural resource exploration and exploitation, and exploration and development of properties located within Aboriginal groups asserted territories may affect or be perceived to affect asserted aboriginal rights and title, which may cause permitting delays or opposition by Aboriginal groups, continued availability of capital and financing and general economic, market or business conditions as well as risks relating to the uncertainties with respect to the effects of COVID-19. Investors are cautioned that any such statements are not guarantees of future performance and actual results or developments may differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. For more information on Amarc investors should review the Company’s annual Form 20-F filing with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) at www.sec.gov and its home jurisdiction filings that are available at www.sedar.com.
 
 
 
 
 
 
4
 
 
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
 
Certain terms used herein are defined as follows:
 
Coastal Plutonic Complex (“CPC”)
 
A complex of granitic rocks formed between approximately 170 and 45 million years ago.
 
Induced Polarization (“IP”) Survey
 
A geophysical survey used to identify a feature that appears to be different from the typical or background survey results when tested for levels of electro-conductivity; IP detects both chargeable, pyrite-bearing rock and non-conductive rock that has a high content of quartz.
 
mV/V
 
Millivolts/volt; a unit measure of chargeability in an IP survey.
 
Magmatic/hydrothermal-structural deposit
 
Any concentration of metallic minerals formed by the precipitation of solids from hot waters (hydrothermal solution). The solutions may be sourced from a magma or from deeply circulating water heated by magma.
 
Mesothermal-epithermal deposit
 
Deposit formed at moderate temperature and pressure and depth (175-300 degrees C at 1,220-3,660 m - mesothermal) or lower temperature and pressure at shallow depth (<150- ~300 degrees C at surface to 1-2 km - epithermal).
 
  
  
Mineral Symbols
 
As – arsenic; Au – gold; Ag – silver; Cu – copper; Fe – iron; Hg – mercury; Mo – molybdenum; Na – sodium; Ni – nickel; O – oxygen; Pd – palladium; Pt – platinum; Pb – lead; S – sulphur; Sb – antimony; Zn – zinc.
 
National Instrument 43-101
 
National Instrument 43-101 - Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects, is a rule developed by the Canadian Securities Administrators that establishes standards for all public disclosure a reporting issuer makes of scientific and technical information concerning mineral projects.
 
Net Smelter Return (NSR) Royalty
 
Monies received for concentrate delivered to a smelter net of metallurgical recovery losses, transportation costs, smelter treatment-refining charges and penalty charges.
 
Polymetallic
 
Comprised of several metals.
 
Porphyry Deposit
 
Mineral deposit characterized by widespread disseminated or veinlet-hosted sulphide mineralization, characterized by large tonnage and moderate to low grade.
 
Vein
 
A tabular or sheet-like mineral deposit with identifiable walls, often filling a fracture or fissure.
 
 
 
 
5
 
 
CURRENCY AND MEASUREMENT
 
All currency amounts in this Annual Report are stated in Canadian Dollars unless otherwise indicated.
 
Approximate conversion of metric units into imperial equivalents is as follows:
 
 
Metric Units
 
Multiply by
 
Imperial Units
 
hectares
 
2.471
 
= acres
 
meters
 
3.281
 
= feet
 
kilometers
 
3281
 
= feet
 
kilometers
 
0.621
 
= miles
 
grams
 
0.032
 
= ounces (troy)
 
tonnes
 
1.102
 
= tons (short) (2,000 lbs)
 
grams/tonne
 
0.029
 
= ounces (troy)/ton
 
 
STATUS AS AN EMERGING GROWTH COMPANY
 
The Company is an “emerging growth company” as defined in section 3(a) of the Exchange Act, and the Company will continue to qualify as an “emerging growth company” until the earliest to occur of: (a) the last day of the fiscal year during which the Company has total annual gross revenues of US$1.07 billion (as such amount is indexed for inflation every 5 years by the SEC) or more; (b) the last day of the Company's fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of the date of the first sale of common equity securities pursuant to an effective registration statement under the Securities Act; (c) the date on which the Company has, during the previous 3-year period, issued more than US$1 billion in non-convertible debt; or (d) the date on which the Company is deemed to be a “large accelerated filer”, as defined in Exchange Act Rule
 
12b–2. Therefore, the Company expects to continue to be an emerging growth company for the foreseeable future.
 
Generally, a registrant that registers any class of its securities under section 12 of the Exchange Act is required to include in the second and all subsequent annual reports filed by it under the Exchange Act, a management report on internal control over financial reporting and, subject to an exemption available to registrants that are neither an “accelerated filer” or a “larger accelerated filer” (as those terms are defined in Exchange Act Rule 12b-2), an auditor attestation report on management's assessment of internal control over financial reporting. However, for so long as the Company continues to qualify as an emerging growth company, the Company will be exempt from the requirement to include an auditor attestation report in its annual reports filed under the Exchange Act, even if it were to qualify as an “accelerated filer” or a “larger accelerated filer”. In addition, auditors of an emerging growth company are exempt from the rules of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board requiring mandatory audit firm rotation or a supplement to the auditor's report in which the auditor would be required to provide additional information about the audit and the financial statements of the registrant (auditor discussion and analysis).
 
The Company has irrevocably elected to comply with new or revised accounting standards even though it is an emerging growth company.
 
ITEM 1 
IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS
 
A.            
DIRECTORS AND SENIOR MANAGEMENT
 
Not applicable.
 
B.            
ADVISERS
 
Not applicable.
 
C.            
AUDITORS
 
Not applicable.
 
 
6
 
 
ITEM 2 
OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE
 
Not applicable.
 
ITEM 3 
KEY INFORMATION
 
A.            
SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
 
The following tables summarize selected financial data for Amarc extracted from the Company's audited financial statements for related fiscal years. The data should be read in conjunction with the Company's audited financial statements included as an exhibit in this Annual Report.
 
The following table is derived from the financial statements of the Company which have been prepared in accordance with and using accounting policies in full compliance with International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”) effective for each of the Company's fiscal year presented.
 
The following selected financial data is presented in thousands of Canadian Dollars.
 
Statements of Financial Position Data
 
($ 000’s)
 
2021
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
2018
 
 
2017
 
Equipment, net
 $ 
 $ 
 $ 
 $ 
 $ 
Total assets
  1,560 
  529 
  799 
  3,625 
  1,112 
Total liabilities
  1,533 
  1,504 
  1,342 
  2,379 
  1,521 
Working capital surplus (deficit)
  418 
  (641)
  (716)
  1,836 
  419 
Share capital
  64,745 
  64,342 
  64,042 
  63,884 
  59,560 
Reserves
  4,870 
  5,632 
  5,105 
  5,143 
  5,741 
Accumulated deficit
  (69,588)
  (70,949)
  (69,690)
  (67,782)
  (65,709)
Net assets (liabilities)
  27 
  (975)
  (543)
  1,246 
  (409)
Shareholders' equity (deficiency)
  27 
  (975)
  (543)
  1,246 
  (409)
 
Statements of Comprehensive Loss Data
 
($ 000’s, except per share amounts and number of shares)
 
2021
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
2018
 
 
2017
 
Interest and other income
 $(27)
 $(6)
 $(38)
 $(27)
 $(8)
General and administrative expenses
  631 
  856 
  913 
  1,054 
  733 
Exploration expenditures, net of METC*
  576 
  664 
  5,390 
  6,686 
  2,926 
Contributions pursuant to Option Agreements
  (791)
  (413)
  (4,538)
  (6,197)
  (2,933)
Share-based payments
  18 
   
   
   
   
Other
  167 
  153 
  221 
  556 
  325 
Gain on sale of mineral property
  (1,935)
   
   
   
   
Flow-through shares premium
   
   
   
   
   
Net income (loss) for the year
  1,361 
  (1,254)
  (1,948)
  (2,072)
  (1,043)
Other comprehensive income (loss)
  (626)
  (11)
  2 
  28 
  8 
Total comprehensive income (loss)
 $735 
 $(1,265)
 $1,946 
 $2,044 
 $1,035 
 
    
    
    
    
    
Basic and diluted net earnings (loss) per share
 $0.01 
 $(0.01)
 $(0.01)
 $(0.01)
 $(0.01)
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding
  178,666,081 
  171,767,287 
  156,826,422 
  141,435,020 
  141,406,301 
 
“METC” refers to Mineral Exploration Tax Credits, which are discussed in Item 5, under the heading “Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates”.
 
Currency and Exchange Rates
 
As of the date of this Annual Report, the average rate of exchange of the Canadian Dollar was US$1.00 = Canadian $1.32. Exchange rates published by the Bank of Canada are available on its website, www.bankofcanada.ca, are nominal quotations — not buying or selling rates — and are intended for statistical or analytical purposes.
 
 
 
7
 
 
The following tables set out the exchange rates for the conversion of Canadian Dollars into U.S. Dollars.
 
 
 
For year ended March 31(Canadian Dollar per U.S. Dollar)
 
 
 
2021
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
2018
 
 
2017
 
End of period
 $1.2575 
 $1.4187 
 $1.3363 
 $1.2894 
 $1.3322 
Average for the period
 $1.3219 
 $1.3308 
 $1.3118 
 $1.2837 
 $1.3126 
High for the period
 $1.4217 
 $1.4496 
 $1.3642 
 $1.3743 
 $1.3582 
Low for the period
 $1.2455 
 $1.2970 
 $1.2552 
 $1.2128 
 $1.2544 
 
 
 
Monthly High and Low Exchange Rate (Canadian Dollar per U.S. Dollar)
 
 
 
High
 
 
Low
 
July 2021 (to the date of this Annual Report)
 $1.2759 
 $1.2343 
June 2021
 $1.2419 
 $1.2040 
May 2021
 $1.2315 
 $1.2051 
April 2021
 $1.2617 
 $1.2285 
March 2021
 $1.2668 
 $1.2455 
February 2021
 $1.2828 
 $1.2530 
 
B.            
CAPITALIZATION AND INDEBTEDNESS
 
Not applicable.
 
C.            
REASONS FOR THE OFFER AND USE OF PROCEEDS
 
Not applicable.
 
D.            
RISK FACTORS
 
An investment in the Company's common shares is highly speculative and subject to a number of risks. Only those persons who can bear the risk of the entire loss of their investment should participate. An investor should carefully consider the risks described below and the other information that the Company furnishes to, or files with, the Securities and Exchange Commission and with Canadian securities regulators before investing in the Company's common shares. The risks described below are not the only ones faced by the Company. Additional risks that management is aware of or that the Company currently believes are immaterial may indeed become important factors that affect the Company's business. If any of the following risks occur, or if others occur, the Company's business, operating results and financial condition could be seriously harmed and the investor may lose all of his investment.
 
The Company has limited working capital and will require additional capital to advance its projects.
 
The Company has limited working capital as at the current reporting date. Further exploration on, and development of, the Company's projects will require additional resources and funding. The Company currently does not have sufficient funds to fully develop these projects.
 
There is no assurance that the Company will be successful in obtaining the required financing for these or other purposes, including for general working capital.
 
The Company has no earnings, has incurred net losses and negative cash flows since inception, and expects to incur losses for the foreseeable future.
 
The Company does not have any operational history of earnings and has incurred net losses and negative cash flow from its operations since incorporation. Although the Company hopes to eventually generate revenues, significant operating losses are to be anticipated for at least the next several years and possibly longer. To the extent that such expenses do not result in the creation of appropriate revenues, the Company's business may be materially adversely affected. It is not possible to forecast how the business of the Company will develop, and there can be no assurance that the underlying assumed levels of expenses will prove to be accurate.
 
The advancement of mineral properties to production will require the commitment of substantial resources to conduct time-consuming exploration and development activities. The Company's operating expenses and capital expenditures may increase in subsequent years as needed consultants, personnel and equipment associated with advancing exploration, development and commercial production of the Company's projects and any other properties the Company may acquire are added. The amounts and timing of expenditures will depend on:
 
 
8
 
 
● 
the progress of ongoing exploration and development;
 
● 
the results of consultants' analyses and recommendations;
 
● 
the rate at which operating losses are incurred;
 
● 
the execution of any joint venture agreements with strategic allies; and
 
● 
the acquisition of additional properties and other factors, many of which are beyond the Company's control.
 
The Company has no history of mining operations, and does not expect to receive revenues from operations in the foreseeable future.
 
The Company has no history of mining operations, and there can be no assurance that the Company will generate any revenues or achieve profitability. The Company expects to incur losses unless and until such time as one or more of the Company’s existing projects, or any other properties the Company may acquire, enter into commercial production and generate sufficient revenues to fund its continuing operations, which cannot be assured. The Company does not expect to receive revenues from operations in the foreseeable future, if at all.
 
The Company has not demonstrated that any mineralized material on its properties constitutes reserves as defined in SEC Industry Guide 7.
 
The Company has no mineral producing properties, and the Company has not demonstrated that any mineralized material on its properties constitutes reserves under SEC Industry Guide 7. Although the mineralized material and mineralized deposit figures included in this annual report have been carefully prepared by the Company, or, in some instances have been prepared, reviewed or verified by independent mining experts, these amounts are estimates only and no assurance can be given that any particular level of recovery of minerals from mineralized material will in fact be realized or that an identified mineralized deposit will ever qualify as a commercially mineable (or viable) reserve.
 
No assurance can be given that minerals will be discovered in sufficient quantities to justify commercial operations or that funds required for development can be obtained on a timely basis. Whether a mineral deposit will be commercially viable depends on a number of factors, some of which are:
 
● 
the particular attributes of the deposit, such as size, grade and proximity to infrastructure;
 
● 
metal prices, which may be volatile, and are highly cyclical; and
 
● 
government regulations, including regulations relating to prices, taxes, royalties, land tenure, land use, importing and exporting of minerals, and environmental protection.
 
The exact effect of these factors cannot accurately be predicted, but the combination of these factors may result in the Company not receiving an adequate return on invested capital.
 
The Company is subject to certain risks that are inherent in exploration and mining activities beyond its control.
 
Resource exploration, development, and operations are highly speculative, characterized by a number of significant risks, which even a combination of careful evaluation, experience and knowledge may not eliminate, including, among other things, unprofitable efforts resulting not only from the failure to discover mineral deposits but from finding mineral deposits which, though present, are insufficient in quantity and quality to return a profit from production. Few properties that are explored are ultimately developed into producing mines. No deposit that has been shown to be economic has yet been found on the Company's existing projects, and there can be no assurance that the Company will be able to acquire any additional properties or that any additional properties that are acquired will contain sufficient mineralization to warrant further development.
 
Unusual or unexpected formations, formation pressures, fires, power outages, labour disruptions, flooding, explosions, cave-ins, landslides, environmental hazards, the discharge of toxic chemicals and other hazards, and the inability to obtain suitable or adequate machinery, equipment or labour, are other risks involved in the conduct of exploration programs, and in the development and operation of mines. Such occurrences may delay development of the Company’s properties, delay production, increase production costs or result in liability.
 
 
9
 
 
Substantial expenditures are and will be required to establish mineral resources and mineral reserves.
 
Substantial expenditures are and will be required to establish mineral resources and mineral reserves through drilling, to develop metallurgical processes to extract the metal from mineral resources. No assurance can be given that the Company will be able to obtain sufficient financing to cover such expenditures when required, or that such financing can be obtained on terms that are acceptable to the Company.
 
The Company’s ability to obtain financing to fund its exploration activities and, if warranted, development of any of its properties, will be significantly affected by metal prices.
 
The ability of the Company to obtain financing to fund its exploration activities and, if warranted, development of any of its properties, will be significantly affected by changes in the market price of the metals for which it explores. Mineral prices are subject to fluctuation. The effect of these factors cannot accurately be predicted. The mining industry in general is intensely competitive and there is no assurance that, even if commercial quantities of mineral resource are discovered, a profitable market will exist for the sale of the same.
 
Factors beyond the control of the Company may affect the marketability of any copper, gold, silver or any other materials discovered. The prices of copper, gold, silver and other minerals are affected by numerous factors beyond the control of the Company, including international economic and political trends, expectations of inflation, currency exchange fluctuations (specifically, Canadian dollars relative to other currencies), interest rates and global or regional consumption patterns, speculative activities and increased production due to improved mining and production methods. In addition, the world supplies of and demands for copper, gold, silver and other minerals can cause fluctuations in the price of such minerals.
 
Development of any of the Company’s properties, if warranted, will be subject to financing risks and potential delays.
 
Inability to obtain financing, technical considerations, delays in obtaining governmental approvals, and other factors could cause delays in developing any of the Company’s properties that may in the future be determined to contain a commercially mineable ore-body.
 
If it is determined that a commercially mineable ore-body exists and it can be economically exploited, the Company will require significant additional financing in order to fund the costs of developing the Company’s properties into commercial production, if warranted. The Company may have to seek additional funds through public and private share offerings, arrangements with collaborative parties, or debt financing. There can be no assurance that the Company will be successful in its efforts to raise these required funds, or that it will be able to raise the funds on terms that do not result in high levels of dilution to shareholders.
 
Before development and production can commence on any of its properties, the Company must obtain regulatory and environmental approvals. There is no assurance that such approvals will be obtained on a timely basis or at all. The cost of compliance with changes in governmental regulations has the potential to reduce the profitability of operations or preclude entirely the economic development of a property.
 
Mining is one of the most intensely regulated businesses in Canada. The period of time required to obtain environment assessments, consult with aboriginal peoples and other stakeholders as well as governments at the Canadian provincial and federal level can take 10 years or more. No assurance can be given that permitting of any mine on the Company’s properties will occur.
 
The Company will rely on third-party consultants and contractors – whose availability cannot be assured - to undertake its mineral exploration activities, as well as any future mine development and mining activities.
 
The Company will rely on consultants and others for exploration, development, construction and operating expertise. No assurance can be given that such consultants and other contractors will be available when required, or that they can be retained on terms that are acceptable to the Company.
 
 
 
10
 
 
The Company may enter into agreements with First Nations in relation to its current and future exploration activities, and any potential future production, which could impact any expected earnings.
 
Our properties are located within First Nations asserted traditional territories, and the exploration and development of these properties may affect, or be perceived to affect, asserted aboriginal rights and title, which has the potential to manifest permitting delays or opposition by First Nations communities.
 
The Company is working to establish positive relationships with First Nations. As part of this process the Company may enter into agreements, commensurate with the stage of activity, with First Nations in relation to current and future exploration and any potential future production. This could impact any expected earnings.
 
The Company is subject to intense competition.
 
The mining industry is competitive in all of its phases, including financing, technical resources, personnel and property acquisition. It requires significant capital, technical resources, personnel and operational experience to effectively compete in the mining industry. Because of the high costs associated with exploration, the expertise required to analyze a project's potential and the capital required to develop a mine, larger companies with significant resources may have a competitive advantage over Amarc. Amarc faces strong competition from other mining companies, some with greater financial resources, operational experience and technical capabilities than those that Amarc possesses. As a result of this competition, Amarc may be unable to maintain or acquire financing, personnel, technical resources or attractive mining properties on terms Amarc considers acceptable or at all.
 
The Company is subject to certain risks that are not insurable.
 
Hazards such as unusual or unexpected geological formations and other conditions are involved in mineral exploration and development. Amarc may become subject to liability for pollution, cave-ins or hazards against which it cannot insure. The payment of such liabilities could result in increases in Amarc's operating expenses which could, in turn, have a material adverse effect on Amarc's financial position and its results of operations. Although Amarc maintains liability insurance in an amount which it considers adequate, the nature of these risks is such that the liabilities might exceed policy limits, the liabilities and hazards might not be insurable against, or Amarc might elect not to insure itself against such liabilities due to high premium costs or other reasons. In these events, Amarc could incur significant liabilities and costs that could materially increase Amarc's operating expenses.
 
The Company’s operations are and will be subject to environmental regulations which can significantly increase compliance costs and subject the Company to potential liability.
 
All of the Company's operations are and will be subject to environmental regulations, which can make operations more expensive or potentially prohibit them altogether. Many of the regulations require the Company to obtain permits for its activities. The Company must update and review its permits from time to time, and is subject to environmental impact analyses and public review processes prior to approval of the additional activities.
 
The Company may be subject to the risks and liabilities associated with potential pollution of the environment and the disposal of waste products that could occur as a result of its activities.
 
To the extent the Company is subject to environmental liabilities, the payment of such liabilities or the costs that it may incur to remedy environmental pollution would reduce funds otherwise available to it and could have a material adverse effect on the Company. If the Company is unable to fully remedy an environmental problem, it might be required to suspend operations or enter into interim compliance measures pending completion of the required remedy. The potential exposure may be significant and could have a material adverse effect on the Company.
 
Changes in government regulations and the presence of unknown environmental hazards on the Company’s mineral properties may result in significant unanticipated delays, as well as significant compliance costs.
 
Changes to existing environmental legislation, regulations and actions could give rise to additional expense, capital expenditures, restrictions and delays in the activities of the Company, the extent of which cannot be predicted. Regulatory requirements and environmental standards are subject to constant evaluation and may be significantly increased. It is possible that future changes in applicable laws, regulations and permits or changes in their enforcement or regulatory interpretation could have a significant impact on some portion of the Company's business, causing those activities to become economically unattractive at that time.
 
 
 
11
 
 
Trading in the Company’s common shares is subject to volatility.
 
There can be no assurance that an active trading market in the Company's securities will be established or sustained. The market price for the Company's securities is subject to wide fluctuations. Factors such as announcements of exploration results, as well as market conditions in the industry, may have a significant adverse impact on the market price of the securities of the Company. Shares of the Company are suitable only for those who can afford to lose their entire investment. The stock market has from time to time experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations, which have often been unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies.
 
Certain of the Company's directors and officers may be subject to conflicts of interest.
 
Certain of the Company's directors and officers may serve as directors or officers of other companies or companies providing services to the Company or they may have significant shareholdings in other companies. Situations may arise where these directors and/or officers of the Company may be in competition with the Company. Any conflicts of interest will be subject to and governed by the law applicable to directors' and officers' conflicts of interest. In the event that such a conflict of interest arises at a meeting of the Company's directors, a director who has such a conflict will abstain from voting for or against the approval of such participation or such terms. In accordance with applicable laws, the directors of the Company are required to act honestly, in good faith and in the best interests of the Company.
 
The Company is unlikely to be in a position to pay dividends for the foreseeable future.
 
There is no assurance that the Company will pay dividends on its shares in the foreseeable future. The Company will likely require all its funds to further the development of its business.
 
The Company is vulnerable to changes in the financial markets.
 
Market conditions and unexpected volatility or illiquidity in financial markets may adversely affect the prospects of the Company and the value of its shares.
 
The Company will be dependent on the continued services of its senior management team, and its ability to retain other key personnel.
 
The Company will be dependent on the continued services of its senior management team, and its ability to retain other key personnel. The loss of such key personnel could have a material adverse effect on the Company. There can be no assurance that any of the Company's employees will remain with the Company or that, in the future, the employees will not organize competitive businesses or accept employment with companies competitive with the Company.
 
Furthermore, as part of the Company's growth strategy, it must continue to hire highly qualified individuals. There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to attract, assimilate or retain qualified personnel in the future, which would adversely affect its business.
 
Changes in government rules, regulations or agreements, or their application, may negatively affect the Company’s ownership rights, its access to or its ability to advance the exploration and development of its mineral properties.
 
The government currently has in place or may in the future implement laws, regulations, policies or agreements that may negatively affect the Company’s ownership rights with respect to its mineral properties or its access to the properties. These may restrain or block the Company’s ability to advance the exploration and development of its mineral properties or significantly increase the costs and timeframe to advance the properties.
 
If the Company raises additional funding through equity financings, then the Company's current shareholders will suffer dilution.
 
The Company will require additional financing in order to complete full exploration of the Company's mineral properties. Management anticipates that the Company will have to sell additional equity securities including, but not limited to, its common stock, share purchase warrants or some form of convertible security. The effect of additional issuances of equity securities will result in the dilution of existing shareholders' percentage ownership interests.
 
 
 
12
 
 
The Company believes it is likely a “passive foreign investment company” which may have adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences for U.S. shareholders.
 
U.S. shareholders should be aware that the Company believes it was classified as a passive foreign investment company (“PFIC”), as defined in Section 1297 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, during one or more previous tax years, and may be a PFIC in the current tax year and possibly in subsequent tax years. If the Company is a PFIC for any tax year during a U.S. shareholder's holding period, then such U.S. shareholder generally will be required to treat any gain realized upon a disposition of common shares, or any so-called “excess distribution” received on its common shares, as ordinary income, and to pay an interest charge on a portion of such gain or distributions, unless the shareholder makes a timely and effective “qualified electing fund” election or a “mark-to-market” election with respect to the common shares. A U.S. shareholder who makes a qualified electing fund election generally must report on a current basis its share of the Company's net capital gain and ordinary earnings for any tax year in which the Company is a PFIC, whether or not the Company distributes any amounts to its shareholders. A U.S. shareholder who makes the mark-to-market election generally must include as ordinary income each year the excess of the fair market value of the common shares over the taxpayer's basis therein. This paragraph is qualified in its entirety by the discussion below under the heading “Certain United States Federal Income Tax Considerations.” Each U.S. shareholder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the PFIC rules and the U.S. federal income tax consequences of the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares.
 
The Company's shareholders could face significant potential equity dilution as a result of grants under the Company’s stock option plan.
 
Amarc has a stock option plan which allows the management to issue options to its employees and non-employees based on the policies of the Company. If further shares, options, or warrants are issued, they will likely act as an upside damper on the trading range of the Company's shares. As a consequence of the passage of time since the date of their original sale and issuance, none of the Company's shares remain subject to any hold period restrictions in Canada or the United States. The unrestricted resale of outstanding shares from the exercise of dilutive securities may have a depressing effect on the market for the Company's shares.
 
Penny stock classification could affect the marketability of the Company's common stock and shareholders could find it difficult to sell their stock.
 
The penny stock rules in the United States require a broker-dealer, prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from the rules, to deliver a standardized risk disclosure document that provides information about penny stocks and the nature and level of risks in the penny stock market. The broker-dealer also must provide the customer with current bid and offer quotations for the penny stock, the compensation of the broker-dealer and its salesperson in the transaction, and monthly account statements showing the market value of each penny stock held in the customer's account. The bid and offer quotations, and the broker-dealer and salesperson compensation information, must be given to the customer orally or in writing prior to effecting the transaction and must be given to the customer in writing before or with the customer's confirmation.
 
Further, the penny stock rules require that prior to a transaction in a penny stock not otherwise exempt from such rules; the broker-dealer must make a special written determination that the penny stock is a suitable investment for the purchaser and receive the purchaser's written agreement to the transaction. These additional broker-dealer practices and disclosure requirements may have the effect of reducing the level of trading activity in the secondary market for the Company's common shares in the United States, and shareholders may find it more difficult to sell their shares.
 
The Company's financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue on a going concern basis, but there can be no assurance that the Company will continue as a going concern.
 
The Company’s financial statements have been prepared on the basis that it will continue as a going concern. The Company has prioritized the allocation of available financial resources in order to meet key corporate and mineral development expenditure requirements in the near term. The costs required to complete exploration and development of the Company's projects may be well in excess of this amount. Accordingly, unless additional funding is obtained, the going concern assumption may have to change. If Amarc is unable to obtain adequate additional financing, the Company will be required to curtail operations and exploration activities. Furthermore, failure to continue as a going concern would require that Amarc's assets and liabilities be restated on a liquidation basis which could differ significantly from the going concern basis.
 
 
 
13
 
 
The Company may from time to time be subject to litigation.
 
The Company may in future be subject to legal proceedings. If the Company is unable to resolve these matters favorably it may have a material adverse effect of the Company.
 
ITEM 4 
INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY
 
A.            
HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE COMPANY
 
Incorporation
 
Amarc Resources Ltd. was incorporated on February 2, 1993, pursuant to the Company Act (British Columbia, Canada) (the “BCCA”), as “Patriot Resources Ltd.” and changed its name on January 26, 1994 to “Amarc Resources Ltd.” The BCCA was replaced by the Business Corporations Act (British Columbia) (the “BCA”) in March 2004 and the Company is now governed by the BCA.
 
Amarc became a public company or “reporting issuer” in the Province of British Columbia on May 30, 1995. The common shares of Amarc were initially listed on the Vancouver Stock Exchange (“VSE”) on August 4, 1995, and continue to trade on the TSX Venture Exchange (“TSX Venture”) under the symbol AHR. The TSX Venture was formerly known as the Canadian Venture Exchange, the successor stock exchange to the VSE.
 
Amarc commenced trading on the OTC Bulletin Board (“OTCBB”) in the United States in June 2004 and on the OTCQB in August 2014 (at which time quotation of Amarc’s common shares on the OTCBB was discontinued), in each case under the symbol AXREF.
 
Offices
 
The head office of Amarc is located at 14th Floor, 1040 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6E 4H1, telephone (604) 684-6365, facsimile (604) 684-8092. The Company's registered office is in care of its attorneys, McMillan LLP, 1500 Royal Centre P.O. Box 11117, 1055 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6E 4N7, telephone (604) 689-9111, fax (604) 685-7084.
 
Company Development
 
Amarc has been engaged in the acquisition and exploration of mineral properties since its incorporation. The Company is currently actively exploring a number of properties located in British Columbia, Canada. All of the Company's mineral properties are at the exploration stage.
 
B.            
BUSINESS OVERVIEW
 
Amarc is a mineral exploration company with an experienced and successful management team focused on advancing toward a new generation of long life, high value British Columbia (“BC”) porphyry copper-gold (“Cu-Au”) mines. By combining high demand projects with successful management, Amarc has created a solid platform to create value from its exploration stage assets.
 
Amarc is advancing the 100%-owned JOY, IKE and DUKE porphyry Cu±Au deposit districts located in northern and central BC, respectively. Importantly, each of the three districts is located in proximity to industrial infrastructure – including power, highways and rail. The JOY, IKE and DUKE Districts represent significant potential for the development of multiple and important-scale, porphyry Cu±Au deposits.
 
 
 
14
 
 
LOCATION OF THE COMPANY'S JOY, IKE and DUKE PROJECTS
 
 
Amarc’s 100%-owned 482 km2 JOY District covers the northern extension of the prolific Kemess porphyry Cu-Au district (the “Kemess District”) in the Toodoggone region of north-central BC. A geological region with high potential for important porphyry and epithermal deposits, the Toodoggone is part of BC's Golden Horseshoe, which includes the Golden Triangle to the west and northwest.
 
The JOY claims are located approximately 20 km north of the former Kemess South Mine and the government-approved Kemess underground project. In mid-2017, Centerra Gold Inc. (“Centerra”) purchased the Kemess District from AuRico Metals Inc. for $310 million1. JOY is host to the open-ended PINE porphyry Cu-Au deposit (the “PINE Deposit”) and the promising MEX porphyry Cu-Au deposit target. Work by Amarc has identified significant expansion potential that requires drill testing at both the PINE Deposit and at MEX. In addition, Amarc’s extensive exploration surveys have identified a pipeline of other large (approximately 1 to 8 km2) and high potential, porphyry Cu-Au targets, which cluster on the property. Each of these target areas in themselves host multiple targets that are either drill-ready, or can rapidly be brought up to a drill ready status by the completion of focused surface surveys.
 
Amarc has entered into an alliance with Freeport-McMoran Minerals Properties Canada Inc. (“Freeport”), a wholly owned subsidiary of Freeport-McMoRan Inc., to efficiently advance the JOY District. Under the terms of the agreement Freeport may acquire up to a 70% ownership interest by making staged investments totalling $110 million dollars. As project operator, Amarc has mobilized work crews to JOY to undertake a comprehensive 2021 exploration program, inclusive of drilling, which is designed to advance deposit delineation and assess several important-scale mineral systems. Drill and IP permits are in hand for the work programs being undertaken.
 
The 462 km2 IKE District is located 33 km northwest of the historical mining community of Gold Bridge near the heartland of BC’s producing porphyry Cu mines. The greater IKE District includes porphyry Cu-Mo-Ag deposit discovery (the “IKE Deposit”), the high potential Greater Empress Cu-Au Project (the “Greater Empress” area) that hosts the Empress Cu-Au-Ag deposit (the “Empress Deposit”) and other significant porphyry Cu-Au-Mo-Ag and Cu-Au-Ag replacement deposit targets, and also the number of promising porphyry Cu and epithermal Au-Ag targets. The District shares many characteristics with porphyry districts around the globe that host major, and commonly multiple, Cu±Au±Mo±Ag deposits and has the potential to possess the grades and resources necessary to develop into an important mining camp.
 
Subject to funding Amarc is planning:
 
An expanded drill program at the IKE Deposit with the goal of establishing a mineral resource;
 
 
 
15
 
 
A well-planned core drilling program at the Empress Deposit to expand the mineralization which remains open; and
 
An integrated program in the Greater Empress area to drill test high potential drill-ready targets and survey work on other promising targets to bring them also to a drill ready status.
 
The Company has the required drill and IP permits in hand for the proposed work programs.
 
Amarc’s DUKE District is located 80 km northeast of Smithers within the broader Babine District (the “District”), one of BC’s most prolific porphyry Cu-Au belts. The Babine District, a 40 by 100 km north- northwesterly striking mineralized belt is host to Noranda Mines’ past producing Bell and Granisle Cu-Au mines that produced a total of 1.1 billion pounds of Cu, 634,000 ounces of Au and 3.5 million ounces of Ag2, and the advanced stage Morrison Cu-Au deposit. The DUKE District includes both the DUKE porphyry Cu deposit target discovery and a series of high potential porphyry Cu-Au deposit targets generated form the Company’s comprehensive district-scale targeting programs.
 
The Company is currently planning:
 
To undertake the drilling required to delineate the geometry and grade distribution of its DUKE discovery in order to inform a mineral resource estimate and related studies; and
 
Initial ground surveys on its regional targets taking advantage of extensive logging road networks across the property. These focused surveys would be followed by RC drilling to test prioritized targets for the presence of potential porphyry Cu- Au mineralized systems below cover and, where a deposit target is confirmed, core drilling to determine the extent, grade and geometry of the mineralized system.
 
The Company has permits in hand to commence these works.
 
Amarc works closely with local governments, indigenous groups and other stakeholders in order to advance its mineral projects responsibly, and to do so in a manner that contributes to sustainable community and economic development. We pursue early and meaningful engagement to ensure our mineral exploration and development activities are well coordinated and broadly supported, address local priorities and concerns, and optimize opportunities for collaboration. In particular, we seek to establish mutually beneficial partnerships with indigenous groups within whose traditional territories its projects are located, through the provision of jobs, training programs, contract opportunities, capacity funding agreements and sponsorship of community events. All Amarc’s work programs are carefully planned to achieve high levels of environmental and social performance.
 
The JOY Cu-Au District
 
Amarc’s 100%-owned 482 km2 JOY District covers the northern extension of the prolific Kemess District in the Toodoggone region of north-central BC (see Amarc’s May 15, 2020 news release and other information on the Company’s website at www.amarcresources.com/projects/joy-project). A geological region with high potential for important porphyry and epithermal deposits, the Toodoggone is part of BC's Golden Horseshoe, which includes the Golden Triangle to the west and northwest. Through its association with Hunter Dickinson Inc. (“HDI”), Amarc's technical team was first to recognize the Kemess District's true porphyry potential, historically, acquiring both Kemess North and Kemess South as early-stage prospects and advancing both to significant porphyry Cu-Au deposits. Kemess South was sold on beneficial terms to a predecessor of Northgate Minerals, which brought the deposit into production. Northgate Minerals produced 3 million ounces of Au, and 750 million pounds of Cu over a 13-year period to 20113 from Kemess South (BC’s third largest Au producer). The southern area of the Kemess District, now owned by Centerra, includes the government-approved Kemess Underground Project (the deeper higher-grade extension of the Kemess North deposit), the advanced stage Kemess East deposit as well as the mined-out Kemess South deposit. The resource road that services Centerra’s deposits and the historical Lawyers and Shasta Au-Ag mines, also provides access to Amarc’s JOY District.
 
2 MINFILE Number 093L 146 and 093M 001 MINFILE Production Detail Report, BC Geological Survey, Ministry of Energy and Mines, BC.
3 SRK Consulting (Canada) Inc. 2013 NI-43-101 Technical Report on the Kemess Underground Project, British Columbia, Canada, AuRico Metals Ltd.Sedar
 
16
 
 
JOY District Highlights
 
The PINE Deposit within the JOY District has seen several phases of historical drilling. Work by Amarc has identified significant expansion potential at both the PINE Deposit and the MEX deposit target that requires drill testing. In addition, Amarc has defined seven large (approximately 1 to 8 km2), high potential porphyry Cu-Au exploration target areas, each of which hosts multiple targets that are either drill-ready, or can rapidly be brought up to a drill ready status by the completion of focused surface surveys. A highly effective targeting strategy was achieved by combining and interpreting information from the Company’s exploration surveys and extensive historical datasets. These datasets include results from soil geochemical sample grids, airborne magnetics and Induced Polarization (“IP”) geophysical surveys, geological and alteration mapping and historical drilling. The large historical soils geochemical database (6,390 samples) was of particular use.
 
The JOY technical information in this section is summarized from the Company’s National Instrument
 
43-101 Technical Report (“JOY Technical Report”) filed under Amarc’s profile at www.sedar.com and on the Company’s website at www.amarcresources.com/projects/joy-project/technical-report.
 
Amarc has mobilized work crews to JOY to undertake a comprehensive 2021 exploration program, inclusive of drilling, which is designed to advance deposit delineation and assess several important-scale mineral systems. Required drill and IP permits are in hand for the work programs being undertaken.
 
New Porphyry Cu-Au Potential at the PINE Deposit and MEX Deposit Target
 
The PINE Deposit is a northeast-trending, 2.5 km-long porphyry Cu-Au mineralized system located within an underexplored 6 km2 area of strong hydrothermal alteration, as defined by IP chargeability, alteration mapping and limited historical drilling. At the PINE Deposit, shallow historical drilling (most holes record less than 175 m vertical penetration) indicates that mineralization is open both laterally and to depth, with many of the holes ending in mineralization and some showing a downhole increase in Cu and Au grades. Examples of the historical results are provided in Table 1.
 
Table 1: PINE DEPOSIT
Selected Drill Intervals from Historical Drilling
 
Drill HoleFrom (m)To (m)
Int.(m)1,2,3
Cu(%)Au(g/t)Ag(g/t)Mo(%)
CuEQ(%)4,5
79-21.851.049.20.280.669--0.64
 99.0127.528.50.320.647--0.67
80-0710.848.237.40.221.353*1.40.0010.97*
Incl.13.015.92.90.303.121.30.0011.94*
 57.090.533.50.110.5311.40.0030.41
92-3814.044.130.10.211.1160.70.0010.82
 53.5192.2138.70.090.3810.60.0030.31
92-4014.049.235.20.211.506*1.30.0011.04*
Incl.20.022.02.00.283.341.20.0011.93*
 54.5140.085.50.140.7250.60.0020.55
 164.5182.718.20.080.3670.60.0010.29
93-4169.5113.043.50.130.741*0.80.0020.55*
Incl.75.077.02.00.283.103.60.0011.94*
 129.0137.08.00.360.2100.10.0020.48
 189.0197.08.00.100.3750.60.0030.32
 265.0273.08.00.080.4380.10.0040.33
         
P97-0455.175.320.20.150.510*4.50.0020.46*
Incl.74.075.31.30.32205.2043.40.0042.25*
 90.7127.436.70.150.5222.80.0020.46*
 127.4192.465.00.160.658*2.30.0020.54*
Incl.150.0153.03.00.2839.8016.10.0032.02*
Incl.166.8168.41.60.174.364.40.0011.84*
P97-08127.7268.6140.90.170.4922.00.0020.46
 
CuEQ% >=0.30 & <0.50
 >=0.50
 
 
 
17
 
 
Notes to Table 1:
 
1
Widths reported are drill widths, such that the thicknesses are unknown.
2
All assay intervals represent length-weighted averages.
3
Some figures may not sum exactly due to rounding.
4
 Copper equivalent (CuEQ) calculations use metal prices of: Cu US$3.00/lb, Mo US$12.00/lb, Ag US$18.00/oz and Au US$1,400.00/oz and conceptual recoveries of: Cu 90%, Au 72%, 67% Ag and 82% Mo. Conversion of metals to an equivalent Cu grade based on these metal prices is relative to the Cu price per unit mass factored by predicted recoveries for those metals normalized to the copper recovery. The metal equivalencies for each metal are added to the Cu grade. The general formula for this is: CuEQ % = Cu% + (Au g/t * (Au recovery / Cu recovery) * (Au $ per oz/ 31.1034768) / (Cu $ per lb* 22.04623)) + (Ag g/t * (Ag recovery / Cu recovery) * (Ag $ per oz/ 31.1034768) / (Cu $ per lb* 22.04623)) + (Mo % * (Mo recovery / Cu recovery) * (Mo $ per lb / Cu $ per lb)).  
5
The estimated metallurgical recoveries are conceptual in nature. There is no guarantee that the metallurgical testing required to determine metal recoveries will be done or, if done, the metallurgical recoveries could be at the level of the conceptual recoveries used to determine the CuEQ.
6
Details of analysis, QA/QC and data verification for the PINE Deposit drilling is provided in the 2020 IKE National Instrument 43-101 Technical Report, which is posted on the Amarc website and the Company’s profile on SEDAR.  
 
In addition:
 
(-) means not assayed for.
Au and CuEQ values marked with an asterisk signify capping of very high Au assay results at 3.0 g/t for the composite calculation (3.0 g/t is the 98th percentile for Au in the JOY drill data). The included (Incl.) interval that follows presents the sample interval with the uncapped Au result.
 
In addition to the delineated drill-ready targets at the PINE Deposit, untested areas of high IP chargeability and/or soil geochemistry lie between the widely-spaced historical holes and extend outward laterally, with the majority of the surrounding 6 km2 area of strong hydrothermal alteration remaining to be fully explored.
 
Similarly, at the MEX deposit target widely-spaced historical drilling indicates that the system remains open both laterally and to depth.
 
Newly Identified Porphyry Cu-Au Targets
 
The MEX Cluster, located between the PINE Deposit and MEX mineralized systems, includes a series of new targets that are characterized by coincident anomalies defined by geochemical, geophysical and mapping surveys. These new, well-defined targets are a priority for early drill testing.
 
Additional surface surveys are planned to prepare emerging drill targets at the Canyon South, Twins, SW Takla, Central Takla and the North Finley target areas for drilling. For example at Canyon South, a 1 km wide high-contrast >28 mV/V core of a 2 km-wide >18 mV/V IP chargeability anomaly closely coincides with a 500 m diameter magnetic high that is possibly related to an unidentified, and potentially mineralized, porphyry stock. Notably, two historical drill holes: PIN09-15, which encountered 11.43 g/t Au over 3 m, and MEX12-013, which recorded 0.05% Cu and 0.18 g/t Au over 62.3 m are located on the periphery of the Canyon South target and on the opposite sides of the open 2 km-wide IP chargeability anomaly. Such an occurrence of Au ± Cu could be related to the outer regions of a porphyry system. A new IP survey is proposed to expand the coverage of the historical IP to define the full extent of the chargeability anomaly in preparation for drill testing.
 
JOY District Agreement with Freeport
 
On May 12, 2021 Amarc announced it entered into an agreement (the "Agreement") with Freeport pursuant to which Freeport may acquire, through a staged two-stage option up to a 70% ownership interest in the mineral claims comprising the JOY District, plus other rights and interests, over up to a 10 year period.
 
To earn an initial 60% interest, Freeport is required to fund $35 million of work expenditures over a 5-year term. During the first year of the earn-in, a $4 million work program is required in the JOY District. Annual optional earn-in expenditures can be accelerated by Freeport at its discretion. Amarc will be operator during the initial earn-in period. Once Freeport has acquired such 60% interest, Amarc and Freeport will proceed to explore and develop the JOY District through a jointly owned corporation with Freeport assuming project operatorship.
 
Upon Freeport earning such 60% interest, it can elect, in its sole discretion, to earn an additional 10% in the mineral claims comprising the JOY District, plus other rights and interests (for a total 70% interest) by sole funding a further $75 million within the following five years.
 
Once Freeport has finalized its earned ownership interest at either the 60% or 70% level, each party will be responsible for funding its own pro-rata share of project costs on a 60:40 or 70:30 basis.
 
 
18
 
 
JOY District Royalties
 
The 100% Amarc owned JOY District comprises the JOY, PINE and Paula properties, and also the STAKED Claims. The mineral claims comprising the STAKED Claims were staked and are owned 100% by the Company.
 
On November 21, 2017, Amarc acquired 100% interest in the 7,200 Ha JOY property from United Minerals Services Ltd., a private vendor. The JOY property is subject to an underlying 3% NSR royalty from production to a former owner, which is capped at $3.5 million.
 
On August 29, 2017, Amarc announced that it had concluded option agreements with each of Gold Fields Toodoggone Exploration Corporation (“Gold Fields”) and Cascadero Copper Corporation ("Cascadero"), which at that time held the PINE property in a 51%:49% joint venture, that enabled Amarc to purchase 100% of the property. On December 31, 2018, Amarc completed the purchase of Cascadero’s 49% interest in the PINE property (Amarc MD&A December 31, 2018). Further on December 9, 2019, Amarc announced that it had reached an agreement with Gold Fields to amend the option agreement between the parties and purchased outright the remaining 51% of the PINE property from Gold Fields (Amarc news release, December 9, 2019).
 
Gold Fields retains a 2.5% NPI royalty on mineral claims comprising about 96% of the PINE property and a 1% NSR royalty on the balance of the claims. The NPI royalty can be reduced to 1.25% at any time through the payment to Gold Fields of $2.5 million in cash or shares. The NSR royalty can be reduced to 0.50% through the payment to Gold Fields of $2.5 million in cash or shares.
 
The PINE property is subject to a 3% underlying NSR royalty payable from production to a former owner and capped at $5 million payable from production (Amarc November 21, 2017 news release).
 
In November 2019, Amarc entered into a purchase agreement with two prospectors to acquire 100% of a single mineral claim, called the Paula property, located internal to the wider JOY District tenure (Amarc MD&A December 31, 2019). The claim is subject to a 1% NSR royalty payable from commercial production that is capped at $0.5 million.
 
The IKE Cu-Au District
 
Amarc’s 100% owned IKE District is located 35 km northwest of the town of Gold Bridge in southwestern BC near the heartland of the province’s producing porphyry Cu mines. It is proximal to industrial infrastructure including power, and also highways and rail that connect the District to Vancouver and its port facilities.
 
Hydrothermal alteration and mineralization, which is prospective for the discovery of porphyry Cu±Au±Mo±Ag and related deposit types occurs throughout the 462 km2 IKE District. The District occupies a highly fertile block of crust where magmatic‐hydrothermal‐structural characteristics are favorable for the formation of intrusion-related Cu±Au±Mo±Ag deposits with good grade (see below). These characteristics are common to most porphyry districts around the globe that host major, and commonly multiple, Cu±Au±Mo±Ag deposits.
 
The greater IKE District includes the IKE porphyry Cu-Mo-Ag deposit discovery, the high potential Greater Empress area that hosts the Empress Cu-Au-Ag deposit and significant porphyry Cu-Au-Mo-Ag and Cu-Au-Ag replacement deposit targets, and also a number of promising porphyry Cu and Au-Ag epithermal targets. The District has the potential to possess the grades and resources necessary to develop into an important mining camp.
 
IKE Porphyry Cu-Mo-Ag Deposit
 
The potential of the IKE porphyry deposit was recognized by Amarc during a review of porphyry occurrences located in underexplored mineral belts in BC. Limited historical drilling indicated the presence of a mineral system with characteristics favorable for an economically viable porphyry Cu-Mo-Ag deposit, underlying a significant area of gossanous material. Three historical drill holes, located over approximately 220 m, had intersected long continuous intercepts of chalcopyrite and molybdenite mineralization with encouraging grades, for example: Hole 11-1 returned 186 m of 0.41% CuEQ4 (see Table 1 above for note 4) at 0.31% Cu, 0.022% Mo, 1.9 g/t Ag and 0.01 g/t Au, including 58 m of 0.52% CuEQ at 0.39% Cu, 0.031% Mo, 1.9 g/t Ag and 0.02 g/t Au; and, Hole 11-2: 120 m of 0.41% CuEQ at 0.31% Cu, 0.020% Mo, 3.3 g/t Ag and 0.01 g/t Au, including 32 m of 0.58% CuEQ at 0.42 % Cu, 0.028% Mo, 6.3 g/t Ag and 0.02g/t Au.
 
 
19
 
 
There was no follow up exploration until Amarc initiated exploration.
 
Largely co-incident magnetic, IP chargeability geophysics and geochemical talus fines anomalies, together with geological alteration mapping have defined an extensive 9 km2 hydrothermal system, into which Amarc has completed approximately 15,455 m of core drilling in 26 widely-spaced holes.
 
This drilling has confirmed the presence of a substantial body of porphyry Cu-Mo-Ag mineralization with encouraging grades, over an area 1,200 m east-west by 1,000 m north- south, and over a vertical extent of 875 m depth, that remains open to expansion. Table 1 provides selected drill intercepts for the IKE Deposit.
 
Table 2: IKE DEPOSIT
Selected Drill Intervals from Amarc’s Drilling
 
Drill HoleFrom (m)To (m)
Int. (m)1,2,3
Cu (%)Au (g/t)Ag (g/t)Mo (%)
CuEQ(%)4,5
IK14005269.4325.456.00.31-1.60.0640.55
 339.1426.287.10.36-0.70.0540.56
Incl.347.7378.630.90.47-1.20.0520.67
 437.6554.6117.00.27-0.30.0210.35
 602.9616.113.20.29-0.60.0090.32
IK15010204.0268.064.00.30-2.90.0150.38
 293.0421.0128.00.33-3.10.0220.43
Incl.298.5330.031.50.43-4.30.0320.58
 444.0506.062.00.24-2.30.0200.32
IK1501348.060.012.00.23-1.70.0170.31
 75.099.024.00.24-1.90.0440.41
 129.0307.7178.70.32-2.20.0250.42
 339.5366.527.00.18-1.20.0300.30
 372.5693.3320.80.32-2.30.0380.47
Incl.527.4651.5124.10.43-3.30.0630.68
IK16020111.0156.045.00.25-1.70.0150.31
 314.5381.967.40.35-2.80.0230.45
Incl.366.0381.915.90.45-3.50.0440.64
 395.8456.060.20.53-3.70.0450.72
 528.0543.015.00.16-1.30.0350.30
 549.0582.033.00.23-1.60.1100.64
IK18025257.0351.794.70.370.0202.50.0200.47
Incl.308.0345.437.40.480.0253.40.0300.62
 359.0437.078.00.440.0193.00.0370.61
 461.0482.021.00.140.0051.00.0540.35
 
CuEQ% >=0.30 & <0.50
 >=0.50
 
For notes refer to Table 1.
 
Details of analysis, QA/QC and data verification for the IKE Deposit drilling is provided in the 2020 IKE National Instrument 43-101 Technical Report, which is posted on the Amarc website and the Company’s profile on SEDAR.
 
Like many major porphyry deposits, the IKE deposit formed in a very active, multi-stage hydrothermal system that was extensive and robust. Geological mapping and logging of diamond drill core at IKE indicate the deposit is hosted entirely by multi-phase intrusive rocks. Its overall geological setting is similar to that of many important porphyry belts along the Cordillera in North and South America.
 
Core observations and initial petrographic studies at IKE indicate that the chalcopyrite and molybdenite mineralization occurs as fine to relatively coarse, mostly discrete grains, mainly as disseminations and less commonly in fractures and veins. Multi-element analyses have returned consistently and unusually low concentrations of metallurgically or environmentally deleterious elements. These characteristics, and the generally low concentrations of pyrite at IKE, suggest excellent potential to produce clean, good-grade Cu and Mo concentrates by standard flotation processing.
 
Subject to funding, the Company is planning an expanded phased drill program at the IKE deposit with the goal of establishing a mineral resource, which will provide the basis for initial future economic studies. The Company has the required permit in-hand for the proposed drill programs.
 
 
20
 
 
Empress Deposit and Greater Empress Area Au-Rich Porphyry Cu and Replacement-Style Deposit Potential
 
Having recognized the potential of the IKE Deposit, Amarc consolidated the IKE District tenure. This included an important 35 km2 sub-area of the District located 6 km north of the IKE Deposit, that straddles the Coastal Plutonic Complex (“CPC”) contact for approximately 15 km. This area known as the Greater Empress area is centred on the high grade Empress Cu-Au-Ag Deposit. The Greater Empress area has seen exploration completed by several operators since the 1920’s. Recent compilation and integration of useful historical information from geochemical and geophysical surveys and also drilling, permitted a rapid advancement in the understanding of the potential both to expand the Empress Deposit, and throughout the area with the recognition of significant porphyry Cu±Au±Mo-Ag and Cu-Au-Ag replacement deposit targets. Potential also exits for auriferous, polymetallic/mesothermal-epithermal deposits. The Company has the required permits in-hand for the proposed drill programs and IP geophysical surveys.
 
Empress Cu-Au-Ag Replacement Deposit
 
Historical drilling at Empress has indicated a significant body of good grade Cu-Au mineralization, which remains open to expansion with a modern core drilling program. Table 3 provides selected drill historical intercepts for the Empress Deposit. Mineralization at Empress is considered to have formed by the replacement of previously altered volcanics by a quartz-magnetite-sulphide assemblage, with higher Cu-Au-Ag grades commonly occurring within 100 m in vertical distance above the CPC’s contact, within the overlying volcanics. An initial examination of historical drill core by the Amarc team recognized the nearby, Granite porphyry Cu-Au-Ag-Mo deposit target, which is shallowly concealed by overburden. The Granite porphyry deposit target is considered a probable source of the Empress Deposit replacement fluids. Historical core drill intercepts at Granite include Hole 91-49 which returned 92 m of 0.38% CuEQ4 (see Table 1 for note 4) @ 0.22% Cu, 0.23 g/t Au, 0.008% Mo and 0.4 g/t Ag. This target has not been delineated and mineralization remains open to expansion. Step-out drilling from the known mineralization is required.
 
 
21
 
 
Table 3: EMPRESS DEPOSIT
Selected Drill Intervals from Historical Drilling
 
Drill HoleFrom (m)To (m)
Int. (m)1,2,3
Cu (%)Au (g/t)Ag (g/t)Mo (%)
CuEQ (%)4,5
76-251.2114.963.70.370.4920.1-0.64
Incl.60.472.412.00.510.442--0.76
Incl.103.0114.911.90.750.7210.4-1.15
 139.6185.345.70.420.3500.6-0.61
Incl.139.6157.918.30.390.9411.1-0.91
Incl.173.1185.312.20.730.010--0.74
 209.4215.86.40.740.758--1.15
76-35.217.712.50.230.1621.6-0.33
 26.8102.976.10.921.4184.7-1.72
Incl.26.837.610.80.494.2442.3-2.81
Incl.42.774.431.71.111.3884.5-1.89
88-27.350.343.00.360.3261.30.0050.57
Incl.13.429.916.50.620.5792.30.0020.95
88-717.769.551.80.470.4572.40.0020.74
Incl.48.464.616.20.980.7415.70.0011.43
89-221.6123.7102.10.360.3612.70.0010.58
Incl.26.537.010.50.310.7543.20.0030.75
Incl.60.678.918.30.720.5733.80.0011.06
Incl.99.1118.018.90.490.4704.20.0010.78
89-89.1115.5106.40.350.3591.50.0030.56
Incl.78.099.621.60.690.9132.80.0031.21
90-17107.6113.45.80.550.4461.60.0100.84
 143.9200.356.41.381.6664.10.0092.35
90-1822.629.36.70.150.3000.70.0080.35
 35.040.55.50.150.5230.30.0060.46
 47.974.426.50.470.6833.20.0100.90
 79.992.712.80.150.2540.40.0030.31
 107.0161.954.90.780.7461.00.0041.20
90-2110.419.59.10.310.3360.50.0110.53
 140.5192.952.41.101.2092.50.0041.79
Incl.153.3175.322.01.581.6712.60.0062.52
Incl.182.6191.18.51.922.7357.80.0063.48
 198.4218.820.40.300.5421.30.0020.61
90-22143.9190.246.31.151.4154.20.0091.98
90-2994.2110.616.40.430.1711.30.0030.55
 141.7214.672.90.370.4330.60.0030.62
Incl.178.3194.816.50.861.0691.50.0031.46
 
CuEQ% >=0.30 & <0.50
 >=0.50
 
 For notes refer to Table 1.
 
Greater Empress Area Cu±Au±Mo-Ag Porphyry and Replacement Targets: In addition to the Empress deposit, the 35 km2 Greater Empress area includes seven identified compelling porphyry and replacement-style Cu-Au±Mo±Ag deposit and exploration targets. The deposit targets include, Empress East, Empress Gap, Granite (as discussed above) and Buzzer, and the earlier-stage exploration targets include Empress West. Each are discussed below with selected historical drill results provided in Tables 4 and 5. These targets are either: not fully drill delineated or have been tested only by shallow, widely-spaced historical reconnaissance percussion drilling: and can with focused exploration be brought to a drill ready status.
 
Empress East Cu-Au-Ag Replacement Deposit Target: Located 1 km east of the Empress Deposit, limited historical core holes drilled at the Empress East deposit target intercepted mineralization similar to that at the Empress deposit in both style and grade. This drilling together with moderate to locally strong IP chargeability responses, magnetic geophysical features, and results from historical Cu and Au soil geochemistry where (>250 ppm Cu and ≥50 ppb Au values closely reflect the first three historical drill samples results at the base of overburden), indicate there is significant potential with further core drilling to enlarge this body of mineralization. Notably there is a complete absence of drill holes in the southern part of this target, which is at a position that is analogous to shallower, high grade Cu-Au-Ag replacement-style mineralization at the Empress deposit to the west.
 
 
22
 
 
Table 4: EMPRESS EAST DEPOSIT TARGET
         Selected Drill Intervals from Historical Drill
 
Drill HoleFrom (m)To (m)Int. (m)1,2,3Cu(%)Au (g/t)Ag (g/t)Mo (%)CuEQ (%)4,5
91-399.837.828.00.340.5431.20.0020.66
 107.6147.539.90.400.3320.80.0040.60
Incl.141.4147.56.11.230.9282.20.0091.78
91-5473.185.011.90.310.2210.70.0010.44
 108.2158.250.00.460.3041.00.0020.64
 
CuEQ% >=0.30 & <0.50
 >=0.50
 
For notes refer to Table 1.
 
Empress Gap Cu-Au-Ag Replacement Deposit Target: Results from limited historical drilling, comprising 11 shallow percussion drill holes and three deeper core holes in the >1 km long Empress Gap zone located between the Empress Deposit and Empress East, suggest a clear opportunity to discover additional Cu-Au-Ag mineralization in proximity to the volcanic-CPC contact. Many of the short percussion holes returned anomalous Cu‐Mo (Au and Ag were not analyzed for), potentially indicative of higher-grade underlying mineralization as at the Empress Deposit. Of the deeper core holes, Cu‐Au mineralization associated with alteration similar to that at Empress is also reported, however only two of these holes reached the volcanic-CPC contact.
 
Empress Gap is a significantly underexplored target and drill testing of areas close to the CPC-volcanic contact is required.
 
Buzzer Cu-Au-Ag±Mo Porphyry Deposit Target: The Buzzer deposit target is located in the eastern side of the Greater Empress area inboard of the CPC. Historical drilling at Buzzer has intercepted high-grade Cu-Au-Ag-Mo porphyry mineralization hosted in biotite altered intrusions (Table 5). Whether these mineralized intrusions, are part of a small high-level cupola or a large mineralized intrusive mineralized body below, as indicated by magnetic surveys, cannot be determined from the limited drilling.
 
The Granite and Buzzer porphyry systems demonstrate that significant porphyry-style mineralization is present in the Greater Empress area, and that further exploration surveys and drilling have the potential to make new porphyry discoveries, both inboard and outboard from the CPC contact.
 
Table 5: BUZZER DEPOSIT TARGET
Selected Drill Intervals from Historical Drilling
 
Drill HoleFrom (m)To (m)Int. (m)1,2,3Cu(%)Au (g/t)Ag (g/t)Mo (%)
CuEQ (%)4,5
DDH-3†21.3120.499.10.43--0.0420.58
DDH-4†14.6113.498.80.37--0.0370.50
X-10.05.95.90.150.2375.80.0130.36
 9.542.533.00.260.1753.40.0420.53
Incl.24.740.816.10.400.2685.00.0640.81
X-30.044.244.20.670.4965.30.0461.14
Incl.10.738.127.40.860.7246.60.0591.51
GC11-7411.452.240.80.280.2101.80.0120.44
Incl.15.027.012.00.410.2812.60.0210.66
 
CuEQ% >=0.30 & <0.50
 >=0.50
 
For notes refer to Table 1.
 
Assay interval from historically reported composite. Individual assay results are unknown.
 
 
23
 
 
Empress West Cu-Au-Ag Exploration Target: This large target, which extends more than 2 km to the west of the Empress deposit along the favorable CPC-volcanic contact, has only been tested by widely-spaced and shallow percussion holes and a few core. It exhibits the same geological setting as the Empress Deposit, and the potential to discover additional Cu-Au-Ag mineralization is indicated by the results of the historical drilling when combined with magnetic and IP survey data, and known Cu-Au-Mo anomalies in soils. Modern IP and drilling are required to test a series of defined targets.
 
IKE District Porphyry and Epithermal Targets: The IKE District hosts several known centres of porphyry Cu mineralization (Rowbottom, Mad Major- OMG) and Au-Ag epithermal mineralization (Battlement, Mewtwo) that exist outside of, but in proximity to and between, the IKE Deposit and Greater Empress areas. Limited exploration by historical operators and/or Amarc indicates that further survey work followed by drilling is warranted at these targets. The Company has the permits in-hand for the potential work program.
 
Rowbottom Cu-Mo-Au Porphyry Deposit Target: At Rowbottom, porphyry-style mineralization and alteration is intermittently exposed along 550 m of Rowbottom creek, and spatially associated with an extensive 1.3 km by 1.0 km IP chargeability anomaly that remains open for further surveying. Limited historical shallow percussion drilling returned good Cu and Mo grades (Au and Ag were not analysed for), and a single core hole completed by Amarc confirmed the presence of Au and Ag.
 
Historical drill intercepts include for example: Hole S-64: 49 m of 0.51% CuEQ4 (see Table 1 for note 4) 0.49% Cu and 0.007% Mo and Hole S-24: 43 m of 0.40% CuEQ at 0.28% Cu and 0.032% Mo.
 
The Amarc core hole intersected significant intervals of porphyry Cu-Mo mineralization hosting elevated Ag and Au values, which are cut by a number of post mineral dykes and returned, for example: RB17001: 66 m of 0.38% CuEQ4 at 0.29% Cu, 0.006% Mo, 0.08 g/t Au and 4.1 g/t Ag and 21 m of 0.43% CuEQ at 0.38% Cu, 0.007% Mo and 4.3 g/t Ag.
 
An historical soils grid along with both the historical and Amarc IP chargeability anomalies suggest that a larger system could be present, warranting further drilling both laterally and to depth in order to determine the geometry and grade distribution of the Rowbottom deposit target.
 
Mad Major Cu-Mo Porphyry Target: The Mad Major-OMG target area extends over approximately 23 km2 area of highly anomalous stream sediment geochemistry and gossanous ridges (see IKE Technical Report). Amarc’s exploration, and that of historical operators, has defined several large IP chargeability and magnetic geophysical, talus fines and soils geochemical and geological alteration mapping anomalies that remain to be adequately drill tested. Amarc has completed only eight very wide-spaced core holes into the target, and the source of the IP and geochemical anomalies is yet to be determined. Additional survey work and drilling are warranted.
 
Battlement and Mewtwo Au-Ag Epithermal Targets: Although not the focus of Amarc’s exploration, epithermal potential exits on the IKE District. For example, at both Battlement and Mewtwo reconnaissance stage exploration suggests a geological environment that is permissive for either, or both, a porphyry or epithermal-type deposits. Further exploration is warranted at both targets.
 
In summary collectively the IKE Deposit, Empress Deposit, Greater Empress area and IKE District target areas as described warrant substantial exploration programs.
 
IKE District Capped Royalties
 
Amarc has a 100% interest in the IKE, Granite, Juno and Galore Properties, which make up the IKE District. The mineral claims comprising the Juno Property were staked and are owned 100% by the Company.
 
In July 2014, Amarc acquired a 100% interest in the IKE property from Oxford Resources Inc. (“Oxford”, formerly Highpoint Exploration Inc.). At that time Oxford’s ownership interest was converted to a 1% Net Smelter Returns (“NSR”) royalty, which can be purchased at any time for $2 million (payable in cash or common shares of Amarc at the company’s sole election).
 
The IKE property is also subject to a 2% underlying NSR royalty to two underlying owners, whereby Amarc has the right to purchase: (1) one half of the royalty (1%) for $2 million ($1 million of which is payable in cash, Amarc common shares, or any such combination of cash and shares, at Amarc's discretion) at any time prior to commercial production; and (2) the second half of the royalty (1%) also for $2 million ($1 million of which is payable in cash, and the balance in Amarc common shares, or any such combination of cash and shares, at Amarc's discretion) at any time on or before a commercial mine production decision has been made in respect of the IKE property. Amarc has agreed that upon completion of a positive feasibility study it will issue 500,000 common shares to the underlying owners.
 
 
24
 
 
In November 2014, Amarc acquired a 100% interest in the adjoining Granite property from Great Quest Fertilizers Ltd. ("Great Quest", previously known as Great Quest Metals Ltd., which is also referred to as “Great Quest” herein). Great Quest holds a 2% NSR royalty on that property which can be purchased for $2 million, on or before commercial production (payable in cash, Amarc common shares, or any such combination of cash and shares, at Amarc’s discretion). In addition, there is an underlying 2.5% NSR royalty on certain mineral claims within the Granite property, which can be purchased at any time for $1.5 million less any amount of royalty already paid.
 
In January 2017, Amarc acquired a 100% interest in the adjoining Galore property from Galore Resources Inc. ("Galore Resources"), clear of any royalties to Galore Resources. In January 2018, Amarc concluded an agreement with the underlying owners of the Galore property, whereby Amarc acquired all of the underlying owners’ residual interest in and to the Galore property, including five NSR and five NPI royalties.
 
On September 3, 2015, Amarc entered into an agreement (the "Agreement") with Thompson Creek (now a wholly owned subsidiary of Centerra) pursuant to which Thompson Creek could acquire, through a staged investment process within five years, a 30% ownership interest in mineral claims and crown grants covering the IKE District. Under the terms of the Agreement, Thompson Creek also received an option, after acquiring its 30% interest, to acquire an additional 20% interest in the IKE District, subject to certain conditions, including the completion of a Feasibility Study. On January 11, 2017, Amarc announced that Thompson Creek, having been acquired by Au-focused Centerra, relinquished its option to earn up to a 50% interest in the IKE District. Thompson Creek had a 10% participating interest in the IKE District by investing $6 million in exploration programs undertaken in 2015 and 2016, and elected to exchange its participating interest for a 1% Conversion NSR royalty from mine production, which is capped at a total of $5 million. As a result, Amarc re-acquired 100% interest in the IKE District.
 
The DUKE District
 
Amarc’s 100% owned DUKE District is located 80 km northeast of Smithers within the broader Babine District (the “District”), one of BC’s most prolific porphyry Cu-Au belts. The Babine District, a 40 by 100 km north- northwesterly striking mineralized belt is host to Noranda Mines’ past producing Bell and Granisle Cu-Au mines that produced a total of 1.1 billion pounds of Cu, 634,000 ounces of Au and 3.5 million ounces of Ag2, and the advanced stage Morrison Cu-Au deposit. Amarc’s DUKE porphyry Cu discovery is located 30 km north of the Bell Mine. Extensive infrastructure exists in the District, which primarily relates to the forestry industry but also dates back to mining activity.
 
The 704 km2 DUKE District includes both the DUKE porphyry Cu deposit target discovery (“DUKE”) and a series of high potential porphyry Cu-Au deposit targets generated form the Company’s district- scale targeting program.
 
Porphyry Cu Expansion Potential at the Duke Deposit Target: The porphyry Cu system at DUKE has seen only limited drilling. Many of the 30 historical shallow and closely-spaced core holes intersected and ended in significant Cu-Mo-Ag-Au mineralization. In the main area of known mineralization, these holes extended to only 124 m vertical depth from surface. Examples of the intercepts from the historical drill holes are provided in Table 6.
 
 
25
 
 
Table 6: DUKE DEPOSIT TARGET
Selected Drill Intervals from Historical and Amarc’s Drilling
 
Drill HoleFrom (m)To (m)
Int.(m)1,2,3
Cu%Au(g/t)Ag(g/t)Mo(%)
CuEQ(%)4,5
70-027
30.5143.3112.80.290.0601.10.0120.38
 73.185.312.20.410.0911.60.0100.50
70-107
21.3164.6143.30.260.0681.70.0160.37
Incl.115.8131.015.20.470.1102.90.0270.64
71-147
28.6115.286.60.400.0532.20.0210.52
Incl.34.874.439.60.480.0672.60.0230.61
DK1700217.032.015.00.440.1262.10.0190.59
 40.3142.0101.70.220.0641.30.0140.31
 238.0268.030.00.330.0691.90.0190.45
 308.5399.090.50.210.0431.10.0250.34
 450.5523.072.50.230.0301.20.0220.33
Incl.486.0495.09.00.410.0622.00.0400.61
DK1800513.589.976.40.230.0421.10.0120.30
 98.9246.0147.10.270.0461.10.0280.40
Incl.125.0137.012.00.320.0721.10.0370.51
Incl.212.1231.919.80.450.0622.00.0330.62
 302.0344.042.00.280.0591.20.0190.38
DK1800698.0416.0318.00.240.0521.10.0120.32
Incl.206.0296.090.00.270.0671.20.0150.37
Incl.338.0416.078.00.300.0551.40.0160.39
and347.0405.258.20.340.0591.50.0150.45
 
CuEQ% >=0.30 & <0.50
 >=0.50
 
For notes refer to Table 1.
 
7 Results of these historical Ducanex JV drill holes are from the 1991 Corona resampling and analyses by Acme.
 
The historical drilling was centered within a restricted part of a robust, 3 km north-south by 1 km east-west historical IP chargeability anomaly, which is thought to have been offset by faulting. When reconstructed, this IP chargeability anomaly has a classic donut shape that was the target of Amarc’s eight core holes completed in 2017 through 2018 (see December 19, 2017 and June 12, 2018 news releases).
 
Seven of the eight core holes drilled over an area measuring approximately 400 m north-south by 600 m
 
east-west successfully intersected porphyry Cu-style mineralization to a vertical depth of 360 m. This mineralization remains open to expansion. Select intercept examples are provided in Table 6.
 
Notably, a single step-out hole (DK18004) completed by Amarc more than 1 km to the north of the seven other
 
Amarc holes, and within the displaced portion of the IP chargeability anomaly, intersected substantial lengths of moderate to low grade Cu and Mo mineralization, confirming a very extensive lateral dimension to the DUKE porphyry Cu system.
 
Subject to financing Amarc is currently planning how best to undertake the drilling required to delineate the geometry and grade distribution of its DUKE discovery in order to inform a mineral resource estimate and related studies. The Company has the permit in hand to commence potential works.
 
New Duke District Porphyry Cu-Au Targets: Appreciating the Cu-Au prospectivity of the Babine District and its relatively unexplored nature due to widespread glacial cover (4 m to 18 m thick in the Amarc DUKE discovery drill holes), Amarc has completed a comprehensive compilation of government and historical data over the entire 704 km2 DUKE District. This integrated study provided a new interpretation of the geological, geochemical and geophysical characteristics of the Babine District, identifying 12 previously unrecognized high potential porphyry Cu-Au deposit targets. These target areas were defined, for example, by anomalous Cu-Au-Mo-Ag (and other porphyry indicator elements) till geochemistry, till samples with identified grains of bornite, chalcopyrite and/or favorable biotite feldspar porphyry, compelling up- ice magnetic geophysics features, and indications of structural control along faults emanating from large deep-seated regional structures that likely controlled the emplacement of the prospective intrusions, along with numerous other scientific vectors.
 
 
26
 
 
Regionally, Amarc is planning for initial, focused ground surveys taking advantage of extensive logging road networks across the property. These surveys would be followed by RC drilling that would test prioritized targets for the presence of potential porphyry Cu mineralized systems below cover and, where a deposit target is confirmed core drilling to determine the extent, grade and geometry of the mineralized system. The Company has an IP permit in hand to commence these works.
 
DUKE District Royalties
 
Amarc holds 100% interest in the DUKE District free of any royalty.
 
The Newton Au Property
 
Amarc reported the sale of the Newton Au project located in south-central BC in December 2020 to a wholly-owned subsidiary of Carlyle Commodities Corp. (“Carlyle”). Under the terms of the agreement, Amarc has received consideration comprising total cash of $300,000 and 5.5 million equity units (share plus warrant) in Carlyle valued at $0.25 per unit. In addition, Amarc retains a 2% NSR Royalty in the Property.
 
The divestment of the Newton Property allows Amarc to retain exposure to the upside Au potential at Newton through its equity position in Carlyle and the retained NSR Royalty, while maintaining strategic focus on the development of its three high-value and expansive, 100%-owned Cu±Au districts – JOY, IKE and DUKE.
 
C.            
ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE
 
The Company has one subsidiary, 1130346 B.C. Ltd. (“Amarc Subco”), incorporated under the laws of British Columbia, Canada. Amarc Subco is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company incorporated for the purpose of entering into an option agreement. The Amarc Subco did not have any asset, liability, income, or expense and was dissolved on March 30, 2021.
 
D.            
PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
 
None of the Company’s properties have any material tangible fixed assets located thereon.
 
ITEM 4A 
UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
 
Not applicable.
 
ITEM 5 
OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS
 
OVERVIEW
 
Amarc is a mineral exploration company with a portfolio of active exploration projects located in British Columbia, Canada. The Company's business strategy is the acquisition and exploration of mineral properties. None of the Company's properties have any mineral reserves or have been proven to host mineralized material which can be said to be “ore” or feasibly economic at current metals prices. The Company incurs significant exploration expenditures as it carries out its business strategy. As Amarc is an exploration stage company, it does not have any revenues from its operations to offset its exploration expenditures. Accordingly, the Company's ability to continue exploration of its properties will be contingent upon the availability of additional financing.
 
 
27
 
 
Amarc's financial statements are prepared on the basis that it will continue as a going concern. The Company has incurred losses since inception and the ability of the Company to continue as a going concern depends upon its ability to continue to raise adequate financing and to develop profitable operations. Amarc's financial statements do not reflect adjustments, which could be material, to the carrying values of assets and liabilities, which may be required should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.
 
The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the audited annual financial statements and the related notes accompanying this Annual Report. The Company prepares its financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”), as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board. The Company includes selected financial data prepared in compliance with IFRS without reconciliation to U.S. GAAP.
 
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
 
The Company's accounting policies are presented in note 2 of the accompanying audited annual financial statements.
 
The preparation of financial statements in accordance with IFRS requires management to select accounting policies and make estimates, judgments and assumptions. Such estimates, judgments and assumptions may have a significant impact on the financial statements. These include but are not limited to:
 
● 
estimate of the accrual of Mineral Exploration Tax Credits (“METC”);
 
● 
the determination of categories of financial assets and financial liabilities; and
 
● 
the carrying value and recoverability of the Company's marketable securities.
 
Actual amounts could differ from the estimates used and, accordingly, affect the results of operation.
 
Mineral Exploration Tax Credits (“METC”)
 
When the Company is entitled to receive METC and other government grants, this government assistance is recognized as a cost recovery within exploration expense when there is reasonable assurance of recovery.
 
Judgements are involved in determining which expenditures qualify for the METC, and there may be disagreement between the Company and taxation authorities on the applicability of specific items.
 
Financial assets and financial liabilities
 
Financial assets and liabilities are recognized when the Company becomes party to the contracts that give rise to them. The Company determines the classification of its financial assets and liabilities at initial recognition and, where allowed and appropriate, re-evaluates such classification at each financial year end. The Company does not have any derivative financial instruments.
 
Financial assets and financial liabilities are initially measured at fair value. Transaction costs that are directly attributable to the acquisition or issuance of financial assets and financial liabilities (other than financial assets and financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss) are added to or deducted from the fair value of the financial assets or financial liabilities, as appropriate, on initial recognition. Transaction costs directly attributable to the acquisition of financial assets or financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss are recognized immediately in profit or loss.
 
Marketable securities
 
The Company's investments in marketable securities are classified as available-for-sale (“AFS”) financial assets. Subsequent to initial recognition, they are measured at fair value and changes therein, other than impairment losses and foreign currency differences on AFS monetary items, are recognized in other comprehensive income or loss. When an investment is derecognized, the cumulative gain or loss in the investment revaluation reserve is transferred to profit or loss.
 
The fair value of AFS monetary assets denominated in a foreign currency is determined in that foreign currency and translated at the exchange rate prevailing at the end of the reporting period. Changes in the fair value of AFS equity investments are recognized directly in equity.
 
 
28
 
 
A.            
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
Year Ended March 31, 2021 (“2021”) Versus Year Ended March 31, 2020 (“2020”)
 
The Company recorded a net income of $1,361,000 during 2021 compared to a net loss of $1,254,000 during 2020. This swing from a net loss position in 2020 into a net income position in 2021 is mainly due to the non-recurring event related to the gain on disposition of the Newton property in the third quarter of fiscal 2021, together with the decrease in general and administration expenses.
 
($ 000’s)
2021
2020
Discussion
Exploration and evaluation, net of recoveries
 
576
664
 
Field exploration activities during the 2021 fiscal period were focused on both Amarc owned and also various project which Amarc operated on behalf of third parties, these field activities commenced late in the second quarter of fiscal 2021.
Administration631856Administration expenses decreased during the 2021 period due to further efforts by senior management to reduce overhead costs.
Interest expense on loans payable to director111106Interest incurred on loans provided by a director.
Amortization of finance charges
57

109

The amount relates to a loan bonus through the issuance of share purchase warrants to a director. Relates to a loan provided by the director in November 2014.
Equity settled share-based compensation
 
18
 
42
 
The $18,000 equity settled share-based compensation represents the fiscal 2021 amortization of the share-based compensation related to the 2,000,000 share-purchased options granted in October 2019 fully vested on April 3, 2021. The fiscal 2021 amortization amount is calculated based on graded-vesting method.
 
Year Ended March 31, 2020 (“2020”) Versus Year Ended March 31, 2019 (“2019”)
 
The Company recorded a net income of $1,254,000 during 2020 compared to a net loss of $1,946,000 during 2019. The decrease in net loss was mainly due to a decrease in both exploration and evaluation expenses, net of METC, and general and administration expenses.
 
($ 000’s)
2020
2019
Discussion
Exploration and evaluation, net of METC
 
664
 
5,390
 
Exploration activity during the 2020 and 2019 periods was focused on the IKE, DUKE and JOY Districts. Exploration activity during the 2020 period was lower due to decreased exploration activity as discussed in this Annual Report.
Administration
 
856
 
914
 
Administration expenses decreased during the 2020 period due to decreased administration activities in support of the Company’s JOY, IKE and DUKE Districts.
Interest expense on loans payable to director10690Interest incurred on loans provided by a director. Interest expense increased during the 2020 period due to new addition of loan advance.
Amortization of finance charges
 
109
 
130
 
The amount relates to a loan bonus through the issuance of share purchase warrants to a director. Relates to loan provided by the director in November 2014.
Equity settled share-based compensation42During fiscal 2020, there were 500,000 share-purchased options granted in October 2019 vested.
 
 
29
 
 
Year Ended March 31, 2019 (“2019”) Versus Year Ended March 31, 2018 (“2018”)
 
The Company recorded a net loss of $1,946,000 during 2019 compared to a net loss of $2,072,000 during 2018. The decrease in net loss was mainly due to a decrease in both exploration and evaluation expenses, net of METC, and general and administration expenses.
 
($ 000’s)
2019
2018
Discussion
Exploration and evaluation, net of METC
 
5,390
 
6,686
 
Exploration activity during the 2019 and 2018 period was focused on the JOY, IKE and DUKE Districts’ drilling and related field programs. Exploration activity during the 2019 period decreased for reasons discussed in this Annual Report.
Administration
 
914
 
1,053
 
Administration expenses decreased during the 2019 period due to decreased administration activities in support of the Company’s JOY, IKE and DUKE Districts.
Interest expense on loans payable to director
 
90
 
128
 
Interest incurred on loans provided by a director. Interest expense decreased during the 2019 period due to partial repayment of the principal amounts on the loan outstanding.
Amortization of finance charges
 
130
 
433
 
The amount relates to a loan bonus through the issuance of share purchase warrants to a director. Relates to loan provided by the director in November 2014.
 
B.  
LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
 
Liquidity
 
Historically, the Company's sole source of funding has been provided from the issuance of equity securities for cash, primarily through private placements to sophisticated investors and institutions, and from director loans. The Company's access to financing is always uncertain. There can be no assurance of continued access to significant equity funding to finance the Company's ongoing
 
At March 31, 2021, the Company had a cash balance of approximately $308,000 and working capital of approximately $418,000. The Company plans its cash spending based on availability of funds.
 
Further advancement and development of the Company’s mineral property interests will require additional funding from a combination of the Company’s shareholders, existing or potential new optionees and joint venture parties, and debt financing. As the Company is currently in the exploration stage, it does not have any revenues from operations. Therefore, the Company relies on funding from its optionees for its continuing financial liquidity and the Company relies on the equity market and debt financing as sources of funding. The Company continues to focus on preserving its cash resources while maintaining its operational activities.
 
Other than disclosed in Section F - Tabular Disclosure Of Contractual Obligations, the Company does not have any material capital lease obligations, purchase obligations or any other long-term obligations.
 
Capital Resources
 
The Company has no lines of credit or other sources of financing which have been arranged or utilized.
 
The Company has no “Purchase Obligations” defined as any agreement to purchase goods or services that is enforceable and legally binding on the Company that specifies all significant terms, including: fixed or minimum quantities to be purchased; fixed, minimum or variable price provisions; and the approximate timing of the transaction.
 
 
30
 
 
Requirement of Financing
 
Historically, Amarc's sole source of funding has been provided from the sale of equity securities for cash, primarily through private placements to sophisticated investors and institutions. Like all exploration stage companies, Amarc will need to raise additional financing to meet its business objectives.
 
The Company presently does not have any material commitments for capital expenditures and accordingly, can remain fairly flexible in directing its exploration activities to the availability of funds.
 
Financial Instruments
 
Amarc keeps its financial instruments primarily denominated in Canadian Dollars with a very small amount held in U.S. Dollars. The Company does not engage in any hedging operations with respect to currency or in-situ minerals. Funds which are excess to Amarc's current needs are invested in short-term near-cash investments.
 
Amarc does not have any material, legally enforceable obligations requiring it to make capital expenditures and accordingly, can remain relatively flexible in gearing its activities to the availability of funds.
 
C.            
RESEARCH EXPENDITURES
 
Amarc does not carry out any research or development activities. Please refer to Item 5.A and Item 5.B above for a discussion of the exploration expenditures that the Company has incurred in connection with the exploration of the Company's mineral properties.
 
D.            
TREND INFORMATION
 
As a natural resource exploration company, Amarc's activities reflect the traditional cyclical nature of metal prices. Consequently, Amarc's business is primarily an “event-driven” business based on exploration results.
 
Average annual prices for copper, molybdenum, gold and silver are shown in the table below:
 
 
Average metal price (US$)
Calendar year
Copper
Molybdenum
Gold
Silver
20143.11/lb11.59/lb1,264/oz19.09/oz
20152.50/lb6.73/lb1,160/oz15.69/oz
20162.21/lb6.56/lb1,251/oz17.14/oz
20172.88/lb7.26 /lb1,275/oz17.01/oz
20182.96/lb11.94/lb1,269/oz15.71/oz
20192.72/lb11.36/lb1,393/oz16.21/oz
20202.80/lb8.68/lb1,769/oz20.54/oz
2021 (to the date of this Annual Report)4.14/lb13.41/lb1,805/oz26.42/oz
 
E.            
OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS
 
Amarc has no off-balance sheet arrangements.
 
 
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F.            
TABULAR DISCLOSURE OF CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS
 
The following table lists the contractual obligations of the Company as at March 31, 2021:
 
 
Payment due by period
Type of Contractual Obligation
Total
Less than 1 Year
1 - 3 Years
3 - 5 Years
More than 5 Years
Debt Obligations (gross amount)$ 1,000,000$ –$ –$ 1,000,000$ –
Capital (Finance) Lease Obligations
Operating Lease Obligations (Office Lease)134,27523,41652,29156,2212,347
Purchase Obligations
Other Long-term Liabilities Reflected on the Company's Balance Sheet under IFRS
Total$ 1,134,275$ 23,416$ 52,291$ 1,056,221$ 2,347
 
The Company has no capital (finance) lease obligations, no operating lease obligations, no purchase obligations, or other long-term liabilities.
 
G.            
SAFE HARBOR
 
The safe harbor provided in Section 27A of the Securities Act and Section 21E of the Exchange Act applies to forward-looking information provided pursuant to Item 5.E and Item 5.F above.
 
ITEM 6 
DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES
 
A.            
DIRECTORS AND SENIOR MANAGEMENT
 
Name
Year born
Position
Director or Officer Since
T. Barry Coughlan1945DirectorFebruary 2009
Scott D. Cousens1964Director September 1995
Robert A. Dickinson1948Chairman of the Board and DirectorApril 1993
Diane Nicolson(2)
1965President, CEO and DirectorJanuary 2008
Sebastian Tang(3)
1976Chief Financial OfficerJuly 2020
Trevor Thomas1967SecretaryFebruary 2008
(1)
To the best of the Company's knowledge, none of such persons has any family relationship with any other and none were elected as a director or appointed as an officer as a result of an arrangement or understanding with a major shareholder, customer, supplier, or any other party.
(2)
In February 2019, Diane Nicolson was appointed as CEO of the Company.
(3)
In July 2020, Sebastian Tang was appointed as CFO of the Company.
 
The following is biographical information on each of the persons listed above:
 
Barry Coughlan – Director
 
Mr. Coughlan is a self-employed businessman and financier, and senior executive with extensive international experience in capital markets who has been involved in the financing of publicly traded companies for over 30 years. During this period Mr. Coughlan has been involved in the financing of over 30 private companies, which subsequently listed on both international and North American financial markets. His principal occupation is President and Director of TBC Ventures Ltd., a private investment company.
 
Mr. Coughlan is, or was within the past five years, an officer and/or a director of the following public companies:
 
CompanyPositions HeldFromTo
Amarc Resources Ltd.DirectorFebruary 2009Present
Northcliff Resources Ltd.DirectorJune 2011Present
Rathdowney Resources Ltd.DirectorMarch 2011Present
Taseko Mines LimitedDirectorFebruary 2001June 2015
Quadro Resources Ltd.President and DirectorJune 1986Present
Mineral Mountain Resources Ltd.DirectorDecember 2014Present
Vatic Ventures CorporationDirectorJanuary 2011Present
 
 
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Scott Cousens – Director
 
Scott Cousens provides management, technical and financial services to a number of publicly traded companies. Mr. Cousens' focus since 1991 has been the development of relationships within the international investment community. Substantial financings and subsequent corporate success has established strong ties with North American, European and Asian investors.
 
Mr. Cousens is, or was within the past five years, an officer and/or director of the following public companies:
 
CompanyPositions HeldFromTo
Amarc Resources Ltd.DirectorSeptember 1995Present
Heatherdale Resources Ltd.Chairman and DirectorNovember 2009June 2017
Northcliff Resources Ltd.DirectorMay 2012Present
Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd.DirectorJune 1996February 2016
Quartz Mountain Resources Ltd.Chairman and DirectorNovember 2012June 2017
Rathdowney Resources Ltd.DirectorJune 2011September 2016
 
Robert Dickinson, B.Sc., M.Sc. – Chairman of the Board and Director
 
Robert Dickinson is an economic geologist who serves as a member of management of several mineral exploration companies, primarily those for whom Hunter Dickinson Services Inc. provides services. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree (Hons. Geology) and a Master of Science degree (Business Administration - Finance) from the University of British Columbia. Mr. Dickinson has been active in mineral exploration for over 45 years and was inducted into the Canadian Mining Hall of Fame in 2012. He is a director of Hunter Dickinson Services Inc. He is also President and Director of United Mineral Services Ltd., a private resource company. He also serves as a Director of the BC Mining Museum and a Trustee of the BC Mineral Resources Education Program.
 
Mr. Dickinson is, or was within the past five years, an officer and/or director of the following public companies:
 
CompanyPositions HeldFromTo
Amarc Resources Ltd.DirectorApril 1993Present
ChairmanApril 2004Present
Heatherdale Resources Ltd.DirectorNovember 2009August 2020
Northcliff Resources Ltd.DirectorJune 2011Present
Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd.DirectorJune 1994Present
ChairmanApril 2004Present
Quartz Mountain Resources Ltd.DirectorDecember 2011February 2019
Taseko Mines LimitedDirectorJanuary 1991Present
 
 
33
 
 
Diane Nicolson, PhD – President, Chief Executive Officer and Director
 
Diane Nicolson has a B.Sc. degree in geology from the University of London, a PhD in economic geology from the University of Wales and 20 years international experience in the exploration and mining industry. She has worked for both major and junior mining companies, including Rio Tinto, Minera Antamina, Noranda and Cambior. Over the past 10 years, she has been involved primarily with business development and new project assessment and acquisitions, with a particular focus on Latin America where she was based for 13 years.
 
Dr. Nicolson joined Hunter Dickinson in 2007 as a member of the global business development team and is responsible for management, strategic planning and new project development for Amarc Resources Ltd.
 
Dr. Nicolson is, or was within the past five years, an officer of the following public companies:
 
CompanyPositions HeldFromTo
Amarc Resources Ltd.
 
DirectorJune 2017Present
PresidentNovember 2014Present
Chief Executive OfficerFebruary 2019Present
Executive Vice PresidentSeptember 2012November 2014
Mirasol Resources Ltd.DirectorMarch 2019Present
 
Sebastian Tang – Chief Financial Officer
 
Sebastian Tang is Chartered Professional Accountant (CPA CA) with more than 15 years of professional experience in accountancy and financial reporting. He previously held positions with professional services firms Ernst & Young providing financial auditing services to companies in Asia and the Americas.
 
CompanyPositions HeldFromTo
Lucky Minerals Inc.Chief Financial OfficerMay 2019March 2020
Global Hemp GroupChief Financial OfficerMay 2020Present
 
Trevor Thomas, LLB – Secretary
 
Trevor Thomas has practiced in the areas of corporate commercial, corporate finance, securities and mining law since 1995, both in private practice environment as well as in-house positions and is currently in-house legal counsel for Hunter Dickinson Services Inc. Prior to joining Hunter Dickinson Services Inc., he served as in-house legal counsel with Placer Dome Inc.
 
Mr. Thomas is, or was within the past five years, an officer of the following public companies:
 
CompanyPositions HeldFromTo
Amarc Resources Ltd.SecretaryFebruary 2008Present
Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd.SecretaryFebruary 2008Present
Heatherdale Resources Ltd.SecretaryJune 2013August 2020
Mineral Mountain Resources Ltd.DirectorSeptember 2016Present
Northcliff Resources Ltd.SecretaryJune 2011Present
Quadro Resources Ltd.DirectorJuly 2017Present
Quartz Mountain Resources Ltd.SecretaryJune 2013Present
Rathdowney Resources Ltd.SecretaryMarch 2011Present
Taseko Mines LimitedSecretaryJuly 2008Present
 
 
34
 
 
B.            
COMPENSATION
 
During the Company's financial year ended March 31, 2021, the aggregate cash compensation paid or payable by the Company to its directors and senior officers was $197,332.
 
Diane Nicolson, President and Chief Executive Officer, Ronald W. Thiessen, Former Chief Executive Officer, Sebastian Tang, Chief Financial Officer, Michael Lee, Former Chief Financial Officer, and Luqman Khan, Former Chief Financial Officer are each a Named Executive Officer (“NEO”) of the Company for the purposes of the following disclosure. The compensation paid to the NEOs during the Company's most recently completed financial year of March 31, 2021 is as set out below and expressed in Canadian Dollars:
 
Name and principal position
Year
Salary
($)
Share-based awards
($)
Option-based awards
($)
Non-equity incentive plan compensation($)
Pension
value
($)
All other
compensation
($)
Total
Compensation
($)
Annual incentive plans
Long-term incentive plans
Diane Nicolson
       President and Chief Executive Officer, Director (2)
2021$187,332NilNilNilNilNilNil$187,332
2020$195,000NilNilNilNilNilNil$195,000
2019$213,000NilNilNilNilNilNil$213,000
Ronald Thiessen
Chief Executive Officer (1) (2)
2021NilNilNilNilNilNilNilNil
2020NilNilNilNilNilNilNilNil
2019NilNilNilNilNilNilNilNil
Sebastian Tang
Chief Financial Officer (1) (4)
2021$10,000NilNilNilNilNilNil$10,000
2020NilNilNilNilNilNilNilNil
Michael Lee
       Chief
       Financial
       Officer (1)(3)
2021NilNilNilNilNilNilNilNil
2020$22,000NilNilNilNilNilNil$22,000
2019$3,000NilNilNilNilNilNil$3,000
Luqman Khan
       Chief Financial Officer (1) (3)
2021NilNilNilNilNilNilNilNil
2020NilNilNilNilNilNilNilNil
2019$16,000NilNilNilNilNilNil$16,000
Notes:
(1)            
Mr. Thiessen, Mr. Tang, Mr. Lee, and Mr. Khan did not serve the Company on a substantially full-time basis.
(2)            
Mr. Thiessen was replaced as CEO in January 2019 by Dr. Nicolson.
(3) 
Mr. Khan was replaced as CFO in January 2019 by Mr. Lee.
(4)            
Mr. Lee was replaced as CFO in July 2020 by Mr. Tang.
 
Pension Plan Benefits
 
The Company has no pension or deferred compensation plans for its directors, officers or employees.
 
Termination and Change of Control Benefits
 
There are no compensatory plan(s) or arrangement(s), with respect to the Named Executive Officer resulting from the resignation, retirement or any other termination of employment of the officer's employment or from a change of the Named Executive Officer's responsibilities following a change in control.
 
Director Compensation
 
The compensation provided to the directors, excluding a director who is already set out in disclosure for a NEO for the Company's most recently completed financial year of March 31, 2021 is as set out below:
 
 
35
 
 
Name
Fees earned
($)
Share-based awards
($)
Option-based awards
($)
Non-equity incentive plan compensation
($)
Pension value
($)
All other compensation
($)
Total
($)
Barry CoughlanNilNilNilNilNilNilNil
Scott CousensNilNilNilNilNilNilNil
Robert Dickinson (1)NilNilNilNilNilNilNil
 
Notes:
 
(1)
Pursuant to the Corporate Services Agreement with Hunter Dickinson Services Inc., compensation for Mr. Dickinson is allocated to the Company on the basis of estimated time spent in respect of the Company's business.
 
C.            
BOARD PRACTICES
 
All of the Company's directors were elected at the annual general meeting of shareholders held on November 21, 2019. All directors have a term of office expiring at the next annual general meeting of the Company's shareholders. All officers have a term of office lasting until their removal or replacement by the board of directors (the “Board”).
 
There were no arrangements, standard or otherwise, pursuant to which directors were compensated by Amarc or its subsidiaries for their services in their capacity as directors, or for committee participation, involvement in special assignments or for services as consultants or experts during the most recently completed financial year.
 
General
 
The Board believes that good corporate governance improves corporate performance and benefits all shareholders. The Canadian Securities Administrators (the “CSA”) have adopted National Policy 58-201 Corporate Governance Guidelines, which provides non-prescriptive guidelines on corporate governance practices for reporting issuers such as the Company. In addition, the CSA have implemented National Instrument NI 58-101 Disclosure of Corporate Governance Practices, which prescribes certain disclosure by the Company of its corporate governance practices. This section sets out the Company's approach to corporate governance and addresses the Company's compliance with NI 58-101.
 
1. Board of Directors
 
Directors are considered to be independent if they have no direct or indirect material relationship with the Company. A “material relationship” is a relationship which could, in the view of the Company's board of directors, be reasonably expected to interfere with the exercise of a director's independent judgment.
 
The Board facilitates its independent supervision over management in a number of ways including: by holding regular meetings without the presence of management; by retaining independent consultants; and by reviewing corporate developments with larger shareholders, analysts and potential industry joint venture parties, where it deems necessary.
 
Messrs. Coughlan and Cousens are independent. Mr. Dickinson and Dr. Nicolson are not independent. The Company is taking steps to ensure that the duties generally performed by independent directors are being performed by the current directors. The Board members have extensive experience as directors of public companies and are sensitive to the related corporate governance and financial reporting obligations associated with such positions. Thus, the Board members are well versed in the obligations of directors and the expectations of independence from management.
 
2. Other Directorships
 
The section entitled Item 6 – Directors, Senior Management and Employees in this Annual Report gives details of other reporting issuers of which each director is a director or officer.
 
3. Orientation and Continuing Education
 
The Company has traditionally retained experienced mining people as directors and hence the orientation needed is minimized. When new directors are appointed, they are acquainted with the Company's mineral project and the expectations of directors. Board meetings generally include presentations by the Company's senior management and project staff in order to give the directors full insight into the Company's operations.
 
 
36
 
 
4. Ethical Business Conduct
 
The Board has adopted an ethics policy which is available on the Company's website, www.amarcresources.com. The Board also understands that the fiduciary duties placed on individual directors by the Company's governing corporate legislation and the common law and the restrictions placed by applicable corporate legislation on an individual director's participation in decisions of the Board in which the director has an interest have been sufficient to ensure that the Board operates independently of management and in the best interests of the Company.
 
5. Nomination of Directors
 
The Board considers its size each year when it considers the number of directors required, taking into account the number required to carry out the Board's duties effectively and to maintain a diversity of views and experience.
 
The Board does not have a nominating committee, and these functions are currently performed by the Board as a whole. However, if there is a change in the number of directors required by the Company, this policy will be reviewed.
 
6. Compensation
 
The Board determines the compensation for independent directors and executives.
 
7. Other Board Committees
 
The Board has no compensation or other committees, other than the audit committee.
 
8. Assessments
 
The Board monitors the adequacy of information given to directors, communication between the Board and management and the strategic direction and processes of the Board and its audit committee.
 
Audit Committee
 
The Audit Committee's Charter
 
The audit committee has adopted a charter that sets out its mandate and responsibilities. A copy of the audit committee charter is available at the Company's website, www.amarcresources.com.
 
Composition of the Audit Committee
 
As of the date of this document, the members of the audit committee were Scott Cousens, Barry Coughlan and Diane Nicolson. All members are financially literate. Messrs. Cousens and Coughlan are independent.
 
Relevant Education and Experience
 
As a result of their education and experience, each member of the audit committee has familiarity with, an understanding of, or experience in:
 
● 
the accounting principles used by the Company to prepare its financial statements, and the ability to assess the general application of those principles in connection with estimates, accruals and reserves;
 
● 
reviewing or evaluating financial statements that present a breadth and level of complexity of accounting issues that are generally comparable to the breadth and complexity of issues that can reasonably be expected to be raised by the Company's financial statements, and
 
●            
an understanding of internal controls and procedures for financial reporting.
 
 
37
 
 
Audit Committee Oversight
 
The audit committee has not made any recommendations to the Board to nominate or compensate any external auditor that was not adopted by the Board.
 
The Company's auditor De Visser Gray LLP has not provided any material non-audit services during the most recently completed fiscal year.
 
Pre-Approval Policies and Procedures
 
The Company has procedures for the review and pre-approval of any services performed by its auditors. The procedures require that all proposed engagements of its auditors for audit and non-audit services be submitted to the audit committee for approval prior to the beginning of any such services. The audit committee considers such requests, and, if acceptable to a majority of the audit committee members, pre-approves such audit and non-audit services by a resolution authorizing management to engage the Company's auditors for such audit and non-audit services, with set maximum dollar amounts for each itemized service. During such deliberations, the audit committee assesses, among other factors, whether the services requested would be considered “prohibited services” as contemplated by the regulations of the US Securities and Exchange Commission, and whether the services requested and the fees related to such services could impair the independence of the auditors.
 
Exemptions From Certain Canadian Audit Committee Requirements
 
Pursuant to section 6.1 of National Instrument 52-110 – Audit Committees (“NI 52-110”), as adopted by the Canadian Securities Administrators (including the British Columbia and Alberta Securities Commissions which have jurisdiction over the Company, the “CSA”), the Company is exempt from the requirements of Parts 3 and 5 of NI 52-110 for the current year, by virtue of the Company being a “venture issuer” (as defined in NI 52-110).
 
Part 3 of NI 52-110 prescribes certain requirements for the composition of audit committees of non-exempt companies that are reporting issuers under Canadian provincial securities legislation. Part 3 of NI 52-110 requires, among other things that an audit committee be comprised of at three directors, each of whom, is, subject to certain exceptions, independent and financially literate in accordance with the standards set forth in NI 52-110.
 
Part 5 of NI 52-110 requires an annual information form that is filed by a non-exempt reporting issuer under National Instrument 51-102 – Continuous Disclosure Obligations, as adopted the CSA, to include certain disclosure about the issuer's audit committee, including, among other things: the text of the audit committee's charter; the name of each audit committee member and whether or not the member is independent and financially literate; whether a recommendation of the audit committee to nominate or compensate an external auditor was not adopted by the issuer's board of directors, and the reasons for the board's decision; a description of any policies and procedures adopted by the audit committee for the engagement of non-audit services; and disclosure of the fees billed by the issuer's external auditor in each of the last two fiscal years for audit, tax and other services.
 
D.            
EMPLOYEES
 
At March 31, 2021, Amarc had the following employees:
 
 
March 31,2021
March 31,2020
March 31,2019
Full-time salaried
Hourly122
 
Amarc's administrative and exploration functions are primarily administered through Hunter Dickinson Services Inc. (See Item 7 - Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions).
 
 
 
38
 
 
E.            
SHARE OWNERSHIP
 
Security Holdings of Directors and Senior Management
 
As at March 31, 2021, the directors and officers of Amarc, and their respective affiliates, directly and indirectly, own or control as a group an aggregate of 31,037,495 common shares (17.19%), or 44,037,495 (22.75%) on a diluted basis.
 
As at March 31, 2021, the Company's directors and senior management beneficially own the following number of the Company's common shares and share purchase options:
 
Name of Insider
Securities Beneficially Owned or Controlled (1)
As a % of the outstanding common shares
Barry Coughlan (3)
86,000 common shares0.05%
Scott D. Cousens (3)
148,300 common shares0.08%
Robert A. Dickinson (2)
29,955,195 common shares
11,000,000 share purchase warrants
16.59%
Diane Nicolson (3)
718,000 common shares
2,000,000 share purchase options
0.40%
 
Sebastian TangNil common shares0.00%
Trevor Thomas130,000 common shares0.07%
Total
31,037,495 common shares
11,000,000 purchase warrants
2,000,000 share purchase options
17.19%
Notes:
 
(1) 
The information as to the number of Common Shares beneficially owned or controlled is not within the knowledge of management of the Company and has been furnished by the respective nominees as filed on SEDI. Each nominee has held the same or a similar principal occupation with the organization indicated or a predecessor thereof for the last five years.
(2) 
Certain of these common shares are beneficially owned through private companies controlled by Mr. Dickinson, and a Registered Retirement Saving Plan (RRSP) owned by Mr. Dickinson.
(3) 
Member of the audit committee.
 
Share Option Plan
 
As of the date of this document, there were 2,000,000 options outstanding pursuant to the Company's share option plan (the “Plan”), described below, and an aggregate of 16,060,289 common shares remained available for issuance pursuant to the Plan, described below.
 
Share Incentive Plan
 
In order to provide incentive to directors, officers, employees, management and others who provide services to the Company to act in the best interests of the Company, the Company has adopted a Share Incentive Plan (the “Plan”). The Plan is required to comply with the policies of the TSX Venture.
 
In order to increase the Company's flexibility and to bring the Company's share option incentive program in line with the current regulatory regime, the Board approved a new rolling share option plan (the “New Plan”) on August 13, 2010 to replace the plan previously approved and confirmed by the shareholders on September 21, 2004 and September 29, 2009, respectively. The New Plan was approved by shareholders at the Company's annual general meeting (the “Meeting”) held on September 15, 2010. Under TSXV rules the Plan must be approved by the Company’s shareholders annually.
 
Subject to certain restrictions described below, the Plan is based on the maximum number of eligible shares equaling a rolling percentage of up to 10% of the Company's outstanding common shares, calculated from time to time. Pursuant to the Plan, if outstanding options are exercised, or expire, or the number of issued and outstanding common shares of the Company increases, the number of options available to grant under the Plan increases proportionately. At the date of approval of the New Plan, all outstanding options were rolled into and deemed to be granted under the New Plan.
 
The exercise price of each option is set by the board of directors at the time of grant based on the market price on the date preceding the date of grant. Options can have a maximum term of ten years and typically terminate ninety days following the termination of the optionee's employment or engagement, except in the case of retirement or death. Vesting of options is at the discretion of the board of directors at the time the options are granted.
 
 
39
 
 
Eligible Optionees
 
Under the policies of the TSX Venture, to be eligible for the issuance of a stock option under the Plan an optionee must either be a director, officer or employee of the Company or its affiliates, or a consultant or an employee of a company providing management or other services to the Company, or its subsidiaries, at the time the option is granted.
 
Options may be granted only to an individual or to a company that is wholly-owned by individuals eligible for an option grant. If the option is granted to a non-individual, the company must provide the TSX Venture with an undertaking that it will not permit any transfer of its securities, nor issue further securities, to any other individual or entity as long as the incentive stock option remains in effect without the consent of the TSX Venture.
 
Insider Limitations
 
The aggregate number of Common Shares reserved for issuance under options granted to Insiders must not exceed ten percent (10%) of the outstanding shares (in the event that the New Plan is amended to reserve for issuance more than ten percent (10%) of the outstanding shares) unless the Company has obtained Disinterested Shareholder Approval (as defined below) to do so;
 
The number of optioned shares issued to Insiders in any twelve (12) month period must not exceed ten percent (10%) of the outstanding shares (in the event that the New Plan is amended to reserve for issuance more than ten percent (10%) of the outstanding shares) unless the Company has obtained Disinterested Shareholder Approval to do so;
 
The exercise price of an option previously granted to an Insider must not be reduced, unless the Company has obtained Disinterested Shareholder Approval to do so.
 
Other Limitations
 
The Company must not grant an option to a director, employee, consultant, or consultant company (the “Service Provider”) in any twelve (12) month period that exceeds five percent (5%) of the outstanding shares, unless the Company has obtained approval by a majority of the votes cast by the shareholders of the Company eligible to vote at a shareholders' meeting, excluding votes attaching to shares beneficially owned by Insiders and their Associates (defined below) (“Disinterested Shareholder Approval”);
 
The aggregate number of options granted to a Service Provider conducting Investor Relations Activities in any twelve (12) month period must not exceed two percent (2%) of the outstanding shares calculated at the date of the grant, without the prior consent of the TSX Venture;
 
The Company must not grant an option to a Consultant in any twelve (12) month period that exceeds two percent (2%) of the outstanding shares calculated at the date of the grant of the option; and the issuance to any one Optionee within a twelve (12) month period of a number of Common Shares must not exceed five percent (5%) of outstanding Common Shares unless the Company has obtained Disinterested Shareholder Approval to do so.
 
Disinterested Shareholder Approval
 
“Disinterested Shareholder Approval” means the approval by a majority of the votes cast by all shareholders of the Company at the Meeting excluding votes attached to listed shares beneficially owned by insiders of the Company to whom the options have been granted under the existing plan and associates of those insiders.
 
 
40
 
 
ITEM 7 
MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS
 
A.            
MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS
 
Major Shareholders
 
To the best of Amarc's knowledge, other than as noted below, no person, corporation or other entity beneficially owns, directly or indirectly, or controls more than 5% of the common shares of Amarc, the only class of securities with voting rights.
 
Shareholder
Securities Beneficially Owned or Controlled
As a % of the outstanding common shares
Sun Valley Gold Master Fund Ltd14,615,3848.09%
Robert A. Dickinson29,955,19516.59%
 
For these purposes, “beneficial ownership” means the sole or shared power to vote or direct the voting or to dispose or direct the disposition of any security.
 
As of the date of this document, Amarc had authorized unlimited common shares without par value, of which 180,602,894 were issued and outstanding. Amarc's authorized share structure also includes a class of preferred shares without par value and without a maximum number. The preferred shares may be issued in series on such terms as determined by the Company's directors in accordance with the class rights and restrictions. No series of preferred shares has been designated by the board of directors, and no preferred shares are outstanding.
 
All of the common shares have the same voting rights.
 
Geographic Breakdown of Shareholders
 
As of the date of this Annual Report, Amarc's register of shareholders indicates that Amarc's common shares are held as follows:
 
Location
Number of registered shareholders of record
Number of shares
Percentage of total shares
Canada27161,109,12689.21%
United States817,955,3069.94%
Other11,538,4620.85%
TOTALS36180,602,894100.00%
 
Shares registered in intermediaries were assumed to be held by residents of the same country in which the clearing house was located.
 
Amarc's securities are recorded on the books of its transfer agent, Computershare Investor Services Inc., located at 510 Burrard Street, Vancouver, Canada (604) 661-9400 in registered form. However, the majority of such shares are registered in the name of intermediaries such as brokerage houses and clearing houses (on behalf of their respective brokerage clients). Amarc does not have knowledge or access to the identities of the beneficial owners of such shares registered through intermediaries.
 
Control
 
Amarc is not directly or indirectly owned or controlled by any other corporation, by any foreign government or by any other natural or legal person, severally or jointly, other than as noted above under Major Shareholders. There are no arrangements known to Amarc which, at a subsequent date, may result in a change in control of Amarc.
 
 
41
 
 
Insider Reports Under the Securities Acts of British Columbia and Alberta
 
Since the Company is a reporting issuer under the Securities Acts of British Columbia and Alberta, certain “insiders” of the Company (including its directors, certain executive officers, and persons who directly or indirectly beneficially own, control or direct more than 10% of its common shares) are generally required to file insider reports of changes in their ownership of Amarc's common shares five days following the trade under National Instrument 55-104 – Insider Reporting Requirements and Exemptions, as adopted by the CSA. Copies of such reports are available for public inspection at the offices of the British Columbia Securities Commission, 9th Floor, 701 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V7Y 1L2, (604) 899-6500 or at the British Columbia Securities Commission web site, www.bcsc.bc.ca. In British Columbia, all insider reports must be filed electronically five days following the date of the trade at www.sedi.ca. The public is able to access these reports at www.sedi.ca.
 
B.            
RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS
 
Except as disclosed below, or otherwise disclosed in this Annual Report on Form 20-F, Amarc has not, since April 1, 2012, and does not at this time propose to:
 
(1)            
enter into any transactions which are material to Amarc or a related party or any transactions unusual in their nature or conditions involving goods, services or tangible or intangible assets to which Amarc or any of its former subsidiaries was a party;
 
(2)            
make any loans or guarantees for the benefit of any of the following persons:
 
(a)            
enterprises directly or indirectly through one or more intermediaries, controlling or controlled by or under common control with Amarc;
 
(b)            
associates of Amarc (unconsolidated enterprises in which Amarc has significant influence or which has significant influence over Amarc) including shareholders beneficially owning 10% or more of the outstanding shares of Amarc;
 
(c)            
individuals owning, directly or indirectly, shares of Amarc that gives them significant influence over Amarc and close members of such individuals families;
 
(d)            
key management personnel (persons having authority in responsibility for planning, directing and controlling the activities of Amarc including directors and senior management and close members of such directors and senior management); or
 
(e)            
enterprises in which a substantial voting interest is owned, directly or indirectly, by any person described in (c) or (d) or over which such a person is able to exercise significant influence.
 
Hunter Dickinson Services Inc. (“HDSI”)
 
Hunter Dickinson Inc. (“HDI”) and its wholly-owned subsidiary Hunter Dickinson Services Inc. (“HDSI”) are private companies established by a group of mining professionals. HDSI provides contract services for a number of mineral exploration and development companies, and also to companies that are outside of the mining and mineral development space. Amarc is one of the publicly-listed companies for which HDSI provides a variety of contract services.
 
The Company has one director in common with HDSI, namely Robert Dickinson. Also, the Company’s President, Chief Executive Officer and Director, Chief Financial Officer, and Corporate Secretary are employees of HDSI and work for the Company under an employee secondment arrangement between the Company and HDSI.
 
HDSI provides technical, geological, corporate communications, regulatory compliance, and administrative and management services to the Company, on an as-needed and as-requested basis from the Company.
 
HDSI also incurs third party costs on behalf of the Company. Such third party costs include, for example, directors and officers insurance, travel, conferences, and technology services.
 
As a result of this relationship, the Company has ready access to a range of diverse and specialized expertise on a regular basis, without having to engage or hire full-time experts. The Company benefits from the economies of scale created by HDSI which itself serves several clients. The Company is also able to eliminate many of its fixed costs, including rent, technology, and other infrastructure which would otherwise be incurred for maintaining its corporate offices.
 
 
42
 
 
The Company procures services from HDSI pursuant to an agreement dated July 2, 2010. Services from HDSI are provided on a non-exclusive basis as required and as requested by the Company. The Company is not obligated to acquire any minimum amount of services from HDSI. The fees for services from HDSI are determined based on a charge-out rate for each employee performing the service and for the time spent by the employee. Such charge-out rates are agreed and set annually in advance. These time charges consist substantially of salaries, office rent, utilities, office supplies and administration, warehouse space, and insurance.
 
Third party costs are billed at cost, without markup.
 
There are no ongoing contractual or other commitments resulting from the Company's transactions with HDSI, other than the payment for services already rendered and billed. The agreement may be terminated upon 60 days' notice by either the Company or HDSI.
 
The disclosure for the transactions with HDSI has been included in note 11 of the accompanying financial statements of the Company.
 
Director’s Loan
 
In November 2014, the Company announced that it has entered into a $1 million unsecured Loan Agreement (the “Loan”), with a non-arm's length director and officer of the Company (the “Lender”) at an interest rate of prime plus 2% per annum and with a maturity date of November 2015. In connection with the Loan, Amarc issued to the Lender a loan bonus of 2,500,000 previously unissued common shares in its capital with a fair value of $187,500. The Company and the Lender have agreed to two extension terms for the Loan to May 2016 for 7% fixed interest rate and to November 2016 for 9% fixed interest rate, respectively.
 
In December 2016, the Loan was extended for an additional three years on customary terms and conditions, and the principal sum was increased to $1,500,000 by way of an additional advance of $500,000.
 
In September 2017, $500,000 of the Loan was repaid to the Lender, leaving a balance outstanding of $1,000,000.
 
In September 2015, the Company announced that it has entered into an additional $500,000 unsecured Loan Agreement with the Lender at a rate of 7% per annum and with a maturity date of September 2017. Amarc issued a loan bonus in the form of 5,555,555 warrants, each entitling the holder to acquire one common share of Amarc for 2 years at a price of $0.09 per share. In September 2017, this loan was fully repaid.
 
In December 2019, the Company entered into a loan extension and amendment agreement (the “Loan”) with a director and significant shareholder of the Company (the “Lender”), pursuant to which a previous loan agreement with a maturity date of November 26, 2019 was extended for five years or earlier pending the achievement of certain financing milestones. The Loan has a principal sum of $1,000,000, is unsecured and bears interest at a rate of 10% per annum.
 
Pursuant to the Loan, the Company issued to the Lender a loan bonus comprising of 16,000,000 common share purchase warrants (the “Warrants”) with an expiry of five years and an exercise price of $0.05 per share.
 
In July and August 2019, the Company entered into certain loan agreements (collective the “Bridge Loans”) with a director of the Company and a private company wholly-owned by a director of the Company (collectively the “Bridge Lenders”), pursuant to which the Bridge Lenders advanced to the Company an aggregate principal sum of $375,000 with a 1-year term and bearing interest at 10% per annum. The Bridge Loans were fully repaid in September 2019.
 
In December 2019, the Company entered into a loan agreement (the “Second Bridge Loan”) with a director of the Company (the “Second Bridge Lender”), pursuant to which the Second Bridge Lender advanced to the Company a principal sum of $300,000 with a 6-month term and bearing interest at a rate of 10% per annum. In August 2020, the principal and interest balances of the Second Bridge Loan were fully repaid.
 
Refer to note 9 of the accompanying financial statements of Amarc for additional monetary disclosures about the abovementioned loans.
 
 
43
 
 
C.            
INTERESTS OF EXPERTS AND COUNSEL
 
Not applicable.
 
ITEM 8 
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
A.            
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
Item 18 of this Form 20-F contains Amarc's audited annual financial statements as at and for the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019. These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with IFRS, as issued by the IASB.
 
Legal Proceedings
 
Amarc is not involved in any legal, arbitration or governmental proceedings and, to Amarc's knowledge, no material legal, arbitration or governmental proceedings involving Amarc are pending or contemplated against Amarc.
 
Dividend Policy
 
The Company has not paid any dividends on its outstanding common shares since its incorporation and does not anticipate that it will do so in the foreseeable future. All funds of Amarc are being retained for exploration of its projects.
 
B.            
SIGNIFICANT CHANGES
 
There have been no significant changes to Amarc’s affairs as disclosed in the accompanying financial statements, except as disclosed in this Annual Report on Form 20-F.
 
ITEM 9 
THE OFFER AND LISTING
 
A.            
OFFER AND LISTING DETAILS
 
Trading Markets
 
Amarc's common shares have been listed in Canada on the TSX Venture (and its predecessors) since August 1995, under the symbol AHR.
 
The Company's common shares were traded in the U.S. on the OTCBB from June 2004 until August 2014, and have been traded on the OTCQB since August 2014, in each case under the symbol AXREF.
 
The following tables set forth for the periods indicated the price history of the Company's common shares on the TSX Venture and on the OTCQB.
 
 
44
 
 
 
 
TSX Venture Exchange
 
 
OTCBB/OTCQB
 
Fiscal Year Ended March 31,
 
High(Cdn$)
 
 
Low(Cdn$)
 
 
High(US$)
 
 
Low(US$)
 
2021
  0.13 
  0.03 
  0.09 
  0.02 
2020
  0.08 
  0.02 
  0.06 
  0.02 
2019
  0.14 
  0.04 
  0.11 
  0.03 
2018
  0.26 
  0.12 
  0.21 
  0.09 
2017
  0.16 
  0.06 
  0.12 
  0.04 
2016
  0.17 
  0.04 
  0.14 
  0.02 
2015
  0.18 
  0.06 
  0.13 
  0.05 
 
 
 
 
 
TSX Venture Exchange
 
 
OTCQB
 
 
Fiscal Quarter
 
 
High(Cdn$)
 
 
Low(Cdn$)
 
 
High(US$)
 
 
Low(US$)
 
  Q4 2021 
  0.13 
  0.05 
  0.09 
  0.04 
  Q3 2021 
  0.08 
  0.05 
  0.06 
  0.04 
  Q2 2021 
  0.08 
  0.04 
  0.07 
  0.02 
  Q1 2021 
  0.04 
  0.03 
  0.03 
  0.02 
  Q4 2020 
  0.08 
  0.02 
  0.06 
  0.02 
  Q3 2020 
  0.06 
  0.03 
  0.04 
  0.02 
  Q2 2020 
  0.06 
  0.04 
  0.05 
  0.03 
  Q1 2020 
  0.07 
  0.04 
  0.05 
  0.03 
  Q4 2019 
  0.07 
  0.07 
  0.05 
  0.05 
  Q3 2019 
  0.10 
  0.04 
  0.07 
  0.04 
  Q2 2019 
  0.10 
  0.06 
  0.07 
  0.04 
  Q1 2019 
  0.14 
  0.08 
  0.11 
  0.07 
  Q4 2018 
  0.17 
  0.12 
  0.14 
  0.09 
  Q3 2018 
  0.20 
  0.14 
  0.15 
  0.11 
  Q2 2018 
  0.26 
  0.17 
  0.21 
  0.13 
  Q1 2018 
  0.21 
  0.14 
  0.15 
  0.11 
  Q4 2017 
  0.16 
  0.08 
  0.12 
  0.06 
  Q3 2017 
  0.11 
  0.07 
  0.08 
  0.05 
  Q2 2017 
  0.13 
  0.08 
  0.10 
  0.06 
  Q1 2017 
  0.08 
  0.06 
  0.06 
  0.04 
 
 
 
 
TSX Venture Exchange
 
 
OTCQB
 
Month
 
High(Cdn$)
 
 
Low(Cdn$)
 
 
High(US$)
 
 
Low(US$)
 
July 2021 (to the date of this Annual Report)
  0.14 
  0.12 
  0.11 
  0.10 
June 2021
  0.14 
  0.12 
  0.11 
  0.10 
May 2021
  0.18 
  0.12 
  0.15 
  0.09 
April 2021
  0.14 
  0.11 
  0.11 
  0.09 
March 2021
  0.13 
  0.06 
  0.09 
  0.05 
February 2021
  0.07 
  0.06 
  0.06 
  0.05 
January 2021
  0.08 
  0.05 
  0.06 
  0.04 
 
 
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B.            
PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION
 
Not applicable.
 
C.            
MARKETS
 
The shares of Amarc traded in Canada on the TSX Venture (formerly the Canadian Venture Exchange and successor to the Vancouver Stock Exchange) since August 1995 under the trading symbol AHR. Amarc's shares were traded on the OTCBB from June 2004 until August 2014, and have been traded on the OTCQB since August 2014, in each case under the symbol AXREF.
 
D.            
SELLING SHAREHOLDERS
 
Not applicable.
 
E.            
DILUTION
 
Not applicable.
 
F.            
EXPENSES OF THE ISSUE
 
Not applicable.
 
 
46
 
 
ITEM 10 
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
A.            
SHARE CAPITAL
 
Not applicable.
 
B.            
MEMORANDUM AND ARTICLES OF ASSOCIATION
 
Amarc's original corporate constituting documents comprised of the Memorandum and Articles of Association were registered with the British Columbia Registrar of Companies under Corporation No. 436691. A copy of the Company's original Articles of Association was filed as an exhibit with Amarc's initial registration statement on Form 20-F.
 
In March 2004, the Company Act (British Columbia) (the “BCCA”) was replaced by the Business Corporations Act (British Columbia) (the “BCA”). All companies incorporated under the BCCA were required to complete a transition application to the BCA by March 29, 2006. The directors of the Company authorized the Company to file a transition application with the Registrar of Companies and to comply with the BCA.
 
The Company subsequently filed a Notice of Articles with the Registrar of Companies on October 2, 2004. The Notice of Articles and the Articles constitute the constating documents of the Company, and have superseded the Memorandum and Articles of Association. The Articles of a company, among other things, set out rules for the conduct of its business and affairs; they are no longer required to be filed with the Registrar of Companies, but are required to be kept as part of the company's corporate records.
 
On October 22, 2004, the Company filed a Notice of Alteration with the Registrar of Companies to remove the former limitation on its authorized share capital of 100,000,000 common shares without par value. As a result, the Company's authorized share capital now consists of an unlimited number of common shares without par value. The Registrar of Companies issued a Notice of Articles dated October 22, 2004 to reflect this change.
 
Under the BCA, every “pre-existing company' remained subject to certain “Pre-existing Company Provisions” contained in the BCCA unless such provisions were removed with the approval of the shareholders. In order to take full advantage of the flexibility offered by the BCA, the shareholders adopted a special resolution on October 12, 2005 authorizing the removal of the Pre-existing Company Provisions and the adoption by the Company of a new form of Articles that incorporates provisions permitted under the BCA. On January 31, 2006, the Company filed a Notice of Alteration with the Registrar of Companies to remove the Pre-Existing Company Provisions, and the Registrar of Companies issued a Notice of Articles to reflect this change.
 
As discussed in more detail below, on August 17, 2007, the Company filed a Notice of Alteration with the Registrar of Companies to create a new class of Preferred Shares, and the Registrar of Companies issued a Notice of Articles to reflect this change.
 
Effective September 19, 2013 the Company’s Articles were amended to include advance notice provisions relating to the nomination and the election of directors of the Company.
 
Set out below is a discussion of the principal changes effected by the adoption of the new Articles by the Company under the BCA, which took effect on January 31, 2006.
 
Borrowing Powers
 
Under the original Articles of Association, the Company could borrow money, issue bonds, debentures and other debt obligations and mortgage, charge, or give security on the undertaking, or on the whole or any part of the property and assets, of the Company (both present and future). Under the BCA, companies are also permitted, without restriction (other than general corporate governance principles), to guarantee repayment of money by any other person or the performance of any obligation of any other person. This change reflected the modernization of corporate legislation to effectively respond to increasingly complex financial transactions that companies may enter into in the course of their business. As a result, the Company's Articles now provide that the Company may guarantee the repayment of money by any other person or the performance of any obligation of any other person.
 
 
47
 
 
Share Certificates
 
Under the original Articles of Association, a shareholder was entitled to a share certificate representing the number of shares of the Company held. Under the BCA, a shareholder is entitled to a share certificate representing the number of shares of the Company held or a written acknowledgement of the shareholder's right to obtain such a share certificate. As a result, the Articles now provide for this additional right. The addition of the ability to issue a written acknowledgement is very useful for public companies such as the Company, since it permits flexibility in corporate and securities transmissions.
 
On September 15, 2010, the shareholders of the Company approved an amendment to the Articles that enabled the Company to use uncertificated electronic shares and to use an electronic record keeping system.
 
Indemnity Provisions
 
Under the BCCA, the Company could only indemnify directors where it obtained prior court approval, except in certain limited circumstances. The original Articles of Association provided for the Company to indemnify directors, subject to the provisions of the BCCA. Under the BCA, the Company is permitted (and is, in some circumstances, required) to indemnify a past or present director or officer of the Company or an associated corporation without obtaining prior court approval in respect of an “eligible proceeding”. An “eligible proceeding” includes any legal proceeding relating to the activities of the individual as a director or officer of the Company. However, under the BCA, the Company is prohibited from paying an indemnity if:
 
(a)            
the party did not act honestly and in good faith with a view to the best interests of the Company;
 
(b)            
the proceeding was not a civil proceeding and the party did not have reasonable grounds for believing that his or her conduct was lawful; and
   
(c)            
the proceeding is brought against the party by the Company or an associated corporation.
 
As a result, the Articles require the Company to indemnify directors, officers and other persons, subject to the limits imposed under the BCA.
 
Alternate Directors
 
The original Articles of Association permitted a director to appoint another director as his alternate. The Company's Articles now permit a director to appoint anyone as his alternate, as long as that person is qualified to act as a director.
 
Amendment of Articles and Notice of Articles
 
The Articles provide that the general authority required to amend all provisions of the Company's Articles and the Notice of Articles, other than as set out in the BCA as specifically requiring a special resolution, can be effected as an ordinary or by directors' resolution. The Company's Articles provide that the Company may amend provisions of the Articles and Notice of Articles relating to certain aspects of its Shares and authorized share structure by ordinary resolution. A share consolidation or a share split and name change of the Company can only be done by a resolution of the directors. The default provision under the BCA is a special resolution where the Articles are silent as to the type of resolution required.
 
The Articles also provide that the attachment, variation and deletion of special rights and restrictions to any class of shares may be authorized by ordinary resolution. If the amendment prejudices or interferes with the rights or special rights attached to any class of issued shares, by the provisions of the BCA, the consent of the holders of that class of shares by a “special separate resolution” is required.
 
All special resolutions of the Company must be adopted by a majority of two-thirds of votes cast; the Company's original Article of Association required special resolutions to be adopted by a majority of three-quarters of the votes cast.
 
Shareholders' Meetings
 
In addition to reflecting the present notice and other provisions of the BCA relating to shareholders' meetings, the Articles provide that shareholders' meetings may be held at such place as is determined by the directors.
 
 
48
 
 
The Articles permit the giving of notice to shareholders, directors and officers by fax or e-mail in addition to regular mail or personal delivery.
 
Officers
 
Under the original Articles of Association, the Company was required to have at least a President and Secretary as officers, and separate individuals were required to hold those positions. In addition, the Chairman and President were required to be directors. However, under the BCA, those requirements no longer exist, and as a result, the Articles do not provide for such restrictions.
 
Disclosure of Interest of Directors
 
The Articles refer to the provisions of the BCA relating to the disclosure of interest by directors, which superseded more the cumbersome and outdated provisions contained under the BCCA.
 
Creation of Preferred Shares
 
Under the original Articles of Association, the creation of a new class of shares required the approval of the shareholders of the Company by a special resolution adopted by a majority of three-quarters of votes cast. In contrast, the Articles now provide that the creation of a new class of shares requires the approval of the shareholders of the Company by an ordinary resolution.
 
On September 26, 2006, the shareholders adopted an ordinary resolution authorizing the creation of a new class of Preferred Shares without par value and without a maximum authorized number, issuable in series, on such terms as may be determined by the Company's directors for each such series. On August 17, 2007, the Company filed a Notice of Alteration with the Registrar of Companies to create the new class of Preferred Shares, and the Registrar of Companies issued a Notice of Articles to reflect this change.
 
As a result, the authorized share structure of the Company now includes, in addition to a class of common shares without par value and without a maximum number, a class of Preferred Shares without par value and without a maximum number. The Preferred Shares may be issued in series on such terms as determined by the Company's directors in accordance with the class rights and restrictions.
 
The special rights and restrictions attaching to the Preferred Shares are set forth in Article 26 of the Articles, and effectively provide the directors with wide latitude to create a series of Preferred Shares which may be convertible into Common Shares, and have attached to them rights that rank ahead of Common Shares in respect of entitlement to assets and dividends.
 
C.            
MATERIAL CONTRACTS
 
Amarc's only material contract as of the date of this Annual Report is:
 
Corporate Services Agreement between Amarc and Hunter Dickinson Services Inc. dated July 2, 2010. See Item 7.B and Exhibit 4.1.
 
Other agreements are in the normal course of business.
 
D.            
EXCHANGE CONTROLS
 
Amarc is incorporated pursuant to the laws of the Province of British Columbia, Canada. There is no law or governmental decree or regulation in Canada that restricts the export or import of capital, or affects the remittance of dividends, interest or other payments to a non-resident holder of Common Shares, other than withholding tax requirements. Any such remittances to United States residents are generally subject to withholding tax, however no such remittances are likely in the foreseeable future. See “Taxation”, below.
 
There is no limitation imposed by Canadian law or by the charter or other constituent documents of the Company on the right of a non-resident to hold or vote Common Shares of the Company. However, the Investment Canada Act (Canada) (the “Investment Act”) has rules regarding certain acquisitions of shares by non-Canadians, along with other requirements under that legislation.
 
The following discussion summarizes the principal features of the Investment Act for a non-Canadian who proposes to acquire Common Shares of the Company. The discussion is general only; it is not a substitute for independent legal advice from an investor's own adviser; and, except where expressly noted, it does not anticipate statutory or regulatory amendments.
 
 
49
 
 
The Investment Act is a federal statute of broad application regulating the establishment and acquisition of Canadian businesses by non-Canadians, including individuals, governments or agencies thereof, corporations, partnerships, trusts and joint ventures. Investments by non-Canadians to acquire control over existing Canadian businesses or to establish new ones are either reviewable or notifiable under the Investment Act. If an investment by a non-Canadian to acquire control over an existing Canadian business is reviewable under the Investment Act, the Investment Act generally prohibits implementation of the investment unless, after review, the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development (the “Minister”) (or the Minister of Canadian Heritage for investments in a Canadian business engaged in any of the activities of a “cultural business”), is satisfied that the investment is likely to be of net benefit to Canada.
 
A non-Canadian would acquire control of the Company for the purposes of the Investment Act through the acquisition of Common Shares if the non-Canadian acquired a majority of the Common Shares of the Company.
 
Further, the acquisition of less than a majority but one-third or more of the Common Shares of the Company would be presumed to be an acquisition of control of the Company unless it could be established that, on the acquisition, the Company was not controlled in fact by the acquirer through the ownership of Common Shares.
 
To determine whether an investment is reviewable under the Investment Act it is necessary to consider certain matters, including whether the investor is a state-owned enterprise; whether the investor is a “WTO investor” (i.e., controlled by persons who are citizens of countries that are members of the World Trade Organization (“WTO”)), and, if so, whether the WTO investor is party to certain free trade agreements; the enterprise value of the assets of the Canadian business being acquired; and whether the Canadian business being acquired is a cultural business.
 
An acquisition of control of a Canadian business by a non-Canadian that falls below the thresholds for review under the Investment Act does not require the filing of an application for review. However, even where an investment falls below the thresholds, it must still be notified by way of a short form to the Investment Review Division of the Department of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada (or the Department of Canadian Heritage for cultural cases). Notifications may be submitted by the investor any time before or up to 30 days after implementation of the investment.
 
In 2009, amendments were enacted to the Investment Act concerning investments that may be considered injurious to national security. If the Minister has reasonable grounds to believe that an investment by a non-Canadian “could be injurious to national security,” the Minister may send the non-Canadian a notice indicating that an order for review of the investment may be made. The review of an investment on the grounds of national security may occur whether or not an investment is otherwise subject to review on the basis of net benefit to Canada or otherwise subject to notification under the Investment Canada Act.
 
Certain transactions, except those to which the national security provisions of the Investment Act may apply, relating to Common Shares of the Company are exempt from the Investment Act, including
 
(a)            
acquisition of Common Shares of the Company by a person in the ordinary course of that person's business as a trader or dealer in securities,
 
(b)            
acquisition of control of the Company in connection with the realization of security granted for a loan or other financial assistance and not for a purpose related to the provisions of the Investment Act, if the investment is subject to approval under certain other legislation, and
 
(c)            
acquisition of control of the Company by reason of an amalgamation, merger, consolidation or corporate reorganization following which the ultimate direct or indirect control in fact of the Company, through the ownership of Common Shares, remained unchanged.
 
E.            
TAXATION
 
Certain Canadian Federal Income Tax Information for United States Residents
 
The following summarizes the principal Canadian federal income tax considerations generally applicable to the holding and disposition of common shares of the Company by a holder (a) who, for the purposes of the Income Tax Act (Canada) the (“Tax Act”) and at all relevant times, is not resident in Canada or deemed to be resident in Canada, deals at arm's length and is not affiliated with the Company, holds the common shares as capital property and does not use or hold the common shares in the course of carrying on, or otherwise in connection with, a business in Canada, and (b) who, for the purposes of the Canada-United States Income Tax Convention (the “Treaty”) and at all relevant times, is a resident of the United States, has never been a resident of Canada, has not held or used (and does not hold or use) common shares in connection with a permanent establishment or fixed base in Canada, and who qualifies for the full benefits of the Treaty. The Canada Revenue Agency has introduced special forms to be used in order to substantiate eligibility for Treaty benefits, and affected holders should consult with their own advisers with respect to these forms and all relevant compliance matters.
 
 
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Holders who meet all such criteria in clauses (a) and (b) above are referred to herein as a “U.S. Holder” or “U.S. Holders”, and this summary only addresses such U.S. Holders. The summary does not deal with special situations, such as particular circumstances of traders or dealers, limited liability companies, tax-exempt entities, insurers, financial institutions (including those to which the mark-to-market provisions of the Tax Act apply), entities considered fiscally transparent under applicable law, or otherwise.
 
This summary is based on the current provisions of the Tax Act and the regulations thereunder, all proposed amendments to the Tax Act and regulations publicly announced by the Minister of Finance (Canada) to the date hereof, the current provisions of the Treaty and our understanding of the current administrative practices of the Canada Revenue Agency. It has been assumed that all currently proposed amendments to the Tax Act and regulations will be enacted as proposed and that there will be no other relevant change in any governing law, the Treaty or administrative policy, although no assurance can be given in these respects. This summary does not take into account provincial, U.S. or other foreign income tax considerations, which may differ significantly from those discussed herein.
 
This summary is not exhaustive of all possible Canadian income tax consequences. It is not intended as legal or tax advice to any particular U.S. Holder and should not be so construed. The tax consequences to a U.S. Holder will depend on that U.S. Holder's particular circumstances. Accordingly, all U.S. Holders or prospective U.S. Holders should consult their own tax advisers with respect to the tax consequences applicable to them having regard to their own particular circumstances. The discussion below is qualified accordingly.
 
Dividend
 
Dividends paid or deemed to be paid or credited by the Company to a U.S. Holder are subject to Canadian withholding tax. Under the Treaty, the rate of withholding tax on dividends paid to a U.S. Holder is generally limited to 15% of the gross dividend (or 5% in the case of a U.S. Holder that is a corporate shareholder owning at least 10% of the Company's voting shares), provided the U.S. Holder can establish entitlement to the benefits of the Treaty.
 
Disposition
 
A U.S. Holder is generally not subject to tax under the Tax Act in respect of a capital gain realized on the disposition of a common share in the open market, unless the share is “taxable Canadian property” to the holder thereof and the U.S. Holder is not entitled to relief under the Treaty.
 
Provided that the Company's common shares are listed on a “designated stock exchange” for purposes of the Tax Act (which currently includes the TSX Venture) at the time of disposition, a common share will generally not constitute taxable Canadian property to a U.S. Holder unless, at any time during the 60 month period ending at the time of disposition, (i) the U.S. Holder, persons with whom the U.S. Holder did not deal at arm's length for purposes of the Tax Act, partnerships in which the U.S. Holder or such persons holds a membership interest directly or indirectly, (or the U.S. Holder together with any such foregoing persons) or partnerships, owned 25% or more of the issued shares of any class or series of the Company AND (ii) more than 50% of the fair market value of the share was derived directly or indirectly from certain types of assets, including real or immoveable property situated in Canada, Canadian resource properties or timber resource properties, and options, interests or rights in respect of any of the foregoing. Common shares may also be deemed to be taxable Canadian property under the Tax Act in certain specific circumstances. A U.S. Holder holding Common shares as taxable Canadian property should consult with the U.S. Holder's own tax advisers in advance of any disposition of Common shares or deemed disposition under the Tax Act in order to determine whether any relief from tax under the Tax Act may be available by virtue of the Treaty, and any related compliance procedures.
 
 
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Certain United States Federal Income Tax Considerations
 
The following is a general summary of certain material U.S. federal income tax considerations applicable to a U.S. Holder (as defined below) arising from the acquisition, ownership and disposition of our common shares.
 
This summary is for general information purposes only and does not purport to be a complete analysis or listing of all potential U.S. federal income tax considerations that may apply to a U.S. Holder as a result of the acquisition, ownership and disposition of our common stock. In addition, this summary does not take into account the individual facts and circumstances of any particular U.S. Holder that may affect the U.S. federal income tax consequences to such U.S. Holder, including specific tax consequences to a U.S. Holder under an applicable tax treaty. Accordingly, this summary is not intended to be, and should not be construed as, legal or U.S. federal income tax advice with respect to any particular U.S. Holder. In addition, this summary does not address the U.S. federal alternative minimum, U.S. federal estate and gift, U.S. Medicare contribution, U.S. state and local, or non-U.S. tax consequences of the acquisition, ownership or disposition of our common stock. Except as specifically set forth below, this summary does not discuss applicable tax reporting requirements. Each U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding all U.S. federal, U.S. state and local and non-U.S. tax consequences of the acquisition, ownership and disposition of our common stock.
 
No opinion from U.S. legal counsel or ruling from the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) has been requested, or will be obtained, regarding the U.S. federal income tax consequences of the acquisition, ownership or disposition of our common shares. This summary is not binding on the IRS, and the IRS is not precluded from taking a position that is different from, or contrary to, any position taken in this summary. In addition, because the authorities upon whom this summary is based are subject to various interpretations, the IRS and the U.S. courts could disagree with one or more of the positions taken in this summary.
 
Scope of this Summary
 
Authorities
 
This summary is based on the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), Treasury Regulations (whether final, temporary, or proposed), published rulings of the IRS, published administrative positions of the IRS, the Convention Between Canada and the United States of America with Respect to Taxes on Income and on Capital, signed September 26, 1980, as amended (the “Canada-U.S. Tax Convention”), and U.S. court decisions that are applicable and, in each case, as in effect and available, as of the date hereof. Any of the authorities on which this summary is based could be changed in a material and adverse manner at any time, and any such change could be applied on a retroactive or prospective basis, which could affect the U.S. federal income tax considerations described in this summary. This summary does not discuss the potential effects, whether adverse or beneficial, of any proposed legislation that, if enacted, could be applied on a retroactive or prospective basis.
 
U.S. Holders
 
For purposes of this summary, the term “U.S. Holder” means a beneficial owner of common shares that is for U.S. federal income tax purposes:
 
an individual who is a citizen or resident of the U.S.;
 
a corporation (or other entity taxable as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes) organized under the laws of the U.S., any state thereof or the District of Columbia;
 
an estate whose income is subject to U.S. federal income taxation regardless of its source; or
 
a trust that (1) is subject to the primary supervision of a court within the U.S. and the control of one or more U.S. persons for all substantial decisions or (2) has a valid election in effect under applicable Treasury Regulations to be treated as a U.S. person.
 
Non-U.S. Holders
 
For purposes of this summary, a “non-U.S. Holder” is a beneficial owner of common shares that is not a U.S. Holder. This summary does not address the U.S. federal income tax consequences to non-U.S. Holders arising from and relating to the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares. Accordingly, a non-U.S. Holder should consult its own tax adviser regarding the U.S. federal, U.S. federal alternative minimum, U.S. federal estate and gift, U.S. state and local, and foreign tax consequences (including the potential application of and operation of any income tax treaties) relating to the acquisition, ownership, and disposition of common shares.
 
 
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U.S. Holders Subject to Special U.S. Federal Income Tax Rules Not Addressed
 
This summary does not address the U.S. federal income tax considerations of the acquisition, ownership or disposition of our common shares by U.S. Holders that are subject to special provisions under the Code, including, but not limited to, the following: (a) tax-exempt organizations, qualified retirement plans, individual retirement accounts, or other tax-deferred accounts; (b) financial institutions, underwriters, insurance companies, real estate investment trusts, or regulated investment companies; (c) broker-dealers, dealers, or traders in securities or currencies that elect to apply a “mark-to-market” accounting method; (d) U.S. Holders that have a “functional currency” other than the U.S. dollar; (e) U.S. Holders that own our common shares as part of a straddle, hedging transaction, conversion transaction, constructive sale, or other arrangement involving more than one position; (f) U.S. Holders that acquire our common shares in connection with the exercise of employee stock options or otherwise as compensation for services; (g) U.S. Holders that hold our common shares other than as a capital asset within the meaning of Section 1221 of the Code (generally, property held for investment purposes); (h) are required to accelerate the recognition of any item of gross income with respect to Common Shares as a result of such income being recognized on an applicable financial statement; and (i) U.S. Holders that own directly, indirectly, or by attribution, 10% or more, by voting power, of the outstanding stock of the Company. This summary also does not address the U.S. federal income tax considerations applicable to U.S. Holders who are: (a) U.S. expatriates or former long-term residents of the U.S.; (b) persons that have been, are, or will be a resident or deemed to be a resident in Canada for purposes of the Income Tax Act (Canada); (c) persons that use or hold, will use or hold, or that are or will be deemed to use or hold our common shares in connection with carrying on a business in Canada; (d) persons whose common shares in our Company constitutes “taxable Canadian property” under the Income Tax Act (Canada); or (e) persons that have a permanent establishment in Canada for purposes of the Canada-U.S. Tax Convention. U.S. Holders that are subject to special provisions under the Code, including U.S. Holders described immediately above, should consult their own tax advisors regarding all U.S. federal, U.S. state and local, and non-U.S. tax consequences (including the potential application and operation of any income tax treaties) relating to the acquisition, ownership or disposition of our common shares.
 
If an entity or arrangement that is classified as a partnership (or other “pass-through” entity) for U.S. federal income tax purposes holds our common shares, the U.S. federal income tax consequences to such partnership and the partners (or other owners) of such partnership of the acquisition, ownership or disposition of our common shares generally will depend on the activities of the partnership and the status of such partners (or other owners). This summary does not address the U.S. federal income tax considerations for any such partner or partnership (or other “pass-through” entity or its owners). Owners of entities and arrangements that are classified as partnerships (or other “pass-through” entities) for U.S. federal income tax purposes should consult their own tax advisors regarding the U.S. federal income tax consequences of the acquisition, ownership or disposition of our common shares.
 
Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules
 
If the Company were to constitute a “passive foreign investment company” under the meaning of Section 1297 of the Code (a “PFIC”, as defined below) for any year during a U.S. Holder's holding period, then certain potentially adverse rules will affect the U.S. federal income tax consequences to a U.S. Holder resulting from the acquisition, ownership and disposition of common shares. The Company believes that it was classified as a PFIC during the tax year ended March 31, 2018, and may be a PFIC in future tax years. The determination of whether any corporation was, or will be, a PFIC for a tax year depends, in part, on the application of complex U.S. federal income tax rules, which are subject to differing interpretations. In addition, whether any corporation will be a PFIC for any tax year depends on the assets and income of such corporation over the course of each such tax year and, as a result, cannot be predicted with certainty as of the date of this document. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that the IRS will not challenge any determination made by the Company (or any subsidiary of the Company) concerning its PFIC status. Each U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the PFIC status of the Company and any subsidiary of the Company.
 
In addition, in any year in which the Company is classified as a PFIC, such holder would be required to file an annual report with the IRS containing such information as Treasury Regulations and/or other IRS guidance may require. In addition to penalties, a failure to satisfy such reporting requirements may result in an extension of the time period during which the IRS can assess a tax. U.S. Holders should consult their own tax advisors regarding the requirements of filing such information returns under these rules, including the requirement to file an IRS Form 8621.
 
 
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PFIC Status of the Company
 
The Company generally will be a PFIC if, for a tax year, (a) 75% or more of the gross income of the Company is passive income (the “income test”) or (b) 50% or more of the value of the Company's assets either produce passive income or are held for the production of passive income, based on the quarterly average of the fair market value of such assets (the “asset test”). “Gross income” generally includes all sales revenues less the cost of goods sold, plus income from investments and from incidental or outside operations or sources, and “passive income” generally includes, for example, dividends, interest, certain rents and royalties, certain gains from the sale of stock and securities, and certain gains from commodities transactions.
 
Active business gains arising from the sale of commodities generally are excluded from passive income if substantially all of a foreign corporation's commodities are stock in trade or inventory, depreciable property used in a trade or business, or supplies regularly used or consumed in a trade or business and certain other requirements are satisfied.
 
For purposes of the PFIC income test and asset test described above, if the Company owns, directly or indirectly, 25% or more of the total value of the outstanding shares of another corporation, the Company will be treated as if it (a) held a proportionate share of the assets of such other corporation and (b) received directly a proportionate share of the income of such other corporation. In addition, for purposes of the PFIC income test and asset test described above, and assuming certain other requirements are met, “passive income” does not include certain interest, dividends, rents, or royalties that are received or accrued by the Company from certain “related persons” (as defined in Section 954(d)(3) of the Code), to the extent such items are properly allocable to the income of such related person that is not passive income.
 
Under certain attribution rules, if the Company is a PFIC, U.S. Holders will generally be deemed to own their proportionate share of the Company's direct or indirect equity interest in any company that is also a PFIC (a ''Subsidiary PFIC''), and will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on their proportionate share of (a) any “excess distributions,” as described below, on the stock of a Subsidiary PFIC and (b) a disposition or deemed disposition of the stock of a Subsidiary PFIC by the Company or another Subsidiary PFIC, both as if such U.S. Holders directly held the shares of such Subsidiary PFIC. In addition, U.S. Holders may be subject to U.S. federal income tax on any indirect gain realized on the stock of a Subsidiary PFIC on the sale or disposition of common shares. Accordingly, U.S. Holders should be aware that they could be subject to tax even if no distributions are received and no redemptions or other dispositions of common shares are made.
 
Tax Consequences if the Company is a PFIC
 
If the Company is a PFIC for any tax year during which a U.S. Holder owns our common shares, special rules may increase such U.S. Holder’s U.S. federal income tax liability with respect to the ownership and disposition of such common shares. If the Company meets the income test or the asset test for any tax year during which a U.S. Holder owns our common shares, the Company will be treated as a PFIC with respect to such U.S. Holder for that tax year and for all subsequent tax years, regardless of whether the Company meets the income test or the asset test for such subsequent tax years, unless the U.S. Holder elects to recognize any unrealized gain in such common shares or makes a timely and effective QEF Election or, if applicable, Mark-to-Market Election.
 
Under the default PFIC rules:
 
any gain realized on the sale or other disposition (including dispositions and certain other events that would not otherwise be treated as taxable events) of our common shares (including an indirect disposition of the stock of any Subsidiary PFIC) and any “excess distribution” (defined as a distribution to the extent it, together with all other distributions received in the relevant tax year, exceeds 125% of the average annual distribution received during the preceding three years) received on our common shares or with respect to the stock of a Subsidiary PFIC will be allocated rateably to each day of such U.S. Holder’s holding period for our common shares; 
 
the amount allocated to the current tax year and any year prior to the first year in which the Company was a PFIC will be taxed as ordinary income in the current year; 
 
the amount allocated to each of the other tax years (the “Prior PFIC Years”) will be subject to tax at the highest ordinary income tax rate in effect for the applicable class of taxpayer for that year; 
 
an interest charge will be imposed with respect to the resulting tax attributable to each Prior PFIC Year, which interest charge is not deductible by non-corporate U.S. Holders; and 
 
any loss realized on the disposition of our common shares generally will not be recognized.
 
 
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A U.S. Holder that makes a timely and effective “mark-to-market” election under Section 1296 of the Code (a “Mark-to-Market Election”) or a timely and effective election to treat the Company and each Subsidiary PFIC as a “qualified electing fund” (a “QEF”) under Section 1295 of the Code (a “QEF Election”) may generally mitigate or avoid the PFIC consequences described above with respect to our common shares.
 
If a U.S. Holder makes a timely and effective QEF Election, the U.S. Holder must include currently in gross income each year its pro rata share of the Company’s ordinary income and net capital gains, regardless of whether such income and gains are actually distributed. Thus, a U.S. Holder could have a tax liability with respect to such ordinary income or gains without a corresponding receipt of cash from the Company. If the Company is a QEF with respect to a U.S. Holder, the U.S. Holder’s basis in our common shares will be increased to reflect the amount of the taxed but undistributed income. Distributions of income that had previously been taxed will result in a corresponding reduction of basis in our common shares and will not be taxed again as a distribution to a U.S. Holder. Taxable gains on the disposition of our common shares by a U.S. Holder that has made a timely and effective QEF Election are generally capital gains. A U.S. Holder must make a QEF Election for the Company and each Subsidiary PFIC if it wishes to have this treatment. To make a QEF Election, a U.S. Holder will need to have an annual information statement from the Company setting forth the ordinary income and net capital gains for the year. U.S. Holders should be aware that there can be no assurance that the Company will satisfy the recordkeeping requirements that apply to a QEF or that the Company will supply U.S. Holders with information such U.S. Holders require to report under the QEF rules in the event that the Company is a PFIC for any tax year.
 
In general, a U.S. Holder must make a QEF Election on or before the due date for filing its income tax return for the first year to which the QEF Election applies. Under applicable Treasury Regulations, a U.S. Holder will be permitted to make retroactive elections in particular circumstances, including if it had a reasonable belief that the Company was not a PFIC and filed a protective election. If a U.S. Holder owns PFIC stock indirectly through another PFIC, separate QEF Elections must be made for the PFIC in which the U.S. Holder is a direct shareholder and the Subsidiary PFIC for the QEF rules to apply to both PFICs. Each U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the availability and desirability of, and procedure for, making a timely and effective QEF Election for the Company and any Subsidiary PFIC.
 
A Mark-to-Market Election may be made with respect to stock in a PFIC if such stock is “regularly traded” on a “qualified exchange or other market” (within the meaning of the Code and the applicable Treasury Regulations). A class of stock that is traded on one or more qualified exchanges or other markets is considered to be “regularly traded” for any calendar year during which such class of stock is traded in other than de minimus quantities on at least 15 days during each calendar quarter. If our common shares are considered to be “regularly traded” within this meaning, then a U.S. Holder generally will be eligible to make a Mark-to-Market Election with respect to our common shares but not with respect to a Subsidiary PFIC.
 
A U.S. Holder that makes a timely and effective Mark-to-Market Election with respect to our common stock generally will be required to recognize as ordinary income in each tax year in which the Company is a PFIC an amount equal to the excess, if any, of the fair market value of such stock as of the close of such taxable year over the U.S. Holder’s adjusted tax basis in such stock as of the close of such taxable year. A U.S. Holder’s adjusted tax basis in our common shares generally will be increased by the amount of ordinary income recognized with respect to such stock. If the U.S. Holder’s adjusted tax basis in our common shares as of the close of a tax year exceeds the fair market value of such stock as of the close of such taxable year, the U.S. Holder generally will recognize an ordinary loss, but only to the extent of net mark-to-market income recognized with respect to such stock for all prior taxable years. A U.S. Holder’s adjusted tax basis in our common shares generally will be decreased by the amount of ordinary loss recognized with respect to such stock. Any gain recognized upon a disposition of our common shares generally will be treated as ordinary income, and any loss recognized upon a disposition generally will be treated as ordinary loss to the extent of the net mark-to-market income recognized for all prior taxable years. Any loss recognized in excess thereof will be taxed as a capital loss. Capital losses are subject to significant limitations under the Code. Each U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the availability and desirability of, and procedure for, making a timely and effective Mark-to-Market Election with respect to our common shares.
 
Foreign Tax Credit
 
A U.S. Holder that pays (whether directly or through withholding) Canadian income tax in connection with the ownership or disposition of our common shares may be entitled, at the election of such U.S. Holder, to receive either a deduction or a credit for such Canadian income tax paid. Generally, a credit will reduce a U.S. Holder’s U.S. federal income tax liability on a dollar-for-dollar basis, whereas a deduction will reduce a U.S. Holder’s income subject to U.S. federal income tax. This election is made on a year-by-year basis and applies to all creditable foreign taxes paid (whether directly or through withholding) by a U.S. Holder during a year.
 
 
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Complex limitations apply to the foreign tax credit, including the general limitation that the credit cannot exceed the proportionate share of a U.S. Holder’s U.S. federal income tax liability that such U.S. Holder’s “foreign source” taxable income bears to such U.S. Holder’s worldwide taxable income. In applying this limitation, a U.S. Holder’s various items of income and deduction must be classified, under complex rules, as either “foreign source” or “U.S. source.” Generally, dividends paid by a non-U.S. corporation should be treated as foreign source for this purpose, and gains recognized on the sale of securities of a non-U.S. corporation by a U.S. Holder should be treated as U.S. source for this purpose, except as otherwise provided in an applicable income tax treaty, and if an election is properly made under the Code. However, the amount of a distribution with respect to our common shares that is treated as a “dividend” may be lower for U.S. federal income tax purposes than it is for Canadian federal income tax purposes, resulting in a reduced foreign tax credit allowance to a U.S. Holder. In addition, this limitation is calculated separately with respect to specific categories of income. The foreign tax credit rules are complex, and each U.S. Holder should consult its own U.S. tax advisor regarding the foreign tax credit rules.
 
Special rules apply to the amount of foreign tax credit that a U.S. Holder may claim on a distribution, including a constructive distribution, from a PFIC. Subject to such special rules, non-U.S. taxes paid with respect to any distribution in respect of stock in a PFIC are generally eligible for the foreign tax creditThe rules relating to distributions by a PFIC and their eligibility for the foreign tax credit are complicated, and a U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding their application to the U.S. Holder.
 
Receipt of Foreign Currency
 
The amount of any distribution or proceeds paid in Canadian dollars to a U.S. Holder in connection with the ownership, sale or other taxable disposition of our common shares, will be included in the gross income of a U.S. Holder as translated into U.S. dollars calculated by reference to the exchange rate prevailing on the date of actual or constructive receipt of the payment, regardless of whether the Canadian dollars are converted into U.S. dollars at that time. If the Canadian dollars received are not converted into U.S. dollars on the date of receipt, a U.S. Holder will have a basis in the Canadian dollars equal to their U.S. dollar value on the date of receipt. Any U.S. Holder who receives payment in Canadian dollars and engages in a subsequent conversion or other disposition of the Canadian dollars may have a foreign currency exchange gain or loss that would be treated as ordinary income or loss, and generally will be U.S. source income or loss for foreign tax credit purposes. Different rules apply to U.S. Holders who use the accrual method of tax accounting. Each U.S. Holder should consult its own U.S. tax advisor regarding the U.S. federal income tax consequences of receiving, owning, and disposing of Canadian dollars.
 
Information Reporting; Backup Withholding
 
Under U.S. federal income tax law, certain categories of U.S. Holders must file information returns with respect to their investment in, or involvement in, a non-U.S. corporation. For example, U.S. return disclosure obligations (and related penalties) are imposed on individuals who are U.S. Holders that hold certain specified foreign financial assets in excess of certain threshold amounts. The definition of “specified foreign financial assets” includes not only financial accounts maintained in non-U.S. financial institutions, but also, if held for investment and not in an account maintained by certain financial institutions, any stock or security issued by a non-U.S. person, any financial instrument or contract that has an issuer or counterparty other than a U.S. person and any interest in a non-U.S. entity. A U.S. Holder may be subject to these reporting requirements unless such U.S. Holder’s shares of our common shares are held in an account at certain financial institutions. Penalties for failure to file certain of these information returns are substantial. U.S. Holders should consult with their own tax advisors regarding the requirements of filing information returns on IRS Form 8938 for specified foreign financial assets, filing obligations relating to the PFIC rules including possible reporting on IRS Form 8621, and any other applicable reporting requirements.
 
Payments made within the U.S. or by a U.S. payor or U.S. middleman of (a) distributions on our common shares, and (b) proceeds arising from the sale or other taxable disposition of our common shares generally will be subject to information reporting. In addition, backup withholding, currently at a rate of 24%, may apply to such payments if a U.S. Holder (a) fails to furnish such U.S. Holder’s correct U.S. taxpayer identification number (“TIN”) (generally on Form W-9), (b) furnishes an incorrect U.S. TIN, (c) is notified by the IRS that such U.S. Holder has previously failed to properly report items subject to backup withholding, or (d) fails to certify, under penalty of perjury, that such U.S. Holder has furnished its correct U.S. TIN and that the IRS has not notified such U.S. Holder that it is subject to backup withholding. Certain exempt persons generally are excluded from these information reporting and backup withholding rules. Backup withholding is not an additional tax. Any amounts withheld under the U.S. backup withholding rules are allowed as a credit against a U.S. Holder’s U.S. federal income tax liability, if any, or will be refunded, if such U.S. Holder furnishes required information to the IRS in a timely manner. The information reporting and backup withholding rules may apply even if, under the Canada-U.S. Tax Convention, payments are exempt from dividend withholding tax or otherwise eligible for a reduced withholding rate.
 
 
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The discussion of reporting requirements set forth above is not intended to constitute an exhaustive description of all reporting requirements that may apply to a U.S. Holder. A failure to satisfy certain reporting requirements may result in an extension of the time period during which the IRS can assess a tax, and, under certain circumstances, such an extension may apply to assessments of amounts unrelated to any unsatisfied reporting requirement. Each U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the information reporting and backup withholding rules.
 
THE ABOVE SUMMARY IS NOT INTENDED TO CONSTITUTE A COMPLETE ANALYSIS OF ALL U.S. TAX CONSIDERATIONS APPLICABLE TO U.S. HOLDERS WITH RESPECT TO THE ACQUISITION, OWNERSHIP OR DISPOSITION OF OUR COMMON SHARES. U.S. HOLDERS SHOULD CONSULT THEIR OWN TAX ADVISORS AS TO THE TAX CONSIDERATIONS APPLICABLE TO THEM IN THEIR PARTICULAR CIRCUMSTANCES.
 
F.            
DIVIDENDS AND PAYING AGENTS
 
Not applicable.
 
G.            
STATEMENT BY EXPERTS
 
Not applicable.
 
H.            
DOCUMENTS ON DISPLAY
 
Exhibits attached to this Form 20-F are also available for viewing on EDGAR, or at the offices of Amarc, Suite 1400 – 1040 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6E 4H1 or on request of Amarc at 604-684-6365, attention: Corporate Secretary. Copies of Amarc's financial statements and other continuous disclosure documents required under the British Columbia Securities Act are available for viewing on the internet at www.sedar.com.
 
I.            
SUBSIDIARY INFORMATION
 
Not applicable.
 
ITEM 11 
QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
 
A.
RISK RELATED TO COVID-19
 
The current outbreak of COVID-19, and any future emergence and spread of similar pathogens, could have a material adverse effect on global and local economic and business conditions, which may adversely impact the Company’s business and results of operations and the operations of contractors and service providers. The extent to which the COVID-19 impacts our operations will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, including the duration of the outbreak, new information that may emerge concerning its severity and the actions taken to contain the virus or treat its impact, among others. The adverse effects on the economy, the stock market and the Company’s share price could adversely impact its ability to raise capital, with the result that our ability to pursue development of the JOY, IKE and DUKE Districts could be adversely impacted, both through delays and through increased costs. Any of these developments, and others, could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business and results of operations and could delay its plans for development of its districts.
 
B.            
TRANSACTION RISK AND CURRENCY RISK MANAGEMENT
 
Amarc's operations do not employ financial instruments or derivatives which are market sensitive and Amarc does not have financial market risks that it deems to be material.
 
C.            
EXCHANGE RATE SENSITIVITY
 
Amarc's administrative operations are in Canada. The Company typically holds most of its funds in Canadian Dollars and typically acquires foreign currency on an as-needed basis and, hence, it is not significantly affected by exchange rate risk. The Company does, however, from time to time, invest in U.S. Dollars denominated short-term investments. The Company is exposed to foreign currency exchange risk on such investments. However, such U.S. Dollars denominated investments have been minor and the foreign exchange risk has been immaterial.
 
 
57
 
 
The Company currently does not engage in foreign currency hedging.
 
D.            
INTEREST RATE RISK AND EQUITY PRICE RISK
 
Amarc's liabilities consist of routine accounts payable, balance due to a related party, and a loan payable to a director of the Company. The loans bear fixed interest rates. Based on these factors, interest rate change risk for the Company is nominal. For more details on the loan, refer to Note 8 of the accompanying audited annual financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2021.
 
Some of the Company's marketable securities are subject to equity price risk as they relate to shares held in publicly-traded companies. Given the small value of the Company's marketable securities, equity price risk for the Company is nominal.
 
E.            
COMMODITY PRICE RISK
 
While the value of Amarc's resource properties can always be said to relate to the price of copper and gold metals and the outlook for same, Amarc does not have any operating mines and hence does not have any hedging or other commodity-based operational risks respecting its business activities.
 
ITEM 12 
DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES OTHER THAN EQUITY SECURITIES
 
Not applicable.
 
ITEM 13 
DEFAULTS, DIVIDEND ARREARAGES AND DELINQUENCIES
 
Not applicable.
 
ITEM 14 
MATERIAL MODIFICATIONS TO THE RIGHTS OF SECURITY HOLDERS AND USE OF PROCEEDS
 
Not applicable.
 
ITEM 15 
CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
 
DISCLOSURE CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
 
At the end of the period covered by this annual report on Form 20-F, an evaluation was carried out with the participation of the Company's management, including the President and Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”) and the Chief Financial Officer (“CFO”), of the effectiveness of the Company's disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a – 15(e) and 15d –15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”)). Based on that evaluation, the President and CEO and the CFO have concluded that as of the end of the period covered by this annual report on Form 20-F, the Company's disclosure controls and procedures were effective in providing reasonable assurance that: (i) information required to be disclosed by the Company in reports that it files or submits to the SEC under the Exchange Act was recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in applicable rules and forms, and (ii) material information required to be disclosed in the Company's reports filed under the Exchange Act was accumulated and communicated to the Company's management, including the President and CEO and the CFO, as appropriate, to allow for accurate and timely decisions regarding required disclosure.
 
MANAGEMENT'S ANNUAL REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING
 
The Company's management, including the President and CEO and CFO, is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act. The Company's internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with IFRS. The Company's internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that:
 
 
58
 
 
● 
pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the Company;
 
● 
provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with IFRS, and that receipts and expenditures of the Company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the Company; and
 
● 
provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the Company's assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
 
With the participation of the President and CEO and CFO, management conducted an evaluation of the design and operation of the Company's internal control over financial reporting as of March 31, 2021, based on the criteria set forth in Internal Control – Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. This evaluation included review of the documentation of controls, evaluation of the design effectiveness of controls, testing of the operating effectiveness of controls and a conclusion on this evaluation. Based on this evaluation, management concluded in its report that the Company's internal control over financial reporting was effective as of March 31, 2021.
 
This Annual Report does not include an attestation report of the Company's registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting. Management's report was not subject to attestation by the Company's registered public accounting firm pursuant to rules that permit the Company to provide only management's report in this Annual Report.
 
CHANGES IN INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING
 
During the period covered by this Annual Report on Form 20-F, no changes occurred in the Company's internal control over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company's internal control over financial reporting.
 
LIMITATIONS OF CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
 
The Company's management, including its President and CEO and CFO, does not expect that its disclosure controls and procedures or internal controls and procedures will prevent all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs.
 
Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the controls. The design of any system of controls is also based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.
 
ITEM 16 
[RESERVED]
 
ITEM 16A 
AUDIT COMMITTEE FINANCIAL EXPERT
 
The members of the audit committee are Scott Cousens, Barry Coughlan and Diane Nicolson. The board of directors has determined that Mr. Coughlan qualifies as a “financial expert” under the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission, based on his education and experience. Mr. Coughlan is independent, as the term is defined in section 803 of the NYSE American Company Guide.
 
Each audit committee member is able to read and understand fundamental financial statements.
 
ITEM 16B 
CODE OF ETHICS
 
The Company's board of directors has adopted a Code of Ethics governing directors, officers, employees and contractors. The Code of Ethics sets forth written standards that are designed to deter wrongdoing and to promote:
 
 
59
 
 
(a) 
honest and ethical conduct, including the ethical handling of actual or apparent conflicts of interest between personal and professional relationships;
 
(b) 
full, fair, accurate, timely, and understandable disclosure in reports and documents that the Company files with, or submits to, securities regulators and in other public communications made by the Company;
 
(c) 
compliance with applicable laws, rules and regulations;
 
(d) 
the prompt internal reporting of violations of the Code of Ethics to an appropriate person or persons identified in the Code; and
 
(e) 
accountability for adherence to the Code of Ethics.
 
The board of directors monitors compliance with the Code of Ethics by ensuring that all Company personnel have read and understood the Code of Ethics, and by charging management with bringing to the attention of the board of directors any issues that arise with respect to the Code of Ethics.
 
The Company's Code of Ethics was filed as Exhibit 11.1 of the Company's Form 20-F filed on October 7, 2008. The Company's Code of Ethics can be viewed at the Company's website (www.amarcresources.com). The Company will also provide a copy of the Code of Ethics to any person without charge, upon request. Requests can be sent by mail to: 15th floor, 1040 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6E 4H1 or on request of the Company at 604-684-6365, attention: Investor Relations Department.
 
During the most recently completed fiscal year, the Company has neither: (a) amended its Code of Ethics; nor (b) granted any waiver (including any implicit waiver) form any provision of its Code of Ethics.
 
ITEM 16C 
PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES
 
The following table discloses the aggregate fees billed for each of the last two fiscal years for professional services rendered by the Company's audit firm, De Visser Gray LLP for various services.
 
 
Services: Year ended March 31, 2021Year ended March 31, 2020
Audit Fees
 
Includes fees necessary to perform the annual audit and quarterly reviews of the Company's financial statements. Audit Fees include fees for review of tax provisions and for accounting consultations on matters reflected in the financial statements. Audit Fees also include audit or other attest services required by legislation or regulation, such as comfort letters, consents, reviews of securities filings and statutory audits.$20,000$20,000
Audit-related Fees
 
Includes services that are traditionally performed by the auditor. These audit-related services include employee benefit audits, due diligence assistance, accounting consultations on proposed transactions, internal control reviews and audit or attest services not required by legislation or regulation.NilNil
Tax Fees
 
Includes fees for all tax services other than those included in “Audit Fees” and “Audit-related Fees”. This category includes fees for tax compliance, tax planning and tax advice. Tax planning and tax advice includes assistance with tax audits and appeals, tax advice related to mergers and acquisitions, and requests for rulings or technical advice from tax authorities.NilNil
All Other FeesIncludes all other non-audit services.NilNil
Total $20,000$20,000
 
From time to time, management of the Company recommends to and requests approval from the audit committee for non-audit services to be provided by the Company's auditors. The audit committee routinely considers such requests at committee meetings, and if acceptable to a majority of the audit committee members, pre-approves such non-audit services by a resolution authorizing management to engage the Company's auditors for such non-audit services, with set maximum dollar amounts for each itemized service. During such deliberations, the audit committee assesses, among other factors, whether the services requested would be considered “prohibited services” as contemplated by the SEC, and whether the services requested and the fees related to such services could impair the independence of the auditors. No material non-audit services were provided by the Company's auditors during the years presented in the above table.
 
 
60
 
 
ITEM 16D 
EXEMPTIONS FROM LISTING STANDARDS FOR AUDIT COMMITTEES
 
Not applicable.
 
ITEM 16E 
PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES BY THE ISSUER AND AFFILIATED PURCHASERS
 
In the year ended March 31, 2021, the Company did not purchase any of its issued and outstanding Common Shares pursuant to any repurchase program or otherwise.
 
ITEM 16F 
CHANGE IN REGISTRANT'S CERTIFYING ACCOUNTANT
 
None.
 
ITEM 16G 
CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
 
Not applicable.
 
ITEM 16H 
MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE
 
Not applicable.
 
ITEM 17 
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
 
ITEM 18 
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
The following are incorporated herein:
 
Report of the Company's independent registered public accountants, De Visser Gray LLP, dated July 27, 2021;
Statements of financial position as at March 31, 2021 and March 31, 2020;
Statements of loss for the years ended March 31, 2021, March 31, 2020, and March 31, 2019;
Statements of other comprehensive loss (income) for the years ended March 31, 2021, March 31, 2020, and March 31, 2019;
Statements of cash flows for the years ended March 31, 2021, March 31, 2020, and March 31, 2019;
Statements of changes in equity for the years ended March 31, 2021, March 31, 2020, and March 31, 2019; and
Notes to annual financial statements.


 
61
 
  
 
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
   
CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 

 
 
FOR THE YEARS ENDED
MARCH 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
 
To the Shareholders and the Board of Directors of Amarc Resources Ltd.,
 
Opinion on the Consolidated Financial Statements
We have audited the accompanying consolidated financial statements of Amarc Resources Ltd. (“the Company”), which comprise the consolidated statements of financial position as at March 31, 2021 and 2020 and the consolidated statements of income (loss), comprehensive income (loss), changes in (deficiency) equity and cash flows for each of the years in the three year period ended March 31, 2021, and a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory information (collectively referred to as the “consolidated financial statements”). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as at March 31, 2021 and 2020 and its financial performance and its cash flows for each of the years in the three year period ended March 31, 2021, in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board.
 
Going Concern
The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. Without modifying our opinion, we draw attention to Note 1 in the consolidated financial statements which indicates that the Company has no current source of revenue, has incurred losses from inception and is dependent upon its ability to secure new sources of financing. These conditions, along with other matters as set forth in Note 1, indicate the existence of a material uncertainty that casts significant doubt as to the Company's ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s plans in regard to these matters are also described in Note 1. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.
 
Basis for Opinion
These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission andthe PCAOB.
 
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.
 
Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
 
Critical Audit Matter
The critical audit matter communicated below is a matter arising from the current period audit of the consolidated financial statements that was communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relates to accounts or disclosures that are material to the consolidated financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgements. The communication of a critical audit matter does not alter in any way our opinion on the consolidated financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit matter below, providing a separate opinion on the critical audit matter or on the accounts or disclosures to which it relates.
 
 
F-2
 

Fair value determination of proceeds received from the sale of an exploration property
As described in Notes 4 and 7 to the consolidated financial statements, the proceeds received onthe Company’s divestment of its Newton Property during the current year included non-cash consideration of the purchaser, which required management to use significant judgement in the measurement of the fair values of these instruments. The fair value of the common shares received was determined based on the closing share price of the purchaser’s common shares on the date of purchase. The fair value of the warrants received was determined based on a valuation model which requires significant judgement as to the determination of the inputs used. Subsequent to the initial measurement of the transaction these financial assets were re-valued asat March 31, 2021, with the change in fair value recognized in other comprehensive income.
 
 
The principal considerations for our determination that the fair value determination of these non-cash proceeds is a critical audit matter are: (i) materiality of the amounts involved in respect to quantum; (ii) there was significant judgement by management when determining the inputs to the valuation model used to value the warrants; and (iii) a high degree of auditor judgement, subjectivity, and effort in performing procedures to evaluate management’s valuation model and the significant assumptions including volatility in share price and discount rate.
 
 
Addressing the matter involved performing procedures and evaluating audit evidence in connection with forming our overall opinion on the consolidated financial statements. These procedures also included, among others, (i) testing management’s process for determining the fair value of proceeds received, including evaluating the appropriateness of the valuation model; (ii) testing the completeness and accuracy of underlying data used in the model and evaluating the reasonableness of the significant estimates and assumptions used by management; and (iii) considering whether the financial statements fairly disclosed the inherent uncertainties applicable to these fair value measurements.
 
CHARTERED PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANTS
Vancouver, Canada
July 27, 2021
 
We have served as the Company’s auditor since 1995.
 
 
F-3
 
 
Amarc Resources Ltd.
Consolidated Statements of Financial Position
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars)
 
 
 
Note
 
 
March 31,
2021
 
 
March 31,
2020
 
ASSETS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current assets  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash
  3, 10(b)
 $308,085 
 $249,183 
Amounts receivable and other assets
  6 
  47,380 
  83,378 
Marketable securities
  4, 7(e) 
  1,026,418 
  18,356 

    
  1,381,883 
  350,917 
Non-current assets  
    
    
    
Restricted cash
  5 
  178,487 
  178,143 
Total assets
    
 $1,560,370 
 $529,060 
 
    
    
    
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
    
    
    
 
    
    
    
Current liabilities  
    
    
    
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
  8 
 $168,195 
 $100,075 
Balance due to related parties
  11 
  795,239 
  591,979 
Director's loan
  9 
   
  300,000 
 
    
  963,434 
  992,054 
Non-current liabilities 
    
    
    
Director's loan
  9 
  570,000 
  512,119 
 
    
    
    
Total liabilities
    
  1,533,434 
  1,504,173 
  
    
    
    
Shareholders' equity  
    
    
    
Share capital
  10 
  64,744,721 
  64,341,556 
Reserves
  10 
  4,834,306 
  5,631,897 
Accumulated deficit
    
  (69,587,867)
  (70,948,566)
 
    
  (8,840)
  (975,113)
 
    
    
    
Total liabilities and shareholders' equity
    
 $1,524,594 
 $529,060 
 
Nature of operations and going concern (note 1)
Events after the reporting period (note 15)
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
/s/ Robert A. Dickinson/s/ Scott D. Cousens  
     
Robert A. DickinsonScott D. Cousens  
DirectorDirector    
 
 
F-4
 
 
Amarc Resources Ltd.
Consolidated Statements of Income (Loss)
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, except for weighted average number of common shares)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Year ended March 31,
 
 
 
Note
 
 
2021
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Expenses  11,13 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Exploration and evaluation    
 $(1,395,645)
 $(1,637,479)
 $(5,390,102)
Assays and analysis    
  152,093 
  130,666 
  354,492 
Drilling    
  146,886 
   
  800,682 
Equipment rental    
  1,769 
  4,350 
  103,425 
Geological, including geophysical    
  475,380 
  693,016 
  1,295,699 
Helicopter and fuel    
  208,347 
  25,064 
  934,727 
Property acquisition and assessments costs    
  55,436 
  428,959 
  652,926 
Site activities    
  182,238 
  178,443 
  963,826 
Socioeconomic    
  99,527 
  156,713 
  192,517 
Technical data    
  63,206 
   
   
Travel and accommodation    
  10,763 
  20,268 
  91,808 
     
    
    
    
Administration    
  (629,974)
  (855,869)
  (913,897)
Legal, accounting and audit    
  45,828 
  161,450 
  33,106 
Office and administration  13(b)
  416,924 
  550,534 
  656,569 
Shareholder communication    
  123,925 
  84,608 
  155,126 
Travel and accommodation    
  10,763 
  14,179 
  32,891 
Trust and regulatory    
  32,534 
  45,098 
  36,205 
     
    
    
    
Equity-settled share-based compensation    
  (17,888)
  (42,124)
   
     
    
    
    
Cost recoveries  7(d)
  1,350,891 
  1,491,626 
  4,538,604 
     
    
    
    
Non-refundable contribution of an option agreement  7(d)
  260,115 
   
   
Proceeds from disposal of mineral property  7(e)
  1,934,500 
   
   
     
  1,501,999 
  (1,043,846)
  (1,765,395)
Other items    
    
    
    
Finance income    
  26,904 
  5,558 
  38,016 
Interest expense – director's loans  10 
  (111,354)
  (105,630)
  (90,000)
Transaction cost – director's loans  10 
  (57,881)
  (108,768)
  (130,256)
Foreign exchange loss
    
  1,031 
  (848)
  (933)
Net income (loss)
    
 $1,360,699 
 $(1,253,534)
 $(1,948,568)
 
    
    
    
    
Basic and diluted earnings (loss) per common share
    
 $0.01 
 $(0.01)
 $(0.01)
 
    
    
    
    
Weighted average number of common
    
    
    
    
   shares outstanding
    
  178,666,081 
  171,767,287 
  169,504,538 
 
    
    
    
    
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
  
 
F-5
 
 
Amarc Resources Ltd.
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss)
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars)
 
 
 
Year ended March 31,
 
 
 
2021
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
Net income (loss)
 $1,360,699 
 $(1,253,534)
 $(1,948,568)
 
    
    
    
Other comprehensive income (loss):  
    
    
    
Items that will not be reclassified subsequently to profit and loss:
Revaluation of marketable securities
  (626,438)
  (11,234)
  2,737 
Total other comprehensive income (loss)
  (626,438)
  (11,234)
  2,737 
 
    
    
    
Comprehensive income (loss)
 $734,261 
 $(1,264,768)
 $(1,945,831)
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
 
F-6
 
 
Amarc Resources Ltd.
Consolidated Statements of Changes in (Deficiency) Equity
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, except for share information)
 
 
 
 Share capital
 
 
 Reserves
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Numberof shares
 
 
 Amount
 
 
 Share-based payments reserve
 
 
 Investment revaluation reserve
 
 
 Share warrants reserve
 
 
 Deficit
 
 
 Total
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Balance at April 1, 2018
  168,786,227 
 $63,884,056 
 $2,202,640 
 $57,459 
 $2,882,923 
 $(67,781,665)
 $1,245,413 
Net loss for the year
   
   
   
   
   
  (1,948,568)
  (1,948,568)
Other comprehensive (loss) for the year
   
   
   
  2,737 
   
   
  2,737 
Total comprehensive loss
   
   
   
  2,737 
   
  (1,948,568)
  (1,945,831)
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
Issuance of common shares pursuant to property agreements
  1,816,667 
  157,500 
   
   
   
   
  157,500 
Gain on disposition of equity investments at FVTOCI
   
   
   
  (40,677)
   
  40,677 
   
Balance at March 31, 2019
  170,602,894 
 $64,041,556 
 $2,202,640 
 $19,519 
 $2,882,923 
 $(69,689,556)
 $(542,918)
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
Balance at April 1, 2019
  170,602,894 
 $64,041,556 
 $2,202,640 
 $19,519 
 $2,882,923 
 $(69,689,556)
 $(542,918)
Net income for the year
   
   
   
   
   
  (1,253,534)
  (1,253,534)
Other comprehensive (loss) for the year
   
   
   
  (11,234)
   
   
  (11,234)
Total comprehensive loss
   
   
   
  (11,234)
   
  (1,253,534)
  (1,264,768)
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
Issuance of share purchase warrants
   
   
   
   
  490,449 
   
  490,449 
Issuance of common shares pursuant to property agreements
  5,000,000 
  300,000 
   
   
   
   
  300,000 
Equity-settled share-based compensation
   
   
  42,124 
   
   
   
  42,124 
Gain on disposition of equity investments at FVTOCI
   
   
   
  5,476 
   
  (5,476)
   
Balance at March 31, 2020
  175,602,894 
 $64,341,556 
 $2,244,764 
 $13,761 
 $3,373,372 
 $(70,948,566)
 $(975,113)
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
Balance at April 1, 2020
  175,602,894 
 $64,341,556 
 $2,244,764 
 $13,761 
 $3,373,372 
 $(70,948,566)
 $(975,113)
Net income for the period
   
   
   
   
   
  1,360,699 
  1,360,699 
Other comprehensive (loss) for the year
   
   
   
  (626,438)
   
   
  (626,438)
Total comprehensive loss
   
   
   
  (626,438)
   
  1,360,699 
  734,261 
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
Equity-settled share-based compensation
   
   
  (17,888)
   
   
   
  (17,888)
Shares issued through exercise of warrants
  5,000,000 
  403,165 
   
   
  (153,265)
   
  249,900 
Balance at March 31, 2021
  180,602,894 
 $64,744,721 
 $2,226,876 
 $(612,677)
 $3,220,107 
 $(69,587,867)
 $(8,840)
 
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
  
    
    
    
    
    
  
 
F-7
 
 
Amarc Resources Ltd.
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Year ended March 31,
 
 
 
Note
 
 
2021
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
 
Operating activities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) for the year
 
 
 
 $1,360,699 
 $(1,253,534)
 $(1,948,568)
Adjustments for non-cash items:
 
 
 
    
    
    
Equity-settled share-based compensation
 
 
 
  17,888 
  42,124 
  157,500 
Finance income
 
 
 
   
  (5,558)
   
Proceeds from disposal of mineral property
 
 
 
  (1,934,500)
   
   
Non-cash property payments
 
 
 
   
  300,000 
  130,256 
Interest expense – director's loans
  9 
  111,354 
  105,630 
  (38,016)
Transaction cost – director's loans
  9 
  57,881 
  108,768 
  90,000 
Changes in working capital items:
    
    
    
    
Amounts receivable and other assets
    
  35,998 
  224,217 
  (222,021)
Restricted cash
    
  (344)
  (5,000)
   
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
    
  68,120 
  64,111 
  (328,134)
Advanced contributions received
    
   
  (189,021)
  74,056 
Balance due to related parties
    
  91,906 
  289,320 
  (913,693)
Net cash used in operating activities
    
  (190,998)
  (318,943)
  (2,998,620)
 
    
    
    
    
Investing activities
    
    
    
    
Proceeds from disposition of marketable securities
    
   
  5,476 
  38,016 
Proceeds from disposition of mineral properties
    
  300,000 
   
   
Interest received
    
   
  5,558 
  25,131 
Net cash provided by investing activities
    
  300,000 
  11,034 
  63,147 
 
    
    
    
    
Financing activities
    
    
    
    
Net proceeds from issuance of common shares pursuant to
    
    
    
    
exercise of share purchase warrants
  10(b) 
  249,900 
   
   
Proceeds from director's loan
  9 
   
  675,000 
   
Repayment of director's loans
  9 
  (300,000)
  (375,000)
   
Interest paid on director's loans
  9 
   
  (25,904)
  (90,000)
Net cash (used in) provided by financing activities
    
  (50,100)
  274,096 
  (90,000)
 
    
    
    
    
Net increase (decrease) in cash
    
  58,902 
  (33,813)
  (3,025,473)
Cash, beginning balance
    
  249,183 
  282,996 
  3,308,469 
Cash, ending balance
  4 
 $308,085 
 $249,183 
 $282,996 
 
    
    
    
    
Supplemental Cash Flow Information:
    
    
    
    
 
    
    
    
    
Non-cash investing activities
    
    
    
    
Fair value of common shares received as part of proceeds from
    
    
    
    
disposition of mineral properties
    
 $907,500 
 $ 
 $ 
Fair value of warrants received as part of proceeds from disposition
    
    
    
    
of mineral properties
    
 $727,000 
 $ 
 $ 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
 
 
F-8
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
1. 
NATURE OF OPERATIONS AND GOING CONCERN
 
Amarc Resources Ltd. (“Amarc” or the “Company”) is a company incorporated under the laws of the Province of British Columbia (“BC”). Its principal business activity is the acquisition and exploration of mineral properties. The Company’s mineral property interests are located in BC. The address of the Company’s corporate office is 14th Floor, 1040 West Georgia Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada V6E 4H1.
 
The Company is in the process of exploring its mineral property interests and has not yet determined whether its mineral property interests contain economically recoverable mineral reserves. The Company’s continuing operations are entirely dependent upon the existence of economically recoverable mineral reserves, the ability of the Company to obtain the necessary financing to continue the exploration and development of its mineral property interests and to obtain the permits necessary to mine, and the future profitable production from its mineral property interest or proceeds from the disposition of its mineral property interests.
 
These consolidated financial statements as at and for the year ended March 31, 2021 (the “Financial Statements”) have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the discharge of liabilities in the normal course of business for the foreseeable future. As at March 31, 2021, the Company had cash of $308,085, working capital of $418,449, and accumulated deficit of
$69,587,867.
 
These material uncertainties cast significant doubt on the ability of the Company to continue as a going concern.
 
Management believes that it is able to maintain its core mineral rights in good standing for the next 12 month period. The Company is continually seeking opportunities for additional funding and has reasonable expectation that it will succeed in raising additional funds when necessary. However, there can be no assurance that the Company will obtain the required additional financial resources or achieve positive cash flows. If the Company is unable to obtain adequate additional financing, it will need to curtail its expenditures further untiladditional funds can be raised through financing activities.
 
The current outbreak of COVID-19, and any future emergence and spread of similar pathogens, could have a material adverse effect on global and local economic and business conditions, which may adversely impact Amarc’s business and results of operations and the operations of contractors and service providers. The extent to which the COVID-19 impacts our operations will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with confidence, including the duration of the outbreak, new information thatmay emerge concerning its severity and the actions taken to contain the virus or treat its impact, among others. The adverse effects on the economy, the stock market and Amarc’s share price could adversely impact its ability to raise capital, with the result that our ability to pursue development of the JOY, IKE and DUKE Districts could be adversely impacted, both through delays and through increased costs. Any of these developments, and others, could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business and results of operations and could delay its plans for development of its districts.
 
 
F-9
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
These Financial Statements do not include any adjustments to the amounts and classification of assets and liabilities that may be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.
 
2. 
SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
 
The principal accounting policies applied in the preparation of these Financial Statements are described below. These policies have been consistently applied for all years presented, unless otherwise stated.
 
(a) 
Statement of compliance
 
These Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”), as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (“IASB”) and the International Financial Reporting Interpretations Committee (“IFRIC”), effective for the Company’s reporting year ended March 31, 2021.
 
The Board of Directors of the Company authorized these Financial Statements for issuance on July 27, 2021.
 
(b) 
Basis of presentation and consolidation
 
These Financial Statements have been prepared on a historical cost basis, except for certain financial instruments classified as fair value through other comprehensive income, which are reported at fair value. In addition, these Financial Statements have been prepared using the accrual basis of accounting, except for cash flow information.
 
These Financial Statements include the financial statementsof the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiary, 1130346 B.C. Ltd. (the “Subco”), incorporated under the laws of BC. The Subco was incorporated for the purposes of entering into an option agreement (note 7(b)). As at March 31, 2021 and 2020, the Subco did not have any assets, liabilities, income or expenses. Intercompany balances and transactions are eliminated in full on consolidation. On March 30, 2021, the Subco was dissolved.
 
(c) 
Significant accounting estimates and judgements
 
The preparation of the Financial Statements in conformity with IFRS requires management to make judgments, estimates, and assumptions that affect the application of policies and reported amounts ofassets and liabilities, income and expenses. Actual results may differfrom these estimates.
 
 
F-10
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
The impacts of such estimates are pervasive throughout the Financial Statements, and may require accounting adjustments based on future occurrences. Revisions to accounting estimates are recognized in the period in which the estimate is revised and future periods if the revision affects both current and future periods. These estimates are based on historical experience, current and future economic conditions and other factors, including expectations of future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Specific areas where significant estimates or judgments exist are:
 
● 
assessment of the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern;
● 
the determination of categories of financial assets and financial liabilities; and,
● 
the carrying value and recoverability of the Company’s marketable securities.
 
(d) 
Foreign currency
 
The functional and presentational currency of the Company is the Canadian Dollar (“CAD”).
 
Transactions in currencies other than the functional currency of the Company are recorded at the rates of exchange prevailing on the dates of transactions. At each financial position reporting date, monetary assets and liabilities that are denominated in foreign currencies are translated at the rates of exchange prevailing at the date when the fair value was determined. Non-monetary items that are measured in terms of historical cost in a foreign currency are not re-translated. Gains and losses arising on translation are included in profit or loss for the year.
 
(e) 
Financial instruments
 
A financial asset (unless it is a trade receivable without a significant financing component that is initially measured at the transaction price) is initially measured at fair value plus, for an item not measured at fair value through profit or loss (“FVTPL”), transaction costs that are directly attributable to its acquisition. The directly attributable transaction costs of a financial asset classified at FVTPL are expensed in the period in which they are incurred.
 
Financial assets measured at amortized cost
 
A financial asset is measured at amortized cost if it meets both the following conditions and is not designated as at FVTPL:
 
● 
it is held within a business model whose objective is to hold assets to collect contractual cash flows; and,
● 
its contractual terms give rise on specified dates to cash flows that are solely payments of principal and interest on the principal amount outstanding.
 
These financial assets are subsequently measured at amortized cost using the effective interest method. The amortized cost is reduced by impairment losses. Interest income, foreign exchange gains and losses, and impairment losses are recognized in profit or loss. Any gain or loss on the derecognition of the financial asset is recognized in profit or loss.
 
 
F-11
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
Financial assets measured at fair value through other comprehensive income
 
A debt investment is measured at fair value through other comprehensive income (“FVTOCI”) if it meets both the following conditions and is not designated as at FVTPL:
 
● 
it is held within a business model whose objective is achieved by both collecting contractual cash flows and selling financial assets; and,
● 
its contractual terms give rise on specified dates to cash flows that are solely payments of principal and interest on the principal amount outstanding.
 
On the initial recognition of an equity instrument that is not held for trading, the Company may irrevocably elect to present subsequent changes in the investment’s fair value in other comprehensive income (“OCI”). This election is made on an investment-by-investment basis.
 
Debt investments measured at FVTOCI are subsequently measured at fair value. Interest income calculated using the effective interest method, foreign exchange gains and losses, and impairment are recognized in profit or loss. Other net gains and losses are measured in OCI. On de-recognition, gains and losses accumulated in OCI are reclassified to profit or loss.
 
Equity investments measured at FVTOCI are subsequently measured at fair value. Dividends are recognized as income in profit or loss unless the dividend clearly represents a recovery of part of the cost of the investment. Other net gains and losses are recognized in OCI and are never reclassified to profit or loss.
 
Financial assets measured at fair value through profit or loss
 
All financial assets not classified as measured at amortized cost or measured at FVTOCI, as described above, are measured at FVTPL; this includes all derivative financial assets. On initial recognition, the Company may irrevocably designate a financial asset that otherwise meets the requirements to be measured at amortized cost or measured at FVTOCI as FVTPL if doing so eliminates, or significantly reduces, an accounting mismatch that would otherwise arise.
 
These financial assets are subsequently measured at fair value. Net gains and losses, including any interest or dividend income, are recognized in profit or loss.
 
Financial liabilitiesClassification
  
Accounts payable and accrued liabilitiesAmortized cost
Balance due to related partiesAmortized cost
 
Financial assetsClassification
  
CashAmortized cost
Marketable securitiesFVTOCI
Restricted cashAmortized cost
Amounts receivable and other assetsAmortized cost
 
 
F-12
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
(f) 
Exploration and evaluation expenditures
 
Exploration and evaluation costs are costs incurred to discover mineral resources, and to assess the technical feasibility and commercial viability of the mineral resources found.
 
Exploration and evaluation expenditures include:
 
● 
costs associated with the acquisition of licences;
● 
costs associated with the acquisition of exploration and evaluation assets, including mineral properties; and,
● 
costs associated with exploration and evaluation activities.
 
Exploration and evaluation costs are generally expensed as incurred until the technical feasibility and commercial viability of extracting a mineral resource has been determined and a positive decision to proceed to development has been made. However, if management concludes that future economic benefits are more likely than not to be realized, the costs of property, plant and equipment for use in the exploration and evaluation of mineral resources are capitalized.
 
Costs incurred before the Company has obtained the legal rights to explore an area are expensed. Costs incurred after the technical feasibility and commercial viability of extracting a mineral resource has been determined and a positive decision to proceed to development has been made are considered development costs and are capitalized.
 
Costs applicable to established mineral property interests where no further work is planned by the Company may, for presentation purposes only, be carried at nominal amounts.
 
(g) 
Equipment
 
Equipment is carried at cost, less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses.
 
The cost of equipment consists of the purchase price, any costs directly attributable to bringing the asset to the location and the condition necessary for its intended use, and an initial estimate of the costs of dismantling and removing the asset and restoring the site on which it is located.
 
Depreciation is provided at rates calculated to expense the cost of the equipment, less its estimated residual value, using the declining balance method at various rates ranging from 20% to 30% per annum.
 
An item of equipment is derecognized upon disposal or when no material future economic benefits are expected to arise from the continued use of the asset. Any gain or loss arising on disposal of the asset, determined as the difference between the net disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset, is recognized in profit or loss.
 
Where an item of equipment consists of major components with different useful lives, the components are accounted for as separate items of equipment. Expenditures incurred to replace a component of an item of equipment that is account for separately, including major inspection and overhaul expenditures, are capitalized.
 
 
F-13
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
As at March 31, 2021, all equipment had been fully depreciated. The Company did not purchase any equipment during the year ended March 31, 2021.
 
(h) 
Share capital
 
Common shares of the Company are classified as equity. Transaction costs directly attributable to the issuance of common shares and share purchase options are recognized as a deduction from equity, net of any tax effects.
 
When the Company issues common shares for consideration other than cash, the transaction is measured at fair value based on the quoted market price of the Company’s common shares on the date of issuance.
 
(i) 
Loss per share
 
Loss per share is computed by dividing the losses attributable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the reporting period. Diluted loss per share is determined by adjusting the losses attributable to common shareholders and the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the effects of all dilutive potential common shares, such as options granted to employees. The dilutive effect of options assumes that the proceeds to be received on the exercise of share purchase options are applied to repurchase common shares at the average market price for the reporting period. Share purchase options are included in the calculation of dilutive earnings per share only to the extent that the market price of the common shares exceeds the exercise price of the share purchase options. The effect of anti-dilutive factors is not considered when computed diluted loss per share.
 
(j) 
Equity-settled share-based payments
 
The share purchase option plan allows employees and consultants of the Company to acquire shares of the Company. The fair value of share purchase options granted is recognized as an employee orconsultant expense with a corresponding increase in the share-based payments reserve in equity. An individual is classified as an employee when the individual is an employee for legal and tax purposes (direct employee) or provides services similar to those performed by a direct employee.
 
For employees, fair value is measured at the grant date and each tranche is recognized on a straight-line basis over the period during which the share purchase options vest. The fair value of the share purchase options granted is measured using the Black-Scholes option pricing model taking into account the terms and conditions upon which the share purchase options were granted. At the end of each financial reporting period, the amount recognized as an expense is adjusted to reflect the actual number of share purchase options that are expected to vest.
 
Share-based payment transactions with non-employees are measured at the fair value of the goods and services received. However, if the fair value cannot be estimated reliably, the share-based payment transaction is measured at the fair value of the equity instrument granted at the date the entity obtains the goods or the counterparty renders the service.
 
 
F-14
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
(k) 
Income taxes
 
Income tax on the profit or loss for the years presented comprises of current and deferred tax. Income tax is recognized in profit or loss except to the extent that it relates to items recognized directly in equity, in which case it is recognized in equity.
 
Current tax expense is the expected tax payable on taxable income for the year, using tax rates enacted or substantively enacted at year end, adjusted for amendments to tax payable with regards toprevious years.
 
Deferred tax is provided using the balance sheet liability method, providing for temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts used for taxation purposes.
 
The following temporary differences are not provided for:
 
● 
goodwill not deductible for tax purposes;
● 
the initial recognition of assets or liabilities that affect neither accounting nor taxable profit; and,
● 
differences relating to investments in subsidiaries, associates, and joint ventures to the extent that they will probably not reverse in the foreseeable future.
 
The amount of deferred tax provided is based on the expected manner of realization or settlement of the carrying amount of assets and liabilities, using tax rates enacted or substantively enacted at the financial position reporting date applicable to the period of expected realization or settlement.
 
A deferred tax asset is recognized only to the extent that it is probable that future taxable profits will be available against which the asset can be utilized.
 
Additional income taxes that arise from the distribution of dividends are recognized at the same time as the liability to pay the related dividend.
 
Deferred tax assets and liabilities are offset when there is a legally enforceable right to set off current tax assets against current tax liabilities, when they relate to income taxes levied by the same taxation authority, and the Company intends to settle its current tax assets and liabilities on a net basis.
 
Flow-through Shares
 
The Company will, from time-to-time, issue flow-through common shares to finance a portion of its exploration programs. Pursuant to the terms of the flow-through share agreements, these shares transfer the tax deductibility of qualifying resource expenditures toinvestors. On issuance, the Company bifurcates the flow-through share into i) a flow-through share premium, equal to the estimated premium, if any, investors pay for the flow-through feature, which is recognized as a liability, and ii) share capital. Upon expenses being incurred, the Company derecognizes this liability and recognizes this premium a other income, offsetting any expense associated with the Company’s expenditure of the flow-through proceeds.
 
 
F-15
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
(l) 
Restoration, rehabilitation and environmental obligations
 
An obligation to incur restoration, rehabilitation and environmental costs arises when environmental disturbance is caused by the exploration ordevelopment of a mineral property interest. Such costs arising from the decommissioning of plant and other site preparation work, discounted to their net present value, are provided for and capitalized at the start of each project to the carrying amount of the asset, along with a corresponding liability at the time the obligation to incur such costs arises. The timing of the actual rehabilitation expenditure is dependent on a number of factors such as the life and nature of the project or asset, the conditions imposed by the relevant permits, and, when applicable, the jurisdiction in which the project or asset is located.
 
Discount rates using a pre-tax rate that reflects the time value of money are used to calculate the net present value, where applicable. These costs are charged against profit or loss over the economic life of the related asset, through amortization using either the unit-of-production method or the straight-line method. The corresponding liability is progressively increased as the effect of discounting unwinds, creating an expense recognized in profit or loss.
 
The operations of the Company have been, and may in the future be, affected from time to time in varying degrees by changes in environmental regulations, including those for site restoration costs. Both the likelihood of new regulations and their overall effect upon the Company are not predictable.
 
The Company has no material restoration, rehabilitation and environmental obligations as at March 31, 2021.
 
(m) 
Operating segments

The Company operates as a single reportable segmentthe acquisition, exploration and development of mineral properties. All assets are held in Canada.
 
(n) 
Government assistance
 
When the Company is entitled to receive the BC Mineral Exploration Tax Credit (“BCMETC”) and other government grants, this government assistance is recognized as a cost recovery when there is reasonable assurance of recovery. Any amounts accrued or received, typically remain subject to review and revision by government authorities. It is not possible to predict the occurrence or outcome of such actions in advance.
 
 
F-16
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
(o) 
Recent accounting pronouncements
 
Amendments to IFRS 3, Business Combinations ("IFRS 3")
 
The Company adopted the amendments to IFRS 3 in the current year, although there was no impact on Company. The amendments relate to the definition of a business and clarify that whilea business usually has outputs, outputs are not required for an integrated set of activities and assets to qualify as a business. To be considered a business, an acquired set of activities and assets must include, at a minimum, an input and a substantive process that together significantly contribute to the ability to create outputs. The amendments remove the assessment of whether market participants are capable of replacing any missing inputs or processes and continuing to produce outputs. The amendments also introduce additional guidance that helps to determine whether a substantive process has been acquired.
 
The amendments introduce an optional concentration test that permits a simplified assessment of whether an acquired set of activities and assets is not a business. Under the optional concentration test, the acquired set of activities and assets is not a business if substantially all of the fair value of the gross assets acquired is concentrated in a single identifiable asset or group of similar assets. The amendments are applied prospectively to all business combinations and asset acquisitions for which the acquisition date is on or after April 1, 2020.
 
Adoption of Other Narrow Scope Amendments to IFRSs and IFRS Interpretations
 
The Company also adopted other amendments to IFRSs, which were effective for accounting periods beginning on or after April 1, 2020. The adoption had no impact on the Financial Statements.
 
New and Revised IFRS, Narrow Scope Amendments to IFRS and IFRS Interpretations not yet Effective
 
Certain pronouncements have been issued by the IASB that are mandatory for accounting periods after March 31, 2021. There are currently no such pronouncements that are expected to have a significant impact on the Company's consolidated financial statements upon adoption; however, the pronouncement below may have an impact in future periods.
 
Amendments to IAS 16, Property, Plant and Equipment
 
The amendments clarify the accounting for the net proceeds from selling any items produced while bringing an item of property, plant and equipment ("PPE") to the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management. The amendments prohibit entities from deducting amounts received from selling items produced from the cost of PPE while the Company is preparing the asset for its intended use. Instead, salesproceeds and the cost of producing these items will be recognized in profit or loss. The amendments are effective for annual reporting periods beginning on or after January 1, 2022, with earlier application permitted. The amendments apply retrospectively, but only to assets brought to the location and condition necessary for them to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management on or after the beginning of the earliest period presented in the financial statements in which the Company first applies the amendments.
 
 
F-17
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
3. 
CASH
 
The Company’s cash is invested in business and savings accounts, which are available on demand by the Company.
 
4. 
MARKETABLE SECURITIES
 
As at March 31, 2021, the fair value of its current holdings was $1,026,418 (March 31, 2020-
 
$18,356) and the negative change of fair value adjustment of $626,438 for the year ended March 31, 2021 (March 31, 2020 – negative change of fair value adjustment of $11,234). The marketable securities include
5.5 million units (shares and warrants) of Carlyle Commodities Corp., a Canadian public company listed on TSX-V exchange (note 7(e)).
 
Continuity table:
 

 
Year ended
 
 
Year ended
 
 
 
March 31, 2021
 
 
March 31, 2020
 
Balance – beginning of year
 $18,356 
 $35,067 
Disposition of marketable securities
  - 
  (5,477)
Received as option payments (note 7(e))
  1,634,500 
  - 
Revaluation of marketable securities
  (626,438)
  (11,234)
Balance – end of year
 $1,026,418 
 $18,356 
 
Company
 
Shares/Warrants Held
 
 
Cost
 
 
Fair Value
 
 
Fair Value Increase (Decrease)
 
Carlyle Commodities Corp - Shares
  5,500,000 
  907,500 
  577,500 
  (330,000)
Carlyle Commodities Corp - Warrants
  5,500,000 
  727,000 
  421,000 
  (306,000)
Other
  2,275,002 
  18,356 
  27,918 
  9,562 
 
    
  1,652,856 
  1,026,418 
  (626,438)
 
5. 
RESTRICTED CASH
 
Restricted cash represents amounts held in support of exploration permits. The amounts are refundable subject to the consent of regulatory authorities upon completion of any required reclamation work on the related projects.
 
 
F-18
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
6.          
AMOUNTS RECEIVABLE AND OTHER ASSETS
 
 
 
March 31,
2021
 
 
March 31,
2020
 
Sales tax refundable
 $17,011 
 $16,858 
Contribution receivable
  9,851 
  - 
Prepaid insurance
  20,518 
  66,520 
Total
 $47,380 
 $83,378 
 
7.          
EXPLORATION AND EVALUATION EXPENSES AND COST RECOVERIES
 
Below is a summary of the Company’s major exploration projects on the basis of where the Company is currently incurring the majority of its exploration work.
 
(a) 
IKE District
 
The IKE District is located in south-central BC and is comprised of the IKE, Granite, Galore and Juno Properties. In July 2017, the Company announced that it had entered into a Mineral Property Farm-In Agreement (the “IKE Agreement”) with Hudbay Minerals Inc. (“Hudbay”) pursuant to which Hudbay would acquire, through a staged investment process, up to a 60% ownership interest in the IKE District.
 
The Company initially recorded the amounts of contributions received or receivable from Hudbay pursuant to the IKE Agreement as a liability (advanced contributions received) in the Consolidated Statements of Financial Position, and subsequently recognized amounts as cost recoveries in the Consolidated Statements of Loss as the Company incurred the related expenditures.
 
In January 2019, the Company announced that Hudbay had relinquished its option to earn an interest in the IKE District. As a result of the termination, the Company currently maintains a 100% interest in the IKE District.
 
The IKE Property claims carry a Net Smelter Return (“NSR”) royalty obligation of 1%, subject to a $2 million cap and with the Company able to purchase the royalty at any time by payment of the same amount. These claims carry an additional NSR royalty of 2%, subject to the Company retaining the right to purchase up to the entire royalty amount by the payment of up to $4 million. The Company has also agreed to make annual advance royalty payments of $50,000 to the holders of the 2% NSR royalty interest and, upon completion of a positive feasibility study, to issue to these same parties 500,000 common shares.
 
The Granite Property claims are subject to a 2% NSR royalty which can be purchased for $2 million. In addition there is an underlying 2.5% NSR royalty on certain mineral claims within the Granite Property, which can be purchased at any time for $1.5 million less any amount of royalty already paid.
 
 
F-19
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
The entire project is subject to a 1% NSR royalty from mine production capped at a total of $5 million.
 
(b) 
JOY District
 
The JOY District, located in north-central BC, comprises the JOY and PINE Properties, and also the “Staked Claims” acquired directly by the Company. In November 2016, the Company entered into a purchase agreement with a private company wholly-owned by one of its directors to purchase 100% of the JOY Property for the reimbursement of the vendor’s direct acquisition costs of $335,299. The property is subject to an underlying NSR royalty held by a former owner which is capped at $3.5 million.
 
In August 2017, the Company announced that it had entered into a Mineral Property Farm-In Agreement (the “JOY Agreement”) with Hudbay pursuant to which Hudbay may acquire, through a staged investment process, up to 60% ownership in the JOY Property. This was later amended to include the PINE Property and Staked Claims, collectively the JOY District.
 
The Company initially recorded the amounts of contributions received or receivable from Hudbay pursuant to the JOY Agreement as a liability (advanced contributions received) in the Consolidated Statements of Financial Position, and subsequently reallocated amounts to cost recoveries in the Consolidated Statements of Loss as the Company incurs related expenditures.
 
In January 2019, the Company announced that Hudbay had relinquished its option to earn an interest in the JOY District. As a result of the termination, the Company currently maintains a 100% interest in the JOY District.
 
In addition, the Company concluded agreements with each of Gold Fields Toodoggone Exploration Corporation (“GFTEC”) and Cascadero Copper Corporation (“Cascadero”) in mid-2017 pursuant to which the Company can purchase 100% of the PINE Property.
 
In October 2018, Amarc acquired a 100% interest in Cascadero’s 49% interest in the PINE Property by completing total cash payments of $1,000,000 and issuing 5,277,778 common shares.
 
In November 2019 Amarc entered into a purchase agreement with two prospectors to acquire 100% of a single mineral claim, called the Paula property, located internal to the wider JOY District tenure. The claim is subject to a 1% NSR royalty payable from commercial production that is capped at $0.5 million.
 
In December 2019, the Company amended the GFTEC Agreement to purchase GFTEC’s 51% interest in the PINE property. Under the terms of the amendment Amarc will purchase outright GFTEC’s 51% interest in the 323 km2 Property by issuing to GFTEC 5,000,000 common shares of the Company (issued). As such Amarc now holds a 100% interest in the PINE mineral claims.
 
The PINE Property is subject to a 3% underlying NSR royalty payable to a former owner. The Company has reached an agreement with the former owner to cap the 3% NSR royalty at $5 million payable from production for consideration totaling $100,000 and 300,000 common shares payable in stages through to January 31, 2019 (completed).
 
GFTEC will retain a 2.5% net profits interest (“NPI”) royalty on mineral claims comprising approximately 96% of the PINE Property, which are subject to a NSR royalty payable to a former owner (“Underlying NSR”) and a 1% NSR royalty on the balance of the claims that are not subject to the Underlying NSR royalty. The NPI royalty can be reduced to 1.25% at any time through the payment to GFTEC of $2.5 million in cash or shares. The NSR royalty can be reduced to 0.5% through the payment to GFTEC of $2.5 million in cash or shares.
 
Refer to Note 15 for the JOY District Agreement with Freeport entered into subsequent to March 31, 2021.
 
 
F-20
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements 
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 
(c) 
DUKE District
 
The DUKE District is located in central BC. In November 2016, the Company entered into a purchase agreement with a private company wholly-owned by one of its directors to purchase a 100% interest in the DUKE District for the reimbursement of the vendor’s direct acquisition costs of $168,996.
 
(d) 
Operated Properties
 
During the current year, Amarc operated programs on two exploration properties owned by a related party, Jake and Mack (the “Operated Properties”), for the claim optionee on a cost recovery basis (note 11(c)).
 
During the current year, Amarc received a non-refundable payment of US$200,000 (CDN$260,115) pursuant to an option agreement whereby an arms-length third party optionee has the right to earn a 51% interest in the Windfall Project, being 25 mineral claims in the IKE district (note 7(a)), by spending US$4.2 million on exploration by October 21, 2022. Thereafter, the optionee can joint venture the project with Amarc or increase its interest to 80% by making additional expenditures after which the joint venture would be formed or the residual 20% sold to the optionee for a price to be negotiated. On May 25, 2021, this option agreement was terminated by mutual consent of both Amarc and the optionee.
 
Included in cost recoveries are BCMETC refunds totaling $820,075 received in the year ended March 31, 2021 ($Nil – March 31, 2020; $Nil – March 31, 2019).
 
(e) 
Divestment of the Newton Property
 
On December 16, 2020 (the “Closing Date”), the Company closed the sale of its Newton property (“Newton”) located in south-central British Columbia (“BC”) to Isaac Mining Corp.(“IMC”), an arms- length private company and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Carlyle Commodities Corp. (“Carlyle”) (CSE:CCC, FSE:1OZ, OTC:DLRYF). Amarc has received consideration comprising total cash of$300,000 from IMC and 5.5 million equity units (common share plus warrant) in Carlyle. The 5.5 million warrants are exercisable at $0.50 per warrant with an expiry date on December 8, 2025. The fair value of the 5.5 million shares of Carlyle on the Closing Date was recorded at $907,500 measured at $0.165, the closing quote of Carlyle’s common shares on December 16, 2020. The fair value of the 5.5 million warrants of Carlyle on the Closing Date is recorded was $727,000 using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The fair value was calculated based on the following weighted average assumptions: Risk free-interest rate – 0.38%; Dividend yield – 0.00%; Expected volatility – 139.0%; Expected life – 4.98 years. The fair value of the aggregate consideration totalled $1,934,500 and is recorded as proceeds from sale of mineral property in the Statement of Income for the year ended March 31, 2021.
 
 
F-21
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements 
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
  8.     
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE AND ACCRUED LIABILITIES
 
 
 
March 31,
2021
 
 
March 31,
2020
 
Accounts payable
 $168,195 
 $100,075 
Total
 $168,195 
 $100,075 
 
  9. 
DIRECTOR’S LOANS
 
 
 
Year ended
March 31, 2021
 
 
Year ended
March 31, 2020
 
Opening balance
 $812,119 
 $893,800 
Principal advances
  - 
  675,000 
Principal repayments
  (300,000)
  (375,000)
Transaction costs
  - 
  (490,449)
Amortization of transaction costs
  57,881 
  108,768 
Closing balance
 $570,000 
 $812,119 
 
 
 
March 31,
2021
 
 
March 31,
2020
 
Current portion
 $- 
 $300,000 
Non-current portion
  570,000 
  512,119 
Total
 $570,000 
 $812,119 
 
Finance expenses
 
For the year ended March 31,
 
 
 
2021
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
Interest on director’s loan
 $111,354 
 $105,630 
 $90,000 
Amortization of transaction costs
  57,881 
  108,768 
  130,256 
Total
 $169,235 
 $214,398 
 $220,256 
 
 
F-22
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
(a) 
2019 loan
 
In December 2019, the Company entered into a loan extension and amendment agreement (the “Loan”) with a director and significant shareholder of the Company (the “Lender”), pursuant to which a previous loan agreement with a maturity date of November 26,2019 was extended for five years or earlier pending the achievement of certain financing milestones. The Loan has a principal sum of $1,000,000, is unsecured and bears interest at a rate of 10% per annum.
 
Pursuant to the Loan, the Company issued to the Lendera loan bonus comprising of 16,000,000 common share purchase warrants (the “Warrants”) with an expiry of five years and an exercise price of $0.05 per share (note 10(c)(i)). The warrants are exercisable into common shares or flow-through common shares at the election of the Lender upon exercise.
 
(b) 
2019 bridge loans
 
In July and August 2019, the Company entered into certain loan agreements (collectively the “Bridge Loans”) with a director of the Company and a private company wholly-owned by a director of the Company (collectively the “Bridge Lenders”), pursuant to which the Bridge Lenders advanced to the Company an aggregate principal sum of $375,000 with a 1-year term and bearing interest at 10% per annum. The Bridge Loans were fully repaid in September 2019.
 
In December 2019, the Company entered into a loan agreement (the “Second Bridge Loan”) with a director of the Company (the “Second Bridge Lender”), pursuant to which the Second Bridge Lender advanced to the Company a principal sum of $300,000 with a 9-month term and bearing interest at a rate of 10% per annum.
 
Advances have been measured as financial liabilities at their (cash) transaction values, with the unamortized balance of directly applicable transaction costs, comprised of the fair values of the loan bonus warrants granted, representing a partially offsetting asset balance. Such transaction costs are being expensed pro-rata over the term of the debt, with the effect on the balance sheet presentation being that the aggregate debt is accreted towards its face value.
 
In August 2020, the principal and interest balances of the Second Bridge Loan were fully repaid.
 
10. 
SHARE CAPITAL AND RESERVES
 
(a) 
Authorized and outstanding share capital
 
The Company’s authorized share capital consists of an unlimited number of common shares without par value (“Common Shares”) and an unlimited number of preferred shares. All issued Common Shares are fully paid. No preferred shares have been issued.
 
 
F-23
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
As at March 31, 2021, there were 180,602,894 Common Shares issued and outstanding (March 31, 2020 – 175,602,894).
 
(b) 
Issued share capital
 
In December 2019, the Company amended its option agreement with GFTEC to purchase GFTEC’s 51% interest in the PINE Property (the “Transaction”). Upon completion of the Transaction, the Company would hold a 100% interest in the PINE mineral claims having completed the purchase of Cascadero’s 49% interest in the PINE Property in the prior year (note 6(b)). On January 6, 2020, the Company concluded the Transaction by issuing 5,000,000 Common Shares to GFTEC.
 
On August 20, 2020, 3,000,000 flow-through shares were issued pursuant to the exercise of warrants for gross proceeds of $150,000 (note 9(a)).
 
On October 2, 2020, 2,000,000 flow-through shares were issued pursuant to the exercise of warrants for gross proceeds of $100,000 (note 9(a)). $100 related to flow-through tax filing has been deducted from the gross proceeds as issuance costs.
 
Approximately $167,000 of the flow-through proceeds received were renounced to the shareholder as at December 31, 2020. The Company recognized no flow-through premium in excess of the fair value of these common shares at their dates of issuance.
 
As at March 31, 2021, the amount of flow-through proceeds remaining to be expended is approximately $83,000, which must be incurred on or before December 31, 2023.
 
(c) 
Share purchase options
 
The following summarizes changes in the Company’s share purchase options (the “Options”):
 

 
 
 
 
March 31,
2021
 
 
 
 
 
March 31,
2020
 
 
 
Weighted Average
Exercise Price
 
 
Number of
Options
 
 
Weighted Average
Exercise Price
 
 
Number of
Options
 
Outstanding - beginning balance
 $0.05 
  2,000,000 
 $- 
  - 
Granted
   
   
  0.05 
  2,000,000 
Outstanding - beginning balance
 $0.05 
  2,000,000 
 $0.05 
  2,000,000 
 
Award vesting in several tranches ranging from 6 monthsto 18 months from the date of grant.
 
During the year ended March 31, 2021, the Company recognized share-based compensation expense of $17,888 (2020 – $42,124).
 
 
F-24
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 


The following summarizes information on the options outstanding and exercisable as at March 31, 2021:
 
 
 
Options outstanding
 
 
Options exercisable
 
Exercise price
 
Number of
Options
 
 
Weighted
average
remaining
contractual life
(years)
 
 
Number of
Options
 
 
Weighted
average
remaining
contractual life
(years)
 
$ 0.05
  2,000,000 
  3.51 
  500,000 
  3.51 
Total
  2,000,000 
  3.51 
  500,000 
  3.51 
 
(d) 
Share purchase warrants
 
The following common share purchase warrants were outstanding at March 31, 2021 and 2020:
 
 
 
Exercise price
 
 
March 31, 2021
 
 
March 31, 2020
 
Issued pursuant to a loan agreement (note 9(a))
 $0.05 
  16,000,000 
  16,000,000 
Exercised
 $0.05 
  (5,000,000)
   
Total
    
  11,000,000 
  16,000,000 
 
(i) 
2019 loan bonus warrants
 
In December 2019, 16,000,000 share purchase warrants were issued pursuant to the Loan (note 9(a)). The fair value of these warrants at issue was determined to be $490,449 at $0.03 per warrant using the Black-Scholes pricing model and based on the following assumptions: risk-free rate of 1.57%; expected volatility of 144%; underlying market price of $0.035; strike price of $0.05; expiry term of 5 years; and, dividend yield of nil.
 
11. 
RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS
 
Balances due to related parties
 
March 31,
2021
 
 
March 31,
2020
 
Bookskipper Accounting & Tax Services
 $1,050 
 $- 
Hunter Dickinson Services Inc.
  614,352 
  507,232 
Robert Dickinson (interest payable)
  174,816 
  79,726 
United Mineral Services Ltd.
  5,021 
  5,021 
Total
 $795,239 
 $591,979 
 
 
F-25
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
(a) 
Transactions with key management personnel
 
Key management personnel (“KMP”) are those persons that have the authority and responsibility for planning, directing, and controlling the activities of the Company, directly and indirectly, and by definition include all the directors of the Company.
 
Note 9 includes the details of loans with a director of the Company and a private company wholly-owned by a director of the Company. Note 7(b) and 7(c) includes the details of the acquisition of mineral property interests from a private company wholly-owned by a director of the Company.
 
During the year ended March 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company’s President, Chief Executive Officer and Director; and Corporate Secretary provided services to the Company under a service agreement with Hunter Dickinson Services Inc. (“HDSI”) (note 11(b)).
 
During the year ended March 31, 2021, the Company incurred a $10,000 (March 31, 2020 - $nil) fee for the services provided by the Chief Financial Officer.
 
There were no other transactions with KMP during the year ended March 31, 2021 and 2020.
 
(b) 
Hunter Dickinson Services Inc.
 
Hunter Dickinson Inc. (“HDI”) and its wholly-owned subsidiary HDSI are private companies established by a group of mining professionals. HDSI provides services under contracts for a number of mineral exploration and development companies, and also to companies that are outside of the mining and mineral development space. Amarc acquires services from a number of related and arms-length contractors, and itis at Amarc’s discretion that HDSI providescertain contract services.
 
The Company has one director in common with HDSI, namely Robert Dickinson. Also, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, President and Director, and Corporate Secretary are employees of HDSI and work for the Company under an employee secondment arrangement between the Company and HDSI.
 
Pursuant to an agreement dated July 2, 2010, HDSI provides certain technical, geological, corporate communications, regulatory compliance, and administrative and management services to the Company, on a non-exclusive basis as needed and as requested by the Company. As a result of this relationship, the Company has ready access to a range of diverse and specialized expertise on a regular basis, without having to engage or hire full-time employees or experts. The Company benefits from the economies of scale created by HDSI which itself serves several clients both within and external to the exploration and mining sector.
 
The Company is not obligated to acquire any minimum amount of services from HDSI. The monetary amount of the services received from HDSI in a given period of time isa function of annually set and agreed charge-out rates for and the time spent by each HDSI employee engaged by the Company.
 
HDSI also incurs third-party costs on behalf of the Company. Such third party costs include, for example, directors and officers insurance, travel, conferences, and communication services. Third-party costs are billed at cost, without markup.
 
 
F-26
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
There are no ongoing contractual or other commitments resulting from the Company's transactions with HDSI, other than thepayment for services already rendered and billed. The agreement may be terminated upon 60 days' notice by either the Company or HDSI.
 
The following is a summary of transactions with HDSI that occurred during the reporting period:
 
Transactions with HDSI
 
For the years ended March 31,
 
(rounded to the nearest thousand CAD)
 
2021
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
Services received from HDSI and as requested by the Company
 $914,000 
 $1,272,000 
 $1,620,000 
Information technology – infrastructure and support services
  60,000 
  60,000 
  60,000 
Reimbursement, at cost, of third-party expenses incurred by HDSI on behalf of the Company
  79,000 
  104,000 
  63,000 
Total
 $1,053,000 
 $1,436,000 
 $1,745,000 
 
(c)
United Mineral Services Ltd.
 
United Mineral Services Ltd. (“UMS”) is a private company wholly-owned by one of the directors of the Company. UMS is engaged in the acquisition and exploration of mineral property interests.
 
During the year ended March 31, 2021, UMS reimbursed the Company an aggregate of $139,160 for additional cost related to exploration programs on its operated properties described at note 7(d). The following is a summary of transactions with UMS that occurred during the reporting period:
 
Transactions with UMS
 
For the years ended March 31,
 
(rounded to the nearest thousand CAD)
 
2021
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
Services received from UMS and as requested by the Company
 $- 
 $813 
 $36,000 
Interest andfinance charges
  - 
  616 
   
Reimbursement of third-party expenses incurred by UMS on behalf of the Company
  138,009 
  8,442 
  19,000 
Total
 $138,009 
 $9,871 
 $55,000 
 
 
F-27
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
12. 
INCOME TAXES
 
(a) 
Provision for current tax
  
No provision has been made for current income taxes as the Company has no taxable income.
 
(b) 
Provision fordeferred tax
  
As future taxable profits of the Company are uncertain, no deferred tax asset has been recognized.
 
At March 31, 2021, the Company had unused non-capital loss carry forwards of approximately $10,700,000 (March 31, 2020 – $9.8 million; March 31, 2019 – $8.8 million).
 
At March 31, 2021, the Company had resource tax pools of approximately $31,000,000 (March 31, 2020 – $31.3 million; March 31, 2019 – $30.6 million) available in Canada, which may be carried forward and utilized to offset future taxes related to certain resource income.
 
(c) 
Reconciliation of effective tax rate
 
 
 
March 31,
2021
 
 
March 31,
2020
 
Income (loss) for the year
 $1,360,699 
 $(1,253,534)
Total income tax expense
   
   
Loss excluding income tax
  1,360,699 
  (1,253,534)
 
    
    
Income tax expense (recovery) using the Company’s tax rate
  367,000 
  (388,000)
Non-deductible expenses and other
  (577,000)
  (114,000)
Temporary difference booked to reserve
  (16,000)
  (2,000)
Deferred income tax assets not recognized
  194,000 
  454,000 
 
 $ 
 $ 
 
The Company’s statutory tax rate was 27% (2020 – 27%; 2019 – 27%) and its effective tax rate is nil (2020 – nil; 2019 – nil).
 
(d) 
Deductible temporary differences
 
At March 31, 2021, the Company had the following deductible temporary differences for which no deferred tax asset was recognized:
 
 
F-28
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 


Expiry
 
Tax losses
(capital)
 
 
Tax losses
(non-capital)
 
 
Resources
pools
 
 
Other
 
Within one year
 $ 
 $ 
 $ 
 $ 
One to five years
   
   
   
  21,000 
After five years
   
  10,730,000 
   
  1,011,000 
No expiry date
  1,294,000 
   
  31,201,000 
  77,000 
 
 $1,294,000 
 $10,730,000 
 $31,201,000 
 $1,109,000 
 
13. 
SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION TO THE CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF LOSS
 
(a) 
Employees’ salaries and benefits
 
The employees’ salaries and benefits included in exploration and evaluation expenses and administration expenses are as follows:
 
Employees’ salaries and benefits
 
For the years ended March 31,
 
(rounded to the nearest thousand CAD)
 
2021
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
Salaries and benefits included in the following:
Exploration andevaluation expenses
 $576,000 
 $856,000 
 $1,268,000 
Administration expense 1
  363,000 
  454,000 
  571,000 
Total
 $939,000 
 $1,310,000 
 $1,839,000 
This amount includes salaries and benefits included in office and administration expenses (note 13(b)) as well as other salaries and benefits expenses classified as administration expenses.
 
(b) 
Office and administration expenses
 
Office and administration expenses include the following:
 
Office and administration expenses
 
For the years ended March 31,
 
(rounded to the nearest thousand CAD)
 
2021
 
 
2020
 
 
2019
 
Salaries and benefits
 $300,000 
 $414,000 
 $501,000 
Insurance
  79,000 
  55,000 
  74,000 
Data processing and retention
  23,000 
  60,000 
  60,000 
Other office expenses
  15,000 
  21,000 
  22,000 
Total
 $417,000 
 $550,000 
 $657,000 
 
 
F-29
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
14. 
FINANCIAL RISK MANAGEMENT
 
(a) 
Capital management objectives
 
The Company’s primary objectives when managing capital are to safeguard the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern so that it can continue to provide returns for shareholders, and to have sufficient liquidity available to fund ongoing expenditures and suitable business opportunities as they arise.
 
The Company considers the components of shareholders’ equity as well as its cash as capital. The Company manages its capital structure and makes adjustments to it in light of changes in economic conditions and the risk characteristics of the underlying assets. In order to maintain or adjust the capital structure, the Company may issue equity, sell assets, or return capital to shareholders as well as issue or repay debt.
 
The Company’s investment policy is to invest its cash in highly liquid, short-term, interest-bearing investments having maturity dates of three months or less from the date of acquisition, which are readily convertible into known amounts of cash.
 
The Company is not subject to any imposed equity requirements.
 
There were no changes to the Company’s approach to capital management during the year ended March 31, 2021.
 
(b) 
Carrying amounts and fair values of financial instruments
 
The Company’s marketable securities are carried at fair value based on quoted prices in active markets.
 
As at March 31, 2021 and 2020, the carrying values of the Company’s financial assets and financial liabilities approximate their fair values.
 
(c) 
Financial instrument risk exposure and risk management
 
The Company is exposed in varying degrees to a variety of financial instrument-related risks. The Board of Directors approves and monitors the risk management processes, inclusive of documented treasury policies, counterparty limits, and controlling and reporting structures. The type of risk exposure and the way in which such exposure is managed is provided as follows:
 
Credit risk
 
Credit risk is the risk of potential loss to the Company if a counterparty to a financial instrument fairs to meet its contractual obligations. The Company’s credit risk is primarily attributable to its liquid financial assets, including cash, and amounts receivable and other assets. The carrying values of these financial assets represent the Company’s maximum exposure to credit risk.
 
The Company limits the exposure to credit risk by only investing its cash in high-credit quality financial institutions in business and savings accounts, which are available on demand by the Company for its programs.
 
 
F-30
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
Liquidity risk
 
Liquidity risk is the risk that the Company will encounter difficulty in meeting the obligations associated with its financial liabilities that are settled by delivering cash or other financial assets. The Company ensures that there is sufficient cash in order to meet its short-term business requirements after taking into account the Company’s holdings of cash.
 
The Company has sufficient cash to meet its commitments associated with its financial liabilities in the near term, other than the amounts payable to related parties.
 
Interest rate risk
 
The Company is subject to interest rate risk with respect to its investments in cash. The Company’s policy is to invest cash at variable rates of interest and cash reserves are to be maintained in cash in order to maintain liquidity, while achieving a satisfactory return for shareholders. Fluctuations in interest rates when cash matures impactinterest income earned.
 
As at March 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company’s exposure to interest rate risk was nominal.
 
Price risk
 
Equity price risk is defined as the potential adverse impact on the Company’s earnings due to movements in individual equity prices or general movements in the level of the stock market. The Company is subject to price risk in respect of its investments in marketable securities.
 
As at March 31, 2021 and 2020, the Company’s exposure to price risk was not significant in relation to these Financial Statements.
 
15. 
EVENTS AFTER THE REPORTING PERIOD
 
(a) 
Sublease Agreement
 
On April 22, 2021, the Company and HDSI entered into a sublease agreement for renting an office space in Vancouver British Columbia (the “2021 Office Sublease Agreement”). Pursuant to the Sublease Agreement, the sublease term commences on May 1, 2021 and expires on April 29, 2026. The Company as the sublease tenant will pay HDSI the sublandlord the basic rent according to the following schedule:
 
Rent Periods
 
Basic Rents
 
May 1, 2021 to April 30, 2022
 $25,545 
May 1, 2022 to April 30, 2023
  25,545 
May 1, 2023 to April 30, 2024
  26,855 
May 1, 2024 to April 30, 2025
  28,165 
May 1, 2025 to April 29, 2026
  28,165 
Total
 $134,275 
 
 
F-31
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements
For the years ended March 31, 2021, 2020 and 2019
(Expressed in Canadian Dollars, unless otherwise stated)
 

 
(b) 
JOY District Agreement with Freeport
 
On May 11, 2021, the Company and Freeport-McMoRan Mineral Properties Canada Inc. (“Freeport”), a wholly owned subsidiary of Freeport-McMoRan Inc. (NYSE:FCX) entered into a Mineral Property Earn-in Agreement (the “EIA”) whereby Freeport may acquire up to a 70% ownership interest of the Company’s Joy porphyry Cu-Au District Property (See Note 7(b)).
 
Under the terms of the EIA, Freeport has a two-stage option to earn up to a 70% ownership interest in themineral claims comprising the JOY District, plus other rights and interests, over a 10 year period.
 
To earn an initial 60% interest, Freeport is required to fund $35 million of work expenditures over a 5- year term. During the first year of the earn-in, a $4 million work program is planned in the JOY District.
 
These optional earn-in expenditures can be accelerated by Freeport at its discretion. Amarc will be operator during the initial earn-in period. Once Freeport has acquired such 60% interest, Amarc and Freeport will proceed to operate the JOY District through a jointly owned corporation with Freeport assuming project operatorship.
 
Upon Freeport earning such 60% interest, it can elect, in its sole discretion, to earn an additional 10% interest, for a total 70% interest by sole funding a further $75 million within the following five years.
 
Once Freeport has finalized its earned ownership interest at either the 60% or 70% level, each party will be responsible for funding its own pro-rata share of project costs on a 60:40 or 70:30 basis.
 
 
F-32
 
 
ITEM 19 
EXHIBITS
 
The following Exhibits have been filed with the Company's Annual Report on Form 20-F in previous years:
 
 
Exhibit Number
Description of Exhibit
Articles of Amarc Resources Ltd., as amended (1)
Amended Share Option Plan of Amarc Resources Ltd. dated for reference September 21, 2004, as amended. (2)
Corporate Services Agreement between Amarc Resources Ltd. and Hunter Dickinson Services Inc. dated June 1, 2008 as superseded by the Services Agreement dated July 2, 2010. (2)
Certificate of Expert (3)
Code of Ethics (2)
 
(1)
Incorporated by reference to the Company's Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended March 31, 2010, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 30, 2010.
 
(2)
Incorporated by reference to the Company's Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended March 31, 2008, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 7, 2008.
 
(3)
Incorporated by reference to the Company's Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended March 31, 2013, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 30, 2013.
 
The following exhibits are included with this Annual Report on Form 20-F:
 
Exhibit Number
Description of Exhibit
Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) of the Exchange Act, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) of the Exchange Act, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(b) of the Exchange Act and 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(b) of the Exchange Act and 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
 
 
 
62
 
 
SIGNATURES
 
The registrant hereby certifies that it meets all of the requirements for filing on Form 20-F and that it has duly caused and authorized the undersigned to sign this Annual Report on its behalf.
 
 
 
AMARC RESOURCES LTD.
 
    
DATED: July 27, 2021By:  
/s/  Sebastian Tang
 
  
Sebastian Tang
 
  Chief Financial Officer 
 

 
 
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