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TTI Tetra

Filed: 7 Aug 20, 7:27am


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
 (Mark One)
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 
For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2020
or 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 For the transition period from            to           .
 
Commission File Number 1-13455
 
TETRA Technologies, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Delaware74-2148293
(State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
  
24955 Interstate 45 North 
The Woodlands, 
Texas77380
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)(Zip Code)
(281) 367-1983
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

_______________________________________________________________________
Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, if Changed Since Last Report
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each classTrading Symbol(s)Name of each exchange on which registered
Common StockTTINew York Stock Exchange
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes   No
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes   No
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filerAccelerated filer
Non-accelerated filerSmaller reporting company
  Emerging growth company
 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes   No

 As of August 6, 2020, there were 125,838,030 shares outstanding of the Company’s Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share.









PART I
FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
Item 1. Financial Statements.
 
TETRA Technologies, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Statements of Operations
(In Thousands, Except Per Share Amounts)
(Unaudited)
 Three Months Ended
June 30,
 Six Months Ended
June 30,
 2020 2019 2020 2019
Revenues: 
  
    
Product sales$98,173
 $135,350
 $183,206
 $227,131
Services94,268
 153,446
 232,177
 305,393
Total revenues192,441
 288,796
 415,383
 532,524
Cost of revenues: 
  
    
Cost of product sales75,004
 108,253
 133,971
 182,841
Cost of services58,888
 98,049
 148,615
 200,205
Depreciation, amortization, and accretion29,842
 31,817
 59,302
 62,445
Impairments and other charges8,977
 2,311
 14,348
 2,457
Insurance recoveries(591) 
 (591) 
Total cost of revenues172,120
 240,430
 355,645
 447,948
Gross profit20,321
 48,366
 59,738
 84,576
General and administrative expense34,014
 36,295
 64,551
 70,572
Interest expense, net17,586
 18,529
 35,442
 36,908
Warrants fair value adjustment (income) expense11
 (1,520) (327) (1,113)
CCLP Series A Preferred Units fair value adjustment (income) expense
 146
 
 1,309
Other (income) expense, net3,839
 627
 4,278
 (324)
Loss before taxes and discontinued operations(35,129) (5,711) (44,206) (22,776)
Provision for income taxes2,001
 2,490
 3,155
 4,099
Loss before discontinued operations(37,130) (8,201) (47,361) (26,875)
Discontinued operations:       
Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of taxes163
 (345) 18
 (771)
Net loss(36,967) (8,546) (47,343) (27,646)
Less: loss attributable to noncontrolling interest15,712
 1,633
 24,537
 9,895
Net loss attributable to TETRA stockholders$(21,255) $(6,913) $(22,806) $(17,751)
Basic net loss per common share: 
      
Loss before discontinued operations attributable to TETRA stockholders$(0.17) $(0.06) $(0.18) $(0.13)
Income (loss) from discontinued operations attributable to TETRA stockholders$0.00
 $0.00
 $0.00
 $(0.01)
Net loss attributable to TETRA stockholders$(0.17) $(0.06) $(0.18) $(0.14)
Average shares outstanding125,886
 125,612
 125,736
 125,646
Diluted net loss per common share: 
  
    
Loss before discontinued operations attributable to TETRA stockholders$(0.17) $(0.06) $(0.18) $(0.13)
Income (loss) from discontinued operations attributable to TETRA stockholders$0.00
 $0.00
 $0.00
 $(0.01)
Net loss attributable to TETRA stockholders$(0.17) $(0.06) $(0.18) $(0.14)
Average diluted shares outstanding125,886
 125,612
 125,736
 125,646

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

1


TETRA Technologies, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss)
(In Thousands)
(Unaudited)
 
 Three Months Ended
June 30,
 Six Months Ended
June 30,
 2020 2019 2020 2019
Net loss$(36,967) $(8,546) $(47,343) $(27,646)
Foreign currency translation adjustment, net of taxes of $0 in 2020 and 20191,095
 848
 (5,372) 442
Comprehensive loss(35,872) (7,698) (52,715) (27,204)
Less: Comprehensive loss attributable to noncontrolling interest15,597
 1,550
 24,651
 9,636
Comprehensive loss attributable to TETRA stockholders$(20,275) $(6,148) $(28,064) $(17,568)
 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

2


TETRA Technologies, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Balance Sheets
(In Thousands)
 
 June 30,
2020
 December 31,
2019
 (Unaudited)  
ASSETS 
  
Current assets: 
  
Cash and cash equivalents$56,722
 $17,704
Restricted cash58
 64
Trade accounts receivable, net of allowances of $10,223 in 2020 and $5,262 in 2019114,306
 175,918
Inventories115,506
 136,510
Prepaid expenses and other current assets22,395
 21,158
Total current assets308,987
 351,354
Property, plant, and equipment: 
  
Land and building57,766
 60,586
Machinery and equipment1,356,238
 1,335,157
Automobiles and trucks27,350
 31,681
Chemical plants58,990
 57,692
Construction in progress9,869
 34,393
Total property, plant, and equipment1,510,213
 1,519,509
Less accumulated depreciation(796,629) (760,872)
Net property, plant, and equipment713,584
 758,637
Other assets: 
  
Patents, trademarks and other intangible assets, net of accumulated amortization of $91,458 in 2020 and $88,422 in 201970,175
 74,199
Deferred tax assets, net41
 24
Operating lease right-of-use assets75,524
 68,131
Other assets20,283
 19,577
Total other assets166,023
 161,931
Total assets$1,188,594
 $1,271,922
 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

3


TETRA Technologies, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Balance Sheets
(In Thousands, Except Share Amounts)
 
 June 30,
2020
 December 31,
2019
 (Unaudited)  
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY 
  
Current liabilities: 
  
Trade accounts payable$52,423
 $88,917
Unearned income13,127
 9,831
Accrued liabilities and other79,904
 87,877
Liabilities of discontinued operations1,873
 2,098
Total current liabilities147,327
 188,723
Long-term debt, net843,292
 842,871
Deferred income taxes3,245
 2,988
Asset retirement obligations12,862
 12,762
Warrants liability123
 449
Operating lease liabilities60,693
 53,919
Other liabilities8,366
 7,384
Total long-term liabilities928,581
 920,373
Commitments and contingencies 
  
Equity: 
  
TETRA stockholders' equity: 
  
Common stock, par value $0.01 per share; 250,000,000 shares authorized at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019; 128,773,914 shares issued at June 30, 2020 and 128,304,354 shares issued at December 31, 20191,288
 1,283
Additional paid-in capital469,777
 466,959
Treasury stock, at cost; 2,908,217 shares held at June 30, 2020, and 2,823,191 shares held at December 31, 2019(19,434) (19,164)
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)(57,441) (52,183)
Retained deficit(385,328) (362,522)
Total TETRA stockholders' equity8,862
 34,373
Noncontrolling interests103,824
 128,453
Total equity112,686
 162,826
Total liabilities and equity$1,188,594
 $1,271,922
 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

4


TETRA Technologies, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Statements of Equity
(In Thousands)

 
Common Stock
Par Value
 
Additional Paid-In
Capital
 
Treasury
Stock
 
Accumulated Other 
Comprehensive Income (Loss)
 
Retained
Earnings
 
Noncontrolling
Interest
 
Total
Equity
    
Currency
Translation
   
              
Balance at December 31, 2019$1,283
 $466,959
 $(19,164) $(52,183) $(362,522) $128,453
 $162,826
Net loss for first quarter 2020
 
 
 
 (1,551) (8,825) (10,376)
Translation adjustment, net of taxes of $0
 
 
 (6,238) 
 (229) (6,467)
Comprehensive loss
 
 
 
 
 
 (16,843)
Distributions to public unitholders
 
 
 
 
 (309) (309)
Equity award activity4
 
 
 
 
 
 4
Treasury stock activity, net
 
 (89) 
 
 
 (89)
Equity compensation expense
 1,145
 
 
 
 228
 1,373
Other
 (16) 
 
 
 (15) (31)
Balance at March 31, 2020$1,287
 $468,088
 $(19,253) $(58,421) $(364,073) $119,303
 $146,931
Net loss for second quarter 2020
 
 
 
 (21,255) (15,712) (36,967)
Translation adjustment, net of taxes of $0
 
 
 980
 
 115
 1,095
Comprehensive loss
 
 
 
 
 
 (35,872)
Distributions to public unitholders
 
 
 
 
 (311) (311)
Equity award activity1
 
 
 
 
 
 1
Treasury stock activity, net
 
 (181) 
 
 
 (181)
Equity compensation expense
 1,685
 
 
 
 449
 2,134
Other
 4
 
 
 
 (20) (16)
Balance at June 30, 2020$1,288
 $469,777
 $(19,434) $(57,441) $(385,328) $103,824
 $112,686




5


 
Common Stock
Par Value
 
Additional Paid-In
Capital
 
Treasury
Stock
 
Accumulated Other 
Comprehensive Income (Loss)
 
Retained
Earnings
 
Noncontrolling
Interest
 
Total
Equity
    
Currency
Translation
   
              
Balance at December 31, 2018$1,285
 $460,680
 $(18,950) $(51,663) $(217,952) $139,349
 $312,749
Net loss for first quarter 2019
 
 
 
 (10,838) (8,262) (19,100)
Translation adjustment, net of taxes of $0
 
 
 (582) 
 176
 (406)
Comprehensive loss
 
 
 
 
 
 (19,506)
Distributions to public unitholders
 
 
 
 
 (307) (307)
Equity award activity(1) 
 
 
 
 
 (1)
Treasury stock activity, net
 
 (155) 
 
 
 (155)
Equity compensation expense
 1,628
 
 
 
 311
 1,939
Conversions of CCLP Series A Preferred
 
 
 
 
 2,539
 2,539
Cumulative effect adjustment
 
 
 
 2,843
 
 2,843
Other
 (67) 
 
 
 76
 9
Balance at March 31, 2019$1,284
 $462,241
 $(19,105) $(52,245) $(225,947) $133,882
 $300,110
Net loss for second quarter 2019
 
 
 
 (6,913) (1,633) (8,546)
Translation adjustment, net of taxes of $0
 
 
 765
 
 83
 848
Comprehensive loss
 
 
 
 
 
 (7,698)
Distributions to public unitholders
 
 
 
 
 (308) (308)
Treasury stock activity, net
 
 (11) 
 
 
 (11)
Equity compensation expense
 2,100
 
 
 
 567
 2,667
Other
 (36) 
 
 
 (33) (69)
Balance at June 30, 2019$1,284
 $464,305
 $(19,116) $(51,480) $(232,860) $132,558
 $294,691

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements


6


TETRA Technologies, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(In Thousands)
(Unaudited) 
 Six Months Ended June 30,
 2020 2019
Operating activities: 
  
Net loss$(47,343) $(27,646)
Reconciliation of net loss to net cash provided by operating activities:   
Depreciation, amortization, and accretion59,302
 62,445
Impairment and other charges14,348
 2,457
Benefit for deferred income taxes467
 550
Equity-based compensation expense2,896
 4,932
Provision for doubtful accounts5,504
 922
Amortization and expense of financing costs2,755
 2,644
Insurance recoveries associated with damaged equipment(591) 
Equipment received in lieu of cash725
 
Debt exchange expenses4,754
 
CCLP Series A Preferred Unit distributions and adjustments
 3,178
Warrants fair value adjustment(326) (1,113)
Contingent consideration liability fair value adjustment
 (800)
Gain on sale of assets(2,019) (872)
Changes in operating assets and liabilities: 
  
Accounts receivable54,827
 (7,075)
Inventories10,733
 (92)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets(3,038) (4,327)
Trade accounts payable and accrued expenses(42,853) 4,766
Other246
 (1,592)
Net cash provided by operating activities60,387
 38,377
Investing activities: 
  
Purchases of property, plant, and equipment, net(19,608) (60,604)
Acquisition of businesses, net of cash acquired
 (11,417)
Proceeds on sale of property, plant, and equipment5,311
 1,214
Insurance recoveries associated with damaged equipment591
 
Other investing activities(357) (447)
Net cash used in investing activities(14,063) (71,254)
Financing activities: 
  
Proceeds from long-term debt338,343
 194,090
Principal payments on long-term debt(341,364) (154,217)
CCLP distributions(620) (615)
Redemptions of CCLP Series A Preferred
 (19,760)
Tax remittances on equity based compensation(341) (458)
Debt issuance costs and other financing activities(2,504) (325)
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities(6,486) 18,715
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash(826) 105
Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents39,012
 (14,057)
Cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash at beginning of period17,768
 40,102
Cash and cash equivalents and restricted cash at end of period$56,780
 $26,045
    
    
Supplemental cash flow information: 
  
Interest paid$35,127
 $33,449
Income taxes paid2,195
 4,501
See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

7


TETRA Technologies, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
NOTE 1 – ORGANIZATION, BASIS OF PRESENTATION, AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Organization 

We are a geographically diversified oil and gas services company, focused on completion fluids and associated products and services, water management, frac flowback, production well testing and offshore rig cooling services, and compression services and equipment. We were incorporated in Delaware in 1981. We are composed of 3 divisions – Completion Fluids & Products, Water & Flowback Services, and Compression. Unless the context requires otherwise, when we refer to “we,” “us,” and “our,” we are describing TETRA Technologies, Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries on a consolidated basis.

Presentation  

Our unaudited consolidated financial statements include the accounts of our wholly owned subsidiaries. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. The information furnished reflects all normal recurring adjustments, which are, in the opinion of management, necessary to provide a fair statement of the results for the interim periods. Operating results for the period ended June 30, 2020 are not necessarily indicative of results that may be expected for the twelve months ended December 31, 2020.

We consolidate the financial statements of our CSI Compressco LP subsidiary ("CCLP") as part of our Compression Division, as we determined that CCLP is a variable interest entity and we are the primary beneficiary. We control the financial interests of CCLP and have the ability to direct the activities of CCLP that most significantly impact its economic performance through our ownership of its general partner. The share of CCLP net assets and earnings that is not owned by us is presented as noncontrolling interest in our consolidated financial statements. Our cash flows from our investment in CCLP are limited to the quarterly distributions we receive on our CCLP common units and general partner interest (including incentive distribution rights) and the amounts collected for services we perform on behalf of CCLP, as TETRA's capital structure and CCLP's capital structure are separate, and do not include cross default provisions or cross guarantees.
 
The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Rule 10-01 of Regulation S-X for interim financial statements required to be filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") and do not include all information and footnotes required by U.S. generally accepted accounting principles ("U.S. GAAP") for complete financial statements. These financial statements should be read in conjunction with the financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2019 and notes thereto included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, which we filed with the SEC on March 16, 2020.

Significant Accounting Policies

Our significant accounting policies are described in the notes to our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2019 included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K. There have been no significant changes in our accounting policies or the application thereof during the second quarter of 2020.

Use of Estimates
 
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclose contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues, expenses, and impairments during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates, and such differences could be material.

Reclassifications

Certain previously reported financial information has been reclassified to conform to the current year's presentation. The impact of such reclassifications was not significant to the prior year's overall presentation.


8


Assets Held for Sale

As of June 30, 2020, we had $2.6 million in net book value of compressor equipment classified as held for sale within net property, plant, and equipment on our consolidated balance sheets. For further details of the impairment recorded to adjust the net book value to fair value upon this classification, see Note 3 - Impairments and Other Charges below.

Impairments and Other Charges

Impairments of long-lived assets, including identified intangible assets, are determined periodically when indicators of impairment are present. If such indicators are present, the determination of the amount of impairment is based on our judgment as to the future undiscounted operating cash flows to be generated from the relevant assets throughout their remaining estimated useful lives. If these undiscounted cash flows are less than the carrying amount of the related assets, an impairment is recognized for the excess of the carrying value over fair value. Fair value of intangible assets is generally determined using the discounted present value of future cash flows using discount rates commensurate with the risks inherent with the specific assets. Assets held for disposal are recorded at the lower of carrying value or estimated fair value less estimated selling costs. See Note 3 - "Impairments and Other Charges" for additional discussion of recorded impairments.

Revenue Recognition
 
Performance Obligations. Revenue is generally recognized when we transfer control of our products or services to our customers. Revenue is measured as the amount of consideration we expect to receive in exchange for transferring products or providing services to our customers. We receive cash equal to the invoice price for most sales of product and services and payment terms typically range from 30 to 60 days from the date we invoice our customer. Since the period between when we deliver products or services and when the customer pays for such products or services is not expected to exceed one year, we have elected not to calculate or disclose a financing component for our customer contracts.

Depending on the terms of the arrangement, we may also defer the recognition of revenue for a portion of the consideration received because we have to satisfy a future performance obligation. For example, consideration received from customers during the fabrication of new compressor packages is typically deferred until control of the compressor package is transferred to our customer.

For any arrangements with multiple performance obligations, we use management's estimated selling price to determine the stand-alone selling price for separate performance obligations. For revenue associated with mobilization of service equipment as part of a service contract arrangement, such revenue, if significant, is deferred and amortized over the estimated service period.

Product Sales. Product sales revenues are generally recognized when we ship products from our facility to our customer. The product sales for our Completion Fluids & Products Division consist primarily of clear brine fluids ("CBFs"), additives, and associated manufactured products. Product sales for our Water & Flowback Services Division are typically attributed to specific performance obligations within certain production testing service arrangements. Parts and equipment sales comprise the product sales for the Compression Division.

Services. Service revenues represent revenue recognized over time, as our customer arrangements typically provide agreed upon day-rates (monthly service rates for compression services) and we recognize service revenue based upon the number of days services have been performed. Service revenue recognized over time is associated with a majority of our Water & Flowback Services Division arrangements, compression service and aftermarket service contracts within our Compression Division, and a small portion of Completion Fluids & Products Division revenue that is associated with completion fluid service arrangements. With the exception of the initial terms of the compression services contracts for medium- and high-horsepower compressor packages of our Compression Division, our customer contracts are generally for terms of one year or less. The majority of the service arrangements in the Water & Flowback Services Division are for a period of 90 days or less.

Sales taxes, value added taxes, and other taxes we collect concurrent with revenue-producing activities are excluded from revenue. We have elected to recognize the cost for freight and shipping costs as part of cost of product sales when control over our products (i.e. delivery) has transferred to the customer.


9


Use of Estimates. In recognizing revenue for variable consideration arrangements, the amount of variable consideration recognized is limited so that it is probable that significant amounts of revenues will not be reversed in future periods when the uncertainty is resolved. For products returned by the customer, we estimate the expected returns based on an analysis of historical experience. For volume discounts earned by the customer, we estimate the discount (if any) based on our estimate of the total expected volume of products sold or services to be provided to the customer during the discount period. In certain contracts for the sale of CBFs, we may agree to issue credits for the repurchase of reclaimable used fluids from certain customers at an agreed price that is based on the condition of the fluids.

Contract Assets and Liabilities. We consider contract assets to be trade accounts receivable when we have an unconditional right to consideration and only the passage of time is required before payment is due. In certain instances, particularly those requiring customer specific documentation prior to invoicing, our invoicing of the customer is delayed until certain documentation requirements are met. In those cases, we recognize a contract asset rather than a billed trade accounts receivable until we are able to invoice the customer. Contract assets, along with billed trade accounts receivable, are included in trade accounts receivable in our consolidated balance sheets.

We classify contract liabilities as unearned income in our consolidated balance sheets. Such deferred revenue typically results from advance payments received on orders for new compressor equipment prior to the time such equipment is completed and transferred to the customer in accordance with the customer contract. New equipment sales orders generally take less than twelve months to build and deliver.

Bill-and-Hold Arrangements. We design and fabricate compressor packages based on our customer’s specifications. In some cases, the customer will request us to hold the equipment, upon completion of the unit, until the job site is ready to receive the equipment. When this occurs, we along with the customer sign a bill-and-hold agreement, which outlines that the customer has title to the equipment, the equipment is ready for delivery, we cannot use the equipment or direct it to another customer, and we have a present right to payment. When those criteria have been met and the agreement is executed, we recognize the revenue on the equipment because control of the equipment has passed to our customer and our performance obligations are complete. Entering into these arrangements is something we have done as a courtesy for certain customers for many years. The equipment subject to the bill-and-hold agreements has generally been invoiced and paid for through progressive billings such that at the time the bill-and-hold agreement is executed, the majority of the contractual cash obligation of the customer has been received by us.
Operating Costs
 
Cost of product sales includes direct and indirect costs of manufacturing and producing our products, including raw materials, fuel, utilities, labor, overhead, repairs and maintenance, materials, services, transportation, warehousing, equipment rentals, insurance, and certain taxes. Cost of services includes operating expenses we incur in delivering our services, including labor, equipment rental, fuel, repair and maintenance, transportation, overhead, insurance, and certain taxes. We include in product sales revenues the reimbursements we receive from customers for shipping and handling costs. Shipping and handling costs are included in cost of product sales. Amounts we incur for “out-of-pocket” expenses in the delivery of our services are recorded as cost of services. Reimbursements for “out-of-pocket” expenses we incur in the delivery of our services are recorded as service revenues. Depreciation, amortization, and accretion includes depreciation expense for all of our facilities, equipment and vehicles, amortization expense on our intangible assets, and accretion expense related to our decommissioning and other asset retirement obligations.
 
We include in general and administrative expense all costs not identifiable to our specific product or service operations, including divisional and general corporate overhead, professional services, corporate office costs, sales and marketing expenses, insurance, and certain taxes. 
 
Foreign Currency Translation
 
We have designated the euro, the British pound, the Norwegian krone, the Canadian dollar, the Brazilian real, and the Mexican peso as the functional currencies for our operations in Finland and Sweden, the United Kingdom, Norway, Canada, Brazil, and certain of our operations in Mexico, respectively. The U.S. dollar is the designated functional currency for all of our other foreign operations. The cumulative translation effects of translating the applicable accounts from the functional currencies into the U.S. dollar at current exchange rates are included as a separate component of equity. Foreign currency exchange (gains) and losses are included in other

10


(income) expense, net and totaled $0.4 million and $2.3 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, respectively, and $0.8 million and $(0.5) million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2019, respectively.

Fair Value Measurements
 
We utilize fair value measurements to account for certain items and account balances within our consolidated financial statements. Fair value measurements are utilized on a recurring basis in the determination of the carrying values of certain liabilities, including the liabilities for the warrants to purchase 11.2 million shares of our common stock (the "Warrants") and our foreign currency derivative contracts. Refer to Note 9 - "Fair Value Measurements" for further discussion.

Fair value measurements are also utilized on a nonrecurring basis in certain circumstances, such as in the allocation of purchase consideration for acquisition transactions to the assets and liabilities acquired, including intangible assets and goodwill (a Level 3 fair value measurement), the initial recording of our asset retirement obligations, and for the impairment of long-lived assets, including goodwill (a Level 3 fair value measurement).

New Accounting Pronouncements
 
Standards adopted in 2020

In August 2018, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") 2018-15, "Intangibles—Goodwill and Other—Internal-Use Software (Subtopic 350-40): Customer’s Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That Is a Service Contract." ASU 2018-15 clarifies the accounting for implementation costs in cloud computing arrangements. ASU 2018-15 is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2019, and early adoption is permitted. The adoption of this standard did not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

Standards not yet adopted

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, "Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments." ASU 2016-13 amends the impairment model to utilize an expected loss methodology in place of the currently used incurred loss methodology, which will result in the more timely recognition of losses on financial instruments not accounted for at fair value through net income. The provisions require credit impairments to be measured over the contractual life of an asset and developed with consideration for past events, current conditions, and forecasts of future economic information. Credit impairment will be accounted for as an allowance for credit losses deducted from the amortized cost basis at each reporting date. We are continuing to work through our implementation plan which includes evaluating the impact on our allowance for doubtful accounts methodology, identifying new reporting requirements, and implementing changes to business processes, systems, and controls to support adoption of the standard. Upon adoption, the allowance for doubtful accounts is expected to increase with an offsetting adjustment to retained earnings. Updates at each reporting date after initial adoption will be recorded through selling, general, and administrative expense. ASU 2016-13 has an effective date of the first quarter of fiscal 2023. We continue to assess the potential effects of these changes to our consolidated financial statements.

In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12, "Income Taxes (Topic 740): Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes." ASU 2019-12 simplifies the accounting for income taxes by eliminating certain exceptions related to intraperiod tax allocation, interim period income tax calculation methodology, and the recognition of deferred tax liabilities for outside basis differences. It also simplifies certain aspects of accounting for franchise taxes and clarifies the accounting for transactions that results in a step-up in the tax basis of goodwill. ASU 2019-12 is effective for us the first quarter of fiscal 2021. We continue to assess the potential effects of these changes to our consolidated financial statements.

In March 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-04, “Reference Rate Reform (Topic 848)”, which provides optional expedients and exceptions for applying US GAAP to contracts, hedging relationships, and other transactions affected by the discontinuation of the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) or by another reference rate expected to be discontinued. The amendments are effective for all entities as of March 12, 2020 through December 31, 2022. We are currently evaluating the impacts of the provisions of ASU 2020-04 on our consolidated financial statements.

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NOTE 2 – REVENUE FROM CONTRACTS WITH CUSTOMERS
    
As of June 30, 2020, we had $50.0 million of remaining contractual performance obligations for compression services. As a practical expedient, this amount does not reflect revenue for compression service contracts whose original expected duration is less than twelve months and does not consider the effects of the time value of money. Expected revenue to be recognized in the future as of June 30, 2020 for completion of performance obligations of compression service contracts are as follows:
 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 Total
 (In Thousands)
Compression service contracts remaining performance obligations$35,385
 $12,735
 $1,807
 $62
 $46
 $50,035

For sales of CBFs where we have agreed to issue credits for the repurchase of reclaimable used fluids at an agreed price based on the condition of the fluid upon return, we adjust the revenue recognized in the period of shipment by an estimated amount, based on historical experience, of the credit expected to be issued. As of June 30, 2020, the amount of remaining credits expected to be issued for the repurchase of reclaimable used fluids was $1.5 million recorded in inventory (right of return asset) and either accounts payable or as a reduction to accounts receivable. There were no material differences between amounts recognized during the three and six month period ended June 30, 2020, compared to estimates made in a prior period from these variable consideration arrangements.

Our contract asset balances, primarily associated with customer documentation requirements, were $19.4 million and $34.9 million as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively. Contract assets, along with billed trade accounts receivable, are included in trade accounts receivable in our consolidated balance sheets.

Collections primarily associated with progressive billings to customers for the construction of compression equipment is included in unearned income in the consolidated balance sheets. The following table reflects the changes in unearned income in our consolidated balance sheets for the periods indicated:
 Six Months Ended
June 30,
 2020 2019
 (In Thousands)
Unearned Income, beginning of period$9,678
 $25,333
Additional unearned income32,834
 84,456
Revenue recognized(29,881) (78,119)
Unearned income, end of period$12,631
 $31,670


During the six month period ended June 30, 2020, we recognized product sales revenue of $5.9 million from unearned income that was deferred as of December 31, 2019. During the six months ended June 30, 2019, we recognized product sales revenue of $19.1 million from unearned income that was deferred as of December 31, 2018.

As of June 30, 2020, contract costs were immaterial.
    

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We disaggregate revenue from contracts with customers into Product Sales and Services within each segment, as noted in our three reportable segments in Note 11. In addition, we disaggregate revenue from contracts with customers by geography based on the following table below.
 Three months ended June 30, Six months ended June 30,
 2020 2019 2020 2019
 (In Thousands)
Completion Fluids & Products       
U.S.32,102
 37,536
 $70,060
 $69,142
International39,244
 42,231
 76,523
 72,206
 71,346
 79,767
 146,583
 141,348
Water & Flowback Services       
U.S.22,866
 68,412
 77,250
 141,611
International1,857
 4,712
 4,940
 10,191
 24,723
 73,124
 82,190
 151,802
Compression       
U.S.88,583
 126,122
 169,183
 219,638
International7,789
 9,783
 17,427
 19,736
 96,372
 135,905
 186,610
 239,374
Total Revenue       
U.S.143,551
 232,070
 316,493
 430,391
International48,890
 56,726
 98,890
 102,133
 192,441
 288,796
 $415,383
 $532,524

NOTE 3 – IMPAIRMENTS AND OTHER CHARGES

Impairments of Long-Lived Assets

During the first half of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic and decline in oil and gas prices had a significant impact on our customers and industry. These events led to a significant reduction in the operations of our customers resulting in a decrease in demand in certain of our service lines.

During the first quarter of 2020, we started to see our customers revise their capital budgets downwards and adjust their operations accordingly, which led to a decline in orders for new compression equipment to be fabricated and sold to third parties. We concluded that these events were indicators of impairment for all our asset groups within our Compression Division and certain asset groups within our Completion Fluids & Products Division. We performed recoverability analyses on the relevant asset groups within these divisions. Based upon these recoverability analyses, we determined that the carrying values of our Midland manufacturing facility and related new unit sales inventory in our Compression Division exceeded their respective fair values. Therefore, we recorded impairments of approximately $5.4 million related to these assets. Fair value was estimated based on a market approach.

During the second quarter of 2020, primarily as a result of continued negative impacts on our compression fleet associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and declines in oil and gas prices, our Compression Division recorded impairments and other charges of approximately $9.0 million associated with non-core used compressor equipment that we have held for sale, the low-horsepower class of our compression fleet, and field inventory for compression and related services. Fair value used to determine impairments was estimated based on a market approach. Given the dynamic nature of the events, we are not able to reasonably estimate how long our operations will be adversely impacted and the full impact these events will have on our operations. As a result, we could have indicators of impairment again in future periods resulting in additional asset impairments.

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NOTE 4 – INVENTORIES

Components of inventories as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 are as follows: 
 June 30, 2020 December 31, 2019
 (In Thousands)
Finished goods$63,952
 $70,135
Raw materials4,030
 4,125
Parts and supplies35,814
 47,793
Work in progress11,710
 14,457
Total inventories$115,506
 $136,510


Finished goods inventories include newly manufactured clear brine fluids as well as used brines that are repurchased from certain customers for recycling. Work in progress inventory consists primarily of new compressor packages located at our Compression Division manufacturing facility in Midland, Texas.
NOTE 5 – LEASES

We have operating leases for some of our transportation equipment, office space, warehouse space, operating locations, and machinery and equipment. We have finance leases for certain storage tanks and equipment rentals. These finance leases are not material to our financial statements. Our leases have remaining lease terms ranging from 1 to 16 years. Some of our leases have options to extend for various periods, while some have termination options with prior notice of generally 30 days or six months. The office space, warehouse space, operating location leases, and machinery and equipment leases generally require us to pay all maintenance and insurance costs. During the fourth quarter of 2019, CCLP entered into a lease agreement commitment for 14 compressor packages. The leases are for an initial term of seven years and commence upon the completion of the equipment fabrication. During the first quarter, CCLP took delivery of eight compressor packages. During the second quarter, CCLP took delivery of the remaining six compressor packages. We have no other lease commitments that have not yet commenced that create significant rights and obligations. Our lease agreements do not contain any material residual value guarantees or material restrictive covenants. Variable rent expense was not material.

Our corporate headquarters facility located in The Woodlands, Texas, was sold on December 31, 2012, pursuant to a sale and leaseback transaction. As a condition to the consummation of the purchase and sale of the facility, the parties entered into a lease agreement for the facility having an initial lease term of 15 years, which is classified as an operating lease. Under the terms of the lease agreement, we have the ability to extend the lease for five successive five-year periods at base rental rates to be determined at the time of each extension.

Components of lease expense, included in either cost of revenues or general and administrative expense based on the use of the underlying asset, are as follows (inclusive of lease expense for leases not included on our consolidated balance sheet based on our accounting policy election to exclude leases with a term of 12 months or less):
 Three Months Ended June 30, Six Months Ended June 30,
 2020 2019 2020 2019
 (In Thousands)
Operating lease expense$5,319
 $4,987
 $10,467
 $10,031
Short-term lease expense5,423
 9,552
 14,853
 20,713
Total lease expense$10,742
 $14,539
 $25,320
 $30,744

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Supplemental cash flow information:
  Six Months Ended June 30,
  2020 2019
  (In Thousands)
Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities:    
     Operating cash flows - operating leases $12,065
 $9,398
     
Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for lease obligations:    
     Operating leases $17,069
 $4,881


Supplemental balance sheet information:
 June 30, 2020 December 31, 2019
 (In Thousands)
Operating leases:   
     Operating lease right-of-use assets$75,524
 $68,131
    
     Accrued liabilities and other$16,402
 $15,850
     Operating lease liabilities60,693
 53,919
     Total operating lease liabilities$77,095
 $69,769

Additional operating lease information:
 June 30, 2020 December 31, 2019
Weighted average remaining lease term:   
     Operating leases6.36 Years
 6.43 Years
    
Weighted average discount rate:   
     Operating leases9.74% 9.46%

    
Future minimum lease payments by year and in the aggregate, under non-cancellable operating leases with terms in excess of one year consist of the following at June 30, 2020:
  Operating Leases
 (In Thousands)
   
Remainder of 2020 $11,662
2021 20,294
2022 16,684
2023 13,026
2024 11,505
Thereafter 32,611
Total lease payments 105,782
Less imputed interest (28,687)
Total lease liabilities $77,095

    
At June 30, 2020, future minimum rental receipts under a non-cancellable sublease for office space in one of our locations totaled $5.3 million. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, we recognized sublease income of $0.3 million and $0.6 million.

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NOTE 6 – LONG-TERM DEBT AND OTHER BORROWINGS
 
We believe our capital structure, excluding CCLP, ("TETRA") and CCLP's capital structure should be considered separately, as there are no cross default provisions or cross guarantees between CCLP's debt and TETRA's debt.

Consolidated long-term debt as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, consists of the following:
  June 30, 2020 December 31, 2019
  (In Thousands)
TETRAScheduled Maturity   
Asset-based credit agreement (presented net of unamortized deferred financing costs of $0 million as of June 30, 2020 and $1.0 million as of December 31, 2019)September 2023$
 $
Term credit agreement (presented net of the unamortized discount of $6 million as of June 30, 2020 and $6.4 million as of December 31, 2019 and net of unamortized deferred financing costs of $8.8 million as of June 30, 2020 and $9.5 million as of December 31, 2019)September 2025205,713
 204,633
TETRA total debt 205,713
 204,633
Less current portion 
 
TETRA total long-term debt $205,713
 $204,633
     
CCLP    
CCLP asset-based credit agreement (presented net of unamortized deferred financing costs of $0.7 million as of June 30, 2020 and $0.9 million of December 31, 2019)June 2023746
 2,622
CCLP 7.25% Senior Notes (presented net of the unamortized discount of $0.4 million as of June 30, 2020 and $1.7 million as of December 31, 2019 and net of unamortized deferred financing costs of $0.6 million as of June 30, 2020 and $2.8 million as of December 31, 2019)August 202279,745
 291,444
CCLP 7.50% First Lien Notes (presented net of unamortized deferred financing costs of $5.7 million as of June 30, 2020 and $5.8 million as of December 31, 2019, net of the unamortized discount of $0.2 million as of June 30, 2020, and net of deferred restructuring gain of $5.6 million as of June 30, 2020)April 2025399,613
 344,172
CCLP 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes (presented net of the unamortized discount of $0.8 million as of June 30, 2020, net of unamortized deferred financing costs of $1.3 million as of June 30, 2020, and net of deferred restructuring gain of $4 million as of June 30, 2020)April 2026157,475
 
CCLP total debt 637,579
 638,238
Less current portion 
 
CCLP total long-term debt $637,579
 $638,238
Consolidated total long-term debt $843,292
 $842,871


As of June 30, 2020, TETRA had 0 outstanding balance and $6.4 million in letters of credit against its asset-based credit agreement ("ABL Credit Agreement"). Because there was no outstanding balance on this Credit Agreement, associated deferred financing costs of $1.2 million as of June 30, 2020, were classified as other long-term assets on the accompanying consolidated balance sheet. As of June 30, 2020, subject to compliance with the covenants, borrowing base, and other provisions of the ABL Credit Agreement that may limit borrowings, TETRA had an availability of $37.1 million under this agreement. There was a $1.5 million balance outstanding and $2.8 million in letters of credit against the CCLP asset-based credit agreement ("CCLP Credit Agreement") as of June 30, 2020. As of June 30, 2020, and subject to compliance with the covenants, borrowing base, and other provisions of the CCLP Credit Agreement that may limit borrowings, CCLP had availability of $12.3 million.

TETRA and CCLP credit and senior note agreements contain certain affirmative and negative covenants, including covenants that restrict the ability to pay dividends or other restricted payments. TETRA and CCLP are both in compliance with all covenants of their respective credit and senior note agreements as of June 30, 2020.

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Second Amendment to Credit Agreement

On June 11, 2020, CSI Compressco, LP and CSI Compressco Sub Inc (the “Borrowers”) entered into the Second Amendment to Loan and Security Agreement (the “Amendment”) amending the Loan and Security Agreement dated June 29, 2018 (as amended, restated, amended and restated, supplemented or otherwise modified from time to time, the “Credit Agreement”) with Bank of America, N.A., in its capacity as administrative agent, issuing bank and swing line issuer (“Administrative Agent”), and the other lenders and loan parties party thereto. The Amendment provided for changes and modifications to the Credit Agreement which include, among other things, changes to certain terms of the Credit Agreement as follows: (i) resizing of the maximum credit commitment under the Credit Agreement from $50,000,000 to $35,000,000; (ii) the inclusion of a $5,000,000 reserve with respect to the Borrowing Base (as defined in the Credit Agreement) thereunder, which would result in reduced borrowing availability; (iii) the removal of the financial covenant compliance test with respect to the Consolidated Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio (as defined in the Credit Agreement); (iv) an increase in the applicable margin related to (x) LIBOR Rate Loans (as defined in the Credit Agreement) to a range between 3.00% and 3.50% and (y) Base Rate Loans (as defined in the Credit Agreement) to a range between 2.00% and 2.50%, in each case, which shall be determined according to average daily excess availability under the Credit Agreement; and (v) an increase in the rate used to calculate the commitment fee in respect of the unutilized commitments under the Credit Agreement to 0.50%. In connection to this amendment, $0.2 million of financing costs were incurred by CCLP and deferred against the carrying value of the amount outstanding, if any. Additionally, $0.2 million of financing fees were charged to other (income) expense, net during the three month period ended June 30, 2020.

First Supplemental Indenture for the Old Notes

On June 11, 2020, CSI Compressco, LP and CSI Compressco Finance Inc. (the "Issuers") announced that they had accepted for exchange $215,208,000, or approximately 72.7%, of their outstanding 7.25% Senior Notes due 2022 (the "Old Notes") that were validly tendered (and not validly withdrawn) by 11:59 p.m., New York City time, on June 10, 2020, for (i) $50,000,000 of the Issuers' 7.50% Senior Secured First Lien Notes due 2025 (the "7.50% First Lien Notes") and (ii) $155,529,000 aggregate principal amount of new 10.00%/10.75% Senior Secured Second Lien Notes due 2026 (the "10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes" and, together with the 7.50% First Lien Notes, the "New Notes"), pursuant to its previously announced exchange offer and consent solicitation (the "Exchange Offer"), which commenced on April 17, 2020. In connection with the exchange offer, CCLP incurred financing fees of $4.8 million which were charged to other (income) expense, net during the three month period ended June 30, 2020.

On June 12, 2020, following receipt of the requisite consents of the holders of the Old Notes, the Issuers entered into the First Supplemental Indenture (the "First Supplemental Indenture"), by and among the Issuers, the subsidiary guarantors named therein and U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee, to the Indenture, dated as of August 4, 2014 (the "Unsecured Indenture"), by and among the Issuers, the subsidiary guarantors named therein and U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee.

The First Supplemental Indenture eliminated substantially all of the restrictive covenants and certain of the default provisions in the Unsecured Indenture and became operative upon the consummation by the Issuers of the Exchange Offer.

On June 12, 2020, the Issuers issued $50,000,000 in aggregate principal amount of New First Lien Notes to certain holders of the Old Notes pursuant to the terms of the Exchange Offer. In March 2018, the Issuers had issued $350,000,000 in aggregate principal amount of 7.50% Senior Secured Notes due 2025 (the
"Existing First Lien Notes" and, together with the New First Lien Notes, the "7.50% First Lien Notes") pursuant to the First Lien Base Indenture. The New First Lien Notes were issued as "additional notes" under the First Lien Base Indenture and will be treated as a single class with such notes but will not trade fungibly with the Existing First Lien Notes.

Second Lien Notes Indenture
 
On June 12, 2020, the Issuers issued $155,529,000 in aggregate principal amount of the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes to certain holders of the Old Notes pursuant to the terms of the Exchange Offer. The Issuers issued the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes pursuant to an indenture, dated June 12, 2020 (the "Second Lien Notes Indenture"),by and among the Issuers, the subsidiary guarantors named therein and U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee (the "Second Lien Trustee"). In connection with the payment of PIK Interest (as defined

17


below), if any, in respect of the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes, the Issuers will be entitled, without the consent of the Holders, to increase the outstanding aggregate principal amount of the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes or issue additional notes ("PIK notes") under the Second Lien Notes Indenture on the same terms and conditions as the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes offered hereby (each such increase or issuance, a "PIK Payment"). The Issuers may issue additional 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes under the Second Lien Notes Indenture from time to time. Any issuance of additional 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes (including PIK notes) is subject to all of the covenants in the Second Lien Notes Indenture. The 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes and any additional 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes subsequently issued under the indenture, will be treated as a single class for all purposes under the indenture, including, without limitation, waivers, amendments, redemptions and offers to purchase. Subject to the making of PIK Payments, the Issuers will issue 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes in denominations of $2,000 and integral multiples of $1,000 in excess of $2,000; provided that PIK Payments may result in 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes being issued in denominations of $1.00 and integral multiples of $1.00. The 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes will mature on April 1, 2026. Interest on the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes will be payable semi-annually in arrears on April 1 and October 1, commencing on October 1, 2020. The Issuers will make each interest payment to the holders of record on March 15 and September 15 immediately preceding each interest payment date. Interest will accrue at (1) the annual rate of 7.250% payable in cash, plus (2) at the election of the Issuers (made by delivering a notice to the Second Lien Trustee not less than five business days prior to the record date), the annual rate of (i) 2.750% payable in cash (together with the annual rate set forth in clause (1), the "Cash Interest Rate") or (ii) 3.500% payable by increasing the principal amount of the outstanding 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes or by issuing additional PIK notes, in each case rounding up to the nearest $1.00 (such increased principal amount or additional PIK notes, the "PIK Interest"). In the absence of an interest payment election made by the Issuers as set forth above, interest on the notes will be payable as if the Issuers had elected to pay PIK Interest with respect to the portion of interest payable pursuant to clause (2) above.

The 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes are jointly and severally, and fully and unconditionally, guaranteed (the "Guarantees") on a senior secured basis initially by each of the Partnership's domestic restricted subsidiaries (other than Finance Corp, certain immaterial subsidiaries and certain other excluded domestic subsidiaries, the "Guarantors") and will be secured by a second-priority security interest in substantially all of the Issuers' and the Guarantors' assets (other than certain excluded assets) (the "Collateral") as collateral security for their obligations under the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes, subject to certain permitted encumbrances and exceptions. At any time prior to April 1, 2023, the Issuers may on any one or more occasions redeem up to 35% of the aggregate principal amount of the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes issued under the Second Lien Notes Indenture at a redemption price of 110.000% of the principal amount of the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes, plus accrued and unpaid interest to the redemption date, with an amount of cash equal to the net cash proceeds of certain equity offerings. On or after April 1, 2023, the Issuers may redeem all or part of the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes at redemption prices (expressed as percentages of the principal amount) equal to (i) 107.500% for the twelve month period beginning on April 1, 2023; (ii) 105.000% for the twelve-month period beginning on April 1, 2024 and (iii) 100.000% at any time thereafter, plus accrued and unpaid interest up to, but not including, the redemption date. In addition, at any time prior to April 1, 2023, the Company may redeem all or a part of the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes at a redemption price equal to 100% of the principal amount of the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes to be redeemed plus a make-whole premium, plus accrued and unpaid interest up to, but not including, the redemption date.

The Second Lien Notes Indenture contains customary covenants restricting the Partnership's ability and the ability of its restricted subsidiaries to: (i) pay distributions on, purchase or redeem its common units or purchase or redeem its subordinated debt; (ii) incur or guarantee additional indebtedness or issue certain kinds of preferred equity securities; (iii) create or incur certain liens securing indebtedness; (iv) sell assets, including dispositions of the Collateral; (v) consolidate, merge or transfer all or substantially all of its assets; (vi) enter into transactions with affiliates; and (vii) enter into agreements that restrict distributions or other payments from its restricted subsidiaries to the Partnership. These covenants are subject to a number of important limitations and exceptions, including certain provisions permitting the Partnership, subject to the satisfaction of certain conditions, to transfer assets to certain of its unrestricted subsidiaries. Moreover, if the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes receive an investment grade rating from at least two rating agencies and no default has occurred and is continuing under the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes Indenture, many of the restrictive covenants in the Second Lien Notes Indenture will be terminated. The Second Lien Notes Indenture also contains customary events of default and acceleration provisions relating to such events of default, which provide that upon an event of default under the Second Lien Notes Indenture, the Second Lien Trustee or the holders of at least 25% in aggregate principal amount of the then outstanding 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes may declare all of the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes to be due and payable immediately.

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NOTE 7 – DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS

On March 1, 2018, we closed a series of related transactions that resulted in the disposition of our Offshore Division. As a result, we have accounted for our Offshore Division, consisting of our Offshore Services and Maritech segments, as discontinued operations. See Note 8 - "Commitments and Contingencies" for further discussion. A summary of financial information related to our discontinued operations is as follows:

Reconciliation of the Line Items Constituting Pretax Loss from Discontinued Operations to the After-Tax Loss from Discontinued Operations
(in thousands)
 Three Months Ended
June 30, 2020
 Three Months Ended
June 30, 2019
 Offshore Services Maritech Total Offshore Services Maritech Total
Major classes of line items constituting pretax loss from discontinued operations           
Revenue$
 $
 $
 $
 $
 $
Cost of revenues(274) 
 (274) 
 
 
Depreciation, amortization, and accretion
 
 
 
 
 
General and administrative expense111
 
 111
 345
 
 345
Other (income) expense, net
 
 
 
 
 
Pretax income (loss) from discontinued operations163
 
 163
 (345) 
 (345)
Pretax Income (loss) on disposal of discontinued operations    
     
Total pretax income (loss) from discontinued operations    163
     (345)
Income tax provision (benefit)    
     
Total income (loss) from discontinued operations    $163
     $(345)
 Six Months Ended
June 30, 2020
 Six Months Ended
June 30, 2019
 Offshore Services Maritech Total Offshore Services Maritech Total
Major classes of line items constituting pretax loss from discontinued operations           
Revenue$
 $
 $
 $
 $
 $
Cost of revenues(334) 
 (334) 22
 
 22
Depreciation, amortization, and accretion
 
 
 
 
 
General and administrative expense316
 
 316
 749
 
 749
Other (income) expense, net
 
 
 
 
 
Pretax income (loss) from discontinued operations18
 
 18
 (771) 
 (771)
Pretax income (loss) on disposal of discontinued operations    
     
Total pretax income (loss) from discontinued operations    18
     (771)
Income tax provision (benefit)    
     
Total income (loss) from discontinued operations    $18
     $(771)
    

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Reconciliation of Major Classes of Assets and Liabilities of the Discontinued Operations to Amounts Presented Separately in the Statement of Financial Position
(in thousands)
 June 30, 2020 December 31, 2019
 Offshore Services Maritech Total Offshore Services Maritech Total
Carrying amounts of major classes of assets included as part of discontinued operations           
Trade receivables$
 $
 $
 $
 $
 $
Other current assets
 
 
 
 
 
Assets of discontinued operations$
 $
 $
 $
 $
 $
            
Carrying amounts of major classes of liabilities included as part of discontinued operations           
Trade payables$1,231
 $
 $1,231
 $1,233
 $
 $1,233
Accrued liabilities414
 228
 642
 745
 120
 865
Liabilities of discontinued operations$1,645
 $228
 $1,873
 $1,978
 $120
 $2,098

NOTE 8 – COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
 
Litigation
 
We are named defendants in several lawsuits and respondents in certain governmental proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business. While the outcome of lawsuits or other proceedings against us cannot be predicted with certainty, management does not consider it reasonably possible that a loss resulting from such lawsuits or other proceedings in excess of any amounts accrued has been incurred that is expected to have a material adverse impact on our financial condition, results of operations, or liquidity.

Contingencies of Discontinued Operations

    In early 2018, we closed the Maritech Asset Purchase and Sale Agreement with Orinoco Natural Resources, LLC ("Orinoco") that provided for the purchase by Orinoco of Maritech's remaining oil and gas properties and related assets. Shortly thereafter, we closed the Maritech Membership Interest Purchase and Sale Agreement with Orinoco that provided for the purchase by Orinoco of all of the outstanding membership interests in Maritech. As a result of these transactions, we have effectively exited the business of our former Maritech segment.

Under the Maritech Asset Purchase and Sale Agreement, Orinoco assumed all of Maritech’s decommissioning liabilities related to the leases sold to Orinoco (the “Orinoco Lease Liabilities”) and, under the Maritech Membership Interest Purchase and Sale Agreement, Orinoco assumed all other liabilities of Maritech, including the decommissioning liabilities associated with the oil and gas properties previously sold by Maritech (the “Legacy Liabilities”), subject to certain limited exceptions unrelated to the decommissioning liabilities. To the extent that Maritech or Orinoco fails to satisfy decommissioning liabilities associated with any of the Orinoco Lease Liabilities or the Legacy Liabilities, we may be required to satisfy such liabilities under third party indemnity agreements and corporate guarantees that we previously provided to the US Department of the Interior and other parties, respectively.

Pursuant to a Bonding Agreement entered into as part of these transactions (the "Bonding Agreement"), Orinoco provided non-revocable performance bonds in an aggregate amount of $46.8 million to cover the performance by Orinoco and Maritech of the asset retirement obligations of Maritech (the “Initial Bonds”) and agreed to replace, within 90 days following the closing, the Initial Bonds with other non-revocable performance bonds, meeting certain requirements, in the aggregate sum of $47.0 million (collectively, the “Interim Replacement Bonds”). Orinoco further agreed to replace, within 180 days following the closing, the Interim Replacement Bonds with a maximum of three non-revocable performance bonds in the aggregate sum of $47.0 million, meeting certain requirements (the “Final Bonds”). Among the other requirements of the Final Bonds was that they must provide coverage for all of the asset retirement obligations of Maritech instead of only relating to specific properties. In the event Orinoco did not provide the Interim Replacement Bonds or the Final Bonds, Orinoco was required to make certain cash escrow payments to us.

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    The payment obligations of Orinoco under the Bonding Agreement were guaranteed by Thomas M. Clarke and Ana M. Clarke pursuant to a separate guaranty agreement (the “Clarke Bonding Guaranty Agreement”). Orinoco has not delivered such replacement bonds and neither it nor the Clarkes has made any of the agreed upon cash escrow payments and we filed a lawsuit against Orinoco and the Clarkes to enforce the terms of the Bonding Agreement and the Clarke Bonding Guaranty Agreement. A summary judgment was initially granted in favor of Orinoco and the Clarkes which dismissed our claims against Orinoco under the Bonding Agreement and against the Clarkes under the Clarke Bonding Guaranty Agreement. We filed an appeal and also asked the trial court to grant a new trial on the summary judgment or to modify the judgment because we believe this judgment should not have been granted. On November 5, 2019, the trial court signed an order granting our motion for new trial and vacating the prior order granting summary judgment for Orinoco and the Clarkes. The parties are awaiting direction from the court on a new scheduling order and/or trial setting. The Initial Bonds, which are non-revocable, remain in effect.

    If we become liable in the future for any decommissioning liability associated with any property covered by either an Initial Bond or an Interim Replacement Bond while such bonds are outstanding and the payment made to us under such bond is not sufficient to satisfy such liability, the Bonding Agreement provides that Orinoco will pay us an amount equal to such deficiency and if Orinoco fails to pay any such amount, such amount must be paid by the Clarkes under the Clarke Bonding Guaranty Agreement. However, if the Final Bonds or the full amount of the escrowed cash have been provided, neither Orinoco nor the Clarkes would be liable to pay us for any such deficiency. Our financial condition and results of operations may be negatively affected if Orinoco is unable to cover any such deficiency or if we become liable for a significant portion of the decommissioning liabilities.

    In early 2018, we also closed the sale of our Offshore Division to Epic Companies, LLC (“Epic Companies,” formerly known as Epic Offshore Specialty, LLC). Part of the consideration we received was a promissory note of Epic Companies in the original principal amount of $7.5 million (the “Epic Promissory Note”) payable to us in full, together with interest at a rate of 1.52% per annum, on December 31, 2019, along with a personal guaranty agreement from Thomas M. Clarke and Ana M. Clarke guaranteeing the payment obligations of Epic Companies pursuant to the Epic Promissory Note (the “Clarke Promissory Note Guaranty Agreement”). Additionally, pursuant to the Equity Interest Purchase Agreement (the “Offshore Services Purchase Agreement”) and other agreements with Epic Companies, certain other amounts relating to the Offshore Division totaling approximately $1.5 million were payable to us. At the end of August 2019, Epic Companies filed for bankruptcy. We recorded a reserve of $7.5 million for the full amount of the promissory note, including accrued interest, and the certain other receivables in the amount of $1.5 million during the quarter ended September 30, 2019. The Epic Promissory Note became due on December 31, 2019 but neither Epic nor the Clarkes made the required payment. Upon the default by Epic and the Clarkes, we filed a lawsuit against the Clarkes on January 15, 2020 in Montgomery County, Texas for breach of the Clarke Promissory Note Guaranty Agreement, seeking the amounts due under the Epic Promissory Note and related interest, as well as attorneys’ fees and expenses. The Clarkes each filed an answer and counterclaims for fraud and negligent misrepresentation and seek monetary damages in excess of $1 million, punitive damages, and attorneys’ fees. We have taken discovery from the Clarkes. Currently, the case is set for its first trial setting on October 19, 2020. We will vigorously prosecute our claim and defend against the claims by the Clarkes.
NOTE 9 – FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS
 
Financial Instruments

Warrants

The Warrants are valued using a Black Scholes option valuation model that includes implied volatility of the trading price (a Level 3 fair value measurement).


21


Derivative Contracts

We and CCLP each enter into short term foreign currency forward derivative contracts with third parties as part of a program designed to mitigate the currency exchange rate risk exposure on selected transactions of certain foreign subsidiaries. As of June 30, 2020, we and CCLP had the following foreign currency derivative contracts outstanding relating to portions of our foreign operations:
Derivative Contracts US Dollar Notional Amount Traded Exchange Rate Settlement Date

 (In Thousands) 
 
Forward purchase Euro $9,000
 1.14 7/2/2020
Forward sale Mexican peso 5,292
 22.58 7/2/2020

Under this program, we and CCLP may enter into similar derivative contracts from time to time. Although contracts pursuant to this program will serve as an economic hedge of the cash flow of our currency exchange risk exposure, they are not formally designated as hedge contracts or qualify for hedge accounting treatment. Accordingly, any change in the fair value of these derivative contracts during a period will be included in the determination of earnings for that period.

The fair values of foreign currency derivative contracts are based on quoted market values (a Level 2 fair value measurement). The fair values of our and CCLP's foreign currency derivative contracts as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, are as follows:
Foreign currency derivative contractsBalance Sheet Location  Fair Value at
June 30, 2020
  Fair Value at
December 31, 2019

 
 (In Thousands)
Forward purchase contracts Current assets $95
 $86
Forward sale contracts Current liabilities 
 (53)
Forward purchase contracts Current liabilities (127) (3)
Net asset (liability)   $(32) $30


None of our foreign currency derivative contracts contain credit risk related contingent features that would require us to post assets or collateral for contracts that are classified as liabilities. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2020, we recognized $0.1 million and $(0.9) million of net (gains) losses, respectively, reflected in other (income) expense, net, associated with our foreign currency derivative program. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2019, we recognized $0.2 million and $0.7 million of net (gains) losses, respectively, reflected in other (income) expense, net, associated with our foreign currency derivative program.

During the six months ended June 30, 2020, we recorded impairments of approximately $9.0 million, reflecting the decreased fair value for certain assets. The fair values used in these impairment calculations were estimated based on a market approach, which is based on significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) in accordance with the fair value hierarchy.


22


Recurring and nonrecurring fair value measurements by valuation hierarchy as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, are as follows:
   Fair Value Measurements Using
 Total as of Quoted Prices in Active Markets for Identical Assets or Liabilities Significant Other Observable Inputs Significant Unobservable Inputs
DescriptionJune 30, 2020 (Level 1) (Level 2) (Level 3)
 (In Thousands)
Midland manufacturing facility and related assets$19,646
 $
 $
 $19,646
Non-core used compressor equipment held for sale2,600
 
   2,600
Warrants liability(123) 
 
 (123)
Asset for foreign currency derivative contracts95
 
 95
 
Liability for foreign currency derivative contracts(127) 
 (127) 
Net asset$22,091
      
   Fair Value Measurements Using
 Total as of Quoted Prices in Active Markets for Identical Assets or Liabilities Significant Other Observable Inputs Significant Unobservable Inputs
DescriptionDecember 31, 2019 (Level 1) (Level 2) (Level 3)
 (In Thousands)
Warrants liability$(449) $
 $
 $(449)
Asset for foreign currency derivative contracts86
 
 86
 
Liability for foreign currency derivative contracts(56) 
 (56) 
Net liability$(419)      

The fair values of cash, restricted cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable, accrued liabilities, short-term borrowings and long-term debt pursuant to TETRA's ABL Credit Agreement and Term Credit Agreement, and the CCLP Credit Agreement approximate their carrying amounts. The fair values of the publicly traded CCLP 7.25% Senior Notes at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, were approximately $41.6 million and $266.0 million, respectively. Those fair values compare to the face amount of $80.7 million and 295.9 million at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, respectively. The fair values of the CCLP 7.50% Senior Secured Notes at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019 were approximately $336.4 million and $344.8 million, respectively. These fair values compare to aggregate principal amount of such notes at June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, of $400.0 million and $350.0 million, respectively. The fair value of the CCLP 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes at June 30, 2020 was approximately $96.8 million. This fair value compares to aggregate principal amount of such notes at June 30, 2020 of $155.5 million. We based the fair values of the CCLP 7.25% Senior Notes, the CCLP 7.50% Senior Secured Notes, and the CCLP 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes as of June 30, 2020 on recent trades for these notes.
NOTE 10 – NET INCOME (LOSS) PER SHARE

The following is a reconciliation of the weighted average number of common shares outstanding with the number of shares used in the computations of net income (loss) per common and common equivalent share:
 Three Months Ended
June 30,
 Six Months Ended
June 30,
 2020 2019 2020 2019
 (In Thousands)
Number of weighted average common shares outstanding125,886
 125,612
 125,736
 125,646
Assumed exercise of equity awards and warrants
 
 
 
Average diluted shares outstanding125,886
 125,612
 125,736
 125,646


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For the three and six month periods ended June 30, 2020 and June 30, 2019, the average diluted shares outstanding excludes the impact of all outstanding equity awards and warrants, as the inclusion of these shares would have been anti-dilutive due to the net losses recorded during the periods. In addition, for the three and six month period ended June 30, 2019, the calculation of diluted earnings per common share excludes the impact of the CSI Compressco LP Series A Convertible Preferred Units (the "CCLP Preferred Units"), as the inclusion of the impact from conversion of the CCLP Preferred Units into CCLP common units would have been anti-dilutive.
NOTE 11 – INDUSTRY SEGMENTS
 
We manage our operations through 3 Divisions: Completion Fluids & Products, Water & Flowback Services, and Compression.

 Summarized financial information concerning the business segments is as follows:
 Three Months Ended
June 30,
 Six Months Ended
June 30,
 2020 2019 2020 2019
 (In Thousands)
Revenues from external customers 
  
  
  
Product sales 
  
    
Completion Fluids & Products Division$67,243
 $72,806
 $137,433
 $130,134
Water & Flowback Services Division8
 367
 33
 731
Compression Division30,922
 62,177
 45,740
 96,266
Consolidated$98,173
 $135,350
 $183,206
 $227,131
        
Services 
  
    
Completion Fluids & Products Division$4,103
 $6,961
 $9,150
 $11,214
Water & Flowback Services Division24,715
 72,757
 82,157
 151,071
Compression Division65,450
 73,728
 140,870
 143,108
Consolidated$94,268
 $153,446
 $232,177
 $305,393
        
Total revenues 
  
    
Completion Fluids & Products Division$71,346
 $79,767
 $146,583
 $141,348
Water & Flowback Services Division24,723
 73,124
 82,190
 151,802
Compression Division96,372
 135,905
 186,610
 239,374
Interdivision eliminations
 
 
 
Consolidated$192,441
 $288,796
 $415,383
 $532,524
        
Income (loss) before taxes 
  
    
Completion Fluids & Products Division$13,202
 $14,614
 $32,598
 $20,800
Water & Flowback Services Division(8,418) 2,460
 (10,662) 4,691
Compression Division(23,006) (3,483) (35,796) (11,284)
Interdivision eliminations2
 1
 7
 7
Corporate Overhead(1)
(16,909) (19,303) (30,353) (36,990)
Consolidated$(35,129) $(5,711) $(44,206) $(22,776)

(1)Amounts reflected include the following general corporate expenses:
 Three Months Ended
June 30,
 Six Months Ended
June 30,
 2020 2019 2020 2019
 (In Thousands)
General and administrative expense$11,611
 $14,350
 $19,692
 $26,439
Depreciation and amortization175
 172
 372
 340
Interest expense4,749
 5,696
 10,204
 11,038
Warrants fair value adjustment (income) expense11
 (1,520) (327) (1,113)
Other general corporate (income) expense, net363
 605
 412
 286
Total$16,909
 $19,303
 $30,353
 $36,990


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NOTE 12 – SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

On July 2, 2020, we completed the previously announced sale of our Midland manufacturing facility for a total sale price of $17.0 million. In connection with the sale, we have entered into an agreement with the buyer that permits us to continue to operate the facility until the completion and sale of our remaining backlog, which we anticipate will be completed during the third quarter of 2020. While we will continue to operate the facility until the completion and sale of our remaining backlog, we no longer intend to fabricate new compressor packages for sales to third parties or for our own service fleet.

During the second quarter of 2020, we entered into an agreement to sell 58 low-horsepower units to one of our customers for $2.6 million. We received the proceeds prior to June 30, 2020, however, the assets were not transferred to the customer until after June 30,2020. Therefore, they are classified as held for sale at June 30, 2020 in our financial statements. In addition, in late July, we received a purchase order to sell $6.7 million of idle high horsepower compressor units to one of our significant customers. We expect this sale to be completed and proceeds received by the end of the third quarter. We have and will continue to evaluate the sale of other non-core assets, including our low-horsepower compression fleet. We can provide no assurance that we will consummate a future sale of our low-horsepower compression fleet or any other non-core asset.

Following a customer bankruptcy filing that occurred during the third quarter of 2020, we recorded an additional $2.8 million reserve against the trade receivable balance in the June 30, 2020 consolidated balance sheet.
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

The following discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our unaudited consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes included in this Quarterly Report. In addition, the following discussion and analysis also should be read in conjunction with our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019 filed with the SEC on March 16, 2020 ("2019 Annual Report"). This discussion includes forward-looking statements that involve certain risks and uncertainties.
Business Overview  
We are a geographically diversified oil and gas services company, focused on completion fluids and associated products and services, comprehensive water management, frac flowback, production well testing and offshore rig cooling services, and compression services and equipment. We operate through three reporting segments organized into three Divisions - Completion Fluids & Products, Water & Flowback Services, and Compression.
Demand for products and services of our Completion Fluids & Products Division has remained resilient despite the continued significant downward pressure on oil prices and the continuing uncertainty in many of the markets where we operate, which affects the plans of many of our oil and gas operations customers. During the second quarter of 2020, we experienced increased completion fluids product sales revenues sequentially in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico while international demand for our completion fluids products decreased, in large part due to a one-time spot sale in Latin America that we had in the first quarter of 2020. We also benefited from the strong seasonal results of our Northern European industrial chemicals business in the current quarter. However, the continuing low prices for oil and gas and any further price erosion may adversely affect the demand for our products and services in the near future.
Recent macroeconomic uncertainty resulting from depressed commodity prices and the COVID-19 pandemic has particularly affected domestic onshore demand for our Water & Flowback Services Division. We experienced decreased water management services activity during the second quarter of 2020 and without a meaningful recovery, we expect our water management services operations to continue to be negatively impacted in the near future.
Our Compression Division is significantly dependent upon the demand for, and production of, oil and the associated natural gas from unconventional oil and natural gas production in the domestic and international markets in which we operate. During the second quarter of 2020, we continued to see macroeconomic uncertainty in the oil and natural gas industry and steep declines in spending by the oil and gas operators as evidenced by a 64% decline in the U.S. onshore rig count. In addition, the second quarter of 2020 was the first full quarter where we experienced the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and mitigation efforts to minimize the spread of the virus. The

25


unprecedented drop in U.S. land oil and natural gas activity led to some of our customers temporarily shutting in wells, presenting a new challenge for us. Approximately 15% of our US domestic horsepower was on standby during the quarter as a result. Customers started bringing production back online late in the second quarter and we expect that activity to continue during the third quarter of 2020. During the first half of 2020, we saw our customers revise their capital budgets substantially downward and adjust their operations accordingly, which we believe will continue for an indefinite period. We expect reduced activity levels, particularly in North America, coupled with downward pricing pressure and corresponding reductions in revenue and profitability to continue for the remainder of 2020.
Given the decline in orders for new compression equipment to be fabricated and sold to third parties, in early April 2020, we announced our plan to shut down our Midland manufacturing facility. On July 2, 2020, we completed the previously announced sale of our Midland manufacturing facility for a total sale price of $17.0 million. While we will continue to operate the facility until the completion and sale of our remaining backlog, we no longer intend to fabricate new compressor packages for sales to third parties. Due to excess compression equipment in the industry, we have seen lower utilization of our compression fleet, client requests to put units on stand-by, and pricing pressures as customers try to reduce their costs.
During the first quarter of 2020, we concluded that the impact on our customers and industry from the COVID-19 pandemic and decline in oil prices were indicators of impairment for all asset groups within our Compression Division and certain asset groups in our Completion Fluids & Products Division. As a result, we performed a recoverability analysis on all our long-lived asset groups and we determined that the carrying values of our Midland manufacturing facility and related new unit sales inventory exceeded their respective fair values. Therefore, we recorded impairments of approximately $5.4 million during the first quarter of 2020 related to these assets. During the second quarter of 2020, as a result of continued negative impacts on our compression fleet associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and declines in oil and gas prices, we recorded impairments and other charges of approximately $9.0 million in our Compression Division associated with non-core used compressor equipment that we have held for sale, the low-horsepower class of our compression fleet, and field inventory for compression and related services. Given the dynamic nature of the events, we are not able to reasonably estimate how long our operations will be impacted and the full impact these events will have on our operations. As a result, we could have indicators of impairment again in future periods resulting in additional asset impairments. We have and will continue to evaluate the sale of non-core assets, including our low-horsepower compression fleet. We can provide no assurance that we will consummate a future sale of our low-horsepower compression fleet or any other non-core asset.
During the second quarter of 2020, CCLP, which has a separate capital structure from TETRA, completed a debt exchange offer whereby the effect was a permanent reduction in outstanding long-term debt of $9.6 million and the extension of maturity dates of certain of its remaining long-term debt balances. See further discussion of these changes in the Liquidity and Capital Resources section below.
We intend to continue to manage our flexible cost structure to proactively respond to changing market conditions and execute on actions necessary to manage through these conditions, some of which could result in impairments or restructuring charges in future periods. Temporary and permanent cost reductions we have implemented include reductions in 2020 capital expenditures, workforce reductions, salary reductions, the suspension of 401(k) matching contributions for our employees, targeted reduction in SG&A expenses, and negotiated reductions in expenditures with many of our suppliers. Absent a meaningful recovery in natural gas and oil prices and a material improvement in the status of the COVID-19 pandemic, we expect our operations to continue to be negatively impacted, particularly in our onshore producing regions of the United States. We are not able to predict how long market disruptions resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic will continue, or what impact it will ultimately have on our business. Despite that, we will continue to maintain our commitment to safety and service quality for our customers.
How we Evaluate Operations
We use U.S. GAAP financial measures such as revenues, gross profit, income (loss) before taxes, and net cash provided by operating activities, as well as certain non-GAAP financial measures, including Adjusted EBITDA, as performance measures for our business.
Adjusted EBITDA. We view Adjusted EBITDA as one of our primary management tools, and we track it on a monthly basis, both in dollars and as a percentage of revenues (typically compared to the prior month, prior year

26


period, and to budget). We define Adjusted EBITDA as earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization, impairments and certain other non-cash charges and non-recurring adjustments.
Adjusted EBITDA is used as a supplemental financial measure by our management to:
evaluate the financial performance of our assets without regard to financing methods, capital structure, or historical cost basis; and
determine our ability to incur and service debt and fund capital expenditures.

 The following table reconciles net income (loss) to Adjusted EBITDA for the periods indicated:

 Three Months Ended
 June 30, 2020
 Net Income (Loss), as reportedTax ProvisionIncome (Loss) Before Tax, as ReportedImpairments & Special ChargesAdjusted Income (Loss) Before TaxInterest Expense, Net

Depreciation & Amortization
 
Equity Comp. ExpenseAdjusted EBITDA
 (In Thousands)
Completion Fluids & Products Division  $13,202
$3,310
$16,512
$(143)$1,934
$
$18,303
Water & Flowback Services Division  (8,418)1,203
(7,215)(2)7,617

400
Compression Division  (23,006)15,736
(7,270)12,982
20,116
488
26,316
Eliminations and other  2

2



2
Subtotal  (18,220)20,249
2,029
12,837
29,667
488
45,021
Corporate and other  (16,909)621
(16,288)4,749
175
1,602
(9,762)
TETRA excluding Discontinued Operations$(37,130)$2,001
$(35,129)$20,870
$(14,259)$17,586
$29,842
$2,090
$35,259
          
 Three Months Ended
 June 30, 2019
 Net Income (Loss), as reportedTax ProvisionIncome (Loss) Before Tax, as ReportedImpairments & Special ChargesAdjusted Income (Loss) Before TaxInterest Expense, NetDepreciation & AmortizationEquity Comp. ExpenseAdjusted EBITDA
 (In Thousands)
Completion Fluids & Products Division  $14,614
$(289)$14,325
$(157)$3,723
$
$17,891
Water & Flowback Services Division  2,460
(400)2,060
(8)8,871

10,923
Compression Division  (3,483)3,607
124
12,998
19,054
590
32,766
Eliminations and other  1

1

(3)
(2)
Subtotal  13,592
2,918
16,510
12,833
31,645
590
61,578
Corporate and other  (19,303)268
(19,035)5,696
172
1,673
(11,494)
TETRA excluding Discontinued Operations$(8,201)$2,490
$(5,711)$3,186
$(2,525)$18,529
$31,817
$2,263
$50,084

Adjusted EBITDA is a financial measure that is not in accordance with U.S. GAAP and should not be considered an alternative to net income, operating income, cash provided by operating activities, or any other measure of financial performance presented in accordance with U.S. GAAP. This measure may not be comparable to similarly titled financial metrics of other companies, as other companies may not calculate Adjusted EBITDA in the same manner as we do. Management compensates for the limitations of Adjusted EBITDA as an analytical tool by reviewing the comparable U.S. GAAP measures, understanding the differences between the measures, and incorporating this knowledge into management’s decision-making processes.
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
 
There have been no material changes or developments in the evaluation of the accounting estimates and

27


the underlying assumptions or methodologies pertaining to our Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates disclosed
in our 2019 Annual Report. In preparing our consolidated financial statements, we make assumptions, estimates, and judgments that affect the amounts reported. These judgments and estimates may change as new events occur, as new information is acquired, and as changes in our operating environments are encountered. Actual results are likely to differ from our current estimates, and those differences may be material.    
Results of Operations

Three months ended June 30, 2020 compared with three months ended June 30, 2019.

Consolidated Comparisons
 Three Months Ended
June 30,
 Period to Period Change
 2020 2019 2020 vs 2019 % Change
 (In Thousands, Except Percentages)
Revenues$192,441
 $288,796
 $(96,355) (33.4)%
Gross profit20,321
 48,366
 (28,045) (58.0)%
Gross profit as a percentage of revenue10.6 % 16.7 %  
  
General and administrative expense34,014
 36,295
 (2,281) (6.3)%
General and administrative expense as a percentage of revenue17.7 % 12.6 %  
  
Interest expense, net17,586
 18,529
 (943) (5.1)%
Warrants fair value adjustment (income) expense11
 (1,520) 1,531
 (100.7)%
CCLP Series A Preferred Units fair value adjustment (income) expense
 146
 (146) (100.0)%
Other (income) expense, net3,839
 627
 3,212
 512.3 %
Loss before taxes and discontinued operations(35,129) (5,711) (29,418) (515.1)%
Loss before taxes and discontinued operations as a percentage of revenue(18.3)% (2.0)%  
  
Provision for income taxes2,001
 2,490
 (489) (19.6)%
Loss before discontinued operations(37,130) (8,201) (28,929) 352.7 %
Discontinued operations:       
Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of taxes163
 (345) 508
 (147.2)%
Net loss(36,967) (8,546) (28,421) 332.6 %
Loss attributable to noncontrolling interest15,712
 1,633
 14,079
 862.2 %
Net loss attributable to TETRA stockholders$(21,255) $(6,913) $(14,342) 207.5 %
 
Consolidated revenues during the current year quarter decreased compared to the prior year quarter due to the COVID-19 pandemic and decline in oil and gas prices resulting in decreases in demand and activity. See Divisional Comparisons section below for additional discussion.

Consolidated gross profit during the current year quarter decreased compared to the prior year quarter primarily due to decreased gross profit from our Water & Flowback Services and Compression Divisions and included the impact of $9.0 million of impairments and other charges. This decrease was slightly offset by the increased gross profit of our Completion Fluids & Products Division.
 
Consolidated general and administrative expenses decreased during the current year quarter compared to the prior year quarter primarily due to decreased salary and employee expenses of $4.4 million, decreased insurance and other general expenses of $1.1 million, and decreased professional services fees of $0.4 million partly offset by increased provision for bad debt of $3.8 million.
 
Consolidated interest expense, net, decreased during the current year quarter compared to the prior year quarter primarily due to decreased Corporate interest expense. Corporate interest expense decreased due to reduced borrowing under the ABL Credit Agreement. Interest expense during the current and prior year quarters includes $1.1 million and $1.0 million, respectively, of finance cost amortization.


28


Consolidated other (income) expense, net, was $3.8 million of other expense during the current year quarter compared to $0.6 million of other expense during the prior year quarter primarily due to $4.8 million of fees primarily associated with the CCLP unsecured debt exchange transaction offset by $0.5 million of increased gains on the sale of compression assets, and $0.4 million increased foreign currency gains.
 
Our consolidated provision for income taxes during the three month period ended June 30, 2020 is attributable to taxes in certain foreign jurisdictions and Texas gross margin taxes. Our consolidated effective tax rate for the three month period ended June 30, 2020 of negative 5.7% was primarily the result of losses generated in entities for which no related tax benefit has been recorded. The losses generated by these entities do not result in tax benefits due to offsetting valuation allowances being recorded against the related net deferred tax assets. We establish a valuation allowance to reduce the deferred tax assets when it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. Included in our deferred tax assets are net operating loss carryforwards and tax credits that are available to offset future income tax liabilities in the U.S. as well as in certain foreign jurisdictions.

Divisional Comparisons
 
Completion Fluids & Products Division
 Three Months Ended
June 30,
 Period to Period Change
 2020 2019 2020 vs 2019 % Change
 (In Thousands, Except Percentages)
Revenues$71,346
 $79,767
 $(8,421) (10.6)%
Gross profit20,819
 19,809
 1,010
 5.1 %
Gross profit as a percentage of revenue29.2% 24.8%  
  
General and administrative expense8,442
 5,200
 3,242
 62.3 %
General and administrative expense as a percentage of revenue11.8% 6.5%  
  
Interest (income) expense, net(143) (157) 14
 (8.9)%
Other (income) expense, net(682) 152
 (834) (548.7)%
Income before taxes$13,202
 $14,614
 $(1,412) (9.7)%
Income before taxes as a percentage of revenue18.5% 18.3%  
  
 
The decrease in Completion Fluids & Products Division revenues during the current year quarter compared to the prior year quarter was primarily due to lower demand for our completions fluids products and services and our industrial chemicals sales in the onshore United States, partially offset by a stronger Northern European industrial chemicals business and Gulf of Mexico completion fluids demand.

Completion Fluids & Products Division gross profit during the current year quarter increased compared to the prior year quarter despite decreased revenues primarily due to higher margins on sales of manufactured products as well as increased profitability associated with higher margin completion fluids products and cost cutting initiatives during the current year quarter when compared to the prior year quarter. Completion Fluids & Products Division profitability in future periods will continue to be affected by the mix of its products and services, market demand for our products and services, drilling and completions activity and commodity prices.
 
The Completion Fluids & Products Division reported a decrease in pretax earnings during the current year quarter compared to the prior year quarter despite increased gross profit discussed above. Pre-tax earnings were lower because general and administrative costs increased compared to the prior year quarter primarily due to increased provision for bad debt of $2.9 million and increased salary and employee-related expenses of $0.6 million. Other income increased primarily due to increased foreign currency gains and income from investments.


29


Water & Flowback Services Division
 Three Months Ended
June 30,
 Period to Period Change
 2020 2019 2020 vs 2019 % Change
 (In Thousands, Except Percentages)
Revenues$24,723
 $73,124
 $(48,401) (66.2)%
Gross profit (loss)(4,836) 7,490
 (12,326) (164.6)%
Gross profit (loss) as a percentage of revenue(19.6)% 10.2%  
  
General and administrative expense3,809
 5,775
 (1,966) (34.0)%
General and administrative expense as a percentage of revenue15.4 % 7.9%  
  
Interest (income) expense, net(2) (8) 6
 (75.0)%
Other (income) expense, net(225) (737) 512
 (69.5)%
Income (loss) before taxes$(8,418) $2,460
 $(10,878) (442.2)%
Income (loss) before taxes as a percentage of revenue(34.0)% 3.4%  
  
 
Water & Flowback Services Division revenues decreased significantly during the current year quarter primarily due to decreased customer drilling and completions activity as a result of lower oil and gas prices caused by the COVID-19 pandemic as well as decreased international equipment sales activity.

The Water & Flowback Services Division reported a gross loss during the current year quarter compared to the prior year quarter gross profit primarily due to lower revenues resulting from the decreased activity levels described above.

The Water & Flowback Services Division reported a pretax loss compared to a pretax income in the prior year period, primarily due to the substantial reduction in gross profit described above. General and administrative expense levels decreased compared to the prior year quarter primarily due to decreased wage and benefit related expenses of $2.1 million, decreased general expenses of $0.5 million, and decreased professional fees of $0.2 million. These decreases were offset by increased bad debt expense of $0.8 million.

Compression Division
 Three Months Ended
June 30,
 Period to Period Change
 2020 2019 2020 vs 2019 % Change
 (In Thousands, Except Percentages)
Revenues$96,372
 $135,905
 $(39,533) (29.1)%
Gross profit4,511
 21,235
 (16,724) (78.8)%
Gross profit as a percentage of revenue4.7 % 15.6 %  
  
General and administrative expense10,152
 10,972
 (820) (7.5)%
General and administrative expense as a percentage of revenue10.5 % 8.1 %  
  
Interest expense, net12,982
 12,998
 (16) (0.1)%
CCLP Series A Preferred fair value adjustment (income) expense
 146
 (146) (100.0)%
Other (income) expense, net4,383
 602
 3,781
 628.1 %
Loss before taxes$(23,006) $(3,483) $(19,523) (560.5)%
Loss before taxes as a percentage of revenue(23.9)% (2.6)%  
  
    
Compression Division revenues decreased during the current year quarter compared to the prior year quarter primarily due to the COVID-19 pandemic's impact on demand for oil and natural gas and the resulting decline in oil prices that led to a significant reduction in our customer's activity. Product sales revenues decreased $31.3 million, as we continued to close out remaining backlog and prepared to shut down our Midland manufacturing facility. Service revenues decreased $8.3 million due to returned compressors, compressors placed on standby rates, and some pricing concessions.


30


Compression Division gross profit decreased during the current year quarter compared to the prior year due to the lower revenues discussed above and the impairments and other charges of $9.0 million primarily on non-core used compressor equipment that we have held for sale, the low-horsepower class of our compression fleet, and field inventory for compression and related services.
 
The Compression Division recorded an increased pretax loss during the current year quarter compared to the prior year quarter due to the decreased gross profit discussed above. General and administrative expense levels decreased compared to the prior year quarter, primarily due to decreased employee expenses of $0.9 million. Other (income) expense, net, reflected increased expense primarily due to $4.8 million of fees associated with the exchange of debt offset by decreased expense of $0.6 million associated with the redemption premium incurred during the prior year period in connection with the redemption of CCLP Series A Preferred Units for cash and increased foreign currency gains of 0.2 million.

Corporate Overhead
 Three Months Ended
June 30,
 Period to Period Change
 2020 2019 2020 vs 2019 % Change
 (In Thousands, Except Percentages)
Depreciation and amortization$175
 $172
 $3
 (1.7)%
General and administrative expense11,611
 14,350
 (2,739) (19.1)%
Interest (income) expense, net4,749
 5,696
 (947) (16.6)%
Warrants fair value adjustment (income) expense11
 (1,520) 1,531
 (100.7)%
Other (income) expense, net363
 605
 (242) (40.0)%
Loss before taxes$(16,909) $(19,303) $2,394
 12.4 %

Corporate Overhead pretax loss decreased during the current year quarter compared to the prior year quarter, primarily due to decreased general and administrative expense and decreased interest expense. Corporate general and administrative expense decreased primarily due to decreased salary and employee expenses of $2.0 million, and decreased general expenses of $0.7 million. Interest expense decreased resulting from decreased borrowing under the ABL Credit Agreement. The fair value of the outstanding Warrants liability resulted in a $0.01 million charge to earnings during the current year quarter compared to a $1.5 million credit to earnings in the prior year quarter.

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Results of Operations

Six months ended June 30, 2020 compared with six months ended June 30, 2019.

Consolidated Comparisons
 Six Months Ended June 30, Period to Period Change
 2020 2019 2020 vs 2019 % Change
 (In Thousands, Except Percentages)
Revenues$415,383
 $532,524
 $(117,141) (22.0)%
Gross profit59,738
 84,576
 (24,838) (29.4)%
Gross profit as a percentage of revenue14.4 % 15.9 %  
  
General and administrative expense64,551
 70,572
 (6,021) (8.5)%
General and administrative expense as a percentage of revenue15.5 % 13.3 %  
  
Interest expense, net35,442
 36,908
 (1,466) (4.0)%
Warrants fair value adjustment (income) expense(327) (1,113) 786
 (70.6)%
CCLP Series A Preferred Units fair value adjustment (income) expense
 1,309
 (1,309) (100.0)%
Other (income) expense, net4,278
 (324) 4,602
 (1420.4)%
Loss before taxes and discontinued operations(44,206) (22,776) (21,430) 94.1 %
Loss before taxes and discontinued operations as a percentage of revenue(10.6)% (4.3)%  
  
Provision for income taxes3,155
 4,099
 (944) (23.0)%
Loss before discontinued operations(47,361) (26,875) (20,486) 76.2 %
Discontinued operations:       
Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of taxes18
 (771) 789
 (102.3)%
Net loss(47,343) (27,646) (19,697) 71.2 %
Loss attributable to noncontrolling interest24,537
 9,895
 14,642
 148.0 %
Net loss attributable to TETRA stockholders$(22,806) $(17,751) $(5,055) 28.5 %

Consolidated revenues for the current year period decreased compared to the prior year period primarily due to decreased revenues in our Water & Flowback Services and Compression Divisions, which decreased by $69.6 million and $52.8 million, respectively, primarily due to the COVID-19 pandemic and decline in oil prices. The decrease in revenues for the Water & Flowback Services Division was primarily due to decreased water management services activity. The decreased revenues of the Compression Division were primarily due to lower new unit sales as we progress the shut down of our Midland manufacturing facility. These decreases were partially offset by an increase in revenues in our Completion Fluids & Products Division of $5.2 million primarily due to increased CBF product sales revenues in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, and increased international CBF product sales and domestic manufactured products sales. See Divisional Comparisons section below for additional discussion.

Consolidated gross profit decreased during the current year period compared to the prior year period primarily due to the decreased profitability of our Water & Flowback Services and Compression Divisions. This decreased gross profit was slightly offset by increased gross profit of our Completion Fluids & Products Division. While offshore activity levels for our Completion Fluids & Products Division increased from the prior year period, onshore activity levels decreased, particularly during the second quarter. The impact of pricing pressures in addition to reduced levels of onshore activity continues to challenge profitability in the current markets. Operating expenses reflect the decrease in consolidated revenues, as well as aggressive management of operating costs and headcount.

Consolidated general and administrative expenses decreased during the current year period compared to the prior year period primarily due to decreased salary related expenses of $9.3 million and decreased general expenses of $1.3 million. These decreases were partly offset by increased bad debt expense of $4.8 million. Decreased general and administrative expenses were driven primarily by our Corporate Division. Most of the decrease of our general and administrative expenses stemmed from our restructuring efforts and headcount reductions in response to the decline in activity levels, particularly in our U.S. onshore operations. General and administrative expense as a percentage of revenues increased compared to the prior year period.

32


 
Consolidated interest expense, net, decreased in the current year period primarily due to a decrease in Corporate and Compression Division interest expense. Corporate interest expense decreased due to lower borrowings under the ABL Credit Agreement. Compression Division interest expense decreased due to interest associated with the expense of CCLP Series A Preferred units that was incurred in the prior year period. Interest expense during the current year period and the prior year period includes $2.2 million and $1.9 million, respectively, of finance cost amortization.

The Warrants are accounted for as a derivative liability in accordance with ASC 815 and therefore they are classified as a long-term liability on our consolidated balance sheet at their fair value. Increases (or decreases) in the fair value of the Warrants are generally associated with increases (or decreases) in the trading price of our common stock, resulting in adjustments to earnings for the associated valuation losses (gains), and resulting in future volatility of our earnings during the period the Warrants are outstanding.

The CCLP Preferred Units were eligible to be settled using a variable number of CCLP common units, and therefore the fair value of the CCLP Preferred Units was classified as a long-term liability on our consolidated balance sheets in accordance with ASC 480. Because the CCLP Preferred Units were convertible into CCLP common units at the option of the holder, the fair value of the CCLP Preferred Units generally increased or decreased with the trading price of the CCLP common units, and this increase (decrease) in CCLP Preferred Unit fair value was charged (credited) to earnings, as appropriate. The last remaining outstanding CCLP Preferred Units were redeemed for cash on August 8, 2019.
 
Consolidated other (income) expense, net, was $4.3 million of expense during the current year period compared to $0.3 million of income during the prior year period. The increase in expense is primarily due to $4.8 million of fees associated with the CCLP unsecured debt exchange transaction, $1.0 million of increased foreign currency losses due to the devaluation of the Mexican peso and increased deferred compensation expense of $0.3 million. The increases in expense were offset by $1.1 million of gains associated with the sale of assets and $0.4 million of increased income associated with investments.

Our consolidated provision for income taxes for the current year period is primarily attributable to taxes in certain foreign jurisdictions and Texas gross margin taxes. Our consolidated effective tax rate for the six month period ended June 30, 2020 of negative 7.1% was primarily the result of losses generated in entities for which no related tax benefit has been recorded. The losses generated by these entities do not result in tax benefits due to offsetting valuation allowances being recorded against the related net deferred tax assets. We establish a valuation allowance to reduce the deferred tax assets when it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. Included in our deferred tax assets are net operating loss carryforwards and tax credits that are available to offset future income tax liabilities in the U.S. as well as in certain foreign jurisdictions.

Divisional Comparisons
 
Completion Fluids & Products Division
 Six Months Ended June 30, Period to Period Change
 2020 2019 2020 vs 2019 % Change
 (In Thousands, Except Percentages)
Revenues$146,583
 $141,348
 $5,235
 3.7 %
Gross profit46,783
 30,472
 16,311
 53.5 %
Gross profit as a percentage of revenue31.9% 21.6%  
 

General and administrative expense14,375
 9,928
 4,447
 44.8 %
General and administrative expense as a percentage of revenue9.8% 7.0%  
  
Interest (income) expense, net(297) (337) 40
 (11.9)%
Other (income) expense, net107
 81
 26
 32.1 %
Income before taxes$32,598
 $20,800
 $11,798
 56.7 %
Income before taxes as a percentage of revenue22.2% 14.7%  
  
 
The increase in Completion Fluids & Products Division revenues during the current year period compared to the prior year period was primarily due to $7.3 million of increased product sales revenue which was due to

33


increased CBF product sales revenues in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico as well as improved markets for CBF product sales in international locations, including South America and domestic manufactured product sales. Additionally, service revenues decreased $2.1 million, primarily due to overall decreased demand and decreased filtration and engineering work in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico associated with fluid sales.

Completion Fluids & Products Division gross profit during the current year period increased compared to the prior year period primarily due to profitability associated with increased manufactured products and international CBF sales revenues. Completion Fluids & Products Division profitability in future periods will be affected by the mix of its products and services, including the timing of TETRA CS Neptune completion fluid projects.

The Completion Fluids & Products Division reported an increase in pretax earnings during the current year period compared to the prior year period due to the increase in gross profit discussed above. Completion Fluids & Products Division general and administrative expenses increased compared to the prior year period primarily due to increased bad debt expense of $3.0 million and increased salary and employee-related expenses of $1.7 million.

Water & Flowback Services Division
 Six Months Ended June 30, Period to Period Change
 2020 2019 2020 vs 2019 % Change
 (In Thousands, Except Percentages)
Revenues$82,190
 $151,802
 $(69,612) (45.9)%
Gross profit (loss)(1,569) 16,341
 (17,910) (109.6)%
Gross profit as a percentage of revenue(1.9)% 10.8%  
  
General and administrative expense10,143
 12,571
 (2,428) (19.3)%
General and administrative expense as a percentage of revenue12.3 % 8.3%  
  
Interest (income) expense, net(11) (4) (7) 175.0 %
Other (income) expense, net(1,039) (917) (122) 13.3 %
Income (loss) before taxes$(10,662) $4,691
 $(15,353) 327.3 %
Income (loss) before taxes as a percentage of revenue(13.0)% 3.1%  
  
 
Water & Flowback Services Division service and product revenues decreased $69.6 million during the current year period compared to the prior year period due to decreased water management services activity associated with significantly lower customer drilling and completion activity and decreased international equipment sales activity.

The Water & Flowback Services Division reflected decreased gross profit during the current year period compared to the prior year period partly due to lower revenues and partly due to certain high-margin projects performed during the prior year.
 
The Water & Flowback Services Division reported a pretax loss compared to a pretax income in the prior year period, primarily due to the decrease in gross profit described above. General and administrative expenses decreased primarily due to decreased wage and benefit related expenses of $3.1 million and decreased general expenses of $0.9 million offset by increased bad debt expense of $1.5 million.

34


Compression Division
 Six Months Ended June 30, Period to Period Change
 2020 2019 2020 vs 2019 % Change
 (In Thousands, Except Percentages)
Revenues$186,610
 $239,374
 $(52,764) (22.0)%
Gross profit14,890
 38,094
 (23,204) (60.9)%
Gross profit as a percentage of revenue8.0 % 15.9 %  
  
General and administrative expense20,341
 21,635
 (1,294) (6.0)%
General and administrative expense as a percentage of revenue10.9 % 9.0 %  
  
Interest expense, net25,546
 26,210
 (664) (2.5)%
CCLP Series A Preferred fair value adjustment (income) expense
 1,309
 (1,309) (100.0)%
Other (income) expense, net4,799
 224
 4,575
 2,042.4 %
Loss before taxes$(35,796) $(11,284) $(24,512) 217.2 %
Loss before taxes as a percentage of revenue(19.2)% (4.7)%  
  
    
Compression Division revenues decreased during the current year period compared to the prior year period primarily due to the COVID-19 pandemic's impact on demand for oil and natural gas and the resulting decline in oil prices that led to a significant decrease in customer activity. Product sales revenues decreased $50.5 million due to a decrease in deliveries of new compressors compared to the prior year due to the planned shut down of our Midland manufacturing facility. Service revenues decreased $2.2 million from compression and aftermarket services operations. The decrease in service revenues was primarily due to reduction in customer activity resulting in a decrease in demand for compression services. In addition, returned compressors, compressors placed on standby rates, and pricing concessions also resulted in decreased revenues.

Compression Division gross profit decreased during the current year period compared to the prior year due to decreased revenues discussed above and the impairments and other charges of $14.3 million primarily on our Midland manufacturing facility and related assets, non-core used compressor equipment that we have held for sale, the low-horsepower class of our compression fleet, and field inventory for compression and related services.

The Compression Division recorded increased pretax loss in the current year period compared to the prior year period due to the decreased gross profit discussed above. Interest expense decreased compared to the prior year period due to decreased interest associated with the CCLP Series A Preferred units that was incurred in the prior year period. General and administrative expense levels decreased compared to the prior year period, due to decreased salary and employee-related expenses, including the impact of decreased headcount, incentives and equity compensation of $1.6 million. These decreases were offset by increased professional services of $0.3 million and increased bad debt expense of $0.2 million. Other (income) expense, net changed from income of $0.3 million expense in the prior year period to $4.8 million expense in the current year period. The increase in expense is primarily due to $4.8 million of fees associated with the exchange of debt and $0.9 million of increased foreign currency losses due to the devaluation of the Mexican peso offset by decreased expense of $1.1 million associated with the redemption premium incurred during the prior year period in connection with the redemption of Preferred Units for cash. The last remaining outstanding CCLP Preferred Units were redeemed for cash on August 8, 2019.

Corporate Overhead
 Six Months Ended June 30, Period to Period Change
 2020 2019 2020 vs 2019 % Change
 (In Thousands, Except Percentages)
Depreciation and amortization$372
 $340
 $32
 9.4 %
General and administrative expense19,692
 26,439
 (6,747) (25.5)%
Interest expense, net10,204
 11,038
 (834) (7.6)%
Warrants fair value adjustment (income) expense(327) (1,113) 786
 (70.6)%
Other (income) expense, net412
 286
 126
 44.1 %
Loss before taxes$(30,353) $(36,990) $6,637
 (17.9)%


35


Corporate Overhead pretax loss decreased during the current year period compared to the prior year period primarily due to decreased general and administrative expenses. Corporate general and administrative expense decreased primarily due to decreased salary related expense of $6.3 million and $0.4 million of decreased general expenses. Interest expense decreased due to lower borrowings under the ABL Credit Agreement. The fair value of the outstanding Warrants liability resulted in a $0.3 million credit to earnings in the current year period compared to an $1.1 million credit to earnings during the prior year period.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
    
We believe that our and CCLP's separate capital structures allow us to meet our respective financial obligations, despite current uncertain operating conditions and financial markets. As of June 30, 2020, we and CCLP are in compliance with all covenants of our respective debt agreements. Information about the terms and covenants of our debt agreements can be found in our 2019 Annual Report.

We believe it is important to consider our capital structure and that of CCLP separately because there are no cross default provisions or cross guarantees between CCLP's debt and TETRA's debt. Our consolidated debt outstanding has a carrying value of approximately $843.3 million as of June 30, 2020. However, approximately $637.6 million of this consolidated debt balance is owed by CCLP and is serviced from the cash balances and cash flows of CCLP, and $557.8 million of which is secured by certain of CCLP's assets. Through our common unit ownership interest in CCLP, which was approximately 34% as of June 30, 2020, and ownership of an approximate 1.4% general partner interest, we receive our share of the distributable cash flows of CCLP through its quarterly cash distributions. Approximately $6.8 million of the $56.7 million of the cash balance reflected on our consolidated balance sheet is owned by CCLP and is not accessible by us. The following table provides condensed consolidating balance sheet information reflecting TETRA's net assets and CCLP's net assets that service and secure TETRA's and CCLP's respective capital structures.
 June 30, 2020
Condensed Consolidating Balance SheetTETRA CCLP Eliminations Consolidated
 (In Thousands)
Cash, excluding restricted cash$49,965
 $6,757
 $
 $56,722
Affiliate receivables13,074
 
 (13,074) 
Other current assets156,110
 96,155
 
 252,265
Property, plant and equipment, net106,949
 606,635
 
 713,584
Long-term affiliate receivables12,019
 
 (12,019) 
Other assets, including investment in CCLP12,338
 60,191
 93,494
 166,023
Total assets$350,455
 $769,738
 $68,401
 $1,188,594
        
Affiliate payables$
 $13,074
 $(13,074) $
Other current liabilities73,141
 74,186
 
 147,327
Long-term debt, net205,713
 637,579
 
 843,292
Warrants liability123
 
 
 123
Long-term affiliate payable
 12,019
 (12,019) 
Other non-current liabilities62,616
 22,550
 
 85,166
Total equity8,862
 10,330
 93,494
 112,686
Total liabilities and equity$350,455
 $769,738
 $68,401
 $1,188,594

As of June 30, 2020, subject to compliance with the covenants, borrowing base requirements, and other provisions of the agreement that may limit borrowings, we had $37.1 million of availability under the ABL Credit Agreement. The amounts we may borrow under the ABL Credit Agreement are derived from our accounts receivable and certain inventory. Decreases in the amount of our accounts receivable and the value of our inventory would result in reduced borrowing availability under the ABL Credit Agreement. As of June 30, 2020, and subject to compliance with the covenants, borrowing base requirements, and other provisions of the agreement that may limit borrowings under the CCLP Credit Agreement, CCLP had availability of $12.3 million. See CCLP Financing Activities below for further discussion.
    

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Our consolidated sources (uses) of cash during the six months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019 are as follows:
 Six months ended June 30,
 2020 2019
 (In Thousands)
Operating activities$60,387
 $38,377
Investing activities(14,063) (71,254)
Financing activities(6,486) 18,715

Operating Activities
 
Consolidated cash flows provided by operating activities increased by $22.0 million compared to the first half of 2019. CCLP generated $18.2 million of our consolidated cash flows provided by operating activities during the six months ended June 30, 2020 compared to $40.3 million during the corresponding prior year period. Operating cash flows increased primarily due to monetization of working capital. We continue to monitor customer credit risk in the current environment and focus on serving larger capitalized oil and gas operators and national oil companies.

Investing Activities
 
Total cash capital expenditures during the first six months of 2020 were $19.6 million, which is net of $2.3 million cost of compressors sold. Our Completion Fluids & Products Division spent $1.3 million on capital expenditures, the majority of which related to plant and facility additions. Our Water & Flowback Services Division spent $6.8 million on capital expenditures, primarily to maintain, automate and upgrade its water management and flowback equipment fleet. Our Compression Division spent $11.2 million, primarily to maintain its compression fleet.

Historically, a significant majority of our planned capital expenditures has been related to identified opportunities to grow and expand our existing businesses. However, such expenditures have recently been, and may continue to be, postponed or canceled as we are reviewing all capital expenditure plans carefully in an effort to conserve cash. We currently have no long-term capital expenditure commitments. The deferral of capital projects could affect our ability to expand our operations in the future. Excluding our Compression Division, we expect to spend approximately $10.0 million to $15.0 million during 2020 on capital expenditures, primarily to expand and maintain our Water & Flowback Services Division equipment fleet.

Our Compression Division has adjusted its expected capital spend downward to approximately $28.0 million to $35.0 million during 2020 primarily to maintain its compression fleet.

If the forecasted demand for our products and services increases or decreases, the amount of planned expenditures on growth and expansion may be adjusted.
 
Financing Activities 
 
During the first six months of 2020, the total amount of consolidated cash used in financing activities was $6.5 million, primarily due to repayments under our ABL Credit Agreement and cash fees paid for the exchange of debt. We and CCLP may supplement our existing cash balances and cash flow from operating activities with short-term borrowings, long-term borrowings, issuances of equity and debt securities, and other sources of capital. We and CCLP are aggressively managing our working capital and capital expenditure needs in order to maximize our liquidity in the current environment.

TETRA Long-Term Debt

Asset-Based Credit Agreement. The ABL Credit Agreement provides for a senior secured revolving credit facility of up to $100 million, subject to a borrowing base to be determined by reference to the value of inventory and accounts receivable, and includes a sublimit of $20.0 million for letters of credit and a swingline loan sublimit of $10.0 million. The amounts we may borrow under the ABL Credit Agreement are derived from our accounts receivable and certain inventory. Changes in demand for our products and services have an impact on our eligible accounts receivable, which could result in significant changes to our borrowing base and therefore our availability

37


under our ABL Credit Agreement. With the current depressed oil and gas market conditions, we believe our availability under our ABL Credit facility will be adversely impacted by the expected decline in our customers’ activity levels. The ABL Credit Agreement is scheduled to mature on September 10, 2023. As of August 5, 2020, we have $0.1 million outstanding under our ABL Credit Agreement and $6.4 million letters of credit, resulting in $28.4 million of availability.
    
Term Credit Agreement.    The Term Credit Agreement is scheduled to mature on September 10, 2025. As of August 5, 2020, $220.5 million in aggregate principal amount of our Term Credit Agreement is outstanding.
    
CCLP Financing Activities

CCLP Series A Preferred Units. In January 2019 CCLP began redeeming its Series A Preferred Units for cash, resulting in 2,653,727 Series A Preferred Units being redeemed during the six months ended June 30, 2019 for an aggregate of $19.8 million, which includes approximately $0.9 million of redemption premiums that were paid. The last redemption of the remaining Series A Preferred Units, along with a final cash payment made in lieu of paid-in-kind units, occurred on August 8, 2019.

CCLP Bank Credit Facility. All the obligations of CCLP and two of its wholly owned subsidiaries (collectively the "CCLP Borrowers") under the CCLP Credit Agreement are guaranteed by certain of their existing and future domestic subsidiaries. The Credit Agreement, as amended, provided for modifications to the Credit Agreement which include, among other things: (i) reducing the maximum credit commitment from $50,000,000 to $35,000,000; (ii) the inclusion of a $5,000,000 reserve with respect to the Borrowing Base (as defined in the Credit Agreement) thereunder, which would result in reduced borrowing availability; (iii) the removal of the Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio (as defined in the Credit Agreement) financial maintenance covenant; (iv) a 1.25% increase in the applicable margin related to (x) LIBOR Rate Loans (as defined in the Credit Agreement) and (y) Base Rate Loans (as defined in the Credit Agreement), in each case, which shall be determined according to average daily excess availability under the Credit Agreement; and (v) an 0.50% increase in the rate used to calculate the commitment fee in respect of the unutilized commitments. As of June 30, 2020, and subject to compliance with the covenants, borrowing base, and other provisions of the agreements that may limit borrowings under the CCLP Credit Agreement, CCLP had availability of $12.3 million.

The CCLP Borrowers may borrow funds under the CCLP Credit Agreement to pay fees and expenses related to the CCLP Credit Agreement and for the CCLP Borrower's ongoing working capital needs and for general partnership purposes. The revolving loans under the CCLP Credit Agreement may be voluntarily prepaid, in whole or in part, without premium or penalty, subject to breakage or similar costs. The maturity date of the CCLP Credit Agreement is June 29, 2023. As of June 30, 2020, CCLP had a $1.5 million outstanding balance and had $2.8 million in letters of credit against the CCLP Credit Agreement. As of August 3, 2020, CCLP has $0.0 million balance outstanding under the CCLP Credit Agreement and $2.4 million in letters of credit, resulting in $13.8 million of availability. The amounts the CCLP Borrowers may borrow under the CCLP Credit Agreement are derived from CCLP’s accounts receivable and certain inventory. Decreases in the amount of CCLP’s accounts receivable and the value of its inventory would result in reduced borrowing availability under the CCLP Credit Agreement.

First Supplemental Indenture for the Old Notes.     On June 11, 2020, CSI Compressco, LP and CSI Compressco Finance Inc. (the "Issuers") announced they had accepted for exchange $215,208,000, of their outstanding 7.25% Senior Notes due 2022 (the "Old Notes") that were validly tendered by 11:59 p.m., New York City time, on June 10, 2020, for (i) $50,000,000 of the Issuers' 7.50% Senior Secured First Lien Notes due 2025 (the "7.50% First Lien Notes") and (ii) $155,529,000 aggregate principal amount of new 10.00%/10.75% Senior Secured Second Lien Notes due 2026 (the "10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes" and, together with the 7.50% First Lien Notes, the "New Notes"), pursuant to its previously announced exchange offer and consent solicitation, which commenced on April 17, 2020. In connection with the exchange offer, CCLP incurred financing fees of $4.8 million which were charged to other (income) expense, net during the three month period ended June 30, 2020.

On June 12, 2020, following receipt of the requisite consents of the holders of the Old Notes, the Issuers entered into the First Supplemental Indenture (the "First Supplemental Indenture"), by and among the Issuers, the subsidiary guarantors named therein and U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee, to the Indenture, dated as of August 4, 2014 (the "Unsecured Indenture"), by and among the Issuers, the subsidiary guarantors named therein and U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee.


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The First Supplemental Indenture eliminated substantially all of the restrictive covenants and certain of the default provisions in the Unsecured Indenture and became operative upon the consummation by the Issuers of the exchange offer

On June 12, 2020, the Issuers issued $50,000,000 in aggregate principal amount of new First Lien Notes to certain holders of the Old Notes pursuant to the terms of the exchange offer. In March 2018, the Issuers had issued $350,000,000 in aggregate principal amount of 7.50% Senior Secured Notes due 2025 (the "Existing First Lien Notes" and, together with the newly issued First Lien Notes, the "7.50% First Lien Notes") pursuant to the First Lien Base Indenture. The New First Lien Notes were issued as "additional notes" under the First Lien Base Indenture and will be treated as a single class with such notes but will not trade fungibly with the Existing First Lien Notes.

Second Lien Notes Indenture. On June 12, 2020, the Issuers issued $155,529,000 in aggregate principal amount of the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes to certain holders of the Old Notes pursuant to the terms of the exchange offer. The Issuers issued the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes pursuant to an indenture, dated June 12, 2020 (the "Second Lien Notes Indenture"),by and among the Issuers, the subsidiary guarantors named therein and U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee (the "Second Lien Trustee"). In connection with the payment of PIK Interest (as defined below), if any, in respect of the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes, the Issuers will be entitled, to increase the outstanding aggregate principal amount of the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes or issue additional notes ("PIK notes") under the Second Lien Notes Indenture on the same terms and conditions as the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes offered hereby. The 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes and any additional 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes subsequently issued under the indenture, will be treated as a single class for all purposes under the indenture, including, without limitation, waivers, amendments, redemptions and offers to purchase. The 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes will mature on April 1, 2026. Interest on the 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes will be payable semi-annually in arrears on April 1 and October 1, commencing on October 1, 2020. Interest will accrue at (1) the annual rate of 7.250% payable in cash, plus (2) at the election of the Issuers (made by delivering a notice to the Second Lien Trustee not less than five business days prior to the record date), the annual rate of (i) 2.750% payable in cash (together with the annual rate set forth in clause (1), the "Cash Interest Rate") or (ii) 3.500% payable by increasing the principal amount of the outstanding 10.00%/10.75% Second Lien Notes or by issuing additional PIK notes, in each case rounding up to the nearest $1.00 (such increased principal amount or additional PIK notes, the "PIK Interest").

Other Sources and Uses

In addition to the aforementioned credit facilities, we and CCLP fund our respective short-term liquidity requirements from cash generated by our respective operations and from short-term vendor financing. Should additional capital be required, the ability to raise such capital through the issuance of additional debt or equity securities may currently be limited. Instability or volatility in the capital markets at the times we need to access capital may affect the cost of capital and the ability to raise capital for an indeterminable length of time. If it is necessary to issue additional equity to fund our capital needs, additional dilution of our common stockholders will occur. We periodically evaluate engaging in strategic transactions and may consider divesting non-core assets where our evaluation suggests such transaction is in the best interest of our business. In challenging economic environments, we may experience increased delays and failures by customers to pay our invoices. Given the nature and significance of the pandemic and disruption in the oil and gas industry, we could experience delayed customer payments and payment defaults associated with customer liquidity issues and bankruptcies. If our customers delay paying or fail to pay us a significant amount of our outstanding receivables, it could have an adverse effect on our liquidity. An increase of unpaid receivable would also negatively affect our borrowing availability under the ABL Credit Agreement.

The Second Amended and Restated Partnership Agreement of CCLP requires that within 45 days after the end of each quarter, CCLP distribute all of its available cash, as defined in the Second Amended and Restated Partnership Agreement, to its common unitholders of record on the applicable record date. During the six months ended June 30, 2020, CCLP distributed $1.0 million in cash, including $0.6 million to its public unitholders. The amount of quarterly distributions is determined based on a variety of factors, including estimates of CCLP's cash needs to fund its future operating, investing, and debt service requirements. There can be no assurance that quarterly distributions from CCLP will increase from this amount per unit going forward.
 

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Off Balance Sheet Arrangements
 
As of June 30, 2020, we had no “off balance sheet arrangements” that may have a current or future material effect on our consolidated financial condition or results of operations. 
Commitments and Contingencies
 
Litigation
 
We are named defendants in several lawsuits and respondents in certain governmental proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business. While the outcome of lawsuits or other proceedings against us cannot be predicted with certainty, management does not consider it reasonably possible that a loss resulting from such lawsuits or other proceedings in excess of any amounts accrued has been incurred that is expected to have a material adverse impact on our financial condition, results of operations, or liquidity.

Contingencies of Discontinued Operations

    In early 2018, we closed the Maritech Asset Purchase and Sale Agreement with Orinoco Natural Resources, LLC ("Orinoco") that provided for the purchase by Orinoco of Maritech's remaining oil and gas properties and related assets. Shortly thereafter, we closed the Maritech Membership Interest Purchase and Sale Agreement with Orinoco that provided for the purchase by Orinoco of all of the outstanding membership interests in Maritech. As a result of these transactions, we have effectively exited the business of our former Maritech segment.

    Under the Maritech Asset Purchase and Sale Agreement, Orinoco assumed all of Maritech’s decommissioning liabilities related to the leases sold to Orinoco (the “Orinoco Lease Liabilities”) and, under the Maritech Membership Interest Purchase and Sale Agreement, Orinoco assumed all other liabilities of Maritech, including the decommissioning liabilities associated with the oil and gas properties previously sold by Maritech (the “Legacy Liabilities”), subject to certain limited exceptions unrelated to the decommissioning liabilities. To the extent that Maritech or Orinoco fails to satisfy decommissioning liabilities associated with any of the Orinoco Lease Liabilities or the Legacy Liabilities, we may be required to satisfy such liabilities under third party indemnity agreements and corporate guarantees that we previously provided to the US Department of the Interior and other parties, respectively.

Pursuant to a Bonding Agreement entered into as part of these transactions (the "Bonding Agreement"), Orinoco provided non-revocable performance bonds in an aggregate amount of $46.8 million to cover the performance by Orinoco and Maritech of the asset retirement obligations of Maritech (the “Initial Bonds”) and agreed to replace, within 90 days following the closing, the Initial Bonds with other non-revocable performance bonds, meeting certain requirements, in the aggregate sum of $47.0 million (collectively, the “Interim Replacement Bonds”). Orinoco further agreed to replace, within 180 days following the closing, the Interim Replacement Bonds with a maximum of three non-revocable performance bonds in the aggregate sum of $47.0 million, meeting certain requirements (the “Final Bonds”). Among the other requirements of the Final Bonds was that they must provide coverage for all of the asset retirement obligations of Maritech instead of only relating to specific properties. In the event Orinoco did not provide the Interim Replacement Bonds or the Final Bonds, Orinoco was required to make certain cash escrow payments to us.

    The payment obligations of Orinoco under the Bonding Agreement were guaranteed by Thomas M. Clarke and Ana M. Clarke pursuant to a separate guaranty agreement (the “Clarke Bonding Guaranty Agreement”). Orinoco has not delivered such replacement bonds and neither it nor the Clarkes has made any of the agreed upon cash escrow payments and we filed a lawsuit against Orinoco and the Clarkes to enforce the terms of the Bonding Agreement and the Clarke Bonding Guaranty Agreement. A summary judgment was initially granted in favor of Orinoco and the Clarkes which dismissed our claims against Orinoco under the Bonding Agreement and against the Clarkes under the Clarke Bonding Guaranty Agreement. We filed an appeal and also asked the trial court to grant a new trial on the summary judgment or to modify the judgment because we believe this judgment should not have been granted. On November 5, 2019, the trial court signed an order granting our motion for new trial and vacating the prior order granting summary judgment for Orinoco and the Clarkes. The parties are awaiting direction from the court on a new scheduling order and/or trial setting. The Initial Bonds, which are non-revocable, remain in effect.

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    If we become liable in the future for any decommissioning liability associated with any property covered by either an Initial Bond or an Interim Replacement Bond while such bonds are outstanding and the payment made to us under such bond is not sufficient to satisfy such liability, the Bonding Agreement provides that Orinoco will pay us an amount equal to such deficiency and if Orinoco fails to pay any such amount, such amount must be paid by the Clarkes under the Clarke Bonding Guaranty Agreement. However, if the Final Bonds or the full amount of the escrowed cash have been provided, neither Orinoco nor the Clarkes would be liable to pay us for any such deficiency. Our financial condition and results of operations may be negatively affected if Orinoco is unable to cover any such deficiency or if we become liable for a significant portion of the decommissioning liabilities.

    In early 2018, we also closed the sale of our Offshore Division to Epic Companies, LLC (“Epic Companies,” formerly known as Epic Offshore Specialty, LLC). Part of the consideration we received was a promissory note of Epic Companies in the original principal amount of $7.5 million (the “Epic Promissory Note”) payable to us in full, together with interest at a rate of 1.52% per annum, on December 31, 2019, along with a personal guaranty agreement from Thomas M. Clarke and Ana M. Clarke guaranteeing the payment obligations of Epic Companies pursuant to the Epic Promissory Note (the “Clarke Promissory Note Guaranty Agreement”). Additionally, pursuant to the Equity Interest Purchase Agreement (the “Offshore Services Purchase Agreement”) and other agreements with Epic Companies, certain other amounts relating to the Offshore Division totaling approximately $1.5 million were payable to us. At the end of August 2019, Epic Companies filed for bankruptcy. We recorded a reserve of $7.5 million for the full amount of the promissory note, including accrued interest, and the certain other receivables in the amount of $1.5 million during the quarter ended September 30, 2019. The Epic Promissory Note became due on December 31, 2019 but neither Epic nor the Clarkes made the required payment. Upon the default by Epic and the Clarkes, we filed a lawsuit against the Clarkes on January 15, 2020 in Montgomery County, Texas for breach of the Clarke Promissory Note Guaranty Agreement, seeking the amounts due under the Epic Promissory Note and related interest, as well as attorneys’ fees and expenses. The Clarkes each filed an answer and counterclaims for fraud and negligent misrepresentation and seek monetary damages in excess of $1 million, punitive damages, and attorneys’ fees. We have taken discovery from the Clarkes. Currently, the case is set for its first trial setting on October 19, 2020. We will vigorously prosecute our claim and defend against the claims by the Clarkes.

Contractual Obligations

Our contractual obligations and commitments principally include obligations associated with our outstanding
indebtedness and obligations under operating leases. The table below summarizes our consolidated contractual cash obligations as of June 30, 2020:
  Payments Due
  Total 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 Thereafter
  (In Thousands)
Long-term debt - TETRA $220,500
 $
 $
 $
 $
 $
 $220,500
Long-term debt - CCLP 637,728
 
 
 80,722
 1,477
 
 555,529
Interest on debt - TETRA 83,927
 7,993
 15,986
 15,986
 15,986
 15,986
 11,990
Interest on debt - CCLP 244,842
 25,741
 51,483
 49,532
 45,592
 45,553
 26,941
Purchase obligations 90,188
 4,763
 9,525
 9,525
 9,525
 9,525
 47,325
Asset retirement obligations(1)
 12,862
 
 
 
 
 
 12,862
Operating leases 105,782
 11,662
 20,294
 16,684
 13,026
 11,505
 32,611
Total contractual cash obligations(2)
 $1,395,829
 $50,159
 $97,288
 $172,449
 $85,606
 $82,569
 $907,758
(1) 
We have estimated the timing of these payments for asset retirement obligation liabilities based upon our plans. The amounts shown represent the discounted obligation as of June 30, 2020.
(2) 
Amounts exclude other long-term liabilities reflected in our Consolidated Balance Sheet that do not have known payment streams. These excluded amounts include approximately $0.4 million of liabilities under FASB Codification Topic 740, “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes,” as we are unable to reasonably estimate the ultimate amount or timing of settlements.

For additional information about our contractual obligations as of December 31, 2019, see "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in our 2019 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

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Cautionary Statement for Purposes of Forward-Looking Statements
 
This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Forward-looking statements in this Quarterly Report are identifiable by the use of the following words, the negative of such words, and other similar words: “anticipates", "assumes", “believes,” "budgets", “could,” “estimates,” "expects", "forecasts", "goal", "intends", "may", "might", "plans", "predicts", "projects", "schedules", "seeks", "should", "targets", "will", and "would".

Management believes that these forward-looking statements are reasonable as and when made. However, caution should be taken not to place undue reliance on any such forward-looking statements because such statements speak only as of the date when made. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law. In addition, forward-looking statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from our historical experience and our present expectations or projections. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, those described in Part II, "Item 1A. Risk Factors" and elsewhere in this report and in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019, and those described from time to time in our future reports filed with the SEC.
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.
Not Applicable.
Item 4. Controls and Procedures.
 
Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we conducted an evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures, as such term is defined under Rule 13a-15(e) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Based on this evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of June 30, 2020, the end of the period covered by this quarterly report.

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the quarter ended June 30, 2020, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
PART II
OTHER INFORMATION
Item 1. Legal Proceedings.
 
We are named defendants in several lawsuits and respondents in certain governmental proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business. While the outcome of lawsuits or other proceedings against us cannot be predicted with certainty, management does not consider it reasonably possible that a loss resulting from such lawsuits or other proceedings in excess of amounts accrued has been incurred that is expected to have a material adverse impact on our financial condition, results of operations, or liquidity.
Item 1A. Risk Factors.

The statements in this section describe the known material risks to our business and should be considered carefully. We have described in the 2019 Annual Report significant risk factors and periodically update those risks for material developments. Provided below is an update to our risk factors as previously disclosed in the 2019 Annual Report.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had, or may in the future have, certain negative impacts on our business, and such impacts have had, or may in the future have, an adverse effect on our business, our financial condition, results of operations, or liquidity.

The COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic impact have had a significant negative impact on the oil and gas industry. The deterioration in demand for oil caused by the pandemic, coupled with oil oversupply, has had, and is reasonably likely to continue to have, an adverse impact on the demand for our products and services.

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The public health crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic,  and the measures that have been taken or that may be taken in the future by governments, various regulatory agencies, our customers and our suppliers, have had, or may in the future have, certain negative impacts on our financial condition, results of operations, and  liquidity, including, without limitation, the following:

demand for our products and services is declining as our customers continue to revise their budgets downward and adjust their operations in response to lower oil and gas prices;
actions undertaken by national, state and local governments and health officials to contain COVID-19 or treat its effects. In response to various governmental directives, at points we have required most office-based employees, including most employees based at our headquarters in The Woodlands, Texas, to work remotely. We may experience reductions in productivity and disruptions to our business routines while work-from-home arrangements remain in place;
We could encounter logistical complications and increased costs adapting our disclosure controls and procedures and our internal control over financial reporting in a changing environment that includes work-from-home arrangements and furloughs. In the future we may encounter operational challenges or disruptions stemming from the pandemic that require us to implement new or enhanced internal controls to mitigate the risks of operating in a remote environment or increased risks of material misstatements resulting from changes to the business and other uncertainties;
restrictions on importing and exporting products;
claims from customers and suppliers that their non-performance under our contracts is permitted as a result of force majeure or other reasons;
impacts related to late customer payments and contractual defaults associated with customer and supplier bankruptcies;
potentially higher borrowing costs in the future;
cybersecurity issues, as our network may become more vulnerable to cyberattacks due to increased remote access associated with work-from-home arrangements;
our ability to use our net operating loss carryforwards may be limited;
increased costs associated with possible facility closures to meet expected customer activity levels; and
we may be required to record significant impairment charges with respect to assets, whose fair values may be negatively affected by the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on our operations. Also, we may be required to write off obsolete inventory, and such charges may be significant.

The resumption of our normal business operations after the disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic may be delayed or constrained by its lingering effects on the oil and gas industry. Any of the negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, including those described above, alone or in combination with others, may have a significant adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, or liquidity. Any of these negative impacts, alone or in combination with others, could exacerbate many of the risk factors discussed in Part I, "Item 1A. Risk Factors" in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019. The full extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic will negatively affect our financial condition, results of operations, or liquidity will depend on future developments that are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted, including the scope and duration of the pandemic and the resulting impact on the oil and gas industry. Given the dynamic nature of these events, we cannot reasonably estimate the period of time that the COVID-19 pandemic and related market conditions will persist, the full extent of the impact they will have on our financial condition, results of operations, or liquidity or the pace or extent of any subsequent recovery. For more information, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”    
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.
 
(a) None.
 
(b) None.
 

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(c) Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers.
Period 
Total Number
of Shares Purchased
 
Average
Price
Paid per Share
Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs(1)
 
Maximum Number (or Approximate Dollar Value) of Shares that May Yet be Purchased Under the Publicly Announced Plans or Programs(1)
April 1 – April 30, 2020 11,590
(2)$1.11

 $14,327,000
May 1 – May 31, 2020 



 14,327,000
June 1 – June 30, 2020 
 

 14,327,000
Total 11,590
  

 $14,327,000
(1)
In January 2004, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $20 million of our common stock. Purchases will be made from time to time in open market transactions at prevailing market prices. The repurchase program may continue until the authorized limit is reached, at which time the Board of Directors may review the option of increasing the authorized limit.
(2)Shares we received in connection with the exercise of certain employee stock options or the vesting of certain shares of employee restricted stock. These shares were not acquired pursuant to the stock repurchase program.
Item 3. Defaults Upon Senior Securities.
 
None.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.
 
None.
Item 5. Other Information.
 
None.

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Item 6. Exhibits.
 
Exhibits:
10.1*
31.1*
31.2*
32.1**
32.2**
101.SCH+XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document.
101.CAL+XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document.
101.DEF+XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document.
101.LAB+XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document.
101.PRE+XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document.
104*Cover Page Interactive Data File - the cover page interactive data file does not appear in the Interactive Data File because its XBRL tags are embedded within the Inline XBRL documents
*Filed with this report.
**Furnished with this report.
+
Attached as Exhibit 101 to this report are the following documents formatted in XBRL (Extensible Business Reporting Language): (i) Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three and six month periods ended June 30, 2020 and 2019; (ii) Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the three and six month periods ended June 30, 2020 and 2019; (iii) Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019; (iv) Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the six month periods ended June 30, 2020 and 2019; and (v) Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for the six months ended June 30, 2020.
 


45


SIGNATURES
 
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.
 
 

 
TETRA Technologies, Inc.
 
    
Date:August 7, 2020By:/s/Brady M. Murphy
   Brady M. Murphy
   President
   Chief Executive Officer
    
Date:August 7, 2020By:/s/Elijio V. Serrano
   Elijio V. Serrano
   Senior Vice President
   Chief Financial Officer
    
Date:August 7, 2020By:/s/Richard D. O'Brien
   Richard D. O'Brien
   Vice President – Finance and Global Controller
   Principal Accounting Officer

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